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Sample records for human erythrocyte surface

  1. Atomic force microscopic observation of surface-supported human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mon-Shu; Kuo, Feng-Jia; Lee, Yu-Siang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2007-07-01

    The nanomechanical characteristics of the membrane cytoskeleton of human erythrocytes were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The self-assembly, fine structure, cell diameter, thickness, and reticulate cytoskeleton of erythrocytes on the mica surface were investigated. The adhesive forces that correspond to the membrane elasticity of various parts of the erythrocyte membrane surface were measured directly by AFM to be 0.64±0.14nN for cell indentation, 4.2±0.7nN for cell hump, and 11.5nN for side waist, respectively. The deformation of erythrocytes was discussed. Standing waves on the membrane that were set up by increased AFM amplitude were observed. The propagating velocity on the erythrocyte membrane was estimated to be ˜2.02×10-2m/s. Liquid physiological conditions were considered throughout.

  2. Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 Complexes Mediate Merozoite Binding to Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Clara S; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Epp, Christian; Bujard, Hermann; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Czabotar, Peter E; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-04-01

    Successful invasion of human erythrocytes byPlasmodium falciparummerozoites is required for infection of the host and parasite survival. The early stages of invasion are mediated via merozoite surface proteins that interact with human erythrocytes. The nature of these interactions are currently not well understood, but it is known that merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is critical for successful erythrocyte invasion. Here we show that the peripheral merozoite surface proteins MSP3, MSP6, MSPDBL1, MSPDBL2, and MSP7 bind directly to MSP1, but independently of each other, to form multiple forms of the MSP1 complex on the parasite surface. These complexes have overlapping functions that interact directly with human erythrocytes. We also show that targeting the p83 fragment of MSP1 using inhibitory antibodies inhibits all forms of MSP1 complexes and disrupts parasite growthin vitro.

  3. Human erythrocyte antigens. Regulation of expression of a novel erythrocyte surface antigen by the inhibitor Lutheran In(Lu) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Telen, M J; Eisenbarth, G S; Haynes, B F

    1983-01-01

    Our study describes a novel human erythrocyte protein antigen, the expression of which is regulated by the rare Lutheran inhibitor In(Lu) gene. We have produced a monoclonal antibody (A3D8) that bound strongly to erythrocytes from subjects with Lutheran phenotypes Lu(a+b+), Lu(a+b-), and Lu(a-b+) but bound negligibly to erythrocytes from subjects with the dominant form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype, reflecting inheritance of the In(Lu) gene. Importantly, erythrocytes from an individual with the recessive form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype (i.e., absence of the In(Lu) gene and absence of genes encoding for Lutheran antigens) showed reactivity with A3D8 antibody comparable to that seen with Lu(a+) or Lu(b+) erythrocytes. A3D8 antigen activity was also found on all leukocytes and in serum and plasma; this activity also appeared to be regulated by the In(Lu) gene in serum, plasma, and on a subset of leukocytes. Thus, we have identified a human erythrocyte protein whose expression is modified by the In(Lu) gene. This knowledge that such an antigen exists on erythrocytes and in normal plasma should allow further studies into the molecular genetics of the In(Lu) gene and into the functional and structural significance of the A3D8 antigen. PMID:6863545

  4. Surface properties of Entamoeba: increased rates of human erythrocyte phagocytosis in pathogenic strains

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The assertion that ingestion of human erythrocytes is restricted to invasive strains of Entamoeba histolytica has not been evaluated previously by comparative studies. In this report we describe the in vitro ingestion of human erythrocytes by pathogenic and nonpathogenic Entamoeba. Microscopic evaluation of erythrophagocytosis by eight different Entamoeba grown in culture revealed that strains of E. histolytica isolated from cases of human dysentery show a much higher rate of erythrocyte ingestion than nonpathogenic strains. However, all strains are able to phagocytize erythrocytes. The extremely high rate of phagocytic activity shown by pathogenic E. histolytica could be one of the properties related to the pathogenicity of this parasitic protozoan. PMID:722237

  5. Appearance and distribution of surface proteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. An electron microscope and immunochemical labeling study.

    PubMed

    Shotton, D; Thompson, K; Wofsy, L; Branton, D

    1978-02-01

    We have used freeze-etching, before and after immunoferritin labeling, to visualize spectrin molecules and other surface proteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. After intramembrane particle aggregation was induced, spectrin molecules, identified by labeling with ferritin-conjugated antispectrin, were clustered on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane in patches directly underlying the particle clusters. This labeling pattern confirms the involvement of spectrin in such particle aggregates, as previously inferred from indirect evidence. Ferritin-conjugated antihapten molecules, directed against external and cytoplasmic surface proteins of the erythrocyte membrane which had been covalently labeled nonspecifically with the hapten p-diazoniumphenyl-beta-D-lactoside, were similarly found in direct association with such intramembrane particle aggregates. This indicates that when spectrin and the intramembrane particles are aggregated, all the major proteins of the erythrocyte membrane are constrained to coaggregate with them. Although giving no direct information concerning the freedom of translational movement of proteins in the unperturbed erythrocyte membrane, these experiments suggest that a close dynamic association may exist between the integral and peripheral protein components of the membrane, such that immobilization of one component can restrict the lateral mobility of others.

  6. Interaction of Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan-rich Antigen PvTRAg38 with Band 3 on Human Erythrocyte Surface Facilitates Parasite Growth.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Choudhary, Vandana; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K; Rathore, Sumit; Sharma, Yagya D

    2015-08-14

    Plasmodium tryptophan-rich proteins are involved in host-parasite interaction and thus potential drug/vaccine targets. Recently, we have described several P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs), including merozoite expressed PvTRAg38, from this noncultivable human malaria parasite. PvTRAg38 is highly immunogenic in humans and binds to host erythrocytes, and this binding is inhibited by the patient sera. This binding is also affected if host erythrocytes were pretreated with chymotrypsin. Here, Band 3 has been identified as the chymotrypsin-sensitive erythrocyte receptor for this parasite protein. Interaction of PvTRAg38 with Band 3 has been mapped to its three different ectodomains (loops 1, 3, and 6) exposed at the surface of the erythrocyte. The binding region of PvTRAg38 to Band3 has been mapped to its sequence, KWVQWKNDKIRSWLSSEW, present at amino acid positions 197-214. The recombinant PvTRAg38 was able to inhibit the parasite growth in in vitro Plasmodium falciparum culture probably by competing with the ligand(s) of this heterologous parasite for the erythrocyte Band 3 receptor. In conclusion, the host-parasite interaction at the molecular level is much more complicated than known so far and should be considered during the development of anti-malarial therapeutics.

  7. Falciparum Malaria-Infected Erythrocytes Specifically Bind to Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udeinya, Iroka J.; Schmidt, John A.; Aikawa, Masamichi; Miller, Louis H.; Green, Ira

    1981-07-01

    Erythrocytes infected with the late stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum became attached to a subpopulation of cultured human endothelial cells by knoblike protrusions on the surface of the infected erythrocytes. Infected erythrocytes did not bind to cultured fibroblasts; uninfected erythrocytes did not bind to either endothelial cells or fibroblasts. The results suggest a specific receptor-ligand interaction between endothelial cells and a component, or components, in the knobs of the infected erythrocytes.

  8. [Comparison of photodynamic effect with respect to human and rabbit erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Galebskaia, L V; Solovtsova, I L; Solov'eva, M A; Zammoeva, D B; Kuz'menkov, A N

    2011-01-01

    Parameters of photoinduced lysis are studied for human and rabbit erythrocytes (photosensibilizer--Radachlorin, the light source--Shuttle HeNe lazer, lambda = 633 nm). The higher sensitivity to irradiation is revealed for rabbit erythrocytes. Treatment of erythrocytes with trypsin showed the surface proteins in human cells to produce a protective effect. Trypsynization of rabbit erythrocytes produced the opposite action--the rate of photohemolysis increased. Results of the study indicate the differences in sensitivity to the photoinduced lysis of erythrocytes of different species and participation of erythrocytes proteins in the effect of photohemolysis.

  9. [Kinetics of Cu crossing human erythrocyte membrane].

    PubMed

    Dun, Zhu Ci Ren

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate various factors influencing the proceduction of Cu(II) crossing human erythrocyte membrane, including concentration of Cu²⁺, pH value of the medium, temperature and time of incubation, and to derive kinetic equation of Cu(II) crossing human erythrocyte membrane. Suspension red blood cells were incubated by Cu²⁺, then content of Cu²⁺ crossed human erythrocyte membrane was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry under various conditions after digestion. The results showed that content of Cu²⁺ crossed human erythrocyte membrane increased with the increase of extracellular Cu²⁺ and enhancement of incubation temperature, and the content of Cu²⁺ crossed human erythrocyte membrane showed a increasing tendency when pH reached to 6.2-7.4, and to maximum at pH 7.4, then gradually decreased at range of pH 7.4-9.2. It is concluded that the Cu²⁺ crossing human erythrocyte has been confirmed to be the first order kinetics characteristics within 120 min, and the linear equation is 10³ × Y = 0.0497t +6.5992.

  10. Evidence for differences in erythrocyte surface receptors for the malarial parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Human erythrocytes lacking various blood group determinants were susceptible to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum including Duffy- negative erythrocytes that are refractory to invasion by Plasmodium knowlesi. Erythrocytes treated with trypsin or neuraminidase had reduced susceptibility of P. falciparum and normal susceptibility to P. knowlesi. Chymotrypsin treatment (0.1 mg/ml) blocked invasion only by P. knowlesi. The differential effect of enzymatic cleavage of determinats from the erythrocyte surface on invasion by these parasites suggests that P. falciparum and P. knowlesi interact with different determinants on the erythrocyte surface. PMID:327014

  11. [Lysophosphatidic acid and human erythrocyte aggregation].

    PubMed

    Sheremet'ev, Iu A; Popovicheva, A N; Levin, G Ia

    2014-01-01

    The effects of lysophosphatidic acid on the morphology and aggregation of human erythrocytes has been studied. Morphology of erythrocytes and their aggregates were studied by light microscopy. It has been shown that lysophosphatidic acid changes the shape of red blood cells: diskocyte become echinocytes. Aggregation of red blood cells (rouleaux) was significantly reduced in autoplasma. At the same time there is a strong aggregation of echinocytes. This was accompanied by the formation of microvesicles. Adding normal plasma to echinocytes restores shape and aggregation of red blood cells consisting of "rouleaux". A possible mechanism of action of lysophosphatidic acid on erythrocytes is discussed.

  12. Homeostasis of Extracellular ATP in Human Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Montalbetti, Nicolas; Leal Denis, Maria F.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Kobatake, Eiry; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the intra- and extracellular processes governing the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in human erythrocytes stimulated with agents that increase cAMP. Using the luciferin-luciferase reaction in off-line luminometry we found both direct adenylyl cyclase activation by forskolin and indirect activation through β-adrenergic stimulation with isoproterenol-enhanced [ATP]e in a concentration-dependent manner. A mixture (3V) containing a combination of these agents and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor papaverine activated ATP release, leading to a 3-fold increase in [ATP]e, and caused increases in cAMP concentration (3-fold for forskolin + papaverine, and 10-fold for 3V). The pannexin 1 inhibitor carbenoxolone and a pannexin 1 blocking peptide (10Panx1) decreased [ATP]e by 75–84%. The residual efflux of ATP resulted from unavoidable mechanical perturbations stimulating a novel, carbenoxolone-insensitive pathway. In real-time luminometry experiments using soluble luciferase, addition of 3V led to an acute increase in [ATP]e to a constant value of ∼1 pmol × (106 cells)−1. A similar treatment using a surface attached luciferase (proA-luc) triggered a rapid accumulation of surface ATP levels to a peak concentration of 2.4 pmol × (106 cells)−1, followed by a slower exponential decay (t½ = 3.7 min) to a constant value of 1.3 pmol × (106 cells)−1. Both for soluble luciferase and proA-luc, ATP efflux was fully blocked by carbenoxolone, pointing to a 3V-induced mechanism of ATP release mediated by pannexin 1. Ecto-ATPase activity was extremely low (∼28 fmol × (106 cells min)−1), but nevertheless physiologically relevant considering the high density of erythrocytes in human blood. PMID:21921036

  13. Mechanisms of Human Erythrocytic Bioactivation of Nitrite*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Wajih, Nadeem; Liu, Xiaohua; Basu, Swati; Janes, John; Marvel, Madison; Keggi, Christian; Helms, Christine C.; Lee, Amber N.; Belanger, Andrea M.; Diz, Debra I.; Laurienti, Paul J.; Caudell, David L.; Wang, Jun; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite signaling likely occurs through its reduction to nitric oxide (NO). Several reports support a role of erythrocytes and hemoglobin in nitrite reduction, but this remains controversial, and alternative reductive pathways have been proposed. In this work we determined whether the primary human erythrocytic nitrite reductase is hemoglobin as opposed to other erythrocytic proteins that have been suggested to be the major source of nitrite reduction. We employed several different assays to determine NO production from nitrite in erythrocytes including electron paramagnetic resonance detection of nitrosyl hemoglobin, chemiluminescent detection of NO, and inhibition of platelet activation and aggregation. Our studies show that NO is formed by red blood cells and inhibits platelet activation. Nitric oxide formation and signaling can be recapitulated with isolated deoxyhemoglobin. Importantly, there is limited NO production from erythrocytic xanthine oxidoreductase and nitric-oxide synthase. Under certain conditions we find dorzolamide (an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase) results in diminished nitrite bioactivation, but the role of carbonic anhydrase is abrogated when physiological concentrations of CO2 are present. Importantly, carbon monoxide, which inhibits hemoglobin function as a nitrite reductase, abolishes nitrite bioactivation. Overall our data suggest that deoxyhemoglobin is the primary erythrocytic nitrite reductase operating under physiological conditions and accounts for nitrite-mediated NO signaling in blood. PMID:25471374

  14. Diffusion of glycophorin A in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Giger, Katie; Habib, Ibrahim; Ritchie, Ken; Low, Philip S

    2016-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that glycophorin A (GPA) interacts with band 3 in human erythrocyte membranes including: i) the existence of an epitope shared between band 3 and GPA in the Wright b blood group antigen, ii) the fact that antibodies to GPA inhibit the diffusion of band 3, iii) the observation that expression of GPA facilitates trafficking of band 3 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, and iv) the observation that GPA is diminished in band 3 null erythrocytes. Surprisingly, there is also evidence that GPA does not interact with band 3, including data showing that: i) band 3 diffusion increases upon erythrocyte deoxygenation whereas GPA diffusion does not, ii) band 3 diffusion is greatly restricted in erythrocytes containing the Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis mutation whereas GPA diffusion is not, and iii) most anti-GPA or anti-band 3 antibodies do not co-immunoprecipitate both proteins. To try to resolve these apparently conflicting observations, we have selectively labeled band 3 and GPA with fluorescent quantum dots in intact erythrocytes and followed their diffusion by single particle tracking. We report here that band 3 and GPA display somewhat similar macroscopic and microscopic diffusion coefficients in unmodified cells, however perturbations of band 3 diffusion do not cause perturbations of GPA diffusion. Taken together the collective data to date suggest that while weak interactions between GPA and band 3 undoubtedly exist, GPA and band 3 must have separate interactions in the membrane that control their lateral mobility.

  15. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  16. Metabolism of acetylcholine in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to examine the possible role of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase in the maintenance of membrane phospholipid content and membrane fluidity, experiments were performed to monitor the activity of the enzyme and follow the fate of one of its hydrolytic products, choline. Intact human erythrocytes were incubated with acetylcholine (choline methyl-{sup 14}C). The incubation resulted in the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to acetate and choline; the reaction was catalyzed by membrane acetylcholinesterase. The studies demonstrate the further metabolism of choline. Experiments were carried out to determine rate of hydrolysis of acetylcholine, uptake of choline, identification of intracellular metabolites of choline, and identification of radiolabeled membrane components. Erythrocytes at a 25% hematocrit were incubated in an isoosmotic bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4, containing glucose, adenosine, streptomycin and penicillin with 0.3 {mu}Ci of acetylcholine (choline methyl-{sup 14}C), for 24 hours. Aliquots of the erythrocyte suspension were taken throughout for analysis. Erythrocytes were washed free of excess substrate, lysed, and the hemolysate was extracted for choline and its metabolites. Blank samples containing incubation buffer and radiolabeled acetylcholine only, and erythrocyte hemolysate extracts were analyzed for choline content, the difference between blank samples and hemolysate extracts was the amount of choline originating from acetylcholine and attributable to acetylcholinesterase activity. The conversion of choline to {sup 14}C-betaine is noted after several minutes of incubation; at 30 minutes, more than 80% of {sup 14}C-choline is taken up and after several hours, detectable levels of radiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine were present in the hemolysate extract.

  17. Transformation of human erythrocyte shape by endotoxic lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Warren, J R; Harris, A S; Wallas, C H

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were observed to undergo a discocyte to echinocyte to spheroechinocyte shape transformation during brief incubation with endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. It was concluded that lipopolysaccharide-membrane interactions alter the curvature of erythrocyte membranes.

  18. Transformation of Human Erythrocyte Shape by Endotoxic Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Warren, John R.; Harris, Alan S.; Wallas, Charles H.

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were observed to undergo a discocyte to echinocyte to spheroechinocyte shape transformation during brief incubation with endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. It was concluded that lipopolysaccharide-membrane interactions alter the curvature of erythrocyte membranes. Images PMID:6822423

  19. Stimulating Effect of Sclareol on Suicidal Death of Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Signoretto, Elena; Laufer, Stefan A; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The diterpene alcohol Sclareol has been proposed for the treatment of malignancy. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, a suicidal cell death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Cellular mechanisms involved in the triggering of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i), oxidative stress, ceramide, p38 kinase and casein kinase 1α. The present study explored, whether Sclareol induces eryptosis and, if so, shed light on the mechanisms involved. Phosphatidylserine abundance at the erythrocyte surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, abundance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA)-dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface utilizing specific antibodies. Hemolysis was estimated from haemoglobin concentration in the supernatant. A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to Sclareol (≥ 50 µM) significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells without significantly modifying the average forward scatter, DCF-fluorescence or ceramide abundance. Sclareol (≥ 50 µM) further triggered hemolysis. Sclareol (100 µM) significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence, but the effect of Sclareol on annexin-V-binding was not significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Instead, the effect of Sclareol on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted in the presence of p38 kinase inhibitor skepinone (2 µM) and in the presence of casein kinase 1α inhibitor D4476 (10 µM). Sclareol triggers phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part due to activation of p38 kinase and casein kinase 1α. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Lead transport and binding by human erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simons, T J

    1993-05-01

    Transport and binding of Pb2+ by human erythrocytes were examined for cell Pb contents in the 1-10 microM range, using the 203Pb isotope. Pb2+ crosses the erythrocyte membrane by the anion exchanger, and can also leave erythrocytes by a vanadate-sensitive pathway, identified with the Ca2+ pump. However, Pb2+ exit is very much less than expected from earlier experiments with resealed erythrocyte ghosts [Simons TJB (1988) J Physiol (Lond) 405:105-113] and the distribution of Pb2+ across the erythrocyte membrane is close to equilibrium. The high ratio of erythrocyte to plasma Pb seen in vivo appears to be due to the presence of a labile Pb(2+)-binding component present in erythrocyte cytoplasm.

  1. Comparative studies on osmosis based encapsulation of sodium diclofenac in porcine and outdated human erythrocyte ghosts.

    PubMed

    Bukara, Katarina; Drvenica, Ivana; Ilić, Vesna; Stančić, Ana; Mišić, Danijela; Vasić, Borislav; Gajić, Radoš; Vučetić, Dušan; Kiekens, Filip; Bugarski, Branko

    2016-12-20

    The objective of our study was to develop controlled drug delivery system based on erythrocyte ghosts for amphiphilic compound sodium diclofenac considering the differences between erythrocytes derived from two readily available materials - porcine slaughterhouse and outdated transfusion human blood. Starting erythrocytes, empty erythrocyte ghosts and diclofenac loaded ghosts were compared in terms of the encapsulation efficiency, drug releasing profiles, size distribution, surface charge, conductivity, surface roughness and morphology. The encapsulation of sodium diclofenac was performed by an osmosis based process - gradual hemolysis. During this process sodium diclofenac exerted mild and delayed antihemolytic effect and increased potassium efflux in porcine but not in outdated human erythrocytes. FTIR spectra revealed lack of any membrane lipid disorder and chemical reaction with sodium diclofenac in encapsulated ghosts. Outdated human erythrocyte ghosts with detected nanoscale damages and reduced ability to shrink had encapsulation efficiency of only 8%. On the other hand, porcine erythrocyte ghosts had encapsulation efficiency of 37% and relatively slow drug release rate. More preserved structure and functional properties of porcine erythrocytes related to their superior encapsulation and release performances, define them as more appropriate for the usage in sodium diclofenac encapsulation process.

  2. Biorheological action of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae on human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de León, Patricia Ponce; Del Balzo, Gonzalo; Riquelme, Bibiana

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that A. lumbricoides extracts capture sialic acid (SA) from human red blood cells (RBC). The aim of this work was to study hemorheological alterations in vitro caused by parasite larvae. The biorheological action of three larva concentrates of first and second larval stage on group O erythrocytes was analyzed by incubating the erythrocyte packed together with an equal volume of larvae (treated RBC) and PBS (control RBC). Distribution and parameters of aggregation (digital image analysis), aggregation kinetics (erythroaggregameter), and viscoelasticity (erythrodeformeter) were measured. The digital image analysis showed that all the larvae diminished the isolated cells percentage and increased the size of the formed aggregates. The aggregate formation velocity was lower in the treated than in the control. The deformability index (ID) values of treated RBC did not present variations with respect to those of the control, but a decrease in the erythrocyte elastic modulus (μ(m)) and membrane surface viscosity (η(m)) values was observed, indicating that the larvae not only induced a diminution in the membrane surface viscosity of RBC but also altered the dynamic viscoelasticity of the membrane. Experiments carried out in vitro support the conclusion that the contact between larvae and RBC produces hemorheological alterations.

  3. Antioxidant effect of lutein towards phospholipid hydroperoxidation in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Hatade, Keijiro; Sookwong, Phumon; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2009-11-01

    Peroxidised phospholipid-mediated cytotoxity is involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases; for example, phospholipid hydroperoxides (PLOOH) are abnormally increased in erythrocytes of dementia patients. Dietary carotenoids (especially xanthophylls, polar carotenoids such as lutein) have gained attention as potent inhibitors against erythrocyte phospholipid hydroperoxidation, thereby making them plausible candidates for preventing diseases (i.e. dementia). To evaluate these points, we investigated whether orally administered lutein is distributed to human erythrocytes, and inhibits erythrocyte PLOOH formation. Six healthy subjects took one capsule of food-grade lutein (9.67 mg lutein per capsule) once per d for 4 weeks. Before and during the supplementation period, carotenoids and PLOOH in erythrocytes and plasma were determined by our developed HPLC technique. The administered lutein was incorporated into human erythrocytes, and erythrocyte PLOOH level decreased after the ingestion for 2 and 4 weeks. The antioxidative effect of lutein was confirmed on erythrocyte membranes, but not in plasma. These results suggest that lutein has the potential to act as an important antioxidant molecule in erythrocytes, and it thereby may contribute to the prevention of dementia. Therefore future biological and clinical studies will be required to evaluate the efficacy as well as safety of lutein in models of dementia with a realistic prospect of its use in human therapy.

  4. [AGGREGATION OF METABOLICALLY DEPLETED HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES].

    PubMed

    Sheremet'ev, Yu A; Popovicheva, A N; Rogozin, M M; Levin, G Ya

    2016-01-01

    An aggregation of erythrocytes in autologous plasma after blood storage for 14 days at 4 °C was studied using photometry and light microscopy. The decrease of ATP content, the formation of echinocytes and spheroechinocytes, the decrease of rouleaux form of erythrocyte aggregation were observed during the storage. On the other hand the aggregates of echinocytes were formed in the stored blood. The addition of plasma from the fresh blood didn't restore the normal discocytic shape and aggregation of erythrocytes in the stored blood. The possible mechanisms of erythrocytes and echinocytes aggregation are discussed.

  5. Accumulation of Paprika Carotenoids in Human Plasma and Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Azusa; Ichihara, Takashi; Takaha, Takeshi; Kuriki, Takashi; Nihei, Hideko; Kawamoto, Kazuhisa; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Maoka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation (incorporation) of paprika carotenoid in human plasma and erythrocytes was investigated. A paprika carotenoid supplement (14 mg/day) was ingested for 4 weeks by 5 young healthy volunteers (3 men and 2 women). After 2 weeks of carotenoid ingestion, the carotenoid levels in plasma and erythrocytes increased by 1.2-fold and 2.2-fold, respectively. Characteristic carotenoids found in paprika (capsanthin, cucurbitaxanthin A, and cryptocapsin) were detected in both plasma and erythrocytes. An oxidative metabolite of capsanthin (capsanthone) was also found in both plasma and erythrocytes.

  6. Identification of Functional Domains of Human Erythrocyte Spectrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Jon S.; Speicher, David W.; Knowles, William J.; Hsu, C. Jennifer; Marchesi, Vincent T.

    1980-11-01

    Isolated human erythrocyte spectrin is a dimer of two unique polypeptide chains. The dimer (α β) undergoes reversible salt- and temperature-dependent association to form (α β)2 tetramers. Spectrin also binds with high affinity to a protein receptor on the cytoplasmic surface of erythrocyte membrane vesicles. By cleavage of spectrin at its cysteine residues with 2-nitro-5-thiocyanobenzoic acid, a 50,000-dalton peptide fragment has been isolated which inhibits the binding of spectrin to erythrocyte membrane vesicles. This peptide arises from a terminal region of the β chain. An 80,000-dalton peptide generated by restricted trypsin digestion binds preferentially to dimeric spectrin. This peptide arises from a terminal portion of the α chain. Multiple peptides involved in noncovalent associations between the chains have also been identified. These associations indicate that the two subunits of spectrin are aligned parallel to one another and that the tetramer formation site and the high-affinity membrane binding site are in close proximity to one another.

  7. In vitro studies of graphene oxide reinforced hydroxyapatite nanobiocomposite on human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, G.; Rohith Vinod, K.; Venkatesan, Balaji; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Balakumar, S.

    2017-05-01

    We report the interaction of graphene oxide reinforced hydroxyapatite (GO-HAp) nanocomposites with human erythrocytes. The hemocompatibility of GO-HAp found to be superior as compared to the pristine graphene oxide. It is found that the HAp nanoparticles on GO decrease the disruption of erythrocytes by minimizing the exposure of oxygen groups to phosphatidylcholine surface of erythrocyte membrane and it enhances hemocompatibility. Further, it is also found that the graphene oxide reinforced HAp nanobiocomposite enhances the metabolic activity of osteoblasts-like cells by promoting cell proliferation.

  8. Antioxidant effect of astaxanthin on phospholipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Miyazawa, Taiki; Carpentero Burdeos, Gregor; Kimura, Fumiko; Satoh, Akira; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2011-06-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxides (PLOOH) accumulate abnormally in the erythrocytes of dementia patients, and dietary xanthophylls (polar carotenoids such as astaxanthin) are hypothesised to prevent the accumulation. In the present study, we conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled human trial to assess the efficacy of 12-week astaxanthin supplementation (6 or 12 mg/d) on both astaxanthin and PLOOH levels in the erythrocytes of thirty middle-aged and senior subjects. After 12 weeks of treatment, erythrocyte astaxanthin concentrations were higher in both the 6 and 12 mg astaxanthin groups than in the placebo group. In contrast, erythrocyte PLOOH concentrations were lower in the astaxanthin groups than in the placebo group. In the plasma, somewhat lower PLOOH levels were found after astaxanthin treatment. These results suggest that astaxanthin supplementation results in improved erythrocyte antioxidant status and decreased PLOOH levels, which may contribute to the prevention of dementia.

  9. Preclinical trials of human erythrocyte superoxide dismutase injection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C; Fang, Y; Jiang, D; Yang, S; Lu, X; Sui, J; Li, P; Ren, J

    2000-07-01

    To assess the quality of human erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) injection reaching the official standard for its clinical uses. Human erythrocyte SOD injection prepared by McCord-Fridovich's method without column chromatography but with some modifications was used in preclinical trials, to observe the general pharmacology and pharmacodynamics of the product. The quality of human erythrocyte SOD injection conformed to the official standard of a biological product, which was found to be non-toxic and did not have any effects on the central and autonomic nervous systems as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The efficacy of anti-inflammation and promotion of immuno-regulation especially on carrageenan and adjuvant-induced polyarthritis were shown in animals. Human erythrocyte SOD injection is appropriate for prophylactic and therapeutic uses in clinical trials.

  10. Recognition and invasion of human erythrocytes by malarial parasites: contribution of sialoglycoproteins to attachment and host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.J.; Blankenberg, T.; Sensabaugh, G.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1984-05-01

    The receptivity of human erythrocytes to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites can be decreased by neuraminidase or trypsin treatment, an observation that supports a role for the erythrocyte sialoglycoproteins (glycophorins) in invasion. We have found that ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein (AGP), added to in vitro cultures, can restore invasion of enzyme-treated human erythrocytes. AGP is structurally different from the glycophorins although it does carry 12% sialic acid. Its ability to restore receptivity to desialylated cells is dependent on its sialic acid complement, its concentration, and its binding to the erythrocyte surface. We present evidence that AGP forms a bridge between the merozoite and the enzyme-treated erythrocyte that allows the stronger and more complex interactions of invasion to proceed. We suggest that the glycophorins play the same role on the surface of the intact erythrocyte. 31 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Recognition and invasion of human erythrocytes by malarial parasites: contribution of sialoglycoproteins to attachment and host specificity

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The receptivity of human erythrocytes to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites can be decreased by neuraminidase or trypsin treatment, an observation that supports a role for the erythrocyte sialoglycoproteins (glycophorins) in invasion. We have found that alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), added to in vitro cultures, can restore invasion of enzyme-treated human erythrocytes. AGP is structurally different from the glycophorins although it does carry 12% sialic acid. Its ability to restore receptivity to desialylated cells is dependent on its sialic acid complement, its concentration, and its binding to the erythrocyte surface. We present evidence that AGP forms a bridge between the merozoite and the enzyme-treated erythrocyte that allows the stronger and more complex interactions of invasion to proceed. We suggest that the glycophorins play the same role on the surface of the intact erythrocyte. PMID:6373782

  12. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  13. Enzymatic cleavage of cell surface proteins of pig and cow erythrocytes and its effect on concanavalin-mediated agglutinability.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Savita; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2014-10-01

    Study was carried out to understand and compare architecture of the proteins of erythrocyte cell surface of some mammals viz., Homo sapiens (human), Sus scorfa domestica (pig) and Bos taurus domestica (cow). In this study, we investigated the action of proteinases viz., trypsin and chymotrypsin and neuraminidase on the erythrocyte surface proteins and erythrocyte agglutination tendency with a lectin (concanavalin A). The electrophoretic pattern of membrane proteins and glycophorins (analyzed by SDS-PAGE and visualized by Coomassie brilliant blue and periodic acid-schiff stains, respectively) and concanavalin A (Con A) agglutinability revealed that: (i) There were variations in the number and molecular weights of glycophorins in human, pig and cow, (ii) trypsin action on pig and cow erythrocyte membrane proteins was similar, unlike human, (iii) glycophorins degradation by trypsin and chymotrypsin was not similar in pig, as compared to that of human and cow, (iv) erythrocytes agglutination with Con A was significantly different due to differences in membrane composition and alterations in the surface proteins after enzyme treatment, (v) a direct correlation was found between degradation of glycophorins and Con A agglutinability, and (vi) removal of erythrocyte surface sialic acids by neuraminidase specifically indicated an increase in Con A agglutinability of pig and cow erythrocytes, similar to human.

  14. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface antigen 3 (MSP3) protein peptides that bind specifically to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis E.; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramses; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Receptor–ligand interactions between synthetic peptides and normal human erythrocytes were studied to determine Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) FC27 strain regions that specifically bind to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Three MSP-3 protein high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified; their binding to erythrocytes became saturable, had nanomolar affinity constants, and became sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and trypsin but were resistant to chymotrypsin treatment. All of them specifically recognized 45-, 55-, and 72-kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. They all presented α-helix structural elements. All HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by ~55%–85%, suggesting that MSP-3 protein’s role in the invasion process probably functions by using mechanisms similar to those described for other MSP family antigens. PMID:15987906

  15. Human Erythrocytes Selectively Bind and Enrich Infectious HIV-1 Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Zoltan; Brown, Bruce K.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Peachman, Kristina K.; Matyas, Gary R.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Rao, Mangala; Alving, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Although CD4(+) cells represent the major target for HIV infection in blood, claims of complement-independent binding of HIV-1 to erythrocytes and the possible role of Duffy blood group antigen, have generated controversy. To examine the question of binding to erythrocytes, HIV-1 was incubated in vitro with erythrocytes from 30 healthy leukapheresis donors, and binding was determined by p24 analysis and adsorption of HIV-1 with reduction of infectivity for CD4(+) target cells. All of the cells, regardless of blood group type, bound HIV-1 p24. A typical preparation of erythrocytes bound <2.4% of the added p24, but erythrocytes selectively removed essentially all of the viral infectivity as determined by decreased infection of CD4(+) target cells; however, cell-associated HIV-1 was approximately 100-fold more efficient, via trans infection, than unadsorbed virus for infection of CD4(+) cells. All of the bound HIV-1 p24 was released by treatment of the cells with EDTA, and binding was optimized by adding Ca2+ and Mg2+ during the washing of erythrocytes containing bound HIV-1. Although the small number of contaminating leukocytes in the erythrocyte preparation also bound HIV-1 p24, there was no significant binding to CD4, and it thus appears that the binding occurred on leukocytes at non-CD4 sites. Furthermore, binding occurred to erythrocyte ghosts from which contaminating leukocytes had been previously removed. The results demonstrate that erythrocytes incubated in vitro with HIV-1 differentially adsorb all of the infectious HIV-1 virions (as opposed to non-infectious or degraded virions) in the absence of complement and independent of blood group, and binding is dependent on divalent cations. By analogy with HIV-1 bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic cells, erythrocyte-bound HIV-1 might comprise an important surface reservoir for trans infection of permissive cells. PMID:20011536

  16. Interaction of bilirubin with human erythrocyte membranes. Bilirubin binding to neuraminidase- and phospholipase-treated membranes.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Aono, S; Semba, R; Kashiwamata, S

    1987-11-15

    Saturable bilirubin binding to human erythrocyte membranes was measured before and after digestion with neuraminidase and phospholipases. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocyte membranes did not show any change in their binding properties, indicating that gangliosides could be excluded as candidates for saturable bilirubin-binding sites on erythrocyte membranes. Although bilirubin-binding properties of the membranes did not change after phospholipase D digestion, either, phospholipase C treatment greatly enhanced bilirubin binding. Thus it is suggested that a negatively charged phosphoric acid moiety of phospholipids on the membrane surface may play a role to prevent a large amount of bilirubin from binding to the membranes. Further saturable bilirubin binding to inside-out sealed erythrocyte membrane vesicles showed values comparable with those of the right-side-out sealed membranes, suggesting that the bilirubin-binding sites may be distributed on both outer and inner surfaces of the membranes, or may exist in the membranes where bilirubin may be accessible from either side.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum Antigens on the Surface of the Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maha; Roeffen, Will; Alexander, Neal; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Targett, Geoffrey A. T.; Sutherland, Colin J.

    2008-01-01

    Background The asexual blood stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce highly immunogenic polymorphic antigens that are expressed on the surface of the host cell. In contrast, few studies have examined the surface of the gametocyte-infected erythrocyte. Methodology/Principal Findings We used flow cytometry to detect antibodies recognising the surface of live cultured erythrocytes infected with gametocytes of P. falciparum strain 3D7 in the plasma of 200 Gambian children. The majority of children had been identified as carrying gametocytes after treatment for malaria, and each donated blood for mosquito-feeding experiments. None of the plasma recognised the surface of erythrocytes infected with developmental stages of gametocytes (I–IV), but 66 of 194 (34.0%) plasma contained IgG that recognised the surface of erythrocytes infected with mature (stage V) gametocytes. Thirty-four (17.0%) of 200 plasma tested recognised erythrocytes infected with trophozoites and schizonts, but there was no association with recognition of the surface of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (odds ratio 1.08, 95% C.I. 0.434–2.57; P = 0.851). Plasma antibodies with the ability to recognise gametocyte surface antigens (GSA) were associated with the presence of antibodies that recognise the gamete antigen Pfs 230, but not Pfs48/45. Antibodies recognising GSA were associated with donors having lower gametocyte densities 4 weeks after antimalarial treatment. Conclusions/Significance We provide evidence that GSA are distinct from antigens detected on the surface of asexual 3D7 parasites. Our findings suggest a novel strategy for the development of transmission-blocking vaccines. PMID:18509532

  18. Genetic control of glycolysis in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gilroy, T.E.; Brewer, G.J.; Sing, C.F.

    1980-03-01

    We have studied heritability of the concentration of each glycolytic intermediate and adenine nucleotide in the cytosol of human erythrocytes obtained from a random sample of apparently healthy young individuals. Preliminary to analysis of heritability, each trait was statistically described and the effects attributable to variation in measured concomitants were removed by regression. Heritability was estimated using the family-set method. This method removes covariances between the index case, sibling and first cousin, due to those environmental determinants of the phenotypic values that are shared with a matched, unrelated control member of the family set. It also removes covariances due to environments that are shared by siblings and first cousins. Heritability was estimated by employing the fact that the variance of differences between first cousins minus the variance of differences between full siblings estimates three-fourths of the additive genetic variance. The heritability estimates for G6P, F6P, ATP and some other metabolite concentrations are high and significantly greater than zero. The heritabilities of G6P and F6P are likely attributable to genetic variation in the in vivo activity of HK and/or PFK, because the concentrations of these metabolites are tightly controlled by the two regulatory enzymes. Statistically significant heritability estimates for HK and PFK mass action ratios stronglysuggest genes are responsible for a portion of the quantitative variation in these enzyme activities. Since HK and PFK regulate glycolysis and the production of ATP, genetic variation in their activities might be causally related to the heritability of ATP concentration.

  19. Kinetics of extracellular ATP in mastoparan 7-activated human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Denis, María Florencia Leal; Incicco, J. Jeremías; Espelt, María Victoria; Verstraeten, Sandra V.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) stimulated ATP release in human erythrocytes. We explored intra- and extracellular processes governing the time-dependent accumulation of extracellular ATP (i.e., ATPe kinetics). Methods Human erythrocytes were treated with MST7 in the presence or absence of two blockers of pannexin 1. ATPe concentration was monitored by luciferin-luciferase based real-time luminometry. Results Exposure of human erythrocytes to MST7 led to an acute increase in [ATPe], followed by a slower increase phase. ATPe kinetics reflected a strong activation of ATP efflux and a low rate of ATPe hydrolysis by ectoATPase activity. Enhancement of [ATPe] by MST7 required adhesion of erythrocytes to poly-D-lysin-coated coverslips, and correlated with a 31% increase of cAMP and 10% cell swelling. However, when MST7 was dissolved in a hyperosmotic medium to block cell swelling, ATPe accumulation was inhibited by 49%. Erythrocytes pre-exposure to 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two blockers of pannexin 1, exhibited a partial reduction of ATP efflux. Erythrocytes from pannexin 1 knockout mice exhibited similar ATPe kinetics as those of wild type mice erythrocytes exposed to pannexin 1 blockers. Conclusions MST7 induced release of ATP required either cell adhesion or strong activation of cAMP synthesis. Part of this release required cell swelling. Kinetic analysis and a data driven model suggested that ATP efflux is mediated by two ATP conduits displaying different kinetics, with one conduit being fully blocked by pannexin 1 blockers. General Significance Kinetic analysis of extracellular ATP accumulation from human erythrocytes and potential effects on microcirculation. PMID:23742824

  20. The Mechanism of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate Transport by Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Branda, Richard F.; Anthony, Bruce K.; Jacob, Harry S.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism involved in 5-methyltetrahydrofolate uptake by human cells is poorly understood. To more clearly elucidate this physiologically important process, transport of the vitamin was studied in human erythrocytes. 5-methyltetrahydrofolate uptake was found to increase with reticulocytosis, but measurable incorporation occurred in erythrocyte suspensions depleted of reticulocytes, leukocytes, and platelets, indicating uptake by mature erythrocytes. Incubation of erythrocytes with increasing concentrations of [14C]5-methyltetrahydrofolate resulted in increasing uptake but decreasing percentage incorporation, consistent with saturation of a carrier system. Both influx and efflux phases of uptake were temperature dependent, with almost no transport at 4°C. Uptake of [14C]5-methytetrahydrofolate was effectively inhibited by unlabeled 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, and methotrexate, but not by pteroylglutamic acid. Prior incubation with 5-formyltetrahydrofolate increased uptake of [14C]5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and extracellular 5-formyltetrahydrofolate enhanced efflux of [14C]5-methyltetrahydrofolate. Nearly total depletion of ATP increased uptake of [14C]5-methyltetrahydrofolate, but efflux was unchanged. Column chromatography of membrane-free hemolysate after incubation with [14C]5-methyltetrahydrofolate showed 95% of radioactivity corresponded to marker radioisotope, and no other peak was noted. Thus peripheral erythrocytes incorporate 5-methyltetrahydrofolate by a saturable, temperature-dependent, substrate-specific process which is influenced by counter-transport. This mechanism is qualitatively similar to the carrier-mediated transport of folate compounds previously described in other cell types. Therefore, human erythrocytes should be useful for detailed characterization of this membrane carrier system. PMID:659590

  1. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC.

