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Sample records for human enterotoxigenic escherichia

  1. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M; Munson, George M; Rasko, David A

    2013-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are a pervasive cause of serious diarrheal illness in developing countries. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent these infections, and many features of the basic pathogenesis of these organisms remain poorly understood. Until very recently most pathogenesis studies had focused almost exclusively on a small subset of known “classical” virulence genes, namely fimbrial colonization factors and the heat-labile (LT) and heat stable (ST) enterotoxins. However, recent investigations of pathogen-host interactions reveal a surprisingly complex and intricately orchestrated engagement involving the interplay of classical and “novel” virulence genes, as well as participation of genes highly conserved in the E. coli species. These studies may inform further rational approaches to vaccine development for these important pathogens. PMID:23892244

  2. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  3. Adhesion of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to human mucus secreting HT-29 cell subpopulations in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kerneis, S; Bernet, M F; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bearing the fimbrial colonisation factor antigens CFA/I, CFA/II, CFA/III, and the non-fimbrial antigen 2230 were tested for their ability to adhere to two cultured human intestinal HT-29 mucus secreting cell subpopulations. These populations are referred to as HT29-MTX and HT29-FU, which differ in the amount of secreted mucins and in their gastric or colonic mucin immunoreactivity respectively. Adherence of radiolabelled bacteria to cell monolayers infected apically was assessed. All ETEC strains adhered to the mucus secreting HT29-FU subpopulation, which secretes mucins of colonic immunoreactivity. Visualisation of bacteria by scanning electron microscopy showed that ETEC bound to the HT29-FU cells possessing a brush border, but not to the mucus and that ETEC binding developed as a function of cell differentiation. The adhesion of ETEC to cells possessing a brush border and to mucus secreting cells was also analysed by indirect immunofluorescence in HT29-MTX cells, which secrete mucins of gastric immunoreactivity. Fluorescein isothiocyanate labelling using specific anti-CFA/I antibody was used to show ETEC; rhodamine isothiocyanate labelling using a monoclonal antibody (designated M1) against purified human gastric mucus was used to detect secreted mucins, and rhodamine isothiocyanate labelling using a monoclonal antibody (designated 4H3) against human dipeptidylpeptidase IV was used to show cells possessing a brush border. Binding of bacteria colocalised with dipeptidylpeptidase IV of enterocytes and not with mucins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7959203

  4. Adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2 in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Darfeuille-Michaud, A; Aubel, D; Chauviere, G; Rich, C; Bourges, M; Servin, A; Joly, B

    1990-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains possessing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, CFA/III, and antigen 2230 were tested for their ability to adhere to the following cell lines: HeLa, HEp-2, HRT 18, Hutu 80, MDBK, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2. ETEC strains adhered only to the Caco-2 cell line. Irrespective of the known adhesive factors, the ETEC strains that adhered to the brush border of human enterocytes also adhered to the Caco-2 cell line. The negative variants, which were cured of the plasmid encoding the adhesive factor, did not adhere. Adhesion of ETEC strains no longer occurred when the Caco-2 cells were pretreated with the homologous colonization factor antigen or when the bacterial cells were pretreated with homologous antibodies raised against the adhesive factors. This indicates that this adhesion is specific and that a different receptor exists for each type of adhesion factor. Electron micrographs of cross sections of the monolayer showed that the adhesion of ETEC strains to the brush border microvilli does not induce any lesion. Therefore, the Caco-2 cell line behaves in the same way as human enterocytes do. Images PMID:2180823

  5. Chaperone-Usher Pili Loci of Colonization Factor-Negative Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; O'Ryan, Miguel; Pardo, Mirka; Torres, Alexia; Gutiérrez, Daniela; Cádiz, Leandro; Valdés, Raul; Mansilla, Aquiles; Martínez, Rodrigo; Hernández, Daniela; Caro, Benjamin; Levine, Myron M; Rasko, David A; Hill, Christopher M; Pop, Mihai; Stine, O Colin; Vidal, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea worldwide. Among the 25 different ETEC adhesins, 22 are known as "colonization factors" (CFs), of which 17 are assembled by the chaperone-usher (CU) mechanism. Currently, there is no preventive therapy against ETEC, and CFs have been proposed as components for vaccine development. However, studies of diarrhea-causing ETEC strains worldwide indicate that between 15 and 50% of these are negative for known CFs, hindering the selection of the most widespread structures and suggesting that unknown adhesins remain to be identified. Here, we report the result of a comprehensive analysis of 35 draft genomes of ETEC strains which do not carry known adhesin genes; our goal was to find new CU pili loci. The phylogenetic profiles and serogroups of these strains were highly diverse, a majority of which produced only the heat-labile toxin. We identified 10 pili loci belonging to CU families β (1 locus), γ2 (7 loci), κ (1 locus), and π (1 locus), all of which contained the required number of open reading frames (ORFs) to encode functional structures. Three loci were variants of previously-known clusters, three had been only-partially described, and four are novel loci. Intra-loci genetic variability identified would allow the synthesis of up to 14 different structures. Clusters of putative γ2-CU pili were most common (23 strains), followed by putative β-CU pili (12 strains), which have not yet been fully characterized. Overall, our findings significantly increase the number of ETEC adhesion genes associated with human infections.

  6. Chaperone-Usher Pili Loci of Colonization Factor-Negative Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Del Canto, Felipe; O'Ryan, Miguel; Pardo, Mirka; Torres, Alexia; Gutiérrez, Daniela; Cádiz, Leandro; Valdés, Raul; Mansilla, Aquiles; Martínez, Rodrigo; Hernández, Daniela; Caro, Benjamin; Levine, Myron M.; Rasko, David A.; Hill, Christopher M.; Pop, Mihai; Stine, O. Colin; Vidal, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea worldwide. Among the 25 different ETEC adhesins, 22 are known as “colonization factors” (CFs), of which 17 are assembled by the chaperone-usher (CU) mechanism. Currently, there is no preventive therapy against ETEC, and CFs have been proposed as components for vaccine development. However, studies of diarrhea-causing ETEC strains worldwide indicate that between 15 and 50% of these are negative for known CFs, hindering the selection of the most widespread structures and suggesting that unknown adhesins remain to be identified. Here, we report the result of a comprehensive analysis of 35 draft genomes of ETEC strains which do not carry known adhesin genes; our goal was to find new CU pili loci. The phylogenetic profiles and serogroups of these strains were highly diverse, a majority of which produced only the heat-labile toxin. We identified 10 pili loci belonging to CU families β (1 locus), γ2 (7 loci), κ (1 locus), and π (1 locus), all of which contained the required number of open reading frames (ORFs) to encode functional structures. Three loci were variants of previously-known clusters, three had been only-partially described, and four are novel loci. Intra-loci genetic variability identified would allow the synthesis of up to 14 different structures. Clusters of putative γ2-CU pili were most common (23 strains), followed by putative β-CU pili (12 strains), which have not yet been fully characterized. Overall, our findings significantly increase the number of ETEC adhesion genes associated with human infections. PMID:28111618

  7. Characterization of enterotoxigenic bovine Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaswamy, G; Gyles, C L

    1976-01-01

    Among 300 isolates of bovine Escherichia coli, 56 which had been found enterotoxigenic in calf gut loops were characterized on the basis of O and K antigens, colonial morphology and resistance to seven antimicrobial drugs. The 56 isolates enterotoxigenic in the calf were compared with the nonenterotoxigenic ones. Of the 56 enterotoxigenic E. coli the majority possessed the A type of K antigen and had OK groups, O9:K(PS274) or O101:K(RVC118). Fourteen of these isolates had the K99 antigen. None of 27 isolates found enterotoxigenic in the piglet but not in the calf possessed the K99 antigen or belonged to OK groups O9:K(PS274) or O101:K(RVC118). Comparison of the patterns of resistance to seven antimicrobial drugs showed that all enterotoxigenic and nonenterotoxigenic isolates were susceptible to nitrofurantoin and sulphachlorphyridiazine and that there was no significant difference in the patterns between the two groups. The majority of enterotoxigenic isolates were mucoid, whereas most of the nonenterotoxigenic isolates were nonmucoid. PMID:793694

  8. TleA, a Tsh-Like Autotransporter Identified in a Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Daniela; Pardo, Mirka; Montero, David; Oñate, Angel; Farfán, Mauricio J.; Ruiz-Pérez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a leading cause of acute diarrhea, colonizes the intestine by means of adhesins. However, 15 to 50% of clinical isolates are negative for known adhesins, making it difficult to identify antigens for broad-coverage vaccines. The ETEC strain 1766a, obtained from a child with watery diarrhea in Chile, harbors the colonization factor CS23 but is negative for other known adhesins. One clone, derived from an ETEC 1766a genomic library (clone G10), did not produce CS23 yet was capable of adhering to Caco-2 cells. The goal of this study was to identify the gene responsible for this capacity. Random transposon-based mutagenesis allowed the identification of a 4,110-bp gene that codes for a homologue of the temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (Tsh) autotransporter described in avian E. coli strains (97% identity, 90% coverage) and that is called TleA (Tsh-like ETEC autotransporter) herein. An isogenic ETEC 1766a strain with a tleA mutation showed an adhesion level similar to that of the wild-type strain, suggesting that the gene does not direct attachment to Caco-2 cells. However, expression of tleA conferred the capacity for adherence to nonadherent E. coli HB101. This effect coincided with the detection of TleA on the surface of nonpermeabilized bacteria, while, conversely, ETEC 1766a seems to secrete most of the produced autotransporter to the medium. On the other hand, TleA was capable of degrading bovine submaxillary mucin and leukocyte surface glycoproteins CD45 and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1). These results suggest that TleA promotes colonization of the intestinal epithelium and that it may modulate the host immune response. PMID:25712927

  9. The sialylated fraction of milk oligosaccharides is partially responsible for binding to enterotoxigenic and uropathogenic Escherichia coli human strains.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sosa, Samuel; Martín, María-Jesús; Hueso, Pablo

    2002-10-01

    Milk oligosaccharides can act as soluble receptors that block bacterial adhesion to the different epithelia. Colonization factor antigens (CFA)/I- and CFA/II-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains constitute one of the main causes of diarrhea in infants. Here, the inhibition of hemagglutination mediated by these strains by milk oligosaccharides was tested. Human milk oligosaccharides showed a strong inhibitory capacity, which decreased when the oligosaccharides were desialylated. Because milk oligosaccharides also are present in the urine of neonates receiving mothers' milk, their ability to bind two uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains was also examined. UPEC strains expressing P (Pap) and P-like (Prs) fimbriae are responsible for infections of the urinary tract such as pyelonephritis and cystitis. The hemagglutination mediated by these strains was inhibited by human milk oligosaccharides. The sialylated fraction was partially responsible for this inhibition in the case of the UPEC expressing the P-like fimbria because differences were found after desialylation. Although bovine milk oligosaccharides were less efficient at inhibiting the hemagglutination of ETEC strains, they were still quite good inhibitors of UPEC strains.

  10. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA reveals serotype-specific clonal clusters among enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from humans.

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, A B; Guth, B E; Soares, K C; Nishimura, L; de Almeida, D F; Ferreira, L C

    1997-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 47 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains of serotypes O6:H16, O27:H7, O29:H21, O128ac:H12, and O153:H45, previously isolated from diarrheic patients in Brazil over a period of 15 years, was investigated by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Informative band arrays were obtained with three 10-mer primers with G+C contents of 50, 60, and 70%. Based on the combination of the band profiles generated by the three primers 22 RAPD types were detected, and 5 major clonal clusters, each one with at least 80% identical bands, were established. The clonal clusters corresponded to strains having the same serotype which, in most cases, also had the same virulence factors (colonization factors and toxin types) and outer membrane protein and lipopolysaccharide sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles. The results suggested a correlation between phenotypic properties and genetic relatedness of ETEC isolates of human origin and indicated that a reduced number of clonally related strains are found in areas of ETEC endemicity in Brazil. Moreover, the RAPD technique revealed intraserotype-specific variations, undetectable by the combination of several phenotypic typing methods, among the ETEC strains analyzed. These results show that RAPD typing represents a useful tool for population genetics as well as for epidemiological studies of ETEC. PMID:9163473

  11. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to a pilus colonization factor (colonization factor antigen III) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Honda, T; Wetprasit, N; Arita, M; Miwatani, T

    1989-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to a pilus colonization factor (colonization factor antigen III [CFA/III]) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) were developed and characterized. All of the MAbs isolated belonged to the immunoglobulin G2a subclass. The specificity of these MAbs for CFA/III pili was demonstrated by the immunogold-labeling technique. The presence of more than one epitope in CFA/III pili was suggested. One of the three MAbs appears to recognize a polymeric conformational epitope(s) of CFA/III. CFA/III antigenicity distinct from that of other pilus colonization factors of ETEC was demonstrated by both a bacterial agglutination test and a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the MAbs. Of the 100 strains of ETEC isolated from persons with traveler's diarrhea, 8% were found to carry CFA/III pili. Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems which could detect as little as several or 50 ng of CFA/III per ml were developed. Images PMID:2572553

  12. CfaE tip mutations in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I fimbriae define critical human intestinal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Baker, K K; Levine, M M; Morison, J; Phillips, A; Barry, E M

    2009-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) use colonization factors to attach to the human intestinal mucosa, followed by enterotoxin expression that induces net secretion and diarrhoeal illness. ETEC strain H10407 expresses CFA/I fimbriae, which are composed of multiple CfaB structural subunits and a CfaE tip subunit. Currently, the contribution of these individual fimbrial subunits in intestinal binding remains incompletely defined. To identify the role of CfaE in attachment in the native ETEC background, an R181A single-amino-acid substitution was introduced by recombination into the H10407 genome. The substitution of R181A eliminated haemagglutination and binding of intestinal mucosa biopsies in in vitro organ culture assays, without loss of CFA/I fimbriae expression. Wild-type in trans plasmid-expressed cfaE restored the binding phenotype. In contrast, in trans expression of cfaE containing amino acid 181 substitutions with similar amino acids, lysine, methionine and glutamine did not restore the binding phenotype, indicating that the loss of the binding phenotype was due to localized areas of epitope disruption. R181 appears to have an irreplaceable role in the formation of a receptor-binding feature on CFA/I fimbriae. The results specifically indicate that the CfaE tip protein is a required binding factor in CFA/I-mediated ETEC colonization, making it a potentially important vaccine antigen. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain W25K.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Gang; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-06-26

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and newly weaned pigs. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain W25K, which causes diarrhea in piglets.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain W25K

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Gang; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Peng, Yuanyi; Hardwidge, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and newly weaned pigs. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain W25K, which causes diarrhea in piglets. PMID:24970825

  15. Characterization of Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Toxin and Human Guanylin and Uroguanylin

    PubMed Central

    Taxt, Arne M.; Diaz, Yuleima; Bacle, Amélie; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Aasland, Rein; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing the heat-stable toxin (ST) (human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants) is among the five most important enteric pathogens in young children living in low- and middle-income countries. ST mediates diarrheal disease through activation of the guanylate cyclase C (GC-C) receptor and is an attractive vaccine target with the potential to confer protection against a wide range of ETEC strains. However, immunological cross-reactivity to the endogenous GC-C ligands guanylin and uroguanylin is a major concern because of the similarities to ST in amino acid sequence, structure, and function. We have investigated the presence of similar epitopes on STh, STp, guanylin, and uroguanylin by analyzing these peptides in eight distinct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). A fraction (27%) of a polyclonal anti-STh antibody and an anti-STh monoclonal antibody (MAb) cross-reacted with uroguanylin, the latter with a 73-fold-lower affinity. In contrast, none of the antibodies raised against STp, one polyclonal antibody and three MAbs, cross-reacted with the endogenous peptides. Antibodies raised against guanylin and uroguanylin showed partial cross-reactivity with the ST peptides. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that immunological cross-reactions between ST and the endogenous peptides can occur. However, the partial nature and low affinity of the observed cross-reactions suggest that the risk of adverse effects from a future ST vaccine may be low. Furthermore, our results suggest that this risk may be reduced or eliminated by basing an ST immunogen on STp or a selectively mutated variant of STh. PMID:24778111

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaE, the adhesive subunit of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; Esser, Lothar; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2006-02-01

    The adhesin CfaE of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. CfaE crystals diffracted X-rays to better than 2.4 Å and phasing was solved by the SIRAS method. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) represents a formidable food and waterborne diarrheal disease threat of global importance. The first step in ETEC pathogenesis is bacterial attachment to small-intestine epithelial cells via adhesive fimbriae, many of which are genetically related to the prototype colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I). The minor fimbrial subunit CfaE is required for initiation of CFA/I fimbrial assembly and mediates bacterial attachment to host cell-surface receptors. A donor-strand complemented variant of CfaE (dscCfaE) was expressed with a hexahistidine tag, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 2.4 Å resolution for both native and derivatized crystals and showed the symmetry of space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.9, c = 231.9 Å. Initial phases were derived from the SIRAS approach and electron density showed two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the selenium of an SeMet-derivatized crystal and from S atoms of a native crystal.

  17. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    E . coli is mediated by specific types of pili. These pili are antigenic and can be used in diagnosing enterotoxigenic E . coli infections. They are also good protective antigens. When pregnant dams are vaccinated parenterally or orally with pili on live piliated bacteria, they secrete antibodies against the pili in their milk. Neonates suckling dams so vaccinated are passively protected against fatal challenge by enterotoxigenic E . coli . Pili are also good candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines to protect by

  18. Maternal Vaccination with a Fimbrial Tip Adhesin and Passive Protection of Neonatal Mice against Lethal Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Wilson B.; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Crabb, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 107 bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  19. Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain FMU073332

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodea, Gerardo E.; Porta, Helena; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Eslava-Campos, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of bacterial diarrheal illness, affecting practically every population worldwide, and was estimated to cause 120,800 deaths in 2010. Here, we report the genome sequence of ETEC strain FMU073332, isolated from a 25-month-old girl from Tlaltizapán, Morelos, México. PMID:28232434

  20. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Multilocus Sequence Types in Guatemala and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences. PMID:20031063

  1. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae diarrhea, Bangladesh, 2004.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Khan, Ashraful I; Faruque, Abu Syed G; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Chowdhury, Fahima; Nair, Gopinath B; Salam, Mohammed A; Sack, David A; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2005-07-01

    Flooding in Dhaka in July 2004 caused epidemics of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was almost as prevalent as Vibrio cholerae O1 in diarrheal stools. ETEC that produced heat-stable enterotoxin alone was most prevalent, and 78% of strains had colonization factors. Like V. cholerae O1, ETEC can cause epidemic diarrhea.

  2. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of CofB, the minor pilin subunit of CFA/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Tooru; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2015-06-01

    Colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III) is one of the virulence factors of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that forms the long, thin, proteinaceous fibres of type IV pili through assembly of its major and minor subunits CofA and CofB, respectively. The crystal structure of CofA has recently been reported; however, the lack of structural information for CofB, the largest among the known type IV pilin subunits, hampers a comprehensive understanding of CFA/III pili. In this study, constructs of wild-type CofB with an N-terminal truncation and the corresponding SeMet derivative were cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.97, c = 364.57 Å for the wild-type construct and a = b = 103.47, c = 362.08 Å for the SeMet-derivatized form. Although the diffraction quality of these crystals was initially very poor, dehydration of the crystals substantially improved the resolution limit from ∼ 4.0 to ∼ 2.0 Å. The initial phase was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method using a dehydrated SeMet CofB crystal, which resulted in an interpretable electron-density map.

  3. Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain FMU073332.

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodea, Gerardo E; Porta, Helena; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Eslava-Campos, Carlos; Cevallos, Miguel A; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2017-02-23

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of bacterial diarrheal illness, affecting practically every population worldwide, and was estimated to cause 120,800 deaths in 2010. Here, we report the genome sequence of ETEC strain FMU073332, isolated from a 25-month-old girl from Tlaltizapán, Morelos, México. Copyright © 2017 Saldaña-Ahuactzi et al.

  4. Simple method for purification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brittany; Grassel, Christen; Laufer, Rachel S; Sears, Khandra T; Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are endemic pathogens in the developing world. They frequently cause illness in travelers, and are among the most prevalent causes of diarrheal disease in children. Pathogenic ETEC strains employ fimbriae as adhesion factors to bind the luminal surface of the intestinal epithelium and establish infection. Accordingly, there is marked interest in immunoprophylactic strategies targeting fimbriae to protect against ETEC infections. Multiple strategies have been reported for purification of ETEC fimbriae, however none is ideal. Purification has typically involved the use of highly virulent wild-type strains. We report here a simple and improved method to purify ETEC fimbriae, which was applied to obtain two different Class 5 fimbriae types of clinical relevance (CFA/I and CS4) expressed recombinantly in E. coli production strains. Following removal from cells by shearing, fimbriae proteins were purified by orthogonal purification steps employing ultracentrifugation, precipitation, and ion-exchange membrane chromatography. Purified fimbriae demonstrated the anticipated size and morphology by electron microscopy analysis, contained negligible levels of residual host cell proteins, nucleic acid, and endotoxin, and were recognized by convalescent human anti-sera.

  5. Impact of CD4+ T Cell Responses on Clinical Outcome following Oral Administration of Wild-Type Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wilbur H.; Magder, Laurence; Levine, Myron M.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a non-invasive enteric pathogen of considerable public health importance, being one of the most common attributable causes of diarrheal illness in infants and young children in developing countries and the most common cause of traveler’s diarrhea. To enhance study-to-study consistency of our experimental challenge model of ETEC in volunteers, and to allow concomitant multi-site trials to evaluate anti-ETEC immunoprophylactic products, hundreds of vials, each containing a standardized inoculum of virulent wild-type (wt) ETEC strain H10407 (serotype O78:H11 expressing colonization factor antigen I and heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins), were prepared under current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) and frozen. Following thawing, the contents of each vial can be used (diluted as necessary) to prepare consistent challenge inoculum, even at different study sites. A preliminary human experimental challenge study using this cGMP inoculum was conducted on a research isolation ward and the clinical and cell-mediated immune responses evaluated. Of the 6 healthy adult volunteers challenged 83% (5/6) developed diarrhea and 50% developed moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD). Moderate and severe diarrhea were defined as passage of ≥ 1 liter or ≥ 3 liters of diarrheal stool respectively. We compared the CD4+ T cell responses of volunteers who developed MSD against those who did not and identified significant differences in ETEC-specific cytokine production and gut homing potential. We furthermore demonstrated that increased expression of the gut-homing molecule integrin α4β7 by peripheral T follicular helper cells (pTfh) correlated with decreased stool volume and increased ETEC-specific IgA B memory cell (BM) development. Collectively, despite small numbers of volunteers, our results indicate a potential role for CD4+ T cells, in particular pTfh, in modulating disease outcome following exposure to wt ETEC in a volunteer

  6. Homo-trimeric Structure of the Type IVb Minor Pilin CofB Suggests Mechanism of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Takuya; Imai, Tomoya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Iida, Tetsuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Nakamura, Shota

    2016-03-27

    In gram-negative bacteria, the assembly of type IV pilus (T4P) and the evolutionally related pseudopilus of type II secretion system involves specialized structural proteins called pilins and pseudopilins, respectively, and is dynamically regulated to promote bacterial pathogenesis. Previous studies have suggested that a structural "tip"-like hetero-complex formed through the interaction of at least three minor (pseudo) pilins plays an important role in this process, while some members of the pathogenic type IVb subfamily are known to have only one such minor pilin subunit whose function is still unknown. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the type IVb minor pilin CofB of colonization factor antigen/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli at 1.88-Å resolution. The crystal structure, in conjunction with physicochemical analysis in solution, reveals a symmetrical homo-trimeric arrangement distinct from the hetero-complexes of minor (pseudo) pilins observed in other T4P and type II secretion systems. Each CofB monomer adopts a unique three-domain architecture, in which the C-terminal β-sheet-rich lectin domain can effectively initiate trimer association of its pilin-like N-terminal domain through extensive hydrophobic interactions followed by domain swapping at the central hinge-like domain. Deletion of cofB produces a phenotype with no detectable pili formation on the cell surface, while molecular modeling indicates that the characteristic homo-trimeric structure of CofB is well situated at the pilus tip of colonization factor antigen/III formed by the major pilin CofA, suggesting a role for the minor pilin in the efficient initiation of T4P assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea of travelers: a prospective study of American Peace Corps volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Kaminsky, D C; Sack, R B; Wamola, I A; Orskov, F; Orskov, I; Slack, R C; Arthur, R R; Kapikian, A Z

    1977-08-01

    Travelers' diarrhea was studied prospectively in a group of 39 American Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) during their first five weeks in Kenya. Twenty-seven developed diarrheal disease and 12 remained well. Multiple episodes were documented in 11 of the symptomatic volunteers. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli of many serotypes producing heat-labile and/or heat-stable enterotoxin were isolated from 17 of the 27 volunteers with diarrhea and from 1 of the 12 well volunteers. The enterotoxigenic E. coli were more likely to be antibiotic sensitive than the non-enterotoxigenic E. coli. A serum antibody rise to the heat-labile toxin (LT) was detected in six symptomatic volunteers, five of whom had a positive culture for LT-producing E. coli, and from one asymptomatic, culture negative volunteer. Salmonella cubana was isolated from two volunteers, and three volunteers had serologic evidence of infection with human reovirus-like (rotavirus) agent. This study confirms the role of enterotoxigenic E. coli as a major cause of travelers' diarrhea and suggests that the disease is similar in widely separated geographic areas.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain E24377A, Obtained from a Tribal Drinking Water Source in India

    PubMed Central

    Nerkar, Sandeep S.; Khadake, Prashant P.; Akolkar, Dadasaheb B.; Apurwa, Sachin R.; Deshpande, Uday; Khedkar, Smita U.; Stålsby-Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Its dissemination can occur through water sources contaminated by it. Here, we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain E24377A, obtained from a tribal drinking water source in India. PMID:25838484

  9. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in captive black-footed ferrets.

    PubMed

    Bradley, G A; Orr, K; Reggiardo, C; Glock, R D

    2001-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with genes for heat stabile toxins Sta and STb was isolated from the gastrointestinal tract and multiple visceral organs of three adult and three juvenile black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) that died in a captive breeding colony between 24 May 1998 and 2 July 1998. Similar isolates were obtained from rectal swabs of one adult and one juvenile that were clinically ill. All were fed a diet composed of mink chow, raw rabbit meat, beef liver powder, blood meal and lard. Escherichia coli of the same toxin genotype was isolated from the mixed ration. Clinical signs included sudden death, dehydration, anorexia and diarrhea. Necropsy lesions included acute enteritis with large numbers of rod shaped bacteria microscopically visible on intestinal villi.

  10. Analysis of antigenic determinants in cholera enterotoxin and heat-labile enterotoxins from human and porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Y; Honda, T; Sima, H; Tsuji, T; Miwatani, T

    1983-01-01

    Antigenic determinants of cholera enterotoxin (CT) and heat-labile enterotoxin from a human strain (LTh) and a porcine strain (LTp) were analyzed by Ouchterlony double-gel diffusion test against anti-CT, anti-LTh, and anti-LTp, which were treated by immunoaffinity column chromatography. The results showed the existence of the following antigenic determinants: (i) antigenic determinants unique to CT, LTh, and LTp, respectively; (ii) an antigenic determinant common to CT, LTh, and LTp; (iii) an antigenic determinant common to CT and LTh, but not LTp; and (iv) an antigenic determinant common to LTh and LTp, but not CT. On the basis of these results, an antigenic scheme for CT, LTh, and LTp is proposed. Images PMID:6190758

  11. Quantitative method for enumeration of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, R L; Levin, M A

    1981-01-01

    A rapid method was developed to quantify toxigenic Escherichia coli, using a membrane filter procedure. After filtration of samples, the membrane filter was first incubated on a medium selective for E. coli (24 h, 44 degrees C) and then transferred to tryptic soy agar (3%; 6 h, 37 degrees C). To assay for labile toxin-producing colonies, the filter was then transferred to a monolayer of Y-1 cells, the E. coli colonies were marked on the bottom of the petri dish, and the filter was removed after 15 min. The monolayer was observed for a positive rounding effect after a 15- to 24-h incubation. The method has an upper limit of detecting 30 toxigenic colonies per plate and can detect as few as one toxigenic colony per plate. A preliminary screening for these enterotoxigenic strains in polluted waters and known positive fecal samples was performed, and positive results were obtained with fecal samples only. PMID:7007415

  12. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK).

  13. Novel Antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M.; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens-causing diarrhea in developing countries where they cause hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally-encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  14. Enzyme-linked synthetic oligonucleotide probes: non-radioactive detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in faecal specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Li, P; Medon, P P; Skingle, D C; Lanser, J A; Symons, R H

    1987-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides, complementary to unique sequences in the heat stable enterotoxin gene of Escherichia coli specific for humans, were prepared with a 30-atom spacer arm and a 3' terminal sulfhydryl group which was coupled to bromoacetyl-derivatized alkaline phosphatase. The resulting direct enzyme-linked oligonucleotide probes, containing one enzyme molecule per oligonucleotide, successfully diagnosed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in clinical specimens by using a modified colony hybridization method and a colorimetric assay. The procedure is rapid, simple and reliable with a sensitivity equivalent to that using 5'-terminally labelled [32p]-oligonucleotide probes. The results indicate that the enzyme-labelled oligonucleotide probes should be applicable to the routine diagnosis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and possess the potential for the detection of other microbial pathogens. Images PMID:3299267

  15. Capsule reduces adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to isolated intestinal epithelial cells of pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Runnels, P L; Moon, H W

    1984-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that heat-stable (A-type) capsule on piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli enhances colonization of enterotoxigenic E. coli in the small intestine and enhances virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In this report, four encapsulated enterotoxigenic E. coli strains and one encapsulated nonenterotoxigenic strain of E. coli and their nonencapsulated mutants were tested for adhesion to isolated intestinal epithelial cells or brush borders from neonatal pigs. The enterotoxigenic E. coli also expressed the K99 pilus antigen. The nonencapsulated mutants of the four enterotoxigenic E. coli adhered in higher numbers than did the encapsulated parental strains. Both the encapsulated and nonencapsulated forms of enterotoxigenic E. coli 431 grown at 18 degrees C (K99 production suppressed) adhered poorly to the isolated cells. The nonenterotoxigenic E. coli 1793 which does not express K99 antigen also adhered poorly in both encapsulated and nonencapsulated forms. Fab fragments of anticapsular immunoglobulin G failed to block the effect of capsule on adherence of strain 431. The results indicated that K99 was the principal mediator of in vitro adhesion of the enterotoxigenic E. coli strains and that capsule impedes the in vitro adhesion. They also suggested that the capsular enhancement of colonization by such strains in vivo probably is by some mechanism other than enhanced adhesion to epithelium. PMID:6147310

  16. Capsule reduces adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to isolated intestinal epithelial cells of pigs.

    PubMed

    Runnels, P L; Moon, H W

    1984-09-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that heat-stable (A-type) capsule on piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli enhances colonization of enterotoxigenic E. coli in the small intestine and enhances virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In this report, four encapsulated enterotoxigenic E. coli strains and one encapsulated nonenterotoxigenic strain of E. coli and their nonencapsulated mutants were tested for adhesion to isolated intestinal epithelial cells or brush borders from neonatal pigs. The enterotoxigenic E. coli also expressed the K99 pilus antigen. The nonencapsulated mutants of the four enterotoxigenic E. coli adhered in higher numbers than did the encapsulated parental strains. Both the encapsulated and nonencapsulated forms of enterotoxigenic E. coli 431 grown at 18 degrees C (K99 production suppressed) adhered poorly to the isolated cells. The nonenterotoxigenic E. coli 1793 which does not express K99 antigen also adhered poorly in both encapsulated and nonencapsulated forms. Fab fragments of anticapsular immunoglobulin G failed to block the effect of capsule on adherence of strain 431. The results indicated that K99 was the principal mediator of in vitro adhesion of the enterotoxigenic E. coli strains and that capsule impedes the in vitro adhesion. They also suggested that the capsular enhancement of colonization by such strains in vivo probably is by some mechanism other than enhanced adhesion to epithelium.

  17. Characterization of Mucosal Immune Responses to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Antigens in a Human Challenge Model: Response Profiles after Primary Infection and Homologous Rechallenge with Strain H10407.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Harro, Clayton; DeNearing, Barbara; Ram, Malathi; Feller, Andrea; Cage, Alicia; Bauers, Nicole; Bourgeois, A Louis; Walker, Richard; Sack, David A

    2015-11-18

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in children in resource-poor settings as well as in travelers. Although there are several approaches to develop an effective vaccine for ETEC, no licensed vaccines are currently available. A significant challenge to successful vaccine development is our poor understanding of the immune responses that correlate best with protection against ETEC illness. In this study, ETEC-specific mucosal immune responses were characterized and compared in subjects challenged with ETEC strain H10407 and in subjects rechallenged with the homologous organism. IgA responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB), and colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) in antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS), feces, lavage fluid, and saliva samples were evaluated. In all assay comparisons, ALS was the most sensitive indicator of a local immune response, but serum IgA was also a useful indirect marker of immune response to oral antigens. Volunteers challenged and then rechallenged with strain H10407 were protected from illness following rechallenge. Comparing mucosal antibody responses after primary and homologous rechallenge, protection against disease was reflected in reduced antibody responses to key ETEC antigens and in reduced fecal shedding of the H10407 challenge strain. Subjects challenged with strain H10407 mounted stronger antibody responses to LPS and LTB than subjects in the rechallenge group, while responses to CFA/I in the rechallenge group were higher than in the challenge group. We anticipate that this study will help provide an immunological benchmark for the evaluation of ETEC vaccines and immunization regimens in the future.

  18. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu Xing; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone-usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone-usher mediated bioassembly.

  19. Additive protective effects of colostral antipili antibodies in calves experimentally infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Contrepois, M G; Girardeau, J P

    1985-01-01

    With oral infection of calves by an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain carrying K99, F41, and FY adhesins, colostrums from cows vaccinated against either K99+F41 or FY did not provide protection, but a mixture of the two colostrums did. The association of antibodies directed against the different adhesins is more effective than antibodies directed against one adhesin alone for colostral protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli carrying several adhesins. PMID:2866162

  20. Efficacy of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccine for bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kazuhide; Shimizu, Madoka; Kurose, Tomoyasu; Nakatani, Keiji; Akita, Shinji; Shinozuka, Yasunori; Isobe, Naoki

    2011-05-01

    An enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine designed to prevent diarrhoea was inoculated into dairy cows, and the occurrence of clinical mastitis was investigated for 2 years. Half of 480 cows in five farms were subcutaneously inoculated with ETEC vaccine (Imocolibov) twice with a 1-month interval in 2007 and 2008. Fisher's exact test and survival (time to event) analysis with the log-rank test were used to compare vaccinates and controls. In 2007, there was no significant difference in the incidence rate of mastitis between vaccinate (20.3%) and control (17.1%) cows. The rate of death or culling due to mastitis was lower in vaccinated cows (7.4%) than in control cows (29.2%, P=0.07, Fisher's exact test; P=0.02, log-rank test). In 2008, there was no significant difference in both the incidence rate of mastitis and the rate of death or culling due to mastitis. Milk productivity was compared between vaccinates and controls in one farm. Multi-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the amount of 4% fat-corrected milk, and there was no significant difference between vaccinates and controls. These results suggest that ETEC vaccine inoculation reduces death or culling due to mastitis, whereas no preventive effect on the development of mastitis was observed.

  1. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea among young children in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Richie, E; Punjabi, N H; Corwin, A; Lesmana, M; Rogayah, I; Lebron, C; Echeverria, P; Simanjuntak, C H

    1997-07-01

    The incidence of diarrhea and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was evaluated in children six months to five years of age from an urban community in Jakarta, Indonesia. From January through May 1994, 408 children were monitored in their homes for diarrheal disease. Thirty-six percent (148 of 408) of the study children had at least one episode of diarrhea during the study period. Twenty-nine (19.6%) of the 148 children with diarrhea had ETEC isolated from a rectal swab sample at least once during the surveillance period; five children had ETEC isolated from two distinct episodes of diarrhea, giving a total of 34 episodes of ETEC positive diarrhea in the study group. Ten of 34 episodes were associated with heat-labile toxin, 15 of 34 with heat-stable toxin, and seven of 34 with both toxins. The mean age of children with diarrhea (1.7 years), whether ETEC positive or negative, was significantly lower than those who did not have diarrhea (2.4 years) during the study period; 82% of the children with ETEC were less than two years of age. This study demonstrates a high incidence of ETEC diarrhea among young children in Jakarta, and suggests this site would be suitable for ETEC vaccine efficacy trials.

  2. Serum Antibodies Protect against Intraperitoneal Challenge with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Suo, Zhiyong; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether anticolonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae antibodies (Abs) from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can protect against various routes of challenge, BALB/c mice were immunized with a live attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector expressing CFA/I fimbriae. Vaccinated mice elicited elevated systemic IgG and mucosal IgA Abs, unlike mice immunized with the empty Salmonella vector. Mice were challenged with wild-type ETEC by the oral, intranasal (i.n.), and intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes. Naïve mice did not succumb to oral challenge, but did to i.n. challenge, as did immunized mice; however, vaccinated mice were protected against i.p. ETEC challenge. Two intramuscular (i.m.) immunizations with CFA/I fimbriae without adjuvant conferred 100% protection against i.p. ETEC challenge, while a single 30 μg dose conferred 88% protection. Bactericidal assays showed that ETEC is highly sensitive to anti-CFA/I sera. These results suggest that parenteral immunization with purified CFA/I fimbriae can induce protective Abs and may represent an alternative method to elicit protective Abs for passive immunity to ETEC. PMID:22007145

  3. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu-xing; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2014-01-21

    The molecular chaperone CfaA plays a critical role in the bioassembly of the surface-adhesive CFA/I fimbriae of enterotoxigenic E. coli. Purified CfaA was crystallized and the phase solution was determined by the multiple isomorphous replacement coupled with anomalous scattering method.

  4. Foodborne enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: from gut pathogenesis to new preventive strategies involving probiotics.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Charlène; Sivignon, Adeline; de Wiele, Tom Van; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of traveler's diarrhea and infant mortality in developing countries. Given the rise of antibiotic resistance worldwide, there is an urgent need for the development of new preventive strategies. Among them, a promising approach is the use of probiotics. Although many studies, mostly performed under piglet digestive conditions, have shown the beneficial effects of probiotics on ETEC by interfering with their survival, virulence or adhesion to mucosa, underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This review describes ETEC pathogenesis, its modulation by human gastrointestinal cues as well as novel preventive strategies with a particular emphasis on probiotics. The potential of in vitro models simulating human digestion in elucidating probiotic mode of action will be discussed.

  5. Vaccines for preventing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Bunn, T O

    1993-01-01

    Fimbrial vaccines are routinely given parenterally to pregnant cattle, sheep and swine to protect suckling newborn calves, lambs and pigs against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections. Such vaccines are practical and effective because (1) most fatal ETEC infections in farm animals occur in the early neonatal period when the antibody titres in colostrum and milk are highest; (2) more than 90% of the ETEC in farm animals belong to a small family of fimbrial antigen types; (3) fimbriae consist of good protein antigens on the bacterial surface where they are readily accessible to antibody; (4) fimbriae are required for a critical step (adhesion-colonization) early in the pathogenesis of the disease. ETEC infections continue to be a significant clinical problem in farm animals in spite of extensive use of fimbriae-based vaccines. Definitive data on the efficacy of the commercial vaccines in field use are not available. The prevailing perception among animal health professionals is that the vaccines are effective, that the problem occurs chiefly among non-vaccinated animals, and that in some herds vaccination moves peak prevalence of disease from the first to the second or third week after birth, when mortality is lower. It has been suggested that extensive use of vaccines will rapidly select for the emergence of novel or previously low prevalence fimbrial antigen types. There is no evidence that this has happened after a decade of routine vaccine use in the United States. However, there is no active direct surveillance for such emergence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. )

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  7. A commensal gone bad: complete genome sequence of the prototypical enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain H10407.

    PubMed

    Crossman, Lisa C; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Beatson, Scott A; Wells, Timothy J; Desvaux, Mickael; Cunningham, Adam F; Petty, Nicola K; Mahon, Vivienne; Brinkley, Carl; Hobman, Jon L; Savarino, Stephen J; Turner, Susan M; Pallen, Mark J; Penn, Charles W; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, A Keith; Johnson, Timothy J; Thomson, Nicholas R; Smith, Stephen G J; Henderson, Ian R

    2010-11-01

    In most cases, Escherichia coli exists as a harmless commensal organism, but it may on occasion cause intestinal and/or extraintestinal disease. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) is the predominant cause of E. coli-mediated diarrhea in the developing world and is responsible for a significant portion of pediatric deaths. In this study, we determined the complete genomic sequence of E. coli H10407, a prototypical strain of enterotoxigenic E. coli, which reproducibly elicits diarrhea in human volunteer studies. We performed genomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other E. coli strains, revealing that the chromosome is closely related to that of the nonpathogenic commensal strain E. coli HS and to those of the laboratory strains E. coli K-12 and C. Furthermore, these analyses demonstrated that there were no chromosomally encoded factors unique to any sequenced ETEC strains. Comparison of the E. coli H10407 plasmids with those from several ETEC strains revealed that the plasmids had a mosaic structure but that several loci were conserved among ETEC strains. This study provides a genetic context for the vast amount of experimental and epidemiological data that have been published.

  8. Mouse intestinal innate immune responses altered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Xiaoping; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Wang, Shengping; Tang, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of human and porcine morbidity and mortality. The current study was conducted to identify intestinal immunity that is altered in a mouse model of ETEC infection. Innate immune responses and inflammation were analyzed. The activation of signal transduction pathways, including toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), was analyzed using immunoblotting and PCR array analyses. We found that ETEC infection promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Meanwhile, ETEC infection affected sIgA transportation and Paneth cell function. These data improve our understanding of how ETEC causes disease in animals.

  9. Evaluation of heat-labile enterotoxins type IIa and type IIb in the pathogenicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli for neonatal pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (LT-II) have been reported in Escherichia coli isolates from humans, animals, food and water samples. The roles of the antigenically distinguishable LT-IIa and LT-IIb subtypes in pathogenesis and virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) have not been previously re...

  10. Draft Whole-Genome Sequences of 10 Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Serogroup O6 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years and in adults living in developing countries, as well as in travelers to these countries. In this announcement, we release the draft whole-genome sequences of 10 ETEC serogroup O6 strains. PMID:26044422

  11. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates with enzyme-labeled synthetic oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Medon, P P; Lanser, J A; Monckton, P R; Li, P; Symons, R H

    1988-01-01

    Commercially available kits containing alkaline phosphatase-labeled oligonucleotide probes for Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxins (STI-H, STI-P, and STII) and the heat-labile enterotoxin were compared with bioassays and radiolabeled recombinant DNA probes to identify enterotoxigenic E. coli from 100 clinical isolates. There was very good agreement between the three methods. PMID:3053766

  12. Immunization of suckling pigs against enteric enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection by vaccinating dams with purified pili.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E; To, C C; Brinton, C C

    1978-07-01

    Pregnant swine (gilts) were vaccinated parenterally with a suspension of purified pili from the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain 987 (09:K103::NM). Gilts injected with placebo served as controls. Suckling pigs born to gilts in both groups were challenged intragastrically with virulent strain 987. The percentage of deaths, incidence and duration of diarrhea, numbers of E. coli in the ilea, and E. coli attachment to the villous epithelia were significantly less in suckling pigs of vaccinated gilts than in those of controls. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that pili of some enterotoxigenic E. coli facilitate adhesion to intestinal epithelia. Vaccination of dams with pili appears to be a means of immunizing against diarrheal disease caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli in suckling neonates. This work confirms the role of somatic pili as colonization and virulence factors and provides another example of safe and effective purified pilus vaccines.

  13. Clinical manifestations of diarrhea in calves infected with rotavirus and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tzipori, S R; Makin, T J; Smith, M L; Krautil, F L

    1981-01-01

    The susceptibility of gnotobiotic, colostrum-derived, or suckling calves to four bovine rotavirus isolates was found to be age dependent. Calves older than 7 days remained clinically normal, although they excreted virus in their feces and subsequently developed antibody against the virus, Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, fed to gnotobiotic, colostrum-deprived, or suckling calves ranging in age from a few hours to 26 days old, only caused diarrhea in animals younger than 24 h old. In contrast, diarrhea was consistently induced in 1- and 2-week-old calves infected with both enterotoxigenic E. coli and rotavirus. In general, diarrhea appeared after a rotavirus incubation period of approximately 3 days and was independent of the order in which the two microbial agents were given, the age of the calf, or the level of circulating rotavirus antibodies. The disease episode coincided with the excretion of rotavirus, rather than enterotoxigenic E. coli, in the feces. Infection with enterotoxigenic E. coli became established within 24 h of inoculation, and in older calves enterotoxigenic E. coli was often excreted in very small numbers and for a longer period than rotavirus. PMID:6265493

  14. Detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I in stool specimens by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Clegg, S

    1980-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect and quantitate the fimbrial colonization factor antigen (CFA/I) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in stool specimens obtained from adult cases of diarrhea in which CFA/I-positive E. coli was the known causative agent. The inhibition method, or blocking technique, was used. In this method, a standardized dilution of human anti-CFA/I serum was preincubated with dilutions of stool extract before transfer to CFA/I-coated microtiter plate wells, and then ELISA was performed with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin. CFA/I purified from E. coli strain H-10407 (O78:H11) was used. Acute-phase diarrheal stool specimens were found to contain approximately 3.0 mg of antigen (mean value) per g stool, whereas control (CFA/I-negative) specimens contained insignificant amounts (less than 0.03 mg/g) of antigen. Also, CFA/I was detected in culture fluids of CFA/I positive enterotoxigenic E. coli belonging to a variety of serotypes and was undetectable in similar preparations from P-strains (spontaneous CFA/I-negative derivatives) of the same test cultures. Equivalent results were obtained in ELISA tests by using bacterial cells taken from isolated colonies grown on CFA agar. These results indicate that the ELISA technique will be useful for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by CFA/I-positive enterotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:7031075

  15. Vaccines for preventing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R; Zaman, K; Sinclair, David; Qadri, Firdausi

    2013-07-05

    Infection with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria is a common cause of diarrhoea in adults and children in developing countries and is a major cause of 'travellers' diarrhoea' in people visiting or returning from endemic regions. A killed whole cell vaccine (Dukoral®), primarily designed and licensed to prevent cholera, has been recommended by some groups to prevent travellers' diarrhoea in people visiting endemic regions. This vaccine contains a recombinant B subunit of the cholera toxin that is antigenically similar to the heat labile toxin of ETEC. This review aims to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this vaccine and other vaccines designed specifically to protect people against diarrhoea caused by ETEC infection. To evaluate the efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of vaccines for preventing ETEC diarrhoea. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and http://clinicaltrials.gov up to December 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing use of vaccines to prevent ETEC with use of no intervention, a control vaccine (either an inert vaccine or a vaccine normally given to prevent an unrelated infection), an alternative ETEC vaccine, or a different dose or schedule of the same ETEC vaccine in healthy adults and children living in endemic regions, intending to travel to endemic regions, or volunteering to receive an artificial challenge of ETEC bacteria. Two authors independently assessed each trial for eligibility and risk of bias. Two independent reviewers extracted data from the included studies and analyzed the data using Review Manager (RevMan) software. We reported outcomes as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Twenty-four RCTs, including 53,247 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Four studies assessed the protective

  16. Shear-enhanced binding of intestinal colonization factor antigen I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; McVeigh, Annette L.; Kidd, Brian; Yakovenko, Olga; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In the intestine, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli works against peristaltic forces, adhering to the epithelium via the CFA/I fimbrial adhesin CfaE. The CfaE adhesin is similar in localization and tertiary (but not primary) structure to FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which shows shear-dependent binding to epithelial receptors by an allosteric catch-bond mechanism. Thus, we speculated that CfaE is also capable of shear-enhanced binding. Indeed, bovine erythrocytes coursing over immobilized CFA/I fimbriae in flow-chambers exhibited low accumulation levels and fast rolling at low shear, but an 80-fold increase in accumulation and 3-fold decrease in rolling velocity at elevated shear. This effect was reversible and abolished by pre-incubation of fimbriae with anti-CfaE antibody. Erythrocytes bound to whole CfaE in the same shear-enhanced manner, but to CfaE adhesin domain in a shear-inhibitable fashion. Residue replacements designed to disrupt CfaE interdomain interaction decreased the shear-dependency of adhesion and increased binding under static conditions to human intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that close interaction between adhesive and anchoring pilin domains of CfaE keeps the former in a low-affinity state that toggles into a high-affinity state upon separation of two domains, all consistent with an allosteric catch-bond mechanism of CfaE binding. PMID:20345656

  17. Molecular homogeneity of heat-stable enterotoxins produced by bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, A M; Magnuson, N S; Sriranganathan, N; Burger, D; Cosand, W

    1984-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins (STs) from four strains of bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli representing four serogroups were purified to homogeneity by utilizing previously published purification schemata. Biochemical characterization of the purified STs showed that they met the basic criteria for the heat-stable enterotoxins of E. coli. Amino acid analysis of the purified STs revealed that they were peptides of identical amino acid composition. This composition consisted of 18 residues of 10 different amino acids, 6 of which were cysteine. The amino acid composition of the four ST peptides was identical to that reported for the STs of human and porcine E. coli. In addition, complete sequence analysis of two of the ST peptides and partial sequencing of several others revealed strong homology to the sequences of STs from human and porcine E. coli and to the sequence predicted from the last 18 codons of the transposon Tn1681. There was also substantial homology to the sequence predicted from the ST-coding genetic element of human E. coli, which may indicate the existence of identical bioactive configuration among ST peptides of E. coli strains of various host origins. These data support the hypothesis that STs produced by human, bovine, and porcine E. coli are coded by a closely related genetic element which may have originated from a single, widely disseminated transposon. Images PMID:6376355

  18. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Peruvian Children

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    potential coverage of children in Peru by investigational vaccines . Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the main causes of diarrhea in...important target for vaccine development (11). Diarrhea due to ETEC develops between 8 and 72 h after initial infection, usually due to the ingestion of...products in clinical specimens. Currently, derivatives of LT and the CFs are targets for the development of vaccines against ETEC. However, the great

  19. Passive immunity in calf diarrhea: vaccination with K99 antigen of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, D R; Nagy, L K; Sherwood, D; Campbell, I

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four pregnant cows were vaccinated intramuscularly with K99 extract from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and inactivated rotavirus as follows: six cows were injected with 2 ml of oil-adjuvanted vaccine; six cows were injected with 0.5 ml of oil-adjuvanted vaccine; six cows were injected with 4 ml of aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted vaccine twice with a four-week interval; and six cows were unvaccinated as controls. Calves born to these cows were challenged with enterotoxigenic E. coli at 6 to 18 h after birth. Serum and milk antibodies to K99 and rotavirus in cows vaccinated with either dose of oil vaccine were significantly increased until at least 28 days after calving. In cows vaccinated with alhydrogel vaccine, there was a significant K99 antibody increase in serum and in colostrum but not in milk and a significant rotavirus antibody increase only in colostrum. Five of six calves born to unvaccinated cows developed enterotoxic colibacillosis after challenge, and all excreted the challenge strain of enterotoxigenic E. coli. None of the 18 calves in the three vaccinated groups developed clinical colibacillosis, and fecal excretion of the challenge organism was reduced. A combined enterotoxigenic E. coli-rotavirus vaccine may prove useful in preventing some outbreaks of calf diarrhea. PMID:6288567

  20. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  1. Protective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Antigens in a Murine Intranasal Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Hays, Mike; Lim, Francis; Foster, Leonard J.; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Guoqiang; Miesner, Tracy; Hardwidge, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an endemic health threat in underdeveloped nations. Despite the significant effort extended to vaccine trials using ETEC colonization factors, these approaches have generally not been especially effective in mediating cross-protective immunity. We used quantitative proteomics to identify 24 proteins that differed in abundance in membrane protein preparations derived from wild-type vs. a type II secretion system mutant of ETEC. We expressed and purified a subset of these proteins and identified nine antigens that generated significant immune responses in mice. Sera from mice immunized with either the MltA-interacting protein MipA, the periplasmic chaperone seventeen kilodalton protein, Skp, or a long-chain fatty acid outer membrane transporter, ETEC_2479, reduced the adherence of multiple ETEC strains differing in colonization factor expression to human intestinal epithelial cells. In intranasal challenge assays of mice, immunization with ETEC_2479 protected 88% of mice from an otherwise lethal challenge with ETEC H10407. Immunization with either Skp or MipA provided an intermediate degree of protection, 68 and 64%, respectively. Protection was significantly correlated with the induction of a secretory immunoglobulin A response. This study has identified several proteins that are conserved among heterologous ETEC strains and may thus potentially improve cross-protective efficacy if incorporated into future vaccine designs. PMID:26244636

  2. Proteome analysis for the global proteins in the jejunum tissues of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli -infected piglets

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in humans and livestock. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography (LC) and MS analysis was used for screening the differentially expressed proteins in piglet jejunum after ETEC infection. Totally 1,897 proteins were identified with quantitative information in piglet jejunum. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ETEC-induced diarrhea, of which 30 were up regulated and 62 down regulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in intestinal function of binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity and immune responses. The inhibition of intestinal immune responses in the jejunum in ETEC-induced diarrhea was also validated by immunobloting and RT-PCR. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the protein profile of ETEC-infected piglets by quantitative proteomics, and our findings could provide valuable information with respect to better understanding the host response to ETEC infection. PMID:27157636

  3. Nutritional requirements for synthesis of heat-labile enterotoxin by enterotoxigenic strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, P H; Robertson, D C

    1979-01-01

    Optimal growth conditions have been established for production of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) by both porcine and human strains of enterotoxigenic (ENT(+)) Escherichia coli. There were no unusual growth factor requirements, and some strains produced fairly high levels of LT in a basal salts medium containing 0.5% glucose if the pH was carefully controlled. Several amino acids markedly stimulated LT synthesis when added to the basal salts-glucose medium. Methionine and lysine were the most stimulatory for both human and porcine strains. Either aspartic acid or glutamic acid further enhanced LT synthesis in the presence of methionine and lysine, with aspartic acid being more stimulatory for porcine strains and glutamic acid more stimulatory for human strains. There were no apparent vitamin requirements and no unusual cations needed for toxin synthesis except that Fe(3+) was slightly stimulatory for porcine strains. The stimulation by Fe(3+) was observed only in the presence of the three amino acids, suggesting that the effect was indirect rather than on toxin synthesis. The carbon source also influenced the yield of LT. Glucose supported maximal synthesis, but other carbon sources which exhibit a high degree of catabolite repression also supported high levels of synthesis. Little or no LT was released below pH 7.0; therefore, because the pH drops during growth from 7.5 to 6.8, even in highly buffered media, it was necessary to adjust the pH to 8.0 to effect complete release of cell-associated toxin. The defined medium containing three amino acids reduced the amount of UV-absorbing material in culture supernatants about fivefold and increased LT activity for various strains from two- to fivefold over a complex Casamino Acids-yeast extract medium. Conditions found to be optimal for synthesis of LT were inhibitory for the heat-stable enterotoxin.

  4. Immunologic Control of Diarrheal Disease Due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Classical Enteropathogenic (Serotyped) Escherichia coli Strains of Proven Pathogenicity. Infect. Immun. 38:798-801, 1982. 8. Levine, M.M. Vacunas Contra...Microbiol., 18:808-815, 1983. 8 15. Levine, M.M., Lanata, C. Progresos en Vacunas Contra Diarrea Bacteriana. Adelantos Microbiol. Enferm. Inf., 2:67-117

  5. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) clades with long-term global distribution.

    PubMed

    von Mentzer, Astrid; Connor, Thomas R; Wieler, Lothar H; Semmler, Torsten; Iguchi, Atsushi; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rasko, David A; Joffre, Enrique; Corander, Jukka; Pickard, Derek; Wiklund, Gudrun; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa; Dougan, Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a major cause of infectious diarrhea, produce heat-stable and/or heat-labile enterotoxins and at least 25 different colonization factors that target the intestinal mucosa. The genes encoding the enterotoxins and most of the colonization factors are located on plasmids found across diverse E. coli serogroups. Whole-genome sequencing of a representative collection of ETEC isolated between 1980 and 2011 identified globally distributed lineages characterized by distinct colonization factor and enterotoxin profiles. Contrary to current notions, these relatively recently emerged lineages might harbor chromosome and plasmid combinations that optimize fitness and transmissibility. These data have implications for understanding, tracking and possibly preventing ETEC disease.

  6. Comparison of preservation methods for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Yoh, M; Narita, I; Honda, T; Miwatani, T; Nishibuchi, M

    1991-01-01

    Ten strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) were preserved under 12 different conditions. After 1 month, 9 months, and 3 years of preservation, the cultures were recovered and examined for LT production. Preservation of the cultures on Dorset Egg Medium at 4 degrees C and preservation by freezing the cell suspensions in tryptic soy broth with 20% glycerol were found to be suitable preservation methods; all strains were alive for 3 years and had a minimum loss of LT production. PMID:1939590

  7. Immunochromatographic detection of the heat-labile enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with cross-detection of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Keiko; Tsuji, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the development of an immunochromatographic test strip that can detect heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Five types of monoclonal antibody (mAb)-producing hybridomas were isolated: three mAbs were A subunit specific and two were B subunit specific. Four mAbs also cross-reacted with both LT proteins derived from swine and human E. coli strains, but only one mAb 57B9 additionally cross-reacted with cholera toxin. Thus, mAb 57B9 was used to form a gold colloid-conjugated antibody for the immunochromatographic test by combination with polyclonal anti-LT rabbit IgG. This test strip detected not only LT in the culture supernatant of LT gene-positive strains, but also cholera toxin in the culture supernatant of Vibrio cholerae. These results indicate that this test strip is suitable for the diagnosis of both enterotoxigenic E. coli and V. cholerae infection.

  8. A Commensal Gone Bad: Complete Genome Sequence of the Prototypical Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain H10407▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Crossman, Lisa C.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Beatson, Scott A.; Wells, Timothy J.; Desvaux, Mickael; Cunningham, Adam F.; Petty, Nicola K.; Mahon, Vivienne; Brinkley, Carl; Hobman, Jon L.; Savarino, Stephen J.; Turner, Susan M.; Pallen, Mark J.; Penn, Charles W.; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, A. Keith; Johnson, Timothy J.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Smith, Stephen G. J.; Henderson, Ian R.

    2010-01-01

    In most cases, Escherichia coli exists as a harmless commensal organism, but it may on occasion cause intestinal and/or extraintestinal disease. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) is the predominant cause of E. coli-mediated diarrhea in the developing world and is responsible for a significant portion of pediatric deaths. In this study, we determined the complete genomic sequence of E. coli H10407, a prototypical strain of enterotoxigenic E. coli, which reproducibly elicits diarrhea in human volunteer studies. We performed genomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other E. coli strains, revealing that the chromosome is closely related to that of the nonpathogenic commensal strain E. coli HS and to those of the laboratory strains E. coli K-12 and C. Furthermore, these analyses demonstrated that there were no chromosomally encoded factors unique to any sequenced ETEC strains. Comparison of the E. coli H10407 plasmids with those from several ETEC strains revealed that the plasmids had a mosaic structure but that several loci were conserved among ETEC strains. This study provides a genetic context for the vast amount of experimental and epidemiological data that have been published. PMID:20802035

  9. Pathogenicity of Vietnamese enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains in colostrum-deprived one-day-old piglets.

    PubMed

    Do, T N; Wilkie, I; Driesen, S J; Fahy, V A; Trott, D J

    2006-03-01

    Preweaning colibacillosis is a major cause of economic loss to the swine industry in Vietnam. The aim of this study was to examine the enteropathogenicity of representative enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains obtained during an earlier epidemiologic survey conducted in five provinces in North Vietnam. This included isolates belonging to serotype O8 that produced heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxins but did not produce any of the recognized fimbriae (F4, F5, F6, F41, F18). In vitro hemagglutination (unique mannose-resistant hemagglutination activity with guinea pig, sheep, human, and chicken red blood cells at 37 degrees C, but not at 18 degrees C) and enterocyte brush border attachment assays suggested that the F- ETEC strains produced an unidentified colonization factor that promoted adherence to the intestinal epithelium. Colostrum-deprived 1-day-old piglets challenged with an F- strain (1-2 x 10(9) bacteria) developed acute watery diarrhea within 4 hours of inoculation and suffered up to 20% weight loss, with comparable severity to piglets challenged with conventional F4 and F5 strains. At necropsy, viable counts and histopathologic examination of intestinal sections demonstrated colonization of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum by F4-positive strains. In comparison, the F- and F5-positive strains attached exclusively to the ileum. Transmission electron micrographs of negatively stained F- cells grown at 37 degrees C demonstrated the presence of fimbriae. These results confirm the presence of a potentially new pathogenic ETEC fimbrial type in piggeries in Vietnam, with a unique hemagglutination property and attachment characteristics similar to ETEC bearing F5 fimbriae.

  10. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Subclinical Infection in Pigs: Bacteriological and Genotypic Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Moredo, Fabiana A; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Márquez, Gabriela C; Sanz, Marcelo; Colello, Rocío; Etcheverría, Analía; Padola, Nora L; Quiroga, María A; Perfumo, Carlos J; Galli, Lucía; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the major pathogen responsible for neonatal diarrhea, postweaning diarrhea, and edema disease in pigs. Although it can be harmless, ETEC is also present in the intestines of other animal species and humans, causing occasional diarrhea outbreaks. The evaluation of this pathogen's presence in food sources is becoming an increasingly important issue in human health. In order to determine the prevalence of ETEC in nondiarrheic pigs, 990 animals from 11 pig farms were sampled. Using end-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), eltA, estI genes, or both, were detected in 150 (15.2%) animals. From the positive samples, 40 (26.6%) ETEC strains were isolated, showing 19 antibiotic-resistance patterns; 52.5% of these strains had multiple antibiotic resistances, and 17.5% carried the intI2 gene. The most prevalent genotypes were rfb(O157)/estII/aidA (32.5%) and estI/estII (25.0%). The estII gene was identified most frequently (97.5%), followed by estI (37.5%), astA (20.0%), and eltA (12.5%). The genes coding the fimbriae F5, F6, and F18 were detected in three single isolates. The aidA gene was detected in 20 ETEC strains associated with the estII gene. Among the isolated ETEC strains, stx(2e)/estI, stx(2e)/estI/estII, and stx(2e)/estI/estII/intI2 genotypes were identified. The ETEC belonged to 12 different serogroups; 37.5% of them belonged to serotype O157:H19. Isolates were grouped by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR into 5 clusters with 100.0% similarity. In this study, we demonstrated that numerous ETEC genotypes cohabit and circulate in swine populations without clinical manifestation of neonatal diarrhea, postweaning diarrhea, or edema disease in different production stages. The information generated is important not only for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes, but also for understanding the dynamics and ecology of ETEC in pigs in different production stages that can be potentially transmitted to humans

  11. Hybrid Shiga Toxin-Producing and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia sp. Cryptic Lineage 1 Strain 7v Harbors a Hybrid Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Mammel, Mark K.; Rasko, David A.; Lacher, David W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hybrid isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) are being reported with increasing frequency from a variety of sources. However, information regarding the plasmids that these strains harbor is scarce. In this study, we sequence and characterize a plasmid, p7v, from the STEC/ETEC hybrid strain 7v. Whole-genome phylogenetic analyses of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains and prototype E. coli isolates of other pathotypes placed 7v in the Escherichia sp. cryptic lineage 1 (CL1) clade. The complete plasmid, p7v, was determined to be 229,275 bp and encodes putative virulence factors that are typically carried on STEC plasmids as well as those often carried on ETEC plasmids, indicating that the hybrid nature of the strain extends beyond merely encoding the two toxins. Plasmid p7v carries two copies of sta with identical sequences, which were discovered to be divergent from the sta sequences found in the prototype human ETEC strains. Using a nomenclature scheme based on a phylogeny constructed from sta and stb sequences, the sta encoded on p7v is designated STa4. In silico analysis determined that p7v also encodes the K88 fimbria, a colonization factor usually associated with porcine ETEC plasmids. The p7v sequence and the presence of plasmid-encoded virulence factors are compared to those of other STEC/ETEC CL1 hybrid genomes and reveal gene acquisition/loss at the strain level. In addition, the interrogation of 24 STEC/ETEC hybrid genomes for identification of plasmid replicons, colonization factors, Stx and ST subtypes, and other plasmid-encoded virulence genes highlights the diversity of these hybrid strains. IMPORTANCE Hybrid Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli/enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) strains, which have been isolated from environmental, animal, and human clinical samples, may represent an emerging threat as food-borne pathogens. Characterization of these

  12. Some Characteristics of the Outer Membrane Material Released by Growing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gankema, Henk; Wensink, Jan; Guinée, Pieter A. M.; Jansen, Wim H.; Witholt, Bernard

    1980-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight material released into the medium by Escherichia coli AP1, an enterotoxigenic strain of porcine origin, has been isolated and resolved into two clearly distinct fractions, based on sucrose density gradient and differential centrifugation, chemical analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. These two fractions, referred to as “medium vesicles” and “medium lipopolysaccharides”, were compared with the cellular outer and cytoplasmic membranes, the periplasmic fraction, and the cytoplasmic fraction. The medium vesicles closely resembled outer membrane and accounted for 3 to 5% of the total cellular outer membrane. They contained most of the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) activity released into the medium by E. coli AP1. The medium lipopolysaccharide consisted mostly of lipopolysaccharide and a small amount of outer membrane and contained relatively little LT activity. Based on experiments with E. coli K-12 strains, in which about 5% of the newly synthesized outer membrane is lost from areas of outer membrane synthesis, it is proposed that enterotoxigenic E. coli strains release LT as part of such newly synthesized outer membrane fragments and that released outer membrane fragments may function as physiologically significant LT carriers. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:7011982

  13. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which

  14. Survival study of enterotoxigenic Escherichia colistrain in seawater and wastewater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boukef Ben Omrane, I; El Bour, M; Mejri, S; Mraouna, R; Got, P; Troussellier, M; Boudabous, A

    2011-01-01

    In order to survey osmotic and oligotrophic stress consequence on pathogenic enterobacteria discharged in marine areas, we examined enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and a reference (Ecoli O126:B16) strains during their survival (47 days) in wastewater microcosms, submerged in natural seawater and maintained in laboratory conditions. The results revealed that the survival time for the two strains was prolonged when bacterial cells were previously incubated in wastewater, with less cellular membrane damage. In addition, the wild clinical E. coli strain showed a better survival capacity than the reference E. coli strain one. For both, we noted some modifications in biochemical profiles relatively to the initial state, notably when they were previously incubated in wastewater microcosm.