  2. Genetic Evidence for Erythrocyte Receptor Glycophorin B Expression Levels Defining a Dominant Plasmodium falciparum Invasion Pathway into Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dankwa, Selasi; Chaand, Mudit; Kanjee, Usheer; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Nobre, Luis V.; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Bei, Amy K.; Moechtar, Mischka A.; Grüring, Christof; Ahouidi, Ambroise D.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Dieye, Tandakha N.; Mboup, Souleymane; Weekes, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the deadliest form of malaria, has evolved multiple proteins known as invasion ligands that bind to specific erythrocyte receptors to facilitate invasion of human erythrocytes. The EBA-175/glycophorin A (GPA) and Rh5/basigin ligand-receptor interactions, referred to as invasion pathways, have been the subject of intense study. In this study, we focused on the less-characterized sialic acid-containing receptors glycophorin B (GPB) and glycophorin C (GPC). Through bioinformatic analysis, we identified extensive variation in glycophorin B (GYPB) transcript levels in individuals from Benin, suggesting selection from malaria pressure. To elucidate the importance of the GPB and GPC receptors relative to the well-described EBA-175/GPA invasion pathway, we used an ex vivo erythrocyte culture system to decrease expression of GPA, GPB, or GPC via lentiviral short hairpin RNA transduction of erythroid progenitor cells, with global surface proteomic profiling. We assessed the efficiency of parasite invasion into knockdown cells using a panel of wild-type P. falciparum laboratory strains and invasion ligand knockout lines, as well as P. falciparum Senegalese clinical isolates and a short-term-culture-adapted strain. For this, we optimized an invasion assay suitable for use with small numbers of erythrocytes. We found that all laboratory strains and the majority of field strains tested were dependent on GPB expression level for invasion. The collective data suggest that the GPA and GPB receptors are of greater importance than the GPC receptor, supporting a hierarchy of erythrocyte receptor usage in P. falciparum. PMID:28760933

  3. Mechanism of erythrocyte death in human population exposed to arsenic through drinking water.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Debabrata; Banerjee, Mayukh; Sen, Gargi; Das, Jayanta K; Banerjee, Apurba; Sau, T J; Pandit, Sudipta; Giri, A K; Biswas, Tuli

    2008-07-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is one of the biggest natural calamities, which has become an imperative threat to human health throughout the world. Abbreviation of erythrocyte lifespan leading to the development of anemia is a common sequel in arsenic exposed population. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism of cell death in human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure. Results revealed transformation of smooth discoid red cells into evaginated echinocytic form in the exposed individuals. Further distortion converted reversible echinocytes to irreversible spheroechinocytes. Arsenic toxicity increased membrane microviscosity along with an elevation of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, which hampered the flexibility of red cell membrane and made them less deformable. Significant increase in the binding of merocyanine 540 with erythrocyte membrane due to arsenic exposure indicated disruption of lipid packing in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane resulting from altered transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry. Arsenic induced eryptosis was characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface. Furthermore, metabolic starvation with depletion of cellular ATP triggered apoptotic removal of erythrocytes from circulation. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione content indicating defective antioxidant capacity was coupled with enhancement of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which pointed to oxidative damage to erythrocyte membrane. Arsenic toxicity intervened into red cell membrane integrity eventually leading to membrane destabilization and hemoglobin release. The study depicted the involvement of both erythrophagocytosis and hemolysis in the destruction of human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure.

  4. Mechanism of erythrocyte death in human population exposed to arsenic through drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Banerjee, Mayukh; Sen, Gargi; Das, Jayanta K.; Banerjee, Apurba; Sau, T.J.; Pandit, Sudipta; Giri, A.K. Biswas, Tuli

    2008-07-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is one of the biggest natural calamities, which has become an imperative threat to human health throughout the world. Abbreviation of erythrocyte lifespan leading to the development of anemia is a common sequel in arsenic exposed population. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism of cell death in human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure. Results revealed transformation of smooth discoid red cells into evaginated echinocytic form in the exposed individuals. Further distortion converted reversible echinocytes to irreversible spheroechinocytes. Arsenic toxicity increased membrane microviscosity along with an elevation of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, which hampered the flexibility of red cell membrane and made them less deformable. Significant increase in the binding of merocyanine 540 with erythrocyte membrane due to arsenic exposure indicated disruption of lipid packing in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane resulting from altered transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry. Arsenic induced eryptosis was characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface. Furthermore, metabolic starvation with depletion of cellular ATP triggered apoptotic removal of erythrocytes from circulation. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione content indicating defective antioxidant capacity was coupled with enhancement of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which pointed to oxidative damage to erythrocyte membrane. Arsenic toxicity intervened into red cell membrane integrity eventually leading to membrane destabilization and hemoglobin release. The study depicted the involvement of both erythrophagocytosis and hemolysis in the destruction of human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure.

  5. Thallium and rubidium permeability of human and rat erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Skulskii, I A; Manninen, V; Glasunov, V V

    1990-02-01

    Transport of Tl+ and Rb+ in human and rat erythrocytes was investigated in the presence of ouabain. The chloride-dependent cotransport of Tl+, Rb+ and Na+ was precluded by replacement of Cl- by NO3-. The inward and outward rate constants for the residual fluxes of the cations were determined by measuring the transport of 204Tl and 86Rb in double label experiments. The rate of passive transport of Tl+ exceeded that of Rb+ by one-two orders of magnitude in human as well as rat erythrocytes. The membrane barrier which contributes to the maintenance of ion gradients was shown not to be a barrier for Tl+ which easily penetrates the membrane by an unknown mechanism. In rat erythrocytes the barrier for Rb+ was 10-15 times weaker than that in human red blood cells, while the corresponding ratio of rat/human Tl+ permeabilities was about 1.8-2.0. It follows that Tl+ permeability is only slightly affected by factors modifying the permeability to alkali cations. The increase of temperature from 20 degrees to 37 degrees C resulted in a three-fourfold stimulation of the passive transport of Tl+ both in human and rat erythrocytes. The movement of Tl+ and Rb+ through the erythrocyte membrane differed substantially from their diffusion along the excitable membrane channels characterized both by poor Tl+/K+ selectivity and weak temperature dependence.

  6. Influence of MLS laser radiation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity and secondary structure of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Kamila; Nowacka, Olga; Wróbel, Dominika; Pieszyński, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2014-03-01

    The biostimulating activity of low level laser radiation of various wavelengths and energy doses is widely documented in the literature, but the mechanisms of the intracellular reactions involved are not precisely known. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of low level laser radiation from an multiwave locked system (MLS) of two wavelengths (wavelength = 808 nm in continuous emission and 905 nm in pulsed emission) on the human erythrocyte membrane and on the secondary structure of human serum albumin (HSA). Human erythrocytes membranes and HSA were irradiated with laser light of low intensity with surface energy density ranging from 0.46 to 4.9 J cm(-2) and surface energy power density 195 mW cm(-2) (1,000 Hz) and 230 mW cm(-2) (2,000 Hz). Structural and functional changes in the erythrocyte membrane were characterized by its fluidity, while changes in the protein were monitored by its secondary structure. Dose-dependent changes in erythrocyte membrane fluidity were induced by near-infrared laser radiation. Slight changes in the secondary structure of HSA were also noted. MLS laser radiation influences the structure and function of the human erythrocyte membrane resulting in a change in fluidity.

  7. 3D visualization and quantitative analysis of human erythrocyte phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stachurska, Anna; Król, Teodora; Trybus, Wojciech; Szary, Karol; Fabijańska-Mitek, Jadwiga

    2016-11-01

    Since the erythrophagocytosis of opsonized erythrocytes is investigated mainly by calculating the phagocytic index using subjective light microscopy evaluation, we present methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of human cell erythrophagocytosis. Erythrocytes from two storage periods were used. Using Imaris software, we were able to create a three-dimensional model of erythrophagocytosis. The use of microscopy instead of cytometry revealed a significantly higher number of monocytes and erythrocytes that appeared active in phagocytosis. Spatial reconstruction allowed for detailed analysis of the process by precisely locating erythrocytes in phagocytes. Additionally, a technique of sequential image registration using Nis Elements software allowed for observation of the course of phagocytosis over a range of time intervals. This in vitro research may be helpful for understanding the cellular interactions between monocytes and erythrocytes. The cytometric method-being relatively rapid, sensitive, and specific-can serve as an alternative technique to microscopy in the quantitative analysis of erythrophagocytosis. This allows us to avoid counting the erythrocytes nonspecifically attached to monocytes and gives objective results. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Diminished spectrin extraction from ATP-depleted human erythrocytes. Evidence relating spectrin to changes in erythrocyte shape and deformability.

    PubMed

    Lux, S E; John, K M; Ukena, T E

    1978-03-01

    We measured spectrin "extractability" in erythrocytes which were metabolically depleted by incubation at 37 degrees C in plasma or glucose-free buffers. Membranes were extracted with 1 mM EDTA (pH 8, 40 h, 4 degrees C) and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. This procedure solubilized 85--90% of the spectrin, actin, and residual hemoglobin from ghosts of fresh erythrocytes. In incubated erythrocytes, inextractable spectrin rapidly accumulated when ATP concentrations fell below 0--15% of normal. In severely depleted cells, 60--90% of the total ghost spectrin became inextractable. Inextractability was not abolished by physically disrupting the ghost before extraction, but was reversed when erythrocyte ATP was replenished with adenosine. The accumulation of inextractable spectrin correlated temporally with the increase in apparent membrane deformability and the increases in erythrocyte vicosity, calcium content, sodium gain, and potassium loss characteristic of ATP-depleted erythrocytes. No change in integral membrane protein topography (assessed by the distribution of intramembranous particles and concanavalin A surface-binding sites) was detected in depleted cells. Analogous changes were observed in erythrocytes exposed to extremes of pH and temperature. When the pH in the erythrocyte interior fell below 5.5, a pH where spectrin was aggregated and isoelectrically precipitated, erythrocyte and ghost viscosity increased coincident with a marked decrease in spectrin extractability. Similarly above 49 degrees C, a temperature where spectrin was denatured and precipitated, erythrocyte viscosity rose as inextractable spectrin accumulated. These observations provide direct evidence of a change in the physical state of spectrin associated with a change in erythrocyte shape and deformability. They support the concept that erythrocyte shape and deformability are largely determined by the shape and deformability of the spectrin

  9. Diminished spectrin extraction from ATP-depleted human erythrocytes. Evidence relating spectrin to changes in erythrocyte shape and deformability.

    PubMed Central

    Lux, S E; John, K M; Ukena, T E

    1978-01-01

    We measured spectrin "extractability" in erythrocytes which were metabolically depleted by incubation at 37 degrees C in plasma or glucose-free buffers. Membranes were extracted with 1 mM EDTA (pH 8, 40 h, 4 degrees C) and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. This procedure solubilized 85--90% of the spectrin, actin, and residual hemoglobin from ghosts of fresh erythrocytes. In incubated erythrocytes, inextractable spectrin rapidly accumulated when ATP concentrations fell below 0--15% of normal. In severely depleted cells, 60--90% of the total ghost spectrin became inextractable. Inextractability was not abolished by physically disrupting the ghost before extraction, but was reversed when erythrocyte ATP was replenished with adenosine. The accumulation of inextractable spectrin correlated temporally with the increase in apparent membrane deformability and the increases in erythrocyte vicosity, calcium content, sodium gain, and potassium loss characteristic of ATP-depleted erythrocytes. No change in integral membrane protein topography (assessed by the distribution of intramembranous particles and concanavalin A surface-binding sites) was detected in depleted cells. Analogous changes were observed in erythrocytes exposed to extremes of pH and temperature. When the pH in the erythrocyte interior fell below 5.5, a pH where spectrin was aggregated and isoelectrically precipitated, erythrocyte and ghost viscosity increased coincident with a marked decrease in spectrin extractability. Similarly above 49 degrees C, a temperature where spectrin was denatured and precipitated, erythrocyte viscosity rose as inextractable spectrin accumulated. These observations provide direct evidence of a change in the physical state of spectrin associated with a change in erythrocyte shape and deformability. They support the concept that erythrocyte shape and deformability are largely determined by the shape and deformability of the spectrin

  10. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  11. Effect of thiol drugs on tert-butyl hydroperoxide induced luminol chemiluminescence in human erythrocytes, erythrocyte lysate, and erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Sajewicz, Waldemar

    2010-07-30

    The paper investigates the effect of thiol drugs (RSH) under oxidative stress condition using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence technique. The examinations included N-acetylcysteine (NAC), N-acetylpenicillamine (NAP), penicillamine (PEN), mesna (MES), and tiopronin (TPR). The model systems contained isolated human erythrocytes (RBC), erythrocyte lysates (LYS) or erythrocyte membranes (MEM) exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH). Under the influence of RSH, a bimodal character of some experimental chemiluminescence curves was observed and the kinetic solution was considered as the sum of two logistic-exponential processes. These chemiluminescence changes probably reflected two connected processes--scavenging by RSH of the t-BuOOH-induced free radicals and simultaneous generation of thiol-derived secondary free radicals. Individual differences in thiols interaction showed a multivariate set of the kinetic curve descriptors. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) well distinguished subsets of RSH influence in systems with RBC or LYS. Generally, the action of NAC was exclusively pro-oxidant in both systems, with RBC and LYS. The behaviour of MES or NAP in these systems was also pro-oxidant but many times less prominent than NAC. Under the influence of TPR a dramatic switch in the anti-oxidant effect was observed in system with RBC to very pro-oxidant effect in LYS. The influence of PEN was analogical to TPR but very weak. This experimental model together with kinetic solution of the unique bimodal chemiluminescence curves, and PCA, supply new insights to the dual (anti- and pro-oxidant) effects of thiol drugs under oxidative stress condition. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies on the Orientation of Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase in Human Erythrocyte Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Charles S.; Rosenfeld, Robert D.; Rosen, Ora M.

    1973-01-01

    The topographic location of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase has been studied in preparations of permeable and sealed membranes derived from human erythrocytes. Both the catalytic and cyclic AMP-binding components of protein kinase are localized on the inner, cytoplasmic, surface of the plasma membrane. PMID:4359486

  13. Retention of radiolead by human erythrocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.C.

    1989-06-15

    An in vitro method was developed to assess human erythrocyte lead uptake and release directly, rapidly, and reproducibly; the technique requires small aliquots of blood and uses silicone fluid to separate erythrocytes from their suspending media. Uptake occurred rapidly and was directly related to temperature. Increasing quantities of available elemental lead were associated with increasing absolute quantities but decreasing percentages of uptake. Low values of pH diminished the uptake and enhanced the release of radiolead by erythrocytes, and could be correlated with diminished lead-hemoglobin binding para-Chloromecuribenzoate increased and dithiothreitol inhibited radiolead uptake but neither compound affected lead release, suggesting that sulfhydryl groups are important for lead binding to the erythrocyte. Cyanamide and N-ethylmaleimide did not significantly affect the net uptake or release of radiolead. Calcium disodium EDTA, penicillamine, and dimercaprol significantly reduced lead uptake, although only incubation with dimercaprol resulted in a net removal of lead from erythrocytes. Iron and ceruloplasmin significantly decreased radiolead uptake, but inorganic metal cations other than iron, hyperosmolarity, human serum albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin had no significant effect on uptake or release.

  14. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  15. [COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MECHANICAL STRESS EFFECT ON HUMAN AND ANIMAL ERYTHROCYTES].

    PubMed

    Shpakova, N M; Orlova, N V; Nipot, E E; Aleksandrova, D I

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of human and animal (bovine, rat, rabbit, equine) erythrocytes to the effect of mechanical stress has been studied. Mechanical stress effect was demonstrated to result in a time-dependent (5-60 min) release of potassium cations out of mammalian erythrocytes and a partial hemolytic cell damage. Herewith the release levels of potassium ions and hemolysis did not coincide for erythrocytes of all the mammals except rabbit ones. The most sensitive to mechanical stress (60 min) by the parameters of hemolytic damage and potassium ion release were rat (32%) and bovine (66%) erythrocytes respectively, the lowest sensitive by both parameters were rabbit ones (about 20%). Implemented correlation analysis has demonstrated a statistically significant negative relation between the values of mechanical hemolysis of mammalian erythrocytes and surface-volumetric ratio of cells (rs = -0.900, P = 0.037). A feasible relationship between the content of phosphatidylethanolamine in mammalian erythrocyte membranes and the level of potassium cation loss under mechanical stress effect is under discussion.

  16. An iron stable isotope comparison between human erythrocytes and plasma.

    PubMed

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Oelze, Marcus; Schmid, Dietmar G; van Zuilen, Kirsten; Gschwind, Hans-Peter; Slade, Alan J; Stitah, Sylvie; Kaufmann, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2014-11-01

    We present precise iron stable isotope ratios measured by multicollector-ICP mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) of human red blood cells (erythrocytes) and blood plasma from 12 healthy male adults taken during a clinical study. The accurate determination of stable isotope ratios in plasma first required substantial method development work, as minor iron amounts in plasma had to be separated from a large organic matrix prior to mass-spectrometric analysis to avoid spectroscopic interferences and shifts in the mass spectrometer's mass-bias. The (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio in erythrocytes, expressed as permil difference from the "IRMM-014" iron reference standard (δ(56/54)Fe), ranges from -3.1‰ to -2.2‰, a range typical for male Caucasian adults. The individual subject erythrocyte iron isotope composition can be regarded as uniform over the 21 days investigated, as variations (±0.059 to ±0.15‰) are mostly within the analytical precision of reference materials. In plasma, δ(56/54)Fe values measured in two different laboratories range from -3.0‰ to -2.0‰, and are on average 0.24‰ higher than those in erythrocytes. However, this difference is barely resolvable within one standard deviation of the differences (0.22‰). Taking into account the possible contamination due to hemolysis (iron concentrations are only 0.4 to 2 ppm in plasma compared to approx. 480 ppm in erythrocytes), we model the pure plasma δ(56/54)Fe to be on average 0.4‰ higher than that in erythrocytes. Hence, the plasma iron isotope signature lies between that of the liver and that of erythrocytes. This difference can be explained by redox processes involved during cycling of iron between transferrin and ferritin.

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae Invades Erythrocytes and Utilizes Them to Evade Human Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Mori-Yamaguchi, Yuka; Domon, Hisanori; Sakaue, Yuuki; Yagi, Tetsuya; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nizet, Victor; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium, is a major cause of invasive infection-related diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis. In blood, erythrocytes are considered to be an important factor for bacterial growth, as they contain abundant nutrients. However, the relationship between S. pneumoniae and erythrocytes remains unclear. We analyzed interactions between S. pneumoniae and erythrocytes, and found that iron ion present in human erythrocytes supported the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, another major Gram-positive sepsis pathogen, while it partially inhibited pneumococcal growth by generating free radicals. S. pneumoniae cells incubated with human erythrocytes or blood were subjected to scanning electron and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses, which showed that the bacterial cells adhered to and invaded human erythrocytes. In addition, S. pneumoniae cells were found associated with human erythrocytes in cultures of blood from patients with an invasive pneumococcal infection. Erythrocyte invasion assays indicated that LPXTG motif-containing pneumococcal proteins, erythrocyte lipid rafts, and erythrocyte actin remodeling are all involved in the invasion mechanism. In a neutrophil killing assay, the viability of S. pneumoniae co-incubated with erythrocytes was higher than that without erythrocytes. Also, H2O2 killing of S. pneumoniae was nearly completely ineffective in the presence of erythrocytes. These results indicate that even when S. pneumoniae organisms are partially killed by iron ion-induced free radicals, they can still invade erythrocytes. Furthermore, in the presence of erythrocytes, S. pneumoniae can more effectively evade antibiotics, neutrophil phagocytosis, and H2O2 killing. PMID:24194877

  18. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-06-21

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Altered Membrane Structure and Surface Potential in Homozygous Hemoglobin C Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Nardone, Glenn A.; Ostera, Graciela R.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Beaudry, Steven D.; Hayakawa, Eri; Dvorak, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin C differs from normal hemoglobin A by a glutamate-to-lysine substitution at position 6 of beta globin and is oxidatively unstable. Compared to homozygous AA erythrocytes, homozygous CC erythrocytes contain higher levels of membrane-associated hemichromes and more extensively clustered band 3 proteins. These findings suggest that CC erythrocytes have a different membrane matrix than AA erythrocytes. Methodology and Findings We found that AA and CC erythrocytes differ in their membrane lipid composition, and that a subset of CC erythrocytes expresses increased levels of externalized phosphatidylserine. Detergent membrane analyses for raft marker proteins indicated that CC erythrocyte membranes are more resistant to detergent solubilization. These data suggest that membrane raft organization is modified in CC erythrocytes. In addition, the average zeta potential (a measure of surface electrochemical potential) of CC erythrocytes was ≈2 mV lower than that of AA erythrocytes, indicating that substantial rearrangements occur in the membrane matrix of CC erythrocytes. We were able to recapitulate this low zeta potential phenotype in AA erythrocytes by treating them with NaNO2 to oxidize hemoglobin A molecules and increase levels of membrane-associated hemichromes. Conclusion Our data support the possibility that increased hemichrome deposition and altered lipid composition induce molecular rearrangements in CC erythrocyte membranes, resulting in a unique membrane structure. PMID:19503809

  20. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  1. Accelerated senescence of human erythrocytes cultured with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Omodeo-Salè, Fausta; Motti, Anna; Basilico, Nicoletta; Parapini, Silvia; Olliaro, Piero; Taramelli, Donatella

    2003-07-15

    Red blood cells infected withPlasmodium falciparum(IRBCs) undergo changes primarily in their membrane composition that contribute to malaria pathogenesis. However, all manifestations (eg, anemia) cannot be accounted for by IRBCs alone. Uninfected erythrocytes (URBCs) may play a role, but they have been under-researched. We wanted to document changes in the erythrocyte membrane that could contribute to URBC reduced life span and malaria-associated anemia. Human erythrocytes were cultured withP falciparumand washed at the trophozoite stage. IRBCs and URBCs were separated on Percoll density gradient, thus obtaining erythrocyte fractions of different densities/ages. IRBC- and URBC-purified membranes were analyzed and compared with control normal erythrocytes (NRBCs) of the same age, from the same donor, kept in the same conditions.P falciparumaccelerated aging of both IRBCs and URBCs, causing a significant shift in the cell population toward the denser (old) fraction. Protein, phospholipid, and cholesterol content were reduced in IRBCs and young URBCs. Young and medium uninfected fractions had higher levels of lipid peroxidation and phospholipid saturation (because of the loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFAs) and lower phosphatidylserine. In IRBCs, thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARSs) were higher, and PUFAs and phosphatidylserine lower than in NRBCs and URBCs. In comparison, trophozoite membranes had lower phospholipid (particularly sphingomyelin and phosphatidylserine) and cholesterol content and a higher degree of saturation. Parasite-induced peroxidative damage might account for these modifications. In summary, we demonstrated that membrane damage leading to accelerated senescence of both infected and uninfected erythrocytes will likely contribute to malaria anemia.

  2. Evaluation of methylglyoxal toxicity in human erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.

    PubMed

    Prestes, Alessandro de Souza; Dos Santos, Matheus Mülling; Ecker, Assis; Zanini, Daniela; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Barbosa, Nilda Vargas

    2017-05-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite originated mainly from glucose degradation pathway that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Reactions of MG with biological macromolecules (proteins, DNA and lipids) can induce cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Here, human erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets were acutely exposed to MG at concentration ranging from 0.025 to 10 mM. Afterwards, hemolysis and osmotic fragility in erythrocytes, DNA damage and cell viability in leukocytes, and the activity of purinergic ecto-nucleotidases in platelets were evaluated. The levels of glycated products from leukocytes and free amino groups from erythrocytes and platelets were also measured. MG caused fragility of membrane, hemolysis and depletion of amino groups in erythrocytes. DNA damage, loss of cell viability and increased levels of glycated products were observed in leukocytes. In platelets, MG inhibited the activity of enzymes NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) without affecting the levels of free amino groups. Our findings provide insights for understanding the mechanisms involved in MG acute toxicity towards distinct blood cells.

  3. Effects of cholesterol on lipid organization in human erythrocyte membrane

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The molar ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid (C/P) in human erythrocyte membrane is modified by incubating the cells with liposomes of various C/P ratios. The observed increase in cell surface area may be accounted for by the addition of cholesterol molecules. Fusion between liposomes and cells or attachment of liposomes to cells is not a significant factor in the alteration of C/P ratio. Onset temperatures for lipid phase separation in modified membranes are measured by electron diffraction. The onset temperature increases with decreasing C/P ration from 2 degrees C at C/P = 0.95 to 20 degrees C at C/P = 0.5. Redistribution of intramembrane particles is observed in membranes freeze-quenched from temperatures below the onset temperature. The heterogeneous distribution of intramembrane particles below the onset temperature suggests phase separation of lipid, with concomitant segregation of intramembrane protein into domains, even in the presence of an intact spectrin network. PMID:7372709

  4. Diminished osmotic fragility of human erythrocytes following the membrane insertion of oxygenated sterol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, R.A.; Kanofsky, J.R.; Gunn, R.B.; Yachnin, S.

    1981-08-01

    Oxygenated sterol compounds (OSC), when incubated for 1 hr with human erythrocytes in lipoprotein-depleted medium at concentrations of 0.625-5 x 10/sup -5/M, are inserted into the cell membrane and remain there despite subsequent washing of the cells. The insertion results in expansion of the surface area of the red cell ghost membrane, an increase in critical hemolytic volume, and as a consequence, in dimished osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes. This effect is seen with echinocyte-forming as well as with non-echinocyte-forming OSC. Erythrocytes treated with OSC do not differ from control cells with respect to their mean cell volume (MCV) in isotonic solution, water content, ion fluxes, and filterability through polycarbonate filters. The shift of the osmotic fragility curve toward lower NaCl concentrations is proportional to the amount of OSC inserted into the red cell membrane. 7BETA-Hydroxycholesterol, 22-ketocholesterol, and 20 ..cap alpha..-hydroxycholesterol are the most potent inhibitors of osmotic lysis. The effect of OSC on osmotic fragility is diminished if the erythrocytes are incubated in a lipoprotein-containing medium; free cholesterol, however, does not change this effect. Various progesterones also protect red cells from osmotic lysis if the erythrocytes are directly exposed to the compounds present in the hypotonic NaCl solutions.

  5. The behavior of the human erythrocyte as an imperfect osmometer: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pierre

    2006-01-07

    The human erythrocyte does not behave as a perfect osmometer that is its volume does not change as predicted with the change of the tonicity of the medium, as if there was a fraction of the cell water not participating in the osmotic exchange. A mechanism of control of the erythrocyte shape has been previously proposed in which Band 3 (AE1), the protein anion exchanger of Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-), plays a central role. Specifically, decrease and increase of the ratio of its outward-facing conformation and inward-facing conformation (Band 3(o)/Band 3(i)) contract and relax the membrane skeleton, thus favoring echinocytosis and stomatocytosis, respectively. The equilibrium Band 3(o)/Band 3(i) ratio is determined by the Donnan equilibrium ratio of anions and protons, increasing with it (r=Cl(i)(-)/Cl(o)(-)=HCO 3(i)(-)/HCO 3(o)(-)=H(o)(+)/H(i)(+)). The Donnan ratio is influenced by the erythrocyte transport and metabolic activities. The volume change of the human erythrocyte alters the skeleton conformation as it is accompanied by a change of the membrane curvature. Thus, the mechanism could be a hypothesis for explaining the behavior of the human erythrocyte as an imperfect osmometer since the Donnan ratio controls the Band 3(o)/Band 3(i) ratio which controls the volume by a control of the degree of contraction or relaxation of the skeleton. Predictions made by the hypothesis on the Ponder's coefficient R' values in the presence of sucrose or Band 3 substrates slowly transported as well as on the participation of Band 3 in the osmotic hemolysis appear to be corroborated by previous observations. If the hypothesis was valid, it would follow that there is a pressure gradient across the erythrocyte membrane. The equilibrium volume is antagonistically determined by the Donnan ratio per se and Band 3. Band 3, rather than the ratio of surface-to-volume, primarily controls the osmotic hemolysis.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of Uncaria tomentosa extracts on the size and shape of human erythrocytes (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Bors, Milena; Sicińska, Paulina; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Wieteska, Paulina; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Bukowska, Bożena

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we continued our investigations concerning the interaction of Uncaria tomentosa extracts with the human erythrocytes. The analysis of the size and shape of the erythrocytes by means of flow cytometry and phase contrast microscopy was performed. We executed our experiments using ethanolic and aqueous extracts from the leaves and bark of U. tomentosa. Disturbances were observed in the size and shape of the erythrocytes incubated with ethanolic and aqueous extracts at the concentrations of 100 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively. The observed changes were probably related to the entry of polyphenolic compounds contained in U. tomentosa extracts into erythrocyte membrane. Externalization of phosphatidylserine on the erythrocytic surfaces was also noticed during incubation with extracts at concentration of 250 μg/mL. We concluded that all of the extracts examined induced changes in the erythrocyte membrane properties, whereas ethanolic extracts from bark induced the most significant changes. The possible binding of polyphenols to the erythrocyte surface may have accounted for the protective properties of extracts against haemolysis of RBCs, which was observed in our previous study (Bors et al., 2011), but considerable incorporation of polyphenols into cell membranes can result in disturbance of phosphatidylserine transport and changes in erythrocyte shape. Nevertheless the results of the investigations showed that considerable morphological changes appear only as a result of erythrocyte exposure to high concentrations (50 ppm and 100 ppm) of the extracts studied, thus they should not lead to clinical erythrocytic damage if recommended doses of U. tomentosa preparations are administrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. LIN28A expression reduces sickling of cultured human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcellos, Jaira F; Fasano, Ross M; Lee, Y Terry; Kaushal, Megha; Byrnes, Colleen; Meier, Emily R; Anderson, Molly; Rabel, Antoinette; Braylan, Raul; Stroncek, David F; Miller, Jeffery L

    2014-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) has therapeutic importance for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and the beta-thalassemias. It was recently reported that increased expression of LIN28 proteins or decreased expression of its target let-7 miRNAs enhances HbF levels in cultured primary human erythroblasts from adult healthy donors. Here LIN28A effects were studied further using erythrocytes cultured from peripheral blood progenitor cells of pediatric subjects with SCD. Transgenic expression of LIN28A was accomplished by lentiviral transduction in CD34(+) sickle cells cultivated ex vivo in serum-free medium. LIN28A over-expression (LIN28A-OE) increased HbF, reduced beta (sickle)-globin, and strongly suppressed all members of the let-7 family of miRNAs. LIN28A-OE did not affect erythroblast differentiation or prevent enucleation, but it significantly reduced or ameliorated the sickling morphologies of the enucleated erythrocytes.

  8. The Effect of Covalently-Attached ATRP-Synthesized Polymers on Membrane Stability and Cytoprotection in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Clafshenkel, William P.; Murata, Hironobu; Andersen, Jill; Creeger, Yehuda; Russell, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Erythrocytes have been described as advantageous drug delivery vehicles. In order to ensure an adequate circulation half-life, erythrocytes may benefit from protective enhancements that maintain membrane integrity and neutralize oxidative damage of membrane proteins that otherwise facilitate their premature clearance from circulation. Surface modification of erythrocytes using rationally designed polymers, synthesized via atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), may further expand the field of membrane-engineered red blood cells. This study describes the fate of ATRP-synthesized polymers that were covalently attached to human erythrocytes as well as the effect of membrane engineering on cell stability under physiological and oxidative conditions in vitro. The biocompatible, membrane-reactive polymers were homogenously retained on the periphery of modified erythrocytes for at least 24 hours. Membrane engineering stabilized the erythrocyte membrane and effectively neutralized oxidative species, even in the absence of free-radical scavenger-containing polymers. The targeted functionalization of Band 3 protein by NHS-pDMAA-Cy3 polymers stabilized its monomeric form preventing aggregation in the presence of the crosslinking reagent, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3). A free radical scavenging polymer, NHS-pDMAA-TEMPO˙, provided additional protection of surface modified erythrocytes in an in vitro model of oxidative stress. Preserving or augmenting cytoprotective mechanisms that extend circulation half-life is an important consideration for the use of red blood cells for drug delivery in various pathologies, as they are likely to encounter areas of imbalanced oxidative stress as they circuit the vascular system. PMID:27331401

  9. The Effect of Covalently-Attached ATRP-Synthesized Polymers on Membrane Stability and Cytoprotection in Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Clafshenkel, William P; Murata, Hironobu; Andersen, Jill; Creeger, Yehuda; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Erythrocytes have been described as advantageous drug delivery vehicles. In order to ensure an adequate circulation half-life, erythrocytes may benefit from protective enhancements that maintain membrane integrity and neutralize oxidative damage of membrane proteins that otherwise facilitate their premature clearance from circulation. Surface modification of erythrocytes using rationally designed polymers, synthesized via atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), may further expand the field of membrane-engineered red blood cells. This study describes the fate of ATRP-synthesized polymers that were covalently attached to human erythrocytes as well as the effect of membrane engineering on cell stability under physiological and oxidative conditions in vitro. The biocompatible, membrane-reactive polymers were homogenously retained on the periphery of modified erythrocytes for at least 24 hours. Membrane engineering stabilized the erythrocyte membrane and effectively neutralized oxidative species, even in the absence of free-radical scavenger-containing polymers. The targeted functionalization of Band 3 protein by NHS-pDMAA-Cy3 polymers stabilized its monomeric form preventing aggregation in the presence of the crosslinking reagent, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3). A free radical scavenging polymer, NHS-pDMAA-TEMPO˙, provided additional protection of surface modified erythrocytes in an in vitro model of oxidative stress. Preserving or augmenting cytoprotective mechanisms that extend circulation half-life is an important consideration for the use of red blood cells for drug delivery in various pathologies, as they are likely to encounter areas of imbalanced oxidative stress as they circuit the vascular system.

  10. Abscisic Acid Transport in Human Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Millo, Enrico; Fresia, Chiara; Turco, Emilia; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in the response to environmental stress. Recently, ABA has been shown to be present and active also in mammals, where it stimulates the functional activity of innate immune cells, of mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells, and insulin-releasing pancreatic β-cells. LANCL2, the ABA receptor in mammalian cells, is a peripheral membrane protein that localizes at the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Here we investigated the mechanism enabling ABA transport across the plasmamembrane of human red blood cells (RBC). Both influx and efflux of [3H]ABA occur across intact RBC, as detected by radiometric and chromatographic methods. ABA binds specifically to Band 3 (the RBC anion transporter), as determined by labeling of RBC membranes with biotinylated ABA. Proteoliposomes reconstituted with human purified Band 3 transport [3H]ABA and [35S]sulfate, and ABA transport is sensitive to the specific Band 3 inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid. Once inside RBC, ABA stimulates ATP release through the LANCL2-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase. As ATP released from RBC is known to exert a vasodilator response, these results suggest a role for plasma ABA in the regulation of vascular tone. PMID:25847240

  11. Distribution of actin of the human erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton after interaction with radiographic contrast media.

    PubMed

    Franke, R P; Scharnweber, T; Fuhrmann, R; Krüger, A; Wenzel, F; Mrowietz, C; Jung, F

    2013-01-01

    A type-dependent chemotoxic effect of radiographic contrast media on erythrocytes and endothelial cells was reported several times. While mechanisms of toxicity are still unclear the cellular reactions e.g. echinocyte formation in erythrocytes and the buckling of endothelial cells coincided with deterioration of capillary perfusion (in patients with coronary artery disease) and tissue oxygen tension (in the myocardium of pigs). Whether the shape changes in erythrocytes coincide with changes in the arrangement of actin, the core of the actin-spectrin cytoskeletal network and possible actor in membrane stresses and deformation is not known until now. To get specific informations actin was stained using two different staining methods (antibodies to β-actin staining oligomeric G-actin and polymeric F-actin and Phalloidin-Rhodamin staining polymeric F-actin only). In addition, an advanced version of confocal laser scanning microscopes was used enabling the display of the actin arrangement near substrate surfaces. Blood smears were produced after erythrocyte suspension in autologous plasma or in two different plasma/RCM mixtures. In this study an even homogenous distribution of fine grained globular actin in the normal human erythrocyte could be demonstrated. After suspension of erythrocytes in a plasma/Iodixanol mixture an increased number of membrane protrusions appeared densely filled with intensely stained actin similar to cells suspended in autologous plasma, however, there in less numbers. Suspension in Iopromide, in contrast, induced a complete reorganization of the cytoskeletal actin: the fine grained globular actin distribution disappeared and only few, long and thick actin filaments bundled and possibly polymerized appeared, instead, shown here for the first time.

  12. Attempts to validate a possible predictive animal model for human erythrocyte G-6-PD deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, H.M.; Calabrese, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Dorset sheep erythrocytes as a model for human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes was investigated. Seven pharmaceuticals were examined for oxidant stressor effects using a liver microsomal enzyme system to generate metabolites of the drugs. The pharmaceuticals examined were salicyclic acid, dapsone, naphthalene, B-naphtol, p-aminobenzoic acid, sulfanilamide and sulfapyridine. The test compounds were incubated with Dorset sheep erythrocytes and oxidant stressor effects were measured through reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and methemaglobin formation. The response of the Dorset sheep erythrocytes to the seven agents was compared to previous studies revealing the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes to these agents. The results indicated that metabolites of the pharmaceuticals, B-naphthol, dapsone, and sulfanilamide, are oxidant stressor agents towards sheep G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. These results agreed with studies on the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. The metabolized naphthalene and sulfapyridine did not cause oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, despite the fact that these two agents caused oxidizing effects in human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes in previous studies. None of the non-metabolized parent compounds caused oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, which agreed with the responses of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes.

  13. Fya/Fyb antigen polymorphism in human erythrocyte Duffy antigen affects susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher L.; Adams, John H.; Xianli, Jia; Grimberg, Brian T.; McHenry, Amy M.; Greenberg, Lior J.; Siddiqui, Asim; Howes, Rosalind E.; da Silva-Nunes, Monica; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Zimmerman, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax (Pv) is a major cause of human malaria and is increasing in public health importance compared with falciparum malaria. Pv is unique among human malarias in that invasion of erythrocytes is almost solely dependent on the red cell's surface receptor, known as the Duffy blood-group antigen (Fy). Fy is an important minor blood-group antigen that has two immunologically distinct alleles, referred to as Fya or Fyb, resulting from a single-point mutation. This mutation occurs within the binding domain of the parasite's red cell invasion ligand. Whether this polymorphism affects susceptibility to clinical vivax malaria is unknown. Here we show that Fya, compared with Fyb, significantly diminishes binding of Pv Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) at the erythrocyte surface, and is associated with a reduced risk of clinical Pv in humans. Erythrocytes expressing Fya had 41–50% lower binding compared with Fyb cells and showed an increased ability of naturally occurring or artificially induced antibodies to block binding of PvDBP to their surface. Individuals with the Fya+b− phenotype demonstrated a 30–80% reduced risk of clinical vivax, but not falciparum malaria in a prospective cohort study in the Brazilian Amazon. The Fya+b− phenotype, predominant in Southeast Asian and many American populations, would confer a selective advantage against vivax malaria. Our results also suggest that efficacy of a PvDBP-based vaccine may differ among populations with different Fy phenotypes. PMID:22123959

  14. Transport of 3-bromopyruvate across the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Soszyński, Mirosław; Ułaszewski, Stanisław; Ko, Young; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    3-Bromopyruvic acid (3-BP) is a promising anticancer compound because it is a strong inhibitor of glycolytic enzymes, especially glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The Warburg effect means that malignant cells are much more dependent on glycolysis than normal cells. Potential complications of anticancer therapy with 3-BP are side effects due to its interaction with normal cells, especially erythrocytes. Transport into cells is critical for 3-BP to have intracellular effects. The aim of our study was the kinetic characterization of 3-BP transport into human erythrocytes. 3-BP uptake by erythrocytes was linear within the first 3 min and pH-dependent. The transport rate decreased with increasing pH in the range of 6.0-8.0. The Km and Vm values for 3-BP transport were 0.89 mM and 0.94 mmol/(l cells x min), respectively. The transport was inhibited competitively by pyruvate and significantly inhibited by DIDS, SITS, and 1-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Flavonoids also inhibited 3-BP transport: the most potent inhibition was found for luteolin and quercetin.