  15. Serologic responses to somatic O and colonization-factor antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in travelers.

    PubMed

    Deetz, T R; Evans, D J; Evans, D G; DuPont, H L

    1979-07-01

    To improve the retrospective diagnoses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as a cause of travelers' diarrhea, as well as to determine the presence of colonization-factor antigens in these infections, a study of serologic responses to antigens of ETEC was done. Paired sera from 60 United States students in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, were analyzed for rises in titer of antibody to heat-labile toxin, eight somatic antigen O serogroups associated with ETEC, and two colonization-factor antigens, CFA/I and CFA/II. Only 9% had a response to O antigens, while 20% had responses to the colonization-factor antigens. Response to the colonization-factor antigens correlated significantly with response to the heat-labile toxin and with culture evidence of ETEC infection. Serologic studies confirmed that colonization-factor antigen has a role in naturally acquired cases of travelers' diarrhea and that it can be used as an additional determinant of infection with ETEC.

  16. Methionine deficiency reduces autophagy and accelerates death in intestinal epithelial cells infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Li, Fengna; Ren, Wenkai; Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2015-10-01

    Infections by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) result in large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Dietary supplementation with amino acids has been considered as a potential mechanism to improve host defenses against infection. The goal of this study was to determine whether methionine deprivation alters ETEC interactions with porcine intestinal epithelial cells. IPEC-1 cells were cultured in media with or without L-methionine. Methionine deprivation resulted in enhanced ETEC adhesion and increased both the cytotoxicity and apoptotic responses of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. Methionine deprivation inhibited IPEC-1 cell autophagic responses, suggesting that the increased cytotoxicity of ETEC to methionine-deprived IPEC-1 cells might be due to defects in autophagy.

  17. Immune response in diarrheal patients and asymptomatic carrier with CS6-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Puiprom, Orapim; Chantaroj, Siriporn; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Tooru

    2012-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the major causes of diarrhea in children and travelers in developing countries. ETEC colonization factors (CFs) are virulence determinants considered as protective antigens and major targets for vaccine development against ETEC infections. One of the most prevalent CFs, coli surface antigen 6 (CS6), a non-fimbrial polymeric protein consisting of two major subunits, CssA and CssB, is produced by approximately 25-35% of ETEC worldwide. We could isolate only CS6-producing ETEC strains from two diarrheal patients and one asymptomatic carrier, but we could not detect CssA- or CssB-specific antibodies in the feces and blood of two patients convalescing from natural ETEC infection and of an asymptomatic carrier using western blotting. Therefore, in order to protect against infection with CS6-producing ETEC, protective levels of CS6 immunity should be incorporated in any future vaccines against ETEC.

  18. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Bromelain protects piglets from diarrhoea caused by oral challenge with K88 positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, D; Mynott, T

    1998-01-01

    Background—K88 positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88+ ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhoea in young piglets. K88+ ETEC pathogenesis relies on attachment to specific glycoprotein receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. Proteolytic treatment of these receptors in vitro and in vivo prevents attachment of K88+ ETEC to piglet small intestines and may be of clinical use to prevent K88+ ETEC pathogenesis. 
Aims—To determine whether bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, would protect piglets against K88+ ETEC diarrhoea and to confirm and extend earlier findings on the effects of bromelain on K88+ ETEC receptors in vivo. 
Methods—Bromelain (0, 12.5, or 125 mg) was orally administered to just weaned piglets for 10 days. One day following commencement of bromelain treatment, piglets were challenged with K88+ ETEC (5 × 1010 K88ac:0149) for seven days. Intestinal contents from unchallenged piglets were obtained via an intestinal fistula, and tested for their ability to bind K88+ ETEC before and after bromelain treatment. 
Results—Both doses of bromelain were successful in reducing the incidence of K88+ ETEC diarrhoea and protected piglets from life threatening disease. Bromelain treated pigs also had significantly increased weight gain compared with untreated pigs. Bromelain only temporarily inhibited K88+ ETEC receptor activity, with receptor activity being regenerated 30 hours following treatment, consistent with the regeneration of new enterocytes. 
Conclusion—Results show that bromelain can temporarily inactivate ETEC receptors in vivo and protect against ETEC induced diarrhoea. Bromelain may therefore be an effective prophylaxis against ETEC infection. 

 Keywords: enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli; K88 ETEC; ETEC receptors; diarrhoea; bromelain PMID:10189844

  20. Structure of the CFA/III major pilin subunit CofA from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli determined at 0.90 Å resolution by sulfur-SAD phasing.

    PubMed

    Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Kawahara, Kazuki; Nakamura, Shota; Iwashita, Takaki; Baba, Seiki; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Tooru; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2012-10-01

    CofA, a major pilin subunit of colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III), forms pili that mediate small-intestinal colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). In this study, the crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated version of CofA was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing using five sulfurs in the protein. Given the counterbalance between anomalous signal strength and the undesired X-ray absorption of the solvent, diffraction data were collected at 1.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These data were sufficient to elucidate the sulfur substructure at 1.38 Å resolution. The low solvent content (29%) of the crystal necessitated that density modification be performed with an additional 0.9 Å resolution data set to reduce the phase error caused by the small sulfur anomalous signal. The CofA structure showed the αβ-fold typical of type IVb pilins and showed high structural homology to that of TcpA for toxin-coregulated pili of Vibrio cholerae, including spatial distribution of key residues critical for pilin self-assembly. A pilus-filament model of CofA was built by computational docking and molecular-dynamics simulation using the previously reported filament model of TcpA as a structural template. This model revealed that the CofA filament surface was highly negatively charged and that a 23-residue-long loop between the α1 and α2 helices filled the gap between the pilin subunits. These characteristics could provide a unique binding epitope for the CFA/III pili of ETEC compared with other type IVb pili.

  1. A new method for the extraction and purification of K99 pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and their characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, K; Pyliotis, N A; Mukkur, T K

    1982-01-01

    It was found that K99 pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (of bovine origin) could be extracted by treatment with 3M-KSCN solution. The K99 pili were purified by preparative isoelectric focusing to apparent homogeneity as judged by the presence of a single band on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis; the molecular weight of this component was calculated to be 12 600 +/- 300. This indicated that the K99 pili were composed of a single subunit. On analytical ultracentrifugation, a single boundary with an s20,w of 12.2 S at a concentration of 0.42 mg/ml was observed. The average length of purified pili at zero concentration was approx. 160 nm and the diameter was 7.4 +/- 0.6 nm. Amino acid analysis of the purified K99 pili revealed that sulphur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine, were absent. Aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine, previously reported to be absent [Isaacson (1977) Infect. Immun. 15. 272-279], constituted 7.14% of the total amino acid residues present. On immunoelectrophoresis, purified K99 pili migrated towards the cathode and caused mannose-resistant haemagglutination of horse, but not of sheep or guinea-pig, red blood cells. Pili from enterotoxigenic E. coli of porcine and human origin and from another bacterial species, namely Fusiformis nodosus, could also be extracted by the treatment of respective micro-organisms with 3 M-KSCN. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:6124240

  2. Factors Affecting Release of Heat-Labile Enterotoxin by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Steven L.; Robertson, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Various conditions affecting the release of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli have been examined. The pH of a defined medium containing three amino acids, M-9 salts, and 0.5% glucose decreased to less than 7.0 in early log phase of growth, and no extracellular LT was detected. Adjustment of the pH at 8 h from 6.0 to 8.0 resulted in a concomitant increase in LT activity in culture supernatants. The release of cell-associated LT was significantly reduced by preincubation with protease inhibitors and increased by preincubation with trypsin. Cell-associated LT was not released by pH adjustment of cells grown at 21°C; however, polymyxin B treatment released a toxin species active in only the pigeon erythrocyte lysate (PEL) assay system. As the growth temperature was increased, polymyxin B released toxin species which exhibited both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell activity. Polymyxin B extracts of enterotoxigenic E. coli in early log phase grown at 37°C possessed only PEL activity, whereas extracts from cells in late-log and stationary phases had biological activity in both assay systems. Also, LT released by pH adjustment from mid-log to stationary phase was active in both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assays. Gel electrophoresis of polymyxin B extracts revealed at least three molecular weight species active in either the PEL (22,000 daltons and 30,000 daltons) or both the PEL and the Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assay (72,000 daltons), depending on the growth temperature. These observations may help to explain the chemical and biological heterogeneity of most LT preparations and facilitate purification of LT by increasing the yield of enterotoxin. PMID:37162

  3. Development of vaccines against cholera and diarrhoea due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    This Memorandum summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology of cholera and diarrhoea due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and outlines the results of recent research to develop an effective oral vaccine against cholera. The meeting reviewed current research on the protective antigens of ETEC and made a number of recommendations with the aim of stimulating further efforts towards the development of vaccines against disease caused by ETEC. PMID:2203550

  4. Molecular Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Diarrheal Patients in Korea during 2003–2011

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Su-Mi; Cho, Seung-Hak

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the major causes of infectious diarrhea in developing countries. In order to characterize the molecular features of human ETEC isolates from Korea, we investigated the profiles of enterotoxin and colonization factor (CF) genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with a total of 291 ETEC strains. The specimens comprised 258 domestic strains isolated from patients who had diarrhea and were from widely separated geographic regions in Korea and 33 inflow strains isolated from travelers visiting other Asian countries. Heat-stable toxin (STh)-possessing ETEC strains were more frequent than heat-labile toxin (LT)-possessing ETEC strains in the domestic isolates, while the detection rates of both enterotoxin genes were similar in the inflow isolates. The profile of CF genes of domestic isolates was similar to that of inflow isolates and the major CF types of the strains were CS3-CS21-CS1/PCF071 and CS2-CS3-CS21. Most of these 2 CF types were detected in ETEC strains that possess both lt and sth genes. The major MLSTST types of domestic isolates were ST171 and ST955. Moreover, the 2 major CF types were usually found concomitantly with the 2 major MLST STs, ST171 and ST955. In conclusion, our genotyping results may provide useful information for guiding the development of geographically specific vaccines against human ETEC isolates. PMID:24841334

  5. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of Escherichia coli isolates carrying virulence factors of both enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Michalski, Jane; Luo, Qingwei; Shetty, Amol C; Daugherty, Sean C; Fleckenstein, James M; Rasko, David A

    2017-06-14

    Escherichia coli that are capable of causing human disease are often classified into pathogenic variants (pathovars) based on their virulence gene content. However, disease-associated hybrid E. coli, containing unique combinations of multiple canonical virulence factors have also been described. Such was the case of the E. coli O104:H4 outbreak in 2011, which caused significant morbidity and mortality. Among the pathovars of diarrheagenic E. coli that cause significant human disease are the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the current study we use comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and functional studies to characterize isolates that contain virulence factors of both EPEC and ETEC. Based on phylogenomic analysis, these hybrid isolates are more genomically-related to EPEC, but appear to have acquired ETEC virulence genes. Global transcriptional analysis using RNA sequencing, demonstrated that the EPEC and ETEC virulence genes of these hybrid isolates were differentially-expressed under virulence-inducing laboratory conditions, similar to reference isolates. Immunoblot assays further verified that the virulence gene products were produced and that the T3SS effector EspB of EPEC, and heat-labile toxin of ETEC were secreted. These findings document the existence and virulence potential of an E. coli pathovar hybrid that blurs the distinction between E. coli pathovars.

  6. A biomarker for the identification of swine fecal pollution in water, using the STII toxin gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khatib, L A; Tsai, Y L; Olson, B H

    2003-12-01

    This research developed a PCR method to identify swine fecal pollution in water, using a portion of the STII toxin gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli as the target sequence. This method showed the gene to have a wide-spread geographical distribution and temporal stability; and the primers demonstrated high specificity, sensitivity, and reliability. A total of 110 DNA extracts from different animal fecal and human sewage samples were screened using the primers and no positives resulted. Centrifugation and filtration methods for concentrating E. coli seeded into stream, ocean, secondary effluent, and dairy lagoon waters resulted in detection limits at the femtogram and attogram levels. E. coli with the biomarker seeded into stream, ocean, and secondary effluent waters remained stable for approximately 2 weeks for all water types. Of the farm lagoon and waste samples tested, 94% were positive for the STII trait, regardless of the number of E. coli screened and 100% were positive when > or =35 E. coli isolates were screened. As the PCR product of the target sequence yielded a single band, the method is applicable to dot blot detection methodology, yielding great accuracy in determining the presence of swine fecal sources.

  7. A biomarker for the identification of cattle fecal pollution in water using the LTIIa toxin gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khatib, L A; Tsai, Y L; Olson, B H

    2002-06-01

    This research describes a method based on PCR to identify cattle fecal pollution in water using a portion of the heat labile toxin IIA (LTIIa) gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). We describe the development of the primers and target. DNA extracts (221) from different animal fecal and human sewage samples were screened and showed no cross-reactivity. Minimum detection limits using centrifugation and filtration methods to concentrate E. coli seeded into stream, ocean, and secondary effluent waters were found to be at femtogram and attogram levels, respectively. Stability of the biomarker in stream, ocean, and secondary effluent waters was 2-4 weeks for all water types. Finally, 33 farm lagoon and waste samples were collected and 31 tested to validate the method; 93% were positive for the LTIIa trait when >1,000 E. coli were screened and 100% positive when >10(5) E. coli were screened. Prevalence of the toxin gene in the E. coli population affected the outcome of the analyses. The cow biomarker can be used in watershed studies to identify cattle waste with great accuracy if the appropriate numbers of E. coli are screened.

  8. Phylogenetic background of enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli from patients with diarrhea in Sirjan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinzadeh, Taifeh; Ghanbarpour, Reza; Rokhbakhsh-Zamin, Farokh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains are a major cause of intestinal syndromes in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) in relation to phylogenetic background from patients with diarrhea. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 E. coli isolates were obtained from diarrhea patients in Sirjan, southeast of Iran. The E. coli isolates were confirmed using biochemical and bacteriological tests. DNA of E. coli isolates was extracted by boiling method and checked for existence of ETEC (LT and ST genes) and EIEC (ipaH gene) pathotypes and also characterize the phylogenetic groups on the basis of presence or absence of the chuA, yjaA genes and an anonymous DNA fragment, TspE4. C2 by multiplex PCR. Results: Out of 110 E. coli isolates, 32 (29.09%) were positive for ETEC (LT and ST genes) and 6 (5.45%) possessed EIEC (ipaH gene) pathotypes. Isolates fall into four phylogenetic groups: A (39.09%), B1 (20%), B2 (15.45%) and D (25.45%). Phylotyping of isolates of DEC indicated they were distributed in four phylogenetic groups including A (12 isolates), B1 (7), B2 (9) and D (10). Conclusion: In this study, the DEC isolates were segregated into different phylogenetic groups. The majority of isolates belonged to phylo-groups A and D. PMID:27928486

  9. Distribution of Enteroinvasive and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Across Space and Time in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Darlene; Bayas, Rosa de los Ángeles; Lopez, Velma K; Zhang, Lixin; Trueba, Gabriel; Foxman, Betsy; Marrs, Carl; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2016-02-01

    Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). At its peak, the regional prevalence of EIEC was 8.3 infections/100 persons but this decreased to 1 infection/1,000 persons. The regional prevalence of ETEC ranged from 8 infections/1,000 persons to 3.7 infections/100 persons. The prevalence pattern of EIEC resembled that of a large epidemic whereas the prevalence of ETEC was more stable over time. Here, we provide community-based evidence for temporal shifts in the dominant E. coli pathotype from EIEC to ETEC over a multi-year time period. Furthermore, genotype analysis suggests that a given strain of EIEC and ETEC can persist in this region for long periods, up to 24 and 55 months, respectively.

  10. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA–mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases. PMID:28138329

  11. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Julio A.; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C.; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types. PMID:24877071

  12. Distribution of Enteroinvasive and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli across Space and Time in Northwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Bhavnani, Darlene; de los Ángeles Bayas, Rosa; Lopez, Velma K.; Zhang, Lixin; Trueba, Gabriel; Foxman, Betsy; Marrs, Carl; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). At its peak, the regional prevalence of EIEC was 8.3 infections/100 persons but this decreased to 1 infection/1,000 persons. The regional prevalence of ETEC ranged from 8 infections/1,000 persons to 3.7 infections/100 persons. The prevalence pattern of EIEC resembled that of a large epidemic whereas the prevalence of ETEC was more stable over time. Here, we provide community-based evidence for temporal shifts in the dominant E. coli pathotype from EIEC to ETEC over a multi-year time period. Furthermore, genotype analysis suggests that a given strain of EIEC and ETEC can persist in this region for long periods, up to 24 and 55 months, respectively. PMID:26643532

  13. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA-mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases.

  14. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  16. Flagella mediate attachment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to fresh salad leaves.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Robert K; Berger, Cedric N; Pallen, Mark J; Sjöling, Asa; Frankel, Gad

    2011-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes child and travelers' diarrhea and is presumed to be water- and food-borne. Sporadic outbreaks were traced to consumption of contaminated fresh produce, particularly salad leaves as lettuce and parsley. Importantly, the mechanism by which ETEC binds salad leaves is not known. In this study we investigated the ability of clinical ETEC isolates to adhere to Eruca vesicaria (commonly known as rocket). Towards this end we inoculated pieces of cut E. vesicaria leaves with clinical ETEC isolates grown in Luria broth at 20°C, conditions that are not permissive for expression of the plasmid-encoded colonization factors and hence mimic the actual transmission pathways of ETEC through intake of contaminated food. We found that ETEC strains bind E. vesicaria at various efficiencies. Examination of representative strains by scanning electron microscopy revealed that they adhere to the E. vesicaria surface in a diffuse pattern by extended filaments resembling flagella. Using the prototype ETEC strain H10407 we found that it also binds to lettuce, basil and spinach leaves. Binding of H10407 was dependent on flagella as a fliC mutant attached to leaves at a much lower efficiency. Interestingly, under the employed environmental conditions EtpA, which forms a flagellar tip structure, and colonization factor I are dispensable for leaf attachment. The results show that ETEC can bind specifically to salad leaves, which might represent an important, yet less recognized, source of infection. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Chitosan Modulates Inflammatory Responses in Rats Infected with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of dietary chitosan (COS) on gastrointestinal pathogen resistance in mice model. For two weeks, a control group of ICR mice received a basal diet whilst the intervention group received the basal diet supplemented with 300 mg/kg COS. After two weeks, the mice fed the supplemented diet had a lower body weight. Then enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) was administered to the mice through oral gavage, with each mouse receiving 108 CFU. At day 7 after infection, the bacterial load in the jejunum and faeces was significantly lower in the COS group than that in the control group. Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly lower in the group of mice receiving the COS diet; also the jejunal production of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) was suppressed in the COS group. These results indicate the intervention influenced inflammation and controlled E. coli infection. PMID:28100936

  18. Adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains to neoglycans synthesised with prebiotic galactooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Armenta-Ruiz, Carolina; Sarabia-Sainz, Jose Andre-i; Guzmán-Partida, Ana María; Ledesma-Osuna, Ana Irene; Vázquez-Moreno, Luz; Ramos-Clamont Montfort, Gabriela

    2013-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic (ETEC) Escherichia coli (E. coli) causes traveller's diarrhoea and high mortality among baby animals. ETEC adhesion is mediated by lectins (adhesins) that bind to glycoconjugates on the surface of host cells. Glycans that compete for adhesion could be used for disease prevention. Neoglycans of porcine albumin (PSA) that were conjugated with prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) were synthesised using the Maillard reaction. PSA glycation was confirmed by a reduction in the number of available free amino groups, decreased tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence, increased molecular mass and Ricinus communis lectin recognition. The adhesion of four ETEC strains (E. coli H10407, CFA(+), K99 and K88) to PSA-GOS was examined by an enzyme-linked lectin assay. E. coli K88 bound to PSA-GOS with greater affinity (P<0.05) than did E. coli H10407, CFA(+) and K99. In addition, PSA-GOS partially inhibited the adherence of the K88 strain to intestinal mucins. Pig ETEC strain was unable to ferment galactooligosaccharide-neoglycans. These results suggest that neoglycans obtained by the Maillard reaction may serve in the prophylaxis of ETEC K88 diarrhoea.

  19. Multi-drug-resistant enterotoxigenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from children with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zeighami, Habib; Haghi, Fakhri; Hajiahmadi, Fahimeh; Kashefiyeh, Mehdi; Memariani, Mojtaba

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug-resistant (MDR) diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) has rapidly spread worldwide and represents the most serious threat to the management of diarrhea in developing countries. During the period from March 2011 to January 2012, a total of 450 stool samples of diarrheal children aged 0-60 months were studied. In order to detect enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) simultaneously, a mixture of four primer pairs specific for eltB, estA, vt1, and vt2 genes was used in a multiplex PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed as the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. A total of 140 (31·1%) DEC were isolated from 450 stool samples. Diarrheagenic E. coli exhibited high-level resistance to aztreonam (80·7%), amoxicillin (74·4%), and tetracycline (69·3%). Also, 86·4% of E. coli isolates were resistant to at least three different classes of antimicrobial agents and considered as MDR. The frequency of ETEC and EHEC pathotypes was 46·4 and 12·1%, respectively and all of these isolates were MDR. In conclusion, MDR ETEC continues to be an important agent associated with diarrhea in children from Tabriz, Iran.

  20. An assessment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella vaccine candidates for infants and children.

    PubMed

    Walker, Richard I

    2015-02-18

    Despite improvements to water quality, sanitation, and the implementation of current prevention and treatment interventions, diarrhea remains a major cause of illness and death, especially among children less than five years of age in the developing world. Rotavirus vaccines have already begun making a real impact on diarrhea, but several more enteric vaccines will be necessary to achieve broader reductions of illness and death. Among the many causes of diarrheal disease, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shigella are the two most important bacterial pathogens for which there are no currently licensed vaccines. Vaccines against these two pathogens could greatly reduce the impact of disease caused by these infections. This review describes the approaches to ETEC and Shigella vaccines that are currently under development, including a range of both cellular and subunit approaches for each pathogen. In addition, the review discusses strategies for maximizing the potential benefit of these vaccines, which includes the feasibility of co-administration, consolidation, and combination of vaccine candidates, as well as issues related to effective administration of enteric vaccines to infants. Recent impact studies indicate that ETEC and Shigella vaccines could significantly benefit global public health. Either vaccine, particularly if they could be combined together or with another enteric vaccine, would be an extremely valuable tool for saving lives and promoting the health of infants and children in the developing world, as well as potentially providing protection to travelers and military personnel visiting endemic areas.

  1. Transcriptional Modulation of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Virulence Genes in Response to Epithelial Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita; Rasko, David A.; Sahl, Jason W.; Munson, George P.; Roy, Koushik; Luo, Qingwei; Sheikh, Alaullah; Kuhne, Kurt J.

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to diarrheal illness in developing countries. There is currently no effective vaccine against these important pathogens. Because genes modulated by pathogen-host interactions potentially encode putative vaccine targets, we investigated changes in gene expression and surface morphology of ETEC upon interaction with intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Pan-genome microarrays, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), and transcriptional reporter fusions of selected promoters were used to study changes in ETEC transcriptomes. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate alterations in surface antigen expression and morphology following pathogen-host interactions. Following host cell contact, genes for motility, adhesion, toxin production, immunodominant peptides, and key regulatory molecules, including cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) and c-di-GMP, were substantially modulated. These changes were accompanied by visible changes in both ETEC architecture and the expression of surface antigens, including a novel highly conserved adhesin molecule, EaeH. The studies reported here suggest that pathogen-host interactions are finely orchestrated by ETEC and are characterized by coordinated responses involving the sequential deployment of multiple virulence molecules. Elucidation of the molecular details of these interactions could highlight novel strategies for development of vaccines for these important pathogens. PMID:23115039

  2. Overcoming Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Pathogen Diversity: Translational Molecular Approaches to Inform Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M.; Rasko, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a genetically diverse E. coli pathovar that share in the ability to produce heat-labile toxin and/or heat-stable toxins. While these pathogens contribute substantially to the burden of diarrheal illness in developing countries, at present, there is no suitable broadly protective vaccine to prevent these common infections. Most vaccine development attempts to date have followed a classical approach involving a relatively small group of antigens. The extraordinary underlying genetic plasticity of E. coli has confounded the antigen valency requirements based on this approach. The recent discovery of additional virulence proteins within this group of pathogens, as well as the availability of whole-genome sequences from hundreds of ETEC strains to facilitate identification of conserved molecules, now permits a reconsideration of the classical approaches, and the exploration of novel antigenic targets to complement existing strategies overcoming antigenic diversity that has impeded progress toward a broadly protective vaccine. Progress to date in antigen discovery and methods currently available to explore novel immunogens are outlined here. PMID:27076141

  3. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with synthetic alkaline phosphatase-conjugated oligonucleotide DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Seriwatana, J; Echeverria, P; Taylor, D N; Sakuldaipeara, T; Changchawalit, S; Chivoratanond, O

    1987-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase-conjugated (AP) 26-base oligonucleotide DNA probes were compared with the same probes labeled with gamma-32P for the identification of heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The AP oligonucleotide probes were as sensitive as the radiolabeled (RL) probes in detecting LT and STA-2 target cell DNA, but the AP ST probe, which differed from STA-1 by two bases, was less sensitive than the RL probe in detecting STA-1 DNA (6.25 versus 0.78 ng). Of 94 ETEC that were identified with the RL probe, the AP probes detected 93% (28 of 30) of ST, 73% (25 of 34) of LT, and 67% (20 of 30) of LTST ETEC. When colony lysates of these ETEC were examined, the AP probes identified all 94 ETEC. In examinations of stool blots, the RL and AP probes were shown to have sensitivities of 71 and 59%, specificities of 91 and 86%, positive predictive values of 87 and 73%, and negative predictive values of 86 and 74%, respectively. AP oligonucleotide probes to detect ETEC were less sensitive in detecting ETEC by colony or stool blot hybridization than the RL probes but could be used by laboratories without access to radioisotopes to examine colony lysates. Images PMID:3305559

  4. Traveler's diarrhea at sea: three outbreaks of waterborne enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on cruise ships.

    PubMed

    Daniels, N A; Neimann, J; Karpati, A; Parashar, U D; Greene, K D; Wells, J G; Srivastava, A; Tauxe, R V; Mintz, E D; Quick, R

    2000-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has become the leading bacterial cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks on cruise ships. Investigation of recent outbreaks of ETEC gastroenteritis on 3 cruise ships indicated that all were associated with consuming beverages with ice cubes on board the ship (relative risk [RR], 1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.9, P=.02; RR, 1.9, 95% CI, 1.3-2. 9, P<.001; and RR, 1.3, 95% CI, 1.0-1.6, P<.01), and 2 were associated with drinking unbottled water (RR, 2.7, 95% CI, 1.8-4.1, P<.001; RR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.3-2.3, P<.001). Multiple ETEC serotypes were detected in patients' stool specimens in each of the 3 outbreaks, and 12 (38%) of 32 isolates were resistant to > or =3 antimicrobial agents. ETEC appears to be emerging as a waterborne pathogen on cruise ships. Water bunkered in overseas ports was the likely source of ETEC infection in these outbreaks. To ensure passenger safety, cruise ships that take on water in foreign ports must ensure that water treatment and monitoring systems function properly.

  5. Evaluation of antisera used for detecting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Sao Paulo.

    PubMed Central

    Guth, B E; Trabulsi, L R

    1985-01-01

    The usefulness of antisera in detecting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains in Sao Paulo was evaluated. Polyvalent antisera detected 49% of ETEC isolates and were more effective in identifying E. coli that produced heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and in strains that produced only heat-stable enterotoxin. ETEC strains not detected by the antisera belonged to different serogroups not isolated in Sao Paulo before; 34% of these strains had undetermined O antigens, and most of them produced only heat-labile toxin. A variation of serogroups over time was especially observed among strains that produced heat-stable toxin. The importance of H-antigen determinations in the effectiveness of ETEC diagnosis by serological methods became evident, as non-ETEC strains were also detected by polyvalent antisera, but their serotypes were different from those of ETEC strains. Although antisera can be used to identify O:H types of ETEC strains with accuracy, serotyping cannot be recommended for routine diagnosis. However, such a procedure may be useful for studying outbreaks of ETEC diarrhea if the involved serotypes are already known. PMID:3908475

  6. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC): a recurring decimal in infants' and travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Okoh, Anthony I; Osode, Augustina N

    2008-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea in infants and in travelers from developed to underdeveloped countries, especially in regions of poor sanitation. The ETEC are acquired by the ingestion of contaminated food and water, and adults living in endemic areas develop immunity. The disease condition manifests as a minor discomfort to a severe cholera-like syndrome and requires colonization by the microorganism and the elaboration of one or more enterotoxins. The ETEC attach to the epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract and release substances that affect the normal functioning of the tract, thereby resulting in diarrhea, and subsequently millions of deaths everyday, particularly in children. The prevention of the spread of this strain of diarrheagenic E. coli depends on ensuring appropriate sanitary measures; hand-washing and proper preparation of food; chlorination of water supplies; and appropriate sewage treatment and disposal. Parenteral or oral fluid and electrolyte replacement is used to prevent dehydration, and broad-spectrum antibiotics are used in chronic or life-threatening cases, but in most cases, should be avoided because of severe side effects.

  7. Overcoming Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Pathogen Diversity: Translational Molecular Approaches to Inform Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James M; Rasko, David A

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a genetically diverse E. coli pathovar that share in the ability to produce heat-labile toxin and/or heat-stable toxins. While these pathogens contribute substantially to the burden of diarrheal illness in developing countries, at present, there is no suitable broadly protective vaccine to prevent these common infections. Most vaccine development attempts to date have followed a classical approach involving a relatively small group of antigens. The extraordinary underlying genetic plasticity of E. coli has confounded the antigen valency requirements based on this approach. The recent discovery of additional virulence proteins within this group of pathogens, as well as the availability of whole-genome sequences from hundreds of ETEC strains to facilitate identification of conserved molecules, now permits a reconsideration of the classical approaches, and the exploration of novel antigenic targets to complement existing strategies overcoming antigenic diversity that has impeded progress toward a broadly protective vaccine. Progress to date in antigen discovery and methods currently available to explore novel immunogens are outlined here.

  8. Cloned polynucleotide and synthetic oligonucleotide probes used in colony hybridization are equally efficient in the identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerfelt, H.; Kalland, K.H.; Raj, P.; Moseley, S.L.; Bhan, M.K.; Bjorvatn, B.

    1988-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease-generated polynucleotide and synthetically produced oligonucleotide gene probes used in colony hybridization assays proved to be efficient for the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. To compare their relative efficiencies, these two sets of probes were radiolabeled with /sup 32/P and were applied to 74 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles and to 156 previously unexamined E. coli isolates. The enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1, Vibrio cholerae non-O1 (NAG), Yersinia enterocolitica, and E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were examined for further evaluation of probe specificity. The two classes of probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In the analysis of six strains, the signal strength on autoradiography after hybridization with oligonucleotides was weaker than that obtained after hybridization with polynucleotide probes. The probes did not hybridize with DNA from V. cholerae O1, V. cholerae non-O1 (NAG), or Y. enterocolitica. The strains of E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were, likewise, negative in the hybridization assays.

  9. Structural insight in the inhibition of adherence of F4 fimbriae producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by llama single domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; Okello, Emmanuel; Pardon, Els; De Kerpel, Maia; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-02-24

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that cause neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets express F4 fimbriae to mediate attachment towards host receptors. Recently we described how llama single domain antibodies (VHHs) fused to IgA, produced in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and fed to piglets resulted in a progressive decline in shedding of F4 positive ETEC bacteria. Here we present the structures of these inhibiting VHHs in complex with the major adhesive subunit FaeG. A conserved surface, distant from the lactose binding pocket, is targeted by these VHHs, highlighting the possibility of targeting epitopes on single-domain adhesins that are non-involved in receptor binding.

  10. Bioactive Immune Components of Anti-Diarrheagenic Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum Products.

    PubMed

    Sears, Khandra T; Tennant, Sharon M; Reymann, Mardi K; Simon, Raphael; Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Blackwelder, William C; Barry, Eileen M; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2017-08-01

    Diarrhea is a common illness among travelers to resource-limited countries, the most prevalent attributable agent being enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). At this time, there are no vaccines licensed specifically for the prevention of ETEC-induced traveler's diarrhea (TD), and this has propelled investigation of alternative preventive methods. Colostrum, the first milk expressed after birthing, is rich in immunoglobulins and innate immune components for protection of newborns against infectious agents. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC) produced by immunization of cows during gestation (and containing high levels of specific antibodies) is a practical and effective prophylactic tool against gastrointestinal illnesses. A commercial HBC product, Travelan, is available for prevention of ETEC-induced diarrhea. Despite its demonstrated clinical efficacy, the underlying immune components and antimicrobial activity that contribute to protection remain undefined. We investigated innate and adaptive immune components of several commercial HBC products formulated to reduce the risk of ETEC-induced diarrhea, including Travelan and IMM-124E, a newer product that has broader gastrointestinal health benefits. The immune components measured included total and ETEC-specific IgG, total IgA, cytokines, growth factors, and lactoferrin. HBC products contained high levels of IgG specific for multiple ETEC antigens, including O-polysaccharide 78 and colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) present in the administered vaccines. Antimicrobial activity was measured in vitro using novel functional assays. HBC greatly reduced ETEC motility in soft agar and exhibited bactericidal activity in the presence of complement. We have identified immune components and antimicrobial activity potentially involved in the prevention of ETEC infection by HBC in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Sears et al.

  11. [Cloning, expression and activity of K99 fimbrial operon gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hou, Huayan; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2012-12-04

    To clone and express fan operon gene clusters of K99 fimbriae in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in vitro, and study the activity of the recombinant E. coli expressing K99 fimbriae. K99 fimbriae gene clusters were amplified by long-PCR method, using the genomic DNA of K99-fimbriae E. coli C8307 as the DNA template. The 5.7Kb PCR products were inserted into expressing vector pBR322 with restriction endonuclease, then positive clones were screened. The positive recombinant plasmid was transformed into non-fimbriae E. coli SE5000 strains, and pBR322 plasmid was also transformed into SE5000 for negative control strain. The recombination E. coli expressing K99 fimbriae was tested with agglutination assay, using monoclonal antibody serum and brush border vesicles from the piglet small intestinal epithelia cells. The expressed fimbriae on the surface of the recombinant E. coli SE5000 were observed by transmissible electromicroscope. Heat extraction method was employed to isolate and purify K99 fimbriae, which was exerted SDS-PAGE, and 18.5 kDa protein band was detected. The mouse sera produced from recombinant fimbriae was used to test K99-fimbriae strains C83907, C83914, C83260 with positive agglutination results, while negative results were found with E. coli contain other kinds of fimbriae. The assays of SDS-PAGE, Western blot, agglutination assay were used to evaluate antigenicity and biologic activity between C83907 and recombinant strain. Adhesion test with HeLa cell line demonstrated the recombinant strain and wild type have the similar adherence ability, and this adhesion can be inhibited with mouse serum containing polyclonal antibody against recombinant K99 fimbriae. This study has laid a good foundation for further study on bioactivity of K99.

  12. Phenotypic Profiles of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Associated with Early Childhood Diarrhea in Rural Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Hind I.; Khalil, Sami B.; Rao, Malla R.; Elyazeed, Remon Abu; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Peruski, Leonard F.; Putnam, Shannon; Navarro, Armando; Morsy, Badria Z.; Cravioto, Alejandro; Clemens, John D.; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes substantial diarrheal morbidity and mortality in young children in countries with limited resources. We determined the phenotypic profiles of 915 ETEC diarrheal isolates derived from Egyptian children under 3 years of age who participated in a 3-year population-based study. For each strain, we ascertained enterotoxin and colonization factor (CF) expression, the O:H serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Sixty-one percent of the strains expressed heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) only, 26% expressed heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) alone, and 12% expressed both toxins. The most common CF phenotypes were colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) (10%), coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) (9%), CS14 (6%), and CS1 plus CS3 (4%). Fifty-nine percent of the strains did not express any of the 12 CFs included in our test panel. Resistance of ETEC strains to ampicillin (63%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (52%), and tetracycline (43%) was common, while resistance to quinolone antibiotics was rarely detected. As for the distribution of observed serotypes, there was an unusually wide diversity of O antigens and H types represented among the 915 ETEC strains. The most commonly recognized composite ETEC phenotypes were ST CS14 O78:H18 (4%), ST (or LTST) CFA/I O128:H12 (3%), ST CS1+CS3 O6:H16 (2%), and ST CFA/I O153:H45 (1.5%). Temporal plots of diarrheal episodes associated with ETEC strains bearing common composite phenotypes were consistent with discrete community outbreaks either within a single or over successive warm seasons. These data suggest that a proportion of the disease that is endemic to young children in rural Egypt represents the confluence of small epidemics by clonally related ETEC strains that are transiently introduced or that persist in a community reservoir. PMID:15583286

  13. Age-specific colonization of porcine intestinal epithelium by 987P-piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, E A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal (less than 1-day-old), 3- and 7-day old, and older (3-week-old postweaning) pigs were challenged by intragastric inoculation with 987P-piliated (987P+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) 987. Neonatal pigs were colonized (i.e., there were greater than or equal to 10(8) CFU of test strain per 10-cm ileal segment) and developed diarrhea. Intestinal colonization and the incidence and severity of diarrhea were lower in 3- and 7-day old pigs than in neonates. Older pigs were not colonized and did not develop diarrhea following oral inoculation with five strains of 987P+ ETEC. Strain 987 (987P+) adhered in vitro to intestinal epithelial cell brush borders isolated from both neonatal (sensitive) and older (resistant) pigs. The in vivo growth and expression of 987P pilus by strain 987 in ligated ileal loops created in neonatal and older pigs were similar. The in vivo adherence of 987P+ ETEC to intestinal epithelium in ligated ileal loops in neonatal and older pigs was compared. In neonatal pigs, most of the bacteria were in layers associated with the villous epithelium. In older pigs, most of the bacteria were associated with mucus-like material in the intestinal lumen. We concluded that swine develop an innate resistance to 987P+ ETEC by 3 weeks of age. This resistance does not appear to be due to an absence of 987P-specific receptors in the intestines of the older pig or to an inability of 987P+ bacteria to grow and express pili in the older pig. We hypothesized that the resistance of older pigs to 987P-mediated disease is due to release of 987P-specific receptors into the intestinal lumen, where these receptors facilitate bacterial clearance rather than bacterial adherence to intestinal epithelium and colonization. Images PMID:2562837

  14. Biomechanical and Structural Features of CS2 Fimbriae of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Zakrisson, Johan; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, and infection of children in under-developed countries often leads to high mortality rates. Isolated ETEC expresses a plethora of colonization factors (fimbriae/pili), of which CFA/I and CFA/II, which are assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP), are among the most common. Fimbriae are filamentous structures whose shafts are primarily composed of helically arranged single pilin-protein subunits, with a unique biomechanical ability to unwind and rewind. A sustained ETEC infection, under adverse conditions of dynamic shear forces, is primarily attributed to this biomechanical feature of ETEC fimbriae. Recent understanding about the role of fimbriae as virulence factors points to an evolutionary adaptation of their structural and biomechanical features. In this work, we investigated the biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae from the CFA/II group. Homology modeling of its major structural subunit, CotA, reveals structural clues related to the niche in which they are expressed. Using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy, we found that CS2 fimbriae unwind at a constant force of 10 pN and have a corner velocity (i.e., the velocity at which the force required for unwinding rises exponentially with increased speed) of 1300 nm/s. The biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae assessed in this work classify them into a low-force unwinding group of fimbriae together with the CFA/I and CS20 fimbriae expressed by ETEC strains. The three fimbriae are expressed by ETEC, colonize in similar gut environments, and exhibit similar biophysical features, but differ in their biogenesis. Our observation suggests that the environment has a strong impact on the biophysical characteristics of fimbriae expressed by ETEC. PMID:26153701

  15. Biomechanical and structural features of CS2 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Zakrisson, Johan; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-07-07

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, and infection of children in under-developed countries often leads to high mortality rates. Isolated ETEC expresses a plethora of colonization factors (fimbriae/pili), of which CFA/I and CFA/II, which are assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP), are among the most common. Fimbriae are filamentous structures whose shafts are primarily composed of helically arranged single pilin-protein subunits, with a unique biomechanical ability to unwind and rewind. A sustained ETEC infection, under adverse conditions of dynamic shear forces, is primarily attributed to this biomechanical feature of ETEC fimbriae. Recent understanding about the role of fimbriae as virulence factors points to an evolutionary adaptation of their structural and biomechanical features. In this work, we investigated the biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae from the CFA/II group. Homology modeling of its major structural subunit, CotA, reveals structural clues related to the niche in which they are expressed. Using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy, we found that CS2 fimbriae unwind at a constant force of 10 pN and have a corner velocity (i.e., the velocity at which the force required for unwinding rises exponentially with increased speed) of 1300 nm/s. The biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae assessed in this work classify them into a low-force unwinding group of fimbriae together with the CFA/I and CS20 fimbriae expressed by ETEC strains. The three fimbriae are expressed by ETEC, colonize in similar gut environments, and exhibit similar biophysical features, but differ in their biogenesis. Our observation suggests that the environment has a strong impact on the biophysical characteristics of fimbriae expressed by ETEC. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Age-specific colonization of porcine intestinal epithelium by 987P-piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dean, E A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal (less than 1-day-old), 3- and 7-day old, and older (3-week-old postweaning) pigs were challenged by intragastric inoculation with 987P-piliated (987P+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) 987. Neonatal pigs were colonized (i.e., there were greater than or equal to 10(8) CFU of test strain per 10-cm ileal segment) and developed diarrhea. Intestinal colonization and the incidence and severity of diarrhea were lower in 3- and 7-day old pigs than in neonates. Older pigs were not colonized and did not develop diarrhea following oral inoculation with five strains of 987P+ ETEC. Strain 987 (987P+) adhered in vitro to intestinal epithelial cell brush borders isolated from both neonatal (sensitive) and older (resistant) pigs. The in vivo growth and expression of 987P pilus by strain 987 in ligated ileal loops created in neonatal and older pigs were similar. The in vivo adherence of 987P+ ETEC to intestinal epithelium in ligated ileal loops in neonatal and older pigs was compared. In neonatal pigs, most of the bacteria were in layers associated with the villous epithelium. In older pigs, most of the bacteria were associated with mucus-like material in the intestinal lumen. We concluded that swine develop an innate resistance to 987P+ ETEC by 3 weeks of age. This resistance does not appear to be due to an absence of 987P-specific receptors in the intestines of the older pig or to an inability of 987P+ bacteria to grow and express pili in the older pig. We hypothesized that the resistance of older pigs to 987P-mediated disease is due to release of 987P-specific receptors into the intestinal lumen, where these receptors facilitate bacterial clearance rather than bacterial adherence to intestinal epithelium and colonization.

  17. Orally fed seeds producing designer IgAs protect weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Vikram; Coddens, Annelies; De Buck, Sylvie; Millet, Sam; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Cox, Eric; De Greve, Henri; Depicker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Oral feed-based passive immunization can be a promising strategy to prolong maternal lactogenic immunity against postweaning infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-caused postweaning diarrhea in piglets is one such infection that may be prevented by oral passive immunization and might avert recurrent economic losses to the pig farming industry. As a proof of principle, we designed anti-ETEC antibodies by fusing variable domains of llama heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs) against ETEC to the Fc part of a porcine immunoglobulin (IgG or IgA) and expressed them in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. In this way, four VHH-IgG and four VHH-IgA antibodies were produced to levels of about 3% and 0.2% of seed weight, respectively. Cotransformation of VHH-IgA with the porcine joining chain and secretory component led to the production of light-chain devoid, assembled multivalent dimeric, and secretory IgA-like antibodies. In vitro analysis of all of the antibody-producing seed extracts showed inhibition of bacterial binding to porcine gut villous enterocytes. However, in the piglet feed-challenge experiment, only the piglets receiving feed containing the VHH-IgA–based antibodies (dose 20 mg/d per pig) were protected. Piglets receiving the VHH-IgA–based antibodies in the feed showed a progressive decline in shedding of bacteria, significantly lower immune responses corroborating reduced exposure to the ETEC pathogen, and a significantly higher weight gain compared with the piglets receiving VHH-IgG producing (dose 80 mg/d per pig) or wild-type seeds. These results stress the importance of the antibody format in oral passive immunization and encourage future expression of these antibodies in crop seeds. PMID:23801763

  18. The Structure of the CS1 Pilus of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Reveals Structural Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Ng, Dixon; Zong, ZuSheng; Li, Juliana; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a bacterial pathogen that causes diarrhea in children and travelers in developing countries. ETEC adheres to host epithelial cells in the small intestine via a variety of different pili. The CS1 pilus is a prototype for a family of related pili, including the CFA/I pili, present on ETEC and other Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These pili are assembled by an outer membrane usher protein that catalyzes subunit polymerization via donor strand complementation, in which the N terminus of each incoming pilin subunit fits into a hydrophobic groove in the terminal subunit, completing a β-sheet in the Ig fold. Here we determined a crystal structure of the CS1 major pilin subunit, CooA, to a 1.6-Å resolution. CooA is a globular protein with an Ig fold and is similar in structure to the CFA/I major pilin CfaB. We determined three distinct negative-stain electron microscopic reconstructions of the CS1 pilus and generated pseudoatomic-resolution pilus structures using the CooA crystal structure. CS1 pili adopt multiple structural states with differences in subunit orientations and packing. We propose that the structural perturbations are accommodated by flexibility in the N-terminal donor strand of CooA and by plasticity in interactions between exposed flexible loops on adjacent subunits. Our results suggest that CS1 and other pili of this class are extensible filaments that can be stretched in response to mechanical stress encountered during colonization. PMID:23175654

  19. Immunogenicity of a prototype enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesin vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sincock, Stephanie A; Hall, Eric R; Woods, Colleen M; O'Dowd, Aisling; Poole, Steven T; McVeigh, Annette L; Nunez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Miller, Milagros; Savarino, Stephen J

    2016-01-04

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers. Efforts to develop an ETEC vaccine have intensified in the past decade, and intestinal colonization factors (CFs) are somatic components of most investigational vaccines. CFA/I and related Class 5 fimbrial CFs feature a major stalk-forming subunit and a minor, antigenically conserved tip adhesin. We hypothesized that the tip adhesin is critical for stimulating antibodies that specifically inhibit ETEC attachment to the small intestine. To address this, we compared the capacity of donor strand complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, and CFA/I fimbriae to elicit anti-adhesive antibodies in mice, using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) as proxy for neutralization of intestinal adhesion. When given with genetically attenuated heat-labile enterotoxin LTR192G as adjuvant by intranasal (IN) or orogastric (OG) vaccination, dscCfaE exceeded CFA/I fimbriae in eliciting serum HAI titers and anti-CfaE antibody titers. Based on these findings, we vaccinated Aotus nancymaae nonhuman primates (NHP) with dscCfaE alone or admixed with one of two adjuvants, LTR192G and cholera toxin B-subunit, by IN and OG administration. Only IN vaccination with dscCfaE with either adjuvant elicited substantial serum HAI titers and IgA and IgG anti-adhesin responses, with the latter detectable a year after vaccination. In conclusion, we have shown that dscCfaE elicits robust HAI and anti-adhesin antibody responses in both mice and NHPs when given with adjuvant by IN vaccination, encouraging further evaluation of an ETEC adhesin-based vaccine approach.

  20. Genetically modified enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines induce mucosal immune responses without inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alexandra; Randall, Roger; Darsley, Michael; Choudhry, Naheed; Thomas, Nicola; Sanderson, Ian R; Croft, Nick M; Kelly, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of acute diarrhoea in children in the developing world, in travellers and in the military. Safe, effective vaccines could reduce morbidity and mortality. As immunity to ETEC is strain specific, the ability to create vaccines in vitro which express multiple antigens would be desirable. It was hypothesised that three genetically attenuated ETEC strains, one with a genetic addition, would be immunogenic and safe, and they were evaluated in the first licensed UK release of genetically modified oral vaccines. Methods Phase 1 studies of safety and immunogenicity were carried out at a Teaching Hospital in London. Varying oral doses of any of three oral vaccines, or placebo, were administered to volunteers of both sexes (n = 98). Peripheral blood responses were measured as serum antibodies (IgG or IgA) by ELISA, antibody‐secreting cell (ASC) responses by enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT), and antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) by ELISA. Mucosal antibody secretion was measured by ELISA for specific IgG and IgA in whole gut lavage fluids (WGLFs). Results Significant mucosal IgA responses were obtained to colonisation factors CFA/I, CS1, CS2 and CS3, both when naturally expressed and when genetically inserted. Dose–response relationships were most clearly evident in the mucosal IgA in WGLF. Vaccines were well tolerated and did not elicit interleukin (IL) 8 or IL6 secretion in WGLF. Conclusions Genetically modified ETEC vaccines are safe and induce significant mucosal IgA responses to important colonisation factors. Mucosal IgA responses were clearly seen in WGLF, which is useful for evaluating oral vaccines. PMID:17566016

  1. Zinc influences innate immune responses in children with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Shamsuzzaman, Sohel; Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Nasrin, Dilruba; Nahar, Setarun; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Al Tarique, Abdullah; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Qadri, Syed Saleheen; Chowdhury, Mohiul Islam; Saha, Amit; Larson, Charles P; Qadri, Firdausi

    2010-05-01

    Information is limited on the effect of zinc on immune responses in children with diarrhea due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the most common bacterial pathogen in children. We studied the immunological effect of zinc treatment (20 mg/d) and supplementation (10 mg/d) in children with diarrhea due to ETEC. A total of 148 children aged 6-24 mo were followed up for 9 mo after a 10-d zinc treatment (ZT; n = 74) or a 10-d zinc treatment plus 3-mo supplementation (ZT+S; n = 74), as well as 50 children with ETEC-induced diarrhea that were not treated with zinc (UT). Fifty control children (HC) of the same age group from the same location were also studied. Serum zinc concentrations were higher in both the ZT (P < 0.001) and ZT+S groups (P < 0.001) than in the UT group but did not differ from the HC group. We found higher serum complement C3 immediately after zinc administration in both ZT (P < 0.001) and ZT+S (P < 0.001) groups than in the UT group. Phagocytic activity in children in both ZT (P < 0.01) and ZT+S (P < 0.01) groups was greater than in the UT group. However, oxidative burst capacity was lower in zinc-receiving groups (ZT, P < 0.001 and ZT+S, P < 0.001) than in the UT group. The naïve:memory T cell ratio in both ZT (P < 0.05) and ZT+S (P < 0.01) groups was higher than in the UT group from d 2 to 15. Increased responses, including complement C3, phagocytic activity, and changes in T cell phenotypes, suggest that zinc administration enhances innate immunity against ETEC infection in children.

  2. Exopolysaccharides Synthesized by Lactobacillus reuteri Protect against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Woodward, Adrienne; Zijlstra, Ruurd T.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in piglets; ETEC cells colonize the intestinal mucosa with adhesins and deliver toxins that cause fluid loss. This study determined the antiadhesive properties of bacterial exopolysaccharides (reuteran and levan) and related glycans (dextran and inulin) in a small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) model. The SISP model used 10 jejunal segments from 5-week-old piglets. Five segments were infected with ETEC expressing K88 fimbriae (ETEC K88), while five segments were treated with saline. Every two segments (ETEC and non-ETEC infected) were infused with 65 ml of 10 g liter−1 of glycans or saline (control) for 8 h. High-resolution melting-curve (HRM) quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that E. coli is the dominant bacterium in infected segments, while other bacteria were predominant in noninfected segments. Infection by ETEC K88 was also verified by qPCR; gene copy numbers of K88 fimbriae and the heat-labile toxin (LT) in mucosal scrapings and outflow fluid of infected segments were significantly higher than those in noninfected segments. Genes coding for K88 fimbriae and LT were also detected in noninfected segments. LT amplicons from infected and noninfected segments were 99% identical over 481 bp, demonstrating the presence of autochthonous ETEC K88. All glycans reduced fluid loss caused by ETEC K88 infection. Reuteran tended (P = 0.06) to decrease ETEC K88 levels in mucosal scraping sample, as judged by qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that reuteran significantly (P = 0.012) decreased levels of adherent ETEC K88. Overall, reuteran may prevent piglet diarrhea by reducing adhesion of ETEC K88. PMID:25015886

  3. Multiplex real time PCR panels to identify fourteen colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Silapong, Sasikorn; Jeanwattanalert, Pimmada; Lertsehtakarn, Paphavee; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Swierczewski, Brett; Mason, Carl; McVeigh, Annette L; Savarino, Stephen J; Nshama, Rosemary; Mduma, Esto; Maro, Athanasia; Zhang, Jixian; Gratz, Jean; Houpt, Eric R

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood diarrhea in low income countries and in travelers to those areas. Inactivated enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) are leading vaccine candidates, therefore it is important to determine the prevailing CF types in different geographic locations and populations. Here we developed real time PCR (qPCR) assays for 14 colonization factors, including the common vaccine targets. These assays, along with three enterotoxin targets (STh, STp, and LT) were formulated into three 5-plex qPCR panels, and validated on 120 ETEC isolates and 74 E. coli colony pools. The overall sensitivity and specificity was 99% (199/202) and 99% (2497/2514), respectively, compared to the CF results obtained with conventional PCR. Amplicon sequencing of discrepant samples revealed that the qPCR was 100% accurate. qPCR panels were also performed on nucleic acid extracted from stool and compared to the results of the ETEC isolates or E. coli colony pools cultured from them. 95% (105/110) of the CF detections in the cultures were confirmed in the stool. Additionally, direct testing of stool yielded 30 more CF detections. Among 74 randomly selected E. coli colony pools with paired stool, at least one CF was detected in 63% (32/51) of the colony pools while at least one CF was detected in 78% (47/60) of the stool samples (P = NS). We conclude that these ETEC CF assays can be used on both cultures and stool samples to facilitate better understanding of CF distribution for ETEC epidemiology and vaccine development.

  4. Phenotypic profiles of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with early childhood diarrhea in rural Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Hind I; Khalil, Sami B; Rao, Malla R; Abu Elyazeed, Remon; Wierzba, Thomas F; Peruski, Leonard F; Putnam, Shannon; Navarro, Armando; Morsy, Badria Z; Cravioto, Alejandro; Clemens, John D; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Savarino, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes substantial diarrheal morbidity and mortality in young children in countries with limited resources. We determined the phenotypic profiles of 915 ETEC diarrheal isolates derived from Egyptian children under 3 years of age who participated in a 3-year population-based study. For each strain, we ascertained enterotoxin and colonization factor (CF) expression, the O:H serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Sixty-one percent of the strains expressed heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) only, 26% expressed heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) alone, and 12% expressed both toxins. The most common CF phenotypes were colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) (10%), coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) (9%), CS14 (6%), and CS1 plus CS3 (4%). Fifty-nine percent of the strains did not express any of the 12 CFs included in our test panel. Resistance of ETEC strains to ampicillin (63%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (52%), and tetracycline (43%) was common, while resistance to quinolone antibiotics was rarely detected. As for the distribution of observed serotypes, there was an unusually wide diversity of O antigens and H types represented among the 915 ETEC strains. The most commonly recognized composite ETEC phenotypes were ST CS14 O78:H18 (4%), ST (or LTST) CFA/I O128:H12 (3%), ST CS1+CS3 O6:H16 (2%), and ST CFA/I O153:H45 (1.5%). Temporal plots of diarrheal episodes associated with ETEC strains bearing common composite phenotypes were consistent with discrete community outbreaks either within a single or over successive warm seasons. These data suggest that a proportion of the disease that is endemic to young children in rural Egypt represents the confluence of small epidemics by clonally related ETEC strains that are transiently introduced or that persist in a community reservoir.

  5. Proteomic analysis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in neutral and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Karlsson, Roger; Kenny, Diarmuid; Karlsson, Anders; Sjöling, Åsa

    2017-01-07

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in children and travelers to endemic areas. Secretion of the heat labile AB5 toxin (LT) is induced by alkaline conditions. In this study, we determined the surface proteome of ETEC exposed to alkaline conditions (pH 9) as compared to neutral conditions (pH 7) using a LPI Hexalane FlowCell combined with quantitative proteomics. Relative quantitation with isobaric labeling (TMT) was used to compare peptide abundance and their corresponding proteins in multiple samples at MS/MS level. For protein identification and quantification samples were analyzed using either a 1D-LCMS or a 2D-LCMS approach. Strong up-regulation of the ATP synthase operon encoding F1Fo ATP synthase and down-regulation of proton pumping proteins NuoF, NuoG, Ndh and WrbA were detected among proteins involved in regulating the proton and electron transport under alkaline conditions. Reduced expression of proteins involved in osmotic stress was found at alkaline conditions while the Sec-dependent transport over the inner membrane and outer membrane protein proteins such as OmpA and the β-Barrel Assembly Machinery (BAM) complex were up-regulated. ETEC exposed to alkaline environments express a specific proteome profile characterized by up-regulation of membrane proteins and secretion of LT toxin. Alkaline microenvironments have been reported close to the intestinal epithelium and the alkaline proteome may hence represent a better view of ETEC during infection.

  6. Structural characterization of CFA/III and Longus type IVb pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Roos, Justin; Yuen, Alex S W; Pierce, Owen M; Craig, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    The type IV pili are helical filaments found on many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, with multiple diverse roles in pathogenesis, including microcolony formation, adhesion, and twitching motility. Many pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates express one of two type IV pili belonging to the type IVb subclass: CFA/III or Longus. Here we show a direct correlation between CFA/III expression and ETEC aggregation, suggesting that these pili, like the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), mediate microcolony formation. We report a 1.26-Å resolution crystal structure of CofA, the major pilin subunit from CFA/III. CofA is very similar in structure to V. cholerae TcpA but possesses a 10-amino-acid insertion that replaces part of the α2-helix with an irregular loop containing a 3(10)-helix. Homology modeling suggests a very similar structure for the Longus LngA pilin. A model for the CFA/III pilus filament was generated using the TCP electron microscopy reconstruction as a template. The unique 3(10)-helix insert fits perfectly within the gap between CofA globular domains. This insert, together with differences in surface-exposed residues, produces a filament that is smoother and more negatively charged than TCP. To explore the specificity of the type IV pilus assembly apparatus, CofA was expressed heterologously in V. cholerae by replacing the tcpA gene with that of cofA within the tcp operon. Although CofA was synthesized and processed by V. cholerae, no CFA/III filaments were detected, suggesting that the components of the type IVb pilus assembly system are highly specific to their pilin substrates.

  7. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin seroconversion in US travelers to Mexico.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Mohamed, Jamal A; Carlin, Lily G; Padda, Ranjit S; Paredes, Mercedes; Martinez-Sandoval, Jose Francisco; Villa, Nicolas A; Okhuysen, Pablo C

    2008-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common bacterial pathogen isolated from travelers suffering of diarrhea. Exposure to heat-labile toxin (LT) produces a high rate of seroconversion. However, the role of LT-producing ETEC (LT-ETEC) as a cause of diarrhea is controversial. We conducted a cohort study in US students traveling to Mexico to assess the ETEC-LT seroconversion rate after natural exposure. Participants provided a serum sample on arrival and departure and a stool sample when ill. ETEC-LT immunoglobulin G antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and LT-ETEC were detected by means of polymerase chain reaction done on fecal DNA. A total of 422 participants with a mean age of 34.5 years were followed a mean of 19.9 days; 304 were females (72.0%), and 319 (75.6%) traveled during the summer months. In total, 177 individuals (41.9%) developed travelers' diarrhea and 33.9% had LT-ETEC identified in their stools. Among individuals having an LT-ETEC strain, 74% seroconverted compared to 11% of those not having diarrhea (p < 0.0001). When analyzed with a logistic regression model, the odds of seroconversion were significantly reduced in participants not having LT-ETEC in their stool (odds ratio = 0.1, p < 0.0001) after adjusting for season, length of stay, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. In US young adults traveling to Mexico, ETEC-LT seroconversion reliably identifies individuals naturally exposed to ETEC and correlates with symptomatic illness, length and season of travel.

  8. Nonstarch polysaccharide hydrolysis products of soybean and canola meal protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in piglets.

    PubMed

    Kiarie, Elijah G; Slominski, Bogdan A; Krause, Denis O; Nyachoti, Charles M

    2008-03-01

    Infectious diarrhea is a major problem in both children and piglets. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection results in fluid and electrolyte losses in the small intestine. We investigated the effect of nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) hydrolysis products of soybean meal (SBM) and canola meal (CM) on net absorption of fluid and solutes during ETEC infection. Products were generated by incubating SBM and CM with a blend of carbohydrase enzymes. Following incubation, slurries were centrifuged and the supernatants mixed with absolute ethanol to produce 2 product types: 80% ethanol-soluble (ES) and 80% ethanol-insoluble (EI). Products from SBM and CM were studied in 2 independent experiments in which 2 factors were investigated: product type (EI vs. ES) and time of ETEC infection (before vs. after perfusion). Pairs of small intestine segments, one noninfected and the other ETEC infected, were perfused simultaneously with different products for 7.5 h. Net absorption of fluid and solutes were determined. In both experiments, ETEC-infected segments perfused with saline control had lower (P < or = 0.05) net fluid and solute absorption compared with SBM and CM products. The interaction (P < or = 0.05) between product type and time of infection on fluid absorption was only evident for SBM, in which case perfusing ES products before infection resulted in higher fluid absorption (735 +/- 22 microL/cm2) compared with ETEC infection before perfusion (428 +/- 34 microL/cm2). In conclusion, NSP hydrolysis products of SBM and CM, particularly ES from SBM, were beneficial in maintaining fluid balance during ETEC infection, suggesting potential for controlling ETEC-induced diarrhea in piglets.