  15. The free heme concentration in healthy human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Freundlich, Melissa; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Heme, the prosthetic group of hemoglobin, may be released from its host due to an intrinsic instability of hemoglobin and accumulate in the erythrocytes. Free heme is in the form of hematin (Fe3+ protoporphyrin IX OH) and follows several pathways of biochemical toxicity to tissues, cells, and organelles since it catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. To determine concentration of soluble free heme in human erythrocytes, we develop a new method. We lyse the red blood cells and isolate free heme from hemoglobin by dialysis. We use the heme to reconstitute horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from an excess of the apoenzyme and determine the HRP reaction rate from the evolution of the emitted luminescence. We find that in a population of five healthy adults the average free heme concentration in the erythrocytes is 21 ± 2 μM, ca. 100× higher than previously determined. Tests suggest that the lower previous value was due to the use of elevated concentrations of NaCl, which drive hematin precipitation and re-association with apoglobin. We show that the found hematin concentration is significantly higher than estimates based on equilibrium release and the known hematin dimerization. The factors that lead to enhanced heme release remain an open question. PMID:26460266

  16. Metabolic homeostasis in the human erythrocyte: in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    de Atauri, Pedro; Ramírez, María José; Kuchel, Philip W; Carreras, José; Cascante, Marta

    2006-01-01

    A detailed computer model of human erythrocyte metabolism was shown to predict three steady states, two stable and one unstable. The most extreme steady state is characterized by almost zero concentrations of all the phosphorylated intermediates. The "normal" steady state is remarkably robust in the face of large changes in the activity of most of the enzymes of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway: this steady state can be viewed as an attractor towards which the system returns following a metabolic perturbation. Focus is given to three responses of the system: (1) the 'energy charge' that pertains to the concentration of ATP relative to all purine nucleotides; (2) redox power expressed as the ratio of reduced-to-total glutathione and (3) the concentration of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, that directly affects the oxygen affinity of haemoglobin thus affecting the main physiological function of the cell. The collapse of the normal steady state in what can be viewed topologically as a catastrophe is posited as one key element of erythrocyte senescence and it is particularly important for erythrocyte destruction in patients with an inborn enzyme deficiency.

  17. Acid-sensitive outwardly rectifying anion channels in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, Yuliya V; Mörsdorf, Daniel; Lang, Florian

    2009-07-01

    Acid-sensitive outwardly rectifying anion channels (ASOR) have been described in several mammalian cell types. The present whole-cell patch-clamp study elucidated whether those channels are expressed in erythrocytes. To this end whole-cell recordings were made in human erythrocytes from healthy donors treated with low pH and high osmotic pressure. When the pipette solution had a reduced Cl(-) concentration, treatment of the cells with Cl(-)-containing normal and hyperosmotic (addition of sucrose and polyethelene glycol 1000 [PEG-1000] to the Ringer) media with low pH significantly increased the conductance of the cells at positive voltages. Channel activity was highest in the PEG-1000 media (95 and 300 mM PEG-1000, pH 4.5 and 4.3, respectively) where the current-voltage curves demonstrated strong outward rectification and reversed at -40 mV. Substitution of the Cl(-)-containing medium with Cl(-)-free medium resulted in a decrease of the conductance at hyperpolarizing voltages, a shift in reversal potential (to 0 mV) and loss of outward rectification. The chloride currents were inhibited by chloride channels blockers DIDS and NPPB (IC(50) for both was approximately 1 mM) but not with niflumic acid and amiloride. The observations reveal expression of ASOR in erythrocytes.

  18. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  19. α- and β-Monosaccharide transport in human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Jeffry M.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrative sugar uptake in human erythrocytes is characterized by a rapid phase, which equilibrates 66% of the cell water, and by a slow phase, which equilibrates 33% of the cell water. This behavior has been attributed to the preferential transport of β-sugars by erythrocytes (Leitch JM, Carruthers A. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 292: C974–C986, 2007). The present study tests this hypothesis. The anomer theory requires that the relative compartment sizes of rapid and slow transport phases are determined by the proportions of β- and α-sugar in aqueous solution. This is observed with d-glucose and 3-O-methylglucose but not with 2-deoxy-d-glucose and d-mannose. The anomer hypothesis predicts that the slow transport phase, which represents α-sugar transport, is eliminated when anomerization is accelerated to generate the more rapidly transported β-sugar. Exogenous, intracellular mutarotase accelerates anomerization but has no effect on transport. The anomer hypothesis requires that transport inhibitors inhibit rapid and slow transport phases equally. This is observed with the endofacial site inhibitor cytochalasin B but not with the exofacial site inhibitors maltose or phloretin, which inhibit only the rapid phase. Direct measurement of α- and β-sugar uptake demonstrates that erythrocytes transport α- and β-sugars with equal avidity. These findings refute the hypothesis that erythrocytes preferentially transport β-sugars. We demonstrate that biphasic 3-O-methylglucose equilibrium exchange kinetics refute the simple carrier hypothesis for protein-mediated sugar transport but are compatible with a fixed-site transport mechanism regulated by intracellular ATP and cell shape. PMID:18987250

  20. Erythrocyte binding preference of human pandemic influenza virus a and its effect on antibody response detection.

    PubMed

    Makkoch, Jarika; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Payungporn, Sunchai; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Songserm, Thaweesak; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Poovorawan, Yong

    2012-07-01

    Validation of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays is important for evaluating antibody responses to influenza virus, and selection of erythrocytes for use in these assays is important. This study aimed to determine the correlation between receptor binding specificity and effectiveness of the HI assay for detecting antibody response to pandemic influenza H1N1 (pH1N1) virus. Hemagglutination (HA) tests were performed using erythrocytes from 6 species. Subsequently, 8 hemagglutinating units of pH1N1 from each species were titrated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. To investigate the effect of erythrocyte binding preference on HI antibody titers, comparisons of HI with microneutralization (MN) assays were performed. Goose erythrocytes showed most specific binding with pH1N1, while HA titers using human erythrocytes were comparable to those using turkey erythrocytes. The erythrocyte binding efficiency was shown to have an impact on antibody detection. Comparing MN titers, HI titers using turkey erythrocytes yielded the most accurate results, while those using goose erythrocytes produced the highest geometric mean titer. Human blood group O erythrocytes lacking a specific antibody yielded results most comparable to those obtained using turkey erythrocytes. Further, pre-existing antibody to pH1N1 and different erythrocyte species can distort HI assay results. HI assay, using turkey and human erythrocytes, yielded the most comparable and applicable results for pH1N1 than those by MN assay, and using goose erythrocytes may lead to overestimated titers. Selection of appropriate erythrocyte species for HI assay allows construction of a more reliable database, which is essential for further investigations and control of virus epidemics.

  1. Improved perfusion conditions for patch-clamp recordings on human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Godfrey; Desai, Sanjay A

    2006-08-18

    Various configurations of the patch-clamp method are powerful tools for examining the transport of charged solutes across biological membranes. Originally developed for the study of relatively large cells which adhere to solid surfaces under in vitro culture, these methods have been increasingly applied to small cells or organelles in suspension. Under these conditions, a number of significant technical problems may arise as a result of the smaller geometry. Here, we examined these problems using human erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, a system where experimental differences and the technical difficulty of erythrocyte patch-clamp have hindered universal agreement on the properties of the induced ion channels. We found that patch-clamp recordings on infected erythrocytes are especially susceptible to artifacts from mechanical perturbations due to solution flow around the cell. To minimize these artifacts, we designed a new perfusion chamber whose geometry allows controlled solution flow around the fragile erythrocyte. Not only were recordings acquired in this chamber significantly less susceptible to perfusion artifacts, but the chamber permitted rapid and reversible application of known inhibitors with negligible mechanical agitation. Electrophysiological recordings then faithfully reproduced several findings made with more traditional methods. The new perfusion chamber should also be useful for patch-clamp recordings on blood cells, protoplasts, and organelles.

  2. Surface architectonics of peripheral blood erythrocytes in patients with mental diseases.

    PubMed

    Novitskii, V V; Ryazantseva, N V; Semin, I R

    2000-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated altered surface topography of peripheral erythrocytes in patients with nonpsychotic mental diseases, nonmetabolic mental retardation, and paranoid schizophrenia. Maximum decrease in the number of biconcave diskocytes and accumulation of transitional, prehemolytic, and degenerative forms of erythrocytes were found in schizophrenia.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria: Band 3 as a Possible Receptor during Invasion of Human Erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoye, Vincent C. N.; Bennett, Vann

    1985-01-01

    Human erythrocyte band 3, a major membrane-spanning protein, was purified and incorporated into liposomes. These liposomes, at nanomolar concentrations of protein, inhibited invasion of human erythrocytes in vitro by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Liposomes containing human band 3 were ten times more effective in inhibiting invasion than those with pig band 3 and six times more effective than liposomes containing human erythrocyte glycophorin. Liposomes alone or liposomes containing erythrocyte glycolipids did not inhibit invasion. These results suggest that band 3 participates in the invasion process in a step involving a specific, high-affinity interaction between band 3 and some component of the parasite.

  4. Evaluation of Hemagglutination Activity of Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Jefferson Muniz; Sarmento, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Souza, Joelma Rodrigues; Brayner, Fábio André; Feitosa, Ana Paula Sampaio; Padilha, Rafael; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Porto, Isaque Jerônimo; Batista, Roberta Ferreti Bonan Dantas; de Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; de Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4) D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L−1. The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS) collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH. PMID:25759815

  5. Identification of a sorbitol permease in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kracke, G R; Preston, G G; Stanley, T H

    1994-02-01

    Sorbitol, a polyol derived from glucose by the enzyme, aldose reductase, is a common organic solute in many cells. It plays a role in the osmotic regulation of epithelial cells and in the pathology of uncontrolled diabetes. To learn more about sorbitol transport, we measured D-[14C]sorbitol influx in human erythrocytes. Sorbitol influx at 37 degrees C was a linear function of sorbitol concentration over the range of 0.05-100 mM. The activation energy for sorbitol influx was 10.0 kcal/mol, and the Q10 over the range 10-50 degrees C was 1.8, higher than predicted for diffusion through an aqueous pore. Glucose transport inhibitors either had no effect (1 mM phloridzin) or minimally inhibited (approximately 35% inhibition by 10 microM cytochalasin B or 250 microM phloretin) sorbitol influx. Influx was stimulated twofold by 0.5 mM p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, an inhibitor of glucose transport, and this was reversed by 2 mM dithiothreitol. Sorbitol influx was neither Na dependent nor sensitive to changes in cell volume. Glucose, fructose, mannitol, myo-inositol, and gluconate, at four- to fivefold molar excesses over sorbitol, did not inhibit its influx. We conclude that there is a specific sorbitol transport pathway in human erythrocytes similar to the sorbitol permease in renal epithelial cells.

  6. Cytoplasmic pH and human erythrocyte shape.

    PubMed Central

    Gedde, M M; Davis, D K; Huestis, W H

    1997-01-01

    Altered external pH transforms human erythrocytes from discocytes to stomatocytes (low pH) or echinocytes (high pH). The mechanism of this transformation is unknown. The preceding companion study (Gedde and Huestis) demonstrated that these shape changes are not mediated by changes in membrane potential, as has been reported. The aim of this study was to identify the physiological properties that mediate this shape change. Red cells were placed in a wide range of physiological states by manipulation of buffer pH, chloride concentration, and osmolality. Morphology and four potential predictor properties (cell pH, membrane potential, cell water, and cell chloride concentration) were assayed. Analysis of the data set by stratification and nonlinear multivariate modeling showed that change in neither cell water nor cell chloride altered the morphology of normal pH cells. In contrast, change in cell pH caused shape change in normal-range membrane potential and cell water cells. The results show that change in cytoplasmic pH is both necessary and sufficient for the shape changes of human erythrocytes equilibrated in altered pH environments. PMID:9138569

  7. Evaluation of hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jefferson Muniz; Sarmento, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Souza, Joelma Rodrigues; Brayner, Fábio André; Feitosa, Ana Paula Sampaio; Padilha, Rafael; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Porto, Isaque Jerônimo; Batista, Roberta Ferreti Bonan Dantas; de Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; de Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4) D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L(-1). The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS) collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH.

  8. [Elimination of haloperidol from erythrocytes surfaces supernatant and blood plasma].

    PubMed

    Shanidze, L A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the adsorption rate of haloperidol on erythrocytes surfaces. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of haloperidol were monitored in the experiment. The neuroleptic was administered to 12 adult dogs and the blood samples were collected for further analysis following 20, 30, 60, 180, 240, 360, 420 and 480 minutes after the injection. The groups of samples (blood plasma and supernatant) were monitored during this period. The differences between haloperidol concentration in the supernatant and blood plasma were compared. Our data have shown that dynamics of the elimination of intact and acidified forms of haloperidol from the supernatant and the blood serum are not the same. Intact and acidified forms are differently regulated by plasma. albumines and globulines. The process of redistribution of haloperidol between the both substrates takes place, while the supernatant has a donor function for the free form of haloperidol and represents the acceptor of the haloperidol's metabolites. This provides the possibility to develop multidiscipline approach to the optimization to the prescription of haloperidol.

  9. Human erythrocytes analyzed by generalized 2D Raman correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Kozicki, Mateusz; Czepiel, Jacek; Łabanowska, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Grzegorz; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Birczyńska, Malwina; Biesiada, Grażyna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    The most numerous elements of the blood cells, erythrocytes, consist mainly of two components: homogeneous interior filled with hemoglobin and closure which is the cell membrane. To gain insight into their specific properties we studied the process of disintegration, considering these two constituents, and comparing the natural aging process of human healthy blood cells. MicroRaman spectra of hemoglobin within the single RBC were recorded using 514.5, and 785 nm laser lines. The generalized 2D correlation method was applied to analyze the collected spectra. The time passed from blood donation was regarded as an external perturbation. The time was no more than 40 days according to the current storage limit of blood banks, although, the average RBC life span is 120 days. An analysis of the prominent synchronous and asynchronous cross peaks allow us to get insight into the mechanism of hemoglobin decomposition. Appearing asynchronous cross-peaks point towards globin and heme separation from each other, while synchronous shows already broken globin into individual amino acids. Raman scattering analysis of hemoglobin "wrapping", i.e. healthy erythrocyte ghosts, allows for the following peculiarity of their behavior. The increasing power of the excitation laser induced alterations in the assemblage of membrane lipids. 2D correlation maps, obtained with increasing laser power recognized as an external perturbation, allows for the consideration of alterations in the erythrocyte membrane structure and composition, which occurs first in the proteins. Cross-peaks were observed indicating an asynchronous correlation between the senescent-cell antigen (SCA) and heme or proteins vibrations. The EPR spectra of the whole blood was analyzed regarding time as an external stimulus. The 2D correlation spectra points towards participation of the selected metal ion centers in the disintegration process.

  10. Acute dark chocolate ingestion is beneficial for hemodynamics via enhancement of erythrocyte deformability in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Radosinska, Jana; Horvathova, Martina; Frimmel, Karel; Muchova, Jana; Vidosovicova, Maria; Vazan, Rastislav; Bernatova, Iveta

    2017-03-01

    Erythrocyte deformability is an important property of erythrocytes that considerably affects blood flow and hemodynamics. The high content of polyphenols present in dark chocolate has been reported to play a protective role in functionality of erythrocytes. We hypothesized that chocolate might influence erythrocytes not only after repeated chronic intake, but also immediately after its ingestion. Thus, we determined the acute effect of dark chocolate and milk (with lower content of biologically active substances) chocolate intake on erythrocyte deformability. We also focused on selected factors that may affect erythrocyte deformability, specifically nitric oxide production in erythrocytes and total antioxidant capacity of plasma. We determined posttreatment changes in the mentioned parameters 2hours after consumption of chocolate compared with their levels before consumption of chocolate. In contrast to milk chocolate intake, the dark chocolate led to a significantly higher increase in erythrocyte deformability. Nitric oxide production in erythrocytes was not changed after dark chocolate intake, but significantly decreased after milk chocolate. The plasma total antioxidant capacity remained unaffected after ingestion of both chocolates. We conclude that our hypothesis was confirmed. Single ingestion of dark chocolate improved erythrocyte deformability despite unchanged nitric oxide production and antioxidant capacity of plasma. Increased deformability of erythrocytes may considerably improve rheological properties of blood and thus hemodynamics in humans, resulting in better tissue oxygenation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. LIN28A Expression Reduces Sickling of Cultured Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Fasano, Ross M.; Lee, Y. Terry; Kaushal, Megha; Byrnes, Colleen; Meier, Emily R.; Anderson, Molly; Rabel, Antoinette; Braylan, Raul; Stroncek, David F.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) has therapeutic importance for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and the beta-thalassemias. It was recently reported that increased expression of LIN28 proteins or decreased expression of its target let-7 miRNAs enhances HbF levels in cultured primary human erythroblasts from adult healthy donors. Here LIN28A effects were studied further using erythrocytes cultured from peripheral blood progenitor cells of pediatric subjects with SCD. Transgenic expression of LIN28A was accomplished by lentiviral transduction in CD34(+) sickle cells cultivated ex vivo in serum-free medium. LIN28A over-expression (LIN28A-OE) increased HbF, reduced beta (sickle)-globin, and strongly suppressed all members of the let-7 family of miRNAs. LIN28A-OE did not affect erythroblast differentiation or prevent enucleation, but it significantly reduced or ameliorated the sickling morphologies of the enucleated erythrocytes. PMID:25188417

  12. Ecto-enzyme activity of human erythrocyte adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bielat, K; Tritsch, G L

    1989-04-11

    Adenosine deaminase is found primarily in the cytoplasm of many cell types. In the human erythrocyte, about 30 per cent of the total adenosine deaminase activity is membrane associated, and about two-thirds of this is inactivated by treatment of intact erythrocytes with the nonpenetrating reagent diazotized sulfanilic acid, without affecting lactate dehydrogenase, a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme. This indicates that within the cell membranes, the catalytic site of about two-thirds of the adenosine deaminase faces the external medium, i.e., ecto adenosine deaminase. Localization of adenosine deaminase activity at the cell membrane is demonstrated directly by electron microscopy by use of the substrate 6-Chloropurine ribonucleoside, which is dechlorinated by adenosine deaminase to produce Cl-, which is precipitated at its locus of formation by added Ag+, and the precipitated AgCl converted into the electron dense Ag0 upon exposure to light. From the Hydropathic Profile of the amino acid sequence of adenosine deaminase it is evident that there are two hydrophobic domains of sufficient length to span a biological membrane, and it is proposed that these domains could function to anchor the enzyme to the membrane. The importance of adenosine deaminase is indicated by the fatal immuno-deficiency which results from untreated genetic adenosine deaminase deficiency. It may be important to determine whether the amount of ecto adenosine deaminase activity is better suited to assess the clinical status of adenosine deaminase deficient patients that the currently used total cellular enzyme activity.

  13. Method for Determining Erythrocyte Surface Area by Polarization and Nephelometric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeiko, M. M.; Smunev, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a fast method for determining the surface area and volume of erythrocytes in the biconcave-discoid shape, based on establishing regression relations between the parameters to be determined and the angular polarization coefficients P(Θ) and scattering indicatrix σ(Θ). We have shown that using σ(Θ) for angles 6° and 17°, P(Θ) for angles 81° and 119° lets us determine the surface area of the erythrocytes within ≈1% and the volume of the erythrocytes within ≈2%.

  14. Biochemically altered human erythrocytes as a carrier for targeted delivery of primaquine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Fars K; Harisa, Gamal El-Din I; Maqboul, Ahmad; Abdel-Hamid, Magdi; Neau, Steven H; Alsarra, Ibrahim A

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human erythrocytes as a carrier for targeted drug delivery of primaquine (PQ). The process of PQ loading in human erythrocytes, as well as the effect of PQ loading on the oxidative status of erythrocytes, was also studied. At PQ concentrations of 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/mL and an incubation time of 2 h, the ratios of the concentrations of PQ entrapped in erythrocytes to that in the incubation medium were 0.515, 0.688, 0.697 and 0.788, respectively. The maximal decline of erythrocyte reduced glutathione content was observed at 8 mg/mL of PQ compared with native erythrocytes p < 0.001. In contrast, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl were significantly increased in cells loaded with PQ (p < 0.001). Furthermore, osmotic fragility of PQ carrier erythrocytes was increased in comparison with unloaded cells. Electron microscopy revealed spherocyte formation with PQ carrier erythrocytes. PQ-loaded cells showed sustained drug release over a 48 h period. Erythrocytes were loaded with PQ successfully, but there were some biochemical as well as physiological changes that resulted from the effect of PQ on the oxidative status of drug-loaded erythrocytes. These changes may result in favorable targeting of PQ-loaded cells to reticulo-endothelial organs. The relative impact of these changes remains to be explored in ongoing animal studies.

  15. Preservation of bilayer structure in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts after phospholipase treatment. A 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    van Meer, G; de Kruijff, B; op den Kamp, J A; van Deenen, L L

    1980-02-15

    1. Fresh human erythrocytes were treated with lytic and non-lytic combinations of phospholipases A2, C and sphingomyelinase. The 31P-NMR spectra of ghosts derived from such erythrocytes show that, in all cases, the residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids remain organized in a bilayer configuration. 2. A bilayer configuration of the (lyso)phospholipids was also observed after treatment of erythrocyte ghosts with various phospholipases even in the case that 98% of the phospholipid was converted into lysophospholipid (72%) and ceramides (26%). 3. A slightly decreased order of the phosphate group of phospholipid molecules, seen as reduced effective chemical shift anisotropy in the 31P-NMR spectra, was found following the formation of diacyglycerols and ceramides in the membrane of intact erythrocytes. Treatment of ghosts always resulted in an extensive decrease in the order of the phosphate groups. 4. The results allow the following conclusions to made: a. Hydrolysis of phospholipids in intact red cells and ghosts does not result in the formation of non-bilayer configuration of residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids. b. Haemolysis, which is obtained by subsequent treatment of intact cells with sphingomyelinase and phospholipase A2, or with phospholipase C, cannot be ascribed to the formation of non-bilayer configuration of phosphate-containing lipids. c. Preservation of bilayer structure, even after hydrolysis of all phospholipid, shows that other membrane constitutents, e.g. cholesterol and/or membrane proteins play an important role in stabilizing the structure of the erythrocyte membrane. d. A major prerequisite for the application of phospholipases in lipid localization studies, the preservation of a bilayer configuration during phospholipid hydrolysis, is met for the erythrocyte membrane.

  16. In Vitro Effect of Sodium Fluoride on Malondialdehyde Concentration and on Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; García-Ortíz, Liliana; Morales González, José A.; Hernández-Rodríguez, Sergio; Ramírez-García, Sotero; Núñez-Ramos, Norma R.; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe the in vitro effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the specific activity of the major erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes, as well as on the membrane malondialdehyde concentration, as indicators of oxidative stress. For this purpose, human erythrocytes were incubated with NaF (0, 7, 28, 56, and 100 μg/mL) or NaF (100 μg/mL) + vitamin E (1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μg/mL). The malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration on the surface of the erythrocytes was determined, as were the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GlPx). Our results demonstrated that erythrocytes incubated with increasing NaF concentrations had an increased MDA concentration, along with decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes. The presence of vitamin E partially reversed the toxic effects of NaF on erythrocytes. These findings suggest that NaF induces oxidative stress in erythrocytes in vitro, and this stress is partially reversed by the presence of vitamin E. PMID:24223512

  17. Hydroxyl radical scavenging mechanism of human erythrocytes by quercetin-germanium (IV) complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Pu; Xie, Wei-Ling; Cai, Huai-Hong; Cai, Ji-Ye; Yang, Pei-Hui

    2012-08-30

    Quercetin is a popular flavonoid in plant foods, herbs, and dietary supplement. Germanium, a kind of trace elements, can enhance the body immunity. This study investigated the hydroxyl-radical-scavenging mechanism of the quercertin-germanium (IV) (Qu-Ge) complex to human erythrocytes, especially the effects on ultrastructure and mechanical properties of cell membrane, plasma membrane potential and intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration. Results showed that QuGe(2), a kind of the Qu-Ge complex, could reduce the oxidative damage of erythrocytes, change the cell-surface morphology, and partly recover the disruption of plasma membrane potential and intracellular free Ca(2+) level. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the changes of the cell morphology, cell-membrane ultrastructure and biophysical properties at nanoscalar level. QuGe(2) has triggered the antioxidative factor to inhibit cellular damage. These results can improve the understanding of hydroxyl-radical-scavenging mechanism of human erythrocytes induced by the Qu-Ge complex, which can be potentially developed as a new antioxidant for treatment of oxidative damage. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of hydration on the water content of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, R L; Cravalho, E G; Huggins, C E

    1976-01-01

    An ideal, hydrated, nondilute pseudobinary salt-protein-water solution model of the RBC intracellular solution has been developed to describe the osmotic behavior of human erythrocytes during freezing and thawing. Because of the hydration of intracellular solutes (mostly cell proteins), our analytical results predict that at least 16.65% of the isotonic cell water content will be retained within RBCs placed in hypertonic solutions. These findings are consistent not only with the experimental measurements of the amount of isotonic cell water retained within RBCs subjected to nonisotonic extracellular solutions (20-32%) but also with the experimental evidence that all of the water within RBCs is solvent water. By modeling the RBC intracellular solution as a hydrated salt-protein-water solution, no anomalous osmotic behavior is apparent. PMID:990394

  19. Structural effects of the Solanum steroids solasodine, diosgenin and solanine on human erythrocytes and molecular models of eukaryotic membranes.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Londoño-Londoño, Julián; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Strzałka, Kazimierz; Villena, Fernando; Avello, Marcia; Suwalsky, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This report presents evidence that the following Solanum steroids: solasodine, diosgenin and solanine interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models of their membranes as follows: a) X-ray diffraction studies showed that the compounds at low molar ratios (0.1-10.0mol%) induced increasing structural perturbation to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and to a considerable lower extent to those of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine; b) differential scanning calorimetry data showed that the compounds were able to alter the cooperativity of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine phase transitions in a concentration-dependent manner; c) in the presence of steroids, the fluorescence of Merocyanine 540 incorporated to the membranes decreased suggesting a fluidization of the lipid system; d) scanning electron microscopy observations showed that all steroids altered the normal shape of human erythrocytes inducing mainly echinocytosis, characterized by the formation of blebs in their surfaces, an indication that their molecules are located into the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane.

  20. Plasmodium vivax Invasion of Human Erythrocytes Inhibited by Antibodies Directed against the Duffy Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, Brian T; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Xainli, Jia; McHenry, Amy; Panichakul, Tasanee; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cui, Liwang; Bockarie, Moses; Chitnis, Chetan; Adams, John; Zimmerman, Peter A; King, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax invasion requires interaction between the human Duffy antigen on the surface of erythrocytes and the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) expressed by the parasite. Given that Duffy-negative individuals are resistant and that Duffy-negative heterozygotes show reduced susceptibility to blood-stage infection, we hypothesized that antibodies directed against region two of P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBPII) would inhibit P. vivax invasion of human erythrocytes. Methods and Findings Using a recombinant region two of the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (rPvDBPII), polyclonal antibodies were generated from immunized rabbits and affinity purified from the pooled sera of 14 P. vivax–exposed Papua New Guineans. It was determined by ELISA and by flow cytometry, respectively, that both rabbit and human antibodies inhibited binding of rPvDBPII to the Duffy antigen N-terminal region and to Duffy-positive human erythrocytes. Additionally, using immunofluorescent microscopy, the antibodies were shown to attach to native PvDBP on the apical end of the P. vivax merozoite. In vitro invasion assays, using blood isolates from individuals in the Mae Sot district of Thailand, showed that addition of rabbit anti-PvDBPII Ab or serum (antibodies against, or serum containing antibodies against, region two of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein) (1:100) reduced the number of parasite invasions by up to 64%, while pooled PvDBPII antisera from P. vivax–exposed people reduced P. vivax invasion by up to 54%. Conclusions These results show, for what we believe to be the first time, that both rabbit and human antibodies directed against PvDBPII reduce invasion efficiency of wild P. vivax isolated from infected patients, and suggest that a PvDBP-based vaccine may reduce human blood-stage P. vivax infection. PMID:18092885

  1. Carbohydrate content of human erythrocyte membrane. Variations with ABO-blood group.

    PubMed

    Bladier, D; Perret, G; Baudelot, J; Cornillot, P

    1979-04-01

    The study of the carbohydrates of human erythrocyte membranes has been mainly focused on their glycopeptidic and glycolipidic complexes. Modifications of these carbohydrates have been described in subjects with various pathological states. In order to characterize possible changes of the glycopeptides, or glycolipids obtained from erythrocyte membrane in various pathological situations, the determination of the carbohydrate content of the whole membrane appeared a necessary preliminary. This study concerns the determination of the normal values of the main carbohydrates of whole human erythrocyte membranes, with respect to their blood group. Erythrocyte membranes were prepared from donors of the four ABO blood groups. After acidic hydrolysis, the contents of fucose, mannose, galactose, glucose, glucosamine, galactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid in each blood group were determined and compared with one another. The galactosamine content of A, B and AB erythrocyte membranes is significantly higher than that of the O-erythrocyte. For galactose, the differences are significant for the following pairs: A/O; B/O; AB/O; A/B; A/AB. Significant differences in the mannose contents of O-erythrocytes and A, B and AB erythrocytes have also been found. This result suggests that a basic difference, in the core of the oligosaccharide chains, may exist between O and A, B, AB erythrocyte membranes.

  2. Antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfMSPDBL1 inhibit merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Takeo, Satoru; Maier, Alexander G; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cowman, Alan F; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2012-03-02

    One approach to develop a malaria blood-stage vaccine is to target proteins that play critical roles in the erythrocyte invasion of merozoites. The merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) and the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) are considered promising vaccine candidates, for they are known to play important roles in erythrocyte invasion and are exposed to host immune system. Here we focused on a Plasmodium falciparum antigen, PfMSPDBL1 (encoded by PF10_0348 gene) that is a member of the MSP3 family and has both Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain and secreted polymorphic antigen associated with merozoites (SPAM) domain. Therefore, we aimed to characterize PfMSPDBL1 as a vaccine candidate. Recombinant full-length protein (rFL) of PfMSPDBL1 was synthesized by a wheat germ cell-free system, and rabbit antiserum was raised against rFL. We show that rabbit anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion of wild type parasites in vitro in a dose dependent manner, and the specificity of inhibitory activity was confirmed using PfMSPDBL1 knockout parasites. Pre-incubation of the anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies with the recombinant SPAM domain had no effect on the inhibitory activity suggesting that antibodies to this region were not involved. In addition, antibodies to rFL were elicited by P. falciparum infection in malaria endemic area, suggesting the PfMSLDBL1 is immunogenic to humans. Our results suggest that PfMSPDBL1 is a novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate.

  3. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum EBA-175 homologue sequences that specifically bind to human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, John Jairo; Bravo, Ricardo Vera; Ocampo, Marisol; Lopez, Ramses; Rodriguez, Luis E; Curtidor, Hernando; Puentes, Alvaro; Garcia, Javier E; Tovar, Diana; Gomez, Johana; Leiton, Jesus; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-09-03

    Erythrocyte binding antigen-160 (EBA-160) protein is a Plasmodium falciparum antigen homologue from the erythrocyte binding protein family (EBP). It has been shown that the EBP family plays a role in parasite binding to the erythrocyte surface. The EBA-160 sequence has been chemically synthesised in seventy 20-mer sequential peptides covering the entire 3D7 protein strain, each of which was tested in erythrocyte binding assays to identify possible EBA-160 functional regions. Five EBA-160 high activity binding peptides (HABPs) specifically binding to erythrocytes with high affinity were identified. Dissociation constants lay between 200 and 460 nM and Hill coefficients between 1.5 and 2.3. Erythrocyte membrane protein binding peptide cross-linking assays using SDS-PAGE showed that these peptides bound specifically to 12, 28, and 44 kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. The nature of these receptor sites was studied in peptide binding assays using enzyme-treated erythrocytes. HABPs were able to block merozoite in vitro invasion of erythrocytes. HABPs' potential as anti-malarial vaccine candidates is also discussed.

  4. Effect of alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide on the intracellular cations of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J R; Kowalski, M M; Wallas, C H

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption to human erythrocytes of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide treated by mild alkaline hydrolysis (h-LPS) stimulated an increase in the intracellular Na+ concentration and a decrease in the intracellular K+ concentration of the erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated by h-LPS remained responsive to the membrane adenosine triphosphatase inhibitors ouabain and ethacrynic acid, indicating that hLPS did not alter erythrocyte cations be depleting energy intermediates or uncoupling energy metabolism from active cation transport. The h-LPS-treated erythrocytes became non-agglutinable by the lectin concanavalin A prior to the development of changes in intracellular cations. In addition, h-LPS-treated erythrocytes demonstrated a three-fold greater cation response to ethacrynic acid than the untreated erythrocytes; this greater response was probably due to local membrane effects by h-LPS on the ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase. It is suggested that the h-LPS-induced alteration of erythrocyte cation content was secondary to an increase in ion permeability localized to the concanavalin A receptor regions of the erythrocyte membrane, possibly combined with indirect effects of membrane-bound h-LPS on ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase. Images PMID:330408

  5. Effect of alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide on the intracellular cations of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Warren, J R; Kowalski, M M; Wallas, C H

    1977-08-01

    The adsorption to human erythrocytes of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide treated by mild alkaline hydrolysis (h-LPS) stimulated an increase in the intracellular Na+ concentration and a decrease in the intracellular K+ concentration of the erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated by h-LPS remained responsive to the membrane adenosine triphosphatase inhibitors ouabain and ethacrynic acid, indicating that hLPS did not alter erythrocyte cations be depleting energy intermediates or uncoupling energy metabolism from active cation transport. The h-LPS-treated erythrocytes became non-agglutinable by the lectin concanavalin A prior to the development of changes in intracellular cations. In addition, h-LPS-treated erythrocytes demonstrated a three-fold greater cation response to ethacrynic acid than the untreated erythrocytes; this greater response was probably due to local membrane effects by h-LPS on the ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase. It is suggested that the h-LPS-induced alteration of erythrocyte cation content was secondary to an increase in ion permeability localized to the concanavalin A receptor regions of the erythrocyte membrane, possibly combined with indirect effects of membrane-bound h-LPS on ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase.

  6. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio

    2007-09-17

    Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na(+)/H(+) exchange and HC(3) (-)/Cl(-) anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore damaged proteins, it is equipped with high activity of protective enzymes. Redox changes in the cell initiate various signalling pathways. Plasma membrane oxido-reductases (PMORs) are transmembrane electron transport systems that have been found in the membranes of all cells and have been extensively characterized in the human erythrocyte. Erythrocyte PMORs transfer reducing equivalents from intracellular reductants to extracellular oxidants, thus their most important role seems to be to enable the cell respond to changes in intra- and extra-cellular redox environments.So far the activity of erythrocyte PMORs in disease states has not been systematically investigated. This review summarizes present knowledge on erythrocyte electron transfer activity in humans (health, type 1 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic uremia) and hypothesizes an integrated model of the functional organization of erythrocyte plasma membrane where electron pathways work in parallel with transport metabolons to maintain redox homeostasis.

  7. Identification of the phorbol ester receptor in human and avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, C.M.; Sando, J.J.; Speizer, L.A.

    1986-05-01

    The ability of phorbol esters to inhibit the uptake of a fluorescent glucose analogue in goose but not human erythrocytes is consistent with earlier reports that the human red blood cell lacks the phorbol ester receptor. However, they have located specific phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding sites in both human and goose erythrocytes. Human and goose red blood cells contain 2 classes of phorbol ester receptors with similar affinities, however the human erythrocyte contains 1/3 as many phorbol ester receptors as does the goose red blood cell. An additional contrast in the binding of phorbol esters to human and goose red blood cells is the temperature-induced enhancement of binding to goose, but not human erythrocytes. Equilibrium phorbol ester binding to goose red blood cells at 37/sup 0/C is enhanced 3.3 +/- 0.4 times that amount bound at 4/sup 0/C. Equilibrium binding of phorbol esters to human erythrocytes is identical at both temperatures. In vivo and in vitro phosphorylation profiles of C-kinase substrates also differ between the human and goose erythrocyte.

  8. Human erythrocyte band 3 functions as a receptor for the sialic acid-independent invasion of Plasmodium falciparum. Role of the RhopH3-MSP1 complex.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Michael; Yamodo, Innocent; Ranjan, Ravi; Li, Xuerong; Mines, Gregory; Marinkovic, Marina; Hanada, Toshihiko; Oh, Steven S; Chishti, Athar H

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum takes advantage of two broadly defined alternate invasion pathways when infecting human erythrocytes: one that depends on and the other that is independent of host sialic acid residues on the erythrocyte surface. Within the sialic acid-dependent (SAD) and sialic acid-independent (SAID) invasion pathways, several alternate host receptors are used by P. falciparum based on its particular invasion phenotype. Earlier, we reported that two putative extracellular regions of human erythrocyte band 3 termed 5C and 6A function as host invasion receptor segments binding parasite proteins MSP1 and MSP9 via a SAID mechanism. In this study, we developed two mono-specific anti-peptide chicken IgY antibodies to demonstrate that the 5C and 6A regions of band 3 are exposed on the surface of human erythrocytes. These antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion by the P. falciparum 3D7 and 7G8 strains (SAID invasion phenotype), and the blocking effect was enhanced in sialic acid-depleted erythrocytes. In contrast, the IgY antibodies had only a marginal inhibitory effect on FCR3 and Dd2 strains (SAD invasion phenotype). A direct biochemical interaction between erythrocyte band 3 epitopes and parasite RhopH3, identified by the yeast two-hybrid screen, was established. RhopH3 formed a complex with MSP119 and the 5ABC region of band 3, and a recombinant segment of RhopH3 inhibited parasite invasion in human erythrocytes. Together, these findings provide evidence that erythrocyte band 3 functions as a major host invasion receptor in the SAID invasion pathway by assembling a multi-protein complex composed of parasite ligands RhopH3 and MSP1.

  9. C3b deposition on human erythrocytes induces the formation of a membrane skeleton–linked protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanaphanurach, Pallop; Mirchev, Rossen; Ghiran, Ionita; Asara, John M.; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Golan, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, also known as CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked (GPI-linked) plasma membrane protein, protects autologous cells from complement-mediated damage by inhibiting complement component 3 (C3) activation. An important physical property of GPI-anchored complement regulatory proteins such as DAF is their ability to translate laterally in the plasma membrane. Here, we used single-particle tracking and tether-pulling experiments to measure DAF lateral diffusion, lateral confinement, and membrane skeletal associations in human erythrocyte membranes. In native membranes, most DAF molecules exhibited Brownian lateral diffusion. Fluid-phase complement activation caused deposition of C3b, one of the products of C3 cleavage, onto erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA). We then determined that DAF, C3b, GPA, and band 3 molecules were laterally immobilized in the membranes of complement-treated cells, and GPA was physically associated with the membrane skeleton. Mass spectrometry analysis further showed that band 3, α-spectrin, β-spectrin, and ankyrin were present in a complex with C3b and GPA in complement-treated cells. C3b deposition was also associated with a substantial increase in erythrocyte membrane stiffness and/or viscosity. We therefore suggest that complement activation stimulates the formation of a membrane skeleton–linked DAF-C3b-GPA–band 3 complex on the erythrocyte surface. This complex may promote the removal of senescent erythrocytes from the circulation. PMID:19258706

  10. Whole-grain rye and wheat alkylresorcinols are incorporated into human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Linko, Anna-Maria; Adlercreutz, Herman

    2005-01-01

    Alkylresorcinols (AR), a group of phenolic lipids, exist in the human diet in whole-grain rye and wheat. They are absorbed by humans and have been quantified in plasma. In this 2-week study we assessed AR incorporation into human erythrocyte membranes. Nine subjects attended the study; four avoided whole-grain products for 1 week and then included whole-grain rye and wheat bread in the diet for the second week, four included whole-grain rye and wheat products in the diet during the whole follow-up and one followed a gluten-free diet. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane AR were analysed after weeks 1 and 2. Erythrocyte membrane AR concentrations increased an average of 231 nmol/l of packed erythrocytes (P=0.036) after consumption of whole-grain rye and wheat products. Plasma AR levels increased an average of 175 nmol/l (P=0.058). When intake of whole-grain products was constant, erythrocyte membrane and plasma AR levels remained stable. Long-chain AR were incorporated into erythrocyte membranes in a higher proportion compared to shorter-chain AR. This preliminary study shows that AR are incorporated into human erythrocyte membranes in vivo.

  11. Permeability of human erythrocyte membrane vesicles to alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Sze, H; Solomon, A K

    1979-02-02

    The permeability of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes to inorganic cations was determined quantitatively. Using 86Rb as a K analog, we have measured the rate constant of 86Rb efflux from vesicles under equilibrium exchange conditions, using a dialysis procedure. The permeability coefficients of the vesicles to Rb are only about an order of magnitude greater than that of whole erythrocytes. Furthermore, we have measured many of the specialized transport systems known to exist in erythrocytes and have shown that glucose, sulfate, ATP-dependent Ca and ATP-dependent Na transport activities are retained by the vesicle membranes. These results suggest that inside-out and right-side-out vesicles can be used effectively to study transport properties of erythrocyte membranes.

  12. Reticulocyte and Erythrocyte Binding-Like Proteins Function Cooperatively in Invasion of Human Erythrocytes by Malaria Parasites▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Lopaticki, Sash; Maier, Alexander G.; Thompson, Jennifer; Wilson, Danny W.; Tham, Wai-Hong; Triglia, Tony; Gout, Alex; Speed, Terence P.; Beeson, James G.; Healer, Julie; Cowman, Alan F.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe form of malaria in humans and invades erythrocytes using multiple ligand-receptor interactions. Two important protein families involved in erythrocyte binding are the erythrocyte binding-like (EBL) and the reticulocyte binding-like (RBL or P. falciparum Rh [PfRh]) proteins. We constructed P. falciparum lines lacking expression of EBL proteins by creating single and double knockouts of the corresponding genes for eba-175, eba-181, and eba-140 and show that the EBL and PfRh proteins function cooperatively, consistent with them playing a similar role in merozoite invasion. We provide evidence that PfRh and EBL proteins functionally interact, as loss of function of EBA-181 ablates the ability of PfRh2a/b protein antibodies to inhibit merozoite invasion. Additionally, loss of function of some ebl genes results in selection for increased transcription of the PfRh family. This provides a rational basis for considering PfRh and EBL proteins for use as a combination vaccine against P. falciparum. We immunized rabbits with combinations of PfRh and EBL proteins to test the ability of antibodies to block merozoite invasion in growth inhibition assays. A combination of EBA-175, PfRh2a/b, and PfRh4 recombinant proteins induced antibodies that potently blocked merozoite invasion. This validates the use of a combination of these ligands as a potential vaccine that would have broad activity against P. falciparum. PMID:21149582

  13. THE PERMEABILITY OF THE HUMAN ERYTHROCYTE TO SODIUM AND POTASSIUM

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, A. K.

    1952-01-01

    Measurements have been made on the permeability of the human erythrocyte to Na and K in vitro, using radioactive tracers to observe the system in the steady state. The average inward K flux is 1.67 m.eq./liter cells hour, and the apparent activation energy is 12,300 ± 1300 calories/mol. The inward K flux is independent of the external K concentration in the range of concentrations studied (4 to 16 m.eq. K/liter plasma). Rb appears to compete with K for transport into the cell, whereas Na and Li do not. The average inward Na flux is 3.08 ± 0.57 m.eq. Na/liter cells hour, and the apparent activation energies are 20,200 ± 2700 calories/mol for inward transport, and 14,900 ± 3,400 calories/mol for outward transport. The inward Na flux is dependent on the external Na concentration, but not in a linear fashion. Li appears to compete with Na for inward transport, whereas K and Rb do not. An approximate maximum estimate shows that the energy required for cation transport is only 8.8 calories/mol liter cells hour of the 110 calories/mol liter cells hour available from the consumption of glucose. A working hypothesis for the transport of Na and K is presented. PMID:12981235

  14. THE OSMOTICALLY FUNCTIONAL WATER CONTENT OF THE HUMAN ERYTHROCYTE.

    PubMed

    LEFEVRE, P G

    1964-01-01

    Experiments were directed toward estimation of the magnitude of error incurred by the presumption of idealized osmometric behavior in the author's recent studies of monosaccharide transport through the human erythrocyte membrane. Thick suspensions of washed cells in isotonic buffered balanced salt medium were mixed in fixed proportions with varying dilutions of a concentrate of either (a) the mixed chlorides of the medium, or (b) glucose in the isotonic medium, and the resultant freezing point and hematocrit values determined. The form of the responses in the tonicity and the cell volume, as functions of the variable dilution of sugar or salts, conformed consistently with relations derived from the classical van't Hoff-Boyle-Mariotte pressure-volume relation. However, the effective cell water contents appeared substantially less than the weight lost in conventional drying, and varied somewhat according to the index used: expressed as grams of H(2)O per milliliter of cells at isotonic volume, the cell water implied by the hematocrit behavior was 0.614 +/- 0.015 (SD); by the salt tonicity response, 0.565 +/- 0.027; by the immediate glucose tonicity response, 0.562 +/- 0.044; and by the equilibrium glucose tonicities, 0.589 +/- 0.043. Olmstead's reports of gross deviation from the van't Hoff relation, in the rabbit red cell's responses to tonicity displacement, are attributed primarily to a systematic aberration in his method of data analysis, the observations themselves agreeing substantially with the present findings.

  15. Chloride transport in human erythrocytes and ghosts: a quantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Funder, J; Wieth, J O

    1976-11-01

    1. Homogeneous preparations of resealed ghosts with intracellular KCl concentrations between 15 and 900 mM could be prepared. Virtually all ghosts sealed to chloride. The chloride transport system was found not to be damaged: a quantitative comparison of the self-exchange of 36Cl- across intact and resealed membranes showed that both the transport capacity and a number of characteristic properties were identical (saturation kinetics, temperature dependence and the effect of inhibitors). 2. Due to the absence of intracellular titratable buffers intracellular chloride concentration in ghosts vary only slightly between pH5 and 11. The unidirectional exchange flux was constant between pH 7 and 11, showing that the transport system does not have a functionally important titratable group in the alkaline range, as previously assumed. The decrease of transport below pH 7 is similar in intact erythrocytes and ghosts. 3. Mean cellular volume of the resealed ghosts was a function of the amount of KCl added at 'reversal', before the ghosts are sealed. The ghosts shrank by osmosis when KCl was added to the suspension of 'unsealed' ghosts. The reflexion coefficient of sucrose (and therefore the osmotic effect) is larger than that of KCl. It was, therefore, possible to demonstrate that volume changes do not affect the chloride transport across the human red cell membrane. Unidirectional chloride fluxes at a KCl concentration of 165 mM were independent of ghost volume (100-40 mum3).

  16. Purification and properties of arginase from human liver and erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Berüter, J; Colombo, J P; Bachmann, C

    1978-01-01

    Arginase was isolated from human liver and erythrocytes. The purification procedure used acetone precipitation, heat-treatment, (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Both enzymes migrated to the anode at pH8.3 on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. After incubation at pH8.0 and 37 degrees C the purified anionic liver arginase migrated to the cathode on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. It is assumed that the multiple forms of the enzyme reported in the literature are partly artifacts of the purification procedure. The liver arginase showed a mol.wt. of 107000 determined by gel filtration and a sedimentation coefficient of 5.9S. Treatment of the liver enzyme with 0.25% sodium dodecyl sulphate at pH10 demonstrated an oligomeric structure of the enzyme with a mol.wt. of the subunit of 35000. The kinetic properties determined for the purified liver arginase showed an optimum pH of 9.3 and an optimal MnCl2 concentration of 2mM. The Km for L-arginine was 10.5 mM and for L-canavanine 50mM, and L-lysine exhibited a competitive type of inhibition with a Ki of 4.4mM. L-Homoarginine was not a substrate for liver arginase. PMID:743206

  17. Diffusion properties of band 3 in human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Jeffrey O.

    The plasma membrane of the human erythrocyte (RBC) is a six fold symmetric network held together at various pinning points by several multi-protein complexes. This unique architecture is what gives the RBC its remarkable material properties and any disruptions to the network can have severe consequences for the cell. Band 3 is a major transmembrane protein that plays the role of linking the fluid lipid bilayer to the cytoskeletal network. To interrogate the structural integrity of the RBC membrane we have tracked individual band 3 molecules in RBCs displaying a variety of pathologies that are all a consequence of membrane or network related defects. These diseases are spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and pyropokilocytosis. We have also investigated the protein related diseases sickle cell, and south east asian ovalocytosis. To assess the impact that the network has on the dynamic organization of the cell we have also studied the mobility of band 3 in RBC progenitor cells. Individual band 3 molecules were imaged at 120 frames/second and their diffusion coefficients and compartment sizes recorded. The distributions of the compartment sizes combined with the information about the short and long time diffusion of band 3 has given us insight into the architecture of the membrane in normal and diseased cells. The observation that different membrane pathologies can be distinguished, even to the point of different molecular origins of the same disease, implies that the mobility of transmembrane proteins may be a useful tool for characterizing the "health" of the membrane.

  18. Relationship between erythrocyte volume and cell age in humans and baboons. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; Galli, R.L.; Melaragno, A.J.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-03-30

    The relationship of red blood cell size to age during steady-state hematopoiesis has been studied using erythrocytes separated on the basis of size using counterflow centrifugation. The ratio of the age-related enzyme, erythrocyte glutamic oxaloacetic transferase (EGOT), to hemoglobin (Hb) increased progressively through the fractions, suggesting a correlation between erythrocyte volume and age. Reticulocytes, while present in all fractions, were selectively enriched in the larger subpopulations. To verify the biochemical evidence that erythrocytes decrease in volume with aging, in vivo cohort labeling of red blood cells with 59Fe was performed in baboons. A similar relationship of EGOT to Hb was observed to that in the human subpopulations. While a certain amount of erythrocyte volume heterogeneity seems to be present as a result of erythropoeisis, our data support the hypothesis that red blood cells decrease in volume as they age.

  19. Interactions of the antiviral and antiparkinson agent amantadine with lipid membranes and human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Altamirano, Mariella; Villena, Fernando; Dukes, Nathan; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-07-01

    Aimed to better understand the molecular mechanisms of its interactions with cell membranes, human erythrocyte and molecular models of the red cell membrane were utilized. The latter consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of amantadine to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In an attempt to further elucidate its effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined amantadine influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated that amantadine induced morphological changes to human erythrocytes and interacted in a concentration-dependent manner with DMPC bilayers in contrast to DMPE that was hardly affected by the presence of the drug.

  20. A molecule in teleost fish, related with human MHC-encoded G6F, has a cytoplasmic tail with ITAM and marks the surface of thrombocytes and in some fishes also of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ken; Takizawa, Fumio; Tokumaru, Norihiro; Nakayasu, Chihaya; Toda, Hideaki; Fischer, Uwe; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Hashimoto, Keiichiro; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus

    2010-08-01

    In teleost fish, a novel gene G6F-like was identified, encoding a type I transmembrane molecule with four extracellular Ig-like domains and a cytoplasmic tail with putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs including YxN and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). G6F-like maps to a teleost genomic region where stretches corresponding to human chromosomes 6p (with the MHC), 12p (with CD4 and LAG-3), and 19q are tightly linked. This genomic organization resembles the ancestral "Ur-MHC" proposed for the jawed vertebrate ancestor. The deduced G6F-like molecule shows sequence similarity with members of the CD4/LAG-3 family and with the human major histocompatibility complex-encoded thrombocyte marker G6F. Despite some differences in molecular organization, teleost G6F-like and tetrapod G6F seem orthologous as they map to similar genomic location, share typical motifs in transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions, and are both expressed by thrombocytes/platelets. In the crucian carps goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) and ginbuna (Carassius auratus langsdorfii), G6F-like was found expressed not only by thrombocytes but also by erythrocytes, supporting that erythroid and thromboid cells in teleost fish form a hematopoietic lineage like they do in mammals. The ITAM-bearing of G6F-like suggests that the molecule plays an important role in cell activation, and G6F-like expression by erythrocytes suggests that these cells have functional overlap potential with thrombocytes.

  1. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  2. Plasmodium knowlesi Skeleton-Binding Protein 1 Localizes to the ‘Sinton and Mulligan’ Stipplings in the Cytoplasm of Monkey and Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lucky, Amuza Byaruhanga; Sakaguchi, Miako; Katakai, Yuko; Kawai, Satoru; Yahata, Kazuhide; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, exports protein products to the infected erythrocyte to introduce modifications necessary for the establishment of nutrient acquisition and surface display of host interaction ligands. Erythrocyte remodeling impacts parasite virulence and disease pathology and is well documented for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but has been less described for other Plasmodium species. For P. falciparum, the exported protein skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is involved in the trafficking of erythrocyte surface ligands and localized to membranous structures within the infected erythrocyte, termed Maurer's clefts. In this study, we analyzed SBP1 orthologs across the Plasmodium genus by BLAST analysis and conserved gene synteny, which were also recently described by de Niz et al. (2016). To evaluate the localization of an SBP1 ortholog, we utilized the zoonotic malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi. Immunofluorescence assay of transgenic P. knowlesi parasites expressing epitope-tagged recombinant PkSBP1 revealed a punctate staining pattern reminiscent of Maurer's clefts, following infection of either monkey or human erythrocytes. The recombinant PkSBP1-positive puncta co-localized with Giemsa-stained structures, known as ‘Sinton and Mulligan’ stipplings. Immunoelectron microscopy also showed that recombinant PkSBP1 localizes within or on the membranous structures akin to the Maurer's clefts. The recombinant PkSBP1 expressed in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes co-localized with PfSBP1 at the Maurer's clefts, indicating an analogous trafficking pattern. A member of the P. knowlesi 2TM protein family was also expressed and localized to membranous structures in infected monkey erythrocytes. These results suggest that the trafficking machinery and induced erythrocyte cellular structures of P. knowlesi are similar following infection of both monkey and human erythrocytes, and are conserved with P. falciparum. PMID:27732628

  3. Plasmodium knowlesi Skeleton-Binding Protein 1 Localizes to the 'Sinton and Mulligan' Stipplings in the Cytoplasm of Monkey and Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucky, Amuza Byaruhanga; Sakaguchi, Miako; Katakai, Yuko; Kawai, Satoru; Yahata, Kazuhide; Templeton, Thomas J; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, exports protein products to the infected erythrocyte to introduce modifications necessary for the establishment of nutrient acquisition and surface display of host interaction ligands. Erythrocyte remodeling impacts parasite virulence and disease pathology and is well documented for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but has been less described for other Plasmodium species. For P. falciparum, the exported protein skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is involved in the trafficking of erythrocyte surface ligands and localized to membranous structures within the infected erythrocyte, termed Maurer's clefts. In this study, we analyzed SBP1 orthologs across the Plasmodium genus by BLAST analysis and conserved gene synteny, which were also recently described by de Niz et al. (2016). To evaluate the localization of an SBP1 ortholog, we utilized the zoonotic malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi. Immunofluorescence assay of transgenic P. knowlesi parasites expressing epitope-tagged recombinant PkSBP1 revealed a punctate staining pattern reminiscent of Maurer's clefts, following infection of either monkey or human erythrocytes. The recombinant PkSBP1-positive puncta co-localized with Giemsa-stained structures, known as 'Sinton and Mulligan' stipplings. Immunoelectron microscopy also showed that recombinant PkSBP1 localizes within or on the membranous structures akin to the Maurer's clefts. The recombinant PkSBP1 expressed in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes co-localized with PfSBP1 at the Maurer's clefts, indicating an analogous trafficking pattern. A member of the P. knowlesi 2TM protein family was also expressed and localized to membranous structures in infected monkey erythrocytes. These results suggest that the trafficking machinery and induced erythrocyte cellular structures of P. knowlesi are similar following infection of both monkey and human erythrocytes, and are conserved with P. falciparum.

  4. Characterization of human erythrocytes as potential carrier for pravastatin: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Harisa, Gamal El-din I; Ibrahim, Mohamed F; Alanazi, Fars K

    2011-03-11

    Drug delivery systems including chemical, physical and biological agents that enhance the bioavailability, improve pharmacokinetics and reduce toxicities of the drugs. Carrier erythrocytes are one of the most promising biological drug delivery systems investigated in recent decades. The bioavailability of statin drugs is low due the effects of P-glycoprotein in the gastro-intestinal tract as well as the first-pass metabolism. Therefore in this work we study the effect of time, temperature as well as concentration on the loading of pravastatin in human erythrocytes to be using them as systemic sustained release delivery system for this drug. After the loading process is performed the carriers' erythrocytes were physically and cellulary characterized. Also, the in vitro release of pravastatin from carrier erythrocytes was studied over time interval. Our results revealed that, human erythrocytes have been successfully loaded with pravastatin using endocytosis method either at 25(o)C or at 37(o)C. The loaded amount at 10 mg/ml is 0.32 mg/0.1 ml and 0.69 mg/0.1 ml. Entrapment efficiency is 34% and 94% at 25(o)C and 37(o)C respectively at drug concentration 4 mg/ml. Moreover the percent of cells recovery is 87-93%. Hematological parameters and osmotic fragility behavior of pravastatin loaded erythrocytes were similar that of native erythrocytes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the pravastatin loaded cells has no change in the morphology. Pravastatin releasing from carrier cell was 83% after 23 hours in phosphate buffer saline and decreased to 72% by treatment of carrier cells with glutaraldehyde. The releasing pattern of the drug from loaded erythrocytes obeyed first order kinetics. It concluded that pravastatin is successfully entrapped into erythrocytes with acceptable loading parameters and moderate morphological changes, this suggesting that erythrocytes can be used as prolonged release for pravastatin.

  5. Effects of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) on in vitro human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models

    SciTech Connect

    Suwalsky, Mario; Zambrano, Pablo; Mennickent, Sigrid; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Aguilar, Luis F.; Bolognin, Silvia

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPA is a common ingredient in cough-cold medication and appetite suppressants. {yields} Reports on its effects on human erythrocytes are very scarce. {yields} We found that PPA induced in vitro morphological changes to human erythrocytes. {yields} PPA interacted with isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes. {yields} PPA interacted with class of lipid present in the erythrocyte membrane outer monolayer. -- Abstract: Norephedrine, also called phenylpropanolamine (PPA), is a synthetic form of the ephedrine alkaloid. After reports of the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage and other adverse effects, including several deaths, PPA is no longer sold in USA and Canada. Despite the extensive information about PPA toxicity, reports on its effects on cell membranes are scarce. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of PPA with cell membranes, ranges of concentrations were incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of cell membranes. The latter consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, respectively. The capacity of PPA to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study presents evidence that PPA affects human red cell membranes as follows: (a) in SEM studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that 0.5 mM PPA induced shape changes; (b) in IUM PPA induced a sharp decrease in the fluorescence anisotropy in the lipid bilayer acyl chains in a concentration range lower than 100 {mu}M; (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that PPA in the 0.1-0.5 m

  6. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  7. The effect of metabolites and impurities of glyphosate on human erythrocytes (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2014-02-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study was undertaken to evaluate toxic potential of widely used pesticide - glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA); methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine. We evaluated the effect of those compounds on hemolysis, hemoglobin oxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and changes in morphology of human erythrocytes. The erythrocytes were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate and its metabolites and impurities (0.01-5mM) for 1, 4 and 24h. Glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities induced a little hemolysis and hemoglobin oxidation. All changes were very low, even after 24h incubation. Most of the investigated compounds induced reactive oxygen species formation from 0.25mM, except the N-methylglyphosate which caused an increase in ROS formation from 0.5mM. Moreover, the investigated xenobiotics did not change the size and shape (except bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine) of the human erythrocytes. Changes in human erythrocytes were observed only when high concentrations of the compounds were applied. Some investigated metabolites and impurities caused a slight stronger damage to human erythrocytes than a glyphosate. The results clearly show that the changes induced in the erythrocytes can occur only as a result of poisoning with these compounds.

  8. In vivo formation and binding of SeHg complexes to the erythrocyte surface.

    PubMed

    Cherdwongcharoensuk, Duangrudee; Oliveira, Maria João; Aguas, Artur Perez

    2010-08-01

    The in vivo dynamics of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) interaction was studied in mouse tissues using direct visualization of individual Se, Hg, and SeHg particles on the surface of circulating erythrocytes. This high-resolution detection of Se and Hg was obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis. BALB/c mice were injected in the peritoneal cavity with Se and Hg salts, and the animals were sacrificed 3 min after the Hg injection. Only a minority (9%) of the metal dots seen on mouse liver erythrocytes were SeHg complexes when Se and Hg salts were mixed together before injection. In contrast, the majority (73%) of metal dots on liver erythrocytes were SeHg complexes if Se was injected at least 5 min before Hg injection. All metal dots on liver erythrocytes were of SeHg complexes if Se was injected 9 or 12 min before the Hg injection. We conclude that the formation of stable in vivo SeHg complexes requires preliminary interaction of Se with a putative serum factor before complexes between Se and Hg are formed and are bound to the erythrocyte cell surface.

  9. The Osmotically Functional Water Content of the Human Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    LeFevre, Paul G.

    1964-01-01

    Experiments were directed toward estimation of the magnitude of error incurred by the presumption of idealized osmometric behavior in the author's recent studies of monosaccharide transport through the human erythrocyte membrane. Thick suspensions of washed cells in isotonic buffered balanced salt medium were mixed in fixed proportions with varying dilutions of a concentrate of either (a) the mixed chlorides of the medium, or (b) glucose in the isotonic medium, and the resultant freezing point and hematocrit values determined. The form of the responses in the tonicity and the cell volume, as functions of the variable dilution of sugar or salts, conformed consistently with relations derived from the classical van't Hoff-Boyle-Mariotte pressure-volume relation. However, the effective cell water contents appeared substantially less than the weight lost in conventional drying, and varied somewhat according to the index used: expressed as grams of H2O per milliliter of cells at isotonic volume, the cell water implied by the hematocrit behavior was 0.614 ± 0.015 (SD); by the salt tonicity response, 0.565 ± 0.027; by the immediate glucose tonicity response, 0.562 ± 0.044; and by the equilibrium glucose tonicities, 0.589 ± 0.043. Olmstead's reports of gross deviation from the van't Hoff relation, in the rabbit red cell's responses to tonicity displacement, are attributed primarily to a systematic aberration in his method of data analysis, the observations themselves agreeing substantially with the present findings. PMID:14100971

  10. Ultrastructure of the intact skeleton of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Shen, B W; Josephs, R; Steck, T L

    1986-03-01

    Filamentous skeletons were liberated from isolated human erythrocyte membranes in Triton X-100, spread on fenestrated carbon films, negatively stained, and viewed intact and unfixed in the transmission electron microscope. Two forms of the skeleton were examined: (a) basic skeletons, stripped of accessory proteins with 1.5 M NaCl so that they contain predominantly polypeptide bands 1, 2, 4.1, and 5; and (b) unstripped skeletons, which also bore accessory proteins such as ankyrin and band 3 and small plaques of residual lipid. Freshly prepared skeletons were highly condensed. Incubation at low ionic strength and in the presence of dithiothreitol for an hour or more caused an expansion of the skeletons, which greatly increased the visibility of their elements. The expansion may reflect the opening of spectrin from a compact to an elongated disposition. Expanded skeletons appeared to be organized as networks of short actin filaments joined by multiple (5-8) spectrin tetramers. In unstripped preparations, globular masses were observed near the centers of the spectrin filaments, probably corresponding to complexes of ankyrin with band 3 oligomers. Some of these globules linked pairs of spectrin filaments. Skeletons prepared with a minimum of perturbation had thickened actin protofilaments, presumably reflecting the presence of accessory proteins. The length of these actin filaments was highly uniform, averaging 33 +/- 5 nm. This is the length of nonmuscle tropomyosin. Since there is almost enough tropomyosin present to saturate the F-actin, our data support the hypothesis that tropomyosin may determine the length of actin protofilaments in the red cell membrane.

  11. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid interaction with the human erythrocyte membrane bilayer induce in vitro changes in the morphology of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Belmar, Jessica; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-documented information, there are insufficient reports concerning the effects of salicylate compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) with cell membranes, human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models were utilized. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of ASA and SA to perturb the multibilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction while DMPC unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the changes in the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayers resulting from ASA and SA interaction with PC and PE molecules. In an attempt to further elucidate their effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined their influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of defocusing and scanning electron microscopy, while isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicated that both salicylates interact with human erythrocytes and their molecular models in a concentration-dependent manner perturbing their bilayer structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical, nanostructural, and biophysical properties of Zn-induced changes in human erythrocyte membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairullina, A. Ya.; Ol'shanskaya, T. V.; Filimonenko, D. S.; Kozlova, N. M.; Garmaza, Yu. M.; Slobozhanina, E. I.

    2011-04-01

    We studied changes in the surface of erythrocyte membranes exposed to the action of zinc sulfate in the concentration range of 0.1-2.0 mM/l using methods of light scattering, spectrofluorimetry, and atomic force microscopy. Using the spectrofluorimetry method, we revealed a dose-dependent increase in the fluorescence intensity of a fluorescamine probe incorporated into erythrocyte membranes modified by zinc ions, which is indicative of an increase in the level of NH2 groups on the cell surface. Using atomic force microscopy, we revealed changes in the surface topography of erythrocyte membranes exposed to the action of zinc sulfate in the concentration range of 0.1-2.0 mM/l. By performing a correlation analysis, we revealed that the correlation length of the autocorrelation function of the erythrocyte surface irregularity profile directly related to the fluorescence intensity of fluorescamine incorporated into erythrocyte membranes ( r = 0.9, p < 0.05) modified by zinc ions. We showed that, in the zinc sulfate concentration range of 0.1-2.0 mM/l, zinc oxides form in erythrocyte membranes, which is confirmed by the appearance of an absorption band at 330-340 nm and by an increase in the light scattering. At more considerable concentrations, we identified absorption bands characteristic of zinc protein complexes in erythrocyte membranes. A considerable decrease in the elongation of the scattering indicatrix of erythrocyte membranes caused by luminescence correlates with the content of zinc proteins. Polarization measurements confirm the enhancement of the aggregation of protein complexes observed by the atomic force microscopy method. The proposed complex approach can be used in studies on the action of various abiotic factors on biological cells.

  13. Erythrocytes are the major intravascular storage sites of nitrite in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Dejam, André; Hunter, Christian J.; Pelletier, Mildred M.; Hsu, Lewis L.; Machado, Roberto F.; Shiva, Sruti; Power, Gordon G.; Kelm, Malte; Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma levels of nitrite ions have been used as an index of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in vivo. Recent data suggest that nitrite is a potential intravascular repository for nitric oxide (NO), bioactivated by a nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin. The precise levels and compartmentalization of nitrite within blood and erythrocytes have not been determined. Nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes were determined using reductive chemiluminescence in conjunction with a ferricyanide-based hemoglobin oxidation assay to prevent nitrite destruction. This method yields sensitive and linear measurements of whole blood nitrite over 24 hours at room temperature. Nitrite levels measured in plasma, erythrocytes, and whole blood from 15 healthy volunteers were 121 plus or minus 9, 288 plus or minus 47, and 176 plus or minus 17 nM, indicating a surprisingly high concentration of nitrite within erythrocytes. The majority of nitrite in erythrocytes is located in the cytosol unbound to proteins. In humans, we found a significant artery-to-vein gradient of nitrite in whole blood and erythrocytes. Shear stress and acetylcholine-mediated stimulation of endothelial NOS significantly increased venous nitrite levels. These studies suggest a dynamic intravascular NO metabolism in which endothelial NOS-derived NO is stabilized as nitrite, transported by erythrocytes, and consumed during arterial-to-venous transit. (Blood. 2005;106:734-739) PMID:15774613

  14. Insulin Inhibits Low Oxygen-Induced ATP Release from Human Erythrocytes: Implication for Vascular Control

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Madelyn S.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Achilleus, David; Stephenson, Alan H.; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Sridharan, Meera; Adderley, Shaquria; Sprague, Randy S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective ATP released from human erythrocytes in response to reduced oxygen tension (pO2) participates in the matching of oxygen (O2) supply with need in skeletal muscle by stimulating increases in blood flow to areas with increased O2 demand. Here we investigated the hypothesis that hyperinsulinemia inhibits ATP release from erythrocytes and impairs their ability to stimulate dilation of isolated arterioles exposed to decreased extra-luminal pO2. Methods Erythrocyte ATP release was stimulated pharmacologically (mastoparan 7) and physiologically (reduced pO2) in the absence or presence of insulin. We also examined the ability of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles perfused with buffer containing erythrocytes treated with insulin or its vehicle (saline) to dilate in response to decreased extra-luminal pO2. Results Insulin significantly attenuated mastoparan 7– and reduced pO2–induced ATP release. In vessels perfused with untreated erythrocytes, low extra-luminal pO2 resulted in an increase in vessel diameter. In contrast, when erythrocytes were treated with insulin, no vasodilation occurred. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that insulin inhibits ATP release from erythrocytes in response to reduced pO2 and impairs their ability to stimulate dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles. These results suggest that hyperinsulinemia could hinder the matching of O2 supply with need in skeletal muscle. PMID:19412833

  15. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  16. Relationship between erythrocyte count and volume in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Matyushichev, V B; Shamratova, V G; Savrasova, I V

    2000-09-01

    The mean corpuscular volume and concentration of blood erythrocytes in intact male rats are inversely related in the entire fluctuations range. In healthy men and women the correlation between these parameters is described by a parabola with alternating zones of positive and negative relationships. These covariations are unstable; in disease they change and sometimes are transformed into monotonous reciprocal correlations.

  17. Chlorpyrifos and lambda cyhalothrin-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Deeba, Farah; Raza, Irum; Muhammad, Noor; Rahman, Hazir; Ur Rehman, Zia; Azizullah, Azizullah; Khattak, Baharullah; Ullah, Farman; Daud, M K

    2017-04-01

    Pesticides are one of the most potentially harmful chemicals introduced into the environment, and their adverse impacts on non-target organisms can be significant. The present study was conducted to shed light on effects of locally used insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and lambda cyhalothrin (LCT) on oxidative stress biomarkers in human erythrocytes. The activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and protein contents as well as the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and osmotic fragility (OF) were measured in human erythrocytes exposed to CPF at concentrations of 0, 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 ppm and LCT at concentrations of 0, 100, 300, 600, and 800 ppm for 1 h and 3 h at 37°C. MDA levels and OF of erythrocytes were significantly higher in erythrocytes incubated with CPF and LCT at increasing concentrations of both insecticides and increased incubation time. However, erythrocyte CAT and SOD activities were decreased at all concentrations of CPF and LCT tested. Protein oxidation products were decreased at lower doses of CPF (100 and 500 ppm); at higher doses (1000 and 2000 ppm), total protein content was increased compared with control. In contrast LCT was associated with decreased in protein contents at all the concentrations. These results clearly demonstrated that CPF and LCT can induce oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ( in vitro).

  18. Chlorella is an effective dietary source of lutein for human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kimura, Fumiko; Nakashima, Yuya; Maruyama, Isao; Higuchi, Ohki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella contains a high amount of carotenoids, especially lutein, and has received attention as a possible dietary source for improving carotenoid levels in human blood. In the present study, we performed a 2-month single arm human study, and investigated the efficacy of Chlorella supplementation (9 g Chlorella/day; equivalent to 32 mg lutein/day) on lutein and other carotenoid concentrations in plasma as well as erythrocytes of 12 healthy subjects. Following Chlorella supplementation, lutein was the predominant carotenoid in erythrocytes, showing a 4-fold increase (from 14 to 54 pmol/mL packed cells). After the one month without Chlorella ingestion, erythrocyte lutein then decreased to a basal level (17 pmol/mL packed cells). Erythrocyte carotenoid (lutein, zeaxanthin, α-carotene, and β-carotene) levels were proportional to plasma carotenoid levels. The results suggest the transfer of Chlorella carotenoids, especially lutein, from plasma lipoprotein particles to the erythrocyte membrane. Chlorella intake would be effective for improving and maintaining lutein concentrations in human erythrocytes.

  19. ABCG2 membrane transporter in mature human erythrocytes is exclusively homodimer.

    PubMed

    Leimanis, Mara L; Georges, Elias

    2007-03-09

    The human ABCG2 protein, a member of ABC transporter family, was shown to transport anti-cancer drugs and normal cell metabolites. Earlier studies have demonstrated the expression of ABCG2 in hematopoietic stem cells and erythroid cells; however little is known about the expression and activity of ABCG2 in mature erythrocytes. In this report, we show that ABCG2 in mature human erythrocytes migrates with an apparent molecular mass of 140 kDa, under reducing conditions, on Fairbanks SDS gel system. In contrast, tumor cells expressing higher levels of ABCG2 show no detectable homodimers, when resolved under identical reducing conditions. Analysis of the same membrane extracts from tumor cells and human erythrocytes on Laemmli SDS gel system, where samples are boiled in the presence of increasing concentrations of disulfide reducing conditions and then analyzed, migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 70 kDa or a monomer. Drug transport studies using Pheophorbide A, a substrate of ABCG2, show the protein to be active in erythrocytes. Furthermore, Fumitremorgin C, a specific inhibitor of ABCG2 increases the accumulation of Pheophorbide A in erythrocytes and drug-resistant cells but not in the parental drug-sensitive cells. Given the ability of ABCG2 to transport protoprophyrin IX or heme, these findings may have implications on the normal function of erythrocytes.

  20. Human erythrocytes are not suitable for determination of intravascular volume of perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Karabey, Y; Sahin, S

    2006-01-01

    Homologous or heterologous erythrocytes have been widely used for the estimation of intravascular volume of the liver. However, cross-species blood mediates immune response in the organ, and foreign cells are rapidly cleared from the plasma, indicating that heterologous erythrocytes may not be a suitable marker for determination of vascular space. This aspect was investigated in the perfused rat liver preparation following bolus administration of human (heterologous) erythrocytes into the portal vein. To compare the extent of its distribution within the liver, rat (homologous) erythrocytes and Evans blue were chosen as the reference vascular and extracellular markers, respectively. Hepatic distribution of human erythrocytes was influenced by the perfusion medium (with and without protein) and injection number (first and second injections). Mean transit time and hence volume of distribution decreased in the presence of protein and repetition of the injection. Even in the presence of protein, the volume of distribution obtained for human erythrocytes was larger than that of the extracellular volume of the liver obtained with Evans blue (0.22 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 ml/g), indicating that they are not suitable for determination of intravascular volume of the perfused rat liver preparation.

  1. Purification of the NF2 tumor suppressor protein from human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Hitesh K; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Seo, Pil-Soo; Lutchman, Mohini; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H

    2006-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disease predisposing individuals to the risk of developing tumors of cranial and spinal nerves. The NF2 tumor suppressor protein, known as Merlin/Schwanomin, is a member of the protein 4.1 superfamily that function as links between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. Upon selective extraction of membrane-associated proteins from erythrocyte plasma membrane (ghosts) using low ionic strength solution, the bulk of NF2 protein remains associated with the spectrin-actin depleted inside-out-vesicles. Western blot analysis showed a approximately 70 kDa polypeptide in the erythrocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, quantitative removal of NF2 protein from the inside-out-vesicles was achieved using 1.0 M potassium iodide, a treatment known to remove tightly-bound peripheral membrane proteins. These results suggest a novel mode of NF2 protein association with the erythrocyte membrane that is distinct from the known membrane interactions of protein 4.1. Based on these biochemical properties, several purification strategies were devised to isolate native NF2 protein from human erythrocyte ghosts. Using purified and recombinant NF2 protein as internal standards, we quantified approximately 41-65,000 molecules of NF2 protein per erythrocyte. We provide evidence for the presence of NF2 protein in the human erythrocyte membrane. The identification of NF2 protein in the human erythrocyte membrane will make it feasible to discover novel interactions of NF2 protein utilizing powerful techniques of erythrocyte biochemistry and genetics in mammalian cells.

  2. Effects of an antimalarial quinazoline derivative on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Aguirre, Yareli; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Mendoza-Martínez, César; Sotomayor, Carlos Patricio; Aguilar, Luis Felipe; Villena, Fernando; Castillo, Ivan; Hernández, David J; Suwalsky, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Plasmodium, the parasite which causes malaria in humans multiplies in the liver and then infects circulating erythrocytes. Thus, the role of the erythrocyte cell membrane in antimalarial drug activity and resistance has key importance. The effects of the antiplasmodial N(6)-(4-methoxybenzyl)quinazoline-2,4,6-triamine (M4), and its inclusion complex (M4/HPβCD) with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models are herein reported. This work evidences that M4/HPβCD interacts with red cells as follows: a) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on human erythrocytes induced shape changes at a 10μM concentration; b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) a concentration as low as 1μM induced sharp DPH fluorescence anisotropy decrease whereas increasing concentrations produced a monotonically decrease of DPH fluorescence lifetime at 37°C; c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that 200μM induced a complete structural perturbation of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers whereas no significant effects were detected in dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of lipids present in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively; d) fluorescence spectroscopy data showed that increasing concentrations of the complex interacted with the deep hydrophobic core of DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) at 18°C. All these experiments are consistent with the insertion of M4/HPβCD in the outer monolayer of the human erythrocyte membrane; thus, it can be considered a promising and novel antimalarial agent.

  3. Human erythrocytes and neuroblastoma cells are affected in vitro by Au(III) ions

    SciTech Connect

    Suwalsky, Mario; Gonzalez, Raquel; Villena, Fernando; Aguilar, Luis F.; Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2010-06-25

    Gold compounds are well known for their neurological and nephrotoxic implications. However, haematological toxicity is one of the most serious toxic and less studied effects. The lack of information on these aspects of Au(III) prompted us to study the structural effects induced on cell membranes, particularly that of human erythrocytes. AuCl{sub 3} was incubated with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) and molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane. The latter consisted of multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, phospholipids classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. This report presents evidence that Au(III) interacts with red cell membranes as follows: (a) in scanning electron microscopy studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that Au(III) induced shape changes at a concentration as low as 0.01 {mu}M; (b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes Au(III) induced a decrease in the molecular dynamics and/or water content at the glycerol backbone level of the lipid bilayer polar groups in a 5-50 {mu}M concentration range, and (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that Au(III) in the 10 {mu}m-1 mM range induced increasing structural perturbation only to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. Additional experiments were performed in human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. A statistically significant decrease of cell viability was observed with Au(III) ranging from 0.1 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M.

  4. Antibody recognition of rodent malaria parasite antigens exposed at the infected erythrocyte surface: specificity of immunity generated in hyperimmune mice.

    PubMed

    Mota, M M; Brown, K N; Do Rosário, V E; Holder, A A; Jarra, W

    2001-04-01

    In regions where malaria is endemic, inhabitants remain susceptible to repeated reinfection as they develop and maintain clinical immunity. This immunity includes responses to surface-exposed antigens on Plasmodium sp.-infected erythrocytes. Some of these parasite-encoded antigens may be diverse and phenotypically variable, and the ability to respond to this diversity and variability is an important component of acquired immunity. Characterizing the relative specificities of antibody responses during the acquisition of immunity and in hyperimmune individuals is thus an important adjunct to vaccine research. This is logistically difficult to do in the field but is relatively easily carried out in animal models. Infections in inbred mice with rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS represent a good model for Plasmodium falciparum in humans. This model has been used in the present study in a comparative analysis of cross-reactive and specific immune responses in rodent malaria. CBA/Ca mice were rendered hyperimmune to P. chabaudi chabaudi (AS or CB lines) or Plasmodium berghei (KSP-11 line) by repeated infection with homologous parasites. Serum from P. chabaudi chabaudi AS hyperimmune mice reacted with antigens released from disrupted P. chabaudi chabaudi AS-infected erythrocytes, but P. chabaudi chabaudi CB and P. berghei KSP-11 hyperimmune serum also contained cross-reactive antibodies to these antigens. However, antibody activity directed against antigens exposed at the surfaces of intact P. chabaudi chabaudi-infected erythrocytes was mainly parasite species specific and, to a lesser extent, parasite line specific. Importantly, this response included opsonizing antibodies, which bound to infected erythrocytes, leading to their phagocytosis and destruction by macrophages. The results are discussed in the context of the role that antibodies to both variable and invariant antigens may play in protective immunity in the face of continuous susceptibility

  5. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  6. Phosphorylation sites in human erythrocyte band 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Yannoukakos, D; Vasseur, C; Piau, J P; Wajcman, H; Bursaux, E

    1991-01-30

    The human red cell anion-exchanger, band 3 protein, is one of the main phosphorylated proteins of the erythrocyte membrane. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that ATP-depletion of the red blood cell decreased the anion-exchange rate, suggesting that band 3 protein phosphorylation could be involved in the regulation of anion transport function (Bursaux et al. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 777, 253-260). Phosphorylation occurs mainly on the cytoplasmic domain of the protein and the major site of phosphorylation was assigned to tyrosine-8 (Dekowski et al. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 2750-2753). This site being very far from the integral, anion-exchanger domain, the aim of the present study was to determine whether phosphorylation sites exist in the integral domain. The phosphorylation reaction was carried out on isolated membranes in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and phosphorylated band 3 protein was then isolated. Both the cytoplasmic and the membrane spanning domains were purified. The predominant phosphorylation sites were found on the cytoplasmic domain. RP-HPLC analyses of the tryptic peptides of whole band 3 protein, and of the isolated cytoplasmic and membrane-spanning domains allowed for the precise localization of the phosphorylated residues. 80% of the label was found in the N-terminal tryptic peptide (T-1), (residues 1-56). In this region, all the residues susceptible to phosphorylation were labeled but in varying proportion. Under our conditions, the most active membrane kinase was a tyrosine kinase, activated preferentially by Mn2+ but also by Mg2+. Tyrosine-8 was the main phosphate acceptor residue (50-70%) of the protein, tyrosine-21 and tyrosine-46 residues were also phosphorylated but to a much lesser extent. The main targets of membrane casein kinase, preferentially activated by Mg2+, were serine-29, serine-50, and threonine(s)-39, -42, -44, -48, -49, -54 residue(s) located in the T-1 peptide. A tyrosine phosphatase activity was

  7. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  8. Expression, localization, and erythrocyte binding activity of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-8.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qifang; Cernetich-Ott, Amy; Lynch, Michelle M; Burns, James M

    2006-10-01

    PyMSP-8 is a member of a family of merozoite surface proteins that have been described in Plasmodium that are characterized by the presence of a glycolipid membrane anchor and 1-2 epidermal growth factor-like domains. Immunization with recombinant PyMSP-8 has also been shown to protect mice against lethal Plasmodium yoelii malaria. In this report, we demonstrate that PyMSP-8 expression is detectable throughout the entire erythrocytic life cycle of P. yoelii 17XL, reaching peak level during trophozoite development. As determined by immunofluorescence, PyMSP-8 co-localizes with PyMSP-1 on the surface of merozoites in segmented schizonts and on the surface of ring stages in newly invaded erythrocytes. PyMSP-8 binds to the surface of uninfected mouse RBCs in a species-dependent manner, suggesting a potential role in merozoite attachment to and/or invasion of erythrocytes. The receptor for PyMSP-8 on RBCs is sensitive to trypsin digestion but is resistant to treatment with chymotrypsin or neuraminidase and is putatively identified as a approximately 105kDa membrane protein. Since PyMSP-8 binds to both mature RBCs as well as reticulocytes, it appears unlikely that the function of PyMSP-8 is restricted to the invasion of normocytes. While proper folding and conformation of PyMSP-8 are important, linear determinants of PyMSP-8 also contribute to erythrocyte binding. Unexpectedly, however, PyMSP-8 specific antibodies that are protective in vivo, do not disrupt the binding of rPyMSP-8 to its receptor on erythrocytes. The data indicate that protective anti-PyMSP-8 antibodies mediate their effect in vivo by an alternate mechanism(s).