  9. Identification of Novel Components Influencing Colonization Factor Antigen I Expression in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Sara; Gautheron, Sylviane; Nasser, William; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Colonization factors (CFs) mediate early adhesion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in the small intestine. Environmental signals including bile, glucose, and contact with epithelial cells have previously been shown to modulate CF expression in a strain dependent manner. To identify novel components modulating CF surface expression, 20 components relevant to the intestinal environment were selected for evaluation. These included mucin, bicarbonate, norepinephrine, lincomycin, carbon sources, and cations. Effects of individual components on surface expression of the archetype CF, CFA/I, were screened using a fractional factorial Hadamard matrix incorporating 24 growth conditions. As most CFs agglutinate erythrocytes, surface expression was evaluated by mannose resistant hemagglutination. Seven components, including porcine gastric mucin, lincomycin, glutamine, and glucose were found to induce CFA/I surface expression in vitro in a minimal media while five others were inhibitory, including leucine and 1,10-phenanthroline. To further explore the effect of components positively influencing CFA/I surface expression, a response surface methodology (RSM) was designed incorporating 36 growth conditions. The optimum concentration for each component was identified, thereby generating a novel culture media, SP1, for CFA/I expression. CFs closely related to CFA/I, including CS4 and CS14 were similarly induced in SP1 media. Other epidemiologically relevant CFs were also induced when compared to the level obtained in minimal media. These results indicate that although CF surface expression is complex and highly variable among strains, the CF response can be predicted for closely related strains. A novel culture media inducing CFs in the CF5a group was successfully identified. In addition, mucin was found to positively influence CF expression in strains expressing either CFA/I or CS1 and CS3, and may function as a common environmental cue. PMID:26517723

  10. Identification of Novel Components Influencing Colonization Factor Antigen I Expression in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sara; Gautheron, Sylviane; Nasser, William; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Colonization factors (CFs) mediate early adhesion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in the small intestine. Environmental signals including bile, glucose, and contact with epithelial cells have previously been shown to modulate CF expression in a strain dependent manner. To identify novel components modulating CF surface expression, 20 components relevant to the intestinal environment were selected for evaluation. These included mucin, bicarbonate, norepinephrine, lincomycin, carbon sources, and cations. Effects of individual components on surface expression of the archetype CF, CFA/I, were screened using a fractional factorial Hadamard matrix incorporating 24 growth conditions. As most CFs agglutinate erythrocytes, surface expression was evaluated by mannose resistant hemagglutination. Seven components, including porcine gastric mucin, lincomycin, glutamine, and glucose were found to induce CFA/I surface expression in vitro in a minimal media while five others were inhibitory, including leucine and 1,10-phenanthroline. To further explore the effect of components positively influencing CFA/I surface expression, a response surface methodology (RSM) was designed incorporating 36 growth conditions. The optimum concentration for each component was identified, thereby generating a novel culture media, SP1, for CFA/I expression. CFs closely related to CFA/I, including CS4 and CS14 were similarly induced in SP1 media. Other epidemiologically relevant CFs were also induced when compared to the level obtained in minimal media. These results indicate that although CF surface expression is complex and highly variable among strains, the CF response can be predicted for closely related strains. A novel culture media inducing CFs in the CF5a group was successfully identified. In addition, mucin was found to positively influence CF expression in strains expressing either CFA/I or CS1 and CS3, and may function as a common environmental cue.

  11. Longus, a Type IV Pilus of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Is Involved in Adherence to Intestinal Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Mazariego-Espinosa, Karina; Cruz, Ariadnna; Ledesma, Maria A.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in the developing world, as well as the most common cause of traveler's diarrhea. The main hallmarks of this type of bacteria are the expression of one or more enterotoxins and fimbriae used for attachment to host intestinal cells. Longus is a pilus produced by ETEC. These bacteria grown in pleuropneumonia-like organism (PPLO) broth at 37°C and in 5% CO2 produced longus, showing that the assembly and expression of the pili depend on growth conditions and composition of the medium. To explore the role of longus in the adherence to epithelial cells, quantitative and qualitative analyses were done, and similar levels of adherence were observed, with values of 111.44 × 104 CFU/ml in HT-29, 101.33 × 104 CFU/ml in Caco-2, and 107.11 × 104 CFU/ml in T84 cells. In addition, the E9034AΔlngA strain showed a significant reduction in longus adherence of 32% in HT-29, 22.28% in Caco-2, and 21.68% in T84 cells compared to the wild-type strain. In experiments performed with nonintestinal cells (HeLa and HEp-2 cells), significant differences were not observed in adherence between E9034A and derivative strains. Interestingly, the E9034A and E9034AΔlngA(pLngA) strains were 30 to 35% more adherent in intestinal cells than in nonintestinal cells. Twitching motility experiments were performed, showing that ETEC strains E9034A and E9034AΔlngA(pLngA) had the capacity to form spreading zones while ETEC E9034AΔlngA does not. In addition, our data suggest that longus from ETEC participates in the colonization of human colonic cells. PMID:20348256

  12. Structural and Functional Insight into the Carbohydrate Receptor Binding of F4 Fimbriae-producing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli *

    PubMed Central

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; De Kerpel, Maia; Deboeck, Francine; Raymaekers, Hanne; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are important causes of intestinal disease in humans and lead to severe production losses in animal farming. A range of fimbrial adhesins in ETEC strains determines host and tissue tropism. ETEC strains expressing F4 fimbriae are associated with neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Three naturally occurring variants of F4 fimbriae (F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad) exist that differ in the primary sequence of their major adhesive subunit FaeG, and each features a related yet distinct receptor binding profile. Here the x-ray structure of FaeGad bound to lactose provides the first structural insight into the receptor specificity and mode of binding by the poly-adhesive F4 fimbriae. A small D′-D″-α1-α2 subdomain grafted on the immunoglobulin-like core of FaeG hosts the carbohydrate binding site. Two short amino acid stretches Phe150–Glu152 and Val166–Glu170 of FaeGad bind the terminal galactose in the lactosyl unit and provide affinity and specificity to the interaction. A hemagglutination-based assay with E. coli expressing mutant F4ad fimbriae confirmed the elucidated co-complex structure. Interestingly, the crucial D′-α1 loop that borders the FaeGad binding site adopts a different conformation in the two other FaeG variants and hints at a heterogeneous binding pocket among the FaeG serotypes. PMID:25631050

  13. Presence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in biofilms formed in water containers in poor households coincides with epidemic seasons in Dhaka.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, D; Islam, M S; Begum, Y A; Janzon, A; Qadri, F; Sjöling, A

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if biofilms may be potential reservoirs for the waterborne pathogen enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in household water in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Biofilms formed on submerged glass slides. Mature biofilms were found significantly more often on glass slides collected in the monsoon period between the two annual ETEC peaks in Bangladesh, that is, between May and August than the rest of the year (P < 0.03). Sixty-four per cent (49/77) of all biofilms analysed by quantitative real-time PCR were positive for ETEC. Significantly more ETEC-PCR positive biofilms were found during the epidemic peaks and during flooding periods than the rest of the year (P < 0.008). Planktonic ETEC was present in the household water during all seasons, but there was no correlation between presence or numbers of ETEC in water and the epidemic peaks. We conclude that ETEC is continuously present in water and biofilms in household water reservoirs in Dhaka, which has a high prevalence of ETEC diarrhoea. The frequency of biofilms with ETEC was significantly associated (P < 0.008) with seasonal epidemic peaks of ETEC diarrhoea. We show for the first time that enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the causative agent of acute watery diarrhoea and travellers' diarrhoea is present in biofilms in household water tanks in Dhaka, Bangladesh. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. A FaeG-FedF-LT192 fusion elicits protective anti-adhesin and antitoxin antibodies against porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing K88 or F18 fimbriae and heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) toxins are the major cause of diarrhea in young pigs. Effective vaccines inducing anti-adhesin (anti-K88 & anti-F18) and antitoxin (anti-LT & anti-ST) 5 immunity would provide ...

  15. Role of fimbriae F18 for actively acquired immunity against porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, E; Bertschinger, H U

    1997-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enterotoxaemic (ETEEC) Escherichia (E.) coli that express F18 (F107) fimbriate colonize the small intestine and cause diarrhoea and/or oedema disease in weaned pigs. So far, two antigenic variants of F18 can be distinguished with a common antigenic factor designated 'a' and two specific factors called 'b' and 'c'. In this study the existence of crosswise anti-colonization immunity between E. coli strains that express F18ab or F18ac fimbrial variants, respectively, was demonstrated. Weaned pigs of susceptible genotype with respect to susceptibility to adhesion of E. coli with fimbriae F18 were inoculated with E. coli strains 3064STM (0157:K-:H-:F18ab; resistant to streptomycin) and 8199RIF (0141ab:K-:H4:F18ac; resistant to rifampicin). The faecal shedding was compared subsequent to immunization and homologous or heterologous challenge. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to measure IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies against the F18ab and F18ac antigens in saliva, faeces, serum and intestinal wash samples. About 8 log CFU/g of the inoculated strains were found in faeces of all pigs following immunization as well as in non-immunized controls after challenge. Bacterial counts of the inoculated strains after challenge were between 2 and 5 log lower, without any difference between homologous and heterologous challenge. Intestinal colonization with fimbriated E. coli resulted in production of significantly increased levels of anti-fimbrial antibodies, especially IgA, in serum and intestinal wash samples. There were higher levels of homologous than of heterologous anti-fimbrial antibodies. Production of antibodies against F18a or against another common fimbrial antigen is probably responsible for crosswise anti-colonization immunity between E. coli strains with F18ab and F18ac fimbrial variants. Serum F18-specific IgA may be a useful indicator of a mucosal immune response directed against F18 fimbriae.

  16. Resistance Pattern and Molecular Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Strains Isolated in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Begum, Yasmin A; Talukder, K A; Azmi, Ishrat J; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Sheikh, A; Sharmin, Salma; Svennerholm, A-M; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of bacterial infection leading to acute watery diarrhea in infants and young children as well as in travellers to ETEC endemic countries. Ciprofloxacin is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent nowadays used for the treatment of diarrhea. This study aimed to characterize ciprofloxacin resistant ETEC strains isolated from diarrheal patients in Bangladesh. A total of 8580 stool specimens from diarrheal patients attending the icddr,b Dhaka hospital was screened for ETEC between 2005 and 2009. PCR and Ganglioside GM1- Enzyme Linked Immuno sorbent Assay (ELISA) was used for detection of Heat labile (LT) and Heat stable (ST) toxins of ETEC. Antimicrobial susceptibilities for commonly used antibiotics and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin were examined. DNA sequencing of representative ciprofloxacin resistant strains was performed to analyze mutations of the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE. PCR was used for the detection of qnr, a plasmid mediated ciprofloxacin resistance gene. Clonal variations among ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) and ciprofloxacin susceptible (CipS) strains were determined by Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among 1067 (12%) ETEC isolates identified, 42% produced LT/ST, 28% ST and 30% LT alone. Forty nine percent (n = 523) of the ETEC strains expressed one or more of the 13 tested colonization factors (CFs) as determined by dot blot immunoassay. Antibiotic resistance of the ETEC strains was observed as follows: ampicillin 66%, azithromycin 27%, ciprofloxacin 27%, ceftriazone 13%, cotrimaxazole 46%, doxycycline 44%, erythromycin 96%, nalidixic acid 83%, norfloxacin 27%, streptomycin 48% and tetracycline 42%. Resistance to ciprofloxacin increased from 13% in 2005 to 34% in 2009. None of the strains was resistant to mecillinam. The MIC of the nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin of representative Cip

  17. Resistance Pattern and Molecular Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Strains Isolated in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Yasmin A.; Talukder, K. A.; Azmi, Ishrat J.; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Sheikh, A.; Sharmin, Salma; Svennerholm, A.-M.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of bacterial infection leading to acute watery diarrhea in infants and young children as well as in travellers to ETEC endemic countries. Ciprofloxacin is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent nowadays used for the treatment of diarrhea. This study aimed to characterize ciprofloxacin resistant ETEC strains isolated from diarrheal patients in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 8580 stool specimens from diarrheal patients attending the icddr,b Dhaka hospital was screened for ETEC between 2005 and 2009. PCR and Ganglioside GM1- Enzyme Linked Immuno sorbent Assay (ELISA) was used for detection of Heat labile (LT) and Heat stable (ST) toxins of ETEC. Antimicrobial susceptibilities for commonly used antibiotics and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin were examined. DNA sequencing of representative ciprofloxacin resistant strains was performed to analyze mutations of the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE. PCR was used for the detection of qnr, a plasmid mediated ciprofloxacin resistance gene. Clonal variations among ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) and ciprofloxacin susceptible (CipS) strains were determined by Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Among 1067 (12%) ETEC isolates identified, 42% produced LT/ST, 28% ST and 30% LT alone. Forty nine percent (n = 523) of the ETEC strains expressed one or more of the 13 tested colonization factors (CFs) as determined by dot blot immunoassay. Antibiotic resistance of the ETEC strains was observed as follows: ampicillin 66%, azithromycin 27%, ciprofloxacin 27%, ceftriazone 13%, cotrimaxazole 46%, doxycycline 44%, erythromycin 96%, nalidixic acid 83%, norfloxacin 27%, streptomycin 48% and tetracycline 42%. Resistance to ciprofloxacin increased from 13% in 2005 to 34% in 2009. None of the strains was resistant to mecillinam. The MIC of the nalidixic acid and

  18. Patterns of loss of enterotoxigenicity by Escherichia coli isolated from adults with diarrhea: suggestive evidence for an interrelationship with serotype.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G; DuPont, H L; Orskov, F; Orskov, I

    1977-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates obtained in Mexico from adult subjects with diarrhea and from healthy controls were examined for the production of heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) after serial passage in the laboratory. Isolates were found to be either stable for the production of ST and LT or unstable with respect to ST, LT, or both. Unilateral loss of either ST or LT production allowed classification of E. coli isolates into four groups according to stability/instability of enterotoxin production. Fewer serotypes, with more representative isolates, were in group I (stable) than in group IV (completely unstable). Isolates from Dacca, Bangladesh, could be similarly classified into stability groups. There is an apparent relationship between serotype, stability of enterotoxin production, particularly LT, and isolation from diarrhea cases as opposed to isolation from healthy controls. PMID:328392

  19. Value of passive immune hemolysis for detection of heat-labile enterotoxin produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, T; Kinoshita, Y; Taga, S; Takeda, Y; Miwatani, T

    1980-01-01

    The method of passive immune hemolysis of Evans and Evans (Infect. Immun. 16:604-609, 1977) for detection of heat-labile enterotoxin produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was modified. A total of 373 strains of E. coli were tested by this method using materials obtained by treating the cells with polymyxin B and rabbit antiserum against cholera enterotoxin, purified by affinity gel column coupled with purified cholera enterotoxin, in N-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid buffer (pH 6.7). The results correlated very well with those obtained in an assay with Chinese hamster ovary cells. It is concluded that passive immune hemolysis is useful as a routine clinical method for identifying E. coli strains that produce heat-labile enterotoxin. PMID:7031077

  20. Erythrocyte and Porcine Intestinal Glycosphingolipids Recognized by F4 Fimbriae of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Coddens, Annelies; Valis, Erik; Benktander, John; Ångström, Jonas; Breimer, Michael E.; Cox, Eric; Teneberg, Susann

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic F4-fimbriated Escherichia coli is associated with diarrheal disease in neonatal and postweaning pigs. The F4 fimbriae mediate attachment of the bacteria to the pig intestinal epithelium, enabling an efficient delivery of diarrhea-inducing enterotoxins to the target epithelial cells. There are three variants of F4 fimbriae designated F4ab, F4ac and F4ad, respectively, having different antigenic and adhesive properties. In the present study, the binding of isolated F4ab, F4ac and F4ad fimbriae, and F4ab/ac/ad-fimbriated E. coli, to glycosphingolipids from erythrocytes and from porcine small intestinal epithelium was examined, in order to get a comprehensive view of the F4-binding glycosphingolipids involved in F4-mediated hemagglutination and adhesion to the epithelial cells of porcine intestine. Specific interactions between the F4ab, F4ac and F4ad fimbriae and both acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were obtained, and after isolation of binding-active glycosphingolipids and characterization by mass spectrometry and proton NMR, distinct carbohydrate binding patterns were defined for each fimbrial subtype. Two novel glycosphingolipids were isolated from chicken erythrocytes, and characterized as GalNAcα3GalNAcß3Galß4Glcß1Cer and GalNAcα3GalNAcß3Galß4GlcNAcß3Galß4Glcß1Cer. These two compounds, and lactosylceramide (Galß4Glcß1Cer) with phytosphingosine and hydroxy fatty acid, were recognized by all three variants of F4 fimbriae. No binding of the F4ad fimbriae or F4ad-fimbriated E. coli to the porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids occurred. However, for F4ab and F4ac two distinct binding patterns were observed. The F4ac fimbriae and the F4ac-expressing E. coli selectively bound to galactosylceramide (Galß1Cer) with sphingosine and hydroxy 24:0 fatty acid, while the porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids recognized by F4ab fimbriae and the F4ab-fimbriated bacteria were characterized as galactosylceramide, sulfatide (SO3-3Galß1Cer), sulf

  1. Biochemical and genetic diversity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with diarrhea in United States students in Cuernavaca and Guadalajara, Mexico, 2004-2007.

    PubMed

    Ouyang-Latimer, Jeannette; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Okhuysen, Pablo C; Paredes, Mercedes; Flores, Jose; Dupont, Herbert L

    2010-06-15

    Molecular characterization of Escherichia coli with use of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay allows the determination of clonal origin and geographic clustering. Presumed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) from 213 adults with travelers' diarrhea acquired in Mexico during the summer months of 2004-2007 were studied. Biochemical testing strips determined a 7-digit fingerprint on the basis of 21 biochemical reactions. E. coli producing enterotoxin were evaluated for clonality by RAPD assay. Dendrograms were developed using Pearson correlations with 80% similarity to determine clonal groups. Of the presumed ETEC, 85% were confirmed to be E. coli on the basis of biochemical analysis. Other enterotoxigenic bacteria included Citrobacter species (9%) and other coliforms (all 2%). RAPD analysis with primers 1247 and 1254 determined 24 ETEC clonal groups containing 2-9 subjects each, of which 15 spanned the 4 years and 8 spanned both cities. Complete biochemical evaluation of E. coli-like, enterotoxigenic organisms is crucial in ETEC identification. In addition, other enterotoxigenic organisms identified should be studied further for their role in enteric disease. Travelers to Mexico are exposed to a large pool of different ETEC strains from multiple sources, with a small number of dominant types showing a widespread and persistent reservoir of infection.

  2. Concurrent outbreak of norovirus genotype I and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on a U.S. Navy ship following a visit to Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Victor E; Ramos, Mariana; Maves, Ryan C; Freeman, Randal; Montgomery, Joel M

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of norovirus (NoV) genotype I and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) occurred among US Navy Ship personnel following a visit to Lima, Peru, in June 2008. Visiting a specific area in Lima was significantly associated with illness. While ETEC and NoV are commonly recognized as causative agents of outbreaks, co-circulation of both pathogens has been rarely observed in shipboard outbreaks.

  3. Occurrence of K99 antigen on Escherichia coli isolated from pigs and colonization of pig ileum by K99+ enterotoxigenic E. coli from calves and pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H W; Nagy, B; Isaacson, R E; Orskov, I

    1977-01-01

    Several strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated from pigs were found to have an antigen (K99) previously reported only on strains of calf and lamb origin and which facilitates intestinal colonization in the latter two species. Several human ETEC were also tested for K99; however, none were positive. Each of four K99-positive ETEC strains of calf origin and one of pig origin produced K99 in pig ileum in vivo, adhered to villous epithelium in pig ileum, colonized pig ileum, and caused profuse diarrhea in newborn pigs. In contrast to the K99-positive strains above, four K99-negative ETEC from humans and chickens and one K99-positive ETEC from a calf either did not colonize pig ileum or did so inconsistently. When the K99-negative strains did colonize, they had little or no tendency to adhere to intestinal villi. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that K99 facilitates adhesion to and colonization of pig ileum by some ETEC. Images PMID:321356

  4. Occurrence of K99 antigen on Escherichia coli isolated from pigs and colonization of pig ileum by K99+ enterotoxigenic E. coli from calves and pigs.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Nagy, B; Isaacson, R E; Orskov, I

    1977-02-01

    Several strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated from pigs were found to have an antigen (K99) previously reported only on strains of calf and lamb origin and which facilitates intestinal colonization in the latter two species. Several human ETEC were also tested for K99; however, none were positive. Each of four K99-positive ETEC strains of calf origin and one of pig origin produced K99 in pig ileum in vivo, adhered to villous epithelium in pig ileum, colonized pig ileum, and caused profuse diarrhea in newborn pigs. In contrast to the K99-positive strains above, four K99-negative ETEC from humans and chickens and one K99-positive ETEC from a calf either did not colonize pig ileum or did so inconsistently. When the K99-negative strains did colonize, they had little or no tendency to adhere to intestinal villi. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that K99 facilitates adhesion to and colonization of pig ileum by some ETEC.

  5. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with STh and STp genotypes is associated with diarrhea both in children in areas of endemicity and in travelers.

    PubMed

    Bölin, Ingrid; Wiklund, Gudrun; Qadri, Firdausi; Torres, Olga; Bourgeois, A Louis; Savarino, Stephen; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2006-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea among children in developing countries and in travelers to areas of ETEC endemicity. ETEC strains isolated from humans may produce a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and two types of the heat-stable enterotoxin STa, called STh and STp, encoded by the estA gene. Two commonly used assay methods for the detection of STa, the infant mouse assay or different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, are unable to distinguish between the two subtypes of ST. Different genotypic methods, such as DNA probes or PCR assays, may, however, allow such discrimination. Using gene probes, it has recently been reported that ETEC strains producing STp as the only enterotoxin are not associated with diarrhea. In this study, we have used highly specific PCR methods, including newly designed primers for STh together with previously described STp primers, to compare the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC isolated from children with diarrhea in three different geographically distinct areas, i.e., Bangladesh, Egypt, and Guatemala, and from travelers to Mexico and Guatemala. It was found that ETEC strains producing STp were as commonly isolated from cases of diarrhea as strains producing STh both in Egypt and Guatemala, whereas STp strains were considerably less common in Bangladesh. No difference was found in the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC strains isolated from travelers with diarrhea and from asymptomatic carriers. Irrespective of ST genotype, the disease symptoms were also similar in both children and travelers.

  6. Secretory IgA-mediated protection against V. cholerae and heat-labile enterotoxin-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by rice-based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Kodama, Toshio; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Nanno, Masanobu; Nakanishi, Ushio; Takaiwa, Fumio; Honda, Takeshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Cholera and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are among the most common causes of acute infantile gastroenteritis globally. We previously developed a rice-based vaccine that expressed cholera toxin B subunit (MucoRice-CTB) and had the advantages of being cold chain–free and providing protection against cholera toxin (CT)–induced diarrhea. To advance the development of MucoRice-CTB for human clinical application, we investigated whether the CTB-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) induced by MucoRice-CTB gives longstanding protection against diarrhea induced by Vibrio cholerae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT)–producing ETEC (LT-ETEC) in mice. Oral immunization with MucoRice-CTB stored at room temperature for more than 3 y provided effective SIgA-mediated protection against CT- or LT-induced diarrhea, but the protection was impaired in polymeric Ig receptor–deficient mice lacking SIgA. The vaccine gave longstanding protection against CT- or LT-induced diarrhea (for ≥6 months after primary immunization), and a single booster immunization extended the duration of protective immunity by at least 4 months. Furthermore, MucoRice-CTB vaccination prevented diarrhea in the event of V. cholerae and LT-ETEC challenges. Thus, MucoRice-CTB is an effective long-term cold chain–free oral vaccine that induces CTB-specific SIgA-mediated longstanding protection against V. cholerae– or LT-ETEC–induced diarrhea. PMID:20421480

  7. Detection and sequences of the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 gene in enterotoxigenic E. coli strains isolated from piglets and calves with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Nakazawa, M

    1997-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated from piglets and calves with diarrhea were tested for the presence of the enteroaggregative E. coli enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) gene sequences by PCR and colony hybridization. The EAST1 gene was found in most porcine ETEC strains with adherence factor K88, especially in those elaborating heat-labile enterotoxin. One porcine ETEC strain with adherence factor K99 was also positive for the EAST1 gene. In contrast, 987P-positive (987P+) ETEC strains from piglets, K99+ ETEC strains from calves, and K99+ F41+ or F41+ ETEC strains from piglets and calves were negative for the EAST1 gene. The K88ab+ or K88ac+ ETEC strains tested possessed the EAST1 gene on a plasmid that was distinct from a K88-encoding plasmid. The EAST1 gene sequences of the K88+ ETEC strains were identical to each other and 99.1 and 98.3% homologous to the previously reported sequences of ETEC strains colonizing humans and enteroaggregative E. coli strains, respectively. The data indicate that the EAST1 gene is distributed among porcine ETEC strains in association with the adherence factor type.

  8. Prophylactic Efficacy of Hyperimmune Bovine Colostral Antiadhesin Antibodies Against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Diarrhea: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 1 Trial.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Stephen J; McKenzie, Robin; Tribble, David R; Porter, Chad K; O'Dowd, Aisling; Cantrell, Joyce A; Sincock, Stephanie A; Poole, Steven T; DeNearing, Barbara; Woods, Colleen M; Kim, Hye; Grahek, Shannon L; Brinkley, Carl; Crabb, Joseph H; Bourgeois, A Louis

    2017-07-01

    Tip-localized adhesive proteins of bacterial fimbriae from diverse pathogens confer protection in animal models, but efficacy in humans has not been reported. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) commonly elaborate colonization factors comprising a minor tip adhesin and major stalk-forming subunit. We assessed the efficacy of antiadhesin bovine colostral IgG (bIgG) antibodies against ETEC challenge in volunteers. Adults were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to take oral hyperimmune bIgG raised against CFA/I minor pilin subunit (CfaE) tip adhesin or colonization factor I (CFA/I) fimbraie (positive control) or placebo. Two days before challenge, volunteers began a thrice-daily, 7-day course of investigational product administered in sodium bicarbonate 15 minutes after each meal. On day 3, subjects drank 1 × 109 colony-forming units of colonization factor I (CFA/I)-ETEC strain H10407 with buffer. The primary efficacy endpoint was diarrhea within 120 hours of challenge. After enrollment and randomization, 31 volunteers received product, underwent ETEC challenge, and were included in the per protocol efficacy analysis. Nine of 11 placebos developed diarrhea, 7 experiencing moderate to severe disease. Protective efficacy of 63% (P = .03) and 88% (P = .002) was observed in the antiadhesin bIgG and positive control groups, respectively. Oral administration of anti-CFA/I minor pilin subunit (CfaE) antibodies conferred significant protection against ETEC, providing the first clinical evidence that fimbrial tip adhesins function as protective antigens.

  9. Construction and immunogenic properties of a chimeric protein comprising CfaE, CfaB and LTB against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gheibi Hayat, Seyed-Mohammad; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed-Latif; Nazarian, Shahram

    2016-11-01

    ETEC (Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli) is a major cause of diarrhea in developing countries and children. ETEC has two virulence factors including colonization factors antigen (CFA) and labile enterotoxins (LTs). CFA/I consists the major pilin subunit CfaB and a minor adhesive subunit, CfaE. In this study a tripartite fusion protein containing CfaB, CfaE and LTB was designed. In silico analysis of the tertiary structure of the chimeric protein showed a protein with three main domains linked together with linkers. Linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were identified. A chimera consisting cfaB, cfaE and ltB(BET)was then synthesized with E. coli codon bias in pUC57 and sub cloned into pET32 vector. Recombinant protein was expressed and purified by affinity chromatography and confirmed by western blotting. Mice were immunized with recombinant protein and the antibody titer and specificity of the sera were analyzed by ELISA. The efficiency of the immune sera against ETEC was evaluated by binding assay and GM1-ELISA. VaxiJen analysis of the protein showed high antigenicity. Post-immune sera contained high titers of anti-BET IgG. Pretreatment of ETEC cells with sera from immunized mice decreased their ability to adhere to cells of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29.

  10. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from two paediatric cohort studies in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Anicia M.; Rivera, Fulton P.; Pons, Maria J.; Riveros, Maribel; Gomes, Cláudia; Bernal, María; Meza, Rina; Maves, Ryan C.; Huicho, Luis; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Lanata, Claudio F.; Gil, Ana I.; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, being of special concern in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of resistance in 205 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates from two cohort studies in children <24 months in Lima, Peru. Methods ETEC were identified by an in-house multiplex real-time PCR. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was tested by disk diffusion; mechanisms of resistance were evaluated by PCR. Results ETEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin (64%), cotrimoxazole (52%), tetracycline (37%); 39% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. Heat-stable toxin producing (ETEC-st) (48%) and heat-labile toxin producing ETEC (ETEC-lt) (40%) had higher rates of multidrug resistance than isolates producing both toxins (ETEC-lt-st) (21%), p<0.05. Only 10% of isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid and none to ciprofloxacin or cefotaxime. Ampicillin and sulfamethoxazole resistance were most often associated with blaTEM (69%) and sul2 genes (68%), respectively. Tetracycline resistance was associated with tet(A) (49%) and tet(B) (39%) genes. Azithromycin inhibitory diameters were ≤15 mm in 36% of isolates, with 5% of those presenting the mph(A) gene. Conclusions ETEC from Peruvian children are often resistant to older, inexpensive antibiotics, while remaining susceptible to ciprofloxacin, cephalosporins and furazolidone. Fluoroquinolones and azithromycin remain the drugs of choice for ETEC infections in Peru. However, further development of resistance should be closely monitored. PMID:26175267

  11. Contamination of potable water by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: qPCR based culture-free detection and quantification.

    PubMed

    Patel, C B; Vajpayee, P; Singh, G; Upadhyay, R S; Shanker, R

    2011-11-01

    Tourists visiting to endemic zones may acquire Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection resulting into diarrhea due to consumption of contaminated potable waters. In this study, a qPCR assay (SYBR Green), targeting LT1 and ST1 genes was designed to quantify ETEC in potable waters derived from civic water supply. The assay could detect lowest 1CFU/PCR targeting LT1/ST1 gene from ten-fold diluted culture of the reference strain (E. coli MTCC 723) and is ten-fold more sensitive than the conventional PCR. The quantification of the ETEC in potable waters collected from civic supply of a major city of the northern India exhibiting high flow of tourists reveals that all the sites that ran along sewage line were contaminated by the ETEC. Contamination was due to percolation of sewage. The assay could be used for the regular monitoring of potable water in places exhibiting heavy flow of tourists to prevent ETEC induced diarrhea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. F41 pili as protective antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that produce F41, K99, or both pilus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Runnels, P L; Moseley, S L; Moon, H W

    1987-01-01

    Pigs suckling dams that have been vaccinated with pilus antigen are protected against challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that express the same pilus antigen. However, some ETEC strains express more than one pilus antigen. Pregnant swine were vaccinated either with E. coli HB101 that harbored a recombinant plasmid coding for F41 expression (F41+) or with the HB101 parent strain that carries the pHC79 vector (F41-). Suckling pigs born to vaccinated dams were challenged with ETEC that expressed either K99, F41, or both pilus antigens. Production of F41 in vivo was demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay of sections of ileum and by seroconversion against F41 antigen by pigs challenged with F41+ and K99+ F41+ ETEC strains. The F41+ vaccine protected against challenge with an F41+ ETEC strain. In contrast, F41+ vaccination did not protect against challenge with K99+ or K99+ F41+ ETEC strains. The F41- vaccine did not protect against challenge with any strain used. The results indicate that K99+ F41+ ETEC strains produce F41 antigen in the small intestine during disease and that F41+ vaccination can be a protective antigen if the challenge strain expresses only F41 antigen, but that F41+ vaccination may not protect against strains that produce both K99 and F41 antigens. PMID:2880807

  13. A foodborne outbreak of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli serotype O169:H41 in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Hirai, Yuji; Kanki, Masashi; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Seto, Kazuko; Taguchi, Masumi; Kumeda, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    We describe our laboratory investigation of a massive foodborne outbreak of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) serotype O169:H41 that occurred during a 2-day traditional festival held in September 2012 in Osaka Prefecture, Japan. Of 126 customers who patronized a particular Japanese restaurant during the event, 102 developed symptoms of gastrointestinal disease. We isolated strains of ETEC serotype O169:H41 from 1 food sample and from fecal samples collected from 19 of 34 patients and 2 of 4 food handlers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of these isolates suggested that the foodborne pathogen that caused the diarrheal outbreak was a specific clone of ETEC serotype O169:H41. Based on these findings and our interviews with the restaurant owner and employees, we concluded that a likely cause of the outbreak was an overwhelmed capacity of the restaurant kitchen in terms of preservation of sanitary procedures during the festival and the inability of the restaurant staff to handle the relatively large quantity of food to ensure a lack of contamination with ETEC. Thus, we reconfirm that ETEC strains of serotype O169:H41 remain important causes of domestic foodborne outbreaks in developed countries, including Japan.

  14. Adjuvant effect of Gantrez®AN nanoparticles during oral vaccination of piglets against F4+enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Katrien; Melkebeek, Vesna; Vesna, Melkebeek; Cox, Eric; Eric, Cox; Remon, Jean Paul; Paul, Remon Jean; Vervaet, Chris; Chris, Vervaet

    2011-02-15

    In this study, the adjuvanticity of methylvinylether-co-maleic anhydride (Gantrez(®)AN) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated in an oral immunisation experiment of pigs against F4+enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4+ETEC). In addition, Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA)-coating of the nanoparticles was tested for enterocyte-targeting. Pigs were either vaccinated with F4 fimbriae, F4 encapsulated in Gantrez(®)AN NP, F4 encapsulated in Gantrez(®)AN NP coated with WGA or F4 fimbriae mixed with empty Gantrez(®)AN NP. Only vaccination with the combination of F4 mixed with empty Gantrez(®)AN NP improved protection against F4+ETEC infection. In addition, vaccination with this formulation also resulted in an F4-specific serum antibody response prior to F4+ETEC challenge. Encapsulation of F4 in Gantrez(®)AN NP only raised the serum antibody response after F4+ETEC challenge compared to soluble F4, but did not improve protection, whereas WGA-coating almost completely abolished the serum antibody response. These data indicate that nanoparticle effects after F4 encapsulation were of lesser importance for the adjuvant effect of Gantrez(®)AN NP, contrarily to the reactivity of the Gantrez(®)AN polymer used to prepare the nanoparticles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An in silico chimeric multi subunit vaccine targeting virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) with its bacterial inbuilt adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Shahram; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Rasooli, Iraj; Amani, Jafar; Bagheri, Samane; Alerasool, Masoome

    2012-07-01

    Enteric infections resulting in diarrheal diseases remain as major global health problems. Among bacteria, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes the largest number of diarrheal cases. There is a great interest in developing an effective ETEC vaccine. An ETEC vaccine could focus on virulence factors present in ETEC pathogens and nontoxic Heat-labile B subunit (LTB). Chimeric proteins carrying epitopes, or adjuvant sequences increase the possibility of eliciting a broad cellular or humoral immune response. In-silico tools are highly suited to study, design and evaluate vaccine strategies. Colonization factors are among the virulence factor studied in the present work employing bioinformatic tools. A synthetic chimeric gene, encoding CfaB, CstH, CotA, and LTB was designed. Modeling was done to predict the 3D structure of protein. This model was validated using Ramachandran plot statistics. The predicted B-cell epitopes were mapped on the surface of the model. Validation result showed that 97.2% residues lie in favored or additional allowed region of Ramachandran plot. VaxiJen analysis of the protein showed high antigenicity. Linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were identified. The identified T-cell epitopes are apt to bind MHC molecules. The epitopes in the chimeric protein are likely to induce both the B-cell and T-cell mediated immune responses.

  16. Improving genome annotation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TW10598 by a label-free quantitative MS/MS approach.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Steinsland, Hans; Wiker, Harald G

    2015-11-01

    The most commonly used genome annotation processes are to a great extent based on computational methods. However, those can only predict genes that have been described earlier or that have sequence signatures indicative of a gene function. Here, we report a synonymous proteogenomic approach for experimentally improving microbial genome annotation based on label-free quantitative MS/MS. The approach is exemplified by analysis of cell extracts from in vitro cultured enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain TW10598, as part of an effort to create a new reference ETEC genome sequence. The proteomic analysis yielded identification of 2060 proteins, out of which 312 proteins were originally described as hypothetical. For 84% of the identified proteins we have provided description of their relative quantitative levels, among others, for 20 abundantly expressed ETEC virulence factors. Proteogenomic mapping supported the existence of four protein-coding genes that had not been annotated, and led to correction of translation start positions of another nine. The addition of the proteomic analysis into TW10598 genome re-annotation project improved quality of the annotation, and provided experimental evidence for a significant portion of ETEC expressed proteome. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002473 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002473).

  17. Diarrhea Burden Due to Natural Infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in a Birth Cohort in a Rural Egyptian Community

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, H. I.; Amine, M.; Hassan, K.; Sanders, J. W.; Riddle, M. S.; Armstrong, A. W.; Svennerholm, A. M.; Sebeny, P. J.; Klena, J. D.; Young, S. Y. N.; Frenck, R. W.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is commonly associated with diarrhea in Egyptian children. Children less than 3 years old in Abu Homos, Egypt, had approximately five diarrheal episodes per child every year, and at least one of these episodes was due to ETEC. The epidemiology of ETEC diarrhea among children living in a rural Egyptian community was further evaluated in this study. Between January 2004 and April 2007, 348 neonates were enrolled and followed for 2 years. Children were visited twice weekly, and a stool sample was obtained every 2 weeks regardless of symptomatology. A stool sample was obtained whenever a child had diarrhea. From the routine stool culture, five E. coli-like colonies were selected and screened for heat-labile and heat-stable toxins by GM1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and further typed for colonization factor antigens by dot blot assay. Incidence of ETEC infection was estimated among children with diarrhea (symptomatic) and without diarrhea (asymptomatic). Incidence of diarrhea and ETEC-associated diarrhea was 7.8 and 1.48 per child-year, respectively. High risk of repeated ETEC diarrhea was associated with being over 6 months of age, warm season, male gender, and crowded sleeping conditions. Exclusive breast-feeding was protective for repeated ETEC infection. ETEC-associated diarrhea remains common among children living in the Nile Delta. The protective role of breast-feeding demonstrates the importance of promoting exclusive breast-feeding during, at least, the first 6 months of life. PMID:24829232

  18. DNA sequence analysis of the composite plasmid pTC conferring virulence and antimicrobial resistance for porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Péter Z; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Blum-Oehler, Gabriele; Olasz, Ferenc; Szabó, Mónika; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg; Nagy, Béla

    2012-01-01

    In this study the plasmid pTC, a 90 kb self-conjugative virulence plasmid of the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain EC2173 encoding the STa and STb heat-stable enterotoxins and tetracycline resistance, has been sequenced in two steps. As a result we identified five main distinct regions of pTC: (i) the maintenance region responsible for the extreme stability of the plasmid, (ii) the TSL (toxin-specific locus comprising the estA and estB genes) which is unique and characteristic for pTC, (iii) a Tn10 transposon, encoding tetracycline resistance, (iv) the tra (plasmid transfer) region, and (v) the colE1-like origin of replication. It is concluded that pTC is a self-transmissible composite plasmid harbouring antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. pTC belongs to a group of large conjugative E. coli plasmids represented by NR1 with a widespread tra backbone which might have evolved from a common ancestor. This is the first report of a completely sequenced animal ETEC virulence plasmid containing an antimicrobial resistance locus, thereby representing a selection advantage for spread of pathogenicity in the presence of antimicrobials leading to increased disease potential. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Faecal contamination and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in street-vended chili sauces in Mexico and its public health relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Garcia, T.; Cerna, J. F.; Thompson, M. R.; Lopez-Saucedo, C.

    2002-01-01

    The street-vended food industry provides employment and cheap ready-to-eat meals to a large proportion of the population in developing countries like Mexico, yet little is known about its role in the transmission of food borne diseases (FBD). Because of its wide consumption, street-vended chili sauces in Mexico are potential vehicles of FBD. An observational study was performed in Mexico City collecting 43 street-vended chili sauces. These sauces were prepared under poor hygienic conditions of handling and selling. Consumers add 4-8 ml of chili sauce per taco, ingest 2-5 tacos per meal and on average, 50 consumers frequent a stall per day. Seventeen (40%) samples were faecally contaminated and 2(5%) sauces harboured sufficient enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to cause disease. Weestimate that the consumption of only one of these chili sauces could result in ETEC disease inat least 21,000 consumers per year, making them important potential vehicles of FBD. PMID:12211591

  20. The major subunit, CfaB, of colonization factor antigen i from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is a glycosphingolipid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lena; Tobias, Joshua; Lebens, Michael; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Teneberg, Susann

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial adherence to mucosal surfaces is an important virulence trait of pathogenic bacteria. Adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to the intestine is mediated by a number of antigenically distinct colonization factors (CFs). One of the most common CFs is CFA/I. This has a fimbrial structure composed of a major repeating subunit, CfaB, and a single tip subunit, CfaE. The potential carbohydrate recognition by CFA/I was investigated by binding CFA/I-fimbriated bacteria and purified CFA/I fimbriae to a large number of variant glycosphingolipids separated on thin-layer chromatograms. For both fimbriated bacteria and purified fimbriae, specific interactions could be identified with a number of nonacid glycosphingolipids. These included glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide with phytosphingosine and/or hydroxy fatty acids, neolactotetraosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, gangliotetraosylceramide, the H5 type 2 pentaglycosylceramide, the Lea-5 glycosphingolipid, the Lex-5 glycosphingolipid, and the Ley-6 glycosphingolipid. These glycosphingolipids were also recognized by recombinant E. coli expressing CFA/I in the absence of tip protein CfaE, as well as by purified fimbriae from the same strain. This demonstrates that the glycosphingolipid-binding capacity of CFA/I resides in the major CfaB subunit.

  1. L-Glutamine and L-arginine protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection via intestinal innate immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Ren, Wenkai; Fang, Jun; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Guan, Guiping; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Jie; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Chen, Shuai; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2017-03-15

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) or arginine (Arg) supplementation is beneficial for intestinal health; however, whether Gln or Arg may confer protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is not known. To address this, we used an ETEC-infected murine model to investigate the protective effects of Gln and Arg. Experimentally, we pre-treated mice with designed diet of Gln or Arg supplementation prior to the oral ETEC infection and then assessed mouse mortality and intestinal bacterial burden. We also determined the markers of intestinal innate immunity in treated mice, including secretory IgA response (SIgA), mucins from goblet cells, as well as antimicrobial peptides from Paneth cells. ETEC colonized in mouse small intestine, including duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and inhibited the mRNA expression of intestinal immune factors, such as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), cryptdin-related sequence 1C (CRS1C), and Reg3γ. We found that dietary Gln or Arg supplementation decreased bacterial colonization and promoted the activation of innate immunity (e.g., the mRNA expression of pIgR, CRS1C, and Reg3γ) in the intestine of ETEC-infected mice. Our results suggest that dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation may inhibit intestinal ETEC infection through intestinal innate immunity.

  2. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDC 298 with FOS in Combination on Viability and Toxin Production of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Anand, Santosh; Mandal, Surajit; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar

    2017-09-25

    The present study was to investigate the utilization of prebiotics by Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDC 298 and its synergistic adversary effect on both population and production of heat-labile (LT) toxin in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). To select suitable prebiotic in order to enhance functionality, its utilization and the prebiotic activity score was examined. Antivirulence effect on ETEC was inspected by its inactivation rate and heat-labile toxin production in presence of different synbiotic combination. L. rhamnosus NCDC 298 strain grown well on media supplemented with fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS), whereas significant inactivation of ETEC was observed when FOS was added to the co-culture medium. Significant decrease in LT enterotoxin was seen through GM1 ganglioside enzyme linked immunoassay (GM1 ELISA), when ETEC has grown with L. rhamnosus NCDC 298 and FOS. Short-chain FOS proved to be the most effective substrate, improving antagonistic activity for L. rhamnosus NCDC 298. Both L. rhamnosus NCDC 298 with FOS can be used as an effective synbiotic combination for secretory antidiarrheal fermented dairy formulations.

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreases inflammatory responses induced by F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Galliano; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Chevaleyre, Claire; Melo, Sandrine; Auclair, Eric; Salmon, Henri

    2011-05-15

    Probiotic yeasts may provide protection against intestinal inflammation induced by enteric pathogens. In piglets, infection with F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) leads to inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage. In this study, we investigated whether the yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc, strain CNCM I-3856) and S. cerevisiae variety boulardii (Sb, strain CNCM I-3799) decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in intestinal epithelial IPI-2I cells cultured with F4+ ETEC. Results showed that viable Sc inhibited the ETEC-induced TNF-α gene expression whereas Sb did not. In contrast, killed Sc failed to inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. This inhibition was dependent on secreted soluble factors. Sc culture supernatant decreased the TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2 and CCL20 ETEC-induced mRNA. Furthermore, Sc culture supernatant filtrated fraction < 10 kDa displayed the same effects excepted for TNF-α. Thus, our results extended to Sc (strain CNCM I-3856) the inhibitory effects of some probiotic yeast strains onto inflammation.

  4. MOST PROBABLE NUMBER-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION-BASED QUANTIFICATION OF ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM RAW MEATS IN SOUTHERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Phetkhajorn, Supawadi; Sirikaew, Siriwan; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2014-11-01

    The detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in food, especially raw meat, has rarely been documented in Thailand, although the presence of this bacterial pathogen is considered of important public health concern. The quantity of ETEC in 150 meat samples collected from fresh food markets in southern Thailand were determined using a most probable number (MPN)-PCR-based quantification approach. ETEC contamination of raw chicken, pork and beef samples was 42%, 25% and 12%, respectively (a significant difference between chicken and beef, p < 0.05). The maximum MPN/g value for enterotoxin gene est-positive ETEC from pork and elt-positive ETEC from chicken were > 1,100 MPN/g, but the range of MPN/g values was greater for ETEC from chicken than from pork or beef. ETEC from raw chicken meat contained significantly more elt- than est-positives (p < 0.05). Thus, a significant proportion of raw meat, in particular chicken, sold in fresh food markets in southern Thailand harbors ETEC and poses a potential threat to consumer health.

  5. Comparison of receptors for 987P pili of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the small intestines of neonatal and older pig.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, E A

    1990-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates that express 987P pili colonize the small intestine and cause diarrhea in neonatal (less than 6-day-old) but not in older (greater than 3-week-old) pigs. However, 987P+ E. coli isolates adhere in vitro to small-intestinal epithelial cells from pigs of both ages. This indicates that older pigs as well as neonatal pigs contain receptors for 987P pili and that resistance in older pigs is not due to a lack of intestinal receptors for 987P pili. In this study, we demonstrated that 3-week-old gnotobiotic pigs, like neonatal pigs, were colonized and developed diarrhea when challenged with 987P+ E. coli. We compared 987P receptors in small-intestinal epithelial cell brush borders and in intestinal washes (luminal contents) from less than 1-day-old, 3-week-old gnotobiotic, and 3- to 4-week-old weaned pigs. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted onto nitrocellulose filters, and 987P binding was demonstrated by immunoassay using purified 987P pili. Multiple 987P-binding components ranging from 33 to 40 kDa were found in brush borders from both 987P-susceptible (neonatal and gnotobiotic) and 987P-resistant (older) pigs: 987P binding to these receptors, which we called 987R, did not correlate with 987P susceptibility. A less than 17-kDa 987P receptor, 987M, was found in the mucus fraction of intestinal washes from 987P-resistant older pigs. Only trace amounts of 987M were detected in 987P-susceptible neonatal and gnotobiotic pigs. 987M comigrated with the 987P receptor previously isolated from adult rabbits. Receptors for 987P in the mucus of older pigs may inhibit 987P-mediated intestinal colonization by preventing the attachment of 987P+ enterotoxigenic E. coli to intestinal epithelial receptors for 987P. Images PMID:1979318

  6. In vivo emergence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli variants lacking genes for K99 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, J G; Sadowski, P L; Tarsio, M; Moon, H W

    1987-01-01

    Neonatal pigs were inoculated with porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli 431, which carries genes for K99 fimbriae and STaP enterotoxin. Colonies of strain 431 were recovered from feces of pigs for up to 17 days after inoculation and tested for hybridization with gene probes for K99 and STaP. Variants of strain 431 that did not hybridize with the probes were considered to have lost the genes. Variants were recovered from 10 of 13 suckling pigs that survived the infection. Only 0.4% of the isolates recovered during the first 2 days after inoculation were variants. Of the isolates recovered 3 to 5 days after inoculation, 20 to 36% were variants. Variant colonies were detected more frequently among pigs in some litters than in others. The litter with the highest number of variant-shedding pigs had the dam with the highest titer of K99 antibody in her colostrum. Variants also occurred in colostrum-deprived, artificially reared pigs. However, the number of variants detected was lower and they occurred later in the course of the infection in colostrum-deprived pigs than in suckling pigs. More variants were detected and they were detected earlier in colostrum-deprived pigs fed anti-K99 monoclonal antibody than in controls fed anti-K88 monoclonal antibody. Loss of STaP appeared to be secondary to loss of K99 in that some variants lacked only K99 (K99- STaP+) and some lacked both genes (K99- STaP-), but none was of the K99+ STaP- type. Our results confirmed reports of gene loss from enterotoxigenic E. coli during infection. They are consistent with the hypothesis that variants emerge under in vivo selection pressure of K99 antibody and with the speculation that gene loss may be an important component of protection in vaccinated populations. However, the emergence of variants did not appear to play a major role in the recovery of individual pigs from clinical disease. PMID:2890584

  7. Competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shi-Shun; Zhang, Zhen-Shu; Wang, Ji-De; Lai, Zhuo-Sheng; Wang, Qun-Ying; Pan, Ling-Jia; Ren, Yue-Xin

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027 (B. ado 1027). METHODS: The binding of bacteria to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo was counted by adhesion assay. The inhibition of adherence of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of B. ado 1027 was evaluated quantitatively by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The purified adhesin at the concentration of 10 µg/mL, 20 µg/mL and 30 µg/mL except at 1 µg/mL and 5 µg/mL could inhibit significantly the adhesion of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo. Moreover, we observed that a reduction in bacterial adhesion was occurred with increase in the concentration of adhesin, and MFI (Mean fluorescent intensity) was decreased with increase in the concentration of adhesin. CONCLUSION: The purified adhesin of B. ado 1027 can inhibit the adhesion of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:15162538

  8. Disruption the Outer Membrane of Enteropathogenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli using Proanthocyanidins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins (PACs) have been reported as a natural antibacterial agent to suppress the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins on destabilizing the outer...

  9. Phenotypic Profiles of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Associated With Early Childhood Diarrhea in Rural Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    excretion of ETEC, either alone (n 729 [78%]) or with one or more copathogens (n 204 [22%]), including Shigella, Salmonella, Campylobacter , rotavirus...A. M., and J. Holmgren. 1978. Identification of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin by means of a ganglioside immunosorbent assay (GM1- ELISA

  10. Homologous and cross-reactive immune responses to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factors in Bangladeshi children.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Ahmed, Firoz; Ahmed, Tanvir; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2006-08-01

    We have studied homologous (HoM) and cross-reacting (CR) immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody responses to colonization factors (CFs) in Bangladeshi children with diarrhea due to enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains of the CF antigen I (CFA/I) group (CFA/I, n = 25; coli surface antigen 4 [CS4], n = 8; CS14, n = 11) and the CS5 group (CS5, n = 15; CS7, n = 8), respectively. The responses to the HoM, CR, and heterologous (HeT) CF antigens in each group of patient were studied and compared to that seen in healthy children (n = 20). In the CFA/I group (CFA/I and CS14), patients responded with antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses to HoM CFs (geometric mean, 156 to 329 ASCs/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) and to CR CFs ( approximately 15 to 38 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs) but least of all to the HeT CS5 antigen (2 to 4 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs). For the CS5 group of patients with ETEC (CS5 and CS7), likewise, responses to HoM CFs (230 to 372 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs) and CR CFs (27 to 676 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs) were seen, along with lower responses to the HeT CFA/I antigen (9 to 38 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs). Both groups of patients responded with CF-specific IgA antibodies to HoM and CR antigens in plasma but responded less to the HeT CFs. The responses in patients were seen very soon after the onset of diarrhea and peaked around 1 week after onset. Vaccinees who had received two doses of the oral, killed whole-cell ETEC vaccine (CF-BS-ETEC) responded with plasma IgA antibodies to CFA/I, a component of the vaccine, but also to the CR CS14 antigen, which was not included in the vaccine, showing that antibody responses can be stimulated by a CFA/I-containing ETEC vaccine to a CR-reacting antigen in individuals in countries where ETEC is endemic.

  11. Distribution of colonization factor antigens among enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with diarrhea in Nepal, Indonesia, Peru, and Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Nirdnoy, W; Serichantalergs, O; Cravioto, A; LeBron, C; Wolf, M; Hoge, C W; Svennerholm, A M; Taylor, D N; Echeverria, P

    1997-01-01

    Samples (1,318) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated in 1994-1995 from children with diarrhea from Nepal, Indonesia, Peru, and Thailand were examined for colonization factor antigen (CFA) and coli surface (CS) antigens. Fifty-five percent of 361 heat-labile and heat-stable (LT-ST), 14% of 620 LT-only, and 48% of 337 ST-only ETEC had CFA/CS antigens. LT-ST ETEC strains were predominantly in the CFA II group, and ST only strains were in the CFA IV group. Additional studies are needed to identify ETEC strains that do not have CFA/CS antigens. PMID:9003636

  12. Prevalence of Pilus Antigens, Enterotoxin Types, and Enteropathogenicity Among K88-Negative Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli from Neonatal Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H. W.; Kohler, E. M.; Schneider, R. A.; Whipp, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that were isolated from neonatal pigs and that did not react in preliminary tests for pilus antigen K88 were subjected to additional tests for K88 and for pilus antigens K99 and 987P. Four such isolates produced K88, 9 isolates produced K99, 55 isolates produced 987P, and the remaining 43 isolates produced none of the three pilus antigens (3P−). Immunofluorescence tests of ileal sections from pigs were more sensitive for 987P detection than was serum agglutination of bacteria grown from the ileum. Most ETEC that produced K88, K99, or 987P were enteropathogenic (adhered to ileal villi, colonized intensively, and caused profuse diarrhea) when given to neonatal pigs. In contrast, only 3 of the 43 ETEC that produced none of the pilus antigens were enteropathogenic. The isolates were also tested for the type of enterotoxin produced. The K88+ isolates all produced heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) detectable in cultured adrenal cells (i.e., were LT+). None of the 987P+, K99+, or enterpathogenic 3P− isolates produced LT. However (except for a single K99+ isolate), they all produced heat-stable enterotoxin detectable in infant mice (STa+). Sixteen isolates produced neither LT nor STa but did produce enterotoxin detectable in ligated intestinal loops of pigs (STb). Most of these LT− STa− STb+ isolates were also K88−, K99−, and 987P− and non-enteropathogenic. One of them was K99+ and enteropathogenic. Our conclusions are as follows. (i) Most enteropathogenic ETEC from neonatal pigs produce either K88, 987P, or K99; however, there are some that produce none of the three antigens. (ii) Immunofluorescence tests for pilus antigens produced in vivo are recommended for the diagnosis of ETEC infections. (iii) Reports of LT− STa− STb+ swine ETEC are confirmed; furthermore, such isolates can be enteropathogenic. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6102079

  13. Susceptibility of porcine intestine to pilus-mediated adhesion by some isolates of piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli increases with age.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Casey, T A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1992-01-01

    Two porcine isolates of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (serogroup O157 and O141) derived from fatal cases of postweaning diarrhea and lacking K88, K99, F41, and 987P pili (4P- ETEC) were tested for adhesiveness to small-intestinal epithelia of pigs of different ages. Neither strain adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders of newborn (1-day-old) pigs in the presence of mannose. However, mannose-resistant adhesion occurred when brush borders from 10-day- and 3- and 6-week-old pigs were used. Electron microscopy revealed that both strains produced fine (3.5-nm) and type 1 pili at 37 degrees C but only type 1 pili at 18 degrees C. Mannose-resistant in vitro adhesion to brush borders of older pigs correlated with the presence of fine pili. These strains produced predominantly fine pili in ligated intestinal loops of both older and newborn pigs, but adherence was greater in loops in older pigs. Immunoelectron microscopic studies, using antiserum raised against piliated bacteria and absorbed with nonpiliated bacteria, of samples from brush border adherence studies revealed labelled appendages between adherent bacteria and intestinal microvilli. Orogastric inoculation of pigs weaned at 10 and 21 days of age indicated significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of adhesion by the ETEC to the ileal epithelia of older pigs than to that of younger ones. We suggest that small-intestinal adhesion and colonization by these ETEC isolates is dependent on receptors that develop progressively with age during the first 3 weeks after birth. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the fine pili described mediate intestinal adhesion by the 4P- ETEC strains studied. Images PMID:1347758

  14. Susceptibility of porcine intestine to pilus-mediated adhesion by some isolates of piliated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli increases with age.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Casey, T A; Whipp, S C; Moon, H W

    1992-04-01

    Two porcine isolates of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (serogroup O157 and O141) derived from fatal cases of postweaning diarrhea and lacking K88, K99, F41, and 987P pili (4P- ETEC) were tested for adhesiveness to small-intestinal epithelia of pigs of different ages. Neither strain adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders of newborn (1-day-old) pigs in the presence of mannose. However, mannose-resistant adhesion occurred when brush borders from 10-day- and 3- and 6-week-old pigs were used. Electron microscopy revealed that both strains produced fine (3.5-nm) and type 1 pili at 37 degrees C but only type 1 pili at 18 degrees C. Mannose-resistant in vitro adhesion to brush borders of older pigs correlated with the presence of fine pili. These strains produced predominantly fine pili in ligated intestinal loops of both older and newborn pigs, but adherence was greater in loops in older pigs. Immunoelectron microscopic studies, using antiserum raised against piliated bacteria and absorbed with nonpiliated bacteria, of samples from brush border adherence studies revealed labelled appendages between adherent bacteria and intestinal microvilli. Orogastric inoculation of pigs weaned at 10 and 21 days of age indicated significantly (P less than 0.001) higher levels of adhesion by the ETEC to the ileal epithelia of older pigs than to that of younger ones. We suggest that small-intestinal adhesion and colonization by these ETEC isolates is dependent on receptors that develop progressively with age during the first 3 weeks after birth. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the fine pili described mediate intestinal adhesion by the 4P- ETEC strains studied.

  15. Colonization of the small intestine of weaned pigs by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that lack known colonization factors.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Arp, L H; Moon, H W; Casey, T A

    1992-05-01

    Intestinal colonization of 3-week-old weaned pigs by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that were originally isolated from weaned pigs with fatal diarrhea and that lacked K88, K99, F41, and 987P adhesins (4P- ETEC) was studied by histologic, immunofluorescent, and electron microscopic techniques. In the first experiment, 16 principal pigs were inoculated orogastrically with ETEC strain 2134 (serogroup O157: H19) or 2171 (serogroup 0141:H4), and eight control pigs were not inoculated. In the second experiment, 24 principals were inoculated with ETEC strain 2134, and 12 controls were inoculated with a nonenterotoxigenic strain of E. coli. Principal and control pigs were necropsied at intervals from 24 to 72 hours after inoculation of principals to provide the tissues used for this report. Results from the two experiments and with both ETEC strains were similar and therefore were combined. Adhesion by 4P- ETEC was demonstrated in ileum but not in cecum or colon in 22/40 principal pigs sampled at 24 to 72 hours after orogastric inoculation. Adherent bacteria were most apparent on the intestinal villi covering Peyer's patches. Only occasional adherent bacteria were detected in ileal sections from a few (4/20) of the control pigs. Adherence by 4P- ETEC was characterized by "patches" of bacteria closely associated with the lateral surfaces and less frequently with the tips and the bases of intact villi. In most cases, the adherent bacteria were separated from epithelial cell microvilli and other bacterial cells by a 50-400-nm space. Filamentous bacterial appendages bridged this space and formed a network among adjacent bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against putative colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and their use in an epidemiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Viboud, G I; Binsztein, N; Svennerholm, A M

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against five putative colonization factors (PCFs), i.e., colonization factor antigen (CFA)/III, coli surface antigen (CS)7 and CS17, PCFO159, and PCFO166 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), were produced. Hybridomas (one each) producing specific antibodies against the respective PCFs were selected. All the MAbs reacted with the corresponding fimbriae but not with CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV or the heterologous PCFs in bacterial agglutination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). In immunoelectron microscopy these MAbs bound along the fimbriae, and they also reacted with the corresponding subunits in immunoblots. The five MAbs were used to evaluate the prevalence of CFA/III, CS7, CS17, PCFO159, and PCFO166 in ETEC strains isolated from children with diarrhea in Argentina. One hundred five ETEC isolates negative for CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV were tested in slide agglutination or in a dot blot test for spontaneously agglutinating strains; positive results were confirmed by inhibition ELISAs. It was found that 27% of the CFA-negative ETEC strains carried one of the PCFs. The sensitivity of slide agglutination with these MAbs was similar to that with specific polyclonal antisera; however, the specificity was higher. PCFO166 was found in 9.5% of the strains tested, mainly in ETEC of serogroup O78 producing heat-stable toxin alone. CS17 and CS7 were identified in 6.7 and 5.7%, respectively, of strains producing heat-labile toxin only, most of which belonged to serogroup O114. PCFO159 was found in 3.8% of the isolates tested, whereas CFA/III was detected in only one ETEC strain. Images PMID:8096215

  17. Comparative genomic analysis and characteristics of NCCP15740, the major type of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taesoo; Chung, Si-Yun; Jung, Young-Hee; Jung, Su-Jin; Roh, Sang-Gyun; Park, Je-Seop; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Kim, Won; Bak, Young-Seok; Cho, Seung-Hak

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause infectious diarrhea and diarrheal death. However, the genetic properties of pathogenic strains vary spatially and temporally, making prevention and treatment difficult. In this study, the genomic features of the major type of ETEC in Korea from 2003 to 2011 were examined by whole-genome sequencing of strain NCCP15740, and a comparative genomic analysis was performed with O6 reference strains. The assembled genome size of NCCP15740 was 4,795,873 bp with 50.54% G+C content. Using rapid annotation using subsystem technology analysis, we predicted 4492 ORFs and 17 RNA genes. NCCP15740 was investigated for enterotoxin genes, colonization factor (CF) genes, serotype, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) profiles, and classical and nonclassical virulence factors. NCCP15740 belonged to the O6:H16 serotype and possessed enterotoxin genes encoding heat-stable toxin (STh) and heat-labile toxin (LT); 87.5% of the O6 serotype strains possessed both toxin types. NCCP15740 carried the colonization factors CS2 and CS3, whereas most O6 strains carried CS2-CS3-CS21 (79.2%). NCCP15740 harbored fewer virulence factors (59.4%) than the average observed in other O6 strains (62.0%). Interestingly, NCCP15740 did not harbor any nonclassical virulence genes. The major type of ETEC in Korea had the same MLST sequence type as that of isolates from the USA obtained in 2011 and 2014, but had different colonization factor types and virulence profiles. These results provide important information for the development of an ETEC vaccine candidate.