  9. The mechanism of calcium oxalate crystal-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Elferink, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals cause membrane damage in human erythrocytes, evident from K+ leakage and haemoglobin release. Whereas the hydrogen acceptor polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide is without effect on CaOx crystal-induced haemolysis, polyanions and negative proteins are strongly inhibitory. This indicates that positive charges are of importance for induction of haemolysis. These positive charges are located on the CaOx crystals. Removal of the negatively charged sialic acid from the cell surface does not affect CaOx crystal-induced haemolysis. CaOx crystals are able to release glucose from negatively charged liposomes, but not from positively charged liposomes. The results are compatible with the view that positive charges on the crystals are of predominant importance in CaOx-induced haemolysis, and that their interactions with negative charges or polarizable structures in the lipid part of the membrane leads to membrane disruption. PMID:2443155

  10. Influence of Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins on Free Radical-induced Human Erythrocyte Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qin Yan; Schramm, Derek D.; Gross, Heidrun B.; Holt, Roberta R.; Kim, Sun H.; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine L.; Keen, Carl L.

    2005-01-01

    Cocoa can be a rich source of antioxidants including the flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and catechin, and their oligomers (procyanidins). While these flavonoids have been reported to reduce the rate of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in experimental animal models, little is known about their effect on human erythrocyte hemolysis. The major objective of this work was to study the effect of a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage on the resistance of human erythrocytes to oxidative stress. A second objective was to assess the effects of select purified cocoa flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, the procyanidin Dimer B2 and one of its major metabolites, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, on free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after consuming a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage that provided 0.25 g/kg body weight (BW), 0.375 or 0.50 g/kg BW of cocoa. Plasma flavanol and dimer concentrations were determined for each subject. Erythrocyte hemolysis was evaluated using a controlled peroxidation reaction. Epicatechin, catechin, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin and (-)-epicatechin-(4β > 8)epicatechin (Dimer B2) were detected in the plasma within 1 h after the consumption of the beverage. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to hemolysis was reduced significantly following the consumption of the beverages. The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 μM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05). PMID:15712596

  11. Interaction of human thiol-specific antioxidant protein 1 with erythrocyte plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Cha, M K; Yun, C H; Kim, I H

    2000-06-13

    During the purification from human erythrocytes, human thiol-specific antioxidant protein 1 (hTSA1), one human member of the TSA/alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (AhpC) family, was fragmented to a molecular mass of 20 323.9300. The fragmented form, in contrast to the intact form, did not bind to the C-terminal peptide (Gln-185-Gln-197) antibody. On the basis of the molecular mass of the fragmented form, the cleavage site was calculated to be between Val-186 and Asp-187. The C-terminal region of hTSA1 appeared to be unnecessary for the antioxidant reaction. In addition to hTSA1, two isoenzymes (hORF06 and hTSA2) were detected in the soluble fraction, whereas only hTSA1 was detected in the membrane fraction. A membrane binding study shows that the intact form binds to erythrocyte plasma membrane but the fragment does not, which suggests that the deleted C-terminal legion (Asp-187-Gln-197) is required for the membrane binding. A model membrane study using phospholipid vesicle showed a strong association of hTSA1 with the phospholipid. Human TSA1 exhibited high catalytic activity for the reduction of the fatty acid hydroperoxide as indicated by K(m) and V(max) (89.9 microM for linoleic acid hydroperoxide, 28.64 micromol(-1) min(-1) mg(-1), respectively). In this paper, we are making the first report of the involvement of the C-terminal region of hTSA1 in membrane binding as evidence supporting the existence of the membrane-associated forms in the erythrocyte. On the basis of our observations, we suggest that hTSA1 can act as a very effective antioxidant to remove oxidative stresses not only in matrix as a free form but also in the membrane surface of red blood cells (RBC) as a membrane-associated form.

  12. Effects of lead chloride on human erythrocyte membranes and on kinetic anion sulphate and glutathione concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gugliotta, Tiziana; De Luca, Grazia; Romano, Pietro; Rigano, Caterina; Scuteri, Adriana; Romano, Leonardo

    2012-12-01

    Our study concerns the effects of exposure to lead chloride on the morphology, K(+) efflux, SO(4)(-) influx and GSH levels of the human erythrocyte. Blood was collected in heparinized tubes and washed three times. The cells were suspended at 3% hematocrit and incubated for 1 h at 25°C in a medium containing increasing concentrations of lead chloride (0, 0.3, 0.5 and 1 μM). After incubation, the suspensions were centrifuged and the erythrocyte pellets were divided into three aliquots for testing. The results show: an increase in the permeability of erythrocytes treated with lead chloride with consequent damage and cellular death, especially in the presence of high concentrations; an increase in potassium ion efflux; alterations in the morphology and membrane structure of the red blood cells; and a decrease in sulphate uptake, due either to the oxidative effect of this compound on the band 3 protein, which loses its biological valence as a carrier of sulphate ions, or to a decrease in the ATP erythrocyte concentration. In conclusion, the exposure of erythrocytes to Pb(2+) ions leads to a reduction in the average lifetime of the erythrocytes and the subsequent development of anemia. These data are discussed in terms of the possible effect of lead on the reduction-oxidation systems of the cell. Oxidant agents, such as lead, are known to cross-link integral membrane proteins, leading to K/Cl-cotransport. The increased K(+) efflux affects the altered redox state.

  13. Antioxidant status of erythrocytes and their response to oxidative challenge in humans with argemone oil poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Challagundla K.; Khanna, Subhash K.; Das, Mukul

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative damage of biomolecules and antioxidant status in erythrocytes of humans from an outbreak of argemone oil (AO) poisoning in Kannauj (India) and AO intoxicated experimental animals was investigated. Erythrocytes of the dropsy patients and AO treated rats were found to be more susceptible to 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) induced peroxidative stress. Significant decrease in RBC glutathione (GSH) levels (46, 63%) with concomitant enhancement in oxidized glutathione (172, 154%) levels was noticed in patients and AO intoxicated animals. Further, depletion of glutathione reductase (GR), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (42-52%) was observed in dropsy patients. Oxidation of erythrocyte membrane lipids and proteins was increased (120-144%) in patients and AO treated animals (112-137%) along with 8-OHdG levels in whole blood (180%) of dropsy patients. A significant reduction in {alpha}-tocopherol content (68%) was noticed in erythrocytes of dropsy patients and hepatic, plasma and RBCs of AO treated rats (59-70%) thereby indicating the diminished antioxidant potential to scavenge free radicals or the limited transport of {alpha}-tocopherol from liver to RBCs leading to enhanced oxidation of lipids and proteins in erythrocytes. These studies implicate an important role of erythrocyte degradation in production of anemia and breathlessness in epidemic dropsy.

  14. Effect of blood storage on erythrocyte/wall interactions: implications for surface charge and rigidity.

    PubMed

    Godin, C; Caprani, A

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we study, under flow conditions, the interactions of stored erythrocytes with an artificial surface: a microelectrode whose charge density ranges from -15 to +27 microC/cm2. Interactions consist of red cells slowly circulating on the microelectrode and exerting a real contact with the electrode. Interaction is detected and measured by transient fluctuations of the electrolyte resistance obtained by impedance measurement of the microelectrode. Effects of aging induced by storage of whole blood at 4 degrees C show that the surface charge of erythrocytes rapidly decreases when blood is stored for more than 6 days under our experimental conditions. In comparison with trypsin-treated erythrocytes, an eight day storage induces a 60% decrease in the surface charge of red cells. After two weeks of storage, red cells are no longer negatively charged, presumably because of removal of sialic acid. Cells rigidity is significant after 6 days of storage and influences the electrical contact. Membrane rigidity increase could arise from the surface charge decrease. Finally the surface charge decrease could be importance in the use of stored blood.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of Bc28.1, major erythrocyte-binding protein from Babesia canis merozoite surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-03-16

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of Bc28.1, Major Erythrocyte-binding Protein from Babesia canis Merozoite Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  17. Inhibition of malaria parasite invasion of human erythrocytes by a lymphocyte membrane polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Benzaquen-Geffin, R; Milner, Y; Ginsburg, H

    1987-02-01

    Extraction by boiling of the buffy coat of human blood yields a protein solution which inhibits the propagation of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in culture with a 50% inhibitory dose of 105 micrograms of protein per ml. The inhibitory activity is associated exclusively with the lymphocytes and affects solely the invasion of erythrocytes by free merozoites. Boiled extracts of isolated lymphocytes had a 50% inhibitory dose of 22 micrograms/ml. Fractionation of surface-labeled or pronase-treated lymphocytes revealed that the antimalarial lymphocyte factor is associated with the intracellular aspect of the membrane fraction and is probably not involved in the host defense system against malaria. Further purification by salt extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, molecular gel filtration, and electroelution from lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels resulted in 300- to 550-fold purification, i.e., a 50% inhibitory dose of 40 to 70 ng/ml. All inhibitory fractions contained a 48-kilodalton polypeptide which eluted from a gel filtration column as a 400-kilodalton species, implying multimeric association. Some 6,000 molecules of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide bind with high affinity to one merozoite, the free form of the parasite. The Kd of 0.1 to 0.5 nM for the binding of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide correlated well with the 50% inhibitory dose of 0.3 to 0.4 nM obtained with purified active antimalarial lymphocyte factor. We therefore suggest that the 48-kilodalton polypeptide partially purified from lymphocyte membranes is the antimalarial lymphocyte factor and that it exerts its inhibitory activity by binding to merozoites, thereby preventing their invasion into erythrocytes. The antimalarial lymphocyte factor or a polypeptide sequence thereof could serve for further probing of invasion at the molecular level.

  18. Inhibition of malaria parasite invasion of human erythrocytes by a lymphocyte membrane polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Benzaquen-Geffin, R; Milner, Y; Ginsburg, H

    1987-01-01

    Extraction by boiling of the buffy coat of human blood yields a protein solution which inhibits the propagation of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in culture with a 50% inhibitory dose of 105 micrograms of protein per ml. The inhibitory activity is associated exclusively with the lymphocytes and affects solely the invasion of erythrocytes by free merozoites. Boiled extracts of isolated lymphocytes had a 50% inhibitory dose of 22 micrograms/ml. Fractionation of surface-labeled or pronase-treated lymphocytes revealed that the antimalarial lymphocyte factor is associated with the intracellular aspect of the membrane fraction and is probably not involved in the host defense system against malaria. Further purification by salt extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, molecular gel filtration, and electroelution from lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels resulted in 300- to 550-fold purification, i.e., a 50% inhibitory dose of 40 to 70 ng/ml. All inhibitory fractions contained a 48-kilodalton polypeptide which eluted from a gel filtration column as a 400-kilodalton species, implying multimeric association. Some 6,000 molecules of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide bind with high affinity to one merozoite, the free form of the parasite. The Kd of 0.1 to 0.5 nM for the binding of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide correlated well with the 50% inhibitory dose of 0.3 to 0.4 nM obtained with purified active antimalarial lymphocyte factor. We therefore suggest that the 48-kilodalton polypeptide partially purified from lymphocyte membranes is the antimalarial lymphocyte factor and that it exerts its inhibitory activity by binding to merozoites, thereby preventing their invasion into erythrocytes. The antimalarial lymphocyte factor or a polypeptide sequence thereof could serve for further probing of invasion at the molecular level. Images PMID:3542831

  19. Acetylcholinesterase of human erythrocytes and neuromuscular junctions: homologies revealed by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Fambrough, D M; Engel, A G; Rosenberry, T L

    1982-01-01

    Human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase was used to immunize mice, and hybridomas were generated by fusion of mouse spleen cells with cells of the Sp 2/0 myeloma cell line. Five independently derived hybridoma clones produced antibodies that bound to purified erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase. All of these antibodies crossreacted with human and monkey neuromuscular junctions; immunocytochemical staining patterns corresponded to the distribution of junctional acetylcholinesterase. The monoclonal antibodies fell into at least four categories based on differences in crossreactivity with neuromuscular acetylcholinesterase of rabbit, dog, calf, and guinea pig, and competition tests indicated that the antibodies defined five different antigenic sites on the acetylcholinesterase molecule. It is concluded that there is a high level of homology between the acetylcholinesterases of erythrocytes and neuromuscular junctions. Images PMID:6175961

  20. Effect of safeners on damage of human erythrocytes treated with chloroacetamide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Bernasinska, Joanna; Duchnowicz, Piotr; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Koceva-Chyla, Aneta

    2013-09-01

    Chloroacetamides are used as pre-emergent substances for growth control of annual grasses and weeds. Since they can be harmful for crop plants, protective compounds (safeners) are used along with herbicides. So far, their effects on human blood cells have not been evaluated, and this study is the very first one devoted to this subject. We examined the harmful effects of chloroacetamides, their metabolites and safeners, used alone or in combination with herbicides, on human erythrocytes measuring the extent of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. Higher impact of herbicides than their metabolites on all of the investigated parameters was found. Safeners alone did not produce any damage to erythrocytes and did not elicit any changes in oxidative stress parameters. Combination of safener with herbicide did not attenuate hemolysis of erythrocytes compared to the herbicide alone. Safeners reduced lipid peroxidation induced by herbicides, which suggest the role of safeners as antioxidants.

  1. Interferon and antibody titrations using haemagglutinating Togaviridae and trypsinized human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sedmak, J J; Dixon, M; Schoenherr, C; Sabran, J L; Grossberg, S E

    1983-02-01

    Several Togaviridae of the alphavirus and flavivirus genera agglutinate trypsinized human group O erythrocytes (THOE) (Shortridge and Hu, 1976). Haemagglutinin titers of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) measured with THOE were equivalent to, if not higher than, those obtained with Embden gander erythrocytes, even with unextracted haemagglutinin. Results obtained with THOE in JEV haemagglutination-inhibition tests on sera taken from a previously infected individual over a 20-yr period were similar to those measured during the initial JEV infection. The inhibition of SFV haemagglutinin production as measured with THOE was a very sensitive bioassay for chicken interferon: interferon titers were 6- to 10-fold higher than those obtained with the vesicular stomatitis virus plaque-reduction method. The generally greater availability of human erythrocytes (including those stabilized with glutaraldehyde), the simplicity of the trypsin treatment, and the possibility of using unextracted haemagglutinin recommend this technique for use with haemagglutinating Togaviridae.

  2. Differential effects of cholesterol on acyl chain order in erythrocyte membranes as a function of depth from the surface. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin label study.

    PubMed

    Cassera, M B; Silber, A M; Gennaro, A M

    2002-10-16

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the effects of cholesterol modulation on acyl chain ordering in the membrane of human erythrocytes as a function of depth from the surface. Partial cholesterol depletion was achieved by incubation of erythrocytes with liposomes containing saturated phospholipids, or with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD). Cholesterol enrichment was achieved by incubation with liposomes formed by phospholipids/cholesterol, or with the complex MbetaCD/cholesterol. Acyl chain order was studied with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) using spin labels that sense the lipid bilayer at different depths. It is shown that the increase in cholesterol stiffens acyl chains but decreases the interaction among lipid headgroups, while cholesterol depletion causes the opposite behavior. It is likely that the observed cholesterol effects are related to those stabilizing the cholesterol-rich detergent-insoluble membrane domains (rafts), recently shown to exist in erythrocytes.

  3. Quercetin protected isolated human erythrocytes against mancozeb-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Bhaskar; Rajendar, Bandi; Ramanathan, Muthiah

    2014-07-01

    Mancozeb is a fungicide belonging to the ethylene-bisdithiocarbamate group and is widely used in agriculture. The aim of this study was to examine the protective effect of quercetin (QRN) against oxidative stress induced by mancozeb in human erythrocytes. In order to verify this, 5 ml of venous blood was collected and the erythrocytes were separated and divided into equal parts. One part was incubated with different concentrations of mancozeb (0, 10, 30, 100 µM) for 4 h at 37°C. The other part was preincubated with QRN (40 and 80 μM) for 30 min, followed by mancozeb (0, 10, 30, 100 µM) incubation for 4 h. We found reduction in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) along with elevated levels of lipid peroxide (LPO) in erythrocytes incubated with 30 and 100 µm of mancozeb. Pre-incubation with QRN (80 μM) reversed oxidative stress induced by mancozeb (30 μM) and inhibited LPO induced at 100 μM by 64.36%. QRN also reduced the haemolytic effect on erythrocytes but could not prevent the induction of haemolysis by mancozeb. Therefore, these results suggest that QRN may play a role in preventing the oxidative stress induced by mancozeb in human erythrocytes.

  4. THE EFFECT OF ACTH AND ADRENAL STEROIDS ON K TRANSPORT IN HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Streeten, D. H. P.; Solomon, A. K.

    1954-01-01

    The effect of ACTH and adrenal steroids on K transport in human erythrocytes has been studied. A new method of calculation has revealed that in normal human erythrocytes the K transport is not independent of external K concentration as had previously been thought. The equation describing the relationship is, K influx (m.eq./liter cells hour) = [K]pi/(0.697 + 0.329 [K]pi) in which [K]pi refers to the plasma K concentration at the beginning of the experiment. At the physiological plasma K concentration of 4.65 m.eq./liter, K influx is 2.09 m.eq./liter cells hour; K efflux is 1.95 m.eq./liter cells hour and is independent of plasma K concentration. The effect of the infusion of ACTH and adrenal steroids on the K content of the erythrocytes was also studied. Infusions of ACTH or cortisone do not cause the expected loss in erythrocyte K content and may well cause a gain. Infusions of ACTH and cortisone decrease the rate of K influx and efflux slightly at all stages of the infusion, as measured in vitro in blood samples drawn at various times during and following the infusion. However, the erythrocytes incubated in vitro do not exhibit the same changes in K content as are found in vivo. Hydrocortisone added to normal cells in vitro also decreases both influx and efflux of K, without affecting the K content of the cells. PMID:13163363

  5. Active Calcium and Strontium Transport in Human Erythrocyte Ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Erik J.; Cazort, Ralph J.

    1969-01-01

    Both calcium and strontium could be transported actively from erythrocytes if adenosine triphosphate, guanosine triphosphate, or inosine triphosphate were included in the hypotonic medium used to infuse calcium or strontium into the cells. Acetyl phosphate and pyrophosphate were not energy sources for the transport of either ion. Neither calcium nor strontium transport was accompanied by magnesium exchange, and the addition of Mg++ to the reaction medium in a final concentration of 3.0 mmoles/liter did not promote the transport of either ion. In the absence of nucleotide triphosphates, the addition of 1.5 mmoles/liter of Sr++ to the reaction solution did not bring about active calcium transport and similarly 1.5 mmoles/liter of Ca++ did not bring about active strontium transport. The inclusion of 1.5 mmoles/liter of Ca++ or Sr++ in the reaction medium did not interfere with the transport of the other ion when the erythrocytes were infused with adenosine triphosphate. PMID:4304202

  6. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gupta, Deepali; Saini, Ekta; Choudhary, Shilpa; Jamwal, Abhishek; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K; Sharma, Yagya D

    2015-01-01

    The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs) to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites. Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively. Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1) showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3) showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1) utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s) as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite. Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s) by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host.

  7. Variation in use of erythrocyte invasion pathways by Plasmodium falciparum mediates evasion of human inhibitory antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Kristina E.M.; McCallum, Fiona J.; Reiling, Linda; Lister, Nicole A.; Stubbs, Janine; Cowman, Alan F.; Marsh, Kevin; Beeson, James G.

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that inhibit Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes are believed to be an important component of immunity against malaria. During blood-stage infection, P. falciparum can use different pathways for erythrocyte invasion by varying the expression and/or utilization of members of 2 invasion ligand families: the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) and reticulocyte-binding homologs (PfRhs). Invasion pathways can be broadly classified into 2 groups based on the use of sialic acid (SA) on the erythrocyte surface by parasite ligands. We found that inhibitory antibodies are acquired by malaria-exposed Kenyan children and adults against ligands of SA-dependent and SA-independent invasion pathways, and the ability of antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion depended on the pathway used by P. falciparum isolates. Differential inhibition of P. falciparum lines that varied in their use of specific EBA and PfRh proteins pointed to these ligand families as major targets of inhibitory antibodies. Antibodies against recombinant EBA and PfRh proteins were acquired in an age-associated manner, and inhibitory antibodies against EBA175 appeared prominent among some individuals. These findings suggest that variation in invasion phenotype might have evolved as a mechanism that facilitates immune evasion by P. falciparum and that a broad inhibitory response against multiple ligands may be required for effective immunity. PMID:18064303

  8. Binding of Cerebratulus cytolysin A-III to human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, K M

    1985-01-10

    Binding of Cerebratulus lacteus cytolysin A-III to intact human erythrocytes and erythrocyte membranes has been investigated. Binding to ghosts is essentially complete within 2.5 min of mixing which is slightly faster than the rate of hemolysis measured with intact cells. Approximately 4 X 10(4) binding sites per cell, exhibiting a K 0.5 of 0.7 microM exist; this compares with 50% hematocrit of about 0.3 microM for A-III. Binding is absent in ghosts extracted with Nonidet P-40, but is unaffected by pretreatment of ghosts with either trypsin or elastase.

  9. Clotrimazole enhances lysis of human erythrocytes induced by t-BHP.

    PubMed

    Lisovskaya, Irene L; Shcherbachenko, Irina M; Volkova, Rimma I; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I

    2009-08-14

    Clotrimazole (CLT) is an antifungal and antimalarial agent also effective as a Gardos channel inhibitor. In addition, CLT possesses antitumor properties. Recent data provide evidence that CLT forms a complex with heme (hemin), which produces a more potent lytic effect than heme alone. This study addressed the effect of CLT on the lysis of normal human erythrocytes induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). For the first time, it was shown that 10 microM CLT significantly enhanced the lytic effect of t-BHP on erythrocytes in both Ca(2+)-containing and Ca(2+)-free media, suggesting that the effect is not related to Gardos channels. CLT did not affect the rate of free radical generation, the kinetics of GSH degradation, methemoglobin formation and TBARS generation; therefore, we concluded that CLT does not cause additional oxidative damage to erythrocytes treated with t-BHP. It is tempted to speculate that CLT enhances t-BHP-induced changes in erythrocyte volume and lysis largely by forming a complex with hemin released during hemoglobin oxidation in erythrocytes: the CLT-hemin complex destabilizes the cell membrane more potently than hemin alone. If so, the effect of CLT on cell membrane damage during free-radical oxidation may be used to increase the efficacy of antitumor therapy.

  10. Inclusion bodies in loggerhead erythrocytes are associated with unstable hemoglobin and resemble human Heinz bodies.

    PubMed

    Basile, Filomena; Di Santi, Annalisa; Caldora, Mercedes; Ferretti, Luigi; Bentivegna, Flegra; Pica, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of the erythrocyte inclusions found during the hematological screening of loggerhead population of the Mediterranean Sea. We studied the erythrocyte inclusions in blood specimens collected from six juvenile and nine adult specimens of the loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta, from the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas. Our study indicates that the percentage of mature erythrocytes containing inclusions ranged from 3 to 82%. Each erythrocyte contained only one round inclusion body. Inclusion bodies stained with May Grünwald-Giemsa show that their cytochemical and ultrastructure characteristics are identical to those of human Heinz bodies. Because Heinz bodies originate from the precipitation of unstable hemoglobin (Hb) and cause globular osmotic resistance to increase, we analyzed loggerhead Hb using electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography to detect and quantitate Hb fractions. We also tested the resistance of Hb to alkaline pH, heat, isopropanol denaturation, and globular osmosis. Our hemogram results excluded the occurrence of any infection, which could be associated with an inclusion body, in all the specimens. Negative Feulgen staining indicated that the inclusion bodies are not derived from DNA fragmentation. We hypothesize that amino acid substitutions could explain why loggerhead Hb precipitates under normal physiologic conditions, forming Heinz bodies. The identification of inclusion bodies in loggerhead erythrocytes allow us to better understand the haematological characteristics and the physiology of these ancient reptiles, thus aiding efforts to conserve such an endangered species. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. SUPPRESSION OF BLOOD GROUP AGGLUTINABILITY OF HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES BY CERTAIN BACTERIAL POLYSACCHARIDES

    PubMed Central

    Ceppellini, Ruggero; Landy, Maurice

    1963-01-01

    Erythrocytes coated with bacterial capsular polysaccharides, notably the Vi antigen, were no longer agglutinated by antibodies directed against the various antigens native to the red cell surface. These effects could not be attributed to prevention of antibody uptake even though in some systems the uptake of antibody was diminished. In fact, agglutination by Rh-incomplete antibody was brought back to the original titer only after the sensitized Vi-coated cells had been subjected to ten alternating exposures to globulin and antiglobulin. Hemagglutination by Newcastle, mumps, and influenza viruses was also suppressed. Erythrocytes coated with Vi polysaccharide assumed the distinctive physicochemical attributes of this acidic polymer which results in a stabilization of the erythrocyte suspension as manifested by increased electrophoretic mobility and a striking decrease in the rate of sedimentation. Among the possible models for explaining the nature of the Vi effect on immune agglutination, the data favor interference with lattice formation. PMID:14019651

  12. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-04-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen.

  13. The effects of chemical and radioactive properties of Tl-201 on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ali; Senturk, Murat; Akkemik, Ebru; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of thallium-201 ((201)Tl) solution on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Erythrocyte GR was initially purified by 2',5'-adenosine diphosphate Sepharose-4B affinity and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. The purification was monitored by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which showed a single band for the final enzyme preparation. The in vitro and in vivo effects of the (201)Tl solution including Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) metals and the in vitro effects of the radiation effect of the (201)Tl solution and nonradioactive Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) metals on human erythrocyte GR enzyme were studied. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method at 340 nm using a spectrophotometer. All purification procedures were carried out at (+)4 °C. Glutathione reductase was purified 2033-fold at a yield of 28.17%. (201)Tl solution and radiation exposure had inhibitory effects on the enzyme activity. Besides, effects of nonradioactive Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) were studied on enzyme activity in vitro. Furthermore, seven human patients were also used for in vivo studies of (201)Tl solution. It was detected in in vitro and in vivo studies that the human erythrocyte GR enzyme is inhibited due to the radiation effect of (201)Tl solution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dematin and Adducin Provide a Novel Link between the Spectrin Cytoskeleton and Human Erythrocyte Membrane by Directly Interacting with Glucose Transporter-1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Anwar A.; Hanada, Toshihiko; Mohseni, Morvarid; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Zeng, Lixiao; Gaetani, Massimiliano; Li, Donghai; Reed, Brent C.; Speicher, David W.; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-01-01

    Dematin and adducin are actin-binding proteins located at the spectrin-actin junctions, also called the junctional complex, in the erythrocyte membrane. Here we propose a new model whereby dematin and adducin link the junctional complex to human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Using a combination of surface labeling, immunoprecipitation, and vesicle proteomics approaches, we have identified glucose transporter-1 as the receptor for dematin and adducin in the human erythrocyte membrane. This finding is the first description of a transmembrane protein that binds to dematin and adducin, thus providing a rationale for the attachment of the junctional complex to the lipid bilayer. Because homologues of dematin, adducin, and glucose transporter-1 exist in many non-erythroid cells, we propose that a conserved mechanism may exist that couples sugar and other related transporters to the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:18347014

  15. Dematin and adducin provide a novel link between the spectrin cytoskeleton and human erythrocyte membrane by directly interacting with glucose transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anwar A; Hanada, Toshihiko; Mohseni, Morvarid; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Zeng, Lixiao; Gaetani, Massimiliano; Li, Donghai; Reed, Brent C; Speicher, David W; Chishti, Athar H

    2008-05-23

    Dematin and adducin are actin-binding proteins located at the spectrin-actin junctions, also called the junctional complex, in the erythrocyte membrane. Here we propose a new model whereby dematin and adducin link the junctional complex to human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Using a combination of surface labeling, immunoprecipitation, and vesicle proteomics approaches, we have identified glucose transporter-1 as the receptor for dematin and adducin in the human erythrocyte membrane. This finding is the first description of a transmembrane protein that binds to dematin and adducin, thus providing a rationale for the attachment of the junctional complex to the lipid bilayer. Because homologues of dematin, adducin, and glucose transporter-1 exist in many non-erythroid cells, we propose that a conserved mechanism may exist that couples sugar and other related transporters to the actin cytoskeleton.

  16. Alcohol and the calcium-dependent potassium transport of human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A.; Caldwell, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro exposure of human red blood cells to ethanol (100 and 400 mM) was found to increase the initial rate of calcium-dependent potassium efflux through the red cell membrane. This effect of ethanol was apparently not due to an elevation of the intracellular free calcium but rather to a direct action of the drug on the transport process as, (1) intracellular calcium concentrations were tightly buffered with EGTA, (2) ethanol did not alter the efflux of UVCa from the cells, and (3) dantrolene, which has been proposed to counteract the effect of ethanol on intracellular calcium levels in the erythrocyte, did not inhibit the stimulatory action of ethanol. The efflux of potassium from erythrocytes obtained from chronic alcoholics was not different from that of erythrocytes from non-alcoholic individuals. The relationship of these findings to neuronal potassium transport is discussed.

  17. Modelling the internal field distribution in human erythrocytes exposed to MW radiation.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, J L; Muñoz San Martín, S; Sancho, M; Miranda, J M

    2004-08-01

    This paper studies the internal electric field distribution in human erythrocytes exposed to MW radiation. For this purpose, an erythrocyte cell model is exposed to linearly polarized electromagnetic (EM) plane waves of frequency 900 MHz and the electric field within the cell is calculated by using a finite element (FE) technique with adaptive meshing. The results obtained show the dependence of the induced electric field distribution on the main modelling parameters, i.e., the electrical properties (permittivity and conductivity) of the membrane and cytoplasm and the orientation of the cell with respect to the applied field. It is found that for certain orientations, the field amplification within the membrane of the erythrocyte shape cell can be higher than the one observed in an equivalent simple spheroidal geometry cell, commonly used in bioelectromagnetism. The present work shows that a better insight of the interaction of electromagnetic fields with basic biological structures is obtained when the most possible realistic cell shape is used.

  18. Influence of band 3 protein absence and skeletal structures on amphiphile- and Ca(2+)-induced shape alterations in erythrocytes: a study with lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) and human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hägerstrand, H; Danieluk, M; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, M; Iglic, A; Wróbel, A; Isomaa, B; Nikinmaa, M

    2000-06-01

    Amphiphiles which induce either spiculated (echinocytic) or invaginated (stomatocytic) shapes in human erythrocytes, and ionophore A23187 plus Ca(2+), were studied for their capacity to induce shape alterations, vesiculation and hemolysis in the morphologically and structurally different lamprey and trout erythrocytes. Both qualitative and quantitative differences were found. Amphiphiles induced no gross morphological changes in the non-axisymmetric stomatocyte-like lamprey erythrocyte or in the flat ellipsoidal trout erythrocyte, besides a rounding up at higher amphiphile concentrations. No shapes with large broad spicula were seen. Nevertheless, some of the 'echinocytogenic' amphiphiles induced plasma membrane protrusions in lamprey and trout erythrocytes, from where exovesicles were shed. In trout erythrocytes, occurrence of corrugations at the cell rim preceded protrusion formation. Other 'echinocytogenic' amphiphiles induced invaginations in lamprey erythrocytes. The 'stomatocytogenic' amphiphiles induced invaginations in both lamprey and trout erythrocytes. Surprisingly, in trout erythrocytes, some protrusions also occurred. Some of the amphiphiles hemolyzed lamprey, trout and human erythrocytes at a significantly different concentration/membrane area. Ionophore A23187 plus Ca(2+) induced membrane protrusions and sphering in human and trout erythrocytes; however, the lamprey erythrocyte remained unperturbed. The shape alterations in lamprey erythrocytes, we suggest, are characterized by weak membrane skeleton-lipid bilayer interactions, due to band 3 protein and ankyrin deficiency. In trout erythrocyte, the marginal band of microtubules appears to strongly influence cell shape. Furthermore, the presence of intermediate filaments and nuclei, additionally affecting the cell membrane shear elasticity, apparently influences cell shape changes in lamprey and trout erythrocytes. The different types of shape alterations induced by certain amphiphiles in the cell

  19. β-amyloid decreases detectable endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human erythrocytes: a role for membrane acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Francesco; Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Sampaolese, Beatrice; Giardina, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Until few years ago, many studies of Alzheimer's disease investigated the effects of this syndrome in the central nervous system. Only recently, the detection of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) in the blood has evidenced the necessity to extend studies on extraneuronal cells, particularly on erythrocytes. Aβ is also present in brain capillaries, where it interacts with the erythrocytes, inducing several metabolic and functional alterations. Recently, functionally active endothelial type nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was discovered in human erythrocytes. The goal of the present study was to evidence the effect of Aβ on erythrocyte eNOS. We found that Aβ following to 24-h exposure causes a decrease in the immune staining of erythrocyte eNOS. Concurrently, Aβ alters erythrocyte cell morphology, decreases nitrites and nitrates levels, and affects membrane acetylcholinesterase activity. Propidium, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was able to reverse the effects elicited by Aβ. These events could contribute to the vascular alterations associated with Alzheimer's disease disease.

  20. Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Ryo; Sakuma, Shinya; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Pöschl, Johannes M. B.; Arai, Fumihito; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-02-01

    Large deformability of erythrocytes in microvasculature is a prerequisite to realize smooth circulation. We develop a novel tool for the three-step “Catch-Load-Launch” manipulation of a human erythrocyte based on an ultra-high speed position control by a microfluidic “robotic pump”. Quantification of the erythrocyte shape recovery as a function of loading time uncovered the critical time window for the transition between fast and slow recoveries. The comparison with erythrocytes under depletion of adenosine triphosphate revealed that the cytoskeletal remodeling over a whole cell occurs in 3 orders of magnitude longer timescale than the local dissociation-reassociation of a single spectrin node. Finally, we modeled septic conditions by incubating erythrocytes with endotoxin, and found that the exposure to endotoxin results in a significant delay in the characteristic transition time for cytoskeletal remodeling. The high speed manipulation of erythrocytes with a robotic pump technique allows for high throughput mechanical diagnosis of blood-related diseases.

  1. Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Ryo; Sakuma, Shinya; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Pöschl, Johannes M B; Arai, Fumihito; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-02-24

    Large deformability of erythrocytes in microvasculature is a prerequisite to realize smooth circulation. We develop a novel tool for the three-step "Catch-Load-Launch" manipulation of a human erythrocyte based on an ultra-high speed position control by a microfluidic "robotic pump". Quantification of the erythrocyte shape recovery as a function of loading time uncovered the critical time window for the transition between fast and slow recoveries. The comparison with erythrocytes under depletion of adenosine triphosphate revealed that the cytoskeletal remodeling over a whole cell occurs in 3 orders of magnitude longer timescale than the local dissociation-reassociation of a single spectrin node. Finally, we modeled septic conditions by incubating erythrocytes with endotoxin, and found that the exposure to endotoxin results in a significant delay in the characteristic transition time for cytoskeletal remodeling. The high speed manipulation of erythrocytes with a robotic pump technique allows for high throughput mechanical diagnosis of blood-related diseases.

  2. Use of a membrane-bound fluorophore to characterize diffusion boundary layers around human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Williams, J B; Kutchai, H

    1986-02-01

    A novel method is used to demonstrate the presence of diffusion boundary layers around erythrocytes following rapid mixing in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer and to estimate the apparent dimensions of the diffusion boundary layers. Pink erythrocyte ghosts labeled on their external surfaces with tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC) were mixed in a stopped-flow apparatus with 50 mM NaI in Ringer's solutions. I- is an effective collisional quencher of TRITC fluorescence. TRITC fluorescence after flow stopped decreased monoexponentially with time. The concentration of I- at the cell surface as a function of time was estimated from the dependence of TRITC fluorescence on I- concentration in steady-state experiments. The kinetics of the increase in I- concentration at the cell surface was fit to two diffusional models: a planar erythrocyte ghost bounded by planar diffusion boundary layer and a spherical erythrocyte surrounded by a spherical shell diffusion boundary layer. The planar model best fits the experimental data with a diffusion boundary layer 4.68 microns thick. Using the spherical model the experimental data is best fit by a 6.9 microns diffusion boundary layer.

  3. Skeleton-binding protein 1 functions at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane to traffic PfEMP1 to the Plasmodium falciparum–infected erythrocyte surface

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Alexander G.; Rug, Melanie; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Beeson, James G.; Marti, Matthias; Reeder, John; Cowman, Alan F.

    2007-01-01

    A key feature of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite causing the most severe form of malaria in humans, is its ability to export parasite molecules onto the surface of the erythrocyte. The major virulence factor and variant surface protein PfEMP1 (P falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) acts as a ligand to adhere to endothelial receptors avoiding splenic clearance. Because the erythrocyte is devoid of protein transport machinery, the parasite provides infrastructure for trafficking across membranes it traverses. In this study, we show that the P falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is required for transport of PfEMP1 to the P falciparum–infected erythrocyte surface. We present evidence that PfSBP1 functions at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane to load PfEMP1 into Maurer clefts during formation of these structures. Furthermore, the major reactivity of antibodies from malaria-exposed multigravid women is directed toward PfEMP1 because this is abolished in the absence of PfSBP1. PMID:17023587

  4. Skeleton-binding protein 1 functions at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane to traffic PfEMP1 to the Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte surface.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander G; Rug, Melanie; O'Neill, Matthew T; Beeson, James G; Marti, Matthias; Reeder, John; Cowman, Alan F

    2007-02-01

    A key feature of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite causing the most severe form of malaria in humans, is its ability to export parasite molecules onto the surface of the erythrocyte. The major virulence factor and variant surface protein PfEMP1 (P falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) acts as a ligand to adhere to endothelial receptors avoiding splenic clearance. Because the erythrocyte is devoid of protein transport machinery, the parasite provides infrastructure for trafficking across membranes it traverses. In this study, we show that the P falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 (PfSBP1) is required for transport of PfEMP1 to the P falciparum-infected erythrocyte surface. We present evidence that PfSBP1 functions at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane to load PfEMP1 into Maurer clefts during formation of these structures. Furthermore, the major reactivity of antibodies from malaria-exposed multigravid women is directed toward PfEMP1 because this is abolished in the absence of PfSBP1.

  5. Dimethyl sulfoxide at high concentrations inhibits non-selective cation channels in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nardid, Oleg A; Schetinskey, Miroslav I; Kucherenko, Yuliya V

    2013-03-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a by-product of the pulping industry, is widely used in biological research, cryobiology and medicine. On cellular level DMSO was shown to suppress NMDA-AMPA channels activation, blocks Na+ channel activation and attenuates Ca2+ influx (Lu and Mattson 2001). In the present study we explored the whole-cell patch-clamp to examine the acute effect of high concentrations of DMSO (0.1-2 mol/l) on cation channels activity in human erythrocytes. Acute application of DMSO (0.1-2 mol/l) dissolved in Cl--containing saline buffer solution significantly inhibited cation conductance in human erythrocytes. Inhibition was concentration-dependent and had an exponential decay profile. DMSO (2 mol/l) induced cation inhibition in Cl-- containing saline solutions of: 40.3 ± 3.9% for K+, 35.4 ± 3.1% for Ca2+ and 47.4 ± 1.9% for NMDG+. Substitution of Cl- with gluconate- increased the inhibitory effect of DMSO on the Na+ current. Inhibitory effect of DMSO was neither due to high permeability of erythrocytes to DMSO nor to an increased tonicity of the bath media since no effect was observed in 2 mol/l glycerol solution. In conclusion, we have shown that high concentrations of DMSO inhibit the non-selective cation channels in human erythrocytes and thus protect the cells against Na+ and Ca2+ overload. Possible mechanisms of DMSO effect on cation conductance are discussed.

  6. Characterization and partial sequence of di-iodosulphophenyl isothiocyanate-binding peptide from human erythrocyte anion-transport protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mawby, W J; Findlay, J B

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the presumed anion-binding domain of the anion-transport protein from human erythrocyte membranes, using 2,6-di-iodo-4-sulphophenyl isothiocyanate, an inhibitor of anion transport. The 125I-labelled reagent binds covalently to the protein with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 86 microM. Treatment of unsealed erythrocyte 'ghosts' with chymotrypsin yielded a membrane-bound fragment (mol.wt. 14 500 +/- 1000) that contained all the protein-bound radioactivity. The binding of the inhibitor to this peptide gave a pattern very similar to that obtained for the effect of the compound on phosphate transport into erythrocytes. The peptide is therefore presumed to be intimately involved in the mediation of anion exchange. Cleavage of the 14 500-mol.wt. transmembrane fragment with CNBr resulted in the production of two peptides with apparent molecular weights of 8800 and 4700. The 4700-mol.wt. peptide is the N-terminal portion of the 14 500-mol.wt. peptide. The attachment site for 2,6-di-iodo-4-sulphophenyl isothiocyanate is situated near the C-terminal of the 8800-mol.wt. peptide. This locates the inhibitor-binding site near the chymotrypsin cleavage point at the extracellular surface of the membrane. A partial sequence (residues 1--38) of the 8800-mol.wt. peptide was obtained. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7150226

  7. Adherence of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to measles-virus infected cells: modulation by solubilized rhesus erythrocyte membranes and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Bankhurst, A D; Maki, D; Sanchez, M; McLaren, L

    1979-01-01

    The adherence of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to HeLa cells persistently infected with measles virus (HeLa-K11) was studied. The following data were observed. (i) The proportion of HeLa-K11 cells with adherent human peripheral blood lymphocytes of rhesus monkey erythrocytes was similar over a wide range of ratios of HeLa-K11 cells to lymphocytes or erythrocytes. (ii) The great majority of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and erythrocytes reacted with the same HeLa-K11 cell (iii). The adherence of lymphocytes or erythrocytes to HeLa-K11 cells was blocked by rabbit anti-measles virus antibody or solubilized monkey erythrocyte membranes. The pretreatment of erythrocytes or lymphocytes with receptor-destroying enzyme did not alter their adherence properties. (iv) The pattern of inhibition observed with several carbohydrates was similar in both the erythrocyte and the lymphocyte adherence assays. These data are consistent with the possibility that the receptor present on both rhesus monkey erythrocytes and human lymphocytes has similar specificities and biochemical composition. PMID:572346

  8. Influence of osmolarity on the optical properties of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2010-01-01

    Plasma osmolarity influences the volume and shape of red blood cells (RBCs). The volume change is inversely related to the hemoglobin concentration and as a consequence to the complex refractive index within the cell. These morphological changes can be linked to changes in the optical behavior of the cells. The optical parameters, absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, and effective scattering phase function of red blood cells are investigated in dependence on osmolarity in the spectral range from 250 to 1100 nm. Integrating sphere measurements of light transmittance and reflectance in combination with inverse Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out for osmolarities from 225 to 400 mosmol/L. Osmolarity changes have a significant influence on the optical parameters, which can in part be explained by changes in the complex refractive index, cell shape, and cell volume. Spherical forms of RBCs induced by low osmolarity show reduced scattering effects compared to the normal RBC biconcave disk shape. Spinocytes, which are crenated erythrocytes induced by high osmolarity, show the highest scattering effects. Even only a 10% change in osmolarity has a drastic influence on the optical parameters, which appears to be of the same order as for 10% hematocrit and oxygen saturation changes.

  9. Influence of osmolarity on the optical properties of human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C.

    2010-09-01

    Plasma osmolarity influences the volume and shape of red blood cells (RBCs). The volume change is inversely related to the hemoglobin concentration and as a consequence to the complex refractive index within the cell. These morphological changes can be linked to changes in the optical behavior of the cells. The optical parameters, absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, and effective scattering phase function of red blood cells are investigated in dependence on osmolarity in the spectral range from 250 to 1100 nm. Integrating sphere measurements of light transmittance and reflectance in combination with inverse Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out for osmolarities from 225 to 400 mosmol/L. Osmolarity changes have a significant influence on the optical parameters, which can in part be explained by changes in the complex refractive index, cell shape, and cell volume. Spherical forms of RBCs induced by low osmolarity show reduced scattering effects compared to the normal RBC biconcave disk shape. Spinocytes, which are crenated erythrocytes induced by high osmolarity, show the highest scattering effects. Even only a 10% change in osmolarity has a drastic influence on the optical parameters, which appears to be of the same order as for 10% hematocrit and oxygen saturation changes.

  10. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  11. Derivativation of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter using a novel forskolin photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Wadzinski, B.; Shanahan, M.; Ruoho, A.

    1987-05-01

    An iodinated photoaffinity label for the glucose transporter, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-0-succinyldeacetyl-forskolin (IAPS-Fsk), has been synthesized, purified, and characterized. The K/sub i/ for inhibition of 3-0-methylglucose transport by TAPS-Fsk in human erythrocytes was found to be 0.1 uM. The carrier-free radioiodinated label has been shown to be a highly specific photoaffinity label for the human erythrocyte glucose transporter. Photolysis of erythrocyte membranes with 1-10 nM (I-125)IAPS-Fsk and analysis by SDS-PAGE showed specific derivatization of a broad band with an apparent molecular weight of 40-70 kDa. Photoincorporation using 2 nM (I-125)IAPS-Fsk was protected with D-glucose, cytochalasin B, and forskolin. No protection was observed with L-glucose. Endo-B-galactosidase digestion and trypsinization of (I-125)IAPS-Fsk labelled erythrocytes reduced the specifically radiolabelled transporter to 40 kDa and 18 kDa respectively. (I-125)-IAPS-Fsk will be used to study the structural aspects of the glucose transporter.

  12. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05% Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t/sub 50%/). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t/sub 50%/ values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt/sub 50%/) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  13. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  14. [Human erythrocyte glycophorin C as the receptor for EBA-140 Plasmodium falciparum merozoite ligand].

    PubMed

    Rydzak, Joanna; Kmiecik, Alicja M; Jaśkiewicz, Ewa

    2013-12-23

    Erythrocyte invasion by the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites is a multistep process involving specific interactions between parasites and red blood cells. Several proteins are involved in this process, including EBL ligands. The structure of the EBA-140 ligand, a member of the EBL protein family, provides a full description of its molecular interactions with the erythrocyte receptor. The crystal structure of the EBA-140 Region II in a complex with sialolactose revealed that the binding region is monomeric. Two glycan binding pockets, one in each F1 or F2 domain, were identified. Stark differences in the receptor binding for the F1 and F2 domains suggests that each domain performs a distinct function. Although both domains are required for effective glycan binding, it seems that the interaction may be mediated solely by the F1 domain. The structure of the binding region and the interaction with glycan are unique to the EBA-140 ligand and not shared by other EBL ligands. The EBA-140 ligand binds specifically to human erythrocytes through the membrane sialoglycoprotein glycophorin C. The receptor site for the EBA-140 ligand was suggested to be a cluster of N-and O-linked sialylated glycans on the GPC molecule, whose conformation is dependent on the polypeptide chain region composed of amino acid residues 36-63. Precise definition of the binding site for the EBA-140 ligand on glycophorin C may be important with respect to human erythrocyte invasion inhibition strategies based on a receptor.

  15. Analysis of Receptor for Vibrio cholerae El Tor Hemolysin with a Monoclonal Antibody That Recognizes Glycophorin B of Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongyan; Takahashi, Junko; Seno, Taiko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Honda, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    El Tor hemolysin (ETH), a pore-forming toxin secreted by Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor and most Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolates, is able to lyse erythrocytes and other mammalian cells. To study the receptor for this toxin or the related molecule(s) on erythrocyte, we first isolated a monoclonal antibody, B1, against human erythrocyte membrane, which not only blocks the binding of ETH to human erythrocyte but also inhibits the hemolytic activity of ETH. Biochemical characterization and immunoblotting revealed that this antibody recognized an epitope on the extracellular domain of glycophorin B, a sialoglycoprotein of erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes lacking glycophorin B but not glycophorin A were less sensitive to the toxin than were normal human erythrocytes. These results indicate that glycophorin B is a receptor for ETH or at least an associated molecule of the receptor for ETH on human erythrocytes. PMID:10496913

  16. ATP11C is a major flippase in human erythrocytes and its defect causes congenital hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arashiki, Nobuto; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Mohandas, Narla; Hale, John; Yoshida, Kenichi; Ogura, Hiromi; Utsugisawa, Taiju; Ohga, Shouichi; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji; Kanno, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine is localized exclusively to the inner leaflet of the membrane lipid bilayer of most cells, including erythrocytes. This asymmetric distribution is critical for the survival of erythrocytes in circulation since externalized phosphatidylserine is a phagocytic signal for splenic macrophages. Flippases are P-IV ATPase family proteins that actively transport phosphatidylserine from the outer to inner leaflet. It has not yet been determined which of the 14 members of this family of proteins is the flippase in human erythrocytes. Herein, we report that ATP11C encodes a major flippase in human erythrocytes, and a genetic mutation identified in a male patient caused congenital hemolytic anemia inherited as an X-linked recessive trait. Phosphatidylserine internalization in erythrocytes with the mutant ATP11C was decreased 10-fold compared to that of the control, functionally establishing that ATP11C is a major flippase in human erythrocytes. Contrary to our expectations phosphatidylserine was retained in the inner leaflet of the majority of mature erythrocytes from both controls and the patient, suggesting that phosphatidylserine cannot be externalized as long as scramblase is inactive. Phosphatidylserine-exposing cells were found only in the densest senescent cells (0.1% of total) in which scramblase was activated by increased Ca2+ concentration: the percentage of these phosphatidylserine-exposing cells was increased in the patient’s senescent cells accounting for his mild anemia. Furthermore, the finding of similar extents of phosphatidylserine exposure by exogenous Ca2+-activated scrambling in both control erythrocytes and the patient’s erythrocytes implies that suppressed scramblase activity rather than flippase activity contributes to the maintenance of phosphatidylserine in the inner leaflet of human erythrocytes. PMID:26944472

  17. Cytochrome P{sub 450}-dependent toxic effects of primaquine on human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shobana; Tekwani, Babu L.; Sahu, Rajnish; Tripathi, Lalit M.; Walker, Larry A.

    2009-11-15

    Primaquine, an 8-aminoquinoline, is the drug of choice for radical cure of relapsing malaria. Use of primaquine is limited due to its hemotoxicity, particularly in populations with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency [G6PD(-)]. Biotransformation appears to be central to the anti-infective and hematological toxicities of primaquine, but the mechanisms are still not well understood. Metabolic studies with primaquine have been hampered due to the reactive nature of potential hemotoxic metabolites. An in vitro metabolism-linked hemotoxicity assay has been developed. Co-incubation of the drug with normal or G6PD(-) erythrocytes, microsomes or recombinant cytochrome P{sub 450} (CYP) isoforms has allowed in situ generation of potential hemotoxic metabolite(s), which interact with the erythrocytes to generate hemotoxicity. Methemoglobin formation, real-time generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and depletion of reactive thiols were monitored as multiple biochemical end points for hemotoxicity. Primaquine alone did not produce any hemotoxicity, while a robust increase was observed in methemoglobin formation and generation of ROIs by primaquine in the presence of human or mouse liver microsomes. Multiple CYP isoforms (CYP2E1, CYP2B6, CYP1A2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) variably contributed to the hemotoxicity of primaquine. This was further confirmed by significant inhibition of primaquine hemotoxicity by the selective CYP inhibitors, namely thiotepa (CYP2B6), fluoxetine (CYP2D6) and troleandomycin (CYP3A4). Primaquine caused similar methemoglobin formation in G6PD(-) and normal human erythrocytes. However, G6PD(-) erythrocytes suffered higher oxidative stress and depletion of thiols than normal erythrocytes due to primaquine toxicity. The results provide significant insights regarding CYP isoforms contributing to hemotoxicity and may be useful in controlling toxicity of primaquine to increase its therapeutic utility.

  18. Rapid transbilayer movement of spin-labeled steroids in human erythrocytes and in liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Peter; Herrmann, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The transbilayer movement and distribution of spin-labeled analogs of the steroids androstane (SLA) and cholestane (SLC) were investigated in the human erythrocyte and in liposomes. Membranes were labeled with SLA or SLC, and the analogs in the outer leaflet were selectively reduced at 4C using 6-O-phenylascorbic acid. As shown previously, 6-O-phenylascorbic acid reduces rapidly nitroxides exposed on the outer leaflet, but its permeation of membranes is comparatively slow and thus does not interfere with the assay. From the reduction kinetics, we infer that transbilayer movement of SLA in erythrocytes is rapid at 4C with a half-time of approximately 4.3 min and that the probe distributes almost symmetrically between both halves of the plasma membrane. We have no indication that a protein-mediated transport is involved in the rapid transbilayer movement of SLA because 1) pretreatment of erythrocytes with N-ethyl maleimide affected neither flip-flop nor transbilayer distribution of SLA and 2) flip-flop of SLA was also rapid in pure lipid membranes. The transbilayer dynamics of SLC in erythrocyte membranes could not be resolved by our assay. Thus, the rate of SLC flip-flop must be on the order of, or even faster than, that of probe reduction rate on the exoplasmic leaflet (half-time approximately 0.5 min). The results are discussed with regard to the transbilayer dynamics of cholesterol. PMID:11867457

  19. Membrane-Wrapping Contributions to Malaria Parasite Invasion of the Human Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sabyasachi; Auth, Thorsten; Gov, Nir S.; Satchwell, Timothy J.; Hanssen, Eric; Zuccala, Elizabeth S.; Riglar, David T.; Toye, Ashley M.; Betz, Timo; Baum, Jake; Gompper, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The blood stage malaria parasite, the merozoite, has a small window of opportunity during which it must successfully target and invade a human erythrocyte. The process of invasion is nonetheless remarkably rapid. To date, mechanistic models of invasion have focused predominantly on the parasite actomyosin motor contribution to the energetics of entry. Here, we have conducted a numerical analysis using dimensions for an archetypal merozoite to predict the respective contributions of the host-parasite interactions to invasion, in particular the role of membrane wrapping. Our theoretical modeling demonstrates that erythrocyte membrane wrapping alone, as a function of merozoite adhesive and shape properties, is sufficient to entirely account for the first key step of the invasion process, that of merozoite reorientation to its apex and tight adhesive linkage between the two cells. Next, parasite-induced reorganization of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton and release of parasite-derived membrane can also account for a considerable energetic portion of actual invasion itself, through membrane wrapping. Thus, contrary to the prevailing dogma, wrapping by the erythrocyte combined with parasite-derived membrane release can markedly reduce the expected contributions of the merozoite actomyosin motor to invasion. We therefore propose that invasion is a balance between parasite and host cell contributions, evolved toward maximal efficient use of biophysical forces between the two cells. PMID:24988340

  20. Chronic cigarette smoking alters erythrocyte membrane lipid composition and properties in male human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Pannuru; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Kavitha, Godugu; Paramahamsa, Maturu; Varadacharyulu, Nallanchakravarthula

    2010-11-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major lifestyle factor influencing the health of human beings. The present study investigates smoking induced alterations on the erythrocyte membrane lipid composition, fluidity and the role of nitric oxide. Thirty experimental and control subjects (age 35+/-8) were selected for the study. Experimental subjects smoke 12+/-2 cigarettes per day for 7-10 years. In smokers elevated nitrite/nitrate levels in plasma and red cell lysates were observed. Smokers showed increased hemolysis, erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, C/P ratio (cholesterol and phospholipid ratio), anisotropic (gamma) value with decreased Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and sulfhydryl groups. Alterations in smokers erythrocyte membrane individual phospholipids were also evident from the study. Red cell lysate nitric oxide positively correlated with C/P ratio (r=0.565) and fluorescent anisotropic (gamma) value (r=0.386) in smokers. Smoking induced generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species might have altered erythrocyte membrane physico-chemical properties.

  1. Influence of acute exercise on the osmotic stability of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Paraiso, L F; de Freitas, M V; Gonçalves-E-Oliveira, A F M; de Almeida Neto, O P; Pereira, E A; Mascarenhas Netto, R C; Cunha, L M; Bernardino Neto, M; de Agostini, G G; Resende, E S; Penha-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 2 different types of acute aerobic exercise on the osmotic stability of human erythrocyte membrane and on different hematological and biochemical variables that are associated with this membrane property. The study population consisted of 20 healthy and active men. Participants performed single sessions of 2 types of exercise. The first session consisted of 60 min of moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE). The second session, executed a week later, consisted of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) until exhaustion. The osmotic stability of the erythrocyte membrane was represented by the inverse of the salt concentration (1/H50) at the midpoint of the sigmoidal curve of dependence between the absorbance of hemoglobin and the NaCl concentration. The values of 1/H50 changed from 2.29±0.1 to 2.33±0.09 after MICE and from 2.30±0.08 to 2.23±0.12 after HIIE. During MICE mean corpuscular volume increased, probably due to in vivo lysis of older erythrocytes, with preservation of cells that were larger and more resistant to in vitro lysis. The study showed that a single bout of acute exercise affected erythrocyte stability, which increased after MICE and decreased after HIIE.

  2. Interaction of hydroxychlorobiphenyls--polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites--with the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L

    1978-01-01

    Effects of hydroxychlorobiphenyls (polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites) and chlorobiphenyls on membranes have been studied with the human erythrocyte membrane as a model. Many of the hydroxychlorobiphenyls are very effective hemolytic agents, whereas the parent chlorobiphenyls are generally quite ineffective at inducing hemolysis. The hemolytic potency of the hydroxychlorobiphenyls varies with the degree of chlorination and, more importantly, with the position of the chloro- and hydroxy- substituents. At lower concentrations, the hydroxychlorobiphenyls protect the erythrocyte against hypotonic hemolysis, while they induce hemolysis at higher concentrations. In the range of concentrations of each hydroxychlorobiphenyl required for maximum protection, the erythrocytes exist in altered morphological forms as opposed to normal discocytes. The chlorobiphenyls at lower concentrations also protect the erythrocytes from hypotonic hemolysis, but they do not induce hemolysis at higher concentrations. These studies suggest that products of the metabolism of chlorobiphenyls may be more biologically active than the parent compounds themselves. Effects on membranes may thus play a role in the mammalian toxicity of the hydroxychloro- and chlorobiphenyls.

  3. H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress Affects SO4= Transport in Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Rossana; Romano, Orazio; La Spada, Giuseppa; Marino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to verify the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein, responsible for Cl-/HCO3- as well as for cell membrane deformability, due to its cross link with cytoskeletal proteins. The role of cytoplasmic proteins binding to Band 3 protein has been also considered by assaying H2O2 effects on hemoglobin-free resealed ghosts of erythrocytes. Oxidative conditions were induced by 30 min exposure of human erythrocytes to different H2O2 concentrations (10 to 300 μM), with or without GSH (glutathione, 2 mM) or curcumin (10 μM), compounds with proved antioxidant properties. Since SO4= influx through Band 3 protein is slower and better controllable than Cl- or HCO3- exchange, the rate constant for SO4= uptake was measured to prove anion transport efficiency, while MDA (malondialdehyde) levels and -SH groups were estimated to quantify the effect of oxidative stress. H2O2 induced a significant decrease in rate constant for SO4= uptake at both 100 and 300 μM H2O2. This reduction, observed in erythrocytes but not in resealed ghosts and associated to increase in neither MDA levels nor in -SH groups, was impaired by both curcumin and GSH, whereas only curcumin effectively restored H2O2-induced changes in erythrocytes shape. Our results show that: i) 30 min exposure to 300 μM H2O2 reduced SO4= uptake in human erythrocytes; ii) oxidative damage was revealed by the reduction in rate constant for SO4= uptake, but not by MDA or -SH groups levels; iii) the damage was produced via cytoplasmic components which cross link with Band 3 protein; iv) the natural antioxidant curcumin may be useful in protecting erythrocytes from oxidative injury; v) SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein may be reasonably suggested as a tool to monitor erythrocytes function under oxidative conditions possibly deriving from alcohol consumption, use of drugs, radiographic contrast media administration, hyperglicemia or neurodegenerative

  4. H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress Affects SO4= Transport in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Rossana; Romano, Orazio; La Spada, Giuseppa; Marino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to verify the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein, responsible for Cl-/HCO3- as well as for cell membrane deformability, due to its cross link with cytoskeletal proteins. The role of cytoplasmic proteins binding to Band 3 protein has been also considered by assaying H2O2 effects on hemoglobin-free resealed ghosts of erythrocytes. Oxidative conditions were induced by 30 min exposure of human erythrocytes to different H2O2 concentrations (10 to 300 μM), with or without GSH (glutathione, 2 mM) or curcumin (10 μM), compounds with proved antioxidant properties. Since SO4= influx through Band 3 protein is slower and better controllable than Cl- or HCO3- exchange, the rate constant for SO4= uptake was measured to prove anion transport efficiency, while MDA (malondialdehyde) levels and –SH groups were estimated to quantify the effect of oxidative stress. H2O2 induced a significant decrease in rate constant for SO4= uptake at both 100 and 300 μM H2O2. This reduction, observed in erythrocytes but not in resealed ghosts and associated to increase in neither MDA levels nor in –SH groups, was impaired by both curcumin and GSH, whereas only curcumin effectively restored H2O2-induced changes in erythrocytes shape. Our results show that: i) 30 min exposure to 300 μM H2O2 reduced SO4= uptake in human erythrocytes; ii) oxidative damage was revealed by the reduction in rate constant for SO4= uptake, but not by MDA or –SH groups levels; iii) the damage was produced via cytoplasmic components which cross link with Band 3 protein; iv) the natural antioxidant curcumin may be useful in protecting erythrocytes from oxidative injury; v) SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein may be reasonably suggested as a tool to monitor erythrocytes function under oxidative conditions possibly deriving from alcohol consumption, use of drugs, radiographic contrast media administration, hyperglicemia or

  5. Erythrocytes from GGTA1/CMAH knockout pigs: implications for xenotransfusion and testing in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng-Yu; Burlak, Christopher; Estrada, Jose L.; Li, Ping; Tector, Matthew F.; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Pig erythrocytes are potentially useful to solve the worldwide shortage of human blood for transfusion. Domestic pig erythrocytes, however, express antigens that are bound by human preformed antibodies. Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to rapidly knock out the genes of multiple xenoantigens, namely galactose α1,3 galactose (aGal) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). We have recently targeted the GGTA1 and CMAH genes with zinc finger endonucleases resulting in double knockout pigs that no longer express aGal or Neu5Gc and attract significantly fewer human antibodies. In this study, we characterized erythrocytes from domestic and genetically modified pigs, baboons, chimpanzees, and humans for binding of human and baboon natural antibody, and complement mediated lysis. Methods Distribution of anti Neu5Gc IgG and IgM in pooled human AB serum was analyzed by ELISA. Erythrocytes from domestic pigs (Dom), aGal knockout pigs (GGTA1 KO), aGal and Neu5Gc double knockout pigs (GGTA1/CMAH KO), baboons, chimpanzees, and humans were analyzed by flow cytometry for aGal and Neu5Gc expression. In vitro comparative analysis of erythrocytes was conducted with pooled human AB serum and baboon serum. Total antibody binding was accessed by hemagglutination; complement-dependent lysis was measured by hemolytic assay; IgG or IgM binding to erythrocytes was characterized by flow cytometry. Results The pooled human AB serum contained 0.38 μg/ml anti Neu5Gc IgG and 0.085 μg/ml anti Neu5Gc IgM. Both Gal and Neu5Gc were not detectable on GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes. Hemagglutinaion of GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes with human serum was 3.5-fold lower compared to GGTA1 KO erythrocytes, but 1.6-fold greater when agglutinated with baboon serum. Hemolysis of GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes by human serum (25%) was reduced 9-fold compared to GGTA1 KO erythrocytes, but increased 1.64-fold by baboon serum. Human IgG binding was reduced 27-fold on GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes

  6. Erythrocytes from GGTA1/CMAH knockout pigs: implications for xenotransfusion and testing in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Yu; Burlak, Christopher; Estrada, Jose L; Li, Ping; Tector, Matthew F; Tector, A Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Pig erythrocytes are potentially useful to solve the worldwide shortage of human blood for transfusion. Domestic pig erythrocytes, however, express antigens that are bound by human preformed antibodies. Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to rapidly knock out the genes of multiple xenoantigens, namely galactose α1,3 galactose (aGal) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). We have recently targeted the GGTA1 and CMAH genes with zinc finger endonucleases resulting in double knockout pigs that no longer express aGal or Neu5Gc and attract significantly fewer human antibodies. In this study, we characterized erythrocytes from domestic and genetically modified pigs, baboons, chimpanzees, and humans for binding of human and baboon natural antibody, and complement-mediated lysis. Distribution of anti-Neu5Gc IgG and IgM in pooled human AB serum was analyzed by ELISA. Erythrocytes from domestic pigs (Dom), aGal knockout pigs (GGTA1 KO), aGal and Neu5Gc double knockout pigs (GGTA1/CMAH KO), baboons, chimpanzees, and humans were analyzed by flow cytometry for aGal and Neu5Gc expression. In vitro comparative analysis of erythrocytes was conducted with pooled human AB serum and baboon serum. Total antibody binding was accessed by hemagglutination; complement-dependent lysis was measured by hemolytic assay; IgG or IgM binding to erythrocytes was characterized by flow cytometry. The pooled human AB serum contained 0.38 μg/ml anti-Neu5Gc IgG and 0.085 μg/ml anti-Neu5Gc IgM. Both Gal and Neu5Gc were not detectable on GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes. Hemagglutination of GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes with human serum was 3.5-fold lower compared with GGTA1 KO erythrocytes, but 1.6-fold greater when agglutinated with baboon serum. Hemolysis of GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes by human serum (25%) was reduced 9-fold compared with GGTA1 KO erythrocytes, but increased 1.64-fold by baboon serum. Human IgG binding was reduced 27-fold on GGTA1/CMAH KO erythrocytes compared with GGTA1

  7. Protection of wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides against free radical-induced oxidative damage in normal human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sun, Baoguo; Cao, Yanping; Tian, Yuan

    2009-07-01

    The present work assessed the protective effect of water-soluble feruloyl oligosaccharides (FSH), ferulic acid ester of oligosaccharides from wheat bran, against in vitro oxidative damage of normal human erythrocytes induced by a water-soluble free radical initiator, 2,2'-azobis-2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH). In the whole process of AAPH-initiated oxidation, hemolysis occurred quickly after the lag time. The rate of hemolysis is correlated dose-dependently with AAPH concentration. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels of erythrocyte with concomitant enhancement in oxidized gluthione (GSSG) levels was noticed. It was also observed that lipid and protein peroxidation of erythrocytes induced by AAPH was significantly increased, and scanning electron microscopy observations showed that AAPH induced obvious morphological alteration in the erythrocytes from a smooth discoid to an echinocytic form. FSH suppressed depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, and methaemoglobin and protein carbonyl group formation of erythrocytes in concentration- and time-dependent manners, remarkably delayed AAPH-induced hemolysis. Morphological changes to erythrocyte caused by AAPH were effectively protected by FSH. It was also observed that FSH could work synergistically with endogenous antioxidants in erythrocytes. These results indicated that FSH efficiently protected normal human erythrocytes against oxidative stress, and they could be used as a potential source of natural antioxidants.

  8. Cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of extract of Amaranthus spinosus L. in Allium cepa and human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Prajitha, V; Thoppil, J E

    2017-02-01

    The present study examined the apoptosis inducing effects of Amaranthus spinosus L. aqueous extract in Allium cepa root meristematic cells and human erythrocytes. Cytogenetic assay revealed many apoptosis inducing cytogenetic aberrations viz., cytoplasmic breakage, cytoplasmic disintegration, cytoplasmic shrinkage, receding of cytoplasm, cytoplasmic vacuolation, enucleated cell, ghost cell, nuclear vacuolation, nuclear fragmentation and nuclear disintegration. A remarkable modification of red blood cell surface morphology was observed in the result of RBC assay. The treated RBCs show membrane blebbing and shrinkage, features typical for apoptosis in nucleated cells. Significant induction of cell death was observed in treated Allium root tip cells after Evans blue staining, disclosing the membrane damage potential of the plant extract. TTC assay results in reduced mitochondrial/metabolic activity in Allium root tip cells after treatment, designating the adverse effect of plant extract on mitochondrial respiratory chain. These results confirm the apoptosis inducing potential of A. spinosus extract. Confirming the present results by further in vitro studies, it can be effectively targeted against cell proliferation during cancer treatment by inducing apoptosis. Thus from the present investigation it can be concluded that the aqueous extract of A. spinosus exhibited apoptosis induction and cytotoxic activities.

  9. Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Human Erythrocytes Involves PATMK, a Member of the Transmembrane Kinase Family

    PubMed Central

    Boettner, Douglas R; Huston, Christopher D; Linford, Alicia S; Buss, Sarah N; Houpt, Eric; Sherman, Nicholas E; Petri, William A

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK), was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i) incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii) PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii) expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMKΔ932). Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMKΔ932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection. PMID:18208324

  10. Transport and subcellular distribution characteristics of human erythrocyte glucose transporter fused in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Inho.

    1990-01-01

    Purified human erythrocyte glucose transporters (HEGT) were incorporated into the rat epididymal adipocytes by polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced fusion. The incorporation of HEGT was found to be dependent on both the molecular weight and the concentration of PEG. Optimal incorporation of HEGT occurred when 10% PEG 8000 was used. This incorporation was found to be proportional to the increasing amounts of HEGT used. Morphology tests showed very little surface adsorption of HEGT on adipocytes after fusion. Transport activity of fused HEGT was studied by measuring equilibrium exchange of 3-O-methylglucose. In adipocytes employed this fusion protocols, the transport rate increased significantly compared with cells treated under non-fusion conditions. This fold increase was directly proportional to the amount of HEGT recovered in the plasma membrane (PM). Furthermore, calculated turnover number of HEGT in fused adipocytes was as high as that of the native adipocyte glucose transporter (AGT). Subcellular distribution of HEGT in fused adipocytes was assessed using ({sup 3}H)cytochalasin B-labeled HEGT vesicles. HEGT was distributed in each subcellular organelle at specific ratios. This relative distribution was almost constant regardless of the amount of HEGT used. The distributions of lipid-labeled HEGT, fluid-phase endocytosed HEGT and free HEGT mixed to adipocyte homogenate were shown to be completely different from that of protein-labeled HEGT fusion.

  11. Facilitated uptake of a bioactive metabolite of maritime pine bark extract (pycnogenol) into human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kurlbaum, Max; Mülek, Melanie; Högger, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Many plant secondary metabolites exhibit some degree of biological activity in humans. It is a common observation that individual plant-derived compounds in vivo are present in the nanomolar concentration range at which they usually fail to display measurable activity in vitro. While it is debatable that compounds detected in plasma are not the key effectors of bioactivity, an alternative hypothesis may take into consideration that measurable concentrations also reside in compartments other than plasma. We analysed the binding of constituents and the metabolite δ-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-γ-valerolactone (M1), that had been previously detected in plasma samples of human consumers of pine bark extract Pycnogenol, to human erythrocytes. We found that caffeic acid, taxifolin, and ferulic acid passively bind to red blood cells, but only the bioactive metabolite M1 revealed pronounced accumulation. The partitioning of M1 into erythrocytes was significantly diminished at higher concentrations of M1 and in the presence of glucose, suggesting a facilitated transport of M1 via GLUT-1 transporter. This concept was further supported by structural similarities between the natural substrate α-D-glucose and the S-isomer of M1. After cellular uptake, M1 underwent further metabolism by conjugation with glutathione. We present strong indication for a transporter-mediated accumulation of a flavonoid metabolite in human erythrocytes and subsequent formation of a novel glutathione adduct. The physiologic role of the adduct remains to be elucidated.

  12. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH.

  13. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes Bind to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells In Vitro, Demonstrating a Dual Adhesion Phenotype Mediated by Distinct P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K.; Ghumra, Ashfaq

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (<10 μg/ml of total IgG). Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:24343658

  14. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    PubMed

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (<10 μg/ml of total IgG). Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  15. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  16. Amphiphile dependency of the monomeric and dimeric forms of acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Ott, P; Brodbeck, U

    1984-08-08

    Human erythrocyte membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase was converted to a monomeric species by treatment of ghosts with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetic acid. After solubilization with Triton X-100, the reduced and alkylated enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography and separated from residual dimeric enzyme by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor. Monomeric and dimeric acetylcholinesterase showed full enzymatic activity in presence of Triton X-100 whereas in the absence of detergent, activity was decreased to approx. 20% and 15%, respectively. Preformed egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles fully sustained activity of the monomeric species whereas the dimer was only 80% active. The results suggest that a dimeric structure is not required for manifestation of amphiphile dependency of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, monomeric enzyme appears to be more easily inserted into phospholipid bilayers than the dimeric species.

  17. Human erythrocyte membranes exhibit a cooperative calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPase of high calcium sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Peter; Michell, Robert H.

    1981-03-01

    It is thought that the ionized Ca2+ concentration in the cytosol of healthy erythrocytes is in the range 0.01-0.1 µM (ref. 1) and that this low concentration is maintained by an ATP-driven calmodulin-dependent Ca2+ pump in the plasma membrane2,3. The Ca2+-stimulated ATPase which is the enzymatic expression of this pump varies in its calcium sensitivity between different preparations of erythrocyte ghosts, with activation generally occurring in a concentration range between ~1 and 10 µM Ca2+ (refs 2-5). This is a higher range of Ca2+ concentrations than might be anticipated for activation of a pump that sustains intracellular concentrations of Ca2+ below 0.1 µM, and recent reports have suggested activation in some membrane preparations at Ca2+ concentrations in the range 0.1-1.0 µM (refs 6, 7). We report here a simple method for preparing human erythrocyte membranes in 2.5 mM HEPES/1 mM EGTA at pH 7.0 (see Fig. 1 legend) in which the activation of the Ca2+-ATPase by Ca2+ and intracellular concentrations of calmodulin is highly cooperative and is complete by ~1 µM Ca2+. Unlike other available erythrocyte membrane preparations, the pattern of activation by Ca2+ and calmodulin is not complicated by partial resealing of the ghosts during and after isolation. We suggest that this cooperative activation of the Ca2+ pump may explain how healthy erythrocytes maintain their normal cytosol Ca2+ concentration at a threshold value at or below ~0.1 µM. We also note that several other calmodulin-dependent enzymes display similar cooperative activation kinetics.

  18. D-glucose-induced second harmonic generation response in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lev, Dmitry; Puzenko, Alexander; Manevitch, Alexandra; Manevitch, Zacharia; Livshits, Leonid; Feldman, Yuri; Lewis, Aaron

    2009-02-26

    The first experimental results of the nonresonant second harmonic generation (SHG) studies of human erythrocytes membrane exposed to various glucose concentrations in phosphate buffered saline (PBS solution) are presented in this article. It is shown that the SHG signal from the membrane can be altered as a function of glucose concentration. The link between the variation of the SHG intensity and the membrane dielectric permittivity with glucose is established both theoretically and experimentally by comparison with time domain dielectric spectroscopy (TDDS) measurement data.

  19. Thermotropic lipid phase separations in human erythrocyte ghosts and cholesterol-enriched rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, L M; Mobley, P W

    1984-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of human erythrocyte ghosts labeled with 5-nitroxide stearate, I(12,3), indicate that a temperature-dependent lipid phase separation occurs with a high onset at 38 degrees C. Cooling below 38 degrees C induces I(12,3) clustering. Similar phase separations were previously identified in human platelet and cholesterol-loaded [cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio (C/P) = 0.85] rat liver plasma membranes [L.M. Gordon et al., 1983; J. Membrane Biol. 76; 139-149]; these were attributed to redistribution of endogenous lipid components such that I(12,3) is excluded from cholesterol-rich domains and tends to reside in cholesterol-poor domains. Further enrichment of rat liver plasma membranes to C/P ratios of 0.94-0.98 creates an "artificial" system equivalent to human erythrocyte ghosts (C/P = 0.90), using such criteria as probe flexibility, temperature dependent I(12,3) clustering; and polarity of the probe environment. Consequently, cholesterol-rich and -poor domains probably exist in both erythrocyte ghosts and high cholesterol liver membranes at physiologic temperatures. The temperature dependence of cold-induced hypertonic lysis of intact human erythrocytes was examined by incubating cells in 0.9 M sucrose for 10 min at 1 degree C intervals between 9 and 46 degrees C (Stage 1), and then subjecting them to 0 degrees C for 10 min (Stage 2). Plots of released hemoglobin are approx. sigmoidal, with no lysis below 18 degrees C and maximal lysis above 40 degrees C. The protective effect of low temperatures during Stage 1 may be due to the formation of cholesterol-rich domains that alter the bilayer distribution and/or conformation of critical membrane-associated proteins.

  20. In vitro inhibition of human erythrocyte glutathione reductase by some new organic nitrates.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, Murat; Talaz, Oktay; Ekinci, Deniz; Cavdar, Hüseyin; Küfrevioğlu, Omer Irfan

    2009-07-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR), is responsible for the existence of GSH molecule, a crucial antioxidant against oxidative stress reagents. The antimalarial activities of some redox active compounds are attributed to their inhibition of antioxidant flavoenzyme glutathione reductase, and inhibitors are therefore expected to be useful for the treatment of malaria. Twelve organic nitrate derivatives were synthesized and treated with human erythrocyte GR. The molecules were identified as strong GR inhibitors and novel antimalaria candidates.

  1. Sodium-23 NMR analysis of human whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma. Chemical shift, spin relaxation, and intracellular sodium concentration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, Jay W.; Woessner, Donald E.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Glonek, Thomas

    Sodium-23 NMR analysis was performed on freshly obtained human whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma. The intracellular and extracellular sodium signals were separated by adding dysprosium: tripolyphosphate to the plasma bathing the erythrocytes. Quantitation of the intracellular sodium content was easily accomplished by sodium NMR and was shown to agree well with the values obtained by flame photometry. T1 and T2 relaxation studies demonstrated that the sodium in human plasma and within human erythrocytes is substantially different in its physical characteristics than sodium in aqueous solution, and that some fraction of the plasma and erythrocyte sodium is relatively immobilized. Sodium NMR would appear therefore to be a useful method for studying sodium biology in inherited and acquired human diseases.

  2. Characterization of peptide fluxes into human erythrocytes. A proton-n.m.r. study.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J E; Campbell, I D; Ellory, J C; King, G F

    1990-04-01

    A new protocol for measuring cellular uptake of dipeptides was developed in which the problem of peptide hydrolysis is obviated by introduction into the cell suspension of a membrane-permeant peptidase inhibitor. The uptake of unlabelled dipeptide is readily monitored so long as some analytical technique is available for measuring the intracellular peptide concentration; in this study we used n.m.r. spectroscopy. Using this protocol, we demonstrated that dipeptide uptake by human erythrocytes occurs by simple diffusion through the lipid bilayer and not via a high-capacity protein-mediated transport system. Substantiating evidence includes demonstration that: (a) the fluxes are slow compared with known protein-mediated transport processes in human erythrocytes; (b) the uptake is not stereospecific; (c) the uptake does not display saturation kinetics; (d) the fluxes are significantly enhanced by butanol; (e) a distinct correlation exists between the size-corrected permeability coefficients of the dipeptides and their calculated n-octanol/water partition coefficients. It is calculated that under normal physiological conditions the diffusive fluxes of circulating plasma peptides into human erythrocytes are too small for these cells to play a significant role in dipeptide catabolism.