  18. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS21 pilus contributes to adhesion to intestinal cells and to pathogenesis under in vivo conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, C. P.; Luiz, W. B.; Sierra, A.; Cruz, C.; Qadri, F.; Kaushik, R. S.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Colonization surface antigens (CSs) represent key virulence-associated factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains. They are required for gut colonization, the first step of the diarrhoeal disease process induced by these bacteria. One of the most prevalent CSs is CS21, or longus, a type IV pili associated with bacterial self-aggregation, protection against environmental stresses, biofilm formation and adherence to epithelial cell lines. The objectives of this study were to assess the role of CS21 in adherence to primary intestinal epithelial cells and to determine if CS21 contributes to the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in vivo. We evaluated adherence of a CS21-expressing wild-type ETEC strain and an isogenic CS21-mutant strain to pig-derived intestinal cell lines. To determine the role of CS21 in pathogenesis we used the above ETEC strains in a neonatal mice challenge infection model to assess mortality. Quantitative adherence assays confirmed that ETEC adheres to primary intestinal epithelial cells lines in a CS21-dependent manner. In addition, the CS21-mediated ETEC adherence to cells was specific as purified LngA protein, the CS21 major subunit, competed for binding with the CS21-expressing ETEC while specific anti-LngA antibodies blocked adhesion to intestinal cells. Neonatal DBA/2 mice died after intra-stomach administration of CS21-expressing strains while lack of CS21 expression drastically reduced the virulence of the wild-type ETEC strain in this animal model. Collectively these results further support the role of CS21 during ETEC infection and add new evidence on its in vivo relevance in pathogenesis. PMID:23760820

  19. Phenotypic and Genotypic Analysis of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Samples Obtained from Egyptian Children Presenting to Referral Hospitals▿

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, H. I.; Abdel Messih, I. A.; Klena, J. D.; Mansour, A.; El-Wakkeel, Z.; Wierzba, T. F.; Sanders, J. W.; Khalil, S. B.; Rockabrand, D. M.; Monteville, M. R.; Rozmajzl, P. J.; Svennerholm, A. M.; Frenck, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    Hospital surveillance was established in the Nile River Delta to increase the understanding of the epidemiology of diarrheal disease among Egyptian children. Between September 2000 and August 2003, samples obtained from children less than 5 years of age who had diarrhea and who were seeking hospital care were cultured for enteric bacteria. Colonies from each culture with a morphology typical of that of Escherichia coli were tested for the heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) toxins by a GM-1-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and colonization factor (CF) antigens by an immunodot blot assay. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) isolates were recovered from 320/1,540 (20.7%) children, and ETEC isolates expressing a known CF were identified in 151/320 (47%) samples. ST CFA/I, ST CS6, ST CS14, and LT and ST CS5 plus CS6 represented 75% of the CFs expressed by ETEC isolates expressing a detectable CF. Year-to-year variability in the proportion of ETEC isolates that expressed a detectable CF was observed (e.g., the proportion that expressed CFA/I ranged from 10% in year 1 to 21% in year 3); however, the relative proportions of ETEC isolates expressing a CF were similar over the reporting period. The proportion of CF-positive ETEC isolates was higher among isolates that expressed ST. ETEC isolates expressing CS6 were isolated significantly less often (P < 0.001) than isolates expressing CFA/I in children less than 1 year of age. Macrorestriction profiling of CFA/I-expressing ETEC isolates by using the restriction enzyme XbaI and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated a wide genetic diversity among the isolates that did not directly correlate with the virulence of the pathogen. The genome plasticity demonstrated in the ETEC isolates collected in this work suggests an additional challenge to the development of a globally effective vaccine for ETEC. PMID:18971368

  20. Feed Fermentation with Reuteran- and Levan-Producing Lactobacillus reuteri Reduces Colonization of Weanling Pigs by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Galle, Sandra; Le, Minh Hong Anh; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Gänzle, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    This study determined the effect of feed fermentation with Lactobacillus reuteri on growth performance and the abundance of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in weanling piglets. L. reuteri strains produce reuteran or levan, exopolysaccharides that inhibit ETEC adhesion to the mucosa, and feed fermentation was conducted under conditions supporting exopolysaccharide formation and under conditions not supporting exopolysaccharide formation. Diets were chosen to assess the impact of organic acids and the impact of viable L. reuteri bacteria. Fecal samples were taken throughout 3 weeks of feeding; at the end of the 21-day feeding period, animals were euthanized to sample the gut digesta. The feed intake was reduced in pigs fed diets containing exopolysaccharides; however, feed efficiencies did not differ among the diets. Quantification of L. reuteri by quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected the two strains used for feed fermentation throughout the intestinal tract. Quantification of E. coli and ETEC virulence factors by qPCR demonstrated that fermented diets containing reuteran significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the copy numbers of genes for E. coli and the heat-stable enterotoxin in feces compared to those achieved with the control diet. Any fermented feed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the abundance of E. coli and the heat-stable enterotoxin in colonic digesta at 21 days; reuteran-containing diets reduced the copy numbers of the genes for E. coli and the heat-stable enterotoxin below the detection limit in samples from the ileum, the cecum, and the colon. In conclusion, feed fermentation with L. reuteri reduced the level of colonization of weaning piglets with ETEC, and feed fermentation supplied concentrations of reuteran that may specifically contribute to the effect on ETEC.

  1. Colonization Factors in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains in Travelers to Mexico, Guatemala, and India Compared with Children in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Vineetkumar B; Ahmed, Makhdum; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Riddle, Mark S; DuPont, Herbert L

    2017-01-11

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can be attributed to around 200 million diarrheal episodes and 380,000 deaths in the developing regions. Travelers' diarrhea occurs in 15-40% of travelers to developing regions with ETEC being the most important etiologic agent. This study aims to describe the distribution of enterotoxins and colonization factor (CF) profiles of ETEC isolates from stool samples of adult travelers acquiring diarrhea in Mexico, Guatemala, and India and a group of children with acute diarrhea in Houston, TX, between 2007 and 2012. The heat-labile/heat-stable (LT/ST) enterotoxins and CFs from 252 patients were determined using polymerase chain reaction assay. Among the 252 ETEC isolates, 15% were LT-only, 58% were ST-only, and 28% produced both LT and ST. The distribution of LT-only (12-15%) and ST-only (55-56%) isolates was similar between Latin American and Indian sites. The most prevalent CF was CS21, expressed in 65% of the isolates followed by CS6 (25%) and CS3 (17%). Among the international travelers, 64% of the ETEC isolates expressed CS21. CS21 was expressed in 46% of isolates from Latin America compared with 96% of isolates from India (P < 0.0001). CS21 was expressed in 85% isolates from Houston children. CS21 was increasingly found in ST-only (P = 0.003) and ST/LT (P = 0.026) ETEC compared with LT-only ETEC. High frequency of finding CS21 among recent isolates of ETEC over a wide geographic distribution warrants additional studies on this CF. Highly conserved CS21 is an important target for potential multivalent ETEC vaccines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Mucosal and systemic immune responses in patients with diarrhea due to CS6-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Ahmed, Tanvir; Ahmed, Firoz; Bhuiyan, M Saruar; Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Cassels, Frederick J; Helander, Anna; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2007-05-01

    Colonization factor CS6 expressed by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a nonfimbrial polymeric protein. A substantial proportion of ETEC strains isolated from patients in endemic settings and in people who travel to regions where ETEC is endemic are ETEC strains expressing CS6, either alone or in combination with fimbrial colonization factor CS5 or CS4. However, relatively little is known about the natural immune responses elicited against CS6 expressed by ETEC strains causing disease. We studied patients who were hospitalized with diarrhea (n = 46) caused by CS6-expressing ETEC (ETEC expressing CS6 or CS5 plus CS6) and had a disease spectrum ranging from severe dehydration (27%) to moderate or mild dehydration (73%). Using recombinant CS6 antigen, we found that more than 90% of the patients had mucosal immune responses to CS6 expressed as immunoglobulin (IgA) antibody-secreting cells (ASC) or antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) and that about 57% responded with CS6-specific IgA antibodies in feces. More than 80% of the patients showed IgA seroconversion to CS6. Significant increases in the levels of anti-CS6 antibodies of the IgG isotype were also observed in assays for ASC (75%), ALS (100%), and serum (70%). These studies demonstrated that patients hospitalized with the noninvasive enteric pathogen CS6-expressing ETEC responded with both mucosal and systemic antibodies against CS6. Studies are needed to determine if the anti-CS6 responses protect against reinfection and if protective levels of CS6 immunity are induced by vaccination.

  3. A DODECAMERIC RING-LIKE STRUCTURE OF THE N0 DOMAIN OF THE TYPE II SECRETIN FROM ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Delarosa, Jaclyn R.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, secretins from the type II secretion system (T2SS) function as outer membrane gated channels that enable passage of folded proteins from the periplasm into the extracellular milieu. Cryo-electron microscopy of the T2SS secretin GspD revealed previously the dodecameric cylindrical architecture of secretins, and crystal structures of periplasmic secretin domains showed a modular domain organization. However, no high-resolution experimental data has as yet been provided about how the entire T2SS secretin or its domains are organized in a cylindrical fashion. Here we present a crystal structure of the N0 domain of the T2SS secretin GspD from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli containing a helix with 12 subunits per turn. The helix has an outer diameter of ~125 Å and a pitch of only 24 Å which suggests a model of a cylindrical dodecameric N0 ring whose dimensions correspond with the cryo-electron microscopy map of Vibrio cholerae GspD. The N0 domain is known to interact with the HR domain of the inner membrane T2SS protein GspC. When the new N0 ring model is combined with the known N0• HR crystal structure, a dodecameric double-ring of twelve N0-HR heterodimers is obtained. In contrast, the previously observed compact N0-N1 GspD module is not compatible with the N0 ring. Interestingly, a N0-N1 T3SS homolog is compatible with forming a N0-N1 dodecameric ring, due to a different N0-vs-N1 orientation. This suggests that the dodecameric N0 ring is an important feature of T2SS secretins with periplasmic domains undergoing considerable motions during exoprotein translocation. PMID:23820381

  4. A dodecameric ring-like structure of the N0 domain of the type II secretin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Konstantin V; Delarosa, Jaclyn R; Hol, Wim G J

    2013-09-01

    In many bacteria, secretins from the type II secretion system (T2SS) function as outer membrane gated channels that enable passage of folded proteins from the periplasm into the extracellular milieu. Cryo-electron microscopy of the T2SS secretin GspD revealed previously the dodecameric cylindrical architecture of secretins, and crystal structures of periplasmic secretin domains showed a modular domain organization. However, no high-resolution experimental data has as yet been provided about how the entire T2SS secretin or its domains are organized in a cylindrical fashion. Here we present a crystal structure of the N0 domain of the T2SS secretin GspD from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli containing a helix with 12 subunits per turn. The helix has an outer diameter of ∼125Å and a pitch of only 24Å which suggests a model of a cylindrical dodecameric N0 ring whose dimensions correspond with the cryo-electron microscopy map of Vibrio cholerae GspD. The N0 domain is known to interact with the HR domain of the inner membrane T2SS protein GspC. When the new N0 ring model is combined with the known N0·HR crystal structure, a dodecameric double-ring of twelve N0-HR heterodimers is obtained. In contrast, the previously observed compact N0-N1 GspD module is not compatible with the N0 ring. Interestingly, a N0-N1 T3SS homolog is compatible with forming a N0-N1 dodecameric ring, due to a different N0-vs-N1 orientation. This suggests that the dodecameric N0 ring is an important feature of T2SS secretins with periplasmic domains undergoing considerable motions during exoprotein translocation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergence of a Multidrug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Lineage in Diseased Swine in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hikoda, Yuna; Fujii, Yuki; Murata, Misato; Miyoshi, Hirotsugu; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Iwata, Taketoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Akiba, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are important causes of diarrhea and edema disease in swine. The majority of swine-pathogenic E. coli strains belong to a limited range of O serogroups, including O8, O138, O139, O141, O147, O149, and O157, which are the most frequently reported strains worldwide. However, the circumstances of ETEC and STEC infections in Japan remain unknown; there have been few reports on the prevalence or characterization of swine-pathogenic E. coli. In the present study, we determined the O serogroups of 967 E. coli isolates collected between 1991 and 2014 from diseased swine in Japan, and we found that O139, O149, O116, and OSB9 (O serogroup of Shigella boydii type 9) were the predominant serogroups. We further analyzed these four O serogroups using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing, and virulence factor profiling. Most of the O139 and O149 strains formed serogroup-specific PFGE clusters (clusters I and II, respectively), whereas the O116 and OSB9 strains were grouped together in the same cluster (cluster III). All of the cluster III strains belonged to a single sequence type (ST88) and carried genes encoding both enterotoxin and Shiga toxin. This PFGE cluster III/ST88 lineage exhibited a high level of multidrug resistance (to a median of 10 antimicrobials). Notably, these bacteria were resistant to fluoroquinolones. Thus, this lineage should be considered a significant risk to animal production due to the toxigenicity and antimicrobial resistance of these bacteria. PMID:26865687

  6. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Colonization following Intradermal, Sublingual, or Oral Vaccination with EtpA Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingwei; Vickers, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a common cause of diarrhea. Extraordinary antigenic diversity has prompted a search for conserved antigens to complement canonical approaches to ETEC vaccine development. EtpA, an immunogenic extracellular ETEC adhesin relatively conserved in the ETEC pathovar, has previously been shown to be a protective antigen following intranasal immunization. These studies were undertaken to explore alternative routes of EtpA vaccination that would permit use of a double mutant (R192G L211A) heat-labile toxin (dmLT) adjuvant. Here, oral vaccination with EtpA adjuvanted with dmLT afforded significant protection against small intestinal colonization, and the degree of protection correlated with fecal IgG, IgA, or total fecal antibody responses to EtpA. Sublingual vaccination yielded compartmentalized mucosal immune responses with significant increases in anti-EtpA fecal IgG and IgA, and mice vaccinated via this route were also protected against colonization. In contrast, while intradermal (i.d.) vaccination achieved high levels of both serum and fecal antibodies against both EtpA and dmLT, mice vaccinated via the i.d. route were not protected against subsequent colonization and the avidity of serum IgG and IgA EtpA-specific antibodies was significantly lower after i.d. immunization compared to other routes. Finally, we demonstrate that antiserum from vaccinated mice significantly impairs binding of LT to cognate GM1 receptors and shows near complete neutralization of toxin delivery by ETEC in vitro. Collectively, these data provide further evidence that EtpA could complement future vaccine strategies but also suggest that additional effort will be required to optimize its use as a protective immunogen. PMID:27226279

  7. Effect of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccine on innate immune function of bovine mammary gland infused with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Kanda, N; Shinde, S; Isobe, N

    2012-09-01

    The effects of using an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccine on innate immune responses following intramammary infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated in midlactation Holstein-Friesian cows. Seven out of 14 cows were inoculated with E. coli vaccine. Three weeks later, 100 μg of LPS dissolved in 10 mL of saline was infused into 1 quarter of all cows. Milk was collected every hour from infusion to 12 h after infusion, and twice daily (at 0900 and 1600 h) for 4 d. Blood samples were collected 0, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after infusion. Rectal temperatures and milk yields were measured. The somatic cell count (SCC), lingual antimicrobial peptide concentration, lactoperoxidase (LPO) activity, and lactoferrin (LF) concentration in milk, and haptoglobin concentration in serum were determined. The mean rectal temperature in vaccinated cows was higher than in control cows at 10 h. The mean milk yield was decreased significantly in the infused quarter of control cows at 24 h compared with pretreatment, but not in vaccinated cows. The mean SCC in milk from vaccinated cows at 12 and 55 h was significantly lower than that of control cows. The lingual antimicrobial peptide and LF concentrations were significantly lower at 8 h and 55 h, respectively, in vaccinated cows than in control cows. The mean antibody titer in the serum against the vaccine at the time of LPS infusion into vaccinated cows was significantly higher than in control cows. These antibody titers were positively correlated with the peak concentrations of LPO and LF in milk following challenge; therefore, cows with a high antibody titer were accompanied by high LPO activity and LF concentration in milk. These results suggest that vaccination suppresses the innate immune reaction after intramammary LPS infusion; however, the elevated antibody titer was unlikely to be responsible for the modification of the innate immune reaction. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published

  8. Administration of probiotics influences F4 (K88)-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli attachment and intestinal cytokine expression in weaned pigs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the probiotics Pediococcus acidilactici and Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii on the intestinal colonization of O149 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli harbouring the F4 (K88) fimbriae (ETEC F4) and on the expression of ileal cytokines in weaned pigs. At birth, different litters of pigs were randomly assigned to one of the following treatments: 1) control without antibiotics or probiotics (CTRL); 2) reference group in which chlortetracycline and tiamulin were added to weanling feed (ATB); 3) P. acidilactici; 4) S. cerevisiae boulardii; or 5) P. acidilactici + S. cerevisiae boulardii. Probiotics were administered daily (1 × 109 CFU per pig) during the lactation period and after weaning (day 21). At 28 days of age, all pigs were orally challenged with an ETEC F4 strain, and a necropsy was performed 24 h later. Intestinal segments were collected to evaluate bacterial colonization in the small intestine and ileal cytokine expressions. Attachment of ETEC F4 to the intestinal mucosa was significantly reduced in pigs treated with P. acidilactici or S. cerevisiae boulardii in comparison with the ATB group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). In addition, proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, were upregulated in ETEC F4 challenged pigs treated with P. acidilactici alone or in combination with S. cerevisiae boulardii compared with the CTRL group. In conclusion, the administration of P. acidilactici or S. cerevisiae boulardii was effective in reducing ETEC F4 attachment to the ileal mucosa, whereas the presence of P. acidilactici was required to modulate the expression of intestinal inflammatory cytokines in pigs challenged with ETEC F4. PMID:21605377

  9. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from two paediatric cohort studies in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Medina, Anicia M; Rivera, Fulton P; Pons, Maria J; Riveros, Maribel; Gomes, Cláudia; Bernal, María; Meza, Rina; Maves, Ryan C; Huicho, Luis; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Lanata, Claudio F; Gil, Ana I; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, being of special concern in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of resistance in 205 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates from two cohort studies in children <24 months in Lima, Peru. ETEC were identified by an in-house multiplex real-time PCR. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was tested by disk diffusion; mechanisms of resistance were evaluated by PCR. ETEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin (64%), cotrimoxazole (52%), tetracycline (37%); 39% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. Heat-stable toxin producing (ETEC-st) (48%) and heat-labile toxin producing ETEC (ETEC-lt) (40%) had higher rates of multidrug resistance than isolates producing both toxins (ETEC-lt-st) (21%), p<0.05. Only 10% of isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid and none to ciprofloxacin or cefotaxime. Ampicillin and sulfamethoxazole resistance were most often associated with blaTEM (69%) and sul2 genes (68%), respectively. Tetracycline resistance was associated with tet(A) (49%) and tet(B) (39%) genes. Azithromycin inhibitory diameters were ≤15 mm in 36% of isolates, with 5% of those presenting the mph(A) gene. ETEC from Peruvian children are often resistant to older, inexpensive antibiotics, while remaining susceptible to ciprofloxacin, cephalosporins and furazolidone. Fluoroquinolones and azithromycin remain the drugs of choice for ETEC infections in Peru. However, further development of resistance should be closely monitored. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Feed Fermentation with Reuteran- and Levan-Producing Lactobacillus reuteri Reduces Colonization of Weanling Pigs by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Galle, Sandra; Le, Minh Hong Anh; Zijlstra, Ruurd T.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effect of feed fermentation with Lactobacillus reuteri on growth performance and the abundance of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in weanling piglets. L. reuteri strains produce reuteran or levan, exopolysaccharides that inhibit ETEC adhesion to the mucosa, and feed fermentation was conducted under conditions supporting exopolysaccharide formation and under conditions not supporting exopolysaccharide formation. Diets were chosen to assess the impact of organic acids and the impact of viable L. reuteri bacteria. Fecal samples were taken throughout 3 weeks of feeding; at the end of the 21-day feeding period, animals were euthanized to sample the gut digesta. The feed intake was reduced in pigs fed diets containing exopolysaccharides; however, feed efficiencies did not differ among the diets. Quantification of L. reuteri by quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected the two strains used for feed fermentation throughout the intestinal tract. Quantification of E. coli and ETEC virulence factors by qPCR demonstrated that fermented diets containing reuteran significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the copy numbers of genes for E. coli and the heat-stable enterotoxin in feces compared to those achieved with the control diet. Any fermented feed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the abundance of E. coli and the heat-stable enterotoxin in colonic digesta at 21 days; reuteran-containing diets reduced the copy numbers of the genes for E. coli and the heat-stable enterotoxin below the detection limit in samples from the ileum, the cecum, and the colon. In conclusion, feed fermentation with L. reuteri reduced the level of colonization of weaning piglets with ETEC, and feed fermentation supplied concentrations of reuteran that may specifically contribute to the effect on ETEC. PMID:26070673

  11. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (P<0.05), inhibited the increased transcript abundances of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) (P<0.05), decreased expression of claudin-1, occludin and zonula occludens (ZO-1) (P<0.05) and protein expression of occludin (P<0.05) of IPEC-J2 cells caused by ETEC K88. Moreover, the mRNA expression of negative regulators of toll-like receptors (TLRs) [single Ig Il-1-related receptor (SIGIRR), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1)] in IPEC-J2 cells pre-treated with L. plantarum were higher (P<0.05) compared with those in cells just exposed to K88. Furthermore, L. plantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Improvements in the passive immune hemolysis test for assaying enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A F; Serafim, M B; Gomes, J A; Gatti, M S

    1980-01-01

    The sensitivity of the passive immune hemolysis test for the detection of heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli was increased when the test was carried out with Veronal-buffered saline plus Ca2+ and Mg2+ as diluent, instead of phosphate-buffered saline. The performance of the test was further improved by using stationary cultures to which mitomycin C had been added at the end of the lag phase. PMID:6792218

  13. Genetic probes for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from childhood diarrhea in the Central African Republic.

    PubMed Central

    Georges, M C; Wachsmuth, I K; Birkness, K A; Moseley, S L; Georges, A J

    1983-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains were isolated from 778 children with diarrhea and 151 well children in the Central African Republic over a period of 1 year. These 929 strains were assayed for heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxin production and were hybridized (probed) with structural genes for these enterotoxins. Twenty-four isolates from diarrheal patients and one isolate from a well child were found to be toxigenic by assay and probe. Minor discrepancies were encountered with both assays and probes during initial screening procedures, but the two methodologies were ultimately comparable. Images PMID:6350346

  14. Genetic Characterization and Immunogenicity of Coli Surface Antigen 4 from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli when It Is Expressed in a Shigella Live-Vector Strain

    PubMed Central

    Altboum, Zeev; Levine, Myron M.; Galen, James E.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    The genes that encode the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) CS4 fimbriae, csaA, -B, -C, -E, and -D′, were isolated from strain E11881A. The csa operon encodes a 17-kDa major fimbrial subunit (CsaB), a 40-kDa tip-associated protein (CsaE), a 27-kDa chaperone-like protein (CsaA), a 97-kDa usher-like protein (CsaC), and a deleted regulatory protein (CsaD′). The predicted amino acid sequences of the CS4 proteins are highly homologous to structural and assembly proteins of other ETEC fimbriae, including CS1 and CS2, and to CFA/I in particular. The csaA, -B, -C, -E operon was cloned on a stabilized plasmid downstream from an osomotically regulated ompC promoter. pGA2-CS4 directs production of CS4 fimbriae in both E. coli DH5α and Shigella flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204, as detected by Western blot analysis and bacterial agglutination with anti-CS4 immune sera. Electron-microscopic examination of Shigella expressing CS4 confirmed the presence of fimbriae on the bacterial surface. Guinea pigs immunized with CVD 1204(pGA2-CS4) showed serum and mucosal antibody responses to both the Shigella vector and the ETEC fimbria CS4. Among the seven most prevalent fimbrial antigens of human ETEC, CS4 is the last to be cloned and sequenced. These findings pave the way for CS4 to be included in multivalent ETEC vaccines, including an attenuated Shigella live-vector-based ETEC vaccine. PMID:12595452

  15. Over-expression of major colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, alone or together, on non-toxigenic E. coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Holmgren, Jan; Hellman, Maria; Nygren, Erik; Lebens, Michael; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2010-10-08

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrheal disease and deaths among children in developing countries and the major cause of traveller's diarrhea. Since surface protein colonization factors (CFs) of ETEC are important for pathogenicity and immune protection is mainly mediated by locally produced IgA antibodies in the gut, much effort has focused on the development of an oral CF-based vaccine. We have recently described the development of recombinant strains over-expressing CFA/I; the most prevalent CF among human clinical ETEC isolates. Here, non-toxigenic recombinant E. coli strains over-expressing Coli surface antigen 2 (CS2), CS4, CS5, and CS6, either alone, or each in combination with CFA/I were constructed by cloning the genes required for expression and assembly of each CF into expression vectors harboring a strong promoter. Immunological assays showed that recombinant strains expressing single CFs produced those in significantly larger amounts than did corresponding naturally high producing reference strains. Recombinant strains co-expressing CFA/I together with another CF also expressed significantly larger amounts of both CFs compared with the corresponding references strains. Further, when tested in mice, oral immunization with formalin-killed recombinant bacteria co-expressing one such double-expression CF pair, CFA/I+CS2, induced specific serum IgG+IgM and fecal IgA antibody responses against both CFs exceeding the responses induced by immunizations with natural reference strains expressing CFA/I and CS2, respectively. We conclude that the described type of recombinant bacteria over-expressing major CFs of ETEC, alone or in combination, may be useful as candidate strains for use in an oral whole-cell CF-ETEC vaccine.

  16. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp)

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J.; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located. PMID:27054573

  17. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  18. Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a Vaccine Strain CVD 1204 Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I and Mutant Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koprowski, Hilary; Levine, Myron M.; Anderson, Richard J.; Losonsky, Genevieve; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Barry, Eileen M.

    2000-01-01

    A multivalent live oral vaccine against both Shigella spp. and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is being developed based on the hypothesis that protection can be achieved if attenuated shigellae express ETEC fimbrial colonization factors and genetically detoxified heat-labile toxin from a human ETEC isolate (LTh). Two detoxified derivatives of LTh, LThK63 and LThR72, were engineered by substitution—serine to lysine at residue 63, or lysine to arginine at residue 72. The genes encoding these two derivatives were cloned separately on expression plasmids downstream from the CFA/I operon. Following electroporation into S. flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204, coexpression of CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, GM1 binding assays, and agglutination with anti-CFA/I antiserum. Hemagglutination and electron microscopy confirmed surface expression of CFA/I. Guinea pigs immunized intranasally on days 0 and 15 with CVD 1204 expressing CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 exhibited high titers of both serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA anti-CFA/I; 40% of the animals produced antibodies directed against LTh. All immunized guinea pigs also produced mucosal IgA (in tears) and serum IgG anti-S. flexneri 2a O antibodies. Furthermore, all immunized animals were protected from challenge with wild-type S. flexneri 2a. This prototype Shigella-ETEC hybrid vaccine demonstrates the feasibility of expressing multiple ETEC antigens on a single plasmid in an attenuated Shigella vaccine strain and engendering immune responses against both the heterologous antigens and vector strain. PMID:10948101

  19. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with STh and STp Genotypes Is Associated with Diarrhea Both in Children in Areas of Endemicity and in Travelers▿

    PubMed Central

    Bölin, Ingrid ; Wiklund, Gudrun; Qadri, Firdausi; Torres, Olga; Bourgeois, A. Louis; Savarino, Stephen; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea among children in developing countries and in travelers to areas of ETEC endemicity. ETEC strains isolated from humans may produce a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and two types of the heat-stable enterotoxin STa, called STh and STp, encoded by the estA gene. Two commonly used assay methods for the detection of STa, the infant mouse assay or different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, are unable to distinguish between the two subtypes of ST. Different genotypic methods, such as DNA probes or PCR assays, may, however, allow such discrimination. Using gene probes, it has recently been reported that ETEC strains producing STp as the only enterotoxin are not associated with diarrhea. In this study, we have used highly specific PCR methods, including newly designed primers for STh together with previously described STp primers, to compare the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC isolated from children with diarrhea in three different geographically distinct areas, i.e., Bangladesh, Egypt, and Guatemala, and from travelers to Mexico and Guatemala. It was found that ETEC strains producing STp were as commonly isolated from cases of diarrhea as strains producing STh both in Egypt and Guatemala, whereas STp strains were considerably less common in Bangladesh. No difference was found in the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC strains isolated from travelers with diarrhea and from asymptomatic carriers. Irrespective of ST genotype, the disease symptoms were also similar in both children and travelers. PMID:16943355

  20. Synthesis and application of glycoconjugate-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as potent anti-adhesion agents for reducing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raval, Yash S.; Stone, Roland; Fellows, Benjamin; Qi, Bin; Huang, Guohui; Mefford, O. Thompson; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J.

    2015-04-01

    Polyethylene oxide stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PEO-MNPs) bio-functionalized with glycoconjugate (Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glcβ-sp) (GM3-MNPs) are synthesized using click chemistry. Interaction of GM3-MNPs with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain K99 (EC K99) is investigated using different microscopic techniques. Our results suggest that GM3-MNPs can effectively act as non-antibiotic anti-adhesion agents for treating ETEC infections.Polyethylene oxide stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PEO-MNPs) bio-functionalized with glycoconjugate (Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glcβ-sp) (GM3-MNPs) are synthesized using click chemistry. Interaction of GM3-MNPs with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain K99 (EC K99) is investigated using different microscopic techniques. Our results suggest that GM3-MNPs can effectively act as non-antibiotic anti-adhesion agents for treating ETEC infections. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods used in the synthesis and characterization of the polymer and particles described in this manuscript. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00511f

  1. Influence of oral antibiotics on resistance and enterotoxigenicity of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bourque, R; Lallier, R; Larivière, S

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of five piglets were formed and 1390 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained during the 45-day period of observation. One of the groups received feed without antibiotic whereas the second received feed containing 100 ppm neomycin and the third feed with 100 ppm neomycin plus 100 ppm tetracycline. Rectal swabbings for bacterial isolation were repeated ten times, twice during an adaptation period and eight times during the treatment period. Resistance among the isolates to tetracycline, streptomycin and triple sulfas remained high throughout this experiment whereas resistance to neomycin, chloramphenicol and ampicillin were found to increase significantly under the influence of antibiotic supplemented feed. This increase of antibiotic resistance was associated with an increase of the percentage of isolates harboring an R. factor. When comparing the ability of strains harboring an R factor to receive the plasmid Ent from the E. coli K12 (P155) with isolates not harboring such a plasmid, no significant difference was observed in their ability to receive the Ent plasmid.

  2. Influence of oral antibiotics on resistance and enterotoxigenicity of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, R; Lallier, R; Larivière, S

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of five piglets were formed and 1390 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained during the 45-day period of observation. One of the groups received feed without antibiotic whereas the second received feed containing 100 ppm neomycin and the third feed with 100 ppm neomycin plus 100 ppm tetracycline. Rectal swabbings for bacterial isolation were repeated ten times, twice during an adaptation period and eight times during the treatment period. Resistance among the isolates to tetracycline, streptomycin and triple sulfas remained high throughout this experiment whereas resistance to neomycin, chloramphenicol and ampicillin were found to increase significantly under the influence of antibiotic supplemented feed. This increase of antibiotic resistance was associated with an increase of the percentage of isolates harboring an R. factor. When comparing the ability of strains harboring an R factor to receive the plasmid Ent from the E. coli K12 (P155) with isolates not harboring such a plasmid, no significant difference was observed in their ability to receive the Ent plasmid. PMID:6994861

  3. Lactobacillus zeae Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Caused Death by Inhibiting Enterotoxin Gene Expression of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengzhou; Yu, Hai; Yin, Xianhua; Sabour, Parviz M.; Chen, Wei; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become increasingly used for screening antimicrobials and probiotics for pathogen control. It also provides a useful tool for studying microbe-host interactions. This study has established a C. elegans life-span assay to preselect probiotic bacteria for controlling K88+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a pathogen causing pig diarrhea, and has determined a potential mechanism underlying the protection provided by Lactobacillus. Methodology/Principal Findings Life-span of C. elegans was used to measure the response of worms to ETEC infection and protection provided by lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB). Among 13 LAB isolates that varied in their ability to protect C. elegans from death induced by ETEC strain JG280, Lactobacillus zeae LB1 offered the highest level of protection (86%). The treatment with Lactobacillus did not reduce ETEC JG280 colonization in the nematode intestine. Feeding E. coli strain JFF4 (K88+ but lacking enterotoxin genes of estA, estB, and elt) did not cause death of worms. There was a significant increase in gene expression of estA, estB, and elt during ETEC JG280 infection, which was remarkably inhibited by isolate LB1. The clone with either estA or estB expressed in E. coli DH5α was as effective as ETEC JG280 in killing the nematode. However, the elt clone killed only approximately 40% of worms. The killing by the clones could also be prevented by isolate LB1. The same isolate only partially inhibited the gene expression of enterotoxins in both ETEC JG280 and E. coli DH5α in-vitro. Conclusions/Significance The established life-span assay can be used for studies of probiotics to control ETEC (for effective selection and mechanistic studies). Heat-stable enterotoxins appeared to be the main factors responsible for the death of C. elegans. Inhibition of ETEC enterotoxin production, rather than interference of its intestinal colonization, appears to be the mechanism of protection

  4. Pathogenicity and Phenotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from a Birth Cohort of Children in Rural Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Hind I.; Amine, Mohamed; Hassan, Khaled; Sanders, John W.; Riddle, Mark S.; Armstrong, Adam W.; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sebeny, Peter J.; Klena, John D.; Young, Sylvia Y. N.; Frenck, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has consistently been the predominant bacterial cause of diarrhea in many birth cohort- and hospital-based studies conducted in Egypt. We evaluated the pathogenicity of ETEC isolates in a birth cohort of children living in a rural community in Egypt. Between 2004 and 2007, we enrolled and followed 348 children starting at birth until their second year of life. A stool sample and two rectal swabs were collected from children during twice-weekly visits when they presented with diarrhea and were collected every 2 weeks if no diarrhea was reported. From routine stool cultures, five E. coli-like colonies were screened for ETEC enterotoxins using a GM1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The isolates were screened against a panel of 12 colonization factor antigens (CFAs) by a dot blot assay. A nested case-control study evaluated the association between initial or repeat excretion of ETEC and the occurrences of diarrhea. The pathogenicity of ETEC was estimated in symptomatic children compared to that in asymptomatic controls. ETEC was significantly associated with diarrhea (crude odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24 to 1.52). The distribution of ETEC enterotoxins varied between the symptomatic children (44.2% heat-labile toxin [LT], 38.5% heat-stable toxin [ST], and 17.3% LT/ST) and asymptomatic children (55.5% LT, 34.6% ST, and 9.9% LT/ST) (P < 0.001). The CFAs CFA/I (n = 61), CS3 (n = 8), CS1 plus CS3 (n = 24), CS2 plus CS3 (n = 18), CS6 (n = 45), CS5 plus CS6 (n = 11), CS7 (n = 25), and CS14 (n = 32) were frequently detected in symptomatic children, while CS6 (n = 66), CS12 (n = 51), CFA/I (n = 43), and CS14 (n = 20) were detected at higher frequencies among asymptomatic children. While all toxin phenotypes were associated with diarrheal disease after the initial exposure, only ST and LT/ST-expressing ETEC isolates (P < 0.0001) were associated with disease in repeat infections. The role of enterotoxins and

  5. Magnolol and honokiol regulate the calcium-activated potassium channels signaling pathway in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanli; Han, Xuefeng; Tang, Shaoxun; Xiao, Wenjun; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinghe

    2015-05-15

    To explore the regulatory mechanisms of magnolol and honokiol on calcium-activated potassium channels signaling pathway in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-induced diarrhea mice, the concentrations of serum chloride ion (Cl(-)), sodium ion (Na(+)), potassium ion (K(+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) were measured. Additionally, the mRNA expressions of calmodulin 1 (CaM), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha subunit (CaMKIIα) and beta subunit (CaMKIIβ), ryanodine receptor 1, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 receptors), protein kinases C (PKC), potassium intermediate/small conductance calcium-activated channels (SK) and potassium large conductance calcium-activated channels(BK)were determined. A diarrhea mouse model was established using ETEC suspensions (3.29×10(9)CFU/ml) at a dosage of 0.02ml/g live body weight (BW). Magnolol or honokiol was intragastrically administered at dosages of 100 (M100 or H100), 300 (M300 or H300) and 500 (M500 or H500) mg/kg BW according to a 3×3 factorial arrangement. Magnolol and honokiol increased the Cl(-) and K(+) concentrations, further, upregulated the CaM, BKα1 and BKβ3 mRNA levels but downregulated the IP3 receptors 1, PKC, SK1, SK2, SK3, SK4 and BKβ4 mRNA expressions. Magnolol and honokiol did not alter the CaMKIIα, CaMKIIβ, ryanodine receptor 1, IP3 receptor 2, IP3 receptor 3, BKβ1 and BKβ2 mRNA expressions. These results clarify that magnolol and honokiol, acting through Ca(2+) channel blockade, inhibit the activation of IP3 receptor 1 to regulate the IP3-Ca(2+) store release, activate CaM to inhibit SK channels, and effectively suppress PKC kinases to promote BKα1 and BKβ3 channels opening and BKβ4 channel closing, which modulates the intestinal ion secretion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum on diarrhea and intestinal barrier function of young piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    PubMed

    Yang, K M; Jiang, Z Y; Zheng, C T; Wang, L; Yang, X F

    2014-04-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the preventative effect of Lactobacillus plantarum on diarrhea in relation to intestinal barrier function in young piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88. Seventy-two male piglets (4 d old) were assigned to 2 diets (antibiotic-free basal diet with or without L. plantarum, 5 × 10(10) cfu/kg diet) and subsequently challenged or not with ETEC K88 (1 × 10(8) cfu per pig) on d 15 in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Feed intake and BW were measured on d 15 and 18 (3 d after challenge) for determination of growth performance. On d 18, 1 piglet from each pen was slaughtered to evaluate small intestinal morphology and expression of tight junction proteins at the mRNA and protein levels while another piglet was used for the intestinal permeability test. Before and after ETEC K88 challenge, piglets fed L. plantarum had greater BW, ADG, and ADFI (P < 0.05) and marginally greater G:F (P < 0.10) compared to piglets fed the unsupplemented diet. After ETEC K88 challenge, the challenged piglets did not show an impaired growth performance but had greater incidence of diarrhea compared to the nonchallenged piglets. There was an interaction between dietary L. plantarum and ETEC K88 challenge (P < 0.05) as L. plantarum prevented the ETEC K88-induced diarrhea. Piglets challenged with ETEC K88 also had greater urinary lactulose:mannitol and plasma concentration of endotoxin, shorter villi, deeper crypt depth, and reduced villous height:crypt depth in the duodenum and jejunum and decreased zonula occludens-1 mRNA and occludin mRNA and protein expression in the jejunum (P < 0.05). These deleterious effects caused by ETEC K88 were inhibited by feeding L. plantarum (P < 0.05). There were no effects of either treatment on the morphology and expression of tight junction proteins in ileum. In conclusion, L. plantarum, given to piglets in early life, improved performance and effectively prevented the

  7. An outbreak of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection in Norway, 2012: a reminder to consider uncommon pathogens in outbreaks involving imported products.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, E; Møller, K E; Wester, A L; Dahle, U R; Hermansen, N O; Jenum, P A; Thoresen, L; Vold, L

    2015-02-01

    We investigated an outbreak of gastroenteritis following a Christmas buffet served on 4-9 December 2012 to ~1300 hotel guests. More than 300 people were reported ill in initial interviews with hotel guests. To identify possible sources of infection we conducted a cohort investigation through which we identified 214 probable cases. Illness was associated with consumption of scrambled eggs (odds ratio 9·07, 95% confidence interval 5·20-15·84). Imported chives added fresh to the scrambled eggs were the suspected source of the outbreak but were unavailable for testing. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was eventually confirmed in 40 hotel guests. This outbreak reinforces that ETEC should be considered in non-endemic countries when the clinical picture is consistent and common gastrointestinal pathogens are not found. Following this outbreak, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority recommended that imported fresh herbs should be heat-treated before use in commercial kitchens.

  8. Toxins and virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with strains isolated from indigenous children and international visitors to a rural community in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Torres, O R; González, W; Lemus, O; Pratdesaba, R A; Matute, J A; Wiklund, G; Sack, D A; Bourgeois, A L; Svennerholm, A-M

    2015-06-01

    Diarrhoea remains a common cause of illness in Guatemala, with children suffering most frequently from the disease. This study directly compared the frequency, enterotoxin, and colonization factor (CF) profiles of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated from children living in a rural community in Guatemala and from Western visitors to the same location during the same seasons, using similar detection methodologies. We found that ETEC accounted for 26% of severe cases of diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalization, 15% of diarrhoea in the community, and 29% of travellers' diarrhoea in visitors staying ⩾2 weeks. The toxin and CF patterns of the ETEC strains isolated from both groups differed significantly (P < 0·0005) as determined by χ 2 = 60·39 for CFs and χ 2 = 35 for toxins, while ETEC phenotypes found in Guatemalan children were comparable to those found in children from other areas of the world.

  9. A Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Promotes EGFR-Independent Akt Activation in an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88-Infected IPEC-J2 Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cai; Yang, Gui-Yan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are important intestinal pathogens that cause diarrhea in humans and animals. Although probiotic bacteria may protect against ETEC-induced enteric infections, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, porcine intestinal epithelial J2 cells (IPEC-J2) were pre-incubated with and without Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and then exposed to F4+ ETEC. Increases in TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA expression were observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge, but these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus treatment. Expression of TLR2 and NOD1 mRNA was up-regulated in cells pre-treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus counteracted F4+ ETEC-induced increases in TNF-α concentration. Increased PGE2. concentrations were observed in cells infected with F4+ ETEC and in cells treated with L. rhamnosus only. A decrease in phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge in cells treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus enhanced Akt phosphorylation and increased ZO-1 and occludin protein expression. Our findings suggest that L. rhamnosus protects intestinal epithelial cells from F4+ ETEC-induced damage, partly through the anti-inflammatory response involving synergism between TLR2 and NOD1. In addition, L. rhamnosus promotes EGFR-independent Akt activation, which may activate intestinal epithelial cells in response to bacterial infection, in turn increasing tight junction integrity and thus enhancing the barrier function and restricting pathogen invasion. Pre-incubation with L. rhamnosus was superior to co-incubation in reducing the adhesion of F4+ ETEC to IPEC-J2 cells and subsequently attenuating F4+ ETEC-induced mucin layer destruction and suppressing apoptosis. Our data indicate that a selected L. rhamnosus strain interacts with porcine intestinal epithelial cells to maintain the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal epithelial cell activation in

  10. A Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Promotes EGFR-Independent Akt Activation in an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88-Infected IPEC-J2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Yang, Jin-Cai; Yang, Gui-Yan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are important intestinal pathogens that cause diarrhea in humans and animals. Although probiotic bacteria may protect against ETEC-induced enteric infections, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, porcine intestinal epithelial J2 cells (IPEC-J2) were pre-incubated with and without Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and then exposed to F4+ ETEC. Increases in TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA expression were observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge, but these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus treatment. Expression of TLR2 and NOD1 mRNA was up-regulated in cells pre-treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus counteracted F4+ ETEC-induced increases in TNF-α concentration. Increased PGE2. concentrations were observed in cells infected with F4+ ETEC and in cells treated with L. rhamnosus only. A decrease in phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge in cells treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus enhanced Akt phosphorylation and increased ZO-1 and occludin protein expression. Our findings suggest that L. rhamnosus protects intestinal epithelial cells from F4+ ETEC-induced damage, partly through the anti-inflammatory response involving synergism between TLR2 and NOD1. In addition, L. rhamnosus promotes EGFR-independent Akt activation, which may activate intestinal epithelial cells in response to bacterial infection, in turn increasing tight junction integrity and thus enhancing the barrier function and restricting pathogen invasion. Pre-incubation with L. rhamnosus was superior to co-incubation in reducing the adhesion of F4+ ETEC to IPEC-J2 cells and subsequently attenuating F4+ ETEC-induced mucin layer destruction and suppressing apoptosis. Our data indicate that a selected L. rhamnosus strain interacts with porcine intestinal epithelial cells to maintain the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal epithelial cell activation in

  11. Multiplicity of serogroups and adhesins in enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from acute diarrhea in Senegal.

    PubMed Central

    Darfeuille-Michaud, A; Forestier, C; Masseboeuf, R; Rich, C; M'Boup, S; Joly, B; Denis, F

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains were isolated from 228 children with diarrhea in Senegal from 1982 to 1984. Among these E. coli involved in cases of diarrhea, we found that 20.3% were enteropathogenic E. coli. Only 3.9% of the strains adhered to the brush borders of human intestinal enterocytes, and they belonged to different serotypes. All these adhesion-positive strains possessed genes encoding for the heat-stable enterotoxin, but their adhesive factors were different regarding serology with anti-colonization factor sera, hemagglutination patterns, electron microscopy structures, or major surface protein subunits. PMID:2885338

  12. Crystal Structure of the Minor Pilin CofB, the Initiator of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Kolappan, Subramania; Ng, Dixon; Yang, Guixiang; Harn, Tony; Craig, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili are extracellular polymers of the major pilin subunit. These subunits are held together in the pilus filament by hydrophobic interactions among their N-terminal α-helices, which also anchor the pilin subunits in the inner membrane prior to pilus assembly. Type IV pilus assembly involves a conserved group of proteins that span the envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Among these is a set of minor pilins, so named because they share their hydrophobic N-terminal polymerization/membrane anchor segment with the major pilins but are much less abundant. Minor pilins influence pilus assembly and retraction, but their precise functions are not well defined. The Type IV pilus systems of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae are among the simplest of Type IV pilus systems and possess only a single minor pilin. Here we show that the enterotoxigenic E. coli minor pilins CofB and LngB are required for assembly of their respective Type IV pili, CFA/III and Longus. Low levels of the minor pilins are optimal for pilus assembly, and CofB can be detected in the pilus fraction. We solved the 2.0 Å crystal structure of N-terminally truncated CofB, revealing a pilin-like protein with an extended C-terminal region composed of two discrete domains connected by flexible linkers. The C-terminal region is required for CofB to initiate pilus assembly. We propose a model for CofB-initiated pilus assembly with implications for understanding filament growth in more complex Type IV pilus systems as well as the related Type II secretion system. PMID:26324721

  13. Crystal Structure of the Minor Pilin CofB, the Initiator of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramania; Ng, Dixon; Yang, Guixiang; Harn, Tony; Craig, Lisa

    2015-10-23

    Type IV pili are extracellular polymers of the major pilin subunit. These subunits are held together in the pilus filament by hydrophobic interactions among their N-terminal α-helices, which also anchor the pilin subunits in the inner membrane prior to pilus assembly. Type IV pilus assembly involves a conserved group of proteins that span the envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Among these is a set of minor pilins, so named because they share their hydrophobic N-terminal polymerization/membrane anchor segment with the major pilins but are much less abundant. Minor pilins influence pilus assembly and retraction, but their precise functions are not well defined. The Type IV pilus systems of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae are among the simplest of Type IV pilus systems and possess only a single minor pilin. Here we show that the enterotoxigenic E. coli minor pilins CofB and LngB are required for assembly of their respective Type IV pili, CFA/III and Longus. Low levels of the minor pilins are optimal for pilus assembly, and CofB can be detected in the pilus fraction. We solved the 2.0 Å crystal structure of N-terminally truncated CofB, revealing a pilin-like protein with an extended C-terminal region composed of two discrete domains connected by flexible linkers. The C-terminal region is required for CofB to initiate pilus assembly. We propose a model for CofB-initiated pilus assembly with implications for understanding filament growth in more complex Type IV pilus systems as well as the related Type II secretion system. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Volunteer Challenge With Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli That Express Intestinal Colonization Factor Fimbriae CS17 and CS19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Levine MM, Merson MM. Serologic differentiation between antitoxin responses to infection with Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxin-producing Escherichia coli...prototype cholera B subunit-colonization factor antigen cnterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccine. Vaccine 1993; 1[:929-34. 15. Levine MM, Nalin DR

  15. Induction of Th1 polarized immune responses by thiolated Eudragit-coated F4 and F18 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Jung; Cha, Seungbin; Shin, Minkyoung; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Cho, Chong-su; Yoo, Han Sang

    2011-10-01

    Diarrhea in newborn and weaned piglets is mainly induced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) with fimbriae F4 (K88) and F18 (F107). In this study, we evaluated F4 and F18 coated with thiolated Eudragit microspheres (TEMS) as a candidate for an oral vaccine. The average particle sizes of TEMS, F4-loaded TEMS, and F18-loaded TEMS were measured as 4.2±0.75 μm, 4.7±0.50 μm, and 4.5±0.37 μm, respectively. F4 is more efficiently encapsulated than F18 in the loading with TEMS. In the release test, F4 and F18 fimbriae were protected in acidic circumstances, whereas most were released at pH 7.4 of intestine circumstances. Production of TNF-α and NO from RAW 264.7 cells was increased in a time-dependent manner after exposure to all groups, whereas only F4- or F18-loaded TEMS-stimulated IL-6 secretion. The levels of IFN-γ from mouse splenocytes after exposure to F4 or F18 were increased while IL-4 was not detectable. These results suggest that F4- and F18-loaded TEMS may effectively induce immune response with the efficient release of antigens to appropriate target sites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Monoclonal antibody passive hemagglutination and capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for direct detection and quantitation of F41 and K99 fimbrial antigens in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Raybould, T J; Crouch, C F; Acres, S D

    1987-01-01

    Production of diarrhea in neonatal calves by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli depends on its ability to attach to the epithelial cells of the intestine via surface adhesins called pili or fimbriae and to secrete enterotoxins. The most important of these fimbriae are designated K99 and F41. We produced and characterized a murine monoclonal antibody specific to F41. This monoclonal antibody and a K99-specific monoclonal antibody were used to develop sensitive and specific passive hemagglutination and capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detection and quantitation of F41 and K99 antigens in E. coli cultures and culture supernatants. The capture ELISA systems exhibited excellent sensitivity and specificity, whereas the passive hemagglutination systems appeared to be oversensitive. The ability of the capture ELISAs to detect K99 and F41 fimbrial antigens in fecal specimens from calves was evaluated. Fimbrial antigens were detected in six of six specimens from scouring calves but not in four of four specimens from nonscouring calves. PMID:2880866

  17. Requirement for capsular antigen KX105 and fimbrial antigen CS1541 in the pathogenicity of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O8:KX105 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Broes, A; Fairbrother, J M; Jacques, M; Larivière, S

    1989-01-01

    The requirement for capsular antigen KX105 and fimbrial antigen CS1541 in the pathogenicity of porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O8:KX105 strains lacking the colonization factor antigens K88, K99, 987P and F41 was investigated using two encapsulated strains and their acapsular variants, one of which produced the fimbrial antigen CS1541 in vitro. None of the strains adhered in vitro to enterocytes isolated from newborn colostrum-deprived piglets. All of the strains caused diarrhea in orally infected, hysterotomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets although a great variability in the clinical response of the piglets was observed. Colonization of the small intestine of infected piglets by these strains was only moderate and no differences in the ability to colonize the small intestine was noted between the strains. All of the strains reacted in the indirect fluorescent antibody test with both CS1541 and 987P antisera when applied to organisms in the intestines of infected piglets. A control strain expressing the 987P fimbrial adhesin also reacted with the CS1541 antiserum applied to organisms in the intestines of an infected piglet. It was concluded that capsular antigen KX105 was not essential for intestinal colonization and production of diarrhea in hysterotomy-derived colostrum-deprived pigs, and that fimbrial antigen CS1541 does not promote in vitro adherence to enterocyte brush borders but could be important in bacterial colonization in vivo. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2563336

  18. Effect of different plant extracts and natural substances (PENS) against membrane damage induced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 in pig intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Roselli, M; Britti, M S; Le Huërou-Luron, I; Marfaing, H; Zhu, W Y; Mengheri, E

    2007-03-01

    Pig weaning period is frequently associated with infectious disease, mainly caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88. Plant extracts exert different beneficial effects and may represent antibiotic alternatives to reduce piglet infection. In this study, plant extracts and other natural substances (PENS) have been evaluated on the pig intestinal IPEC-1 cells, for potential protection against ETEC K88 induced membrane damage. Several PENS have been considered: yeast extract, yeast nucleotides, unsaturated oligo-mannuronic acid, ulvan, bromelain and three fractions of bovine colostrums, as anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory compounds; daidzein and Chlorella vulgaris extract, as anti-oxidant compounds; allicin, cinnamaldehyde and carvacrol, as anti-bacterial compounds. First, possible toxic effect of PENS on cell membrane permeability was verified by assessing the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular flux of the extracellular marker phenol red. The highest non-toxic PENS concentration was added to ETEC infected cells to test the protection against membrane damage. The results showed that yeast extract, daidzein, bovine colostrum, bromelain and allicin protected the cells against the increased membrane permeability caused by ETEC, whereas the other PENS did not show this ability. Allicin protection was not due to its anti-bacterial activity, since ETEC growth was unaffected by the presence of allicin.

  19. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of a freeze-dried formulation of a novel combined multivalent whole-cell/B-subunit oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Borde, Annika; Ekman, Annelie; Larsson, Anette; Carlin, Nils; Holmgren, Jan; Tobias, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    A promising liquid killed multivalent whole-cell plus enterotoxin B-subunit oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the primary cause of diarrhea among children in low-income countries and travelers to these areas, has recently been developed and tested in preclinical and phase-I and phase-II clinical studies. The vaccine contains killed E. coli bacteria over-expressing the main ETEC colonization factors (CFs) CFA/I, CS3, C5 and C6, and a recombinant enterotoxin B subunit protein (LCTBA) given together with a recently developed enterotoxin-derived adjuvant, dmLT. A dry-powder vaccine formulation should be advantageous especially for use in low-income countries. Here we describe a method to produce a dry-powder formulation by freeze-drying of the vaccine using inulin as stabilizer. Although not completely preventing aggregation of bacteria during freeze-drying, the stabilizer provided both improved overall bacterial morphology and almost complete recovery of the CF and B subunit antigens. Most importantly, oral-intragastric immunization of mice with the freeze-dried vaccine together with dmLT adjuvant elicited strong intestinal mucosal and serum antibody responses against all vaccine antigens, which were comparable to those achieved with the liquid vaccine. Our results indicate the feasibility to use freeze-drying with inulin as stabilizer for preparing a dry-powder formulation of the novel ETEC vaccine with retained oral-mucosal immunogenicity compared to the liquid formulation.

  20. The epidemiology of travelers' diarrhea in Incirlik, Turkey: a region with a predominance of heat-stabile toxin producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Porter, Chad K; Riddle, Mark S; Tribble, David R; Putnam, Shannon D; Rockabrand, David M; Frenck, Robert W; Rozmajzl, Patrick; Kilbane, Edward; Fox, Ann; Ruck, Richard; Lim, Matthew; Johnston, James; Murphy, Emmett; Sanders, John W

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated travelers' diarrhea among US military personnel on short-term deployment to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, from June through September 2002. Upon reporting for care for travelers' diarrhea, subjects were enrolled into the study and completed a series of questionnaires and provided stool specimens for pathogen identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Fifty-three percent of the 202 participating subjects had a pathogen isolated from their stool. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was the predominant pathogen (41%), followed by Campylobacter spp. (12%). The most common ETEC phenotype recovered was stable toxin (ST) CS6 (47% of all ETEC). Most (91.1%) of the cases presented with water diarrhea regardless of isolated pathogen. However, there were some differences in nongastrointestinal symptoms among subjects with Campylobacter spp. All illnesses were well managed with antibiotics with or without loperamide with a median time to the last unformed stool of 9 h (interquartile range, 1-32 h). We found no food or environmental factors associated with a differential risk of infection with a specific pathogen. Travelers' diarrhea among a US military population in and around Incirlik, Turkey, can commonly be attributed to ETEC and Campylobacter spp. The high proportion of ST-only-producing CS6 ETEC in this region highlights the pathogen's worldwide diversity. Future studies of travelers' diarrhea in this population should adapt more novel microbiologic techniques such as polymerase chain reaction and enhanced culture methods to increase the likelihood of identifying pathogenic E. coli. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Both flagella and F4 fimbriae from F4ac+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli contribute to attachment to IPEC-J2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Duan, Qiangde; Zhu, Xiaofang; Guo, Zhiyan; Li, Yinchau; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-05-13

    The role of flagella in the pathogenesis of F4ac+ Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) mediated neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) is not currently understood. We targeted the reference C83902 ETEC strain (O8:H19:F4ac+ LT+ STa+ STb+), to construct isogenic mutants in the fliC (encoding the major flagellin protein), motA (encoding the flagella motor), and faeG (encoding the major subunit of F4 fimbriae) genes. Both the ΔfliC and ΔfaeG mutants had a reduced ability to adhere to porcine intestinal epithelial IPEC-J2 cells. F4 fimbriae expression was significantly down-regulated after deleting fliC, which revealed that co-regulation exists between flagella and F4 fimbriae. However, there was no difference in adhesion between the ΔmotA mutant and its parent strain. These data demonstrate that both flagella and F4 fimbriae are required for efficient F4ac+ ETEC adhesion in vitro.

  2. Altered Cytokine Expression and Barrier Properties after In Vitro Infection of Porcine Epithelial Cells with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Probiotic Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Günzel, Dorothee; Bondzio, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of the probiotic feed additive Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium) on porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) during an in vitro challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Cells were incubated with E. faecium, ETEC, or both, and the effects on barrier function and structure and intra- and intercellular signaling were determined. Coincubation with E. faecium abolished the ETEC-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance (Rt) (p ≤ 0.05). No differences were seen in the expression levels of the intercellular connecting tight junction proteins examined. However, for the first time, a reorganization of the monolayer was observed in ETEC-infected cells but not in coincubated cells. ETEC induced an increase in cytotoxicity that was prevented by coincubation (p ≤ 0.05), whereas apoptosis rates were not affected by bacterial treatment. ETEC increased the mRNA expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-6 which could be prevented by coincubation for TNF-α mRNA expression and IL-6 protein (p ≤ 0.05). Likewise, cAMP concentrations elevated by ETEC were reduced in coincubated cells (p ≤ 0.05). These findings indicate a protective effect of the probiotic E. faecium on inflammatory responses during infection with ETEC. PMID:28607532

  3. Entire sequence of the colonization factor coli surface antigen 6-encoding plasmid pCss165 from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Sabui, Subrata; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Hamabata, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) is one of the most prevalent colonization factors among enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated in developing countries. Although it is known that CS6 is encoded by a plasmid, there are no reports on the sequence analysis of the CS6-encoding plasmid or genes exhibiting similar behavior to CS6. Here, we report the isolation of the CS6-encoding plasmid, pCss165Kan, from 4266 ΔcssB::kanamycin (Km) and its complete nucleotide sequence. This plasmid consisted of 165,311bp and 222 predicted coding sequences. Remarkably, there were many insertion sequence (IS) elements, which comprised 24.4% of the entire sequence. Virulence-associated genes such as heat-stable enterotoxin, homologues of ATP-binding cassette transporter in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and ETEC autotransporter A were also present, although the ETEC autotransporter A gene was disrupted by the integration of IS629. We found that 2 transcriptional regulators belonging to the AraC family were not involved in CS6 expression. Interestingly, pCss165 had conjugative transfer genes, as well as 3 toxin-antitoxin systems that potentially exclude other plasmid-free host bacteria. These genes might be involved in the prevalence of CS6 among ETEC isolates.

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production.

  5. Differences in serological responses and excretion patterns of volunteers challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with and without the colonization factor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Satterwhite, T K; Evans, D J; DuPont, H L

    1978-01-01

    Double-blind studies were performed to compare the virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with and without the fimbriate colonization factor antigen (CFA), using young healthy adults (mean age, 23 years) as volunteers. In the first study one group of volunteers ingested 1 X 10(6) E. coli H-10407, the CFA-positive strain, and another group ingested 1 X 10(6) E. coli H-10407-P, the CFA-negative spontaneous derivative of strain H-10407. The second study was similar except that the test strains were administered at a dose of 1 X 10(8) viable cells. Three parameters of infection were monitored: (i) diarrhea and associated symptoms; (ii) excretion pattern of test strains; and (iii) humoral antibody response to CFA, somatic antigen, and heat-labile enterotoxin. Significant signs of illness occurred only in six of seven volunteers who ingested E. coli H-10407 at a dose of 1 X 10(8). At both doses, E. coli H-10407-P appeared in the stool on day 1 postchallenge and disappeared by day 4. In contrast, strain H-10407 was persistently excreted from the first to the last day of the study. Also, only those volunteers in the H-10407 challenge groups (12 of 13 analyzed) responded with a fourfold antibody titer rise to CFA, somatic antigen, and/or heat-labile enterotoxin. No reversion of H-10407-P to H-10407 was detected. PMID:346488

  6. Identification of a Gene within a Pathogenicity Island of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli H10407 Required for Maximal Secretion of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M.; Lindler, Luther E.; Elsinghorst, Eric A.; Dale, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) have largely centered on extrachromosomal determinants of virulence, in particular the plasmid-encoded heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins and the colonization factor antigens. ETEC causes illnesses that range from mild diarrhea to severe cholera-like disease. These differences in disease severity are not readily accounted for by our current understanding of ETEC pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that Tia, a putative adhesin of ETEC H10407, is encoded on a large chromosomal element of approximately 46 kb that shares multiple features with previously described E. coli pathogenicity islands. Further analysis of the region downstream from tia revealed the presence of several candidate open reading frames (ORFs) in the same transcriptional orientation as tia. The putative proteins encoded by these ORFs bear multiple motifs associated with bacterial secretion apparatuses. An in-frame deletion in one candidate gene identified here as leoA (labile enterotoxin output) resulted in marked diminution of secretion of the LT enterotoxin and lack of fluid accumulation in a rabbit ileal loop model of infection. Although previous studies have suggested that E. coli lacks the capacity to secrete LT, our studies show that maximal release of LT from the periplasm of H10407 is dependent on one or more elements encoded on a pathogenicity island. PMID:10768971

  7. Presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Enteroinvasive E. coli, Enteropathogenic E. coli, and Enterotoxigenic E. coli on tomatoes from public markets in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Torres-Vitela, M Del Refugio; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Andjavier

    2013-09-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEP) are important foodborne pathogens in various countries, including Mexico. However, no data exist on the presence of DEP on fresh tomatoes (Solanum lycopericum) from Mexico. The frequency of fecal coliforms (FC), E. coli, and DEP were determined for two tomato varieties. One hundred samples of a saladette tomato variety and 100 samples of a red round tomato variety were collected from public markets in Pachuca, Mexico. Each tomato sample consisted of four whole tomatoes. For the 100 saladette samples, coliform bacterial, FC, E. coli, and DEP were identified in 100, 70, 60, and 10% of samples, respectively. For the 100 red round samples, coliform bacterial, FC, E. coli, and DEP were identified in 100, 75, 65, and 11% of samples, respectively. Identified DEP included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). STEC were isolated from 6% of saladette samples and 5% of red round samples. ETEC were isolated from 3% of saladette samples and 4% of red round samples. EPEC were isolated from 2% of saladette samples and 3% of red round samples, and EIEC were isolated from 1% of saladette samples. Both STEC and ETEC were identified in two saladette samples and 1 red round sample. E. coli O157:H7 was not detected in any STEC-positive samples.

  8. Behavior of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on alfalfa sprouts.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, M Del Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2013-08-01

    Data about the behavior of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (non-O157 STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) on seeds and alfalfa sprouts are not available. The behavior of STEC, EIEC, ETEC, and EPEC was determined during germination and sprouting of alfalfa seeds at 20 ± 2°C and 30 ± 2°C and on alfalfa sprouts at 3 ± 2°C. When alfalfa seeds were inoculated with STEC, EIEC, ETEC, or EPEC strains, all these diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) grew during germination and sprouting of seeds, reaching counts of approximately 5 and 6 log CFU/g after 1 day at 20 ± 2°C and 30 ± 2°C, respectively. However, when the sprouts were inoculated after 1 day of seed germination and stored at 20 ± 2°C or 30 ± 2°C, no growth was observed for any DEP during sprouting at 20 ± 2°C or 30 ± 2°C for 9 days. Refrigeration reduced significantly (P < 0.0.5) the number of viable DEPs on sprouts after 20 days in storage; nevertheless, these decreases have no practical significance for the safety of the sprouts.

  9. Construction and expression of immunogenic hybrid enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I and CS2 colonization fimbriae for use in vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Holmgren, Jan; Lebens, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of diarrheal morbidity in developing countries, especially in children and also of traveler's diarrhea. Colonization factors (CFs) of ETEC, like CFA/I and CS2 which are genetically and structurally related, play a substantial role in pathogenicity, and since intestinal-mucosal immune responses against CFs appear to be protective, much effort has focused on the development of a CF-based ETEC vaccine. We have constructed hybrid operons in which the major CS2 subunit-encoding cotA gene was inserted into the CFA/I operon, either replacing (hybrid I) or being added to the major CFA/I subunit-encoding cfaB gene (hybrid II). Using specific monoclonal antibodies against the major subunits of CFA/I and CS2, high levels of surface expression of both fimbrial subunits were shown in E. coli carrying the hybrid II operon. Oral immunization of mice with formalin-killed bacteria expressing hybrid II fimbriae induced strong CFA/I- and CS2-specific serum IgG + IgM and fecal IgA antibody responses, which were higher than those achieved by similar immunization with the reference strains. Bacteria expressing hybrid fimbriae are potential candidate strains in an oral-killed CF-ETEC vaccine, and the approach represents an attractive and novel means of producing a broad-spectrum ETEC vaccine.