  3. Characterization of peptide fluxes into human erythrocytes. A proton-n.m.r. study.

    PubMed Central

    Odoom, J E; Campbell, I D; Ellory, J C; King, G F

    1990-01-01

    A new protocol for measuring cellular uptake of dipeptides was developed in which the problem of peptide hydrolysis is obviated by introduction into the cell suspension of a membrane-permeant peptidase inhibitor. The uptake of unlabelled dipeptide is readily monitored so long as some analytical technique is available for measuring the intracellular peptide concentration; in this study we used n.m.r. spectroscopy. Using this protocol, we demonstrated that dipeptide uptake by human erythrocytes occurs by simple diffusion through the lipid bilayer and not via a high-capacity protein-mediated transport system. Substantiating evidence includes demonstration that: (a) the fluxes are slow compared with known protein-mediated transport processes in human erythrocytes; (b) the uptake is not stereospecific; (c) the uptake does not display saturation kinetics; (d) the fluxes are significantly enhanced by butanol; (e) a distinct correlation exists between the size-corrected permeability coefficients of the dipeptides and their calculated n-octanol/water partition coefficients. It is calculated that under normal physiological conditions the diffusive fluxes of circulating plasma peptides into human erythrocytes are too small for these cells to play a significant role in dipeptide catabolism. PMID:2327979

  4. Agglutination of human O erythrocytes by influenza A(H1N1) viruses freshly isolated from patients.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Seto, Y; Kimura, T; Minoshiro, S; Shibe, K

    1991-04-01

    The hemagglutinin titers of 10 influenza A (H1N1) viruses were examined using the erythrocytes of several species. Human O erythrocytes showed the highest agglutination titer to the viruses, whereas chicken erythrocytes showed a low titer. These findings were noted for at least 10 passages by serial dilutions of the viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. All influenza A(H1N1) viruses, plaque-cloned directly from throat-washing specimens of patients, also agglutinated human O but not chicken erythrocytes. The results of a hemadsorption test indicated that chicken erythrocytes possess less affinity to MDCK cells infected with the A/Osaka City/2/88(H1N1) stain than to those infected with the A/Yamagata/120/86(H1N1) strain which is used as an inactivated influenza vaccine in Japan. However, there were no significant differences between the A/Osaka City/2/88 and the A/Yamagata/120/86 strains in the hemagglutination inhibition test. Since human O erythrocytes have high agglutination activity to influenza A(H1N1) and also to A(H3N2) and B viruses in MDCK cells, these erythrocytes may be useful for the serological diagnosis of influenza.

  5. Diffractomery analysis of human and rat erythrocytes deformability under ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugovtsov, Andrei E.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Nikitin, Sergei Y.; Koshelev, Vladimir B.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of human and rat red blood cells (RBC) deformability, internal viscosity and yield stress of RBC in norm and ischemia was performed by means of laser diffractometry - a modern technique allowing for measuring the flexibility of RBC, which determines the blood flow parameters in vessels. Ischemic diseases of people and animals are accompanied with deterioration of microrheologic properties of their blood, in particular, with impairing the RBC deformability. Human RBCs were obtained from the blood of healthy individuals and from patients suffering from ischemic diseases. The RBC deformability indices from both groups of individuals were measured. Rat RBCs were obtained from a control group of animals and from a group with experimentally induced ischemia (EII). This animal model is frequently used for studying the response of an organism to ischemia. The effect of semax, a medication that is frequently used for therapeutic treatments of human brain diseases in clinical practice, on RBC deformability was studied with its application in vitro and in vivo. It is shown that in human ischemic patients, the deformability index of RBC was lower than that from healthy individuals. Both in vivo and in vitro applied semax positively influences the impaired deformability properties of RBCs of ischemic rats.

  6. Human erythrocytes transport dehydroascorbic acid and sugars using the same transporter complex.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jay M; Carruthers, Anthony

    2014-05-15

    GLUT1, the primary glucose transport protein in human erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs)], also transports oxidized vitamin C [dehydroascorbic acid (DHA)]. A recent study suggests that RBC GLUT1 transports DHA as its primary substrate and that only a subpopulation of GLUT1 transports sugars. This conclusion is based on measurements of cellular glucose and DHA equilibrium spaces, rather than steady-state transport rates. We have characterized RBC transport of DHA and 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG), a transported, nonmetabolizable sugar. Steady-state 3-OMG and DHA uptake in the absence of intracellular substrate are characterized by similar Vmax (0.16 ± 0.01 and 0.13 ± 0.02 mmol·l(-1)·min(-1), respectively) and apparent Km (1.4 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.7 mM, respectively). 3-OMG and DHA compete for uptake, with Ki(app) of 0.7 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.1 mM, respectively. Uptake measurements using RBC inside-out-membrane vesicles demonstrate that 3-OMG and DHA compete at the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane, with Ki(app) of 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 mM, respectively. Intracellular 3-OMG stimulates unidirectional uptake of 3-OMG and DHA. These findings indicate that DHA and 3-OMG bind at mutually exclusive sites at exo- and endofacial surfaces of GLUT1 and are transported via the same GLUT1 complex. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Human erythrocytes transport dehydroascorbic acid and sugars using the same transporter complex

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.

    2014-01-01

    GLUT1, the primary glucose transport protein in human erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs)], also transports oxidized vitamin C [dehydroascorbic acid (DHA)]. A recent study suggests that RBC GLUT1 transports DHA as its primary substrate and that only a subpopulation of GLUT1 transports sugars. This conclusion is based on measurements of cellular glucose and DHA equilibrium spaces, rather than steady-state transport rates. We have characterized RBC transport of DHA and 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG), a transported, nonmetabolizable sugar. Steady-state 3-OMG and DHA uptake in the absence of intracellular substrate are characterized by similar Vmax (0.16 ± 0.01 and 0.13 ± 0.02 mmol·l−1·min−1, respectively) and apparent Km (1.4 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.7 mM, respectively). 3-OMG and DHA compete for uptake, with Ki(app) of 0.7 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.1 mM, respectively. Uptake measurements using RBC inside-out-membrane vesicles demonstrate that 3-OMG and DHA compete at the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane, with Ki(app) of 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 mM, respectively. Intracellular 3-OMG stimulates unidirectional uptake of 3-OMG and DHA. These findings indicate that DHA and 3-OMG bind at mutually exclusive sites at exo- and endofacial surfaces of GLUT1 and are transported via the same GLUT1 complex. PMID:24598365

  8. Effects of an angelica extract on human erythrocyte aggregation, deformation and osmotic fragility.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wei, L; Ouyang, J P; Muller, S; Gentils, M; Cauchois, G; Stoltz, J F

    2001-01-01

    In Chinese traditional medicine, angelica is widely used for its known clinical effects of ameliorating blood microcirculation. But the mechanism of these beneficial effects still remains unclear. In this work the rheological behaviour of human erythrocytes treated by angelica was studied in vitro. Normal RBCs incubated with an angelica extract at different concentrations (5, 10 or 20 mg/ml) for 60 min at 37 degrees C and then their aggregation, deformation and osmotic fragility were measured with different recently developed optical techniques, namely Erythroaggregometer (Regulest, Florange, France), LORCA (Mechatronics, Amsterdam) and Fragilimeter (Regulest, Florange, France). Experimental results show that angelica (20 mg/ml) significantly decreased normal RBCs' aggregation speed (p<0.01) and could inhibit the hyperaggregability caused by dextran 500. However, the strength of normal RBCs aggregates were not influenced by angelica. When a calcium ionophore A23187 (1.9 microM) was used to harden cell membrane, angelica (20 mg/ml) could significantly (p<0.01) protect erythrocytes against the loss of their deformability even it had no effects on normal RBCs deformation. Finally angelica (5 and 10 mg/ml) decreased significantly (p<0.01) normal RBCs osmotic fragility. In conclusion angelica plays a rheologically active role on human erythrocytes, and this study suggests a possible mechanism for angelica's positive effects against certain cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Activation of phosphatidic acid metabolism of human erythrocyte membranes by perfringolysin O

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Ando, S.; Mitsui, K.; Homma, Y.; Takenawa, T.

    1986-05-29

    The effect of perfringolysin O on the lipid metabolism of human erythrocyte membranes was investigated. Erythrocytes were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonic acid and (/sup 32/P)inorganic phosphate. In the presence of calcium ion (5.5 mM), the effect of perfringolysin O on lipid metabolism was very similar to that of an calcium-ionophore A23187. In the absence of calcium ion, the accumulation of phosphatidic acid and its following decreasing trend were observed during the reaction with the toxin. Such changes were not caused by filipin. These results suggest that perfringolysin O causes the activation of a diglyceride-phosphatidic acid cycle, which might be involved in the calcium transport.

  10. Protective effects of Emblica officinalis (Amla) on metal-induced lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay Kumar; Rather, Irfan Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    The protective potential of Emblica officinalis (amla) was investigated on metal-induced lipid per oxidation in human erythrocytes. Increases in the levels of MDA and catalase activity were assessed as lipid per oxidation. In addition, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), and ascorbic acid levels were assessed as antioxidant indices. Preliminary investigation of the extract exhibited a significant reduction in lipid per oxidation and an increase in antioxidant abilities, such as a decrease in MDA, GPx and GSH (P<0.05). A significant reduction in erythrocyte hemolysis induced by hydrogen peroxide was observed using amla extract (P<0.05). These findings show that amla extract has significant protective potential against lipid per oxidation.

  11. Influence of magnesium sulfate on HCO3/Cl transmembrane exchange rate in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chernyshova, Ekaterina S; Zaikina, Yulia S; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Serebrennikova, Elena S; Volkov, Leonid; Maltsev, Valeri P; Chernyshev, Andrei V

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is widely used in medicine but molecular mechanisms of its protection through influence on erythrocytes are not fully understood and are considerably controversial. Using scanning flow cytometry, in this work for the first time we observed experimentally (both in situ and in vitro) a significant increase of HCO3(-)/Cl(-) transmembrane exchange rate of human erythrocytes in the presence of MgSO4 in blood. For a quantitative analysis of the obtained experimental data, we introduced and verified a molecular kinetic model, which describes activation of major anion exchanger Band 3 (or AE1) by its complexation with free intracellular Mg(2+) (taking into account Mg(2+) membrane transport and intracellular buffering). Fitting the model to our in vitro experimental data, we observed a good correspondence between theoretical and experimental kinetic curves that allowed us to evaluate the model parameters and to estimate for the first time the association constant of Mg(2+) with Band 3 as KB~0.07mM, which is in agreement with known values of the apparent Mg(2+) dissociation constant (from 0.01 to 0.1mM) that reflects experiments on enrichment of Mg(2+) at the inner erythrocyte membrane (Gunther, 2007). Results of this work partly clarify the molecular mechanisms of MgSO4 action in human erythrocytes. The method developed allows one to estimate quantitatively a perspective of MgSO4 treatment for a patient. It should be particularly helpful in prenatal medicine for early detection of pathologies associated with the risk of fetal hypoxia.

  12. cGMP transport by vesicles from human and mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, Cornelia J F; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; van der Heijden, Ingrid; Wielinga, Peter R; Hundscheid, Stefanie L; Ono, Nobuhito; Scheffer, George L; de Haas, Marcel; Schuetz, John D; Wijnholds, Jan; Borst, Piet

    2007-01-01

    cGMP secretion from cells can be mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCC4, ABCC5, and ABCC11. Indirect evidence suggests that ABCC4 and ABCC5 contribute to cGMP transport by erythrocytes. We have re-investigated the issue using erythrocytes from wild-type and transporter knockout mice. Murine wild-type erythrocyte vesicles transported cGMP with an apparent Km that was 100-fold higher than their human counterparts, the apparent Vmax being similar. Whereas cGMP transport into human vesicles was efficiently inhibited by the ABCC4-specific substrate prostaglandin E1, cGMP transport into mouse vesicles was inhibited equally by Abcg2 and Abcc4 inhibitors/substrates. Similarly, cGMP transport into vesicles from Abcc4-/- and Abcg2-/- mice was 42% and 51% of that into wild-type mouse vesicles, respectively, whereas cGMP transport into vesicles from Abcc4(-/-)/Abcg2(-/-) mice was near background. The knockout mice were used to show that Abcg2-mediated cGMP transport occurred with lower affinity but higher Vmax than Abcc4-mediated transport. Involvement of Abcg2 in cGMP transport by Abcc4-/- erythrocyte vesicles was supported by higher transport at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.4, a characteristic of Abcg2-mediated transport. The relative contribution of ABCC4/Abcc4 and ABCG2/Abcg2 in cGMP transport was confirmed with a new inhibitor of ABCC4 transport, the protease inhibitor 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride.

  13. The osmotic resistance, and zeta potential responses of human erythrocytes to transmembrane modification of Ca2+ fluxes in the presence of the imposed low rate radiation field of 90Sr.

    PubMed

    Zhirnov, Victor V; Iakovenko, Igor N

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the imposed low dose rate ionizing field on membrane stability of human erythrocytes under modulation of transmembrane exchange of Ca(2+). Osmotic resistance of human erythrocytes was determined by a measure of haemoglobin released from erythrocytes when placed in a medium containing serial dilutions of Krebs isotonic buffer. The zeta potential as indicator of surface membrane potential was calculated from value of the cellular electrophoretic mobility. The irradiation of erythrocyte suspensions carried out by applying suitable aliquots of (90)Sr in incubation media. Irradiation of human erythrocytes by (90)Sr (1.5-15.0 μGy·h(-1)) induced a reversible increase of hyposmotic hemolysis and negative charge value on the outer membrane surface as well as changed responses these parameters to modification of Ca(2+) fluxes with calcimycin and nitrendipine. Findings indicate that the low dose rate radionuclides ((90)Sr) field modifies both Ca(2+)-mediated, and Ca(2+)-independent cellular signalling regulating mechanical stability of erythrocyte membrane. A direction of that modification presumably depends on the initial structure of membranes, and it is determined by the quality and quantitative parameters of changes in membrane structure caused by concrete operable factors.

  14. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D.; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. PMID:21839519

  15. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-09-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood.

  16. Shape changes and deformability in human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Schrier, S L

    1987-12-01

    To evaluate the membrane events that take place during red blood cell shape change, the deformability of resealed ghosts was studied in the ektacytometer while alterations in ghost shapes were produced. By studying ghosts in the ektacytometer it is possible to assess small changes in membrane dynamic rigidity free of the complicating factors that exist in intact red blood cells, such as concerns over the ratio of surface area to volume and the internal viscosity. Ghosts resealed in isotonic buffers are echinocytic, but addition of magnesium-adenosine triphosphate converts them to discocytes. This conversion to discocytosis was accompanied by an increase in membrane rigidity. Addition of vanadate along with magnesium-adenosine triphosphate blocked the conversion of echinocytic ghosts to discocytes, and in parallel blocked the accompanying increase in rigidity. Monospecific rabbit antispectrin antibody was resealed within ghosts and produced the anticipated increase in membrane rigidity. Morphologic evaluation revealed that such ghosts had changed from echinocytes to discocytes. Therefore two very different methods were used to convert normally echinocytic ghosts into discocytic ghosts, and in both cases the shape change was accompanied by an increase in ghost rigidity. These experiments indicate that in isotonically resealed ghosts, the discocytic shape is achieved as a consequence of membrane protein changes that produce an increase in membrane rigidity.

  17. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  18. Uptake of cesium ions by human erythrocytes and perfused rat heart: a cesium-133 NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.G.; Murphy, E.; London, R.E.

    1988-05-17

    Cesium-133 NMR studies have been carried out on suspended human erythrocytes and on perfused rat hearts in media containing CsCl. The resulting spectra exhibit two sharp resonances, arising from intra-and extracellular Cs/sup +/, separated in chemical shift by 1.0-1.4 ppm. Thus, intra- and extracellular resonances are easily resolved without the addition of paramagnetic shift reagents required to resolve resonance of the other alkali metal ions. Spin-lattice relaxation times in all cases are monoexponential and significantly shorter (3-4 times) for the intracellular component. When corrections are made for the pulse repetition rate, the total intensity of the intracellular and extracellular Cs/sup +/ resonances in erythrocytes is conserve, implying total observability of the intracellular pool. The uptake of Cs/sup +/ by erythrocytes occurs at approximately one-third the reported rate for K/sup +/ and was reduced by a factor of 2 upon addition of ouabain to the sample. These results indicate that /sup 133/Cs NMR is a promising tool for studying the distribution and transport of cesium ions in biological systems and, in some cases such as uptake by cellular Na,K-ATPase, for analysis of K/sup +/ ion metabolism.

  19. Oxygen regulates the band 3–ankyrin bridge in the human erythrocyte membrane

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Marko; Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Kodippili, Gayani; Low, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    The oxygenation state of erythrocytes is known to impact several cellular processes. As the only known O2-binding protein in red blood cells, haemoglobin has been implicated in the oxygenation-mediated control of cell pathways and properties. Band 3, an integral membrane protein linked to the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton, preferentially binds deoxygenated haemoglobin at its N-terminus, and has been postulated to participate in the mechanism by which oxygenation controls cellular processes. Because the ankyrin-binding site on band 3 is located near the deoxyHb (deoxygenated haemoglobin)-binding site, we hypothesized that deoxyHb might impact the association between band 3 and the underlying erythrocyte cytoskeleton, a link that is primarily established through band 3–ankyrin bridging. In the present paper we show that deoxygenation of human erythrocytes results in displacement of ankyrin from band 3, leading to release of the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton from the membrane. This weakening of membrane–cytoskeletal interactions during brief periods of deoxygenation could prove beneficial to blood flow, but during episodes of prolonged deoxygenation, such as during sickle cell occlusive crises, could promote unwanted membrane vesiculation. PMID:23013433

  20. Oxygen regulates the band 3-ankyrin bridge in the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Marko; Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Kodippili, Gayani; Low, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The oxygenation state of erythrocytes is known to impact several cellular processes. As the only known O2-binding protein in red blood cells, haemoglobin has been implicated in the oxygenation-mediated control of cell pathways and properties. Band 3, an integral membrane protein linked to the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton, preferentially binds deoxygenated haemoglobin at its N-terminus, and has been postulated to participate in the mechanism by which oxygenation controls cellular processes. Because the ankyrin-binding site on band 3 is located near the deoxyHb (deoxygenated haemoglobin)-binding site, we hypothesized that deoxyHb might impact the association between band 3 and the underlying erythrocyte cytoskeleton, a link that is primarily established through band 3-ankyrin bridging. In the present paper we show that deoxygenation of human erythrocytes results in displacement of ankyrin from band 3, leading to release of the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton from the membrane. This weakening of membrane-cytoskeletal interactions during brief periods of deoxygenation could prove beneficial to blood flow, but during episodes of prolonged deoxygenation, such as during sickle cell occlusive crises, could promote unwanted membrane vesiculation.

  1. Diffusional water permeability of human erythrocytes and their ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The diffusional water permeability of human red cells and ghosts was determined by measuring the rate of tracer efflux by means of an improved version of the continuous flow tube method, having a time resolution of 2-3 ms. At 25 degrees C, the permeability was 2.4 x 10(3) and 2.9 x 10(3) cm s-1 for red cells and ghosts, respectively. Permeability was affected by neither a change in pH from 5.5 to 9.5, nor by osmolality up to 3.3 osmol. Manganous ions at an extracellular concentration of 19 mM did not change diffusional water permeability, as recently suggested by NMR measurements. A "ground" permeability of 1 x 10(3) cm s-1 was obtained by inhibition with 1 mM of either p- chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) or p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (PCMBS). Inhibition increased temperature dependence of water permeability for red cells and ghosts from 21 to 30 kJ mol-1 to 60 kJ mol-1. Although diffusional water permeability is about one order of magnitude lower than osmotic permeability, inhibition with PCMB and PCMBS, temperature dependence both before and after inhibition, and independence of osmolality showed that diffusional water permeability has qualitative features similar to those reported for osmotic permeability, which indicates that the same properties of the membrane determine both types of transport. It is suggested that the PCMB(S)- sensitive permeability above the ground permeability takes place through the intermediate phase between integral membrane proteins and their surrounding lipids. PMID:7097244

  2. Spectrin phosphorylation and shape change of human erythrocyte ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Human erthrocyte membranes in isotonic medium change shape from crenated spheres to biconcave disks and cup-forms when incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence of MgATP (M. P. Sheetz and S. J. Singer, 1977, J. Cell Biol. 73:638-646). The postulated relationship between spectrin phosphorylation and shape change (W. Birchmeier and S. J. Singer, 1977, J. Cell Biol. 73:647-659) is examined in this report. Salt extraction of white ghosts reduced spectrin phosphorylation during shape changes by 85-95%. Salt extraction did not alter crenation, rate of MgATP-dependent shape change, or the fraction (greater than 80%) ultimately converted to disks and cup-forms after 1 h. Spectrin was partially dephosphorylated in intact cells by subjection to metabolic depletion in vitro. Membranes from depleted cells exhibited normal shape-change behavior. Shape-change behavior was influenced by the hemolysis buffer and temperature and by the time required for membrane preparation. Tris and phosphate ghosts lost the capacity to change shape after standing for 1-2 h at 0 degrees C. Hemolysis in HEPES or N- tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid yielded ghosts that were converted rapidly to disks in the absence of ATP and did not undergo further conversion to cup-forms. These effects could not be attributed to differential dephsphorylation of spectrin, because dephosphorylation during ghost preparation and incubation was negligible. These results suggest that spectrin phosphorylation is not required for MgATP-dependent shape change. It is proposed that other biochemical events induce membrane curvature changes and that the role of spectrin is passive. PMID:7204501

  3. Protective effect of Scutellaria species on AAPH-induced oxidative damage in human erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Salini, Sasidharan; Divya, Menon Kunnathully; Chubicka, Thomas; Meera, Nair; Fulzele, Devanand P; Ragavamenon, Achuthan C; Babu, Thekkekara Devassy

    2016-06-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis is a well-known plant in traditional Chinese medicine. Recently, several Scutellaria species with therapeutic potential have been recognized worldwide. Scutellaria colebrookiana and Scutellaria violacea, native to the Western Ghats of India, are reported to possess free radical scavenging efficacy. At present, the protective effect of these Scutellaria spp. against 2,2' azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH)-induced oxidative damage in human erythrocytes has been analyzed. Oxidative stress in erythrocyte was induced by AAPH. The inhibition of hemolysis, membrane lipid peroxidation, and protein damage by chloroform extracts of Scutellaria spp. was assessed biochemically. Phytochemicals of the extracts were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR). Approximately 95% of erythrocytes were lysed by AAPH over 3 h of incubation. Significant reduction in hemolysis was observed by the extracts, and the IC50 values were 18.3 and 23.5 μg/mL for S. colebrookiana and S. violacea, respectively. Both the extracts were found to inhibit AAPH-induced lipid peroxidation in ghost membrane with IC50 92±2.8 and 70±5.6 μg/mL. In the analysis of the membrane proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the AAPH-induced degradation of actin was found reduced by both the extracts. The FTIR spectrum revealed the presence of polyphenols, carboxylic acids, alkanes, and aromatic compounds in extracts. In quantitative analysis, the total polyphenolic content estimated was 380±0.23 and 203.7±1.4 mg of gallic acid equivalent per gram extract of S. colebrookiana and S. violacea. Results indicate that S. colebrookiana and S. violacea are capable of protecting erythrocytes from oxidative damage. This cytoprotective effect of the extract is possibly by its antioxidant property.

  4. Fructosamine 3-kinase is involved in an intracellular deglycation pathway in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Delpierre, Ghislain; Collard, François; Fortpied, Juliette; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2002-01-01

    Fructosamine 3-kinase, which phosphorylates low-molecular-mass and protein-bound fructosamines on the third carbon of their deoxyfructose moiety, is quite active in erythrocytes, and was proposed to initiate a process removing fructosamine residues from proteins. In the present study, we show that incubation of human erythrocytes with 200 mM glucose not only caused the progressive formation of glycated haemoglobin, but also increased the level of an anionic form of haemoglobin containing alkali-labile phosphate, to approx. 5% of total haemoglobin. 1-Deoxy-1-morpholinofructose (DMF), a substrate and competitive inhibitor of fructosamine 3-kinase, doubled the rate of accumulation of glycated haemoglobin, but markedly decreased the amount of haemoglobin containing alkali-labile phosphate. The latter corresponds therefore to haemoglobin bound to a fructosamine 3-phosphate group (FN3P-Hb). Returning erythrocytes incubated with 200 mM glucose and DMF to a low-glucose medium devoid of DMF caused a decrease in the amount of glycated haemoglobin, a transient increase in FN3P-Hb and a net decrease in the sum (glycated haemoglobin+FN3P-Hb). These effects were prevented by DMF, indicating that fructosamine 3-kinase is involved in the removal of fructosamine residues. The second step of this 'deglycation' process is most likely a spontaneous decomposition of the fructosamine 3-phosphate residues to a free amine, 3-deoxyglucosone and P(i). This is consistent with the findings that 2-oxo-3-deoxygluconate, the product of 3-deoxyglucosone oxidation, is formed in erythrocytes incubated for 2 days with 200 mM glucose in a sufficient amount to account for the removal of fructosamine residues from proteins, and that DMF appears to inhibit the formation of 2-oxo-3-deoxygluconate from elevated glucose concentrations. PMID:11975663

  5. Phosphatidylethanol stimulates the plasma-membrane calcium pump from human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Suju, M; Davila, M; Poleo, G; Docampo, R; Benaim, G

    1996-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanol is formed by "transphosphatidylation' of phospholipids with ethanol catalysed by phospholipase D and can be accumulated in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells after treatment of animals with ethanol. In the present work we show that phosphatidylalcohols, such as phosphatidylethanol and phosphatidylbutanol, produced a twofold stimulation of the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of human erythrocytes. This stimulation occurs with the purified, solubilized enzyme as well as with ghost preparations, where the enzyme is in its natural lipidic environment and is different to that obtained with other acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine. Addition of either phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanol or phosphatidylbutanol to the purified Ca(2+)-ATPase, or to ghosts preparations, increased the affinity of the enzyme for Ca2+ and the maximal velocity of the reaction as compared with controls in the absence of acidic phospholipids. However, in contrast with what occurs with phosphatidylserine, simultaneous addition of phosphatidyl-alcohols and calmodulin increased the affinity of the enzyme for Ca2+ to a greater extent than each added separately. When ethanol was added to either the purified erythrocyte Ca(2+)-ATPase or to erythrocyte-ghost preparations in the presence of acidic phospholipids, an additive effect was observed. There was an increase in the affinity for Ca2+ and in the maximal velocity of the reaction, well above the values obtained with ethanol or with the acidic phospholipids tested separately. These findings could have pharmacological importance. It is conceivable that the decrease in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that has been reported in erythrocytes as a result of ethanol intoxication could be due to the stimulation of the Ca(2+)-ATPase by the accumulated phosphatidylethanol, to a direct effect of ethanol on the enzyme or to an additive combination of both. PMID:8760385

  6. Induction of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Cantharidin.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Kousi; Egler, Jasmin; Briglia, Marilena; Fazio, Antonella; Faggio, Caterina; Lang, Florian

    2015-07-28

    The natural phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor cantharidin, primarily used for topical treatment of warts, has later been shown to trigger tumor cell apoptosis and is thus considered for the treatment of malignancy. Similar to apoptosis of tumor cells, erythrocytes may undergo eryptosis, a suicidal cell death characterized by cell shrinkage and translocation of cell membrane phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling of eryptosis includes increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i), ceramide, oxidative stress and dysregulation of several kinases. Phosphatidylserine abundance at the erythrocyte surface was quantified utilizing annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ceramide from antibody binding, and reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with cantharidin significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥10 mg/mL), significantly decreased forward scatter (≥25 mg/mL), significantly increased [Ca2+]i (≥25 mg/mL), but did not significantly modify ceramide abundance or ROS. The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding following cantharidin treatment was not significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by kinase inhibitor staurosporine (1 mM) and slightly decreased by p38 inhibitor skepinone (2 mM). Exposure of erythrocytes to cantharidin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death with erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect sensitive to kinase inhibitors staurosporine and skepinone.

  7. Induction of suicidal erythrocyte death by nelfinavir.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, Rosi; Waibel, Sabrina; Lang, Florian

    2015-05-08

    The HIV protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, primarily used for the treatment of HIV infections, has later been shown to be effective in various infectious diseases including malaria. Nelfinavir may trigger mitochondria-independent cell death. Erythrocytes may undergo eryptosis, a mitochondria-independent suicidal cell death characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include oxidative stress and increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i). During malaria, accelerated death of infected erythrocytes may decrease parasitemia and thus favorably influence the clinical course of the disease. In the present study, phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with nelfinavir significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥5µg/mL), significantly decreased forward scatter (≥2.5µg/mL), significantly increased ROS abundance (10 µg/mL), and significantly increased [Ca2+]i (≥5 µg/mL). The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding following nelfinavir treatment was significantly blunted, but not abolished by either addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (1 mM) or removal of extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, exposure of erythrocytes to nelfinavir induces oxidative stress and Ca2+ entry, thus leading to suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling.

  8. Human erythrocyte dematin and protein 4.2 (pallidin) are ATP binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Azim, A C; Marfatia, S M; Korsgren, C; Dotimas, E; Cohen, C M; Chishti, A H

    1996-03-05

    Dematin and protein 4.2 are peripheral membrane proteins associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Isoforms of dematin and protein 4.2 exist in many nonerythroid cells. In solution, dematin is a trimeric protein containing two subunits of 48 kDa and one subunit of 52 kDa. Recent determination of the primary structure of the 52 kDa subunit of dematin showed that it contains an additional 22-amino acid sequence in the headpiece domain. An alignment of the 22-amino acid insertion sequence revealed that the 52 kDa subunit of dematin shares a novel 11-amino acid motif with protein 4.2. In this communication, we report that the conserved 11-amino acid motif in dematin52 and protein 4.2 contains a nucleotide binding P-loop. Direct binding of ATP is demonstrated to the glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing corresponding segments of dematin52 and protein 4.2 as well as to purified protein 4.2. The binding of ATP to the recombinant domains of dematin52 and protein 4.2 is specific, saturable, and of high affinity. The nucleotide specificity of the P-loop is restricted to ATP since no detectable binding was observed with GTP. These results show that the 11-amino acid motif provides an ATP binding site in dematin52 and protein 4.2. Although the functional significance of ATP binding is not yet clear, our findings open new perspectives for the function of dematin and protein 4.2 in vivo.

  9. In vitro effects of quercetin on oxidative stress mediated in human erythrocytes by benzoic acid and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Baş, Hatice; Kalender, Suna; Pandir, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) and citric acid (CA) are food additives commonly used in many food products. Food additives play an important role in food supply but they can cause various harmful effects. The in vitro adverse effects of BA and CA and the protective effect of quercetin on human erythrocytes were investigated by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities. Erythrocytes were incubated with BA and CA, at three doses of 50, 100 and 200 microg/ml, and quercetin, at a concentration of 10 microM. After BA and CA application, a dose-dependent increase in MDA level and decreases in SOD, CAT, GST and GPx activities were found in erythrocytes. Among the two food additives, BA exerted a more harmful influence on human erythrocytes than CA. The protective effects of quercetin against oxidative stress--induction in the human erythrocytes by CA and BA, were found when these two food additives were applied at each of three doses of 50, 100 and 200 microg/ml. However, complete protection of quercetin against CA toxicity was only observed when this agent was applied at a lower dose of 50 microg/ml. Quercetin did not completely protect erythrocytes even at the lowest concentration of BA.

  10. Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA) binds human erythrocytes independent of Duffy antigen status

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Lu, Feng; Wang, Bo; Li, Jian; Han, Jin-Hee; Ito, Daisuke; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Jiang, Lubin; Wu, Jian; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Jun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Desai, Sanjay A.; Miller, Louis H.; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, a major agent of malaria in both temperate and tropical climates, has been thought to be unable to infect humans lacking the Duffy (Fy) blood group antigen because this receptor is critical for erythrocyte invasion. Recent surveys in various endemic regions, however, have reported P. vivax infections in Duffy-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite may utilize alternative receptor-ligand pairs to complete the erythrocyte invasion. Here, we identified and characterized a novel parasite ligand, Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA), that bound human erythrocytes regardless of Duffy antigen status. PvGAMA was localized at the microneme in the mature schizont-stage parasites. The antibodies against PvGAMA fragments inhibited PvGAMA binding to erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The erythrocyte-specific binding activities of PvGAMA were significantly reduced by chymotrypsin treatment. Thus, PvGAMA may be an adhesion molecule for the invasion of Duffy-positive and -negative human erythrocytes. PMID:27759110

  11. Ex vivo effects of ibogaine on the activity of antioxidative enzymes in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Oreščanin-Dušić, Zorana; Spasojević, Ivan; Slavić, Marija; Mijušković, Ana; Paškulin, Roman; Miljević, Čedo; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-04-22

    Ibogaine is a naturally occurring alkaloid with psychotropic and metabotropic effects, derived from the bark of the root of the West African Tabernanthe iboga plant. The tribes of Kongo basin have been using iboga as a stimulant, for medicinal purposes, and in rite of passage ceremonies, for centuries. Besides, it has been found that this drug has anti-addictive effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that ibogaine changed the quantity of ATP and energy related enzymes as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes in cells thus altering redox equilibrium in a time manner. In this work, the mechanism of its action was further studied by measuring the effects of ibogaine in human erythrocytes in vitro on ATP liberation, membrane fluidity and antioxidant enzymes activity. Heparinized human blood samples were incubated with ibogaine (10 and 20 μM) at 37°C for 1h. Blood plasma was separated by centrifugation and the levels of ATP and uric acid were measured 10 min after the addition of ibogaine using standard kits. The activity of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GR) were measured in erythrocytes after incubation period. The stability of SOD1 activity was further tested through in vitro incubation with H2O2 and scanning of its electrophoretic profiles. Membrane fluidity was determined using an electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labelling method. Results showed that ibogaine treatment of erythrocytes in vitro increased ATP concentration in the blood plasma without changes in neither erythrocytes membrane fluidity nor uric acid concentration. Ibogaine also increased SOD1 activity in erythrocytes at both doses applied here. Treatment with 20 μM also elevated GR activity after in vitro incubation at 37°C. Electrophoretic profiles revealed that incubation with ibogaine mitigates H2O2 mediated suppression of SOD1 activity. Some of the effects of ibogaine seem to be mediated through

  12. Proteomic analysis shows the upregulation of erythrocyte dematin in zinc-restricted human subjects123

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Guthrie, Gregory J; Maki, Alyssa B; Aydemir, Tolunay B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the importance of adequate zinc intake has been known for decades, the estimated global prevalence of zinc deficiency remains high. This substantiates the need for a specific and sensitive status assessment tool. Objective: The objective was to evaluate erythrocyte zinc transporters as candidate molecules with the potential of being a biomarker of dietary zinc status in humans. Design: A 24-d observational study with acclimation (7 d, 10.4 mg Zn/d), zinc-depletion (10 d, 0.3 mg Zn/d), and zinc-repletion (7 d, 29.5 mg Zn/d) phases was conducted in healthy men (n = 9). Proteomic approaches including Western blot analyses and tandem mass spectrometry were implemented to identify the zinc responsiveness of selected red blood cell membrane proteins. Results: Zinc transporter 1 (ZnT1) and Zrt/Irt-like proteins ZIP8 and ZIP10 were detected in human erythrocyte membranes. No effects of short-term dietary zinc depletion were observed on the amounts of these proteins. However, changes in a cytoskeletal protein, dematin, by zinc depletion were identified through the nonspecific signals produced by an anti-ZIP8 antibody. This response was further validated by a dematin-specific antibody and with erythrocytes collected from mice fed a zinc-deficient diet. Conclusions: The presence of ZnT1, ZIP8, and ZIP10 in human red blood cells implicates their role in the regulation of cellular zinc metabolism in the human erythroid system. The zinc responsiveness of membrane dematin suggests its capability to serve as a biomarker for dietary zinc depletion and its involvement in impaired erythroid membrane fragility by zinc restriction. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01221129. PMID:22456662

  13. The use of cis-parinaric acid to determine lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes. Comparison of normal and sickle erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, J J; Kuypers, F A; Qju, J H; Chiu, D; Lubin, B; Roelofsen, B; Op den Kamp, J A

    1988-09-15

    The recently developed parinaric acid assay is shown to offer possibilities for studying peroxidation processes in biological membrane systems. Taking the human erythrocyte membrane as a model, several initiating systems were investigated, as well as the effect of residual hemoglobin in ghost membrane preparations. The effectivity of a radical generating system appeared to be strongly dependent upon whether radicals are generated at the membrane level or in the water phase. Thus, cumene hydroperoxide at concentrations of 1.0-1.5 mM was found to be a very efficient initiator of peroxidation in combination with submicromolar levels of hemin-Fe3+ as membrane-bound cofactor. In combination with cumene hydroperoxide, membrane-bound hemoglobin appeared to be about 6-times more effective in promoting peroxidation than hemoglobin in the water phase. Results comparing the behaviour of normal and sickle erythrocyte ghost suspensions in the peroxidation assay suggest that the increased oxidative stress on sickle erythrocyte membranes could be due to enhanced membrane binding of sickle hemoglobin, but also partly to a characteristically higher capability of sickle hemoglobin to promote peroxidation. The order of peroxidation-promoting capabilities that could be derived from the experiments was hemin greater than sickle hemoglobin greater than normal hemoglobin.

  14. Purine nucleobase transport in human erythrocytes. Reinvestigation with a novel "inhibitor-stop" assay.

    PubMed

    Domin, B A; Mahony, W B; Zimmerman, T P

    1988-07-05

    A novel "inhibitor-stop" method for the determination of initial rates of purine nucleobase transport in human erythrocytes has been developed, based on the addition of seven assay volumes of cold 19 mM papaverine to terminate influx. In view of our finding that the initial velocities of adenine, guanine, and hypoxanthine influx into human erythrocytes were linear for only 4-6 s at 37 degrees C, the present method has been used to reexamine the kinetics of purine nucleobase transport in these cells. Initial influx rates of all three purine nucleobases were shown to be the result of concurrent facilitated and nonfacilitated diffusion. The nonfacilitated influx rates could be estimated either from the linear concentration dependence of nucleobase influx at high concentrations of permeant or from residual influx rates which were not inhibited by the presence of co-permeants. Appropriate corrections for nonfacilitated diffusion were made to the influx rates observed at low nucleobase concentrations. Kinetic analyses indicated that adenine (Km = 13 +/- 1 microM, n = 7), guanine (Km = 37 +/- 2 microM, n = 5), and hypoxanthine (Km = 180 +/- 12 microM, n = 6) were mutually competitive substrates for transport. The Ki values obtained with each nucleobase as an inhibitor of the influx of the other nucleobases were similar to their respective Km values for influx. Furthermore, the transport of the purine nucleobases was not inhibited by nucleosides (uridine, inosine) or by inhibitors of nucleoside transport (6-[(4-nitrobenzyl)thio]-9-beta-D-ribofuranosylpurine, dilazep, dipyridamole). It is concluded that all three purine nucleobases share a common facilitated transport system in human erythrocytes which is functionally distinct from the nucleoside transporter.

  15. Conductivity of normal and pathological human erythrocytes (homozygous beta-thalassemia) at radiowave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Ballario, C; Bonincontro, A; Cametti, C; Rosi, A; Sportelli, L

    1984-01-01

    The conductivity of normal and homozygous beta-thalassemic erythrocyte suspensions has been measured over the frequency range from 5 KHz to 100 MHz in the temperature interval from 5 to 45 degrees C. The electrical parameters of the membrane, i.e., the capacitance CM and the conductance GM per unit surface have been calculated from an expression given by Hanai for the conductivity of a suspension of ellipsoidal particles covered with a shell. Some interesting differences between the normal and pathological state are evidentiated.

  16. Expression levels of the ABCG2 multidrug transporter in human erythrocytes correspond to pharmacologically relevant genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Kasza, Ildikó; Várady, György; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Koszarska, Magdalena; Tordai, Attila; Scheffer, George L; Németh, Adrienn; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a rapid, simple and reliable, antibody-based flow cytometry assay for the quantitative determination of membrane proteins in human erythrocytes. Our method reveals significant differences between the expression levels of the wild-type ABCG2 protein and the heterozygous Q141K polymorphic variant. Moreover, we find that nonsense mutations on one allele result in a 50% reduction in the erythrocyte expression of this protein. Since ABCG2 polymorphisms are known to modify essential pharmacokinetic parameters, uric acid metabolism and cancer drug resistance, a direct determination of the erythrocyte membrane ABCG2 protein expression may provide valuable information for assessing these conditions or for devising drug treatments. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte membrane protein levels may reflect genotype-dependent tissue expression patterns. Extension of this methodology to other disease-related or pharmacologically important membrane proteins may yield new protein biomarkers for personalized diagnostics.