  10. Binding of CFA/I Pili of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to Asialo-GM1 Is Mediated by the Minor Pilin CfaE.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Riches, James D; Scanlon, Martin J; Ulett, Glen C; Sakellaris, Harry

    2016-05-01

    CFA/I pili are representatives of a large family of related pili that mediate the adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells. They are assembled via the alternate chaperone-usher pathway and consist of two subunits, CfaB, which makes up the pilus shaft and a single pilus tip-associated subunit, CfaE. The current model of pilus-mediated adherence proposes that CFA/I has two distinct binding activities; the CfaE subunit is responsible for binding to receptors of unknown structure on erythrocyte and intestinal epithelial cell surfaces, while CfaB binds to various glycosphingolipids, including asialo-GM1. In this report, we present two independent lines of evidence that, contrary to the existing model, CfaB does not bind to asialo-GM1 independently of CfaE. Neither purified CfaB subunits nor CfaB assembled into pili bind to asialo-GM1. Instead, we demonstrate that binding activity toward asialo-GM1 resides in CfaE and this is essential for pilus binding to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that the binding activities of CFA/I pili for asialo-GM1, erythrocytes, and intestinal cells are inseparable, require the same amino acid residues in CfaE, and therefore depend on the same or very similar binding mechanisms. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. A Chimeric protein of CFA/I, CS6 subunits and LTB/STa toxoid protects immunized mice against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zeinalzadeh, Narges; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Goujani, Goli; Amani, Jafar; Ahangari, Ghasem; Akhavian, Asal; Jafari, Mahyat

    2017-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli (ETEC) strains are the commonest bacteria causing diarrhea in children in developing countries and travelers to these areas. Colonization factors (CFs) and enterotoxins are the main virulence determinants in ETEC pathogenesis. Heterogeneity of CFs is commonly considered the bottleneck to developing an effective vaccine. It is believed that broad spectrum protection against ETEC would be achieved by induced anti-CF and anti-enterotoxin immunity simultaneously. Here, a fusion antigen strategy was used to construct a quadrivalent recombinant protein called 3CL and composed of CfaB, a structural subunit of CFA/I, and CS6 structural subunits, LTB and STa toxoid of ETEC. Its anti-CF and antitoxin immunogenicity was then assessed. To achieve high-level expression, the 3CL gene was synthesized using E. coli codon bias. Female BALB/C mice were immunized with purified recombinant 3CL. Immunized mice developed antibodies that were capable of detecting each recombinant subunit in addition to native CS6 protein and also protected the mice against ETEC challenge. Moreover, sera from immunized mice also neutralized STa toxin in a suckling mouse assay. These results indicate that 3CL can induce anti-CF and neutralizing antitoxin antibodies along with introducing CFA/I as a platform for epitope insertion. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Binding of CFA/I Pili of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to Asialo-GM1 Is Mediated by the Minor Pilin CfaE

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, T. P. Vipin; Riches, James D.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    CFA/I pili are representatives of a large family of related pili that mediate the adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells. They are assembled via the alternate chaperone-usher pathway and consist of two subunits, CfaB, which makes up the pilus shaft and a single pilus tip-associated subunit, CfaE. The current model of pilus-mediated adherence proposes that CFA/I has two distinct binding activities; the CfaE subunit is responsible for binding to receptors of unknown structure on erythrocyte and intestinal epithelial cell surfaces, while CfaB binds to various glycosphingolipids, including asialo-GM1. In this report, we present two independent lines of evidence that, contrary to the existing model, CfaB does not bind to asialo-GM1 independently of CfaE. Neither purified CfaB subunits nor CfaB assembled into pili bind to asialo-GM1. Instead, we demonstrate that binding activity toward asialo-GM1 resides in CfaE and this is essential for pilus binding to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that the binding activities of CFA/I pili for asialo-GM1, erythrocytes, and intestinal cells are inseparable, require the same amino acid residues in CfaE, and therefore depend on the same or very similar binding mechanisms. PMID:26975993

  13. Construction of non-toxic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae strains expressing high and immunogenic levels of enterotoxigenic E. coli colonization factor I fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Lebens, Michael; Bölin, Ingrid; Wiklund, Gudrun; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2008-02-06

    To express high quantities of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) derived from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) for use in ETEC vaccines, the entire CFA/I operon consisting of four genes (cfa-A, -B, -C, -E) was cloned into plasmid expression vectors that could be maintained either with or without antibiotic selection. Expression from the powerful tac promoter was under the control of the lacIq repressor present on the plasmids. Fimbriae were expressed on the surface of both a non-toxigenic E. coli K12 strain and a non-toxigenic strain of Vibrio cholerae following induction with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). It was found that the recombinant E. coli strains expressed up to 16-fold higher levels of CFA/I fimbriae compared to a reference strain which had previously been shown to be among the highest natural producers of the CFA/I fimbriae among tested wild type ETEC strains. Oral immunization with formalin-killed recombinant E. coli bacteria over-expressing CFA/I induced significantly higher serum IgA and IgG+M antibodies responses compared to the reference strain. Oral immunization with formalin-killed recombinant V. cholerae bacteria also induce strong CFA/I-specific serum IgA and IgG+M responses. We conclude that our constructs may be useful as candidate strains in an oral killed CF-ETEC vaccine.

  14. Different assay conditions for detecting the production and release of heat-labile and heat-stable toxins in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Letícia B; Ozaki, Christiane Y; Horton, Denise S P Q; Menezes, Caroline A; Silva, Anderson; Fernandes, Irene; Magnoli, Fabio C; Vaz, Tania M I; Guth, Beatriz E C; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2013-12-02

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable enterotoxins (ST). Despite that, the mechanism of action of both toxins are well known, there is great controversy in the literature concerning the in vitro production and release of LT and, for ST, no major concerns have been discussed. Furthermore, the majority of published papers describe the use of only one or a few ETEC isolates to define the production and release of these toxins, which hinders the detection of ETEC by phenotypic approaches. Thus, the present study was undertaken to obtain a better understanding of ST and LT toxin production and release under laboratory conditions. Accordingly, a collection of 90 LT-, ST-, and ST/LT-producing ETEC isolates was used to determine a protocol for toxin production and release aimed at ETEC detection. For this, we used previously raised anti-LT antibodies and the anti-ST monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies described herein. The presence of bile salts and the use of certain antibiotics improved ETEC toxin production/release. Triton X-100, as chemical treatment, proved to be an alternative method for toxin release. Consequently, a common protocol that can increase the production and release of LT and ST toxins could facilitate and enhance the sensitivity of diagnostic tests for ETEC using the raised and described antibodies in the present work.

  15. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  16. Association of vitamin D status with incidence of enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli diarrhoea in children of urban Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A M S; Soares Magalhaes, R J; Long, K Z; Ahmed, T; Alam, Md A; Hossain, Md I; Islam, Md M; Mahfuz, M; Mondal, D; Haque, R; Mamun, A A

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the association between vitamin D status and diarrhoeal episodes by enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli in underweight and normal-weight children aged 6-24 months in urban Bangladesh. Cohorts of 446 normal-weight and 466 underweight children were tested separately for ETEC, EPEC and EAEC from diarrhoeal stool samples collected during 5 months of follow-up while considering vitamin D status at enrolment as the exposure. Cox proportional hazards models with unordered failure events of the same type were used to determine diarrhoeal risk factors after adjusting for sociodemographic and concurrent micronutrient status. Vitamin D status was not independently associated with the risk of incidence of ETEC, EPEC and EAEC diarrhoea in underweight children, but moderate-to-severe retinol deficiency was associated with reduced risk for EPEC diarrhoea upon adjustment. Among normal-weight children, insufficient vitamin D status and moderate-to-severe retinol deficiency were independently associated with 44% and 38% reduced risk of incidence of EAEC diarrhoea, respectively. These children were at higher risk of ETEC diarrhoea with vitamin D deficiency status when adjusted for micronutrient status only. This study demonstrates for the first time that normal-weight children with insufficient vitamin D status have a reduced risk of EAEC diarrhoea than children with sufficient status. Moderate-to-severe deficiency of serum retinol is associated with reduced risk of EPEC and EAEC diarrhoea in underweight and normal-weight children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-08-26

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) that cross-react immunologically with heterologous CFAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, A; McConnell, M M; Svennerholm, A M

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli binds to enterocytes in the small intestine by means of antigenically distinct colonization factors (CFs), usually termed colonization factor antigens (CFAs), coli surface antigens (CS), or putative colonization factor antigens (PCFs). To explore the immunological relationship between different CFs, we dissociated CFA/I fimbriae into subunits and produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against these subunits. We selected three MAbs that cross-reacted immunologically with a number of different, whole purified CFs in a dot blot test and with the corresponding subunits in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One of the MAbs, i.e., subunit CFA/I 17:8 (S-CFA/I 17:8), reacted more strongly with subunits of CFA/I than with whole purified fimbriae. This MAb cross-reacted with whole purified fimbriae and subunits of CS4, PCFO166, CS1, and CS2. Moreover, it bound strongly to a peptide of 25 amino acids corresponding to the N-terminal end of CFA/I. The other two MAbs, i.e., S-CFA/I 5:6 and S-CFA/I 8:11, cross-reacted with CS1, CS2, CS4, PCFO166, and CS17 fimbriae but reacted only slightly or not at all with the CFA/I peptide. MAbs S-CFA/I 17:8 and S-CFA/I 5:6 were shown to inhibit hemagglutination by bacterial strains that express either CFA/I, CS1, or CS4. In addition, the binding of enterotoxigenic E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CS2, CS4, and PCFO166 to enterocyte-like cell-line Caco-2 was inhibited by both MAbs. These results show that several antigenically different CFs have common epitopes and that among these at least one is located in the N-terminal end of the subunit protein. Moreover, antibodies against the common epitopes seem to block binding of the bacterial strains that express different CFs to both erythrocytes and Caco-2 cells. Images PMID:7927693

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli serotype O8:KX105 and O8:K"2829" strains isolated from piglets with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Broes, A; Fairbrother, J M; Mainil, J; Harel, J; Lariviere, S

    1988-11-01

    Twelve pathogenic and seven nonpathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains which were previously identified as belonging to serogroup O8:KX105 (A. Broes, J. M. Fairbrother, S. Larivière, M. Jacques, and W. M. Johnson, Infect. Immun. 56:241-246, 1988) were further examined for their phenotypic and genotypic properties. Only the 12 pathogenic strains were confirmed to possess the capsular antigen KX105. The seven nonpathogenic strains did not possess this antigen and thus were incorrectly assigned to have capsular antigen KX105. All seven nonpathogenic strains apparently possessed a previously unrecognized capsular antigen which has been designated K"2829". Studies with antisera prepared against F1 (type 1) fimbriae from three E. coli strains suggested that at least three antigenic subtypes of F1 fimbriae were represented among the O8:KX105 strains examined. By using serotyping, biotyping, and outer membrane protein profile analyses, the O8:KX105 strains were divided into at least two distinct clusters, whereas the O8:K"2829" strains were grouped into a single unique cluster. Most of the strains of the same cluster were further differentiated by testing for antibiotic resistance and colicin production and resistance and by analysis of plasmid content. With the exception of one strain which lost its enterotoxicity during storage, all of the O8:KX105 strains hybridized with the gene probes for the heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (STb) enterotoxins. For each O8:KX105 strain, a single plasmid ranging in size from 61 to 77 megadaltons carried the LT and STb genes. All of the enterotoxigenic O8: KX105 strains fermented sorbose, whereas the nonenterotoxigenic strain did not. All of the O8:K "2829" strains hybridized with the STb probe only. For each O8:K "2829" strain, the STb genes were located on a single plasmid of 61 or 22 megadaltons. None of the strains demonstrated homology with the genes encoding the F4 (K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), and F41 fimbrial antigens

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli serotype O8:KX105 and O8:K"2829" strains isolated from piglets with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Broes, A; Fairbrother, J M; Mainil, J; Harel, J; Lariviere, S

    1988-01-01

    Twelve pathogenic and seven nonpathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains which were previously identified as belonging to serogroup O8:KX105 (A. Broes, J. M. Fairbrother, S. Larivière, M. Jacques, and W. M. Johnson, Infect. Immun. 56:241-246, 1988) were further examined for their phenotypic and genotypic properties. Only the 12 pathogenic strains were confirmed to possess the capsular antigen KX105. The seven nonpathogenic strains did not possess this antigen and thus were incorrectly assigned to have capsular antigen KX105. All seven nonpathogenic strains apparently possessed a previously unrecognized capsular antigen which has been designated K"2829". Studies with antisera prepared against F1 (type 1) fimbriae from three E. coli strains suggested that at least three antigenic subtypes of F1 fimbriae were represented among the O8:KX105 strains examined. By using serotyping, biotyping, and outer membrane protein profile analyses, the O8:KX105 strains were divided into at least two distinct clusters, whereas the O8:K"2829" strains were grouped into a single unique cluster. Most of the strains of the same cluster were further differentiated by testing for antibiotic resistance and colicin production and resistance and by analysis of plasmid content. With the exception of one strain which lost its enterotoxicity during storage, all of the O8:KX105 strains hybridized with the gene probes for the heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (STb) enterotoxins. For each O8:KX105 strain, a single plasmid ranging in size from 61 to 77 megadaltons carried the LT and STb genes.All of the enterotoxigenic O8: KX105 strains fermented sorbose, whereas the nonenterotoxigenic strain did not. All of the O8:K "2829" strains hybridized with the STb probe only. For each O8:K "2829" strain, the STb genes were located on a single plasmid of 61 or 22 megadaltons. None of the strains demonstrated homology with the genes encoding the F4 (K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), and F41 fimbrial antigens

  1. Immunization of suckling pigs against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrheal disease by vaccinating dams with purified 987 or K99 pili: protection correlates with pilus homology of vaccine and challenge.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R L; Isaacson, R E; Moon, H W; Brinton, C C; To, C C

    1978-12-01

    Pregnant gilts were vaccinated with purified strain 987 pili (987P), strain K99 pili, or a saline-formaldehyde control. Suckling pigs born to vaccinated gilts were allowed to consume colostrum and were then challenged intragastrically with one of three enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains: 987 (O9:K103, 987P:NM), 74-5208 (02O:K101, 987P:NM) or 431 (O101:K30, 99:NM). In litters where the dam was vaccinated with the same pilus as that possessed by the challenge organism, the incidence and duration of diarrhea and the degree of intestinal colonization (either duration or extent) were less than those of the other vaccine groups. Surviving pigs in the homologous vaccine groups also had better weight gains than pigs in the other vaccine groups. The experiments extend and confirm previous reports that vaccination of the dam with purified pili confers protection to neonatal suckling pigs against diarrheal disease caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli strains that possess the same pili. Protection did not extend to enterotoxigenic strains possessing different pili.

  2. Enterotoxigenic potential of Staphylococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Becker, K; Keller, B; von Eiff, C; Brück, M; Lubritz, G; Etienne, J; Peters, G

    2001-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) caused by enterotoxigenic staphylococci is one of the main food-borne diseases. In contrast to Staphylococcus aureus, a systematic screening for the enterotoxins has not yet been performed on the genomic level for the coagulase-positive species S. intermedius. Therefore, the enterotoxigenic potential of 281 different veterinary (canine, n = 247; equine, n = 23; feline, n = 9; other, n = 2) and 11 human isolates of S. intermedius was tested by using a multiplex PCR DNA-enzyme immunoassay system targeting the staphylococcal enterotoxin genes sea, seb, sec, sed, and see. Molecular results were compared by in vitro testing of enterotoxin production by two immunoassays. A total of 33 (11.3%) S. intermedius isolates, including 31 (12.6%) canine isolates, 1 equine isolate, and 1 human isolate, tested positive for the sec gene. In vitro production of the respective enterotoxins was detected in 30 (90.9%) of these isolates by using immunological tests. In contrast, none of 65 veterinary specimen-derived isolates additionally tested and comprising 13 (sub)species of coagulase-negative staphylococci were found to be enterotoxigenic. This study shows on both molecular and immunological levels that a substantial number of S. intermedius isolates harbor the potential for enterotoxin production. Since evidence for noninvasive zoonotic transmission of S. intermedius from animal hosts to humans has been documented, an enterotoxigenic role of this microorganism in SFP via contamination of food products may be assumed.

  3. Impact of rapid urbanization on the rates of infection by Vibrio cholerae O1 and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Begum, Yasmin A; Khan, Ashraful I; Faruque, Abu S G; Saha, Nirod Chandra; Baby, Nabilah Ibnat; Malek, M A; Kumar, Anisha Rajeev; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Pietroni, Mark; Cravioto, Alejandro; Qadri, Firdausi

    2011-04-05

    In Bangladesh, increases in cholera epidemics are being documented with a greater incidence and severity. The aim of this prospective study was to identify the prevalence and importance of V. cholerae O1 and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as causal agents of severe diarrhea in a high diarrhea prone urban area in Dhaka city. Systematic surveillance was carried out on all diarrheal patients admitted from Mirpur between March 2008 to February 2010 at the ICDDR, B hospital. Stool or rectal swabs were collected from every third diarrheal patient for microbiological evaluation. Of diarrheal patients attending the hospital from Mirpur, 41% suffered from severe dehydration with 39% requiring intravenous rehydration therapy. More diarrheal patients were above five years of age (64%) than those below five years of age (36%). About 60% of the patients above five years of age had severe dehydration compared with only 9% of patients under five years of age. The most prevalent pathogen isolated was Vibrio cholerae O1 (23%) followed by ETEC (11%). About 8% of cholera infection was seen in infants with the youngest children being one month of age while in the case of ETEC the rate was 11%. Of the isolated ETEC strains, the enterotoxin type were almost equally distributed; ST accounted for 31% of strains; LT/ST for 38% and LT for 31%. V. cholerae O1 is the major bacterial pathogen and a cause of severe cholera disease in 23% of patients from Mirpur. This represents a socioeconomic group that best reflects the major areas of high cholera burden in the country. Vaccines that can target such high risk groups in the country and the region will hopefully be able to reduce the disease morbidity and the transmission of pathogens that impact the life and health of people.

  4. Effects of lng Mutations on LngA Expression, Processing, and CS21 Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli E9034A

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Rodea, Gerardo E.; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Espinosa-Mazariego, Karina; González-Montalvo, Martín A.; Ochoa, Sara A.; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Eslava-Campos, Carlos A.; López-Villegas, Edgar O.; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Arellano-Galindo, José; Patiño-López, Genaro; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity in children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries and a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea worldwide. The ability of ETEC to colonize the intestinal epithelium is mediated by fimbrial adhesins, such as CS21 (Longus). This adhesin is a type IVb pilus involved in adherence to intestinal cells in vitro and bacterial self-aggregation. Fourteen open reading frames have been proposed to be involved in CS21 assembly, hitherto only the lngA and lngB genes, coding for the major (LngA) and minor (LngB) structural subunit, have been characterized. In this study, we investigated the role of the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins in the assembly of CS21 in ETEC strain E9034A. The deletion of the lngA, lngB, lngC, lngD, lngH, or lngP genes, abolished CS21 assembly in ETEC strain E9034A and the adherence to HT-29 cells was reduced 90%, compared to wild-type strain. Subcellular localization prediction of CS21 proteins was similar to other well-known type IV pili homologs. We showed that LngP is the prepilin peptidase of LngA, and that ETEC strain E9034A has another peptidase capable of processing LngA, although with less efficiency. Additionally, we present immuno-electron microscopy images to show that the LngB protein could be localized at the tip of CS21. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins are essential for CS21 assembly, as well as for bacterial aggregation and adherence to HT-29 cells. PMID:27536289

  5. Safety and Immunogenicity of Two Different Lots of the Oral, Killed Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Vaccine in Israeli Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Dani; Orr, Nadav; Haim, Moti; Ashkenazi, Shai; Robin, Guy; Green, Manfred S.; Ephros, Moshe; Sela, Tamar; Slepon, Raphael; Ashkenazi, Isaac; Taylor, David N.; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Eldad, Arieh; Shemer, Joshua

    2000-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the leading causes of diarrhea among Israeli soldiers serving in field units. Two double-blind placebo-controlled, randomized trials were performed among 155 healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of different lots of the oral, killed ETEC vaccine consisting of two doses of whole cells plus recombinantly produced cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB). The two doses of vaccine lot E005 and the first dose of vaccine lot E003 were well tolerated by the volunteers. However, 5 (17%) vaccinees reported an episode of vomiting a few hours after the second dose of lot E003; none of the placebo recipients reported similar symptoms. Both lots of vaccine stimulated a rate of significant antibody-secreting cell (ASC) response to CTB and to colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) after one or two doses, ranging from 85 to 100% and from 81 to 100%, respectively. The rate of ASC response to CS2, CS4, and CS5 was slightly lower than the rate of ASC response induced to CTB, CFA/I, and CS1. The second vaccine dose enhanced the response to CTB but did not increase the frequencies or magnitude of ASC responses to the other antigens. The two lots of the ETEC vaccine induced similar rates of serum antibody responses to CTB and CFA/I which were less frequent than the ASC responses to the same antigens. Based on these safety and immunogenicity data, an efficacy study of the ETEC vaccine is under way in the Israel Defense Force. PMID:10899847

  6. Pilus Production, Hemagglutination, and Adhesion by Porcine Strains of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Lacking K88, K99, and 987P Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Awad-Masalmeh, M.; Moon, H. W.; Runnels, P. L.; Schneider, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Three strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli which adhered, colonized intensively, and caused disease in pig intestine, but which did not produce pili of the K88, K99, or 987P antigen types were designated 3P− ETEC. The 3P− ETEC caused mannose-resistant hemagglutination, adhered to porcine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro, and produced pili. However, most bacteria taken directly from the intestine of pigs infected with 3P− ETEC appeared to be nonpiliated. Two preparations were isolated from the 3P− ETEC. One (material A) contained pili, caused mannose-sensitive hemagglutination, and did not inhibit adhesion of whole bacteria to epithelial cells in vitro. The other (material B) had no demonstrable pili, caused mannose-resistant hemagglutination, and blocked ahesion of bacteria to epithelial cells in vitro. Antiserum against an acapsular mutant (K−) of one 3P− ETEC strain was absorbed to remove antibodies directed against somatic (O) antigen. The absorbed antiserum agglutinated all three 3P− ETEC strains grown in the K− form at 37°C, but not when they were grown at 18°C. The absorbed antiserum blocked the hemagglutinating activity of material B, but not of material A. It also reacted (via indirect immunofluorescence) with all of the 3P− ETEC when they were grown in pig intestine. The results were interpreted to indicate that: (i) the epithelial adhesive and mannose-resistant hemagglutinating activities of the 3P− ETEC strains may be mediated by an antigen contained in material B; (ii) this antigen either is not pilus associated or is associated with pili that are not demonstrable by the methods used here; (iii) the 3P− ETEC strains produce type 1 pili which do not mediate their adhesion to intestinal epithelium of pigs. Images PMID:6119295

  7. Use of specific antibody to demonstrate glycocalyx, K99 pili, and the spatial relationships of K99+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the ileum of colostrum-fed calves.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R; Acres, S D; Costerton, J W

    1982-01-01

    The attachment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain B44 (O9:K30:K99:F41:H-) to the ileal epithelium of newborn colostrum-fed calves was studied by electron microscopy. Stabilization of the bacterial glycocalyx (K30) and pili (K99) by fixation of tissue sections in specific antibody and staining with ruthenium red were used so that the bacterial surface structures could be clearly visualized and their spatial relationship to the intestinal brush border defined. When sections of ileum from infected calves were neither fixed in antibody nor stained with ruthenium red, the ETEC cells colonizing the small intestine were separated from each other and from the brush border by an electron-translucent halo; neither the glycocalyx nor the pili could be clearly resolved. When ruthenium red staining was used, the halo was partially filled by a net of electron-dense fibers composed of pili and condensed glycocalyx which extended to the brush border. Tissue sections reacted with anti-K30 antibody before staining with ruthenium red revealed microcolonies of ETEC surrounded by a discrete electron-dense glycocalyx 0.3 to 1.0 micrometers thick and in tight contact with the epithelial cell surface. When ileal tissue was treated with K99 antibody, the K99 pili were visible as discrete fibers extending from the bacterial cell surface through the glycocalyx. We discuss the role of these cell surface components in pathogenic adhesion and in the formation of protected microcolonies at the surface of the infected ileal epithelium. Images PMID:6127313

  8. Surface expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA adhesion antigen on Vibrio cholerae, enhanced by co-expressed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial antigens.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Lebens, Michael; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2017-02-17

    Helicobacter pylori infection can cause peptic ulceration and is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. This study aimed to construct and characterize a non-virulent Vibrio cholerae O1 strain, which grows more rapidly than H. pylori, as vector for H. pylori antigens for possible use as a vaccine strain against H. pylori. This was done by recombinant expression of the H. pylori adhesion antigen HpaA alone or, as a proof of principle, together with different colonization factor (CF) antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) which may enhance immune responses against HpaA. A recombinant V. cholerae strain co-expressing HpaA and a fimbrial CF antigens CFA/I or CS5, but not the non-fimbrial CF protein CS6, was shown to express larger amounts of HpaA on the surface when compared with the same V. cholerae strain expressing HpaA alone. Mutations in the CFA/I operon showed that the chaperon, possibly together with the usher, was involved in enhancing the surface expression of HpaA. Oral immunization of mice with formaldehyde-inactivated recombinant V. cholerae expressing HpaA alone or together with CFA/I induced significantly higher serum antibody responses against HpaA than mice similarly immunized with inactivated HpaA-expressing H. pylori bacteria. Our results demonstrate that a non-virulent V. cholerae strain can be engineered to allow strong surface expression of HpaA, and that the expression can be further increased by co-expressing it with ETEC fimbrial antigens. Such recombinant V. cholerae strains expressing HpaA, and possibly also other H. pylori antigens, may have the potential as oral inactivated vaccine candidates against H. pylori.

  9. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and diffusely adherent E. coli as likely causes of a proportion of pathogen-negative travelers' diarrhea--a PCR-based study.

    PubMed

    Meraz, Ismail M; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Ericsson, Charles D; Bourgeois, A Louis; Steffen, Robert; Taylor, David N; Hernandez, Norma; DuPont, Herbert L

    2008-01-01

    Enteropathogens cannot be identified in 40% to 50% of subjects with travelers' diarrhea (TD). We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to look for the presence of two bacterial causes of diarrhea in a large group of international travelers after failing to detect a pathogen by conventional tests. DNA was isolated from the diarrheal stool and subjected to PCR from 162 subjects from whom we earlier failed to identify a pathogen in a previous study and included 54 from Antigua, Guatemala, 39 from Guadalajara, Mexico, 29 from Kolkata, India, and 40 from Goa, India. Gene products for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)--LT (heat-labile enterotoxin) and ST (heat-stable enterotoxin)--and diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC), afa/dr (Afa fimbrial and Dr nonfimbrial family of adhesins), were used. At least one gene product was identified in diarrhea stool samples of 47 of 162 (29%) subjects. ETEC virulence genes (LT, ST) were found in 34 (21%) samples studied, with rates of occurrence ranging from 8% in Goa to 39% for the samples from Guatemala (p = 0.0006). A large number of ST-only strains explained the high ETEC rate in Guatemala. DAEC afa/dr family of adhesions was identified in between 8 and 14% of the samples. ETEC and DAEC were implicated in nearly one-third of the subjects initially diagnosed as pathogen negative. Direct PCR results from stools are consistent with the previous assumption that most undiagnosed TD is bacterial in nature and also highlights the potential value that PCR can add to studies designed to evaluate treatment and preventive interventions for TD, including vaccines.

  10. Electron Acceptors Induce Secretion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin under Anaerobic Conditions through Promotion of GspD Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the major virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), can lead to severe diarrhea and promotes ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Most previous in vitro studies focused on ETEC pathogenesis were conducted under aerobic conditions, which do not reflect the real situation of ETEC infection because the intestine is anoxic. In this study, the expression and secretion of LT under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions were determined; LT was not efficiently secreted into the supernatant under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions unless terminal electron acceptors (trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate [TMAO] or nitrate) were available. Furthermore, we found that the restoration effects of TMAO and nitrate on LT secretion could be inhibited by amytal or ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG E. coli strains, indicating that LT secretion under anaerobic conditions was dependent on the integrity of the respiratory chain. At the same time, electron acceptors increase the ATP level of ETEC, but this increase was not the main reason for LT secretion. Subsequently, the relationship between the integrity of the respiratory chain and the function of the type II secretion system was determined. The GspD protein, the secretin of ETEC, was assembled under anaerobic conditions and was accompanied by LT secretion when TMAO or nitrate was added. Our data also demonstrated that TMAO and nitrate could not induce the GspD assembly and LT secretion in ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG strains, respectively. Moreover, GspD assembly under anaerobic conditions was assisted by the pilot protein YghG. PMID:27430271

  11. Generation of Salmonella ghost cells expressing fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and evaluation of their antigenicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Song; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium ghost cells expressing K88ab, K88ac, K99, and FasA fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in their envelopes were constructed. The genes encoding the fimbriae were individually cloned into an expression plasmid, pMMP81, carrying the asd gene, which was subsequently electroporated into the Δasd S. Typhimurium mutant. Plasmid pJHLP99, carrying the phiX174 lysis gene E, was also subsequently electroporated into the Salmonella mutant. The presence of the individual fimbriae on the ghost cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Forty BALB/c mice were equally divided into 2 groups of 20 mice each. Group A mice were intramuscularly vaccinated with a mixture of the 4 ghost cells expressing the individual fimbriae. The group B mice were inoculated with sterile phosphate-buffered saline as a control. The antigen-specific serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher in group A than in group B from week 2 until week 6 after inoculation. In addition, the antigen-specific IgA concentrations in fecal samples were significantly higher in group A than in group B at week 2 after inoculation. A large difference between the groups in the number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine was observed by immunohistochemical study. Also, the splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly greater in group A than in the control mice. These results suggest that vaccination with our Salmonella ghost cells can induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and that the increased number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine may be correlated with the elevated fecal IgA immune response. PMID:26733731

  12. In vivo therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of colistin sulfate in an experimental model of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Thériault, William; Bergeron, Nadia; Beauchamp, Guy; Laurent-Lewandowski, Sylvette; Fairbrother, John Morris; Letellier, Ann

    2016-05-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC: F4) associated with post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs has developed resistance against several antimicrobial families, leading to increased use of colistin sulfate (CS) for the treatment of this disease. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of oral CS treatment in experimental PWD due to ETEC: F4 challenge and determine the effect of this challenge on CS intestinal absorption. In this study, 96 pigs were divided into two trials based on CS dose (100 000 or 50 000 IU/kg). Fecal shedding of ETEC: F4, total E. coli, and CS-resistant E. coli, diarrhea scores, and weight changes were evaluated. Colistin sulfate plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. Regardless of the dose, CS treatment resulted in a reduction of fecal ETEC: F4 and total E. coli shedding, and in diarrhea scores but only during the treatment period. However, CS treatment resulted in a slight increase in fecal shedding of CS resistant E. coli and did not prevent weight loss in challenged pigs. In addition, challenge with ETEC: F4 resulted in an increase of CS intestinal absorption. Our study is among the first to demonstrate that under controlled conditions, CS was effective in reducing fecal shedding of ETEC: F4 and total E. coli in experimental PWD. However, CS treatment was associated with a slight selection pressure on E. coli and did not prevent pig weight loss. Further studies are needed in field conditions, to better characterize CS therapeutic regimen efficacy and bacterial resistance dissemination.

  13. Structural signature of Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn mutations in DNA gyrase from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and impact on quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2016-01-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is among the most frequent microorganisms causing traveler's diarrhea (TD). Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents used for the treatment of TD. Resistance to quinolones is typically caused by substitutions in QRDR region of gyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. The aim of this study was to seek insights into the effect of these substitutions at structural level and their association with observed quinolone resistance. Majority of the ETEC strains have gyrA mutations at amino acid position 83 and 87. To understand the quinolone resistance mechanism at molecular level, we have studied the interaction of wild type and mutant forms of ETEC gyrA with nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin by molecular modeling using Discovery Studio and LeadIt. All the mutants had reduced affinity towards both ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid relative to the wild type due to the mutations introduced in gyrA. Besides Ser83 and Asp87, for nalidixic acid binding Arg91 and His45 residues were observed to be critical while in ciprofloxacin binding Lys42 and Arg91 residues played a significant role. Amino acid substitutions contribute to the emergence of drug resistance in sensitive strains by causing structural alterations leading to reduced affinity of the drug towards receptor. Analysis of the effect of amino acid substitutions at structural level is of utmost importance to establish possible associations between mutations and the diseases. These studies accelerate the identification of pharmaceutical targets for relevant treatments and could also be helpful in guiding the design of further experimental research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of lng Mutations on LngA Expression, Processing, and CS21 Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli E9034A.

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Rodea, Gerardo E; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Espinosa-Mazariego, Karina; González-Montalvo, Martín A; Ochoa, Sara A; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Eslava-Campos, Carlos A; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Arellano-Galindo, José; Patiño-López, Genaro; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity in children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries and a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea worldwide. The ability of ETEC to colonize the intestinal epithelium is mediated by fimbrial adhesins, such as CS21 (Longus). This adhesin is a type IVb pilus involved in adherence to intestinal cells in vitro and bacterial self-aggregation. Fourteen open reading frames have been proposed to be involved in CS21 assembly, hitherto only the lngA and lngB genes, coding for the major (LngA) and minor (LngB) structural subunit, have been characterized. In this study, we investigated the role of the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins in the assembly of CS21 in ETEC strain E9034A. The deletion of the lngA, lngB, lngC, lngD, lngH, or lngP genes, abolished CS21 assembly in ETEC strain E9034A and the adherence to HT-29 cells was reduced 90%, compared to wild-type strain. Subcellular localization prediction of CS21 proteins was similar to other well-known type IV pili homologs. We showed that LngP is the prepilin peptidase of LngA, and that ETEC strain E9034A has another peptidase capable of processing LngA, although with less efficiency. Additionally, we present immuno-electron microscopy images to show that the LngB protein could be localized at the tip of CS21. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins are essential for CS21 assembly, as well as for bacterial aggregation and adherence to HT-29 cells.

  15. Fimbrial subunit protein FaeG expressed in transgenic tobacco inhibits the binding of F4ac enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to porcine enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Jussi J; Kotiaho, Mirkka; Riipi, Tero; Snoeck, Veerle; Palva, E Tapio; Teeri, Teemu H; Lång, Hannu; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Niklander-Teeri, Viola

    2004-06-01

    Plants offer a promising alternative for the production of foreign proteins for pharmaceutical purposes in tissues that are consumed as food and/or feed. Our long-term strategy is to develop edible vaccines against piglet diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4 ETEC) in feed plants. In this work, we isolated a gene, faeG, encoding for a major F4ac fimbrial subunit protein. Our goal was to test whether the FaeG protein, when isolated from its fimbrial background and produced in a plant cell, would retain the key properties of an oral vaccine, that is, stability in gastrointestinal conditions, binding to intestinal receptors and inhibition of the F4 ETEC attachment. For this purpose, tobacco was first transformed with a faeG construct that included a transit peptide encoding sequence to target the FaeG protein to the chloroplast. The best transgenic lines produced FaeG protein in amounts of 1% total soluble protein. The stability of the plant-produced FaeG was tested in fluids simulating piglet gastric (SGF) and intestinal (SIF) conditions. Plant-produced FaeG proved to be stable up to 2 h under these conditions. The binding and inhibition properties were tested with isolated piglet villi. These results showed that the plant-produced FaeG could bind to the receptors on the villi and subsequently inhibit F4 ETEC binding in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the first two prerequisites for the development of an oral vaccine have been met.

  16. Defining cases of severe pediatric diarrhea for an efficacy trial of an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine: Report on an international workshop, Washington DC, March 2016.

    PubMed

    Wierzba, Thomas F; Bourgis, Alexandra

    2017-01-23

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes severe acute watery diarrhea. No ETEC vaccine is available but candidates are in development, including ETVAX, an oral, whole-cell inactivated vaccine. ETVAX is being tested in a descending-age trial in Bangladesh. If found safe and immunogenic, investigators may test it for efficacy in children. Like oral rotavirus vaccines, we expect that ETVAX will be most effective at decreasing the incidence of moderate-to-severe ETEC episodes. Thus, for an efficacy trial outcome, it will be necessary to triage patients into moderate-to-severe versus mild disease. A severity scale specific to ETEC does not exist. To develop this scale, PATH convened a committee of international experts for a two-day meeting to strategize on diagnostic scale development. The workshop began with four presentations. The first described existing scales, item selection, and issues related to validation, reliability, and ease of use. The other three presentations provided details on the following published scores: the DHAKA score, validated for use with Bangladeshi children seeking diarrhea treatment; a modified-Vesikari score for evaluating North American outpatient children with diarrhea; and the Community Diarrhea Assessment (CODA) score developed for passive-case surveillance of Peruvian children with diarrhea. Following the presentations and discussion, the committee made several recommendations including: modifying existing scores to make them ETEC-centric; evaluating scoring systems against an objective measure of dehydration (i.e., the percent change in a child's bodyweight following rehydration); and adding an item to the scale measuring ETEC effects on growth faltering. The committee also discussed using available data sets to evaluate scores, but was concerned that if investigators characterized patients using different procedures than prescribed by the score, the results would be difficult to interpret. Committee members suggested new data

  17. Advanced application of bovine intestinal epithelial cell line for evaluating regulatory effect of lactobacilli against heat-killed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously, a bovine intestinal epithelial cell line (BIE cells) was successfully established. This work hypothesized that BIE cells are useful in vitro model system for the study of interactions of microbial- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or PAMPs) with bovine intestinal epithelial cells and for the selection of immunoregulatory lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Results All toll-like receptor (TLR) genes were expressed in BIE cells, being TLR4 one of the most strongly expressed. We demonstrated that heat-stable PAMPs of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) significantly enhanced the production of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1α and MCP-1 in BIE cells by activating both NF-κB and MAPK pathways. We evaluated the capacity of several lactobacilli strains to modulate heat-stable ETEC PAMPs-mediated inflammatory response in BIE cells. Among these strains evaluated, Lactobacillus casei OLL2768 attenuated heat-stable ETEC PAMPs-induced pro-inflammatory response by inhibiting NF-κB and p38 signaling pathways in BIE cells. Moreover, L. casei OLL2768 negatively regulated TLR4 signaling in BIE cells by up-regulating Toll interacting protein (Tollip) and B-cell lymphoma 3-encoded protein (Bcl-3). Conclusions BIE cells are suitable for the selection of immunoregulatory LAB and for studying the mechanisms involved in the protective activity of immunobiotics against pathogen-induced inflammatory damage. In addition, we showed that L. casei OLL2768 functionally modulate the bovine intestinal epithelium by attenuating heat-stable ETEC PAMPs-induced inflammation. Therefore L. casei OLL2768 is a good candidate for in vivo studying the protective effect of LAB against intestinal inflammatory damage induced by ETEC infection or heat-stable ETEC PAMPs challenge in the bovine host. PMID:23497067

  18. Concurrent outbreaks of Shigella sonnei and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections associated with parsley: implications for surveillance and control of foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Naimi, Timothy S; Wicklund, Julie H; Olsen, Sonja J; Krause, Gerard; Wells, Joy G; Bartkus, Joanne M; Boxrud, David J; Sullivan, Maureen; Kassenborg, Heidi; Besser, John M; Mintz, Eric D; Osterholm, Michael T; Hedberg, Craig W

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, the globalization of the food supply and the development of extensive food distribution networks have increased the risk of foodborne disease outbreaks involving multiple states or countries. In particular, outbreaks associated with fresh produce have emerged as an important public health concern. During July and August 1998, eight restaurant-associated outbreaks of shigellosis caused by a common strain of Shigella sonnei occurred in the United States and Canada. The outbreak strain was characterized by unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. Epidemiologic investigation determined that the illness was associated with the ingestion of parsley at four restaurants; at the other four restaurants, the majority of the people who contracted the illness ate parsley. Isolates from patrons in two unrelated restaurant-associated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) outbreaks in Minnesota shared a common serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern. Parsley was the implicated or suspected source of both ETEC outbreaks. In each of the outbreak-associated restaurants, parsley was chopped, held at room temperature, and used as an ingredient or garnish for multiple dishes. Infected food workers at several restaurants may also have contributed to the propagation of the outbreak. The sources of parsley served in outbreak-associated restaurants were traced, and a 1,600-acre farm in Baja California, Mexico, was identified as a likely source of the parsley implicated in six of the seven Shigella outbreaks and as a possible source of the parsley implicated in the two ETEC outbreaks. Global food supplies and large distribution networks demand strengthened laboratory and epidemiologic capacity to enable state and local public health agencies to conduct foodborne disease surveillance and to promote effective responses to multistate outbreaks.

  19. Dietary specific antibodies in spray-dried immune plasma prevent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4 (ETEC) post weaning diarrhoea in piglets.

    PubMed

    Niewold, T A; van Dijk, A J; Geenen, P L; Roodink, H; Margry, R; van der Meulen, J

    2007-10-06

    In order to establish the mechanism of spray dried plasma powder (SDPP) in improving pig health and performance, a diet containing either 8% SDPP, spray dried immune plasma powder (SDIPP), or control protein (soybean and whey) ration was fed to piglets in an experimental model of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4 (ETEC) post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD). SDIPP was obtained from pigs immunized with a vaccine containing ETEC fimbrial subunit F4 and heat-labile toxin (LT), and SDPP from non-immunized controls. Average daily growth (ADG) was determined, and daily samples of rectal faeces were assessed for diarrhoea (as percentage of dry matter), and ETEC excretion (in CFU/g). SDPP and SDIPP significantly (p<0.05) reduced diarrhoea, and SDIPP significantly reduced ETEC excretion. ADG was not significantly (p>0.05) affected. After the experiment, 30% of piglets tested F4 receptor positive (F4R+). A significant correlation between F4R status and morbidity was found. In F4R+ animals, SDIPP significantly improved diarrhoea and ADG, and decreased ETEC excretion, and SDPP significantly improved diarrhoea and ADG. Surprisingly, SDPP reduced diarrhoea in F4R+ animals without significant reduction of ETEC excretion, which is most likely related to the presence of anti-LT antibodies in SDPP. The results show that oral protection against ETEC by SDPP is attributable to spontaneous antibodies, in this case anti-LT antibodies. Furthermore, the results indicate that the combination of anti-LT and anti-F4 antibodies as in SDIPP is most effective in ETEC prevention. Finally, the F4R distribution in the herd should be taken into account to correctly assess efficacy.

  20. A standardised challenge model with an enterotoxigenic F4+ Escherichia coli strain in piglets assessing clinical traits and faecal shedding of fae and est-II toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Franz; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Martinez-Vallespin, Beatriz; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five feed additives on post weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets challenged 3 d after weaning with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (ETEC). In three experimental runs, a total of 84 piglets was weaned at 21 days of age and randomly assigned to seven treatments. As dietary treatment, piglets were fed a basal diet or diets with addition of bovine colostrum (0.2%), pineapple stem extract containing bromelain (0.2%), an autolysed yeast preparation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (0.1%), a combination of organic acids (0.7%) and a phytogenic product with thyme essential oil (0.015%). A porcine ETEC, serotype O149:K91:K88ac was given twice via oral infection on day 3 after weaning at 10(10) colony forming units/animal. One group of piglets was fed the basal diet without ETEC challenge. Traits included clinical sores, body temperature, faecal scoring and determination of faecal dry matter and the shedding of fae and est-II ETEC toxin genes. After weaning, non-challenged control piglets did not show signs of diarrhoea or impaired health, while the majority of infected piglets had a drop in body temperature, signs of diarrhoea and impaired general health. Mortality, the decrease of faecal dry matter and shedding of the toxin genes fae and est-II were not affected by the different additives. In conclusion, the ETEC challenge model induced distinct clinical signs of PWD in piglets, but the tested feed additives had no preventive effect under these conditions.

  1. Concomitant Infection of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in an Outbreak of Cholera Caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in Ahmedabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Deokule, J. S.; Garg, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Nandy, R. K.; Nair, G. Balakrish; Yamasaki, S.; Takeda, Y.; Ramamurthy, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Ahmedabad, a major city in the state of Gujarat, India, an outbreak of acute secretory diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa El Tor, V. cholerae O139, and multiple serotypes of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) occurred in January 2000. All of the representative V. cholerae O1 and O139 isolates examined harbored the ctxA gene (encoding the A subunit of cholera toxin) and the El Tor variant of the tcpA gene (encoding toxin-coregulated pilus). ETEC isolates of different serotypes were positive for the elt gene, encoding heat-labile enterotoxin. To further understand the molecular characteristics of the pathogens, representative isolates were examined by ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ribotyping showed that the isolates of V. cholerae O1 Ogawa exhibited a pattern identical to that of the prevailing clone of O1 in areas where cholera is endemic in India, and all of the O139 isolates were identical to the BII clone of V. cholerae O139. PFGE of the representative O1 Ogawa isolates exhibited an identical pattern, comparable to the H pattern of the new clone of O1 reported in Calcutta, India. PFGE analysis of the V. cholerae O139 isolates showed identical patterns, but these differed from the PFGE patterns of O139 isolates reported during 1992 to 1997 in Calcutta. ETEC isolates showed genetic heterogeneity among isolates belonging to the same serotype, although the identical PFGE pattern was also observed among ETEC isolates of different serotypes. Antibiograms of the isolates were unusual, because all of the O139 isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid. Likewise, all of the E. coli isolates showed resistance to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and nalidixic acid. This is a unique outbreak, and we believe that it is the first in which V. cholerae and ETEC were concomitantly involved. PMID:11526157

  2. Biofilm formation and binding specificities of CFA/I, CFA/II and CS2 adhesions of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Cfae-R181A mutant.

    PubMed

    Liaqat, Iram; Sakellaris, Harry

    2012-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are leading causes of childhood diarrhea in developing countries. Adhesion is the first step in pathogenesis of ETEC infections and ETEC pili designated colonization factor antigens (CFAs) are believed to be important in the biofim formation, colonization and host cell adhesions. As a first step, we have determined the biofilm capability of ETEC expressing various types of pili (CFA/I, CfaE-R181A mutant/CfaE tip mutant, CFA/II and CS2). Further, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay were developed to compare the binding specificity of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1 - CS3) and CS2 of ETEC, using extracted pili and piliated bacteria. CFA/II strain (E24377a) as well as extracted pili exhibited significantly higher binding both in biofilm and ELISA assays compared to non piliated wild type E24377a, CFA/I and CS2 strains. This indicates that co-expression of two or more CS2 in same strain is more efficient in increasing adherence. Significant decrease in binding specificity of DH5αF'lacI (q)/∆cotD (CS2) strain and MC4100/pEU2124 (CfaE-R181A) mutant strain indicated the important contribution of tip proteins in adherence assays. However, CS2 tip mutant strain (DH5αF'lacI (q)/pEU5881) showed that this specific residue may not be important as adhesions in these strains. In summary, our data suggest that pili, their minor subunits are important for biofilm formation and adherence mechanisms. Overall, the functional reactivity of strains co expressing various antigens, particularly minor subunit antigen observed in this study suggest that fewer antibodies may be required to elicit immunity to ETEC expressing a wider array of related pili.

  3. MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen)-Novel Technology for Structural Vaccinology, Proof from Computational and Empirical Immunogenicity Characterization of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Adhesin MEFA

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qiangde; Lee, Kuo Hao; Nandre, Rahul M; Garcia, Carolina; Chen, Jianhan; Zhang, Weiping

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine development often encounters the challenge of virulence heterogeneity. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria producing immunologically heterogeneous virulence factors are a leading cause of children’s diarrhea and travelers’ diarrhea. Currently, we do not have licensed vaccines against ETEC bacteria. While conventional methods continue to make progress but encounter challenge, new computational and structure-based approaches are explored to accelerate ETEC vaccine development. In this study, we applied a structural vaccinology concept to construct a structure-based multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) to carry representing epitopes of the seven most important ETEC adhesins [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1–CS3), CFA/IV (CS4–CS6)], simulated antigenic structure of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA with computational atomistic modeling and simulation, characterized immunogenicity in mouse immunization, and examined the potential of structure-informed vaccine design for ETEC vaccine development. A tag-less recombinant MEFA protein (CFA/I/II/IV MEFA) was effectively expressed and extracted. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that this MEFA immunogen maintained a stable secondary structure and presented epitopes on the protein surface. Empirical data showed that mice immunized with the tagless CFA/I/II/IV MEFA developed strong antigen-specific antibody responses, and mouse serum antibodies significantly inhibited in vitro adherence of bacteria expressing these seven adhesins. These results revealed congruence of antigen immunogenicity between computational simulation and empirical mouse immunization and indicated this tag-less CFA/I/II/IV MEFA potentially an antigen for a broadly protective ETEC vaccine, suggesting a potential application of MEFA-based structural vaccinology for vaccine design against ETEC and likely other pathogens. PMID:28944092

  4. Biofilm formation and binding specificities of CFA/I, CFA/II and CS2 adhesions of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Cfae-R181A mutant

    PubMed Central

    Liaqat, Iram; Sakellaris, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are leading causes of childhood diarrhea in developing countries. Adhesion is the first step in pathogenesis of ETEC infections and ETEC pili designated colonization factor antigens (CFAs) are believed to be important in the biofim formation, colonization and host cell adhesions. As a first step, we have determined the biofilm capability of ETEC expressing various types of pili (CFA/I, CfaE-R181A mutant/CfaE tip mutant, CFA/II and CS2). Further, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay were developed to compare the binding specificity of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1 - CS3) and CS2 of ETEC, using extracted pili and piliated bacteria. CFA/II strain (E24377a) as well as extracted pili exhibited significantly higher binding both in biofilm and ELISA assays compared to non piliated wild type E24377a, CFA/I and CS2 strains. This indicates that co-expression of two or more CS2 in same strain is more efficient in increasing adherence. Significant decrease in binding specificity of DH5αF’lacIq/∆cotD (CS2) strain and MC4100/pEU2124 (CfaE-R181A) mutant strain indicated the important contribution of tip proteins in adherence assays. However, CS2 tip mutant strain (DH5αF’lacIq/pEU5881) showed that this specific residue may not be important as adhesions in these strains. In summary, our data suggest that pili, their minor subunits are important for biofilm formation and adherence mechanisms. Overall, the functional reactivity of strains co expressing various antigens, particularly minor subunit antigen observed in this study suggest that fewer antibodies may be required to elicit immunity to ETEC expressing a wider array of related pili. PMID:24031915

  5. Clonal relatedness of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing LT and CS17 isolated from children with diarrhoea in La Paz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Claudia; Klena, John D; Nicklasson, Matilda; Iniguez, Volga; Sjöling, Asa

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of traveller's and infantile diarrhoea in the developing world. ETEC produces two toxins, a heat-stable toxin (known as ST) and a heat-labile toxin (LT) and colonization factors that help the bacteria to attach to epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized a subset of ETEC clinical isolates recovered from Bolivian children under 5 years of age using a combination of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, virulence typing, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance test patterns in order to determine the genetic background of ETEC strains circulating in Bolivia. We found that strains expressing the heat-labile (LT) enterotoxin and colonization factor CS17 were common and belonged to several MLST sequence types but mainly to sequence type-423 and sequence type-443 (Achtman scheme). To further study the LT/CS17 strains we analysed the nucleotide sequence of the CS17 operon and compared the structure to LT/CS17 ETEC isolates from Bangladesh. Sequence analysis confirmed that all sequence type-423 strains from Bolivia had a single nucleotide polymorphism; SNP(bol) in the CS17 operon that was also found in some other MLST sequence types from Bolivia but not in strains recovered from Bangladeshi children. The dominant ETEC clone in Bolivia (sequence type-423/SNP(bol)) was found to persist over multiple years and was associated with severe diarrhoea but these strains were variable with respect to antimicrobial resistance patterns. The results showed that although the LT/CS17 phenotype is common among ETEC strains in Bolivia, multiple clones, as determined by unique MLST sequence types, populate this phenotype. Our data also appear to suggest that acquisition and loss of antimicrobial resistance in LT-expressing CS17 ETEC clones is more dynamic than acquisition or loss of virulence factors.

  6. Clonal Relatedness of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Strains Expressing LT and CS17 Isolated from Children with Diarrhoea in La Paz, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Rodas, Claudia; Klena, John D.; Nicklasson, Matilda; Iniguez, Volga; Sjöling, Åsa

    2011-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of traveller's and infantile diarrhoea in the developing world. ETEC produces two toxins, a heat-stable toxin (known as ST) and a heat-labile toxin (LT) and colonization factors that help the bacteria to attach to epithelial cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we characterized a subset of ETEC clinical isolates recovered from Bolivian children under 5 years of age using a combination of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, virulence typing, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance test patterns in order to determine the genetic background of ETEC strains circulating in Bolivia. We found that strains expressing the heat-labile (LT) enterotoxin and colonization factor CS17 were common and belonged to several MLST sequence types but mainly to sequence type-423 and sequence type-443 (Achtman scheme). To further study the LT/CS17 strains we analysed the nucleotide sequence of the CS17 operon and compared the structure to LT/CS17 ETEC isolates from Bangladesh. Sequence analysis confirmed that all sequence type-423 strains from Bolivia had a single nucleotide polymorphism; SNPbol in the CS17 operon that was also found in some other MLST sequence types from Bolivia but not in strains recovered from Bangladeshi children. The dominant ETEC clone in Bolivia (sequence type-423/SNPbol) was found to persist over multiple years and was associated with severe diarrhoea but these strains were variable with respect to antimicrobial resistance patterns. Conclusion/Significance The results showed that although the LT/CS17 phenotype is common among ETEC strains in Bolivia, multiple clones, as determined by unique MLST sequence types, populate this phenotype. Our data also appear to suggest that acquisition and loss of antimicrobial resistance in LT-expressing CS17 ETEC clones is more dynamic than acquisition or loss of virulence factors. PMID:22140423

  7. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Randomized control trials using a tablet formulation of hyperimmune bovine colostrum to prevent diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Najnigier, Boguslaw; Stelmasiak, Teodor; Robins-Browne, Roy M

    2011-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the leading cause of travelers' diarrhea. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a powdered extract of hyperimmune bovine colostrum to protect against diarrhea in volunteers challenged with ETEC. Tablets were manufactured from a colostrum extract from cattle immunized with 14 ETEC strains, including serogroup O78. Two separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials involving 90 healthy adult volunteers were performed to investigate the ability of different tablet formulations to protect against diarrhea following an oral challenge with an O78 ETEC strain. The first study with 30 participants evaluated the efficacy of tablets, containing 400 mg of colostrum protein, taken thrice daily with bicarbonate buffer. This regimen conferred 90.9% protection against diarrhea in the group receiving the active preparation compared with the placebo group (p = 0.0005). The second study examined the efficacy of tablets containing 400 mg colostrum protein given with buffer (83.3% protection; p = 0.0004) or without buffer (76.7% protection; p = 0.007), and tablets containing 200 mg colostrum protein given without buffer (58.3% protection; p = 0.02), compared with placebo. The difference between buffered and unbuffered treatments was not significant (p > 0.1). Active tablet formulations were significantly more effective than placebo in protecting volunteers against the development of diarrhea caused by ETEC. These results suggest that administration of a tablet formulation of hyperimmune bovine colostrum containing antibodies against ETEC strains may reduce the risk of travelers' diarrhea.

  9. Randomized control trials using a tablet formulation of hyperimmune bovine colostrum to prevent diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Najnigier, Boguslaw; Stelmasiak, Teodor; Robins-Browne, Roy M

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the leading cause of travelers' diarrhea. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a powdered extract of hyperimmune bovine colostrum to protect against diarrhea in volunteers challenged with ETEC. Materials and methods. Tablets were manufactured from a colostrum extract from cattle immunized with 14 ETEC strains, including serogroup O78. Two separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials involving 90 healthy adult volunteers were performed to investigate the ability of different tablet formulations to protect against diarrhea following an oral challenge with an O78 ETEC strain. Results. The first study with 30 participants evaluated the efficacy of tablets, containing 400 mg of colostrum protein, taken thrice daily with bicarbonate buffer. This regimen conferred 90.9% protection against diarrhea in the group receiving the active preparation compared with the placebo group (p = 0.0005). The second study examined the efficacy of tablets containing 400 mg colostrum protein given with buffer (83.3% protection;p = 0.0004) or without buffer (76.7% protection;p =0.007), and tablets containing 200 mg colostrum protein given without buffer (58.3% protection; p = 0.02), compared with placebo. The difference between buffered and unbuffered treatments was not significant (p > 0.1). Conclusions. Active tablet formulations were significantly more effective than placebo in protecting volunteers against the development of diarrhea caused by ETEC. These results suggest that administration of a tablet formulation of hyperimmune bovine colostrum containing antibodies against ETEC strains may reduce the risk of travelers' diarrhea. PMID:21526980

  10. Rapid Fluorescent Detection of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 Based on Graphene Oxide-Dependent Nanoquencher and Klenow Fragment-Triggered Target Cyclic Amplification.

    PubMed

    Ling, Min; Peng, Zhihui; Cheng, Lijuan; Deng, Le

    2015-10-01

    Based on Klenow fragment (KF)-assisted target recycling amplification and graphene oxide (GO), a novel aptasensor, containing a capture probe (CP) and a signal probe (SP), was constructed and applied for the rapid detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88. The CP was constructed of regions I and II, where the region I is aptamer sequence of ETEC K88 and the region II can form a double-stranded DNA structure with the SP. The SP was labeled with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and acted as the primer sequence of the polymerization reaction. Before the targets were added, the two probes formed a partial double-strand junction (PDSJ) on the surface of the GO and the fluorescence was completely quenched. In the presence of the targets, the fluorescence was recovered due to the formation of the target-aptamer complex and its separation from the surface of the GO. Following this, the target-aptamer complex initiated the polymerization of the DNA strand in the presence of deoxynucleotides (dNTPs) and the KF. The displaced target then combined into another PDSJ, and the cycle started anew, leading to the formation of numerous complementary double-stranded DNAs. Meanwhile, the fluorescence signal was significantly enhanced. The results indicated that the established sensor has higher sensitivity specificity to its target bacteria in a wide range of 1 × 10(2) to 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) mL(-1). The detection limit based on a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 is 1 × 10(2) CFU mL(-1). More important, this rapid detection method is superior to other methods, having not only a short detection time but also a low fluorescence background, and is cheaper and has a wider applicability because its probes are easily designed and synthesized. Given these factors, our detection system has great prospects as a potential alternative to conventional ETEC K88 detection.

  11. Alkaline pH Is a signal for optimal production and secretion of the heat labile toxin, LT in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Lucia; Ali, Zahra Bagher; Nygren, Erik; Wang, Zhiyun; Karlsson, Stefan; Zhu, Baoli; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Sjöling, Åsa

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause secretory diarrhea in children and travelers to endemic areas. ETEC spreads through the fecal-oral route. After ingestion, ETEC passes through the stomach and duodenum before it colonizes the lower part of the small intestine, exposing bacteria to a wide range of pH and environmental conditions. This study aimed to determine the impact of external pH and activity of the Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) on the regulation of production and secretion of heat labile (LT) enterotoxin. ETEC strain E2863wt and its isogenic mutant E2863ΔCRP were grown in LBK media buffered to pH 5, 7 and 9. GM1 ELISA, cDNA and cAMP analyses were carried out on bacterial pellet and supernatant samples derived from 3 and 5 hours growth and from overnight cultures. We confirm that CRP is a repressor of LT transcription and production as has been shown before but we show for the first time that CRP is a positive regulator of LT secretion both in vitro and in vivo. LT secretion increased at neutral to alkaline pH compared to acidic pH 5 where secretion was completely inhibited. At pH 9 secretion of LT was optimal resulting in 600 percent increase of secreted LT compared to unbuffered LBK media. This effect was not due to membrane leakage since the bacteria were viable at pH 9. The results indicate that the transition to the alkaline duodenum and/or exposure to high pH close to the epithelium as well as activation of the global transcription factor CRP are signals that induce secretion of the LT toxin in ETEC.

  12. Clostridium perfringens: Comparative effects of heat and osmotic stress on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic strains.

    PubMed

    Abbona, Cinthia Carolina; Stagnitta, Patricia Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolates associated with food poisoning carries a chromosomal cpe gene, while non-foodborne human gastrointestinal disease isolates carry a plasmid cpe gene. The enterotoxigenic strains tested produced vegetative cells and spores with significantly higher resistance than non-enterotoxigenic strains. These results suggest that the vegetative cells and spores have a competitive advantage over non-enterotoxigenic strains. However, no explanation has been provided for the significant associations between chromosomal cpe genotypes with the high resistance, which could explain the strong relationship between chromosomal cpe isolates and C. perfringens type A food poisoning. Here, we analyse the action of physical and chemical agent on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic regional strains. And this study tested the relationship between the sensitivities of spores and their levels SASPs (small acid soluble proteins) production in the same strains examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relative importance of heat-labile enterotoxin in the causation of severe diarrheal disease in the gnotobiotic piglet model by a strain of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that produces multiple enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Berberov, Emil M; Zhou, You; Francis, David H; Scott, Michael A; Kachman, Stephen D; Moxley, Rodney A

    2004-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that produce multiple enterotoxins are important causes of severe dehydrating diarrhea in human beings and animals, but the relative importance of these enterotoxins in the pathogenesis is poorly understood. Gnotobiotic piglets were used to study the importance of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) in infection with an ETEC strain that produces multiple enterotoxins. LT(-) (DeltaeltAB) and complemented mutants of an F4(+) LT(+) STb(+) EAST1(+) ETEC strain were constructed, and the virulence of these strains was compared in gnotobiotic piglets expressing receptors for F4(+) fimbria. Sixty percent of the piglets inoculated with the LT(-) mutant developed severe dehydrating diarrhea and septicemia compared to 100% of those inoculated with the nalidixic acid-resistant (Nal(r)) parent and 100% of those inoculated with the complemented mutant strain. Compared to piglets inoculated with the Nal(r) parent, the mean rate of weight loss (percent per hour) of those inoculated with the LT(-) mutant was 67% lower (P < 0.05) and that of those inoculated with the complemented strain was 36% higher (P < 0.001). Similarly, piglets inoculated with the LT(-) mutant had significant reductions in the mean bacterial colony count (CFU per gram) in the ileum; bacterial colonization scores (square millimeters) in the jejunum and ileum; and clinical pathology parameters of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and metabolic acidosis (P < 0.05). These results indicate the significance of LT to the development of severe dehydrating diarrhea and postdiarrheal septicemia in ETEC infections of swine and demonstrate that EAST1, LT, and STb may be concurrently expressed by porcine ETEC strains.

  14. Evolution of slime production by coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterotoxigenic characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from various human clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Boynukara, Banur; Gulhan, Timur; Gurturk, Kemal; Alisarli, Mustafa; Ogun, Erdal

    2007-10-01

    The present study was designed to determine the slime production of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and the enterotoxigenic properties of Staphylococcus aureus strains, and to evaluate the clinical importance of slime-producing CoNS and enterotoxigenic S. aureus strains isolated from various human clinical specimens. For this purpose, a total of 120 Staphylococcus strains were isolated and identified, and further characterized for their slime production and enterotoxigenicity. Of the clinical isolates, 55 (45.8 %) were found to be S. aureus, and the others (54.2 %) were identified as CoNS. Of the CoNS, 20 (16.7 %) were further identified as Staphylococcus hominis, 18 (15 %) as Staphylococcus epidermidis, six (5 %) as Staphylococcus xylosus, six (5 %) as Staphylococcus warneri, five (4.2 %) as Staphylococcus sciuri, four (3.3 %) as Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and two each (1.7 %) as Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, respectively. Thirty-nine (60 %) of 65 CoNS were found to be slime producers. Slime production was observed in all CoNS, except S. capitis, mostly from blood (38.5 %), tracheal aspiration (20.5 %) and urine (12.8 %) specimens. In addition, of the 55 S. aureus isolates, 46 (83.6 %) were found to be enterotoxigenic, and of these S. aureus strains, 39 (84.7 %) were positive for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE)A. The results of this study showed that the slime-producing CoNS were mostly found in clinical specimens of blood, tracheal aspirate and urine. SEA was the predominant enterotoxin type detected in S. aureus strains from human clinical specimens.

  15. A polyphasic approach to detect enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in raw milk Italian cheeses by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Valentina; Sgarbi, Elisa; Bove, Claudio Giorgio; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo

    2010-12-01

    A polyphasic approach was evaluated for the detection of eight staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE)-encoding genes (sea, sec, sed, seg, seh, sei, sej, sel) and the Escherichia coli genes most commonly associated with virulence factors (eae, elt, ipaH, stx) in traditional soft cheeses, manufactured artisanally from whole raw milk in the Lombardy region (northern Italy). To determine the presence of the target genes, two multiplex PCRs were performed on DNA extracted both directly from cheese samples (culture-independent approach) and from whole cultivable cells, formed by harvesting colonies from the first serial dilution agar plates of selective media, as representative of cultivable community ("bulk"). Genes associated with enteroinvasive E. coli, ipaH, and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, stx, were detected in two of the bulk samples analyzed; no virulence genes were found by amplifying DNA directly extracted from cheeses. SE-encoding genes were found in three cheeses (sea in all three samples, associated with sed and sej in two of these). More SE-encoding genes were detected by amplifying DNA obtained from bulk samples: sea, sed, sej, sec, seg, sel, and sei. No samples harbored the gene encoding for SE type H. The polyphasic approach followed has been useful in enhancing detection of target genes. Our results indicate that some of the artisanal cheeses examined may constitute a potential hazard for consumer health.

  16. Functional Role of N- and C-Terminal Amino Acids in the Structural Subunits of Colonization Factor CS6 Expressed by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Anusuya; Sabui, Subrata; Wajima, Takeaki; Hamabata, Takashi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CS6 is a common colonization factor expressed by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. It is a two-subunit protein consisting of CssA and CssB in an equal stoichiometry, assembled via the chaperone-usher pathway into an afimbrial, oligomeric assembly on the bacterial cell surface. A recent structural study has predicted the involvement of the N- and C-terminal regions of the CS6 subunits in its assembly. Here, we identified the functionally important residues in the N- and C-terminal regions of the CssA and CssB subunits during CS6 assembly by alanine scanning mutagenesis. Bacteria expressing mutant proteins were tested for binding with Caco-2 cells, and the results were analyzed with respect to the surface expression of mutant CS6. In this assay, many mutant proteins were not expressed on the surface while some showed reduced expression. It appeared that some, but not all, of the residues in both the N and C termini of CssA and CssB played an important role in the intermolecular interactions between these two structural subunits, as well as chaperone protein CssC. Our results demonstrated that T20, K25, F27, S36, Y143, and V147 were important for the stability of CssA, probably through interaction of CssC. We also found that I22, V29, and I33 of CssA and G154, Y156, L160, V162, F164, and Y165 of CssB were responsible for CssA-CssB intermolecular interactions. In addition, some of the hydrophobic residues in the C terminus of CssA and the N terminus of CssB were involved in the stabilization of higher-order complex formation. Overall, the results presented here might help in understanding the pathway used to assemble CS6 and predict its structure. IMPORTANCE Unlike most other colonization factors, CS6 is nonfimbrial, and in a sense, its subunit composition and assembly are also unique. Here we report that both the N- and C-terminal amino acid residues of CssA and CssB play a critical role in the intermolecular interactions between them and assembly proteins

  17. Effects of dietary supplementation of bacteriophages against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 on clinical symptoms of post-weaning pigs challenged with the ETEC pathogen.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Kim, S J; Park, B C; Han, J H

    2017-02-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of bacteriophages (phages) against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 as a therapy against the ETEC infection in post-weaning pigs. Two groups of post-weaning pigs aged 35 days, eight animals per group, were challenged with 3.0 × 10(10) colony forming units of ETEC K88, a third group given the vehicle. The unchallenged group and one challenged group were fed a basal nursery diet for 14 days while the remaining challenged group was fed the basal diet supplemented with 1.0 × 10(7) plaque forming units of the phage per kg. Average daily gain (ADG), goblet cell density and villous height:crypt depth (VH:CD) ratio in the intestine were less in the challenged group than in the unchallenged group within the animals fed the basal diet (p < 0.05); the reverse was true for rectal temperature, faecal consistency score (FCS), E. coli adhesion score (EAS) in the intestine, serum interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and digesta pH in the stomach, caecum and colon. The ETEC infection symptom within the challenged animals was alleviated by the dietary phage supplementation (p < 0.05) in ADG, FCS, EAS in the jejunum, serum TNF-α concentration, digesta pH in the colon, goblet cell density in the ileum and colon and VH:CD ratio in the ileum. Moreover, the infection symptom tended to be alleviated (p < 0.10) by the phage supplementation in rectal temperature, EAS in the ileum and caecum, and VH:CD ratio in the duodenum and jejunum. However, EAS in the colon, digesta pH in the stomach and caecum, and goblet cell density in the jejunum did not change due to the dietary phage. Overall, results indicate that the phage therapy is effective for alleviation of acute ETEC K88 infection in post-weaning pigs. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor types collected from 1997 to 2001 in US military personnel during operation Bright Star in northern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Rockabrand, David M; Shaheen, Hind I; Khalil, Sami B; Peruski, Leonard F; Rozmajzl, Patrick J; Savarino, Stephen J; Monteville, Marshall R; Frenck, Robert W; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Putnam, Shannon D; Sanders, John W

    2006-05-01

    Operation Bright Star (OBS) is a biennial, multinational exercise in Egypt involving 15000 US troops. Consistent with past observations in deployed troops, diarrhea is the most significant cause of morbidity. Focused efforts are ongoing to develop vaccines against the most common pathogens affecting our troops. As part of these efforts, diarrhea surveillance was conducted during OBS to monitor pathogens associated with illness and to identify new vaccine targets. A retrospective review was conducted of prior studies with similar methods. Soldiers with diarrhea presenting to the OBS clinic provided a stool sample that was inoculated into Carey-Blair transport media. Within 3 days, the Cary-Blair tubes were transported to the Naval Medical Research Unit no. 3 in Cairo where bacterial culture was performed. As part of the evaluation, 5 Escherichia coli-like colonies were collected and tested for toxin production using the GM1-ELISA. Toxin-positive isolates were further tested for colonization factors (CF) by a dot-blot assay using a standardized panel of monoclonal antibodies against CFA/I, CS1-CS7, CS17, CS8 (CFA/III), CS12 (PCFO159), and CS14 (PCFO166). Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) was the most frequently isolated pathogen during each OBS from which data were collected. The rate of ETEC-associated diarrhea ranged from 22% to 58%. Over time, there were dramatic shifts in the frequency and distribution of CFs. Over the 5 years of study, an increasing number of ETEC isolates had no known CF identified, and in 2001, only 40% of ETEC was associated with known CFs. The most commonly identified CF was CS6. Diarrheal disease, particularly ETEC, continues to be a common malady among US military personnel deployed to Egypt. We have identified ETEC CF types, especially CS6, which should be considered potential vaccine candidates. However, despite intensive testing, CFs could not be identified in most of the ETEC isolated, highlighting the need for further studies to identify

  19. Modulatory Effects of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide on Intestinal Mucosal Immunity and Microbial Community of Weaned Piglets Challenged by an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chunlan; Wang, Youming; Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial pathogens and trigger immune response, but their regulation by neuropeptide-vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in weaned piglets infected by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 remains unexplored. Therefore, the study was conducted to investigate its role using a model of early weaned piglets infected by ETEC K88. Male Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire piglets (n = 24) were randomly divided into control, ETEC K88, VIP, and ETEC K88+VIP groups. On the first three days, ETEC K88 and ETEC K88+VIP groups were orally administrated with ETEC K88, other two groups were given sterile medium. Then each piglet from VIP and ETEC K88+VIP group received 10 nmol VIP intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily, on day four and six. On the seventh day, the piglets were sacrificed. The results indicated that administration of VIP improved the growth performance, reduced diarrhea incidence of ETEC K88 challenged pigs, and mitigated the histopathological changes of intestine. Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-γ and TNF-α in the ETEC K88+ VIP group were significantly reduced compared with those in the ETEC group. VIP significantly increased IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β and S-IgA production compared with the ETEC K88 group. Besides, VIP could inhibit the expression of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB p65 and the phosphorylation of IκB-α, p-ERK, p-JNK, and p-38 induced by ETEC K88. Moreover, VIP could upregulate the expression of occludin in the ileum mucosa compared with the ETEC K88 group. Colon and caecum content bacterial richness and diversity were lower for pigs in the ETEC group than the unchallenged groups. These results demonstrate that VIP is beneficial for the maturation of the intestinal mucosal immune system and elicited local immunomodulatory activities. The TLR2/4-MyD88 mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway may be critical to the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect of VIP on intestinal mucosal immune function and

  20. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin.

  1. Colonization of porcine intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: selection of piliated forms in vivo, adhesion of piliated forms to epithelial cells in vitro, and incidence of a pilus antigen among porcine enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E

    1977-01-01

    In contrast to K88-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), K88-negative porcine ETEC strains did not adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. However, they did adhere to intestinal epithelium in vivo. Growth of one such ETEC (strain 987) in pig small intestine consistently yielded a greater percentage of piliated cells than did growth in vitro. This increase was demonstrable by electron microscopy, by change in colonial morphology, and by agglutination in specific antisera against the pili of strain 987. In contrast to the stored stock culture (which contained very few piliated cells), richly piliated forms of strain 987 did adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. A series of porcine E. coli strains was tested for agglutinability in antiserum against the pili of strain 987, and several K88-negative ETEC strains were agglutinated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that pili facilitate intestinal adhesion and colonization by K88-negative ETEC strains. Images PMID:326676

  2. Colonization of porcine intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: selection of piliated forms in vivo, adhesion of piliated forms to epithelial cells in vitro, and incidence of a pilus antigen among porcine enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E

    1977-04-01

    In contrast to K88-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), K88-negative porcine ETEC strains did not adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. However, they did adhere to intestinal epithelium in vivo. Growth of one such ETEC (strain 987) in pig small intestine consistently yielded a greater percentage of piliated cells than did growth in vitro. This increase was demonstrable by electron microscopy, by change in colonial morphology, and by agglutination in specific antisera against the pili of strain 987. In contrast to the stored stock culture (which contained very few piliated cells), richly piliated forms of strain 987 did adhere to isolated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. A series of porcine E. coli strains was tested for agglutinability in antiserum against the pili of strain 987, and several K88-negative ETEC strains were agglutinated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that pili facilitate intestinal adhesion and colonization by K88-negative ETEC strains.

  3. Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum CJLP243 on the growth performance and cytokine response of weaning pigs challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Awji, E G; Lee, S J; Tassew, D D; Park, Y B; Park, K S; Kim, M K; Kim, B; Park, S C

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of diets containing Lactobacillus plantarum CJLP243 on the growth and cytokine response of weaning pigs (Sus scrofa) challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). In a 28-d experiment (14 d before and 14 d after challenge), a total of 108 pigs at 20 ± 1 d of age were allotted to 1 of 6 diets. These were a control diet without ETEC challenge (CON) and 5 treatment diets with ETEC challenge, including a control diet with ETEC challenge (negative control, NC); a positive control diet containing antibiotics (PC); control diet plus (10(8), 10(9), or 10(10)) cfu/kg L. plantarum CJLP243 (T1, T2, and T3, respectively). After challenge, NC showed the least ADFI, whereas PC and T3 had the greatest ADFI (P = 0.002). The ADG of PC, T2, and T3 were greater (P = 0.001) than that of CON, NC, and T1 during wk 1 to wk 2. During wk 3 to wk 4, a marked decline was seen in NC (P = 0.001) compared with CON, whereas PC and T3 showed increased ADG (P = 0.001). The overall ADG of PC and T3 were greater (P < 0.001) than the remaining groups. The PC and T3 had the greatest G:F during the second 2 wk (P = 0.002), and the overall 4-wk experimental period (P = 0.003). At 3 h after challenge, all groups except CON had greater rectal temperatures (RT; P < 0.05). The RT decreased to prechallenge temperatures at 9 h (PC and T3), 24 h (T1 and T2), and remained increased until d 7 in NC. At 7 and 14 d postinfection, the number of animals detected positive for ETEC by PCR assay was the greatest in NC; however, the PC group had the fewest ETEC-positive animals (P < 0.05), which was similar to T3. All challenged pigs, except T2, had greater concentrations of serum haptoglobin compared with CON, with the greatest concentration observed in NC (P < 0.001). Challenged pigs had increased serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) 3 to 48 h postinfection, with the greatest concentration of TNF-α at 48 h observed in NC

  4. Characteristics of adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to human and animal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Endo, S; Yokota, T; Echeverria, P

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli strain (serotype O127a:H2) that had been isolated from a child with diarrhea in Thailand and that was negative for the virulence factors of the four categories of diarrheagenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, and enterohemorrhagic) and that showed an aggregative pattern of adherence to HeLa cells was investigated for adherence to native or Formalin-fixed human and animal mucosa. The hemagglutinating activity and adherence ability of the bacteria were resistant to D-mannose and were strictly regulated by environmental conditions. Genetic data supported the close relation between the hemagglutinating activity and adherence ability. In accordance with the adherence pattern on tissue-cultured cells, the bacteria adhered to human and animal mucosa, as evidenced by a direct gold-labeling analysis. In human intestines, Formalin-fixed mucous coatings, epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, epithelial cells of ileal single lymphoid follicles and Peyer's patches, and the absorptive cells of jejunal or ileal villi provided adherence targets. Adherence to M cells in the Peyer's patch-associated epithelium was also confirmed. The adherence levels to native jejunal or ileal human villi were low, as was the case with the corresponding Formalin-fixed villi. In human urinary tract, the superficial epithelial cells of both native and Formalin-fixed ureter provided striking adherence targets. In animal (porcine and rabbit) small intestines, the bacteria adhered to the native villi to a lesser extent than to the Formalin-fixed villi. The adherence levels were compared with those of enterotoxigenic E. coli with colonization factor antigen (CFA)/I pili or CFA/II pili. The data suggested unique mucosa adherence characteristics of the enteroaggregative E. coli strain. The possibility of the adherence ability as a virulence factor was discussed. Images PMID:1680107

  5. Isolation of enterotoxigenic strains of staphylococci from dogs.

    PubMed

    Adesiyun, A A; Usman, B

    1983-10-01

    The ability of 309 staphylococcal isolates from household dogs to produce enterotoxin, coagulase, thermonuclease and hemolysin was investigated. A total of 52 (16.8%) isolates from 45 out of 150 dogs examined were enterotoxigenic when tested for enterotoxin types A, B and C. Based on sites sampled, 33 (20.5%) out of 161 isolates from the anterior nares were enterotoxigenic while from dorsal skins 19 (12.8%) out of 148 isolates were enterotoxigenic. Staphylococcal enterotoxin C(SEC) was predominantly produced as 21 (6.8%) isolates elaborated it and also accounted for 40.4% of all enterotoxins produced by isolates. Staphylococcal enterotoxins A(SEA) and B(SEB) were produced by 10 (3.2%) and 16 (5.2%) strains, respectively. Mixed enterotoxin types AB, AC and BC were produced by 1,3 and 1 strains, respectively. With human plasma, 17.1% of coagulase-positive and 15.0% of coagulase-negative strains were enterotoxigenic. However, using canine plasma, 19.1% and 6.9% of the coagulase-positive and negative isolates, respectively, were enterotoxigenic. The incidence of enterotoxigenicity was 16.9% amongst thermonuclease-positive isolates and 16.3% for thermonuclease-negative strains. Alpha hemolysin was predominantly produced by 180 (60.2%) isolates and 19.9% of these were enterotoxigenic. Beta hemolysin was produced by 36 (11.7%) isolates with 13.9% enterotoxigenic, while 87 (28.2%) exhibited gamma hemolytic pattern amongst which 11.5% were enterotoxigenic. Based on data provided on coagulation of human and canine plasmas and hemolytic patterns, it is concluded that a large proportion of canine isolates from this environment are not of canine biotypes, but are most probably human biotypes.

  6. Construction of Synthetic Immunogens in View of Developing Orally-Active Anti-Enterotoxigenic E. coli Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-31

    The aim of this research was to build immunogens susceptible of inducing a response against enterotoxigenic E . coli (Escherichia coli) (ETEC...ganglioside which represents the toxin receptor. Two different E . coli peptides have been analyzed by HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography). Eight...enterotoxigenic E . coli immunogens, 3-Muramyl dipeptides, 4-Synthetic cholera toxin receptor, 5-GM1 ganglioside, RA 1.

  7. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB5 toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins. PMID:26755534

  8. Three dimensional modeling of C-terminal loop of CssA subunit in CS6 of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and its interaction with the 70 KDa domain of Fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Ghosal, Abhisek; Sabui, Subrata; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2011-01-01

    Colonization factor CS6 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) helps to establish the adherence of CS6-expressing ETEC in the intestinal wall. CS6 is composed of two structural subunits, known as CssA and CssB. During CS6-expressing ETEC adherence in intestinal wall, 15 amino acid residues containing Cterminal region of CssA subunit, help to bind with N-terminal 70kDa domain of fibronectin (Fn). In this study, we have predicted a theoretical structural model for C-terminal domain of CssA by homology modelling using protein data bank (PDB) file, 1NTY-A as template (66.67% sequence identity) in Discovery Studio. The structural model of N-terminal region of Fn was also determined by homology modelling using PDB files 1FBR and 1E88 as templates. The structure of the model was also validated by Ramachandran plot. The energy minimization for Fn was performed in standard dynamic cascade using Steepest Descent algorithm followed by Adopted Basis NR algorithm in Discovery studio. The docking model between C-terminal domain and fibronectin were generated by using ClusPro algorithm. This docking study would be help for better understanding how CS6 interacts with fibronectin of intestinal extracellular matrix in the host during infection, and would be of great help towards subunit vaccine generation.

  9. The expression of Longus type 4 pilus of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is regulated by LngR and LngS and by H-NS, CpxR and CRP global regulators.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Miguel A; Ruiz-Tagle, Alejandro; Ares, Miguel A; Pacheco, Sabino; Yáñez, Jorge A; Cedillo, Lilia; Torres, Javier; Girón, Jorge A

    2017-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli produces a long type 4 pilus called Longus. The regulatory elements and the environmental signals controlling the expression of Longus-encoding genes are unknown. We identified two genes lngR and lngS in the Longus operon, whose predicted products share homology with transcriptional regulators. Isogenic lngR and lngS mutants were considerably affected in transcription of lngA pilin gene. The expression of lngA, lngR and lngS genes was optimally expressed at 37°C at pH 7.5. The presence of glucose and sodium chloride had a positive effect on Longus expression. The presence of divalent ions, particularly calcium, appears to be an important stimulus for Longus production. In addition, we studied H-NS, CpxR and CRP global regulators, on Longus expression. The response regulator CpxR appears to function as a positive regulator of lng genes as the cpxR mutant showed reduced levels of lngRSA expression. In contrast, H-NS and CRP function as negative regulators since expression of lngA was up-regulated in isogenic hns and crp mutants. H-NS and CRP were required for salt- and glucose-mediated regulation of Longus. Our data suggest the existence of a complex regulatory network controlling Longus expression, involving both local and global regulators in response to different environmental signals. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB(5) toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins.

  11. Effects of the −791(C→T) mutation in the promoter for tumor necrosis factor alpha on gene expression and resistance of Large White pigs to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F18

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Dai, Chaohui; Sun, Li; Zhu, Guoqiang; Wu, Shenglong; Bao, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in the immune system. In this study, TNF-α expression was analyzed in 11 tissues of 8 piglets resistant to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) F18 and 8 ETEC F18-susceptible piglets from the Large White breed. The expression levels of TNF-α were high in immune organs (spleen, lung, thymus, and lymph nodes). The levels were higher in ETEC F18-resistant piglets than in ETEC F18-susceptible piglets, with significant differences in spleen, kidney, thymus, lymph node, and duodenum (P < 0.05). The mutation TNF-α −791(C→T) and 3 genotypes (CC, CT, and TT) were identified. The TNF-α expression levels in the spleen, kidney, lymph nodes, and duodenum were significantly higher in the TT pigs than in the CC pigs (P < 0.05). Thus, TNF-α −791(C→T) has significant effects on mRNA expression and may regulate ETEC F18 resistance of weaning piglets. Therefore, the −791(C→T) mutation of the TNF-α gene could be considered an important potential genetic marker of ETEC F18 resistance. PMID:27408333

  12. Effect of dietary supplementation with inulin and/or benzoic acid on the incidence and severity of post-weaning diarrhoea in weaner pigs after experimental challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Halas, Danka; Hansen, Christian F; Hampson, David J; Mullan, Bruce P; Wilson, Robert H; Pluske, John R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of feeding pigs with inulin and/or benzoic acid on post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD), indices of fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract, and production in pigs experimentally infected with an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli (ETEC). Forty-eight entire male pigs (Large White×Landrace) aged 21 ± 3 days of age and weighing 4.97 ± 0.08 kg (mean ± SE) were used in a 2×2 factorial experiment, with the respective factors being inulin (0 versus 8%) and benzoic acid (0 vs. 0.5%). Feeding inulin-supplemented diets improved (p = 0.022) the faecal consistency (FC) and reduced (p = 0.001) the incidence of PWD; however, the use of benzoic acid had no effects on PWD or faecal ETEC shedding. Wet faeces (a higher FC score) were associated with increased faecal ETEC shedding (R(2) = 0.394, p = 0.001). Inulin reduced the total concentrations of short chain fatty acids (p = 0.029) in the proximal colon. The total concentration of lactic acid was increased by inulin in the caecum (p = 0.007) and proximal colon (p = 0.002). Feeding inulin or benzoic acid had no effects on production after weaning.

  13. Oral administration of synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 improves growth performance and cecal microbial flora and down-regulates the expression of intestinal toll-like receptor-4 and inflammatory cytokines in weaned piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiru; Xu, Ling; Shi, Baoshi; Deng, Huang; Lai, Xin; Liu, Jingyan; Sun, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 (pBD-2) was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth-promoters in pig production. Thirty 21-day weaned piglets were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and orally dosed with either sterile water (CON), pBD-2 (BD) or neomycin sulphate (NS) twice daily for 21 days. pBD-2 and NS led to higher growth performance, jejunum villus height and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-I compared with the CON group (P < 0.05). Hemolytic E. coli scores from rectal swabs, and copy numbers of E. coli, Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus in the cecal digesta of the BD- or NS-treated piglets were lower than those in the CON group (P < 0.05). Messenger RNA levels of toll-like receptor 4, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-8 in the jejunum mucosa of the BD and NS groups were lower than those in the CON group (P < 0.05). Copy numbers of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in the cecal digesta of the BD group were higher than those of the CON and NS groups (P < 0.05). Therefore, pBD-2 has antimicrobial activity in piglets, and it can improve growth performance, reduce inflammatory cytokine expression and affect intestinal morphological indices in the same way as probiotics. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Presence of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and Salmonella in fresh beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) juice from public markets in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Bautista-De León, Haydee; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Unpasteurized juice has been associated with foodborne illness outbreaks for many years. Beetroot is a vegetable grown all over the world in temperate areas. In Mexico beetroot is consumed cooked in salads or raw as fresh unpasteurized juices. No data about the microbiological quality or safety of unpasteurized beetroot juices are available. Indicator bacteria, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEP) and Salmonella frequencies were determined for fresh unpasteurized beetroot juice from restaurants. One hundred unpasteurized beetroot juice samples were collected from public markets in Pachuca, Mexico. Frequencies in these samples were 100%, 75%, 53%, 9% and 4% of positive samples, for coliform bacteria, fecal coliforms, E. coli, DEP and Salmonella, respectively. Identified DEP included enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Identified Salmonella serotypes included Typhimurium and Enteritidis. This is the first report of microbiological quality and atypical EPEC, ETEC, non-O157 STEC and Salmonella isolation from fresh raw beetroot juice in Mexico. Fresh raw beetroot juice from markets is very probably an important factor contributing to the endemicity of atypical EPEC, ETEC, non-O157 STEC and Salmonella-related gastroenteritis in Mexico. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates the inflammatory response to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 via inhibition of the NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihua; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Longbin; Zhu, Qi; Wang, Wenjie; Qiao, Jiayun

    2016-11-10

    A newly isolated L. acidophilus strain has been reported to have potential anti-inflammatory activities against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in piglet, while the details of the related inflammatory responses are limited. Here we aimed to analysis the ability of L. acidophilus to regulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in its anti-inflammatory activity. The ETEC (enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli) K88-induced up-regulations of IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α were obviously inhibited by L. acidophilus while IL-10 was significantly increased. Moreover, L. acidophilus down-regulated pattern recognition receptors TLR (Toll-like receptor) 2 and TLR4 expression in both spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes of ETEC-challenged piglets, in accompanied with the reduced phosphorylation levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 as well in spleen of ETEC-infected piglets. Furthermore, L.acidophilus significantly increased the expression of the negative regulators of TLRs signaling, including Tollip, IRAK-M, A20 and Bcl-3 in spleen of ETEC-challenged piglets. Our findings suggested that L. acidophilus regulated inflammatory response to ETEC via impairing both NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in piglets.

  16. Biological relationship between F18ab and F18ac fimbriae of enterotoxigenic and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli from weaned pigs with oedema disease or diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Whipp, S C; Imberechts, H; Bertschinger, H U; Dean-Nystrom, E A; Casey, T A; Salajka, E

    1997-01-01

    Comparative fimbrial expression and adhesion studies were made on enterotoxigenic and verotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC and VTEC) strains isolated from cases of porcine postweaning diarrhoea or oedema disease. F107(F18ab) fimbriae--monitored by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies and by electron microscopy--were poorly expressed on most VTEC strains. In contrast, 2134P(F18ac) fimbriae were more readily detected on most ETEC strains. The F18ac strains adhered in vivo to ligated intestinal loops in weaned pigs while the F18ab strains did not adhere or adhered weakly. Similarly, the F18ac strains adhered to isolated intestinal brush borders in weaned pigs but the F18ab strains (except for the F107 reference E. coli) did not adhere or adhered weakly in vitro. Neither the F18ab nor F18ac strains adhered to brush borders from newborn pigs. In vitro adhesion of F18ab and F18ac strains was mannose resistant and receptors for F18 seemed to differ from receptors for K88(F4). It is concluded that the antigenic variants of F18 fimbriae (F18ab and F18ac) are biologically distinct. F18ab fimbriae are expressed poorly both in vitro and in vivo and are frequently linked with the production of SLT-IIv and serogroup O139, while F18ac are more efficiently expressed in vitro and in vivo and most often are linked with enterotoxin (STa, STb) production, and serogroups O141, O157.

  17. Behavior of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, non-O157-shiga toxin-producing E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on mung bean seeds and sprout.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Bautista-De León, Haydee; Vázquez-Barrios, Ma Estela; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2013-09-16

    The behavior of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) on mung bean seeds at 25±2 °C and during germination and sprouting of mung bean seeds at 20±2 ° and 30±2 °C and on mung bean sprouts at 3±2 °C was determined. When mung bean seeds were inoculated with EAEC, non-O157 STEC, EIEC, EPEC or ETEC strains, all these diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) survived at least 90 days on mung bean seeds at 25±2 °C. All DEPs grew during germination and sprouting of seeds, reaching counts of approximately 5 Log and 7 Log CFU/g after 2 days at 20±2 ° and 30±2 °C, respectively. However, when the sprouts were inoculated after 1 day of seeds germination and stored at 20±2 ° or 30±2 °C, no growth was observed for any DEPs during sprouting at 20±2 °C per 9 d; however, a significant increase in the concentration of DEPs of approximately 0.7 log CFU/g was observed during sprouting at 30±2 °C after 1 day of sprout contamination. Refrigeration reduced the number of viable DEPs strains on sprouts after 10 days in storage; nevertheless, these decreases have no practical significance in the safety of the sprouts. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a ΔguaBA Strain CVD 1204 Expressing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) CS2 and CS3 Fimbriae as a Live Mucosal Vaccine against Shigella and ETEC Infection

    PubMed Central

    Altboum, Zeev; Barry, Eileen M.; Losonsky, Genevieve; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2001-01-01

    To construct a prototype hybrid vaccine against Shigella and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the genes encoding the production of ETEC CS2 and CS3 fimbriae were isolated and expressed in attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a guaBA strain CVD 1204. The CS2 cotA to -D genes, isolated from ETEC strain C91F, and the CS3 cstA to -H genes, subcloned from plasmid pCS100, were cloned into ∼15-copy-number-stabilized pGA1 behind the osmotically regulated ompC promoter, resulting in high expression of both fimbriae. Under nonselective in vitro growth conditions, pGA1-CS2 and pGA1-CS3 were stable in CVD 1204, exhibiting a plasmid loss of only approximately 1% per duplication. Expression of CS2 and CS3 reduced the invasiveness of Shigella for HeLa cells and slowed the intracellular growth rate. Guinea pigs immunized intranasally with CVD 1204(pGA1-CS2) or CVD 1204(pGA1-CS3), or with a mixture of these strains, developed secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) in tears and serum IgG antibodies against Shigella lipopolysaccharide, CS2, and CS3 antigens. Moreover, the animals were protected against keratoconjunctivitis following conjunctival challenge with virulent S. flexneri 2a strain 2457T. Animals immunized with Shigella expressing CS2 or CS3 developed serum antibodies that agglutinated Shigella as well as an ETEC strain bearing the homologous fimbriae, whereas animals immunized with combined CVD 1204(pGA1-CS2) and CVD 1204(pGA1-CS3) developed antibodies that agglutinated all three test strains. These observations support the feasibility of a multivalent vaccine against shigellosis and ETEC diarrhea consisting of multiple Shigella live vectors expressing relevant ETEC antigens. PMID:11292735

  19. The Use of Specific Antibodies to Demonstrate the Glycocalyx and Spatial Relationships of a K99-, F41- Enterotoxigenic Strain of Escherichia coli Colonizing the Ileum of Colostrum-deprived Calves

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R.; Lian, C.J.; Costerton, J.W.; Acres, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to study the interaction between the glycocalyx of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain 210 (09:K30+;K99-;F41-:H-) and the glycocalyx of epithelial cells in then ileum of experimentally infected newborn colostrum-deprived calves. Fixation of tissues in anti-K30 antibody and ruthenium red was used to stabilize the bacterial glycocalyx so that the spatial relationship between the bacteria and the intestinal epithelial cells could be characterized. When strain 210 was grown in vitro and reacted with anti-K30 antibody prior to staining with ruthenium red, the extensive glycocalyx could be clearly visualized surrounding the bacterial cells. By negative staining, an unidentified pilus was also seen. Sections of ileum from infected calves, which were not fixed in antibody nor stained with ruthenium red, revealed attached bacteria which were surrounded by an electron-translucent zone and no visible bacterial glycocalyx. When ruthenium red staining was used, the bacterial glycocalyx partially collapsed during the dehydration steps of fixation, but could be seen as either a fibrous capsule or an electron-dense accretion on the bacterial cell surface. When ileal tissue was reacted for one hour in anti-K30 antibody before staining with ruthenium red, the bacterial glycocalyx was seen as a discrete electron-dense structure up to 1.0µm thick which was in intimate contact with the glycocalyx of the epithelial cells. The importance of the bacterial exopolysaccharide to microcolony formation on the villi could be clearly visualized. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:6349756

  20. Effects of dietary administering chitosan on growth performance, jejunal morphology, jejunal mucosal sIgA, occludin, claudin-1 and TLR4 expression in weaned piglets challenged by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dingfu; Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Xionggui; Feng, Zemeng; Wang, Jinquan

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how chitosan (COS) affects intestinal mucosal barrier function and to further explain mechanisms of COS on growth performance. Thirty piglets, weaned at 21 days of age, were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli during preliminary trial period. Three groups of Piglets in individual pens were fed a corn-soybean meal diet containing no addition, 50 mg/kg chlortetracycline, or 300 mg/kg COS for 21 days. Jejunal morphology and histology were analyzed under light microscope. The concentrations of occludin proteins were determined by western blot. Immunohistochemistry assays were used to determine secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA) level. Real-time PCR was used to detect Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Claudin-1 in jejunal mucosa. Feeding COS or chlortetracycline reduced (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio. Villus length, villus length/crypt depth, and goblet cells, were increased (P<0.05), but villus width and crypt depth were decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. Intraepithelial lymphocytes were higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both chlortetracycline and control groups. Occludin protein expression was increased (P<0.01) in the COS group, but was decreased (P<0.05) in the chlortetracycline group. Expression of sIgA protein was higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both control and chlortetracycline groups, however TLR4 mRNA expression was decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. There was no difference in expression of claudin-1 among the three groups. In conclusion, chitosan and the antibiotic have similar effects in promoting piglet growth and reducing intestinal inflammation, but different effects on intestinal mucosal barrier function. This indicates that chitosan can replace chlortetracycline as a feed additive for piglets. © 2013.

  1. Behavior of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on whole and sliced jalapeño and serrano peppers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC) on whole and slices of jalapeño and serrano peppers as well as in blended sauce at 25 ± 2 °C and 3 ± 2 °C was investigated. Chili peppers were collected from markets of Pachuca city, Hidalgo, Mexico. On whole serrano and jalapeño stored at 25 ± 2 °C or 3 ± 2 °C, no growth was observed for EPEC, ETEC, EIEC and non-O157-STEC rifampicin resistant strains. After twelve days at 25 ± 2 °C, on serrano peppers all diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEP) strains had decreased by a total of approximately 3.7 log, whereas on jalapeño peppers the strains had decreased by approximately 2.8 log, and at 3 ± 2 °C they decreased to approximately 2.5 and 2.2 log respectively, on serrano and jalapeño. All E. coli pathotypes grew onto sliced chili peppers and in blended sauce: after 24 h at 25 ± 2 °C, all pathotypes had grown to approximately 3 and 4 log CFU on pepper slices and sauce, respectively. At 3 ± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Presence of Multidrug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Enteropathogenic E. coli and Enterotoxigenic E. coli, on Raw Nopalitos (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) and in Nopalitos Salads from Local Retail Markets in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, Mdel Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angelica; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The presence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in food is a significant public health concern. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEPs) are foodborne bacteria. In Mexico, DEPs have been associated with diarrheal illness. There is no information about the presence of multidrug-resistant DEPs on fresh vegetables and in cooked vegetable salads in Mexico. "Nopalitos" (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) is a Cactacea extensively used as a fresh green vegetable throughout Mexico. The presence of generic E. coli and multidrug-resistant DEPs on raw whole and cut nopalitos and in nopalitos salad samples was determined. One hundred raw whole nopalitos (without prickles) samples, 100 raw nopalitos cut into small square samples, and 100 cooked nopalitos salad samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli was determined using the most probable number procedures. DEPs were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to 16 antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEP strains by standard test. Of the 100 whole nopalitos samples, 100 cut nopalitos samples, and 100 nopalitos salad samples, generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 80% and 10%, 74% and 10%, and 64% and 8%. Eighty-two DEP strains were isolated from positive nopalitos samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). All isolated strains exhibited resistance to at least six antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of multidrug-resistant and antibiotic resistance profiles of STEC, ETEC, and EPEC on raw nopalitos and in nopalitos salads in Mexico.

  3. Seroepidemiology of heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Norwalk virus infections in Panamanians, Canal Zone residents, Apache Indians, and United States Peace Corps volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ryder, R W; Greenberg, H; Singh, N; Oro, G; de Guardia, A; Sack, R B; Kapikian, A Z

    1982-09-01

    Serum antibody titrations against the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli were carried out on Panamanians, U.S. citizens resident in the Panama Canal Zone, Apache Indians living on the reservation in Whiteriver, Arizona, and Peace Corps volunteers before they traveled overseas. Antibody titers to Norwalk virus were also carried out on serum from Panamanian and Canal Zone residents. A high prevalence of low-titer LT antibodies was found in infants and adults from Panama, the Canal Zone, and Whiteriver. Panamanian children aged 1 to 5 years had the highest LT antibody titers. Peace Corps volunteers had a low prevalence and titer of LT antibodies. Prevalence and titer of antibodies to Norwalk virus were generally higher in Panamanians compared with Canal Zone residents of the same age. In the populations we studied, various modes of transmission and mechanisms of immunity likely explain the differences which we observed in antibody prevalence and titer to these two enteric pathogens.

  4. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Pediatric Patients in Lima, Perú

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Anicia M.; Rivera, Fulton P.; Romero, Liliana M.; Kolevic, Lenka A.; Castillo, Maria E.; Verne, Eduardo; Hernandez, Roger; Mayor, Yovanna E.; Barletta, Francesca; Mercado, Erik; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study in three hospitals in Lima in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) children to determine the frequency of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. Five E. coli colonies/patients were studied by a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction to identify the six currently recognized groups of diarrhea-associated E. coli. We have analyzed 70 HIV-associated diarrheal and 70 control samples from HIV-infected children without diarrhea. Among the diarrheal episodes 19% were persistent, 3% dysenteric, and 33% were associated with moderate or severe dehydration. The diarrheagenic E. coli were the most commonly isolated pathogens in diarrhea (19%) and control samples (26%) (P = 0.42), including enteroaggregative (6% versus 10%), enteropathogenic (6% versus 10%), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (4% versus 3%), respectively. The HIV-infected children with diarrhea had the worse age-related immunosuppression, higher viral loads, and were on highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) less often than HIV-infected children without diarrhea. Diarrheagenic E. coli were highly resistant to ampicillin (74%) and cotrimoxazole (70%). PMID:20595495

  5. Differential protection by cell wall components of Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 16698(T)against alterations of membrane barrier and NF-kB activation induced by enterotoxigenic F4(+) Escherichia coli on intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Hynönen, Ulla; Palva, Airi; Mengheri, Elena

    2016-09-29

    The role of Lactobacillus cell wall components in the protection against pathogen infection in the gut is still largely unexplored. We have previously shown that L. amylovorus DSM 16698(T) is able to reduce the enterotoxigenic F4(+) Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesion and prevent the pathogen-induced membrane barrier disruption through the regulation of IL-10 and IL-8 expression in intestinal cells. We have also demonstrated that L. amylovorus DSM 16698(T) protects host cells through the inhibition of NF-kB signaling. In the present study, we investigated the role of L. amylovorus DSM 16698(T) cell wall components in the protection against F4(+)ETEC infection using the intestinal Caco-2 cell line. Purified cell wall fragments (CWF) from L. amylovorus DSM 16698(T) were used either as such (uncoated, U-CWF) or coated with S-layer proteins (S-CWF). Differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cells on Transwell filters were infected with F4(+)ETEC, treated with S-CWF or U-CWF, co-treated with S-CWF or U-CWF and F4(+)ETEC for 2.5 h, or pre-treated with S-CWF or U-CWF for 1 h before F4(+)ETEC addition. Tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins were analyzed by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Membrane permeability was determined by phenol red passage. Phosphorylated p65-NF-kB was measured by Western blot. We showed that both the pre-treatment with S-CWF and the co- treatment of S-CWF with the pathogen protected the cells from F4(+)ETEC induced TJ and AJ injury, increased membrane permeability and activation of NF-kB expression. Moreover, the U-CWF pre-treatment, but not the co-treatment with F4(+)ETEC, inhibited membrane damage and prevented NF-kB activation. The results indicate that the various components of L. amylovorus DSM 16698(T) cell wall may counteract the damage caused by F4(+)ETEC through different mechanisms. S-layer proteins are essential for maintaining membrane barrier function and for mounting an anti-inflammatory response against F4(+)ETEC infection. U

  6. Real-Time TaqMan PCR Assay for the Detection of Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Genes in a Geographically Diverse Collection of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains and Stool Specimens.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A

    2016-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years in developing countries and are the leading bacterial agent of traveler's diarrhea in persons traveling to these countries. ETEC strains secrete heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins that induce diarrhea by causing water and electrolyte imbalance. We describe the validation of a real-time TaqMan PCR (RT-PCR) assay to detect LT, ST1a, and ST1b enterotoxin genes in E. coli strains and in stool specimens. We validated LT/ST1b duplex and ST1a single-plex RT-PCR assay using a conventional PCR assay as a gold standard with 188 ETEC strains and 42 non-ETEC strains. We validated LT/ST1b duplex and ST1a single-plex RT-PCR assay in stool specimens (n = 106) using traditional culture as the gold standard. RT- PCR assay sensitivities for LT, ST1a, and ST1b detection in strains were 100%, 100%, and 98%; specificities were 95%, 98%, and 99%, and Pearson correlation coefficient r was 0.9954 between RT-PCR assay and the gold standard. In stool specimens, RT-PCR assay sensitivities for LT, ST1a, and ST1b detection were 97%, 100%, and 97%; and specificities were 99%, 94%, and 97%. Pearson correlation coefficient r was 0.9975 between RT-PCR results in stool specimens and the gold standard. Limits of detection of LT, ST1a, and ST1b by RT-PCR assay were 0.1 to1.0 pg/μL and by conventional PCR assay were 100 to1000 pg/μL. The accuracy, rapidity and sensitivity of this RT-PCR assay is promising for ETEC detection in public health/clinical laboratories and for laboratories in need of an independent method to confirm results of other culture independent diagnostic tests.

  7. Effect of increasing the dietary tryptophan to lysine ratio on plasma levels of tryptophan, kynurenine and urea and on production traits in weaner pigs experimentally infected with an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Capozzalo, Meeka M; Kim, Jae Cheol; Htoo, John K; de Lange, Cornelius F M; Mullan, Bruce P; Hansen, Christian Fink; Resink, Jan-Willem; Stumbles, Phillip A; Hampson, David J; Pluske, John R

    2015-01-01

    This experiment examined if immune system stimulation of weaner pigs, initiated by inoculation an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli (ETEC), increased the requirement for dietary tryptophan (Trp), modulated the inflammatory response, altered plasma levels of Trp and its metabolite kynurenine (Kyn) and effected post-weaning diarrhoea. Individually housed pigs (n = 72) weaned at 21 d of age were allocated to one of six treatments (n = 12) according to a two by three factorial arrangement of (1) with or without ETEC infection and (2) three dietary ratios of standardised ileal digestible (SID) Trp to lysine (Lys) (SID Trp:Lys) of 0.16, 0.20 or 0.24, in a completely randomised block design. Pigs had ad libitum access to diets (per kg 14.13 MJ ME, 12.4 g SID Lys, 195 g crude protein) for 3 weeks after weaning. Pigs were infected with ETEC (O149:K98:K88) at 72, 96 and 120 h after weaning and then bled on day 3, 11 and 19. An increased dietary Trp:Lys ratio increased plasma Trp and Kyn (p < 0.001) without effect of infection. On day 3, pigs fed 0.24 SID Trp:Lys had lower levels of plasma urea than at 0.20 Trp:Lys (p = 0.047) and on day 11, plasma urea was lower at 0.20 than at 0.16 SID Trp:Lys (p = 0.007). Infection increased (p = 0.039) the diarrhoea index and deteriorated faecal consistency from day 4-10 (p < 0.05). Treatments did not affect haptoglobin and acid soluble glycoprotein levels or daily gain and feed intake. However, 0.24 SID Trp:Lys improved (p = 0.021) feed efficiency without an effect of infection. In conclusion, in the absence of dietary antibiotic growth promotants, increasing the dietary SID Trp:Lys ratio to 0.24 improved feed conversion ratio after weaning and increased plasma levels of Trp and Kyn regardless of infection with E. coli.

  8. Clinical trial to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of an oral inactivated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli prototype vaccine containing CFA/I overexpressing bacteria and recombinantly produced LTB/CTB hybrid protein.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, A; Leach, S; Tobias, J; Carlin, N; Gustafsson, B; Jertborn, M; Bourgeois, L; Walker, R; Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-02-06

    We have developed a new oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) diarrhea containing killed recombinant E. coli bacteria expressing increased levels of ETEC colonization factors (CFs) and a recombinant protein (LCTBA), i.e. a hybrid between the binding subunits of E. coli heat labile toxin (LTB) and cholera toxin (CTB). We describe a randomized, comparator controlled, double-blind phase I trial in 60 adult Swedish volunteers of a prototype of this vaccine. The safety and immunogenicity of the prototype vaccine, containing LCTBA and an E. coli strain overexpressing the colonization factor CFA/I, was compared to a previously developed oral ETEC vaccine, consisting of CTB and inactivated wild type ETEC bacteria expressing CFA/I (reference vaccine). Groups of volunteers were given two oral doses of either the prototype or the reference vaccine; the prototype vaccine was administered at the same or a fourfold higher dosage than the reference vaccine. The prototype vaccine was found to be safe and equally well-tolerated as the reference vaccine at either dosage tested. The prototype vaccine induced mucosal IgA (fecal secretory IgA and intestine-derived IgA antibody secreting cell) responses to both LTB and CFA/I, as well as serum IgA and IgG antibody responses to LTB. Immunization with LCTBA resulted in about twofold higher mucosal and systemic IgA responses against LTB than a comparable dose of CTB. The higher dose of the prototype vaccine induced significantly higher fecal and systemic IgA responses to LTB and fecal IgA responses to CFA/I than the reference vaccine. These results demonstrate that CF over-expression and inclusion of the LCTBA hybrid protein in an oral inactivated ETEC vaccine does not change the safety profile when compared to a previous generation of such a vaccine and that the prototype vaccine induces significant dose dependent mucosal immune responses against CFA/I and LTB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic E scherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales‐Siles, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Enterotoxigenic E scherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food‐borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  10. Genetic Fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (Multiepitope Fusion Antigen) and a Toxoid Fusion of Heat-Stable Toxin (STa) and Heat-Labile Toxin (LT) of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Retain Broad Anti-CFA and Antitoxin Antigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  11. Genetic fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) and a toxoid fusion of heat-stable toxin (STa) and heat-labile toxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) retain broad anti-CFA and antitoxin antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  12. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G.; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin–producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli

  13. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli intestinal

  14. A Tripartite Fusion, FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B, of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Elicits Antibodies That Neutralize Cholera Toxin, Inhibit Adherence of K88 (F4) and F18 Fimbriae, and Protect Pigs against K88ac/Heat-Labile Toxin Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Liu, Mei; Casey, Thomas A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing K88 (F4) or F18 fimbriae and heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) toxins are the major cause of diarrhea in young pigs. Effective vaccines inducing antiadhesin (anti-K88 and anti-F18) and antitoxin (anti-LT and anti-ST) immunity would provide broad protection to young pigs against ETEC. In this study, we genetically fused nucleotides coding for peptides from K88ac major subunit FaeG, F18 minor subunit FedF, and LT toxoid (LT192) A2 and B subunits for a tripartite adhesin-adhesin-toxoid fusion (FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B). This fusion was used for immunizations in mice and pigs to assess the induction of antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies. In addition, protection by the elicited antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies against a porcine ETEC strain was evaluated in a gnotobiotic piglet challenge model. The data showed that this FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B fusion elicited anti-K88, anti-F18, and anti-LT antibodies in immunized mice and pigs. In addition, the anti-porcine antibodies elicited neutralized cholera toxin and inhibited adherence against both K88 and F18 fimbriae. Moreover, immunized piglets were protected when challenged with ETEC strain 30302 (K88ac/LT/STb) and did not develop clinical disease. In contrast, all control nonvaccinated piglets developed severe diarrhea and dehydration after being challenged with the same ETEC strain. This study clearly demonstrated that this FaeG-FedF-LT192A2:B fusion antigen elicited antibodies that neutralized LT toxin and inhibited the adherence of K88 and F18 fimbrial E. coli strains and that this fusion could serve as an antigen for vaccines against porcine ETEC diarrhea. In addition, the adhesin-toxoid fusion approach used in this study may provide important information for developing effective vaccines against human ETEC diarrhea. PMID:21813665

  15. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  16. Effects of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecium and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in a Pig and Human Epithelial Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Lodemann, Ulrike; Strahlendorf, Julia; Schierack, Peter; Klingspor, Shanti; Aschenbach, Jörg R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to elucidate the effect of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on epithelial integrity in intestinal epithelial cells and whether pre- and coincubation with this strain can reproducibly prevent damage induced by enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Porcine (IPEC-J2) and human (Caco-2) intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with bacterial strains and epithelial integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and mannitol flux rates. E. faecium alone increased TEER of Caco-2 cells without affecting mannitol fluxes whereas the E. coli strains decreased TEER and concomitantly increased mannitol flux rates in both cell lines. Preincubation with E. faecium had no effect on the TEER decrease induced by E. coli in preliminary experiments. However, in a second set of experiments using a slightly different protocol, E. faecium ameliorated the TEER decrease induced by ETEC at 4 h in IPEC-J2 and at 2, 4, and 6 h in Caco-2 cells. We conclude that E. faecium positively affected epithelial integrity in monoinfected Caco-2 cells and could ameliorate the damage on TEER induced by an ETEC strain. Reproducibility of the results is, however, limited when experiments are performed with living bacteria over longer periods. PMID:25883829

  17. Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens: Detection and Identification

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the genetics of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens, including whole genome sequencing of a chromosomal cpe strain and sequencing of several cpe-carrying large plasmids, have led to the development of molecular approaches to more precisely investigate isolates involved in human gastrointestinal diseases and isolates present in the environment. Sequence-based PCR genotyping of the cpe locus (cpe genotyping PCR assays) has provided new information about cpe-positive type A C. perfringens including: 1) Foodborne C. perfringens outbreaks can be caused not only by chromosomal cpe type A strains with extremely heat-resistant spores, but also less commonly by less heat-resistant spore-forming plasmid cpe type A strains; 2) Both chromosomal cpe and plasmid cpe C. perfringens type A strains can be found in retail foods, healthy human feces and the environment, such as in sewage; 3) Most environmental cpe-positive C. perfringens type A strains carry their cpe gene on plasmids. Moreover, recent studies indicated that the cpe loci of type C, D, and E strains differ from the cpe loci of type A strains and from the cpe loci of each other, indicating that the cpe loci of C. perfringens have remarkable diversity. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) indicated that the chromosomal cpe strains responsible for most food poisoning cases have distinct genetic characteristics that provide unique biological properties, such as the formation of highly heat-resistant spores. These and future advances should help elucidate the epidemiology of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens and also contribute to the prevention of C. perfringens food poisoning outbreaks and other CPE-associated human diseases. PMID:22504431

  18. Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens: detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the genetics of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens, including whole genome sequencing of a chromosomal cpe strain and sequencing of several cpe-carrying large plasmids, have led to the development of molecular approaches to more precisely investigate isolates involved in human gastrointestinal diseases and isolates present in the environment. Sequence-based PCR genotyping of the cpe locus (cpe genotyping PCR assays) has provided new information about cpe-positive type A C. perfringens including: 1) Foodborne C. perfringens outbreaks can be caused not only by chromosomal cpe type A strains with extremely heat-resistant spores, but also less commonly by less heat-resistant spore-forming plasmid cpe type A strains; 2) Both chromosomal cpe and plasmid cpe C. perfringens type A strains can be found in retail foods, healthy human feces and the environment, such as in sewage; 3) Most environmental cpe-positive C. perfringens type A strains carry their cpe gene on plasmids. Moreover, recent studies indicated that the cpe loci of type C, D, and E strains differ from the cpe loci of type A strains and from the cpe loci of each other, indicating that the cpe loci of C. perfringens have remarkable diversity. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) indicated that the chromosomal cpe strains responsible for most food poisoning cases have distinct genetic characteristics that provide unique biological properties, such as the formation of highly heat-resistant spores. These and future advances should help elucidate the epidemiology of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens and also contribute to the prevention of C. perfringens food poisoning outbreaks and other CPE-associated human diseases.

  19. Insertional inactivation of hblC encoding the L2 component of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 haemolysin BL strongly reduces enterotoxigenic activity, but not the haemolytic activity against human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lindbäck, T; Okstad, O A; Rishovd, A L; Kolstø, A B

    1999-11-01

    Haemolysin BL (HBL) is a Bacillus cereus toxin composed of a binding component, B, and two lytic components, L1 and L2. HBL is also the enterotoxin responsible for the diarrhoeal food poisoning syndrome caused by several strains of B. cereus. The three genes encoding the HBL components constitute an operon and are transcribed from a promoter 608 bp upstream of the hblC translational start site. The first gene of the hbl operon, hblC, in the B. cereus type strain, ATCC 14579, was inactivated in this study. Inactivation of hblC strongly reduced both the enterotoxigenic activity of B. cereus ATCC 14579 and the haemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, while maintaining full haemolytic activity against human erythrocytes.

  20. Enterotoxigenic and non-enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis from fecal microbiota of children.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Aline; Fernandes, Miriam Rodriguez; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio; Nakano, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is an important part of the human and animal intestinal microbiota and is commonly associated with diarrhea. ETBF strains produce an enterotoxin encoded by the bft gene located in the B. fragilis pathogenicity island (BfPAI). Non-enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (NTBF) strains lack the BfPAI and usually show two different genetic patterns, II and III, based on the absence or presence of a BfPAI-flanking region, respectively. The incidence of ETBF and NTBF strains in fecal samples isolated from children without acute diarrhea or any other intestinal disorders was determined. All 84 fecal samples evaluated were B. fragilis-positive by PCR, four of them harbored the bft gene, 27 contained the NTBF pattern III DNA sequence, and 52 were considered to be NTBF pattern II samples. One sample was positive for both ETBF and NTBF pattern III DNA sequences. All 19 B. fragilis strains isolated by the culture method were bft-negative, 9 belonged to pattern III and 10 to pattern II. We present an updated overview of the ETBF and NTBF incidence in the fecal microbiota of children from Sao Paulo City, Brazil.

  1. Antibodies derived from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesin tip MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) against adherence of nine ETEC adhesins: CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Rahul M; Ruan, Xiaosai; Duan, Qiangde; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-06-30

    Diarrhea continues to be a leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years in developing countries. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading bacterial cause of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. ETEC bacteria initiate diarrheal disease by attaching to host receptors at epithelial cells and colonizing in small intestine. Therefore, preventing ETEC attachment has been considered the first line of defense against ETEC diarrhea. However, developing vaccines effectively against ETEC bacterial attachment encounters challenge because ETEC strains produce over 23 immunologically heterogeneous adhesins. In this study, we applied MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) approach to integrate epitopes from adhesin tips or adhesive subunits of CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA adhesins and to construct an adhesin tip MEFA peptide. We then examined immunogenicity of this tip MEFA in mouse immunization, and assessed potential application of this tip MEFA for ETEC vaccine development. Data showed that mice intraperitoneally immunized with this adhesin tip MEFA developed IgG antibody responses to all nine ETEC adhesins. Moreover, ETEC and E. coli bacteria expressing these nine adhesins, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, exhibited significant reduction in attachment to Caco-2 cells. These results indicated that anti-adhesin antibodies induced by this adhesin tip MEFA blocked adherence of the most important ETEC adhesins, suggesting this multivalent tip MEFA may be useful for developing a broadly protective anti-adhesin vaccine against ETEC diarrhea.

  2. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of pathogenic Escherichia coli of calves and the role of calves as reservoirs for human pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, Rafał; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Schierack, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria are the most common causes of diarrhea and septicemia in calves. Moreover, calves form a major reservoir for transmission of pathogenic E. coli to humans. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of publications on E. coli as calf pathogens and the role of calves as reservoir have not been done so far. We reviewed studies between 1951 and 2013 reporting the presence of virulence associated factors (VAFs) in calf E. coli and extracted the following information: year(s) and country of sampling, animal number, health status, isolate number, VAF prevalence, serotypes, diagnostic methods, and biological assays. The prevalence of VAFs or E. coli pathotypes was compared between healthy and diarrheic animals and was analyzed for time courses. Together, 106 papers with 25,982 E. coli isolates from 27 countries tested for VAFs were included. F5, F17, and F41 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) - VAFs of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were significantly associated with calf diarrhea. On the contrary, ETEC VAF F4 fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin as well as enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) were not associated with diarrhea. The prevalence increased overtime for ST-positive isolates, but decreased for F5- and STEC-positive isolates. Our study provides useful information about the history of scientific investigations performed in this domain so far, and helps to define etiological agents of calf disease, and to evaluate calves as reservoir hosts for human pathogenic E. coli.

  3. Isolation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus from pet dogs and cats: a public health implication.

    PubMed

    Abdel-moein, Khaled A; Samir, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a globally distributed bacterium causing wide variety of illnesses in humans, which attributed to its ability to produce wide array of virulence factors, including enterotoxins that are responsible for staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The current study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs and cats and its public health implication. For this purpose, nasal, oral, and wound swabs were collected from 70 dogs and 47 cats, whereas nasal swabs were collected from 26 human contacts. All samples were examined for the presence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus by isolation of S. aureus in culture media and then tested by specific ELISA kits to detect the produced toxins in bacterial cultures. The prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus was 10% and 2.1% for pet dogs and cats, respectively, whereas the nasal carriage rate in human contacts was 7.7%. The majority of animal isolates were obtained from mouth of the apparently healthy animals. All types of staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected in both animal and human isolates. High prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs highlights the possibility of zoonotic transmission to human contacts leading to nasal and/or hand carriage of such strains; thus, pet animals may be incriminated in the epidemiology of household staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks.

  4. Prevalence of bacterial contamination with antibiotic-resistant and enterotoxigenic fecal coliforms in treated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Pathak, S P; Gopal, K

    2008-01-01

    Pollution indicator bacteria such as coliforms, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci were enumerated using a multiple-tube fermentation method in 100 treated drinking-water samples from 20 locations in residential, commercial, and industrial areas of a tropical city during summer. Thirty-four percent of the samples were bacteriologically nonpotable. Maximum coliform-contaminated (27%) samples were derived from industrial areas, while samples contaminated with fecal coliform (23%) and fecal streptococci (20%) originated from commercial areas. Coliforms identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were present in 29%, 26%, 24%, and 15% of samples, respectively. Fecal coliforms were examined for antibiotic susceptibility with disc diffusion method. All test isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) for kanamycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim. Escherichia coli isolates were examined for enterotoxigenicity using the suckling mice bioassay and 60% of the isolates displayed enterotoxigenicity. Data indicate that drinking water contaminated with antibiotic-resistant enterotoxigenic fecal bacteria may be responsible for presence of waterborne diarrheal diseases attributed to therapeutic agents used by urban populations in the tropics.

  5. Oral Administration of a Select Mixture of Bacillus Probiotics Affects the Gut Microbiota and Goblet Cell Function following Escherichia coli Challenge in Newly Weaned Pigs of Genotype MUC4 That Are Supposed To Be Enterotoxigenic E. coli F4ab/ac Receptor Negative.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Zhou, Dong; Wu, Qiong; Song, Dan; Dicksved, Johan; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric diseases. Low, moderate, or high doses of a Bacillus licheniformis-B. subtilis mixture (BLS mix) were orally administered to piglets of genotype MUC4 that are supposed to be F4-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (F4(+) ETEC) F4ab/ac receptor negative (i.e., MUC4-resistant piglets) for 1 week before F4(+) ETEC challenge. The luminal contents were collected from the mucosa of the colon on day 8 after F4(+) ETEC challenge. The BLS mix attenuated E. coli-induced expansion of Bacteroides uniformis, Eubacterium eligens, Acetanaerobacterium, and Sporobacter populations. Clostridium and Turicibacter populations increased following F4(+) ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with low-dose BLS mix. Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius populations increased after administration of BLS mix during E. coli infection. The beneficial effects of BLS mix were due in part to the expansion of certain Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Turicibacter populations, with a corresponding increase in the number of goblet cells in the ileum via upregulated Atoh1 expression, in turn increasing MUC2 production and thus preserving the mucus barrier and enhancing host defenses against enteropathogenic bacteria. However, excessive BLS mix consumption may increase the risk for enteritis, partly through disruption of colonic microbial ecology, characterized by expansion of Proteobacteria and impaired goblet cell function in the ileum. Our findings suggest that oral administration of BLS mix reprograms the gut microbiota and enhances goblet cell function to ameliorate enteritis.

  6. Superoxide dismutase protects Escherichia coli against killing by human serum.

    PubMed

    McManus, D C; Josephy, P D

    1995-02-20

    To assess the role of superoxide dismutase in protecting Escherichia coli from killing by human serum and neutrophils, we constructed isogenic, smooth-lipopolysaccharide K-12 strains, either sod wild-type, delta sodA, or delta sodA delta sodB. The delta sodA delta sodB strain was killed by serum much more readily than either the wild-type or delta sodA strain. After allowing for this serum sensitivity difference, the delta sodA delta sodB strain also showed increased susceptibility to phagocytic killing by human neutrophils. These results indicate that superoxide dismutase protects E. coli from killing by serum (complement system) and by human neutrophils, possibly by a role in maintaining bacterial membrane structure.

  7. Oral Administration of a Select Mixture of Bacillus Probiotics Affects the Gut Microbiota and Goblet Cell Function following Escherichia coli Challenge in Newly Weaned Pigs of Genotype MUC4 That Are Supposed To Be Enterotoxigenic E. coli F4ab/ac Receptor Negative

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dong; Wu, Qiong; Song, Dan; Dicksved, Johan; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric diseases. Low, moderate, or high doses of a Bacillus licheniformis-B. subtilis mixture (BLS mix) were orally administered to piglets of genotype MUC4 that are supposed to be F4-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (F4+ ETEC) F4ab/ac receptor negative (i.e., MUC4-resistant piglets) for 1 week before F4+ ETEC challenge. The luminal contents were collected from the mucosa of the colon on day 8 after F4+ ETEC challenge. The BLS mix attenuated E. coli-induced expansion of Bacteroides uniformis, Eubacterium eligens, Acetanaerobacterium, and Sporobacter populations. Clostridium and Turicibacter populations increased following F4+ ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with low-dose BLS mix. Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius populations increased after administration of BLS mix during E. coli infection. The beneficial effects of BLS mix were due in part to the expansion of certain Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Turicibacter populations, with a corresponding increase in the number of goblet cells in the ileum via upregulated Atoh1 expression, in turn increasing MUC2 production and thus preserving the mucus barrier and enhancing host defenses against enteropathogenic bacteria. However, excessive BLS mix consumption may increase the risk for enteritis, partly through disruption of colonic microbial ecology, characterized by expansion of Proteobacteria and impaired goblet cell function in the ileum. Our findings suggest that oral administration of BLS mix reprograms the gut microbiota and enhances goblet cell function to ameliorate enteritis. IMPORTANCE The present study is important for improving our understanding of the protective role of probiotics against Escherichia coli infection in piglets. Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric

  8. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections) showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA). Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA). The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA) were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma), Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein) cells in the presence of α-d-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100%) were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis.

  9. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reserv...

  10. Recombinant expression of hydroxylated human collagen in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Christoph; Baumann, Stephan; Cabalzar, Jürg; Luther, Kelvin B; Hennet, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and thereby a structural protein of considerable biotechnological interest. The complex maturation process of collagen, including essential post-translational modifications such as prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation, has precluded large-scale production of recombinant collagen featuring the biophysical properties of endogenous collagen. The characterization of new prolyl and lysyl hydroxylase genes encoded by the giant virus mimivirus reveals a method for production of hydroxylated collagen. The coexpression of a human collagen type III construct together with mimivirus prolyl and lysyl hydroxylases in Escherichia coli yielded up to 90 mg of hydroxylated collagen per liter culture. The respective levels of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation reaching 25 % and 26 % were similar to the hydroxylation levels of native human collagen type III. The distribution of hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine along recombinant collagen was also similar to that of native collagen as determined by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. The triple helix signature of recombinant hydroxylated collagen was confirmed by circular dichroism, which also showed that hydroxylation increased the thermal stability of the recombinant collagen construct. Recombinant hydroxylated collagen produced in E. coli supported the growth of human umbilical endothelial cells, underlining the biocompatibility of the recombinant protein as extracellular matrix. The high yield of recombinant protein expression and the extensive level of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation achieved indicate that recombinant hydroxylated collagen can be produced at large scale for biomaterials engineering in the context of biomedical applications.

  11. Heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Lyon, N C

    1975-01-01

    Hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on day 4 of life. Samples of feces and intestinal contents were collected and tested in infant mice for enterotoxic activity. Positive enterotoxic responses were observed in mice given filtrates of feces and intestinal contents from piglets infected withe enterotoxigenic E. coli known to produce heat-stable enterotoxin but not heat-liabile enterotoxin in vitro. It is concluded that heat-stable enterotoxigenic E. coli induce diarrhea by production of heat-stable enterotoxin in vivo. PMID:1097335

  12. The discovery of cholera - like enterotoxins produced by Escherichia coli causing secretory diarrhoea in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sack, R. Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Non-vibrio cholera has been recognized as a clinical entity for as long as cholera was known to be caused by Vibrio cholerae. Until 1968, the aetiologic agent of this syndrome was not known. Following a series of studies in patients with non-vibrio cholera it was found that these patients had large concentrations of Escherichia coli in the small bowel and stools which produced cholera toxin-like enterotoxins, and had fluid and electrolyte transport abnormalities in the small bowel similar to patients with documented cholera. Furthermore, these patients developed antibodies to the cholera-like enterotoxin. Later studies showed that these strains, when fed to volunteers produced a cholera-like disease and that two enterotoxins were found to be produced by these organisms: a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) which is nearly identical to cholera toxin, and a heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), a small molecular weight polypeptide. E. coli that produced one or both of these enterotoxins were designated enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). ETEC are now known not only to cause a severe cholera-like illness, but to be the most common bacterial cause of acute diarrhoea in children in the developing world, and to be the most common cause of travellers’ diarrhoea in persons who visit the developing world. PMID:21415491

  13. Evidence for a human-specific Escherichia coli clone.

    PubMed

    Clermont, Olivier; Lescat, Mathilde; O'Brien, Claire L; Gordon, David M; Tenaillon, Olivier; Denamur, Erick

    2008-04-01

    Escherichia coli is a widespread commensal of the vertebrate intestinal tract. Until recently, no strong association between a particular clone and a given host species has been found. However, members of the B2 subgroup VIII clone with an O81 serotype appear to be human host specific. To determine the degree of host specificity exhibited by this clone, a PCR-based assay was used to screen 723 faecal and clinical isolates from humans, and 904 faecal isolates from animals. This clone was not detected among the animal isolates, but was discovered in people living in Africa, Europe and South America. The clone is rarely isolated from people suffering from intestinal or extraintestinal disease and is avirulent in a mouse model of extraintestinal infection. Fine-scale epidemiological analysis suggests that this clone is competitively dominant relative to other members of the B2 phylogenetic group and that it has increased in frequency over the past 20 years. This clone appears to be a good candidate for use as a probiotic, and may be suitable as an indicator of human faecal contamination in microbial source tracking studies.

  14. Immunization of calves against enterotoxigenic colibacillosis by vaccinating dams with purified K99 antigen and whole cell bacterins.

    PubMed Central

    Acres, S D; Isaacson, R E; Babiuk, L A; Kapitany, R A

    1979-01-01

    Pregnant cattle were either vaccinated subcutaneously with (i) a suspension of purified Escherichia coli K99 pili, (ii) a Formalin-killed whole cell bacterin containing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain B44 (O9:K30;K99:H-), or (iii) a bacterin containing six different strains of bovine enterotoxigenic E. coli (multiple-strain bacterin), or were left as nonvaccinated controls. After birth, calves were allowed to nurse their dams and, at 12 to 14 h of age, were challenged orally with 10(11) cells of enterotoxigenic E. coli strain B44. Colostral antibody titers were determined against K99, K30, and O9 antigens of B44. In the nonvaccinated control group, 9 of 10 calves developed diarrhea and died within 24 to 72 h. Similarly, all six calves in the multiple-strain bacterin group developed diarrhea and four died. In contrast to calves in the two groups mentioned above, calves nursing cows vaccinated with either purified K99 or the homologous whole cell bacterin were protected against fatal diarrhea. There was a highly significant correlation (P less than 0.0005) between protection against fatal diarrhea and K99, but not K30 or O9 colostral antibody titers. Vaccination of cows with either purified pili or whole cell preparations containing sufficient K99 antigen may provide a means of preventing enterotoxigenic colibacillosis in calves. PMID:39031

  15. Rapid differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that produce heat-stable and heat-labile toxins by frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatography analysis of diarrheal stool specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, J B; Basta, M T; el Kholy, A M; Moss, C W

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three stool specimens from infants in the village of Tamooh near Cairo, Egypt, were studied by frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatography (FPEC-GLC). In 13 of the diarrheal cases, the suspected causative agent isolated was Escherichia coli which produced heat-stable toxin (ST), and in 10 other cases E. coli that produced heat-labile toxin (LT) were isolated. Ten control stool samples, collected from infants from whom no pathogenic organisms were isolated, were analyzed at the same time. Comparisons also were made against healthy control stools from individuals in the United States who had been previously analyzed by FPEC-GLC (Brooks et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 20:549-560, 1984). The stools were suspended in water and centrifuged, and the supernatant was extracted with organic solvents and derivatized to form electron-capturing derivatives of carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, alcohols, and amines. Results from the study showed distinct differences among the FPEC-GLC profiles of E. coli ST-positive stools, of E. coli LT-positive stools, and of the control stool samples. An unidentified compound appearing in the ether-soluble hydroxy acid fraction from E. coli ST-positive stools was tentatively identified by mass spectrometry as 6-methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid. 6-Methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid was found in all stools that contained E. coli ST but was not present either in stools from which E. coli LT was isolated or in control samples. 6-Methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid may prove to be an important marker for use in the identification of E. coli ST. In addition to 6-methoxy-2-hydroxyhexanoic acid, the carboxylic acid, alcohol, and amine FPEC-GLC profiles obtained from stools were very different between these two organisms. The data indicate that FPEC-GLC analysis of diarrheal stool specimens might be a rapid way to distinguish diarrhea caused by E. coli ST, E. coli LT, Clostridium difficile, and rotavirus. PMID:6394617

  16. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  17. [Virulence mechanisms of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Farfán-García, Ana Elvira; Ariza-Rojas, Sandra Catherine; Vargas-Cárdenas, Fabiola Andrea; Vargas-Remolina, Lizeth Viviana

    2016-08-01

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) is a global public health problem, especially in developing countries and is one of the causes of mortality in children under five. ADD etiologic agents include viruses, bacteria and parasites in that order. Escherichia coli bacteria it is classified as a major diarrheagenic agent and transmitted by consuming contaminated water or undercooked foods. This review compiled updates on information virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms involved in adhesion and colonization of seven pathotypes of E. coli called enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), shigatoxigenic E. coli (STEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and diffusely-adherent E. coli (DAEC). A final pathotype, adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) associated with Crohn's disease was also reviewed. The diarrheagenic pathotypes of E. coli affect different population groups and knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction with the human is important to guide research towards the development of vaccines and new tools for diagnosis and control.

  18. Development of resistance with host age to adhesion of K99+ Escherichia coli to isolated intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Runnels, P L; Moon, H W; Schneider, R A

    1980-01-01

    When isolated intestinal epithelial cells from neonatal and older pigs, calves, and mice were tested for adhesion by K99+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, cells from older animals were resistant to adhesion. PMID:6103878

  19. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  20. Intestinal Colonization by EnterotoxigenicEscherichia Coli’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    by a double diffusion technique ( Ouchterlony ) in 1%. agar (in 0.15 M sodium chloride). Wells were punched into the agar 4-5 mm apart and filled with...phosphotungstate as previously described (11). 39 RESULTS K99 assay. It has previously been shown that a double diffusion technique ( Ouchterlony ) can be useful

  1. Serologic Correlates of Protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Diarrhea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-14

    positive colonies per specimen were evaluated for both LT and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) production, by LT GM1-ganglioside ELISA and ST inhibition GM1... ELISA [17, 18]. Colonies that were positive for either LT or ST were tested for the presence of a CF by use of a colony dot-blot assay that was based...GM1 ELISA method, and titers of serum IgG antibodies against CFs were measured by use of ELISA methods described elsewhere [21–23]. For CFA/II and

  2. Occurrence of enterotoxigenic and nonenterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in calves and evaluation of their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda S; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2007-07-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is considered an important clinical pathogen and the most common anaerobe isolated from human and animal clinical specimens; enterotoxigenic strains produce diarrhea. The presence of enterotoxigenic (ETBF) and nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis in stool samples from calves with or without acute diarrhea and the antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains were evaluated. The stool samples were plated onto a selective B. fragilis-bile-esculin agar, and incubated anaerobically (10% CO(2)/90% N(2)), at 37 degrees C, for 72 h. Species of the B. fragilis group were identified by using the API 32-A kit. Enterotoxigenic strains were detected by PCR and the cytotoxic assay. From 54 diarrhea and 54 nondiarrhea stools, 124 and 92 members of the B. fragilis group, respectively, were recovered. Only two ETBF strains were isolated from two different diarrhea samples and the bft gene was detected in both. Moreover, the bft gene was detected in DNA from four different diarrheal stools samples but no ETBF strain was recovered. All the bacteria were susceptible to chloramphenicol, imipenem, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, metronidazole and tigecycline. Most of the isolates from both calves with and without diarrhea were resistant to all metals. Our results are of concern, and suggest the need to increase the surveillance of antibiotic and metal resistance of this microbial group isolated from animal production such as calves.

  3. Pathogenic relationships of rotavirus, Escherichia coli, and other agents in mixed infections in calves.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; McClurkin, A W; Isaacson, R E; Pohlenz, J; Skartvedt, S M; Gillette, K G; Baetz, A L

    1978-09-01

    Infection with agents interpreted as causing or contributing to diarrhea (rotavirus, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and cryptosporidia) were demonstrated in 24 of 32 newborn calves that had naturally occurring diarrheal disease. The calves were from 12 herds in Iowa. Infections as well as enteric lesions and hypoglobulinemia occurred more frequently among diarrheal calves than among nondiarrheal calves from these same herds. In most calves, infections were mixed; ie, both viruses, one or both viruses plus cryptosporidia, or rotavirus plus enterotoxigenic E coli.

  4. In vitro adherence of type 1-fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli to human ureteral mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, K; Yamamoto, T; Yokota, T; Kitagawa, R

    1989-01-01

    Type 1-fimbriated Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infections adhered in vitro to the epithelial cell surface of an excised human ureter. The bacteria also adhered to a mucous coating and to Formalin-fixed human ureteral mucosa. D-Mannose strongly inhibited such adherence. The bacteria in their nonfimbriated phase lacked the ability to adhere. We concluded that type 1 fimbriae play a role, at least in part, in upper urinary tract infections in humans. Images PMID:2568346

  5. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Ana R.; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R.; Bezerra, Camila N. A.; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF–preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144–7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa–decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting

  6. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Ana R; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R; Bezerra, Camila N A; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF-preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144-7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa-decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting human

  7. Simple method for purification of enterotoxigenic E. coli fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Brittany; Grassel, Christen; Laufer, Rachel; Sears, Khandra; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Barry, Eileen M.; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are endemic pathogens in the developing world. They frequently cause illness in travelers, and are among the most prevalent causes of diarrheal disease in children. Pathogenic ETEC strains employ fimbriae as adhesion factors to bind the luminal surface of the intestinal epithelium and establish infection. Accordingly, there is marked interest in immunoprophylactic strategies targeting fimbriae to protect against ETEC infections. Multiple strategies have been reported for purification of ETEC fimbriae, however none is ideal. Purification has typically involved the use of highly virulent wild-type strains. We report here a simple and improved method to purify ETEC fimbriae, which was applied to obtain two different Class 5 fimbriae types of clinical relevance (CFA/I and CS4) expressed recombinantly in E. coli production strains. Following removal from cells by shearing, fimbriae proteins were purified by orthogonal purification steps employing ultracentrifugation, precipitation, and ion-exchange membrane chromatography. Purified fimbriae demonstrated the anticipated size and morphology by electron microscopy analysis, contained negligible levels of residual host cell proteins, nucleic acid, and endotoxin, and were recognized by convalescent human anti-sera. PMID:26581778

  8. Plant-based oral vaccines: results of human trials.

    PubMed

    Tacket, C O

    2009-01-01

    Vaccines consisting of transgenic plant-derived antigens offer a new strategy for development of safe, inexpensive vaccines. The vaccine antigens can be eaten with the edible part of the plant or purified from plant material. In phase 1 clinical studies of prototype potato- and corn-based vaccines, these vaccines have been safe and immunogenic without the need for a buffer or vehicle other than the plant cell. Transgenic plant technology is attractive for vaccine development because these vaccines are needle-less, stable, and easy to administer. This chapter examines some early human studies of oral transgenic plant-derived vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection, norovirus, and hepatitis B.

  9. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Ecuador: animal reservoirs, yet no human disease.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Gabriel; Garcés, Verónica; V, Verónica Barragan; Colman, Rebecca E; Seymour, Meagan; Vogler, Amy J; Keim, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is frequently isolated from cases of diarrhea in many industrialized countries; however, it is seldom found in developing countries. The present manuscript reports the presence of E. coli O157:H7 in Ecuadorian livestock, a country where enterohemorrhagic E. coli disease in humans has never been reported. The Ecuadorian isolates were genetically related to some strains linked to clinical cases in the United States as assessed by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis.

  10. Chicken as reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in humans, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Catherine Racicot; Prussing, Catharine; Boerlin, Patrick; Daignault, Danielle; Dutil, Lucie; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Zhanel, George G; Manges, Amee R

    2012-03-01

    We previously described how retail meat, particularly chicken, might be a reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. To rule out retail beef and pork as potential reservoirs, we tested 320 additional E. coli isolates from these meats. Isolates from beef and pork were significantly less likely than those from chicken to be genetically related to isolates from humans with UTIs. We then tested whether the reservoir for ExPEC in humans could be food animals themselves by comparing geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from 475 humans with UTIs and from cecal contents of 349 slaughtered animals. We found genetic similarities between E. coli from animals in abattoirs, principally chickens, and ExPEC causing UTIs in humans. ExPEC transmission from food animals could be responsible for human infections, and chickens are the most probable reservoir.

  11. Chicken as Reservoir for Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Humans, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Catherine Racicot; Prussing, Catharine; Boerlin, Patrick; Daignault, Danielle; Dutil, Lucie; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Zhanel, George G.

    2012-01-01

    We previously described how retail meat, particularly chicken, might be a reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. To rule out retail beef and pork as potential reservoirs, we tested 320 additional E. coli isolates from these meats. Isolates from beef and pork were significantly less likely than those from chicken to be genetically related to isolates from humans with UTIs. We then tested whether the reservoir for ExPEC in humans could be food animals themselves by comparing geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from 475 humans with UTIs and from cecal contents of 349 slaughtered animals. We found genetic similarities between E. coli from animals in abattoirs, principally chickens, and ExPEC causing UTIs in humans. ExPEC transmission from food animals could be responsible for human infections, and chickens are the most probable reservoir. PMID:22377351

  12. Expression of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad Ahangarz; Rezaee, Abbas; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Yasuda, Yoko; Tochikubo, Kunio; Pirayeh, Shahin Najar; Arzanlou, Mohsen

    2005-08-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is both a strong mucosal adjuvant and immunogen. It is a subunit vaccine candidate to be used against ETEC-induced diarrhea. It has already been expressed in several bacterial and plant systems. In order to construct yeast expressing vector for the LTB protein, the eltB gene encoding LTB was amplified from a human origin enterotoxigenic E. coli DNA by PCR. The expression plasmid pLTB83 was constructed by inserting the eltB gene into the pYES2 shuttle vector immediately downstream of the GAL1 promoter. The recombinant vector was transformed into S. cerevisiae and was then induced by galactose. The LTB protein was detected in the total soluble protein of the yeast by SDS-PAGE analysis. Quantitative ELISA showed that the maximum amount of LTB protein expressed in the yeast was approximately 1.9% of the total soluble protein. Immunoblotting analysis showed the yeast-derived LTB protein was antigenically indistinguishable from bacterial LTB protein. Since the whole-recombinant yeast has been introduced as a new vaccine formulation the expression of LTB in S. cerevisiae can offer an inexpensive yet effective strategy to protect against ETEC, especially in developing countries where it is needed most.

  13. Expression and assembly of active human cardiac troponin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lassalle, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy-related mutations in human cardiac troponin subunits, including troponin C (hcTnC), troponin I (hcTnI), and troponin T (hcTnT), are well-documented. Recently, it has been recognised that human cardiac troponin (hcTn) is a sophisticated allosteric system. Therefore, the effect of drugs on this protein complex should be studied with assembled hcTn rather than a short fragment of a subunit or the subunit itself. Here, we describe the expression and assembly of active hcTn in Escherichia coli, a novel method that is rapid and simple, and produces large amounts of functional hcTn.

  14. Production and purification of human Hsp90β in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Radli, Martina; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2017-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is an essential member of the cellular proteostasis system. It plays an important role in the stabilisation and activation of a large number of client proteins and is involved in fatal disease processes, e.g. Alzheimer disease, cancer and cystic fibrosis. This makes Hsp90 a crucial protein to study. Mechanistic studies require large amounts of protein but the production and purification of recombinant human Hsp90 in Escherichia coli is challenging and laborious. Here we identified conditions that influence Hsp90 production, and optimised a fast and efficient purification protocol. We found that the nutrient value of the culturing medium and the length of induction had significant effect on Hsp90 production in Escherichia coli. Our fast, single-day purification protocol resulted in a stable, well-folded and pure sample that was resistant to degradation in a reproducible manner. We anticipate that our results provide a useful tool to produce higher amount of pure, well-folded and stable recombinant human Hsp90β in Escherichia coli in an efficient way. PMID:28651008

  15. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  16. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression and purification of human FANCI and FANCD2 using Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Sato, Koichi; Shimomuki, Mayo; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) is an extremely deleterious DNA lesion that covalently crosslinks complementary strands and prevents the strand-separation reaction. In higher eukaryotes, the Fanconi anemia proteins, FANCI and FANCD2, form a heterodimer and play essential roles in ICL repair. Human FANCI and FANCD2 are large proteins with molecular masses of 149kDa and 164kDa, respectively, and were reportedly purified using a baculovirus expression system with insect cells. We have established a novel expression and purification procedure for human FANCD2 and FANCI, using Escherichia coli cells. The human FANCD2 and FANCI proteins purified by this bacterial expression method formed a stable heterodimer, and exhibited DNA binding and histone chaperone activities, as previously reported for the proteins purified by the baculovirus system. Therefore, these purification methods for human FANCI and FANCD2 provide novel procedures to facilitate structural and biochemical studies of human FANCI and FANCD2.

  18. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-09-09

    Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an outbreak of E. coli O104:H4 in Europe in 2011. We assessed the opportunities for E. coli carrying the aggR and stx genes to emerge in 'backyard' farms in south-east Asia. Faecal samples collected from 204 chicken farms; 204 farmers and 306 age- and gender-matched individuals not exposed to poultry farming were plated on MacConkey agar plates with and without antimicrobials being supplemented. Sweep samples obtained from MacConkey agar plates without supplemented antimicrobials were screened by multiplex PCR for the detection of the stx1, stx2 and aggR genes. One chicken farm sample each (0.5 %) contained the stx1 and the aggR gene. Eleven (2.4 %) human faecal samples contained the stx1 gene, 2 samples (0.4 %) contained stx2 gene, and 31 (6.8 %) contained the aggR gene. From 46 PCR-positive samples, 205 E. coli isolates were tested for the presence of stx1, stx2, aggR, wzx O104 and fliC H4 genes. None of the isolates simultaneously contained the four genetic markers associated with E. coli O104:H4 epidemic strain (aggR, stx2, wzx O104 and fliC H4 ). Of 34 EAEC, 64.7 % were resistant to 3(rd)-generation cephalosporins. These results indicate that in southern Vietnam, the human population is a more likely reservoir of aggR and stx gene carrying E. coli than the chicken population. However, conditions for transmission of isolates and/or genes between human and animal reservoirs resulting in the emergence of highly virulent E. coli strains are still favorable, given the nature of'backyard' farms in Vietnam.

  19. Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin Spreading in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Skurnik, David; Clermont, Olivier; Guillard, Thomas; Launay, Adrien; Danilchanka, Olga; Pons, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Lebreton, François; Kadlec, Kristina; Roux, Damien; Jiang, Deming; Dion, Sara; Aschard, Hugues; Denamur, Maurice; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Schwarz, Stefan; Tenaillon, Olivier; Andremont, Antoine; Picard, Bertrand; Mekalanos, John; Brisse, Sylvain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the great concern about the impact of human activities on the environment, we studied 403 commensal Escherichia coli/Escherichia clade strains isolated from several animal and human populations that have variable contacts to one another. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a decrease of diversity 1) in strains isolated from animals that had an increasing contact with humans and 2) in all strains that had increased antimicrobial resistance. A specific B1 phylogroup clonal complex (CC87, Institut Pasteur schema nomenclature) of animal origin was identified and characterized as being responsible for the increased antimicrobial resistance prevalence observed in strains from the environments with a high human-mediated antimicrobial pressure. CC87 strains have a high capacity of acquiring and disseminating resistance genes with specific metabolic and genetic determinants as demonstrated by high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping. They are good mouse gut colonizers but are not virulent. Our data confirm the predominant role of human activities in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environmental bacterial strains and unveil a particular E. coli clonal complex of animal origin capable of spreading antimicrobial resistance to other members of microbial communities. PMID:26613786

  20. Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin Spreading in Humans.

    PubMed

    Skurnik, David; Clermont, Olivier; Guillard, Thomas; Launay, Adrien; Danilchanka, Olga; Pons, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Lebreton, François; Kadlec, Kristina; Roux, Damien; Jiang, Deming; Dion, Sara; Aschard, Hugues; Denamur, Maurice; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Schwarz, Stefan; Tenaillon, Olivier; Andremont, Antoine; Picard, Bertrand; Mekalanos, John; Brisse, Sylvain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the great concern about the impact of human activities on the environment, we studied 403 commensal Escherichia coli/Escherichia clade strains isolated from several animal and human populations that have variable contacts to one another. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a decrease of diversity 1) in strains isolated from animals that had an increasing contact with humans and 2) in all strains that had increased antimicrobial resistance. A specific B1 phylogroup clonal complex (CC87, Institut Pasteur schema nomenclature) of animal origin was identified and characterized as being responsible for the increased antimicrobial resistance prevalence observed in strains from the environments with a high human-mediated antimicrobial pressure. CC87 strains have a high capacity of acquiring and disseminating resistance genes with specific metabolic and genetic determinants as demonstrated by high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping. They are good mouse gut colonizers but are not virulent. Our data confirm the predominant role of human activities in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environmental bacterial strains and unveil a particular E. coli clonal complex of animal origin capable of spreading antimicrobial resistance to other members of microbial communities.

  1. Biofilm-Forming Abilities of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates Associated with Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D. N.; Jubelin, Grégory; Jacques, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Forming biofilms may be a survival strategy of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to enable it to persist in the environment and the food industry. Here, we evaluate and characterize the biofilm-forming ability of 39 isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates recovered from human infection and belonging to seropathotypes A, B, or C. The presence and/or production of biofilm factors such as curli, cellulose, autotransporter, and fimbriae were investigated. The polymeric matrix of these biofilms was analyzed by confocal microscopy and by enzymatic digestion. Cell viability and matrix integrity were examined after sanitizer treatments. Isolates of the seropathotype A (O157:H7 and O157:NM), which have the highest relative incidence of human infection, had a greater ability to form biofilms than isolates of seropathotype B or C. Seropathotype A isolates were unique in their ability to produce cellulose and poly-N-acetylglucosamine. The integrity of the biofilms was dependent on proteins. Two autotransporter genes, ehaB and espP, and two fimbrial genes, z1538 and lpf2, were identified as potential genetic determinants for biofilm formation. Interestingly, the ability of several isolates from seropathotype A to form biofilms was associated with their ability to agglutinate yeast in a mannose-independent manner. We consider this an unidentified biofilm-associated factor produced by those isolates. Treatment with sanitizers reduced the viability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli but did not completely remove the biofilm matrix. Overall, our data indicate that biofilm formation could contribute to the persistence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and specifically seropathotype A isolates in the environment. PMID:26712549

  2. Biofilm-Forming Abilities of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates Associated with Human Infections.

    PubMed

    Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Jubelin, Grégory; Jacques, Mario; Harel, Josée

    2015-12-28

    Forming biofilms may be a survival strategy of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to enable it to persist in the environment and the food industry. Here, we evaluate and characterize the biofilm-forming ability of 39 isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates recovered from human infection and belonging to seropathotypes A, B, or C. The presence and/or production of biofilm factors such as curli, cellulose, autotransporter, and fimbriae were investigated. The polymeric matrix of these biofilms was analyzed by confocal microscopy and by enzymatic digestion. Cell viability and matrix integrity were examined after sanitizer treatments. Isolates of the seropathotype A (O157:H7 and O157:NM), which have the highest relative incidence of human infection, had a greater ability to form biofilms than isolates of seropathotype B or C. Seropathotype A isolates were unique in their ability to produce cellulose and poly-N-acetylglucosamine. The integrity of the biofilms was dependent on proteins. Two autotransporter genes, ehaB and espP, and two fimbrial genes, z1538 and lpf2, were identified as potential genetic determinants for biofilm formation. Interestingly, the ability of several isolates from seropathotype A to form biofilms was associated with their ability to agglutinate yeast in a mannose-independent manner. We consider this an unidentified biofilm-associated factor produced by those isolates. Treatment with sanitizers reduced the viability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli but did not completely remove the biofilm matrix. Overall, our data indicate that biofilm formation could contribute to the persistence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and specifically seropathotype A isolates in the environment.

  3. Intestinal colonization and adhesion by enteroxigenic Escherichia coli: ultrastructural observations on adherence to ileal epithelium of the pig.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Nagy, B; Isaacson, R E

    1977-08-01

    Colonization of pig ileum by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that were enteropathogenic for pigs but that lacked K88 antigen (K88-) resulted in morphological characteristics similar to those reported for K88+ strains. Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli from three different K88-serotypes adhered to the villous epithelium. In sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, adherent bacteria were separated from each other and from epithelial microvilli by peribacterial electron-lucent regions. The enterotoxigenic E. coli had appendages that extended into these regions. The appendages were morphologically characteristic for each strain. It is possible that these appendages were pili, polysaccharide K antigens, or structures resulting from some interaction between pili and polysaccharide. Certain pili or pilus-like structures may be virulence attributes that facilitate adhesion of enterotoxigenic E. coli to the intestinal epithelium.

  4. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from humans and animals differ in major phenotypical traits and virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Uber, Ana Paula; Trabulsi, Luiz R; Irino, Kinue; Beutin, Lothar; Ghilardi, Angela C R; Gomes, Tânia A T; Liberatore, Ana Maria A; de Castro, Antônio F P; Elias, Waldir P

    2006-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is characterized by the expression of the aggregative adherence pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we determined the phenotypic and genotypic relationships among 86 EAEC strains of human and animal (calves, piglets and horses) feces. Serotypes and the presence of EAEC virulence markers were determined, and these results were associated with ribotyping. Strains harboring aggR (typical EAEC) of human origin were found carrying several of the searched markers, while atypical EAEC harbored none or a few markers. The strains of animal origin were classified as atypical EAEC (strains lacking aggR) and harbored only irp2 or shf. Strains from humans and animals belonged to several different serotypes, although none of them prevailed. Sixteen ribotypes were determined, and there was no association with virulence genes profiles or serotypes. Relationship was not found among the strains of this study, and the assessed animals may not represent a reservoir of human pathogenic typical EAEC.

  5. Genetic Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli and Cryptic Clades in Birds with Diverse Human Associations.

    PubMed

    Blyton, Michaela D J; Pi, Hongfei; Vangchhia, Belinda; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J; Johnson, James R; Gordon, David M

    2015-08-01

    The manner and extent to which birds associate with humans may influence the genetic attributes and antimicrobial resistance of their commensal Escherichia communities through strain transmission and altered selection pressures. In this study, we determined whether the distribution of the different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups and cryptic clades, the occurrence of 49 virulence associated genes, and/or the prevalence of resistance to 12 antimicrobials differed between four groups of birds from Australia with contrasting types of human association. We found that birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas had similar Escherichia communities. The Escherichia communities of backyard domestic poultry were phylogenetically distinct from the Escherichia communities sourced from all other birds, with a large proportion (46%) of poultry strains belonging to phylogenetic group A and a significant minority (17%) belonging to the cryptic clades. Wild birds sampled from veterinary and wildlife rehabilitation centers (in-care birds) carried Escherichia isolates that possessed particular virulence-associated genes more often than Escherichia isolates from birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas. The Escherichia isolates from both the backyard poultry and in-care birds were more likely to be multidrug resistant than the Escherichia isolates from wild birds. We also detected a multidrug-resistant E. coli strain circulating in a wildlife rehabilitation center, reinforcing the importance of adequate hygiene practices when handling and caring for wildlife. We suggest that the relatively high frequency of antimicrobial resistance in the in-care birds and backyard poultry is due primarily to the use of antimicrobials in these animals, and we recommend that the treatment protocols used for these birds be reviewed.

  6. Genetic Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli and Cryptic Clades in Birds with Diverse Human Associations

    PubMed Central

    Blyton, Michaela D. J.; Pi, Hongfei; Vangchhia, Belinda; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J.; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The manner and extent to which birds associate with humans may influence the genetic attributes and antimicrobial resistance of their commensal Escherichia communities through strain transmission and altered selection pressures. In this study, we determined whether the distribution of the different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups and cryptic clades, the occurrence of 49 virulence associated genes, and/or the prevalence of resistance to 12 antimicrobials differed between four groups of birds from Australia with contrasting types of human association. We found that birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas had similar Escherichia communities. The Escherichia communities of backyard domestic poultry were phylogenetically distinct from the Escherichia communities sourced from all other birds, with a large proportion (46%) of poultry strains belonging to phylogenetic group A and a significant minority (17%) belonging to the cryptic clades. Wild birds sampled from veterinary and wildlife rehabilitation centers (in-care birds) carried Escherichia isolates that possessed particular virulence-associated genes more often than Escherichia isolates from birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas. The Escherichia isolates from both the backyard poultry and in-care birds were more likely to be multidrug resistant than the Escherichia isolates from wild birds. We also detected a multidrug-resistant E. coli strain circulating in a wildlife rehabilitation center, reinforcing the importance of adequate hygiene practices when handling and caring for wildlife. We suggest that the relatively high frequency of antimicrobial resistance in the in-care birds and backyard poultry is due primarily to the use of antimicrobials in these animals, and we recommend that the treatment protocols used for these birds be reviewed. PMID:26002899

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  8. First Report of Human Gastroenteritis Caused by Escherichia coli O157:NM in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata França Castro; Nascimento, Janaína Dos Santos; Geimba, Mercedes Passos; Hessel, Claudia Titze; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2017-08-02

    In September 2005, the Sanitary Surveillance Service of Rio de Janeiro (SSS/RJ), Brazil, investigated a case of gastroenteritis involving a 13-year-old teenager hospitalized because of bloody diarrhea and severe abdominal pain. Owing to the severity of the symptoms, an epidemiological investigation was conducted in two states of Brazil. Escherichia coli O157:NM was isolated from stools and from a tomato and cheese salad prepared at the school canteen where the teenager attended. This is the first report of a human case of gastroenteritis related to E. coli O157:NM infection in Brazil.

  9. Human C5a anaphylatoxin: gene cloning and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bautsch, W; Emde, M; Kretzschmar, T; Köhl, J; Suckau, D; Bitter-Suermann, D

    1992-06-01

    A gene coding for the human anaphylatoxin C5a was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A combination of reverse transcription of mRNA of the U937 cell line with subsequent preparative polymerase chain reaction was employed to obtain the gene. The sequence was cloned into the plasmid vector pKK 233-2 behind an ATG initiation codon under the control of a trc promotor. After purification by ion exchange chromatography and reversed phase FPLC a mixture of predominantly non-glycosylated recombinant human C5a with a beta-mercaptoethanol adduct at cysteine 27 and the N-methionyl derivative was obtained which was homogeneous on silver-stained gels, immunoreactive with C5a-specific monoclonal antibodies and functionally active in releasing myeloperoxidase from human granulocytes and ATP from guinea pig platelets. The final yield was about 0.4-0.8 mg purified recombinant C5a per liter bacterial culture.

  10. Single Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction To Detect Diverse Loci Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    López-Saucedo, Catalina; Cerna, Jorge F.; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolas; Thompson, Rocío; Velazquez, F. Raul; Torres, Javier; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2003-01-01

    We developed and tested a single multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that detects enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, and Shiga-toxin–producing Escherichia coli. This PCR is specific, sensitive, and rapid in detecting target isolates in stool and food. Because of its simplicity, economy, and efficiency, this protocol warrants further evaluation in large, prospective studies of polymicrobial substances. PMID:12533296

  11. Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Enteric Infections Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Roberto; Vidal, Maricel; Lagos, Rossana; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex PCR for detection of three categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. With this method, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were identified in fecal samples from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, watery diarrhea, or hemolytic-uremic syndrome and from food-borne outbreaks. PMID:15071051

  12. Occurrence and characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other non-sorbitol-fermenting E. coli in cattle and humans in urban areas of Morogoro, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lupindu, Athumani M; Olsen, John E; Ngowi, Helena A; Msoffe, Peter L M; Mtambo, Madundo M; Scheutz, Flemming; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2014-07-01

    Escherichia coli strains such as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic, attaching, and effacing E. coli, and enteroinvasive E. coli cause diarrhea in humans. Although other serotypes exist, the most commonly reported STEC in outbreaks is O157:H7. A cross-sectional study was conducted to isolate and characterize non-sorbitol-fermenting (NSF) E. coli O157:H7 from urban and periurban livestock settings of Morogoro, Tanzania. Human stool, cattle feces, and soil and water samples were collected. Observations and questionnaire interview studies were used to gather information about cattle and manure management practices in the study area. E. coli were isolated on sorbitol MacConkey agar and characterized by conventional biochemical tests. Out of 1049 samples, 143 (13.7%) yielded NSF E. coli. Serological and antimicrobial tests and molecular typing were performed to NSF E. coli isolates. These procedures detected 10 (7%) pathogenic E. coli including STEC (n=7), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) (n=2), and attaching and effacing E. coli (A/EEC) (n=1) strains. The STEC strains had the ability to produce VT1 and different VT2 toxin subtypes that caused cytopathic effects on Vero cells. The prevalence of STEC in cattle was 1.6%, out of which 0.9% was serotype O157:H7 and the overall prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in cattle was 2.2%. The serotypes O157:H7, O142:H34, O113:H21, O+:H-, O+:H16, and O25:H4 were identified. One ESBL-producing isolate showed the MLST type ST131. To our knowledge, this is the first finding in Tanzania of this recently emerged worldwide pandemic clonal group, causing widespread antimicrobial-resistant infections, and adds knowledge of the geographical distribution of ST131. Cattle manure was indiscriminately deposited within residential areas, and there was direct contact between humans and cattle feces during manure handling. Cattle and manure management practices expose humans, animals, and the environment

  13. Expression in Escherichia coli of active human alcohol dehydrogenase lacking N-terminal acetylation.

    PubMed

    Höög, J O; Weis, M; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H; von Bahr-Lindström, H

    1987-12-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, beta beta isozyme of class I) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized regarding N-terminal processing. The expression system was obtained by ligation of a cDNA fragment corresponding to the beta-subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase into the vector pKK 223-3 containing the tac promoter. The enzyme, detected by Western-blot analysis and ethanol oxidizing activity, constituted up to 3% of the total amount of protein. Recombinant ADH was separated from E. coli ADH by ion-exchange chromatography and the isolated enzyme was essentially pure as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. The N-terminal sequence was identical to that of the authentic beta-subunit except that the N-terminus was non-acetylated, indicating a correct removal of the initiator methionine, but lack of further processing.

  14. Superoxide dismutase and the resistance of Escherichia coli to phagocytic killing by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Papp-Szabò, E; Sutherland, C L; Josephy, P D

    1993-01-01

    Transformation of Escherichia coli K-12-derived strains with a plasmid carrying the genetic determinants for synthesis of lipopolysaccharide O antigen by Shigella dysenteriae allows the construction of phenotypically smooth derivatives. We show that such E. coli K-12 derivatives are highly resistant to killing by human serum. Isogenic wild-type and sodB mutant (Fe superoxide dismutase-deficient) strains were constructed. The results of experiments on phagocytic killing of these strains by human neutrophils are reported. We observed no difference between the sensitivities of wild-type and sodB mutant strains to phagocytic killing, in contrast to the results reported by other researchers who used species other than E. coli or strains other than K-12. Images PMID:8454348

  15. Production of recombinant human apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Volynets, Galyna P; Gorbatiuk, Oksana B; Kukharenko, Oleksandr P; Usenko, Mariya O; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2016-10-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mediator of the MAPK signaling cascade, which regulates different cellular processes including apoptosis, cell survival, and differentiation. The increased activity of ASK1 is associated with a number of human diseases and this protein kinase is considered as promising therapeutic target. In the present study, the kinase domain of human ASK1 was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) in soluble form. The expression level of ASK1 was around 0.3-0.47 g per 1 L after using auto-induction protocol or IPTG induction. A one-step on column method for the efficient purification of recombinant ASK1 was performed. Our approach yields sufficient amount of recombinant ASK1, which can be used for inhibitor screening assays and different crystallographic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic Modeling of Common Escherichia coli Strains in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingfei

    2014-01-01

    The recent high-throughput sequencing has enabled the composition of Escherichia coli strains in the human microbial community to be profiled en masse. However, there are two challenges to address: (1) exploring the genetic differences between E. coli strains in human gut and (2) dynamic responses of E. coli to diverse stress conditions. As a result, we investigated the E. coli strains in human gut microbiome using deep sequencing data and reconstructed genome-wide metabolic networks for the three most common E. coli strains, including E. coli HS, UTI89, and CFT073. The metabolic models show obvious strain-specific characteristics, both in network contents and in behaviors. We predicted optimal biomass production for three models on four different carbon sources (acetate, ethanol, glucose, and succinate) and found that these stress-associated genes were involved in host-microbial interactions and increased in human obesity. Besides, it shows that the growth rates are similar among the models, but the flux distributions are different, even in E. coli core reactions. The correlations between human diabetes-associated metabolic reactions in the E. coli models were also predicted. The study provides a systems perspective on E. coli strains in human gut microbiome and will be helpful in integrating diverse data sources in the following study. PMID:25126572

  17. Tracking pathogen transmission at the human-wildlife interface: banded mongoose and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pesapane, R; Ponder, M; Alexander, K A

    2013-06-01

    A primary challenge to managing emerging infectious disease is identifying pathways that allow pathogen transmission at the human-wildlife interface. Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we evaluated fecal bacterial transmission between banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) and humans in northern Botswana. Fecal samples were collected from banded mongoose living in protected areas (n = 87, 3 troops) and surrounding villages (n = 92, 3 troops). Human fecal waste was collected from the same environment (n = 46). Isolates were evaluated for susceptibility to 10 antibiotics. Resistant E. coli isolates from mongoose were compared to human isolates using rep-PCR fingerprinting and MLST-PCR. Antimicrobial resistant isolates were identified in 57 % of the mongoose fecal samples tested (range 31-78% among troops). At least one individual mongoose fecal sample demonstrated resistance to each tested antibiotic, and multidrug resistance was highest in the protected areas (40.9%). E. coli isolated from mongoose and human sources in this study demonstrated an extremely high degree of genetic similarity on rep-PCR (AMOVA, F ST = 0.0027, p = 0.18) with a similar pattern identified on MLST-PCR. Human waste may be an important source of microbial exposure to wildlife. Evidence of high levels of antimicrobial resistance even within protected areas identifies an emerging health threat and highlights the need for improved waste management in these systems.

  18. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance profiles among Escherichia coli strains isolated from human and animal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sabaté, Montserrat; Prats, Guillem; Moreno, Eva; Ballesté, Elisenda; Blanch, Anicet R; Andreu, Antonia

    2008-05-01

    To gain insight into whether Escherichia coli isolated from humans and resistant to some common antimicrobial agents are derived from animals, 85 E. coli strains were selected by ERIC-PCR from human and animal wastewater samples. Phylogroup, pathogenicity islands (PAIs), resistance to quinolones, fluoroquinolones and presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) were analyzed. Among the total, 55% were resistant to nalidixic acid and 38% to ciprofloxacin; 12% produced ESBLs. Chicken-derived strains were associated with quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance and presence of ESBLs, while human strains were associated with susceptibility. Group B2 E. coli strains were associated with human origin, susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and presence of PAIs, whereas groups A, B1 and D showed a low virulence profile and a high level of antimicrobial resistance. In both human and animal wastewater, E. coli A, B1 and D were prevalent, and strains from both origins showed a similar virulence profile in each phylogroup. These findings led us to hypothesize that abusive antibiotic use in food animal production may promote the development of resistance among these intestinal E. coli phylogroups, which could later be transmitted to humans through the food supply. The low prevalence of E. coli group B2 in the animal gut may explain, at least in part, the absence of emergence of resistant B2 isolates.

  19. Isolation and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157 from broiler and human samples.

    PubMed

    Kalin, Recep; Ongor, Hasan; Cetinkaya, Burhan

    2012-04-01

    There is a lack of information about the role of poultry, specifically chicken, in transmission of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 and subsequent human illnesses. This study was therefore aimed at investigating the presence of E. coli O157 and its virulence genes in various samples collected from broiler chickens and humans in Eastern Turkey by culture, immunomagnetic separation (IMS), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic relationship between broiler and human isolates was also examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the PCR analysis of sorbitol-negative isolates, E. coli O157 was identified in 0.1% (1/1000) and 0.4% (4/1000) of the liver and cecum samples of broiler chickens, respectively. On the other hand, none of the carcass samples were determined to be positive for E. coli O157. Overall, the results indicated that 12% (3/25) of the flocks were positive for E. coli O157. The differences between the flocks in terms of the positivity were determined to be statistically significant (p<0.001). Ten (2.7%) of 367 human stool samples were also positive for E. coli O157 in the PCR examination. None of the broiler and human E. coli O157 isolates possessed H7, shigatoxins 1-2, or enterohemolysin genes, whereas all the broiler isolates and one of the human isolates were positive for intimin gene. In the PFGE analysis, a total of eight different profiles (four from broiler and four from human isolates) were observed. However, there were no genetic relationships between broiler and human E. coli O157 isolates. It can be concluded that more detailed studies are needed in poultry to better understand the role of these species in the epidemiology of E. coli 0157 infections in humans.

  20. Limited transmission of bla(CTX-M-9)-type-positive Escherichia coli between humans and poultry in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ngan, Bui Thi Kim; Huong, Bui Thi Mai; Hirai, Itaru; Tuyen, Le Danh; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether Escherichia coli isolates that produce CTX-M-9-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are transferred between humans and chickens in a Vietnamese community. The phylogenetic group compositions, sequence types, antimicrobial resistance profiles, the prevalence of plasmid antibiotic resistance genes, and the plasmid replicon types generally differed between the human and chicken E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that transmission of the bla(CTX-M-9)-positive E. coli between humans and poultry was limited.

  1. High-yield expression in Escherichia coli of soluble human MT2A with native functions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Zhou, Min; He, Zhimin; Liu, Xiaorong; Sun, Lin; Sun, Yu; Chen, Zhuchu

    2007-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of low molecular weight, cysteine rich heavy metal binding proteins with multifunction, such as metal detoxification and antioxidation, and are involved in a number of cellular processes including gene expression, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. However, high yield expression of human MT in Escherichia coli has not been established effectively. To produce large amounts of human MT protein at low cost, recombinant human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) protein with an N-terminal GST tag was successfully expressed at high levels in soluble form in E. coli and high purification of it was established by affinity chromatography under native conditions. The final yield was about 5mg of the recombinant MT2A per liter of bacterial culture with the purity of 97.9%. Chemical and functional characteristics analysis of the recombinant human MT2A exhibited intact metal binding ability, hydroxyl radical scavenging ability and significant protective role against DNA damage caused by UVC radiation. Establishment of highly purified recombinant human MT2A protein with native characteristics at low cost would improve its function study and wide applications in protecting against oxidative damage and UV radiation.

  2. One-step purification of soluble recombinant human 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chan, Barden; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2013-11-01

    6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), the third enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, was recently identified as a novel target in human lung cancer. In this report, we present an expression and purification scheme of recombinant human 6PGD from Escherichia coli. Using a DE3 derivative strain expressing tRNAs for seven rare codons in E. coli called Rosetta2 (DE3), a large quantity of soluble human 6PGD can be expressed with an N-terminal histidine tag and purified by a one-step purification procedure to near homogeneity without denaturants or refolding. Three to seven milligrams of purified protein could be obtained from 100 ml of culture. This recombinant human 6PGD follows classic Michaelis-Menton saturation kinetics with respect to both substrates NADP(+) and 6-phosphogluconate. The respective k(cat) and K(m) were comparable to those of 6PGDs purified from mammalian tissues. Using this purified 6PGD enzyme, we devised an endpoint colorimetric assay suitable for high-throughput screening for human 6PGD inhibitors.

  3. Pathogenic Potential to Humans of Bovine Escherichia coli O26, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Tracy; Allison, Lesley J.; Courcier, Emily; Evans, Judith; McKendrick, Iain J.; Pearce, Michael C.; Handel, Ian; Caprioli, Alfredo; Karch, Helge; Hanson, Mary F.; Pollock, Kevin G.J.; Locking, Mary E.; Woolhouse, Mark E.J.; Matthews, Louise; Low, J. Chris; Gally, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O26 and O157 have similar overall prevalences in cattle in Scotland, but in humans, Shiga toxin–producing E. coli O26 infections are fewer and clinically less severe than E. coli O157 infections. To investigate this discrepancy, we genotyped E. coli O26 isolates from cattle and humans in Scotland and continental Europe. The genetic background of some strains from Scotland was closely related to that of strains causing severe infections in Europe. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling found an association between hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and multilocus sequence type 21 strains and confirmed the role of stx2 in severe human disease. Although the prevalences of E. coli O26 and O157 on cattle farms in Scotland are equivalent, prevalence of more virulent strains is low, reducing human infection risk. However, new data on E. coli O26–associated HUS in humans highlight the need for surveillance of non-O157 enterohemorrhagic E. coli and for understanding stx2 phage acquisition. PMID:22377426

  4. A Proteinaceous Fraction of Wheat Bran May Interfere in the Attachment of Enterotoxigenic E. Coli K88 (F4+) to Porcine Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Ortiz, Gemma; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Quarles Van Ufford, H. C.; Halkes, S. Bart A.; Virkola, Ritva; Liskamp, Rob M. J.; Beukelman, Cees J.; Pieters, Roland J.; Pérez, José Francisco; Martín-Orúe, Susana María

    2014-01-01

    Wheat bran (WB) from Triticum aestivum has many beneficial effects on human health. To the best of our knowledge, very little has been published about its ability to prevent pathogenic bacterial adhesion in the intestine. Here, a WB extract was fractionated using different strategies, and the obtained fractions were tested in different in vitro methodologies to evaluate their interference in the attachment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) with the aim of identifying the putative anti-adhesive molecules. It was found that a proteinaceous compound in the >300-kDa fraction mediates the recognition of ETEC K88 to IPEC-J2. Further fractionation of the >300-kDa sample by size-exclusion chromatography showed several proteins below 90 kDa, suggesting that the target protein belongs to a high-molecular-weight (MW) multi-component protein complex. The identification of some relevant excised bands was performed by mass spectrometry (MS) and mostly revealed the presence of various protease inhibitors (PIs) of low MW: Serpin-Z2B, Class II chitinase, endogenous alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor and alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor CM3. Furthermore, an incubation of the WB extract with ETEC K88 allowed for the identification of a 7S storage protein globulin of wheat, Globulin 3 of 66 kDa, which may be one of the most firmly attached WB proteins to ETEC K88 cells. Further studies should be performed to gain an understanding of the molecular recognition of the blocking process that takes place. All gathered information can eventually pave the way for the development of novel anti-adhesion therapeutic agents to prevent bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25119298

  5. A proteinaceous fraction of wheat bran may interfere in the attachment of enterotoxigenic E. coli K88 (F4+) to porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Gemma; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Quarles Van Ufford, H C; Halkes, S Bart A; Virkola, Ritva; Liskamp, Rob M J; Beukelman, Cees J; Pieters, Roland J; Pérez, José Francisco; Martín-Orúe, Susana María

    2014-01-01

    Wheat bran (WB) from Triticum aestivum has many beneficial effects on human health. To the best of our knowledge, very little has been published about its ability to prevent pathogenic bacterial adhesion in the intestine. Here, a WB extract was fractionated using different strategies, and the obtained fractions were tested in different in vitro methodologies to evaluate their interference in the attachment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) with the aim of identifying the putative anti-adhesive molecules. It was found that a proteinaceous compound in the >300-kDa fraction mediates the recognition of ETEC K88 to IPEC-J2. Further fractionation of the >300-kDa sample by size-exclusion chromatography showed several proteins below 90 kDa, suggesting that the target protein belongs to a high-molecular-weight (MW) multi-component protein complex. The identification of some relevant excised bands was performed by mass spectrometry (MS) and mostly revealed the presence of various protease inhibitors (PIs) of low MW: Serpin-Z2B, Class II chitinase, endogenous alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor and alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor CM3. Furthermore, an incubation of the WB extract with ETEC K88 allowed for the identification of a 7S storage protein globulin of wheat, Globulin 3 of 66 kDa, which may be one of the most firmly attached WB proteins to ETEC K88 cells. Further studies should be performed to gain an understanding of the molecular recognition of the blocking process that takes place. All gathered information can eventually pave the way for the development of novel anti-adhesion therapeutic agents to prevent bacterial pathogenesis.

  6. Presence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in artisan fruit salads in the city of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Cecilia S M Lucero; Alcaráz, Lucia E; Satorres, Sara E; Manfredi, Eduardo; Velázquez, Lidia Del C

    2013-12-01

    An increase in the consumption of fruit juices and minimally processed fruits salads has been observed in recent years all over the world. In this work, the microbiological quality of artisan fruit salads was analysed. Faecal coliforms, Salmonella spp, Shigella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were not detected; nevertheless, eleven strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. By multiplex PCR, all isolates showed positive results for S. aureus 16S rRNA gene and 63.6% of them were positive for sea gene. Furthermore, PCR sea positive strains were able to produce the corresponding enterotoxin. Finally, the inactivation of these strains in fruit salads by nisin, lysozyme and EDTA, was studied. EDTA produced a total S. aureus growth inhibition after 60 h of incubation at a concentration of 250 mg/L. The presence of S. aureus might indicate inadequate hygiene conditions during salad elaboration; however, the enterotoxigenicity of the strains isolated in this study, highlights the risk of consumers' intoxication. EDTA could be used to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in artisan fruit salads and extend the shelf life of these products.

  7. Recommendations regarding the development of combined enterotoxigenic Eschericha coli and Shigella vaccines for infants.

    PubMed

    Walker, Richard I; Clifford, Allison

    2015-02-18

    PATH hosted a workshop on October 14 and 15, 2013 in Washington, DC to solicit expert opinions on the potential merits and challenges of developing combined enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shigella vaccine products to benefit children in developing countries. This article summarizes the key issues raised during the workshop and provides an analysis of the recommendations regarding the strategic, clinical and regulatory, and manufacturing considerations for the development of a combined enteric vaccine, which aim to guide future vaccine development efforts and donor investment strategies in this area. Notwithstanding the potential technical, legal, financial, and other constraints that would be faced in developing a combined ETEC/Shigella vaccine, it is clear that this is the preferred approach over standalone products. There are many advantages to a combined vaccine, such as the potential cost-effectiveness and easier logistics of introducing a combined vaccine instead of two standalone vaccines in low-resource, endemic countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Presence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in artisan fruit salads in the city of San Luis, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Cecilia S.M. Lucero; Alcaráz, Lucia E.; Satorres, Sara E.; Manfredi, Eduardo; Velázquez, Lidia del C.

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the consumption of fruit juices and minimally processed fruits salads has been observed in recent years all over the world. In this work, the microbiological quality of artisan fruit salads was analysed. Faecal coliforms, Salmonella spp, Shigella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were not detected; nevertheless, eleven strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. By multiplex PCR, all isolates showed positive results for S. aureus 16S rRNA gene and 63.6% of them were positive for sea gene. Furthermore, PCR sea positive strains were able to produce the corresponding enterotoxin. Finally, the inactivation of these strains in fruit salads by nisin, lysozyme and EDTA, was studied. EDTA produced a total S. aureus growth inhibition after 60 h of incubation at a concentration of 250 mg/L. The presence of S. aureus might indicate inadequate hygiene conditions during salad elaboration; however, the enterotoxigenicity of the strains isolated in this study, highlights the risk of consumers’ intoxication. EDTA could be used to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in artisan fruit salads and extend the shelf life of these products. PMID:24688505

  9. Attaching and effacing activities of rabbit and human enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in pig and rabbit intestines.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H W; Whipp, S C; Argenzio, R A; Levine, M M; Giannella, R A

    1983-01-01

    Three strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), originally isolated from humans and previously shown to cause diarrhea in human volunteers by unknown mechanisms, and one rabbit EPEC strain were shown to attach intimately to and efface microvilli and cytoplasm from intestinal epithelial cells in both the pig and rabbit intestine. The attaching and effacing activities of these EPEC were demonstrable by light microscopic examination of routine histological sections and by transmission electron microscopy. It was suggested that intact colostrum-deprived newborn pigs and ligated intestinal loops in pigs and rabbits may be useful systems to detect EPEC that have attaching and effacing activities and for studying the pathogenesis of such infections. The lesions (attachment and effacement) produced by EPEC in these systems were multifocal, with considerable animal-to-animal variation in response to the same strain of EPEC. The EPEC strains also varied in the frequency and extent of lesion production. For example, three human EPEC strains usually caused extensive lesions in rabbit intestinal loops, whereas two other human EPEC strains usually did not produce lesions in this system. Images PMID:6350186

  10. Expression in Escherichia coli of the catalytic domain of human proline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tallarita, Elena; Pollegioni, Loredano; Servi, Stefano; Molla, Gianluca

    2012-04-01

    The human PRODH gene has been shown to have unique roles in regulating cell survival and apoptotic pathways and it has been related to velocardiofacial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome and increased susceptibility to schizophrenia. It encodes for the flavoprotein proline oxidase (PO), which catalyzes the conversion of l-proline to Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. Despite the important physiological and medical interest in human PO, up to now only microbial homologues of PO have been expressed as recombinant protein and fully characterized. By using a bioinformatics analysis aimed at identifying the catalytic domain and the regions with a high intrinsic propensity to structural disorder, we designed deletion variants of human PO that were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble proteins in fairly high amounts (up to 10mg/L of fermentation broth). The His-tagged PO-barrelN protein was isolated as an active (the specific activity is 0.032U/mg protein), dimeric holoenzyme showing the typical spectral properties of FAD-containing flavoprotein oxidases. These results pave the way for elucidating structure-function relationships of this human flavoenzyme and clarifying the effect of the reported polymorphisms associated with disease states.

  11. Escherichia coli pili as possible mediators of attachment to human urinary tract epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edén, C S; Hansson, H A

    1978-01-01

    Presence of pili of fimbriae on Escherichia coli bacteria isolated from the urine of patients with urinary tract infection was related to the ability of the bacteria to attach to human uroepithelial cells. Piliated E. coli strains agglutinated guinea pig erythrocytes. D-Mannose and alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside inhibited this agglutination with all but one of the 12 strains tested. D-Mannose, D-galactose, alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside, and L-fucose did not afect attachment of piliated strains to uroepithelial cells. Heating as well as washing of piliated strains caused a parallel decrease of piliation and adhesive ability. Growth in glucose-enriched medium increased capsule formation but decreased piliation and adhesion. Capsulated strains retained their adhesive ability provided that pili extended outside the capsule. Images PMID:361565

  12. Transmembrane signaling by a chimera of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor and the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moe, G R; Bollag, G E; Koshland, D E

    1989-01-01

    Since many receptors apparently contain only one or two membrane-spanning segments, their transmembrane topology should be similar. This feature suggests that these receptors share common mechanisms of transmembrane signaling. To test the degree of conservation of signaling properties, a chimeric receptor containing the ligand-binding extracellular domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate chemoreceptor and the cytosolic portion of the human insulin receptor was constructed. This chimeric receptor is active as a tyrosine kinase, and aspartate stimulates its activity. Some interesting differences are noted in the target proteins phosphorylated by the chimera compared to the wild-type insulin receptor. These results indicate that features of the signaling mechanisms used by these diverse receptors are conserved, but that interesting changes in the protein properties are caused by differences in the neighboring domains. Images PMID:2548185

  13. Expression in Escherichia coli of a dominant immunogen of Trypanosoma cruzi recognized by human chagasic sera.

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, P C; Paranhos, G S; Mortara, R A; Wanderley, J; Rassi, A; Camargo, M E; da Silveira, J F

    1990-01-01

    A genomic clone expressing a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen in Escherichia coli was identified using human chagasic sera. Chagasic antibodies affinity purified on extracts of this clone recognized a high-molecular-weight protein expressed in all developmental stages of the parasite life cycle, as well as in various T. cruzi strains. The antigen is associated with the cytoskeleton of the parasite and localizes along the attachment region between the flagellum and the cell body. Antibodies to the recombinant antigen were detected in the sera of 115 chagasic patients from different endemic regions, but not in sera of patients with leishmaniasis, T. rangeli infection, or other parasitic diseases. Our data suggest that the presence of antibodies to this antigen may be specifically associated with Chagas' disease. Images PMID:1691209

  14. Preparation and characterization of human interleukin-5 expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, A E; Fattah, D; Kawashima, E H; Bernard, A; Wingfield, P T

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for human interleukin-5 was synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli under control of a heat-inducible promoter. High-level expression, 10-15% of total cellular protein, was achieved in E. coli. The protein was produced in an insoluble state. A simple extraction, renaturation and purification scheme is described. The recombinant protein was found to be a homodimer, similar to the natural murine-derived protein. Despite the lack of glycosylation, high specific activities were obtained in three 'in vitro' biological assays. Physical characterization of the protein showed it to be mostly alpha-helical, supporting the hypothesis that a conformational similarity exists among certain cytokines. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2205201

  15. [Optimization of fermentation of recombinant human Endostatin (rh-Endostatin) expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Chang, Guo-Dong; Li, Zhuang-Lin; Qin, Jia-Yang; Ma, Cui-Qing; Luo, Yong-Zhang; Xu, Ping

    2005-07-01

    The fermentation process of recombinant human Endostatin expression in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was studied. The effects of factors such as concentration of IPTG, induction time, cultivation temperature and feeding strategies were investigated. Beside that, by changing the temperature to 40 degrees C after induction, the high-density cultivation finished in a much shorter period. After 9 hours cultivation, the optical density (OD) at 600 nm reached 140 and the yield of inclusion body was 3 g/L. While E. coli system was used, protein with better activity and stability was obtained. The cost was much lower and the producing process was much steadier. It will meet the demands of the industrial production.

  16. Bacteriostasis of Escherichia coli by milk. IV. The bacteriostatic antibody of human milk.

    PubMed Central

    Dolby, J. M.; Honour, P.

    1979-01-01

    Bacteriostatic activity for milk-sensitive and milk-resistant strains of Escherichia coli is reduced when IgA is removed from milk by precipitation. Lysozyme is not involved in bacteriostasis and can be removed without loss of activity; heavy bentonite absorption however removes some lactoferrin causing partial loss of activity. The heat-labile antigen eliciting bacteriostatic antibody for E. coli is present in milk-sensitive and milk-resistant strains and in some other Enterobacteriaceae, e.g. salmonella; it cross reacts with the antigen in others, e.g. proteus and enterobacter. The antibody is therefore likely to be present in all human milk as a result of the normal commensal gut flora and with widespread activity. PMID:385767

  17. Draft genome sequence analysis of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated in 2013 from humans and chickens in Nigeria.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of nine multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n=6) and chicken carcass (n=3) from Lagos, Nigeria in 2013. Multiple extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes were identified in these isolates. ...

  18. Virulence Factors and Phenotypical Traits of Verotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Human Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, R.; Untermann, F.

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from stool samples of 14 different asymptomatic human carriers were further characterized. A variety of serotypes was found, but none of the strains belonged to serogroup O157. Only one isolate carried most of the virulence genes that are associated with increased pathogenicity. PMID:10203524

  19. High-yield extraction of Escherichia coli RNA from human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Brennecke, Johannes; Kraut, Simone; Zwadlo, Klara; Gandi, Senthil Kumar; Pritchard, David; Templeton, Kate; Bachmann, Till

    2017-03-01

    Studies of bacterial transcriptomics during bloodstream infections are limited to-date because unbiased extraction of bacterial mRNA from whole blood in sufficient quantity and quality has proved challenging. Problems include the high excess of human cells, the presence of PCR inhibitors and the short intrinsic half-life of bacterial mRNA. This study aims to provide a framework for the choice of the most suitable sample preparation method. Escherichia coli cells were spiked into human whole blood and the bacterial gene expression was stabilized with RNAprotect either immediately or after lysis of the red blood cells with Triton X-100, saponin, ammonium chloride or the commercial MolYsis buffer CM. RNA yield, purity and integrity were assessed by absorbance measurements at 260 and 280 nm, real-time PCR and capillary electrophoresis. For low cell numbers, the best mRNA yields were obtained by adding the commercial RNAprotect reagent directly to the sample without prior lyses of the human blood cells. Using this protocol, significant amounts of human RNA were co-purified, however, this had a beneficial impact on the yields of bacterial mRNA. Among the tested lysis agents, Triton X-100 was the most effective and reduced the human RNA background by three to four orders of magnitude. For most applications, lysis of the human blood cells is not required. However, co-purified human RNA may interfere with some downstream processes such as RNA sequencing. In this case, blood cell lysis with Triton X-100 is desirable.

  20. Expression and purification of recombinant human Mig in Escherichia coli and its comparison with murine Mig.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lan; Zhu, Shunying; Shen, Jiaqing; Han, Xiaodong; Gao, Jin; Wu, Mingyuan; Yu, Yan; Lu, Huili; Han, Wei

    2012-03-01

    Monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig) is a member of CXC-chemokines and recruits T-lymphocytes to activate the immune response. In recent years, it has raised much interest in the areas of autoimmune disease and allograft rejection, as the production of recombinant human Mig (rHuMig) would be of considerable significance for both research and potential clinical use. Here we report the expression, preparation and characterization of non-tagged recombinant human Mig (rHuMig) using a prokaryotic expression system. Following expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21, the 103 amino acid residue of rHuMig was purified from bacteria inclusion bodies with a one-step S-Sepharose cation exchange chromatography. The product was immunologically characterized via Western blot and its purity was determined via SDS-PAGE and silver staining to be above 99%, with an endotoxin level <0.5EU/μg via a chemotaxis assay, rHuMig demonstrated chemotactic activity on mouse spleen lymphocytes with an ED50 of 15 ng/mL. Additionally, using a proliferation assay, rHuMig significantly inhibited proliferation of the human bladder cell line T24. In vivo experiments revealed that rHuMig could inhibit mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells cycling into the S-phase and reduced intestinal cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate that rHuMig is fully functional in the mouse model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Escherichia coli out in the cold: Dissemination of human-derived bacteria into the Antarctic microbiome.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L; Samuel, Angelingifta; Smith, James J; Stark, Jonathon S; Gillings, Michael R; Gordon, David M

    2016-08-01

    Discharge of untreated sewage into Antarctic environments presents a risk of introducing non-native microorganisms, but until now, adverse consequences have not been conclusively identified. Here we show that sewage disposal introduces human derived Escherichia coli carrying mobile genetic elements and virulence traits with the potential to affect the diversity and evolution of native Antarctic microbial communities. We compared E. coli recovered from environmental and animal sources in Antarctica to a reference collection of E. coli from humans and non-Antarctic animals. The distribution of phylogenetic groups and frequency of 11 virulence factors amongst the Antarctic isolates were characteristic of E. coli strains more commonly associated with humans. The rapidly emerging E. coli ST131 and ST95 clones were found amongst the Antarctic isolates, and ST95 was the predominant E. coli recovered from Weddell seals. Class 1 integrons were found in 15% of the Antarctic E. coli with 4 of 5 identified gene cassette arrays containing antibiotic resistance genes matching those common in clinical contexts. Disposing untreated sewage into the Antarctic environment does disseminate non-native microorganisms, but the extent of this impact and implications for Antarctic ecosystem health are, as yet, poorly understood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro cytotoxic effect of alpha-hemolytic Escherichia coli on human blood granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gadeberg, O V; Orskov, I

    1984-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of Escherichia coli bacteria on human blood granulocytes was measured by recording numbers of nonlysed cells and percentages of viable cells after in vitro incubation with bacteria in the presence of plasma. A total of 179 strains from various sources of infection were tested. Of 117 alpha-hemolytic strains, 59 were cytotoxic. Five nonhemolytic mutant strains, derived from alpha-hemolytic cytotoxic strains, were nontoxic. None of the 62 nonhemolytic strains were toxic. Four spontaneously occurring alpha-hemolytic, nontoxic mutant strains were isolated from cytotoxic ones. Cytotoxicity of bacteria reached a maximum after log-phase growth at 30 to 37 degrees C for 2.5 h, and the toxic capacity was equal after growth in various media, including human urine and plasma. The cytotoxic effect increased with the length of exposure of granulocytes to bacteria and with increasing numbers of bacteria per granulocyte. Cytotoxic strains showed different degrees of toxicity, highly cytotoxic strains lysing about 90% of the granulocytes and killing about one-half of nonlysed cells in 1 h. Bacteria killed by heat, formaldehyde, or UV light were nontoxic. Alpha-hemolytic strains of O groups 2, 4, 6, 25, and 75 originating from various infections in humans were more frequently cytotoxic than alpha-hemolytic strains of other O groups derived from human infections. Culture supernatants containing free alpha-hemolysin were highly cytotoxic to human blood granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes in vitro, whether supernatants originated from cytotoxic or noncytotoxic bacteria. Cytotoxicity to phagocytes, which is mediated by or closely linked genetically to alpha-hemolysin, may be a mechanism by which alpha-hemolytic strains of E. coli strengthen their ability to establish and maintain infections. PMID:6376357

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens and humans

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Tricia D; McLaughlin, Wayne; Brown, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial usage is considered the most important factor promoting the emergence, selection and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in both veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic basis of tetracycline resistance in faecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy broiler chickens and compare these data with isolates obtained from hospitalized patients in Jamaica. Results Eighty-two E. coli strains isolated from faecal samples of broiler chickens and urine and wound specimens of hospitalized patients were analyzed by agar disc diffusion to determine their susceptibility patterns to 11 antimicrobial agents. Tetracycline resistance determinants were investigated by plasmid profiling, transformations, and amplification of plasmid-borne resistance genes. Tetracycline resistance occurred at a frequency of 82.4% in avian isolates compared to 43.8% in human isolates. In addition, among avian isolates there was a trend towards higher resistance frequencies to kanamycin and nalidixic acid (p < 0.05), while a greater percentage of human isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol and gentamicin (p < 0.05). Multiple drug resistance was found in isolates from both sources and was usually associated with tetracycline resistance. Tetracycline-resistant isolates from both avian and human sources contained one or several plasmids, which were transmissible by transformation of chemically-competent E. coli. Tetracycline resistance was mediated by efflux genes tetB and/or tetD. Conclusion The present study highlights the prevalence of multiple drug resistant E. coli among healthy broiler chickens in Jamaica, possibly associated with expression of tetracycline resistance. While there did not appear to be a common source for multiple drug resistance in the strains from avian or human origin, the genes encoding resistance are similar. These results suggest that genes are disseminated in the

  4. Toxigenic Escherichia Coli and Childhood Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Mundell, Dave H.; Anselmo, Carl R.; Thrupp, Lauri D.; Wishnow, Rodney M.

    1976-01-01

    Stool specimens were examined from 40 children with diarrhea who were under three years of age to determine the incidence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in endemic diarrhea. Heat-labile E. coli enterotoxin was assayed in the very sensitive and reproducible cultured adrenal tumor cell system. Toxigenic E. coli were isolated from only one stool specimen and in this case infection with Shigella dysenteriae was also present. None of the eight classic enteropathogenic E. coli isolates were positive in the adrenal assay. This study suggests that heat-labile enterotoxin-producing E. coli are not an important cause of endemic childhood diarrhea in Southern California. PMID:775792

  5. Risk Factors for Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli-Associated Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Marta; Chinen, Isabel; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Masana, Marcelo

    2014-10-01

    We have reviewed the risk factors for the occurrence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-associated human diseases. The analysis of STEC surveillance data and trends shows differences in frequency and severity of the illnesses across countries, whereas the economic and social costs for the affected families, the community, and the health system are better estimated in developed countries. The occurrence of STEC infections is determined by the interaction of the pathogen, the reservoirs, and the biological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of the host. The main risk factors identified in earlier case-control and population-based studies were dietary behaviors and beef consumption. However, in recent years, other risky exposures have also emerged, like the consumption of raw vegetables and sprouts, working or camping in rural areas, visiting farms, and person-to-person transmission. Epidemiological changes have also been determined by the intensification of cattle production, the increase in centralized food production and distribution, and the growth in the volume of international trade of foods. The main lessons learned from recent large outbreaks are knowledge of virulence determinants of new pathogenic strains, recognition of new vehicles of infection, development of new methodologies for detecting STEC in foods and humans, improvement in food regulations and hygiene guidelines, new therapeutic approaches in the treatment of infected patients, establishment of continuous educational programs for food consumers, and enhanced cooperation and teamwork of regional and international networks.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli O157 Isolated from Humans, Cattle, Swine, and Food

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Carl M.; Zhao, Cuiwei; DebRoy, Chitrita; Torcolini, Jocelyn; Zhao, Shaohua; White, David G.; Wagner, David D.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Walker, Robert D.; Meng, Jianghong

    2002-01-01

    A total of 361 Escherichia coli O157 isolates, recovered from humans, cattle, swine, and food during the years 1985 to 2000, were examined to better understand the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among these organisms. Based on broth microdilution results, 220 (61%) of the isolates were susceptible to all 13 antimicrobials tested. Ninety-nine (27%) of the isolates, however, were resistant to tetracycline, 93 (26%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 61 (17%) were resistant to cephalothin, and 48 (13%) were resistant to ampicillin. Highest frequencies of resistance occurred among swine isolates (n = 70), where 52 (74%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 50 (71%) were resistant to tetracycline, 38 (54%) were resistant to cephalothin, and 17 (24%) were resistant to ampicillin. Based on the presence of Shiga toxin genes as determined by PCR, 210 (58%) of the isolates were identified as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Among these, resistance was generally low, yet 21 (10%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and 19 (9%) were resistant to tetracycline. Based on latex agglutination, 189 (52%) of the isolates were identified as E. coli O157:H7, among which 19 (10%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and 16 (8%) were resistant to tetracycline. The data suggest that selection pressure imposed by the use of tetracycline derivatives, sulfa drugs, cephalosporins, and penicillins, whether therapeutically in human and veterinary medicine or as prophylaxis in the animal production environment, is a key driving force in the selection of antimicrobial resistance in STEC and non-STEC O157. PMID:11823193

  7. Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Human Endostatin in Periplasm of Escherichia coli Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Abbas; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Pourhassan-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Karimi, Pouran; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recombinant human endostatin (rhEs) is an angiogenesis inhibitor which is used as a specific drug in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. In the current research, we developed an efficient method for expressing soluble form of the rhEs protein in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli via fusing with pelB signal peptide. Methods: The human endostatin (hEs) gene was amplified using synthetic (hEs) gene as a template; then, cloned and expressed under T7 lac promoter. IPTG was used as an inducer for rhEs expression. Next, the osmotic shock was used to extraction of protein from the periplasmic space. The presence of rhEs in the periplasmic space was approved by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Results: The results show the applicability of pelB fusion protein system usage for secreting rhEs in the periplasm of E. coli in the laboratory scale. The rhEs represents approximately 35 % (0.83mg/l) of the total cell protein. Conclusion: The present study apparently is the first report of codon-optimized rhEs expression as a fusion with pelB signal peptide. The results presented the successful secretion of soluble rhEs to the periplasmic space. PMID:27478780

  8. Over-expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of two recombinant isoforms of human FAD synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Brizio, Carmen; Galluccio, Michele; Wait, Robin; Torchetti, Enza Maria; Bafunno, Valeria; Accardi, Rosita; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria . E-mail: m.barile@biologia.uniba.it

    2006-06-09

    FAD synthetase (FADS) (EC 2.7.7.2) is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor FAD. Two hypothetical human FADSs, which are the products of FLAD1 gene, were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and identified by ESI-MS/MS. Isoform 1 was over-expressed as a T7-tagged protein which had a molecular mass of 63 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Isoform 2 was over-expressed as a 6-His-tagged fusion protein, carrying an extra 84 amino acids at the N-terminal with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa on SDS-PAGE. It was purified near to homogeneity from the soluble cell fraction by one-step affinity chromatography. Both isoforms possessed FADS activity and had a strict requirement for MgCl{sub 2}, as demonstrated using both spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. The purified recombinant isoform 2 showed a specific activity of 6.8 {+-} 1.3 nmol of FAD synthesized/min/mg protein and exhibited a K {sub M} value for FMN of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M. This is First report on characterization of human FADS, and First cloning and over-expression of FADS from an organism higher than yeast.

  9. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  10. Efficient Expression of Bioactive Human Leptin in Escherichia coli in Soluble Fusion Form.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian Feng; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Yun Long; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2010-07-01

    Leptin, a 16 kDa nonglycosylated hormone, is produced by mature adipocytes and functions primarily in the hypothalamus to reduce food intake and body weight. To explore a new approach for high-level expression of human Leptin in Escherichia coli, the human Leptin gene, synthesized according to the published sequence, was cloned into the vector pET32a to construct a fusion expression plasmid: Trx-Leptin/pET32a. Our data showed that more than 40% of the fusion protein Trx-Leptin was expressed in soluble form. After purified by Ni-IDA affinity chromatography, cleaved by enterokinase and applied Ni-IDA affinity chromatography again, purified Leptin with homogeneity over 96% was achieved. The bio-functional experiments of purified Leptin showed a significant reduction in food intake and body weight of female mice treated with Leptin by comparing with control mice, and it indicated that the purified Leptin has full biological activity. In addition, our expression system was a very low-cost and efficient prokaryotic expression system. So taken together, our results demonstrated that our expression system of bio-active Leptin provided a new method for producing Leptin in big scale and would be widely applied in commercial Leptin producing industries.

  11. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance in Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Animals, United States, 1950–2002

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Daniel A.; Zhao, Shaohua; Tong, Emily; Ayers, Sherry; Singh, Aparna; Bartholomew, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of Escherichia coli isolates recovered from human and food animal samples during 1950–2002 to assess historical changes in antimicrobial drug resistance. A total of 1,729 E. coli isolates (983 from humans, 323 from cattle, 138 from chickens, and 285 from pigs) were tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobial drugs. A significant upward trend in resistance was observed for ampicillin (p<0.001), sulfonamide (p<0.001), and tetracycline (p<0.001). Animal strains showed increased resistance to 11/15 antimicrobial agents, including ampicillin (p<0.001), sulfonamide (p<0.01), and gentamicin (p<0.001). Multidrug resistance (≥3 antimicrobial drug classes) in E. coli increased from 7.2% during the 1950s to 63.6% during the 2000s. The most frequent co-resistant phenotype observed was to tetracycline and streptomycin (29.7%), followed by tetracycline and sulfonamide (29.0%). These data describe the evolution of resistance after introduction of new antimicrobial agents into clinical medicine and help explain the range of resistance in modern E. coli isolates. PMID:22515968

  12. The Escherichia coli AlkB protein protects human cells against alkylation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B J; Carroll, P; Samson, L

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli can ameliorate the toxic effects of alkylating agents either by preventing DNA alkylation or by repairing DNA alkylation damage. The alkylation-sensitive phenotype of E. coli alkB mutants marks the alkB pathway as an extremely effective defense mechanism against the cytotoxic effects of the SN2, but not the SN1, alkylating agents. Although it is clear that AlkB helps cells to better handle alkylated DNA, no DNA alkylation repair function could be assigned to the purified AlkB protein, suggesting that AlkB either acts as part of a complex or acts to regulate the expression of other genes whose products are directly responsible for alkylation resistance. However, here we present evidence that the provision of alkylation resistance is an intrinsic function of the AlkB protein per se. We expressed the E. coli AlkB protein in two human cell lines and found that it confers the same characteristic alkylation-resistant phenotype in this foreign environment as it does in E. coli. AlkB expression rendered human cells extremely resistant to cell killing by the SN2 but not the SN1 alkylating agents but did not affect the ability of dimethyl sulfate (an SN2 agent) to alkylate the genome. We infer that SN2 agents produce a class of DNA damage that is not efficiently produced by SN1 agents and that AlkB somehow prevents this damage from killing the cell. Images PMID:7928996

  13. Visualizing attack of Escherichia coli by the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 5.

    PubMed

    Chileveru, Haritha R; Lim, Shion A; Chairatana, Phoom; Wommack, Andrew J; Chiang, I-Ling; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-03-10

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and contributes to innate immunity in the human gut and other organ systems. Despite many years of investigation, its antimicrobial mechanism of action remains unclear. In this work, we report that HD5ox, the oxidized form of this peptide that exhibits three regiospecific disulfide bonds, causes distinct morphological changes to Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative microbes. These morphologies include bleb formation, cellular elongation, and clumping. The blebs are up to ∼1 μm wide and typically form at the site of cell division or cell poles. Studies with E. coli expressing cytoplasmic GFP reveal that HD5ox treatment causes GFP emission to localize in the bleb. To probe the cellular uptake of HD5ox and subsequent localization, we describe the design and characterization of a fluorophore-HD5 conjugate family. By employing these peptides, we demonstrate that fluorophore-HD5ox conjugates harboring the rhodamine and coumarin fluorophores enter the E. coli cytoplasm. On the basis of the fluorescence profiles, each of these fluorophore-HD5ox conjugates localizes to the site of cell division and cell poles. These studies support the notion that HD5ox, at least in part, exerts its antibacterial activity against E. coli and other Gram-negative microbes in the cytoplasm.

  14. Generation of polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human glucocerebrosidase produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Novo, Juliana Branco; Oliveira, Maria Leonor Sarno; Magalhães, Geraldo Santana; Morganti, Ligia; Raw, Isaías; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2010-11-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GCR) enzyme results in Gaucher's disease, the most common inherited storage disorder. Treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by the administration of recombinant GCR produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The production of anti-GCR antibodies has already been described with placenta-derived human GCR that requires successive chromatographic procedures. Here, we report a practical and efficient method to obtain anti-GCR polyclonal antibodies against recombinant GCR produced in Escherichia coli and further purified by a single step through nickel affinity chromatography. The purified GCR was used to immunize BALB/c mice and the induction of anti-GCR antibodies was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The specificity of the antiserum was also evaluated by western blot analysis against recombinant GCR produced by COS-7 cells or against endogenous GCR of human cell lines. GCR was strongly recognized by the produced antibodies, either as cell-associated or as secreted forms. The detected molecular masses of 59-66 kDa are in accordance to the expected size for glycosylated GCR. The GCR produced in E. coli would facilitate the production of polyclonal (shown here) and monoclonal antibodies and their use in the characterization of new biosimilar recombinant GCRs coming in the near future.

  15. An Escherichia coli-Based Assay to Assess the Function of Recombinant Human Hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Srinivasan; Fiori, Mariana C; Whisenant, Ty E; Cortes, D Marien; Altenberg, Guillermo A; Cuello, Luis G

    2017-02-01

    Connexins form the gap junctional channels that mediate cell-to-cell communication, and also form hemichannels present at the plasma membrane. Hemichannels are permeable to small hydrophilic compounds, including molecules involved in autocrine and paracrine signaling. An abnormal hemichannel opening causes or contributes to cell damage in common human disorders (e.g., cardiac infarct, cerebrovascular accidents, deafness, skin diseases, and cataracts) and is therefore a potential pharmacological target. The discovery of useful hemichannels inhibitors has been hampered in part by the lack of suitable high-throughput functional assays. Here, we developed and characterized an assay useful to assess the function of hemichannels formed by human connexins expressed in a genetically modified Escherichia coli strain. The LB2003 cells, devoid of three key K(+) uptake transport mechanisms, cannot grow in low-[K(+)] medium, but expression of Cx26, Cx43, or Cx46 rescues their growth defect (growth complementation). We developed a protocol for a simple, inexpensive, easily scalable, reproducible, and sensitive assay that should be useful for the discovery of new and better hemichannel inhibitors based on the analysis of small-compound libraries.

  16. Intein mediated hyper-production of authentic human basic fibroblast growth factor in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Keith W. Y.; Sivakumar, T.; Wong, W. K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Human basic fibroblast growth factor is a functionally versatile but very expensive polypeptide. In this communication, employing a novel amplification method for the target gene and genetic optimization of a previously engineered expression construct, pWK3R, together with a refined fed-batch fermentation protocol, we report an achievement of a phenomenal yield of 610 mg/L of the 146 aa authentic human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in Escherichia coli. Construct pWK3R was first modified to form plasmid pWK311ROmpAd, which was devoid of the ompA leader sequence and possessed two copies of a DNA segment encoding a fusion product comprising an intein, Saccharomyces cerevisiae vascular membrane ATPase (VMA), and bFGF. When E. coli transformant JM101 [pWK311ROmpAd] was cultivated using the refined fed-batch fermentation protocol, superb expression resulting in a total yield of 610 mg/L of bFGF was detected. Despite existing in high levels, the bFGF remained to be soluble and highly bioactive. PMID:27653667

  17. Expression and characterization of human proinsulin fused to thioredoxin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Trabucchi, Aldana; Guerra, Luciano Lucas; Faccinetti, Natalia Inés; Iacono, Ruben Francisco; Poskus, Edgardo; Valdez, Silvina Noemí

    2012-06-01

    Native proinsulin (PI) belongs to the class of the difficult-to-express proteins in Escherichia coli. Problems mainly arise due to its high proteolytic decay and troubles to reproduce the native disulphide pattern. In the present study, human PI was produced in E. coli as a fusion thioredoxin protein (Trx-PI). Such chimeric protein was obtained from the intracellular soluble fraction, and it was purified in one step by affinity chromatography on immobilized phenylarsine oxide. Trx-PI was also recovered from inclusion bodies and purified by anion exchange chromatography. The product identity and integrity were verified by mass analysis (22,173.5 Da) and mapping with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Native PI folding was evaluated by biochemical and also by immunochemical analysis using specific sera from PI antibody-positive diabetic patients that recognise conformational discontinue epitopes. Dose-response curves showed identity between standard PI and Trx-PI. Moreover, surface plasmon resonance technique verified the correct conformation of the recombinant protein. The biochemical and immunochemical assays demonstrated the integrity of the chimera and the epitopes involved in the interaction with antibodies. In conclusion, it was possible to obtain with high-yield purified human PI as a fusion protein in E. coli and useful for analytical purposes.

  18. Human Viperin Causes Radical SAM-Dependent Elongation of Escherichia coli, Hinting at Its Physiological Role.

    PubMed

    Nelp, Micah T; Young, Anthony P; Stepanski, Branden M; Bandarian, Vahe

    2017-08-01

    Viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, interferon-inducible) is a widely distributed protein that is expressed in response to infection and causes antiviral effects against a broad spectrum of viruses. Viperin is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes, which typically employ a 4Fe-4S cluster to reductively cleave SAM to initiate chemistry. Though the specific reaction catalyzed by viperin remains unknown, it has been shown that expression of viperin causes an increase in the fluidity of lipid membranes, which impedes the budding of nascent viral particles from the membrane inhibiting propagation of the infection. Herein, we show that expression of the human viperin homologue induces a dramatically elongated morphology of the host Escherichia coli cells. Mutation of an essential cysteine that coordinates the radical SAM cluster abrogates this effect. Thus, the native radical SAM activity of viperin is likely occurring in the host bacteria, indicating the elusive substrate is shared between both bacteria and humans, significantly narrowing the range of potential candidate substrates and providing a convenient bacterial platform from which future studies can occur.

  19. Expression, purification, and characterization of human enteropeptidase catalytic subunit in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gasparian, Marine E; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G; Schulga, Alexey A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2003-09-01

    Enteropeptidase (synonym:enterokinase, EC 3.4.21.9) is a heterodimeric serine protease of the intestinal brush border that activates trypsinogen by highly specific cleavage of the trypsinogen activation peptide following the sequence (Asp)(4)-Lys. The DNA sequence encoding the light chain (catalytic subunit) of human enteropeptidase (GenBank Accession No. U09860) was synthesized from 26 oligonucleotides by polymerase chain reaction and cloned into plasmid pET-32a downstream to the gene of fusion partner thioredoxin immediately after the DNA sequence encoding enteropeptidase recognition site. The fusion protein thioredoxin/human enteropeptidase light chain was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain in both soluble and insoluble forms. The soluble recombinant fusion protein failed to undergo autocatalytic cleavage and activation; however, autocatalytic cleavage and activation of recombinant human enteropeptidase light chain (L-HEP) were achieved by solubilization and renaturation of the fusion protein from inclusion bodies and the active L-HEP was purified on agarose-linked soybean trypsin inhibitor. The purified L-HEP cleaved the synthetic peptide substrate Gly-Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys-beta-naphthylamide with kinetic parameters K(m)=0.16 mM and k(cat)=115 s(-1) and small ester Z-Lys-SBzl with K(m)=140 microM, k(cat)=133 s(-1). L-HEP associated with soybean trypsin inhibitor slowly and small ester Z-Lys-SBzl cleavage was inhibited with K(i)(*)=2.3 nM. L-HEP digested thioredoxin/human epidermal growth factor fusion protein five times faster than equal activity units of bovine recombinant light chain (EKMax, Invitrogen) at the same conditions.

  20. Single Multiplex PCR Assay To Identify Simultaneously the Six Categories of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Associated with Enteric Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Maricel; Kruger, Eileen; Durán, Claudia; Lagos, Rosanna; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria; Toro, Cecilia; Vidal, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We designed a multiplex PCR for the detection of all categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. This method proved to be specific and rapid in detecting virulence genes from Shiga toxin-producing (stx1, stx2, and eae), enteropathogenic (eae and bfp), enterotoxigenic (stII and lt), enteroinvasive (virF and ipaH), enteroaggregative (aafII), and diffuse adherent (daaE) Escherichia coli in stool samples. PMID:16208019

  1. Glycoprotein glycans that inhibit adhesion of Escherichia coli mediated by K99 fimbriae: treatment of experimental colibacillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mouricout, M; Petit, J M; Carias, J R; Julien, R

    1990-01-01

    Calf diarrhea due to infection by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was treated by administration of glycoprotein glycans derived from bovine plasma. The glycan moieties of the nonimmunoglobulin fraction of plasma mimicked the oligosaccharide moiety of intestinal receptors recognized by K99 pili. These glycoprotein glycans inhibited adhesion of E. coli K99+ ST+ to erythrocyte glycoconjugates in vitro, and they protected colostrum-deprived newborn calves against lethal doses of enterotoxigenic E. coli (10(10) bacteria). Adhesion of bacteria to the intestines (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) was significantly reduced (by 2 orders of magnitude) in treated calves. PMID:2403535

  2. S-fimbriae from Escherichia coli bind to soluble glycoproteins from human milk.

    PubMed

    Schwertmann, A; Schroten, H; Hacker, J; Kunz, C

    1999-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, expressing S-fimbriae, belong to the most common gram-negative pathogens that cause sepsis and meningitis in neonates. The attachment of S-fimbriae to the cell surface is mediated by membrane glycoconjugates, which often carry N-acetylneuraminic acid. Binding studies were performed with glycoproteins from the whey fraction of human milk to investigate whether they exert a potential inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion. Whey glycoproteins were separated according to their molecular weight by fast protein liquid chromatography gel filtration. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes and incubated with isolated S-fimbriae from recombinant E. coli strain HB 101 (pANN 801-4). S-fimbriae recognized four whey proteins with a molecular mass of more than 200 kDa, 170 to 150 kDa, and 80 kDa. Their glycosylation pattern was investigated using the lectins Sambucus nigra, Maackia amurensis, Galanthus nivalis, and Arachis hypogaea. Thus the presence of N- and O-glycans in these proteins was confirmed. The preferential binding to N-acetylneuraminic acid containing glycoproteins was demonstrated by a complete abolishment of these reactions by incubation with acidic lactose-derived oligosaccharides. However, the cleavage of N-acetylneuraminic acid from glycoproteins by mild acid hydrolysis revealed a second binding site for S-fimbriae on milk proteins of a similar molecular weight range. Terminal galactose in human milk glycoconjugates were thought to react with S-fimbriae as well. These data further support the opinion that glycoproteins from human milk are potential receptor analogues for certain bacteria that may prevent microbial adhesion to the epithelial cell surface.

  3. Human Urine Decreases Function and Expression of Type 1 Pili in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Sarah E.; Hibbing, Michael E.; Janetka, James; Chen, Swaine L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC bind the bladder using type 1 pili, encoded by the fim operon in nearly all E. coli. Assembled type 1 pili terminate in the FimH adhesin, which specifically binds to mannosylated glycoproteins on the bladder epithelium. Expression of type 1 pili is regulated in part by phase-variable inversion of the genomic element containing the fimS promoter, resulting in phase ON (expressing) and OFF (nonexpressing) orientations. Type 1 pili are essential for virulence in murine models of UTI; however, studies of urine samples from human UTI patients demonstrate variable expression of type 1 pili. We provide insight into this paradox by showing that human urine specifically inhibits both expression and function of type 1 pili. Growth in urine induces the fimS phase OFF orientation, preventing fim expression. Urine also contains inhibitors of FimH function, and this inhibition leads to a further bias in fimS orientation toward the phase OFF state. The dual effect of urine on fimS regulation and FimH binding presents a potential barrier to type 1 pilus-mediated colonization and invasion of the bladder epithelium. However, FimH-mediated attachment to human bladder cells during growth in urine reverses these effects such that fim expression remains ON and/or turns ON. Interestingly, FimH inhibitors called mannosides also induce the fimS phase OFF orientation. Thus, the transduction of FimH protein attachment or inhibition into epigenetic regulation of type 1 pilus expression has important implications for the development of therapeutics targeting FimH function. PMID:26126855

  4. Cloning and characterization of a functional human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Aspinwall, Richard; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Roldan-Arjona, Teresa; Anselmino, Catherine; Ward, Christopher J.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Sampson, Julian R.; Lindahl, Tomas; Harris, Peter C.; Hickson, Ian D.

    1997-01-01

    Repair of oxidative damage to DNA bases is essential to prevent mutations and cell death. Endonuclease III is the major DNA glycosylase activity in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the excision of pyrimidines damaged by ring opening or ring saturation, and it also possesses an associated lyase activity that incises the DNA backbone adjacent to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. During analysis of the area adjacent to the human tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) in chromosome region 16p13.3, we identified a gene, OCTS3, that encodes a 1-kb transcript. Analysis of OCTS3 cDNA clones revealed an open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 34.3 kDa that shares extensive sequence similarity with E. coli endonuclease III and a related enzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including a conserved active site region and an iron/sulfur domain. The product of the OCTS3 gene was therefore designated hNTH1 (human endonuclease III homolog 1). The hNTH1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The recombinant protein had spectral properties indicative of the presence of an iron/sulfur cluster, and exhibited DNA glycosylase activity on double-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotides containing urea and thymine glycol residues, as well as an apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activity. Our data indicate that hNTH1 is a structural and functional homolog of E. coli endonuclease III, and that this class of enzymes, for repair of oxidatively damaged pyrimidines in DNA, is highly conserved in evolution from microorganisms to human cells. PMID:8990169

  5. Human and avian extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli: infections, zoonotic risks, and antibiotic resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Mellata, Melha

    2013-11-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) constitutes ongoing health concerns for women, newborns, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals due to increased numbers of urinary tract infections (UTIs), newborn meningitis, abdominal sepsis, and septicemia. E. coli remains the leading cause of UTIs, with recent investigations reporting the emergence of E. coli as the predominant cause of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections. This shift from the traditional Gram-positive bacterial causes of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections could be attributed to the use of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis against Gram-positive bacteria and the appearance of antibiotic (ATB) resistance in E. coli. While ExPEC strains cause significant healthcare concerns, these bacteria also infect chickens and cause the poultry industry economic losses due to costs of containment, mortality, and disposal of carcasses. To circumvent ExPEC-related costs, ATBs are commonly used in the poultry industry to prevent/treat microbial infections and promote growth and performance. In an unfortunate linkage, chicken products are suspected to be a source of foodborne ExPEC infections and ATB resistance in humans. Therefore, the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents) among avian E. coli has created major economic and health concerns, affecting both human healthcare and poultry industries. Increased numbers of immunocompromised individuals, including the elderly, coupled with MDR among ExPEC strains, will continue to challenge the treatment of ExPEC infections and likely lead to increased treatment costs. With ongoing complications due to emerging ATB resistance, novel treatment strategies are necessary to control ExPEC infections. Recognizing and treating the zoonotic risk posed by ExPEC would greatly enhance food safety and positively impact human health.

  6. Human and Avian Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli: Infections, Zoonotic Risks, and Antibiotic Resistance Trends

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) constitutes ongoing health concerns for women, newborns, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals due to increased numbers of urinary tract infections (UTIs), newborn meningitis, abdominal sepsis, and septicemia. E. coli remains the leading cause of UTIs, with recent investigations reporting the emergence of E. coli as the predominant cause of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections. This shift from the traditional Gram-positive bacterial causes of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections could be attributed to the use of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis against Gram-positive bacteria and the appearance of antibiotic (ATB) resistance in E. coli. While ExPEC strains cause significant healthcare concerns, these bacteria also infect chickens and cause the poultry industry economic losses due to costs of containment, mortality, and disposal of carcasses. To circumvent ExPEC-related costs, ATBs are commonly used in the poultry industry to prevent/treat microbial infections and promote growth and performance. In an unfortunate linkage, chicken products are suspected to be a source of foodborne ExPEC infections and ATB resistance in humans. Therefore, the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents) among avian E. coli has created major economic and health concerns, affecting both human healthcare and poultry industries. Increased numbers of immunocompromised individuals, including the elderly, coupled with MDR among ExPEC strains, will continue to challenge the treatment of ExPEC infections and likely lead to increased treatment costs. With ongoing complications due to emerging ATB resistance, novel treatment strategies are necessary to control ExPEC infections. Recognizing and treating the zoonotic risk posed by ExPEC would greatly enhance food safety and positively impact human health. PMID:23962019

  7. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Beta Interferon (rhINF-β) in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Human Interferon β (INF-β) is a member of cytokines family which different studies have shown its immunomodulatory and antiviral activities. In this study an expression vector was designed and constructed for expression of human INF-β-1b either in shake flasks or bench top bioreactor. The designed vector was constructed based upon pET-25b(+) with T7 promoter. Recombinant human beta interferon (rhINF-β) was codon optimized and overexpressed as a soluble, N-terminal pelB fusion protein and secreted into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sugar, Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used as a chemical inducer for rhINF-β production in the shake flasks and bench top bioreactor. Timing of beta interferon expression was controlled by using the T7 promoter. The rhINF-β protein was extracted from periplasmic space by osmotic shock treatment and the expression of the beta interferon encoding gene in random selected transformants, was confirmed by western and dot blot methods. The maximum of product formation achieved at the OD600nm = 3.42 was found to be 35 % of the total protein content of the strain which translates to 0.32 g L-1. The constructed vector could efficiently overexpress the rhINF-β into the periplasmic space of E. coli. The obtained yield of the produced rhINF-β was more than previous reports. The system is easily adapted to include other vectors, tags or fusions and therefore has the potential to be broadly applicable to express other recombinant proteins. PMID:24711841

  8. Virulence genes in bla(CTX-M) Escherichia coli isolates from chickens and humans.

    PubMed

    Randall, Luke; Wu, Guanghui; Phillips, Neil; Coldham, Nick; Mevius, Dik; Teale, Chris

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of virulence genes in isolates of CTX-M Escherichia coli from diseased chickens, from healthy chickens and from urinary tract infections in people. Three CTX-M E. coli strains from three different instances of disease in poultry (two of which were E. coli related) were tested for bla(CTX-M) sequence type and replicon type. Additionally, they were tested for the presence of 56 virulence genes (encoding fimbriae, adhesins, toxins, microcins and iron acquisition genes) using a micro-array. Results were compared to the virulence genes present in isolates from 26 healthy chickens and from 10 people with urinary tract infections. All genes found in isolates from diseased birds, including the astA (heat stable toxin) and tsh (temperature sensitive haemagglutinin) genes which have previously been associated with colibacillosis in chickens, were also present in isolates from healthy birds. However, 6/10 of the virulence genes found were exclusive to isolates from humans. Genes exclusive to chicken isolates included ireA (sidephore receptor), lpfA (long polar fimbriae), mchF (microcin transporter protein) and tsh whilst genes exclusive to human isolates included ctdB (cytolethal distending toxin), nfaE (non-fimbrial adhesion), senB (plasmid encoded enterotoxin) and toxB (toxin B). The results support previous findings that CTX-M E. coli strains in chickens are generally different from those causing disease in humans, but genes such as astA and tsh in isolates from diseased birds with colisepticaemia were also present in isolates from healthy birds. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Proteins in Escherichia coli for Potential Use in a Human Malaria Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, James F.; Hockmeyer, Wayne T.; Gross, Mitchell; Ripley Ballou, W.; Wirtz, Robert A.; Trosper, James H.; Beaudoin, Richard L.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Miller, Louis H.; Diggs, Carter L.; Rosenberg, Martin

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum may be the most promising target for the development of a malaria vaccine. In this study, proteins composed of 16, 32, or 48 tandem copies of a tetrapeptide repeating sequence found in the CS protein were efficiently expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli. When injected into mice, these recombinant products resulted in the production of high titers of antibodies that reacted with the authentic CS protein on live sporozoites and blocked sporozoite invasion of human hepatoma cells in vitro. These CS protein derivatives are therefore candidates for a human malaria vaccine.

  10. Limited Transmission of blaCTX-M-9-Type-Positive Escherichia coli between Humans and Poultry in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ngan, Bui Thi Kim; Tuyen, Le Danh; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether Escherichia coli isolates that produce CTX-M-9-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are transferred between humans and chickens in a Vietnamese community. The phylogenetic group compositions, sequence types, antimicrobial resistance profiles, the prevalence of plasmid antibiotic resistance genes, and the plasmid replicon types generally differed between the human and chicken E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that transmission of the blaCTX-M-9-positive E. coli between humans and poultry was limited. PMID:25779573

  11. Genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 for its ability to cause disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Bono, James L

    2009-08-01

    Escherichia coli are ubiquitous in the world, and for the most part are non-pathogenic and part of the normal lower gastrointestinal tract in mammals. However, some pathogenic isolates can cause severe disease that range from meningitis to hemorrhagic colitis (HC). In recent years, Shiga toxin-containing E. coli (STEC) have been a major cause of food borne and environmental cases of HC and hemolytic uremic syndrome. One STEC serotype, O157:H7, has been responsible for numerous food-associated outbreaks and recalls worldwide. The protocols in this unit will allow the reader to use real-time polymerase chain reaction genotyping to identify isolates that are more likely to cause disease in humans. The genotyping assay targets a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the tir gene. The tir gene is located in a virulence operon called the locus for enterocyte effacement and functions as a receptor for the tight adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to epithelial cells. As more genomes are sequenced, informative SNPs that associate with phenotypes will be identified. Identifying isolates not only by their genus and species, but also by using other informative genomic traits will increase the general knowledge about their genetic diversity.

  12. Observed surface lysine acetylation of human carbonic anhydrase II expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Brian P; Lomelino, Carrie L; Salguero, Antonieta L; Driscoll, Jenna M; Pinard, Melissa A; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation of surface lysine residues of proteins has been observed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), an organism that has been extensively utilized for recombinant protein expression. This post-translational modification is shown to be important in various processes such as metabolism, stress-response, transcription, and translation. As such, utilization of E. coli expression systems for protein production may yield non-native acetylation events of surface lysine residues. Here we present the crystal structures of wild-type and a variant of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) that have been expressed in E. coli and exhibit surface lysine acetylation and we speculate on the effect this has on the conformational stability of each enzyme. Both structures were determined to 1.6 Å resolution and show clear electron density for lysine acetylation. The lysine acetylation does not distort the structure and the surface lysine acetylation events most likely do not interfere with the biological interpretation. However, there is a reduction in conformational stability in the hCA II variant compared to wild type (∼4°C decrease). This may be due to other lysine acetylation events that have occurred but are not visible in the crystal structure due to intrinsic disorder. Therefore, surface lysine acetylation events may affect overall protein stability and crystallization, and should be considered when using E. coli expression systems. PMID:26266677

  13. High Efficient Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Native Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Yu, Jieying; Lin, Jinglian; Wu, Shaomin

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) is a small, mitotic growth polypeptide that promotes the proliferation of various cells and is widely applied in clinical practices. However, high efficient expression of native hEGF in Escherichia coli has not been successful, since three disulfide bonds in monomer hEGF made it unable to fold into correct 3D structure using in vivo system. To tackle this problem, we fused Mxe GyrA intein (Mxe) at the C-terminal of hEGF followed by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and 10x His-tag to construct a chimeric protein hEGF-Mxe-SUMO-H10. The fusion protein was highly expressed at the concentration of 281 mg/L and up to 59.5% of the total cellular soluble proteins. The fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and 29.4 mg/L of native hEGF can be released by thiol induced N-terminal cleavage without any proteases. The mitotic activity in Balb/c 3T3 cells is proliferated by commercial and recombinant hEGF measured with methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay which indicated that recombinant hEGF protein stimulates the cell proliferation similar to commercial protein. This study significantly improved the yield and reduced the cost of hEGF in the recombinant E. coli system and could be a better strategy to produce native hEGF for pharmaceutical development. PMID:27766259

  14. Characterization and biological activities of recombinant human plasminogen kringle 1-3 produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    You, Weon-Kyoo; So, Seung-Ho; Sohn, Young-Doug; Lee, Hyosil; Park, Doo-Hong; Chung, Soo-Il; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2004-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from preexisting blood vessels, is involved in many pathological conditions, for example, tumorigenesis, diabetic retinopathy, and rheumatoid arthritis. Angiostatin, which contains the kringle 1-4 domains of plasminogen, is known to be a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and a strong suppressor of various solid tumors. In this study, we expressed recombinant protein containing the kringle 1-3 domains of human plasminogen in Escherichia coli and investigated its biological activities. The protein was successfully refolded from inclusion bodies and purified at a 30% overall yield, as a single peak by HPLC. The purified recombinant protein had biochemical properties that were similar to those of the native form, which included molecular size, lysine-binding capacity, and immunoreactivity with a specific antibody. The recombinant protein was also found to strongly inhibit the proliferation of bovine capillary endothelial cells in vitro, and the formation of new capillaries on chick embryos. In addition, it suppressed the growth of primary Lewis lung carcinoma and B16 melanoma in an in vivo mouse model. Our findings suggest that the recombinant kringle 1-3 domains in a prokaryote expression system have anti-angiogenic activities, which may be useful in clinical and basic research in the field of angiogenesis.

  15. Escherichia albertii, a novel human enteropathogen, colonizes rat enterocytes and translocates to extra-intestinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T.; Liberatore, Ana Maria A.; Abe, Cecilia M.; de Souza, Rodrigo B.; Romão, Fabiano T.; Sperandio, Vanessa; Koh, Ivan H.

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death of children up to five years old in the developing countries. Among the etiological diarrheal agents are atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC), one of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes that affects children and adults, even in developed countries. Currently, genotypic and biochemical approaches have helped to demonstrate that some strains classified as aEPEC are actually E. albertii, a recently recognized human enteropathogen. Studies on particular strains are necessary to explore their virulence potential in order to further understand the underlying mechanisms of E. albertii infections. Here we demonstrated for the first time that infection of fragments of rat intestinal mucosa is a useful tool to study the initial steps of E. albertii colonization. We also observed that an E. albertii strain can translocate from the intestinal lumen to Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and liver in a rat model. Based on our finding of bacterial translocation, we investigated how E. albertii might cross the intestinal epithelium by performing infections of M-like cells in vitro to identify the potential in vivo translocation route. Altogether, our approaches allowed us to draft a general E. albertii infection route from the colonization till the bacterial spreading in vivo. PMID:28178312

  16. Real-time attack on single Escherichia coli cells by the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Sochacki, Kem A; Barns, Kenneth J; Bucki, Robert; Weisshaar, James C

    2011-04-19

    Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) provide prototypes for the design of unconventional antimicrobial agents. Existing bulk assays measure AMP activity but do not provide details of the growth-halting mechanism. We use fluorescence microscopy to directly observe the attack of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 on single Escherichia coli cells in real time. Our findings strongly suggest that disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane is not the growth-halting mechanism. At 8 μM, LL-37 binding saturates the outer membrane (OM) within 1 min. Translocation across the OM and access to the periplasmic space (5-25 min later) correlates in time with the halting of growth. Septating cells are attacked more readily than nonseptating cells. The halting of growth may occur because of LL-37 interference with cell wall biogenesis. Only well after growth halts does the peptide permeabilize the cytoplasmic membrane to GFP and the small dye Sytox Green. The assay enables dissection of antimicrobial design criteria into two parts: translocation across the OM and the subsequent halting of growth.

  17. High Efficient Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Native Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Yu, Jieying; Lin, Jinglian; Wu, Shaomin; Li, Shan; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) is a small, mitotic growth polypeptide that promotes the proliferation of various cells and is widely applied in clinical practices. However, high efficient expression of native hEGF in Escherichia coli has not been successful, since three disulfide bonds in monomer hEGF made it unable to fold into correct 3D structure using in vivo system. To tackle this problem, we fused Mxe GyrA intein (Mxe) at the C-terminal of hEGF followed by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and 10x His-tag to construct a chimeric protein hEGF-Mxe-SUMO-H10. The fusion protein was highly expressed at the concentration of 281 mg/L and up to 59.5% of the total cellular soluble proteins. The fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and 29.4 mg/L of native hEGF can be released by thiol induced N-terminal cleavage without any proteases. The mitotic activity in Balb/c 3T3 cells is proliferated by commercial and recombinant hEGF measured with methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay which indicated that recombinant hEGF protein stimulates the cell proliferation similar to commercial protein. This study significantly improved the yield and reduced the cost of hEGF in the recombinant E. coli system and could be a better strategy to produce native hEGF for pharmaceutical development.

  18. Comparison of Escherichia coli Strains Recovered from Human Cystitis and Pyelonephritis Infections in Transurethrally Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David E.; Lockatell, C. Virginia; Russell, Robert G.; Hebel, J. Richard; Island, Michael D.; Stapleton, Ann; Stamm, Walter E.; Warren, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Urinary tract infection, most frequently caused by Escherichia coli, is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. A vast amount of literature regarding the mechanisms through which E. coli induces pyelonephritis has accumulated. Although cystitis accounts for 95% of visits to physicians for symptoms of urinary tract infections, few in vivo studies have investigated possible differences between E. coli recovered from patients with clinical symptoms of cystitis and that from patients with symptoms of pyelonephritis. Epidemiological studies indicate that cystitis-associated strains appear to differ from pyelonephritis-associated strains in elaboration of some putative virulence factors. With transurethrally challenged mice we studied possible differences using three each of the most virulent pyelonephritis and cystitis E. coli strains in our collection. The results indicate that cystitis strains colonize the bladder more rapidly than do pyelonephritis strains, while the rates of kidney colonization are similar. Cystitis strains colonize the bladder in higher numbers, induce more pronounced histologic changes in the bladder, and are more rapidly eliminated from the mouse urinary tract than pyelonephritis strains. These results provide evidence that cystitis strains differ from pyelonephritis strains in this model, that this model is useful for the study of the uropathogenicity of cystitis strains, and that it would be unwise to use pyelonephritis strains to study putative virulence factors important in the development of cystitis. PMID:9632566

  19. Effect of prostaglandins, nitrofurantoin, and Escherichia coli on response of human vas deferens to norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Hepperlen, T W; Dalske, H F; Lacy, S S

    1976-03-01

    Surgical specimens of human vas deferens, mounted isometrically in vitro, were tested for their reactivity to norepinephrine, the major neurohumoral control mechanism in this tissue, under a variety of conditions. There was no significant difference in reactivity (measured as amplitude and frequency of contraction) between vasa obtained under either spinal or local anesthesia. Similarly, the age of the donor (range, 20 to 79 years) had no effect on either measure of reactivity. Prostaglandins A1 (10(-7) gm/ml) and E2 (10(-9) gm/ml), Escherichia coli (10(5) organisms/ml), and E. coli endotoxin (10(-7) gm/ml) did not affect norepinephrine responses, suggesting that the role of these compounds in problems of fertility is not related to an alternation in sperm transport through the vas. Nitrofurantoin (10(-5) gm/ml) also had no effect on reactivity to norepinephrine, providing further evidence that low sperm counts in patients taking this drug are more appropriately attributed to a direct effect on spermatogenesis than to an effect on sperm transport.

  20. Characterization of an Escherichia coli-derived human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 bivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Wei, Minxi; Wang, Daning; Li, Zhihai; Xie, Minghui; Pan, Huirong; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2017-08-16

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer worldwide. Neutralizing HPV prophylactic vaccines offer significant benefit, as they block HPV infection and prevent subsequent disease. However, the three licensed HPV vaccines that cover these two genotypes were produced in eukaryotic cells, which is expensive, particularly for low-income countries where HPV is highest. Here, we report a new HPV16 and -18 bivalent candidate vaccine produced from Escherichia coli. We used two strategies of N-terminal truncation of HPV L1 proteins and soluble non-fusion expression to generate HPV16 and HPV18 L1-only virus-like particles (VLPs) in a scalable process. Through comprehensive characterization of the bivalent candidate vaccine, we confirm lot consistency in a pilot scale-up of 30L, 100L and 500L. Using cryo-EM 3D reconstruction, we found that HPV16 and -18VLPs present in a T=7 icosahedral arrangement, similar in shape and size to that of the native virions. This HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine shares comparable immunogenicity with the licensed vaccines. Overall, we show that the production of a HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine from an E. coli expression system is robust and scalable, with potentially good accessibility worldwide as a population-based immunization strategy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is responsible for Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute vascular dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Pleiner, Johannes; Heere-Ress, Elisabeth; Langenberger, Herbert; Sieder, Anna E; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Mittermayer, Fritz; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Böhm, Johannes; Jansen, Burkhard; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Impaired response to catecholamines contributes to the altered hemodynamics in sepsis, which has been attributed to excessive NO formation. We have studied the systemic hemodynamic and local forearm responses and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression during experimental endotoxemia in humans. Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) was administered at doses of 1 or 2 ng/kg to healthy volunteers. In 10 subjects, the systemic pressor effect of phenylephrine was assessed before and after the administration of LPS. In 9 further subjects, forearm blood flow responses to intra-arterial noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glyceryl trinitrate, and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were studied at baseline and after LPS administration. Peripheral blood was collected and analyzed for iNOS mRNA and protein. Four hours after LPS, the response of systolic blood pressure (P<0.0005) and heart rate (P<0.05) to phenylephrine was significantly reduced. In the forearm, noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction was also reduced by approximately 50% (P<0.01), but L-NMMA responsiveness was unchanged. iNOS mRNA or protein was not increased. Marked vascular adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is detectable in the absence of increased NO activity or iNOS expression in endotoxemia, arguing against major involvement of vascular iNOS activity in the acute systemic vasodilation to LPS.

  2. DNA-binding domain of human c-Myc produced in escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, C.V.; Buckmire, M.; VanDam, H.; Lee, W.M.F.

    1989-06-01

    The authors have identified the domain of the human c-myc protein (c-Myc) produced in Escherichia coli that is responsible for the ability of the protein to bind sequence-nonspecific DNA. Using analysis of binding of DNA by proteins transferred to nitrocellulose, DNA-cellulose chromatography, and a nitrocellulose filter binding assay, they examined the binding properties of c-Myc peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage, of butane c-,Myc, and of proteins that fuse portions of c-Myc to staphylococcal protein A. The results of these analyses indicated that c-Myc amino acid 265 to 318 were responsible for DNA binding and that other regions of the protein (including a highly conserved basic region and a region containing the leucine zipper motif) were not required. Some mutant c-Mycs that did not bind DNA maintained rat embryo cell-cotransforming activity, which indicated that the c-Myc property of in vitro DNA binding was not essential for this activity. These mutants, however, were unable to transform established rat fibroblasts (Rat-1a cells) that were susceptible to transformation by wild-type c-Myc, although this lack of activity may not have been due to their inability to bind DNA.

  3. Functional expression of a human GDP-L-fucose transporter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Förster-Fromme, Karin; Schneider, Sarah; Sprenger, Georg A; Albermann, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the translocation of nucleotide-activated sugars from the cytosol across a membrane into the endoplasmatic reticulum or the Golgi apparatus which is an important step in the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids in eukaryotes. The heterologous expression of the recombinant and codon-adapted human GDP-L-fucose antiporter gene SLC35C1 (encoding an N-terminal OmpA-signal sequence) led to a functional transporter protein located in the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. The in vitro transport was investigated using inverted membrane vesicles. SLC35C1 is an antiporter specific for GDP-L-fucose and depending on the concomitant reverse transport of GMP. The recombinant transporter FucT1 exhibited an activity for the transport of (3)H-GDP-L-fucose with a Vmax of 8 pmol/min mg with a Km of 4 µM. The functional expression of SLC35C1 in GDP-L-fucose overproducing E. coli led to the export of GDP-L-fucose to the culture supernatant. The export of GDP-L-fucose by E. coli provides the opportunity for the engineering of a periplasmatic fucosylation reaction in recombinant bacterial cells.

  4. High-fidelity translation of recombinant human hemoglobin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weickert, M J; Apostol, I

    1998-05-01

    Coexpression of di-alpha-globin and beta-globin in Escherichia coli in the presence of exogenous heme yielded high levels of soluble, functional recombinant human hemoglobin (rHb1.1). High-level expression of rHb1.1 provides a good model for measuring mistranslation in heterologous proteins. rHb1.1 does not contain isoleucine; therefore, any isoleucine present could be attributed to mistranslation, most likely mistranslation of one or more of the 200 codons that differ from an isoleucine codon by 1 bp. Sensitive amino acid analysis of highly purified rHb1.1 typically revealed < or = 0.2 mol of isoleucine per mol of hemoglobin. This corresponds to a translation error rate of < or = 0.001, which is not different from typical translation error rates found for E. coli proteins. Two different expression systems that resulted in accumulation of globin proteins to levels equivalent to approximately 20% of the level of E. coli soluble proteins also resulted in equivalent translational fidelity.

  5. Pathogenic potential of Escherichia coli clinical strains from orthopedic implant infections towards human osteoblastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Crémet, Lise; Broquet, Alexis; Brulin, Bénédicte; Jacqueline, Cédric; Dauvergne, Sandie; Brion, Régis; Asehnoune, Karim; Corvec, Stéphane; Heymann, Dominique; Caroff, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the first causes of Gram-negative orthopedic implant infections (OII), but little is known about the pathogenicity of this species in such infections that are increasing due to the ageing of the population. We report how this pathogen interacts with human osteoblastic MG-63 cells in vitro, by comparing 20 OII E. coli strains to two Staphylococcus aureus and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. LDH release assay revealed that 6/20 (30%) OII E. coli induced MG-63 cell lysis whereas none of the four control strains was cytotoxic after 4 h of coculture. This high cytotoxicity was associated with hemolytic properties and linked to hlyA gene expression. We further showed by gentamicin protection assay and confocal microscopy that the non-cytotoxic E. coli were not able to invade MG-63 cells unlike S. aureus strains (internalization rate <0.01% for the non-cytotoxic E. coli versus 8.88 ± 2.31% and 4.60 ± 0.42% for both S. aureus). The non-cytotoxic E. coli also demonstrated low adherence rates (<7%), the most adherent E. coli eliciting higher IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the osteoblastic cells. Either highly cytotoxic or slightly invasive OII E. coli do not show the same infection strategies as S. aureus towards osteoblasts. PMID:26333570

  6. Escherichia albertii, a novel human enteropathogen, colonizes rat enterocytes and translocates to extra-intestinal sites.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Liberatore, Ana Maria A; Abe, Cecilia M; Souza, Rodrigo B de; Romão, Fabiano T; Sperandio, Vanessa; Koh, Ivan H; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death of children up to five years old in the developing countries. Among the etiological diarrheal agents are atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC), one of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes that affects children and adults, even in developed countries. Currently, genotypic and biochemical approaches have helped to demonstrate that some strains classified as aEPEC are actually E. albertii, a recently recognized human enteropathogen. Studies on particular strains are necessary to explore their virulence potential in order to further understand the underlying mechanisms of E. albertii infections. Here we demonstrated for the first time that infection of fragments of rat intestinal mucosa is a useful tool to study the initial steps of E. albertii colonization. We also observed that an E. albertii strain can translocate from the intestinal lumen to Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and liver in a rat model. Based on our finding of bacterial translocation, we investigated how E. albertii might cross the intestinal epithelium by performing infections of M-like cells in vitro to identify the potential in vivo translocation route. Altogether, our approaches allowed us to draft a general E. albertii infection route from the colonization till the bacterial spreading in vivo.

  7. High-Fidelity Translation of Recombinant Human Hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, Michael J.; Apostol, Izydor

    1998-01-01

    Coexpression of di-α-globin and β-globin in Escherichia coli in the presence of exogenous heme yielded high levels of soluble, functional recombinant human hemoglobin (rHb1.1). High-level expression of rHb1.1 provides a good model for measuring mistranslation in heterologous proteins. rHb1.1 does not contain isoleucine; therefore, any isoleucine present could be attributed to mistranslation, most likely mistranslation of one or more of the 200 codons that differ from an isoleucine codon by 1 bp. Sensitive amino acid analysis of highly purified rHb1.1 typically revealed ≤0.2 mol of isoleucine per mol of hemoglobin. This corresponds to a translation error rate of ≤0.001, which is not different from typical translation error rates found for E. coli proteins. Two different expression systems that resulted in accumulation of globin proteins to levels equivalent to ∼20% of the level of E. coli soluble proteins also resulted in equivalent translational fidelity. PMID:9572921

  8. Polycistronic expression of human platelet factor 4 with heparin-neutralizing activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yitao; Wang, Zhe; Wu, Wei; Fang, Zhenjiang; Huang, He

    2012-01-01

    Human platelet factor 4 (hPF4) was evaluated as a clinical alternative to protamine for heparin neutralization, a protector against radiation injury and an anti-neoplastic. To achieve high-level expression of hPF4, expression vectors pET-28a(+)-nf PF4 (n=4, 5, 6) containing n tandem repeats of PF4 were constructed and transformed into the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. A higher expression level, about 45% of the total proteins (TP), was obtained for E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET28a(+)-nf PF4 (n=4, 5, 6). The purified His-PF4 protein was further identified by cleavage with enterokinase and MS, and its heparin-neutralizing activity was determined by colony formation assay. This study represents a novel approach to large-scale production of PF4 in E. coli, one that might be applied to large-scale production of PF4 protein for possible clinical application. It also provides theoretical points for the expression and purification of other small-molecule peptides.

  9. Recognition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Virulence Determinants by Human Colostrum and Serum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Parissi-Crivelli, Joaquín M.; Girón, Jorge A.

    2000-01-01

    Human colostra and sera collected from Mexican mothers and their children at birth and 6 months thereafter were studied for the presence of antibodies against the bundle-forming pilus and several chromosomal virulence gene products (intimin and secreted proteins EspA and EspB) of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Among 21 colostrum samples studied, 76, 71.5, 57, and 47% of them contained immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies against EspA, intimin, EspB, and BfpA, respectively. Interestingly, there was a difference in IgG response to EPEC antigens between the sera from neonates and sera from the same children 6 months later. While the number of neonates reacting to Esps and intimin diminished when they reached 6 months of age, those reacting with BfpA increased from 9 to 71%. Intimin from an enterohemorrhagic E. coli strain was also recognized by most of the samples reacting with EPEC intimin. These data suggest that Bfp and Esps elicit an antibody response during the early days of life of neonates and support the value of breast-feeding in areas of the world where bacterial diarrheal infections are endemic. PMID:10878066

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  11. Intein-mediated one-step purification of Escherichia coli secreted human antibody fragments.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wan-Yi; Miller, Keith D.; Coolbaugh, Michael; Wood, David W.

    2011-02-25

    In this work, we apply self-cleaving affinity tag technology to several target proteins secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm, including two with disulfide bonds. The target proteins were genetically fused to a self-cleaving chitin-binding domain intein tag for purification via a chitin agarose affinity resin. By attaching the intein-tagged fusion genes to the PelB secretion leader sequence, the tagged target proteins were secreted to the periplasmic space and could be recovered in active form by simple osmotic shock. After chitin-affinity purification, the target proteins were released from the chitin-binding domain tag via intein self-cleaving. This was induced by a small change in pH from 8.5 to 6.5 at room temperature, allowing direct elution of the cleaved target protein from the chitin affinity resin. The target proteins include the E. coli maltose-binding protein and b-lactamase enzyme, as well as two human antibody fragments that contain disulfide bonds. In all cases, the target proteins were purified with good activity and yield, without the need for refolding. Overall, this work demonstrates the compatibility of the DI-CM intein with the PelB secretion system in E. coli, greatly expanding its potential to more complex proteins.

  12. Current pathogenic Escherichia coli foodborne outbreak cases and therapy development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Fang, Jia-You

    2017-08-01

    Food contamination by pathogenic microorganisms has been a serious public health problem and a cause of huge economic losses worldwide. Foodborne pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination, such as that with E. coli O157 and O104, is very common, even in developed countries. Bacterial contamination may occur during any of the steps in the farm-to-table continuum from environmental, animal, or human sources and cause foodborne illness. To understand the causes of the foodborne outbreaks by E. coli and food-contamination prevention measures, we collected and investigated the past 10 years' worldwide reports of foodborne E. coli contamination cases. In the first half of this review article, we introduce the infection and symptoms of five major foodborne diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli (STEC/EHEC), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the second half of this review article, we introduce the foodborne outbreak cases caused by E. coli in natural foods and food products. Finally, we discuss current developments that can be applied to control and prevent bacterial food contamination.

  13. Longitudinal Characterization of Escherichia coli in Healthy Captive Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Jonathan B.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Trent, Ava M.; Murphy, Tami; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of non-human primates (NHPs) are well known to harbor Escherichia coli, a known commensal of human beings and animals. While E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the mammalian gut, it also exists in a number of pathogenic forms or pathotypes, including those with predisposition for the GI tract as well as the urogenital tract. Diarrhea in captive NHPs has long been a problem in both zoo settings and research colonies, including the Como Zoo. It is an animal welfare concern, as well as a public health concern. E. coli has not been extensively studied; therefore, a study was performed during the summer of 2009 in collaboration with a zoo in Saint Paul, MN, which was previously experiencing an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea among their NHP collection. Fresh fecal samples were collected weekly from each member of the primate collection, between June and August of 2009, and E. coli were isolated. A total of 33 individuals were included in the study, representing eight species. E. coli isolates were examined for their genetic relatedness, phylogenetic relationships, plasmid replicon types, virulence gene profiles, and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. A number of isolates were identified containing virulence genes commonly found in several different E. coli pathotypes, and there was evidence of clonal transmission of isolates between animals and over time. Overall, the manifestation of chronic diarrhea in the Como Zoo primate collection is a complex problem whose solution will require regular screening for microbial agents and consideration of environmental causes. This study provides some insight toward the sharing of enteric bacteria between such animals. PMID:26664923

  14. Expression and purification of biologically active recombinant human paraoxonase 1 from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Tripathy, Rajan K; Aggarwal, Geetika; Pande, Abhay H

    2015-11-01

    Human PON1 (h-PON1) is a Ca(2+)-dependent serum enzyme and can hydrolyze (and inactivate) a wide range of substrates. It is a multifaceted enzyme and exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-atherogenic, anti-diabetic, anti-microbial, and organophosphate (OP)-detoxifying properties. Thus, h-PON1 is a strong candidate for the development of therapeutic intervention against these conditions in humans. Insufficient hydrolyzing activity of native h-PON1 against desirable substrate affirms the urgent need to develop improved variant(s) of h-PON1 having enhanced activity. Production of recombinant h-PON1 (rh-PON1) using an Escherichia coli expression system is a key to develop such variant(s). However, generation of rh-PON1 using E. coli expression system has been elusive until now because of the aggregation of over-expressed rh-PON1 protein in inactive form as inclusion bodies (IBs) in the bacterial cells. In this study, we have over-expressed rh-PON1(wt) and rh-PON1(H115W;R192K) proteins as IBs in E. coli, and refolded the inactive enzymes present in the IBs to their active form using in vitro refolding. The active enzymes were isolated from the refolding mixture by ion-exchange chromatography. The catalytic properties of the refolded enzymes were similar to their soluble counterparts. Our results show that the pure and the active variant of rh-PON1 enzyme having enhanced hydrolyzing activity can be produced in large quantities using E. coli expression system. This method can be used for the industrial scale production of rh-PON1 enzymes and will aid in developing h-PON1 as a therapeutic candidate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Escherichia coli O157:H7: Animal Reservoir and Sources of Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferens, Witold A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This review surveys the literature on carriage and transmission of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in the context of virulence factors and sampling/culture technique. EHEC of the O157:H7 serotype are worldwide zoonotic pathogens responsible for the majority of severe cases of human EHEC disease. EHEC O157:H7 strains are carried primarily by healthy cattle and other ruminants, but most of the bovine strains are not transmitted to people, and do not exhibit virulence factors associated with human disease. Prevalence of EHEC O157:H7 is probably underestimated. Carriage of EHEC O157:H7 by individual animals is typically short-lived, but pen and farm prevalence of specific isolates may extend for months or years and some carriers, designated as supershedders, may harbor high intestinal numbers of the pathogen for extended periods. The prevalence of EHEC O157:H7 in cattle peaks in the summer and is higher in postweaned calves and heifers than in younger and older animals. Virulent strains of EHEC O157:H7 are rarely harbored by pigs or chickens, but are found in turkeys. The bacteria rarely occur in wildlife with the exception of deer and are only sporadically carried by domestic animals and synanthropic rodents and birds. EHEC O157:H7 occur in amphibian, fish, and invertebrate carriers, and can colonize plant surfaces and tissues via attachment mechanisms different from those mediating intestinal attachment. Strains of EHEC O157:H7 exhibit high genetic variability but typically a small number of genetic types predominate in groups of cattle and a farm environment. Transmission to people occurs primarily via ingestion of inadequately processed contaminated food or water and less frequently through contact with manure, animals, or infected people. PMID:21117940

  16. Killing of an encapsulated strain of Escherichia coli by human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P W; Kroll, H P

    1983-01-01

    Changes in cell viability and in factors affecting metabolic integrity were examined after exposure of Escherichia coli LP1092 to human serum. Antibody-dependent classical pathway activity accounted for the rapid killing of strain LP1092 by complement. Removal of serum lysozyme by bentonite absorption or by neutralization with anti-human lysozyme immunoglobulin G resulted in a reduction in the rate of killing; optimal activity could be restored by the addition of physiological amounts of egg-white lysozyme. The pattern of 86Rb+ and alkaline phosphatase release obtained after serum treatment did not support the view that complement simultaneously disrupts cytoplasmic and outer membrane integrity. Macromolecular synthesis was affected late in the reaction sequence; complete inhibition of precursor incorporation into RNA, DNA, and protein occurred only after almost total loss of bacterial colony-forming ability. Addition of chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, to the bactericidal system resulted in a marked reduction in the rate of serum killing. Killing was completely inhibited by an inhibitor (KCN) and an uncoupler (2,4-dinitrophenol) of oxidative phosphorylation. Exposure of LP1092 cells to serum was followed by a rapid and large increase in intracellular ATP levels; ATP synthesis did not occur when bacteria were exposed to dialyzed serum, which killed LP1092 cells at a much reduced rate. Addition of glucose or serum ultrafiltrate to dialyzed serum restored optimal bactericidal activity. We suggest that optimal killing of gram-negative bacteria is an energy-dependent process requiring an input of bacterially generated ATP. PMID:6185430

  17. [Possible role of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in the etiology of infectious vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Polanco, Nina; Manzi, Lorna; Carmona, Oswaldo

    2012-03-01

    Vaginitis is a common gynecologic disorder. It is due to several causes, some even unknown. Bacteroides fragilis is the most important anaerobe in clinical bacteriology, some strains of this group are notable for being enterotoxigenic and they have been associated with intestinal and extraintestinal syndromes. They have recently been isolated from patients with vagini