  17. Expression Levels of the ABCG2 Multidrug Transporter in Human Erythrocytes Correspond to Pharmacologically Relevant Genetic Variations

    PubMed Central

    Kasza, Ildikó; Várady, György; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Koszarska, Magdalena; Tordai, Attila; Scheffer, George L.; Németh, Adrienn; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a rapid, simple and reliable, antibody-based flow cytometry assay for the quantitative determination of membrane proteins in human erythrocytes. Our method reveals significant differences between the expression levels of the wild-type ABCG2 protein and the heterozygous Q141K polymorphic variant. Moreover, we find that nonsense mutations on one allele result in a 50% reduction in the erythrocyte expression of this protein. Since ABCG2 polymorphisms are known to modify essential pharmacokinetic parameters, uric acid metabolism and cancer drug resistance, a direct determination of the erythrocyte membrane ABCG2 protein expression may provide valuable information for assessing these conditions or for devising drug treatments. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte membrane protein levels may reflect genotype-dependent tissue expression patterns. Extension of this methodology to other disease-related or pharmacologically important membrane proteins may yield new protein biomarkers for personalized diagnostics. PMID:23166586

  18. Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes and the protective effect of vitamins C and E in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Fatma Ben; Gargouri, Bochra; Bejaoui, Hafedh; Lassoued, Saloua; Ammar-Keskes, Leila

    2011-06-01

    Organophosphorus insecticides may induce oxidative stress leading to the generation of free radicals and alteration in the antioxidant system. The aim of this study was to examine the potency of Dimethoate (Dim) to induce oxidative stress response in human erythrocyte in vitro and the role of Vitamins C (Vit C) and E (Vit E) in alleviating the cytotoxic effects. Erythrocytes were divided into three groups. The first group, erythrocytes were incubated for 4 h at 37 °C with different concentrations (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 mM) of Dim. The second and third groups were preincubated with Vit C or Vit E, respectively, for 30 min and followed by Dim incubation for 4 h at 37 °C. Following in vitro exposure, Dim caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) in erythrocytes at different concentrations. Vit E or Vit C pretreated erythrocytes showed a significant protection against the cytotoxic effects inducted by Dim on the studied parameters. In conclusion, antioxidant Vit E and C could protect against Dim-induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation and hyperactivity of SOD and CAT in human erythrocytes.

  19. An ascorbate-mediated transmembrane-reducing system of the human erythrocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Orringer, E P; Roer, M E

    1979-01-01

    Actively metabolizing human erythrocytes catalyze the extracellular reduction of ferricyanide to ferrocyanide. Because neither of these anions can enter the cell, reducing equivalents generated in the course of glycolysis must in some manner be transferred across the cell membrane, thereby resulting in ferricyanide reduction. Work described in this paper suggests that the transmembrane reduction is effected by ascorbic acid. This compound in its oxidized form (dehydroascorbate) rapidly enters the cell. Here it obtains reducing equivalents which appear to come from NADH made available at the level of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Once reduced, it leaves the cell as ascorbic acid and accomplishes the non-enzymatic reduction of ferricyanide. PMID:216708

  20. Adaptation of the genetically tractable malaria pathogen Plasmodium knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Robert W.; Hall, Joanna; Rangkuti, Farania; Ho, Yung Shwen; Almond, Neil; Mitchell, Graham H.; Pain, Arnab; Holder, Anthony A.; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Research into the aetiological agent of the most widespread form of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, has benefitted enormously from the ability to culture and genetically manipulate blood-stage forms of the parasite in vitro. However, most malaria outside Africa is caused by a distinct Plasmodium species, Plasmodium vivax, and it has become increasingly apparent that zoonotic infection by the closely related simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a frequent cause of life-threatening malaria in regions of southeast Asia. Neither of these important malarial species can be cultured in human cells in vitro, requiring access to primates with the associated ethical and practical constraints. We report the successful adaptation of P. knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes. Human-adapted P. knowlesi clones maintain their capacity to replicate in monkey erythrocytes and can be genetically modified with unprecedented efficiency, providing an important and unique model for studying conserved aspects of malarial biology as well as species-specific features of an emerging pathogen. PMID:23267069

  1. Relationships between the surface exposure of acidic phospholipids and cell fusion in erythrocytes subjected to electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Song, L Y; Baldwin, J M; O'Reilly, R; Lucy, J A

    1992-02-17

    The procoagulant activity of human erythrocytes, which provides a measure of the translocation of acidic phospholipids from the inner to the outer monolayer of the plasma membrane, has been compared with the percentage cell fusion in experiments on the effects of electrical breakdown pulses under differing experimental conditions. After treatment with breakdown pulses of 20 microseconds or longer (5 kV cm-1), the plasma membranes of erythrocytes in 250 mM sucrose exhibited an almost complete loss of asymmetry with respect to acidic phospholipids. As the breakdown voltage was increased from 2 to 5 kV cm-1 (with breakdown pulses of 99 microseconds), the surface exposure of acidic phospholipids and cell fusion increased approximately in parallel. Furthermore, with 99 microseconds pulses and a voltage of 3 kV cm-1, a decrease in the osmolarity from 250 to 150 mM of the sucrose medium was accompanied by an increase in both the surface exposure of acidic phospholipids and the extent of cell fusion. Breakdown pulses of 2-5 microseconds were sufficient to cause a marked loss of asymmetry, but no cell fusion was observed unless the pulse length was at least 20 microseconds. Kinetic experiments indicated that exposure of the acidic phospholipids at the cell surface was more likely to be due to a direct effect of the electric field pulses on plasma membrane structure than to secondary effects, such as the action of endogenous proteinases on the membrane skeleton. It seems possible that a localised, surface exposure of acidic phospholipids may contribute to the 'long-lived fusogenic state' (Sowers, A.E. (1986) J. Cell Biol. 102, 1358-1362) and the 'transient permeant structures' (Teissié, J. and Rols, M.P. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 140, 258-266) that enable cell fusion to occur when contact between cells is established after they have been subjected to field pulses. Our observations also provide circumstantial support for the concept that changes in the

  2. Electric fields induce reversible changes in the surface to volume ratio of micropipette-aspirated erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Katnik, C; Waugh, R

    1990-01-01

    Micropipette-aspirated erythrocytes exhibit reversible changes in sphericity (surface-to-volume ratio) in response to applied electric fields. The potentials were applied between the shaft of the pipette and the bathing medium using Ag-AgCl electrodes and current clamping electronics. The change in surface-to-volume ratio is evidenced as a reversible change in the length of the cell projection in the pipette at constant aspiration pressure and changing voltage. The magnitude of the changes decreased in proportion to the inverse of the solute concentration indicating that the change in sphericity was due to a change in cell volume. Reversible changes in projection length equivalent to a 10% change in cell volume were observed to occur over times on the order of 10 s. The magnitude and time course of the effect were not affected by the removal of intracellular hemoglobin or inhibition of anion exchange. The effect was reduced by the presence of lanthanum and other multivalent cations in the suspending solution, suggesting that surface charge may play a role in mediating the effect. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2344469

  3. Erythrocyte membrane transporters during human ageing: modulatory role of tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kanti Bhooshan; Jha, Rashmi; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    Ageing is associated with many physiological and cellular changes, many of which are due to alterations in the plasma membrane. The functions of membrane transporter proteins are crucial for the maintenance of ionic homeostasis between the extra- and intracellular environments. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of erythrocyte membrane transporters, specifically Ca(2+) -ATPases, Na(+) /K(+) -ATPases and the Na(+) /H(+) exchanger (NHE), during ageing in humans. Furthermore, because tea catechins have been reported to possess strong anti-oxidant potential, the study was extended to evaluate the effect of (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on these transporters as a function of human age. The study was performed on 97 normal healthy subjects (62 men, 35 women; 16-80 years old). To investigate the effects of tea catechins, subjects were divided into three groups: young (<40 years old; n = 34); middle-aged (40-60 years old; n = 32); and old (>60 years old; n = 31). Erythrocyte ghosts/cell suspension from each group were incubated with ECG, EGCG, EGC and EC (10 μmol/L) for 30 min at 37°C prior to assay. Ageing significantly increased NHE activity and decreased Ca(2+) -ATPase activity. There were no significant changes in Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity during the ageing process. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate, EGC, ECG and EC effectively mitigated the changes in membrane transporter activity in erythrocytes from all age groups; however, the effect was more pronounced in the old age group. We hypothesize that impairment in -bound transporters may be one of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathological events during ageing. A higher intake of catechin-rich food may provide some protection against age-dependent diseases.

  4. Role of calmodulin in thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1983-03-01

    Because human erythrocyte membrane Ca2+-ATPase is a calmodulin-dependent enzyme, and because physiological levels of thyroid hormone stimulate this enzyme system in vitro, we have studied the role of calmodulin in this model of extranuclear thyroid hormone action. Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of thyroid hormone ("basal activity") was increased by inclusion in the preassay incubation mixture of purified calmodulin or hypothyroid erythrocyte hemolysate that contained calmodulin (39 micrograms calmodulin/ml packed cells, determined by radioimmunoassay); addition of L-thyroxine or 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (10(-10)M) significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) enzyme activity in the presence of calmodulin or hemolysate. The stimulatory effects of thyroid hormone, calmodulin, and hemolysate were additive. At 5-10 microM, trifluoperazine, an antagonist of calmodulin, inhibited thyroid hormone stimulation of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Higher concentrations of trifluoperazine (50-100 microM) inhibited basal and hormone-stimulated enzyme activity, with or without added calmodulin. Anti-calmodulin antibody (10-50 micrograms antibody/mg membrane protein) inhibited basal, calmodulin-stimulated and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity. Membrane preparations were shown by radioimmunoassay to contain residual endogenous calmodulin (0.27 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg membrane protein). The latter accounts for the effect of trifluoperazine and calmodulin antibody on membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of added purified calmodulin. These results support the conclusion that the in vitro action of physiological levels of iodothyronines on human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity requires the presence of calmodulin.

  5. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  6. Human Antibodies Fix Complement to Inhibit Plasmodium falciparum Invasion of Erythrocytes and Are Associated with Protection against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Michelle J.; Reiling, Linda; Feng, Gaoqian; Langer, Christine; Osier, Faith H.; Aspeling-Jones, Harvey; Cheng, Yik Sheng; Stubbs, Janine; Tetteh, Kevin K.A.; Conway, David J.; McCarthy, James S.; Muller, Ivo; Marsh, Kevin; Anders, Robin F.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antibodies play major roles in immunity to malaria; however, a limited understanding of mechanisms mediating protection is a major barrier to vaccine development. We have demonstrated that acquired human anti-malarial antibodies promote complement deposition on the merozoite to mediate inhibition of erythrocyte invasion through C1q fixation and activation of the classical complement pathway. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent (Ab-C′) inhibition was the predominant invasion-inhibitory activity of human antibodies; most antibodies were non-inhibitory without complement. Inhibitory activity was mediated predominately via C1q fixation, and merozoite surface proteins 1 and 2 were identified as major targets. Complement fixation by antibodies was very strongly associated with protection from both clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia in a prospective longitudinal study of children. Ab-C′ inhibitory activity could be induced by human immunization with a candidate merozoite surface-protein vaccine. Our findings demonstrate that human anti-malarial antibodies have evolved to function by fixing complement for potent invasion-inhibitory activity and protective immunity. PMID:25786180

  7. Trypsinized Human Group O Erythrocytes as an Alternative Hemagglutinating Agent for Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, K. F.; Hu, L. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Trypsinized human group O erythrocytes were found to be a suitable alternative to gander cells in hemagglutination (HA) and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) tests for Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus. In the HAI test, no cross-reactions against JE virus were observed with immune sera containing antibody to taxonomically related or unrelated viruses, with mouse brain antigen, or with nonantibody serum inhibitors; specific antibody rise could be detected in an immunized rabbit. Gander and trypsinized human group O cells gave comparable titers in the HAI test, but the latter were preferable since (i) they required less challenging HA antigen, being more sensitive to agglutination by JE virus, and (ii) all human and some animal sera investigated were devoid of natural agglutinins for these cells, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for prior adsorption with packed cells. PMID:4856948

  8. Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Ryo; Sakuma, Shinya; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Pöschl, Johannes M. B.; Arai, Fumihito; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-01-01

    Large deformability of erythrocytes in microvasculature is a prerequisite to realize smooth circulation. We develop a novel tool for the three-step “Catch-Load-Launch” manipulation of a human erythrocyte based on an ultra-high speed position control by a microfluidic “robotic pump”. Quantification of the erythrocyte shape recovery as a function of loading time uncovered the critical time window for the transition between fast and slow recoveries. The comparison with erythrocytes under depletion of adenosine triphosphate revealed that the cytoskeletal remodeling over a whole cell occurs in 3 orders of magnitude longer timescale than the local dissociation-reassociation of a single spectrin node. Finally, we modeled septic conditions by incubating erythrocytes with endotoxin, and found that the exposure to endotoxin results in a significant delay in the characteristic transition time for cytoskeletal remodeling. The high speed manipulation of erythrocytes with a robotic pump technique allows for high throughput mechanical diagnosis of blood-related diseases. PMID:28233788

  9. Damascenine induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice and in vitro assessed human erythrocyte toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khettal, Bachra; Tir, Lydia; Boudrioua, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Nigella damascena seed is characterized by the presence of the major alkaloid, damascenine and its related metabolites. To our knowledge, no detailed subchronic toxicological assessment of damascenine (DA) has been reported. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of DA in vivo after sub-chronic intraperitoneal (i.p) administration in mice and in vitro following human erythrocyte hemolysis. In vivo, a total of 48 adult male and female Swiss albino mice were used in a sub-chronic toxicity study. The mice received intraperitoneally two doses of DA (20 and 100 mg/kg) for 28 days. Food intake, body weight and central body temperature were measured during the experiment. After completion of drug treatment, biochemical and histological analyses were performed. No mortality was observed in any of the treatment groups of mice, showing no toxic effects during the study. Neither were biochemical parameters altered; no significant differences were observed concerning glucose, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea, and creatinine parameters. No histopathological alterations were found in kidney and liver structures. In vitro, we focused on the human erythrocyte hemolytic process in the presence of several concentrations of DA. High level concentration of 1 000 μg/ml of DA revealed normal cell shapes and absence of hemolysis and deformation. PMID:27486370

  10. Extraction of Phospholipids from Human Erythrocyte Membranes by Hemoglobin Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Brunauer, Linda S; Chen, James Y; Koontz, M Zachary; Davis, Kathryn K; O'Brien, Laura E; Wright, Emily M; Huestis, Wray H

    2016-06-01

    This investigation examines oxidation conditions under which hemoglobin extracts membrane phospholipid from erythrocytes and model membranes. In erythrocytes made echinocytic with exogenous phospholipid, addition of hemoglobin oxidized with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or Vitamin C (conditions that result in the formation of significant quantities of choleglobin), but not ferricyanide (which produces predominantly methemoglobin), induced dose-dependent shape reversion to less echinocytic forms, consistent with extraction of phospholipids from the exofacial side of the membrane. Erythrocytes preloaded with radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine or NBD-labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid, exhibited greatest extraction of radiolabel or fluorescence signal with exogenous hemoglobin oxidized via H2O2 or Vitamin C, but not ferricyanide. However, with NBD-phosphatidylserine (a preferential inner monolayer intercalator), significantly less extraction of labeled lipid occurred with oxidized hemoglobin prepared under all three oxidizing conditions. In dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes containing radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine, subsequent addition of hemoglobin oxidized with H2O2 or Vitamin C extracted radiolabeled lipid with significantly greater efficiency than ferricyanide-treated hemoglobin, with enhanced extraction detectable at levels approaching physiological plasma oxidant concentrations. Radiolabeled lipid extraction was comparable for phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains between 12 and 18 carbons but diminished significantly for oleoyl-containing phospholipids. Hemoglobin dimerization occurred at very low levels with H2O2 treatment, and even lower levels with Vitamin C treatment, and thus did not correlate to the high efficiency and consistent levels of lipid extraction observed with these treatments. These findings indicate that choleglobin extracts lipids from cell

  11. [Comparison of modification of surface xenoantigens on bovine and porcine erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Xia; Li, Su-Bo; Wang, Jie-Xi; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2005-10-01

    This study was aimed to explore impact of removal of cell membrane G alalpha1-3Gal beta1-4Glc NAc epitopes (called alpha-Gal) and chemical modification of other xenoantigen on bovine red blood cell (bRBC) and porcine red blood cell (pRBC) antigenicity and to compare their modified erythrocytes, in order to provide basis for development of human blood substitute with rich source, high safety and efficacy. bRBC and pRBC were subjected to both enzymatic removal of membrane alpha-Gal with recombinant coffee bean alpha-galactosidase (rC alpha-GalE) and covalent attachment of benzotriazole carbonate-linked methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG-BTC, MW = 20 kD). The effects of treatment were measured by hemagglutination, flow cytometric assay of IgG binding and clinical cross-match testing to human sera. The results showed that although alpha-galactosidase treatment reduced hemagglutination titers to levels similar to negative control, the combination of the treatments was most effective. Clinically used cross-match tests between bRBC, pRBC and human sera demonstrated increased compatibility. Bovine RBC were more robust than pRBC, and had less xenoantigens, and had longer half life than pRBC in vivo. These characteristics suggested that bRBCs were more suitable to investigation as an alternatives to hRBC in clinical transfusion than pRBC. These data suggested that strategies to remove or mask xenoantigens on bRBC reduce antigenicity sufficiently to allow in vitro cross-match compatibility to human sera, and therefore bRBC following modification may be considered as human blood substitute.

  12. Protective effect of lutein against benzo(a)pyrene-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vijayapadma, Viswanadha; Ramyaa, Periasamy; Pavithra, Dhayalan; Krishnasamy, Rajashree

    2014-04-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant properties and protective effect of lutein in human erythrocyte against benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P). It is a well-known environmental carcinogen that produces free radicals under normal metabolic circumstances. B(a)P reacts with cellular macromolecules and produces oxidation of protein, lipid and DNA. Lutein is a carotenoid possessing antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present investigation, the protective effect of lutein was assessed in vitro against B(a)P-induced oxidative stress by monitoring antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation (LPO), protein carbonyl content, total sulfhydryl (SH) and nonprotein SH groups and methemoglobin in five groups of erythrocytes that include (i) control group, (ii) vehicle control group, (iii) B(a)P-exposed group, (iv) lutein-exposed group and (v) B(a)P coincubation with lutein group. It was observed that the activities of antioxidant enzymes and SH groups were significantly decreased in B(a)P-treated group when compared with control group. LPO level and protein carbonyl and methemoglobin contents were increased in B(a)P-treated group when compared with control group. The erythrocyte that was coincubated with B(a)P and lutein showed significant increase in the  antioxidant enzyme activities and a significant reduction in the level of LPO, methemoglobin and protein carbonyl contents  when compared with B(a)P-treated group. The results of the present investigation suggest that lutein possess protective effect against B(a)P-induced oxidative stress, possibly by combating oxidative stress by its  free radical scavenging activity.

  13. Direct current insulator-based dielectrophoretic characterization of erythrocytes: ABO-Rh human blood typing.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Soumya K; Artemiou, Andreas; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2011-09-01

    A microfluidic platform developed for quantifying the dependence of erythrocyte (red blood cell, RBC) responses by ABO-Rh blood type via direct current insulator dielectrophoresis (DC-iDEP) is presented. The PDMS DC-iDEP device utilized a 400 x 170 μm² rectangular insulating obstacle embedded in a 1.46-cm long, 200-μm wide inlet channel to create spatial non-uniformities in direct current (DC) electric field density realized by separation into four outlet channels. The DC-iDEP flow behaviors were investigated for all eight blood types (A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-, O+, O-) in the human ABO-Rh blood typing system. Three independent donors of each blood type, same donor reproducibility, different conductivity buffers (0.52-9.1 mS/cm), and DC electric fields (17.1-68.5 V/cm) were tested to investigate separation dependencies. The data analysis was conducted from image intensity profiles across inlet and outlet channels in the device. Individual channel fractions suggest that the dielectrophoretic force experienced by the cells is dependent on erythrocyte antigen expression. Two different statistical analysis methods were conducted to determine how distinguishable a single blood type was from the others. Results indicate that channel fraction distributions differ by ABO-Rh blood types suggesting that antigens present on the erythrocyte membrane polarize differently in DC-iDEP fields. Under optimized conductivity and field conditions, certain blind blood samples could be sorted with low misclassification rates.

  14. A new method for the reconstitution of the anion transport system of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Scheuring, U; Kollewe, K; Haase, W; Schubert, D

    1986-01-01

    The anion transport protein of the human erythrocyte membrane, band 3, was solubilized and purified in solutions of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. It was incorporated into spherical lipid bilayers by the following procedure: Dry phosphatidylcholine was suspended in the protein solution. Octylglucopyranoside was added until the milky suspension became clear. The sample was dialyzed overnight against detergent-free buffer. Residual Triton X-100 was removed from the opalescent vesicle suspension by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and subsequent dialysis. Sulfate efflux from the vesicles was studied, under exchange conditions, using a filtration method. Three vesicle subpopulations could be distinguished by analyzing the time course of the efflux. One was nearly impermeable to sulfate, and efflux from another was due to leaks. The largest subpopulation, however, showed transport characteristics very similar to those of the anion transport system of the intact erythrocyte membrane: transport numbers (at 30 degrees C) close to 20 sulfate molecules per band 3 and min, an activation energy of approx. 140 kJ/mol, a pH maximum at pH 6.2, saturation of the sulfate flux at sulfate concentrations around 100 mM, inhibition of the flux by H2DIDS and flufenamate (approx. KI-values at 30 degrees C: 0.1 and 0.7 microM, respectively), and "right-side-out" orientation of the transport protein (as judged from the inhibition of sulfate efflux by up to 98% by externally added H2DIDS). Thus, the system represents, for the first time, a reconstitution of all the major properties of the sulfate transport across the erythrocyte membrane.

  15. Tryptic digestion of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter: effects on ligand binding and tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    May, J M; Qu, Z C; Beechem, J M

    1993-09-21

    The conformation of the human erythrocyte glucose transport protein has been shown to determine its susceptibility to enzymatic cleavage on a large cytoplasmic loop. We took the converse approach and investigated the effects of tryptic digestion on the conformational structure of this protein. Exhaustive tryptic digestion of protein-depleted erythrocyte ghosts decreased the affinity of the residual transporter for cytochalasin B by 3-fold but did not affect the total number of binding sites. Tryptic digestion also increased the affinity of the residual transporter for D-glucose and inward-binding sugar phenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside but decreased that for the outward-binding 4,6-O-ethylidene glucose. These results suggest that tryptic cleavage stabilized the remaining transporter in an inward-facing conformation, but one with decreased affinity for cytochalasin B. The steady-state fluorescence emission scan of the purified reconstituted glucose transport protein was unaffected by tryptic digestion. Addition of increasing concentrations of potassium iodide resulted in linear Stern-Volmer plots, which were also unaffected by prior tryptic digestion. The tryptophan oxidant N-bromosuccinimide was investigated to provide a more sensitive measure of tryptophan environment. This agent irreversibly inhibited 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact erythrocytes and cytochalasin B binding in protein-depleted ghosts, with a half-maximal effect observed for each activity at about 0.3-0.4 nM. Treatment of purified glucose transport protein with N-bromosuccinimide resulted in a time-dependent quench of tryptophan fluorescence, which was resolved into two components by nonlinear regression using global analysis. Tryptic digestion retarded the rate of oxidation of the more slowly reacting class of tryptophans. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. An Improved 2-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Method for Resolving Human Erythrocyte Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Rajendra; Meena, Anil; Patidar, Bhagwan S; Prasad, Rajendra; Chhabra, Sunil K; Bansal, Surendra K

    2017-01-01

    The 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) technique is widely used for the analysis of complex protein mixtures extracted from biological samples. It is one of the most commonly used analytical techniques in proteomics to study qualitative and quantitative protein changes between different states of a cell or an organism (eg, healthy and diseased), conditionally expressed proteins, posttranslational modifications, and so on. The 2-DE technique is used for its unparalleled ability to separate thousands of proteins simultaneously. The resolution of the proteins by 2-DE largely depends on the quality of sample prepared during protein extraction which increases results in terms of reproducibility and minimizes protein modifications that may result in artifactual spots on 2-DE gels. The buffer used for the extraction and solubilization of proteins influences the quality and reproducibility of the resolution of proteins on 2-DE gel. The purification by cleanup kit is another powerful process to prevent horizontal streaking which occurs during isoelectric focusing due to the presence of contaminants such as salts, lipids, nucleic acids, and detergents. Erythrocyte membrane proteins serve as prototypes for multifunctional proteins in various erythroid and nonerythroid cells. In this study, we therefore optimized the selected major conditions of 2-DE for resolving various proteins of human erythrocyte membrane. The modification included the optimization of conditions for sample preparation, cleanup of protein sample, isoelectric focusing, equilibration, and storage of immobilized pH gradient strips, which were further carefully examined to achieve optimum conditions for improving the quality of protein spots on 2-DE gels. The present improved 2-DE analysis method enabled better detection of protein spots with higher quality and reproducibility. Therefore, the conditions established in this study may be used for the 2-DE analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins for

  17. The effects of chemical and radioactive properties of Tl-201 on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ali; Senturk, Murat; Ciftci, Mehmet; Varoglu, Erhan; Kufrevioglu, Omer Irfan

    2010-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of thallium-201 ((201)Tl) solution on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity were investigated. For this purpose, erythrocyte G6PD was initially purified 835-fold at a yield of 41.7% using 2',5'-Adenosine diphosphate sepharose 4B affinity gel chromatography. The purification was monitored by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which showed a single band for the final enzyme preparation. The in vitro and in vivo effects of the (201)Tl solution including Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) metals and the in vitro effects of the radiation effect of the (201)Tl solution and non-radioactive Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) metals on human erythrocyte G6PD enzyme were studied. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method at 340 nm using a spectrophotometer. All purification procedures were carried out at +4 degrees C. (201)Tl solution and radiation exposure had inhibitory effects on the enzyme activity. IC(50) value of (201)Tl solution was 36.86 microl ([Tl(+)]: 0.0036 microM, [Cu(+2)]: 0.0116 microM, [Fe(+3)]: 0.0132 microM), of human erythrocytes G6PD. Seven human patients were also used for in vivo studies of (201)Tl solution. Furthermore, non-radioactive Tl(+), Fe(+3) and Cu(+2) were found not to have influenced the enzyme in vitro. Human erythrocyte G6PD activity was inhibited by exposure for up to 10 minutes to 0.057 mCi/kg (201)Tl solution. It was detected in in vitro and in vivo studies that the human erythrocyte G6PD enzyme is inhibited due to the radiation effect of (201)Tl solution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of ethanol on nitrite- and 1-naphthol-induced oxidant stress in human and sheep erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, E.J.; Yang, J.H.; Horton, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The enhancement by ethanol of nitrite- and 1-naphthol-induced oxidant stress was assessed in vitro in human and Dorset sheep erythrocytes as measured by changes in methemoglobin (MetHb) and glutathione (GSH) levels. The human and sheep erythrocytes treated with nitrite (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mM), 1-naphthol (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mM) or ethanol (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0%) alone revealed significant increases in MetHb and no significant decreases in GSH except for sheep erythrocytes exposed to 1-naphthol and ethanol. The combined nitrite-ethanol treatment resulted in greater than additive increases in MetHb levels in both species; however, a protective effect occurred in sheep erythrocytes at the lowest combined treatment levels. The joint naphthol-ethanol treatment also resulted in synergistic increases in MetHb levels in both species. No synergistic decreases in GSH levels were detected for either of the combined treatments. These results suggest that ethanol combined with nitrite or 1-naphthol exposure in vitro synergistically increases MetHb levels of human and sheep erythrocytes.

  19. In vitro effects of the anti-Alzheimer drug memantine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Pablo; Suwalsky, Mario; Villena, Fernando; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2017-01-29

    Memantine is a NMDA antagonist receptor clinically used for treating Alzheimer's disease. NMDA receptors are present in the human neurons and erythrocyte membranes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of memantine on human erythrocytes. With this purpose, the drug was developed to in vitro interact with human red cells and bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). The latter represent lipids respectively present in both outer and inner monolayers of the red cell membrane. Results obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that memantine changed the normal biconcave shape of red cells to cup-shaped stomatocytes. According to the bilayer-couple hypothesis the drug intercalated into the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Experimental results obtained by X-ray diffraction on multibilayers of DMPC and DMPE, and by differential scanning calorimetry on multilamellar vesicles indicated that memantine preferentially interacted with DMPC in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, it can be concluded that in the low therapeutic plasma concentration of circa 1 μM memantine is located in NMDA receptor channel without affecting the erythrocyte shape. However, at higher concentrations, once the receptors became saturated excess of memantine molecules (20 μM) would interact with phosphoinositide lipids present in the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane inducing the formation of stomatocytes. However, 40-50 μM memantine was required to interact with isolated phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipid-protein interactions: Human erythrocyte glycophorin and phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Yeagle, P.L.; Kelsey, D. )

    1989-03-07

    Human erythrocyte glycophorin containing four molecules of phospholipid tightly bound to the protein was isolated from human red cell ghosts. This protein preparation was reconstituted into a digalactosyl diglyceride bilayer. The {sup 31}P NMR spectrum of this reconstituted membrane produced an axially symmetric powder pattern arising exclusively from the phospholipids bound to glycophorin. The width of the powder pattern, about 90 ppm, is about twice as broad as that normally exhibited by a phospholipid bilayer. The chemical shift tensor is perturbed relative to phospholipids in a bilayer. The spin-lattice relaxation rate of these protein-bound phospholipids is found to be nearly an order of magnitude faster than phospholipids in a bilayer. The results are consistent with phospholipids tightly bound to the membrane protein and undergoing rotational diffusion, perhaps as a complex of phospholipid and protein.

  1. A B-lymphoma cell line that forms rosettes with neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes through monoclonal surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Y; Suzuki, S; Mikata, A; Suzuki, H; Kageyama, K; Watanabe, S; Minato, K; Shimoyama, M

    1982-06-01

    Undifferentiated lymphoma from a 39-year-old female became serially xenotransplantable to preirradiated nude mice. The tumor cells (KT) possessed a monoclonal surface immunoglobulin (SIg mu, kappa) and formed rosettes with neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes (SEn). Precise characterizations of the SEn rosette, however, revealed the following facts: (1) Neuraminidase-untreated or 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide (AET) treated sheep erythrocytes were not bound to the KT cells. (2) SEn rosettes on the KT cells did not show a temperature dependency. (3) Neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes from man, horse, mouse, and rabbit were not bound to the KT cells. (4) Preincubation of the KT cells with antipolyvalent immunoglobulin or anti-kappa-chain serum abolished the SEn rosette formation. (5) Trypsinization decreased both SEn rosettes and SIg on the KT cells. (6) SEn rosettes on the KT cells were too loose to be separated from nonrosetting cells by a Percoll gradient centrifugation method. Summarizing these results, the monoclonal SIg on the KT cells recognized sheep erythrocyte antigen(s) that were exposed only after the neuraminidase treatment. Therefore, this was considered to be a case with peculiar B-lymphoma cells that bound SEn through their SIg.

  2. The peroxidase and peroxynitrite reductase activity of human erythrocyte peroxiredoxin 2.

    PubMed

    Manta, Bruno; Hugo, Martín; Ortiz, Cecilia; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Trujillo, Madia; Denicola, Ana

    2009-04-15

    Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2) is a 2-Cys peroxiredoxin extremely abundant in the erythrocyte. The peroxidase activity was studied in a steady-state approach yielding an apparent K(M) of 2.4 microM for human thioredoxin and a very low K(M) for H2O2 (0.7 microM). Rate constants for the reaction of peroxidatic cysteine with the peroxide substrate, H2O2 or peroxynitrite, were determined by competition kinetics, k(2) = 1.0 x 10(8) and 1.4 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4, respectively. Excess of both oxidants inactivated the enzyme by overoxidation and also tyrosine nitration and dityrosine were observed with peroxynitrite treatment. Prx2 associates into decamers (5 homodimers) and we estimated a dissociation constant K(d) < 10(-23) M(4) which confirms the enzyme exists as a decamer in vivo. Our kinetic results indicate Prx2 is a key antioxidant enzyme for the erythrocyte and reveal red blood cells as active oxidant scrubbers in the bloodstream.

  3. Prospects for Human Erythrocyte Skeleton-Bilayer Dissociation during Splenic Flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Salehyar, Sara; Cabrales, Pedro; Asaro, Robert J

    2017-08-22

    Prospects of vesiculation occurring during splenic flow of erythrocytes are addressed via model simulations of RBC flow through the venous slits of the human spleen. Our model is multiscale and contains a thermally activated rate-dependent description of the entropic elasticity of the RBC spectrin cytoskeleton, including domain unfolding/refolding. Our model also includes detail of the skeleton attachment to the fluidlike lipid bilayer membrane, including a specific accounting for the expansion/contraction of the skeleton that may occur via anchor protein diffusive motion, that is, band 3 and glycophorin, through the membrane. This ability allows us to follow the change in anchor density and thereby the strength of the skeleton/membrane attachment. We define a negative pressure between the skeleton/membrane connection that promotes separation; critical levels for this are estimated using published data on the work of adhesion of this connection. By following the maximum range of negative pressure, along with the observed slight decrease in skeletal density, we conclude that there must be biochemical influences that probably include binding of degraded hemoglobin, among other things, that significantly reduce effective attachment density. These findings are consistent with reported trends in vesiculation that are believed to occur in cases of various hereditary anemias and during blood storage. Our findings also suggest pathways for further study of erythrocyte vesiculation that point to the criticality of understanding the biochemical phenomena involved with cytoskeleton/membrane attachment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Effects of some drugs on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Akkemik, Ebru; Budak, Harun; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    Inhibitory effects of some drugs on glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the erythrocytes of human have been investigated. For this purpose, at the beginning, erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was purified 2256 times in a yield of 44.22% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel. Temperature of +4°C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method by using a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. This method was utilized for all kinetic studies. Ketotifen, dacarbazine, thiocolchicoside, meloxicam, methotrexate, furosemide, olanzapine, methylprednizolone acetate, paricalcitol, ritodrine hydrochloride, and gadobenate-dimeglumine were used as drugs. All the drugs indicated the inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Ki constants for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were found by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. While methylprednizolone acetate showed competitive inhibition, the others displayed non-competitive inhibition. In addition, IC(50) values of the drugs were determined by plotting Activity% vs [I].

  5. Detergent-resistant membranes in human erythrocytes and their connection to the membrane-skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2005-06-01

    In cell membranes, local inhomogeneity in the lateral distribution of lipids and proteins is thought to exist in vivo in the form of lipid 'rafts', microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and in specific classes of proteins, that appear to play specialized roles for signal transduction, cell-cell recognition, parasite or virus infection, and vesicular trafficking. These structures are operationally defined as membranes resistant to solubilization by nonionic detergents at 4 degree C (detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs). This definition appears to be necessary and sufficient, although additional manoeuvres, not always described with sufficient detail, may be needed to ensure isolation of DRMs, like mechanical homogenization, and changes in the pH and/or ionic strength of the solubilization medium. We show here for the human erythrocyte that the different conditions adopted may lead to the isolation of qualitatively and quantitatively different DRM fractions, thus contributing to the complexity of the notion itself of lipid raft. A significant portion of erythrocyte DRMs enriched in reported lipid raft markers, such as flotillin-1, flotillin-2 and GM1, is anchored to the spectrin membrane-skeleton via electrostatic interactions that can be disrupted by the simultaneous increase in pH and ionic strength of the solubilization medium.

  6. Surface Co-Expression of Two Different PfEMP1 Antigens on Single Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes Facilitates Binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1

    PubMed Central

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C.; Bengtsson, Anja; Ronander, Elena; Berger, Sanne S.; Turner, Louise; Dalgaard, Michael B.; Cham, Gerald K. K.; Victor, Michala E.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Theander, Thor G.; Arnot, David E.; Jensen, Anja T. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var gene is expressed per cell at a time. We measured var mRNA transcript levels by real-time Q-PCR, analysed var gene transcripts by single-cell FISH and directly compared these with PfEMP1 antigen surface expression and cytoadhesion in three different antibody-selected P. falciparum 3D7 sub-lines using live confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and in vitro adhesion assays. We found that one selected parasite sub-line simultaneously expressed two different var genes as surface antigens, on single IE. Importantly, and of physiological relevance to adhesion and malaria pathogenesis, this parasite sub-line was found to bind both CD31/PECAM1 and CD54/ICAM1 and to adhere twice as efficiently to human endothelial cells, compared to infected cells having only one PfEMP1 variant on the surface. These new results on PfEMP1 antigen expression indicate that a re-evaluation of the molecular mechanisms involved in P. falciparum adhesion and of the accepted paradigm of absolutely mutually exclusive var gene transcription is required. PMID:20824088

  7. Surface co-expression of two different PfEMP1 antigens on single plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes facilitates binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Bengtsson, Anja; Ronander, Elena; Berger, Sanne S; Turner, Louise; Dalgaard, Michael B; Cham, Gerald K K; Victor, Michala E; Lavstsen, Thomas; Theander, Thor G; Arnot, David E; Jensen, Anja T R

    2010-09-02

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var gene is expressed per cell at a time. We measured var mRNA transcript levels by real-time Q-PCR, analysed var gene transcripts by single-cell FISH and directly compared these with PfEMP1 antigen surface expression and cytoadhesion in three different antibody-selected P. falciparum 3D7 sub-lines using live confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and in vitro adhesion assays. We found that one selected parasite sub-line simultaneously expressed two different var genes as surface antigens, on single IE. Importantly, and of physiological relevance to adhesion and malaria pathogenesis, this parasite sub-line was found to bind both CD31/PECAM1 and CD54/ICAM1 and to adhere twice as efficiently to human endothelial cells, compared to infected cells having only one PfEMP1 variant on the surface. These new results on PfEMP1 antigen expression indicate that a re-evaluation of the molecular mechanisms involved in P. falciparum adhesion and of the accepted paradigm of absolutely mutually exclusive var gene transcription is required.

  8. Comparison of the in vitro hemolytic effects produced by alkoxyacetic acids on human and rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Starek, Andrzej; Szabla, Jolanta; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Szymczak, Wiesław

    2008-01-01

    The alkoxyacetic acids (AAAs) are urinary metabolites of alkoxyethanol solvents. It is well documented that these chemicals can cause acute hemolytic anemia in humans and laboratory animals. There are scarce data on the relative hemolytic activity of these acids. Likewise, information is lacking on the relationship between their hemolytic activity and physicochemical properties. The aim of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity of five AAAs in red blood cells (RBCs) derived from donors' blood and male Wistar rats. Moreover, the possible relationship between lipophilic and hemolytic activity of AAAs was also investigated. The RBCs washed in TRIS buffer, pH 7.4, were adjusted to a packed cell volume (PCV) of about 20% and incubated in a water bath at 37 degrees C for 0-3 h in the presence of different concentrations of AAAs. The hemolytic effects, in terms of the changes in RBCs, PCV, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and free hemoglobin (HGBfree) in incubation medium, were evaluated. Based on the dose-response relationship for RBCs, PCV and MCV, the effective concentration values (EC50) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. The octanol-water partition coefficient (log P) and distribution coefficient (log D) of AAAs were computed using PALLAS software. The correlation between log P and log D values for AAAs at pH 7.4 and their EC50 was analyzed. Human RBCs were 1.9-3.1 times more resistant to the hemolytic activity of AAAs than rat erythrocytes. Also, the hemolytic activity of individual AAAs did not differ considerably; the maximum differences ranging from 2.0 to 3.3. The EC50 values of AAAs highly correlated with their log P and log D values. The relatively small differences between the hemolytic effects of AAAs on rat and human erythrocytes may be associated with the strong acidity and relatively similar lipophilicity of these chemicals.

  9. In vitro effects of helium-neon laser irradiation on human blood: blood viscosity and deformability of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xian-Qiang; Chen, Ji-Yao; Liang, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on some rheological factors of human blood, such as blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and sedimentation rate. The intravascular irradiation of low power laser has been applied in pre-clinical and clinical to treat various pathological processes. However, the mechanism is not fully understood so far. Especially the interaction and related mechanism between the laser and blood are unclear. In this work, by measuring the change of the main rheological factors after laser irradiation, the interaction and mechanism were explored. A30-mW He-Ne laser was used for irradiation with a 4-5-mm-diameter beam spot on blood samples, with a fluence rate of about 150 mW/cm.(2) The irradiation time was 60 min, so the total dose of irradiation was 540 J/cm.(2) The pathological samples of blood were obtained from patients (volunteers), and each sample was divided into two tubes for irradiation and control. The blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and sedimentation rate were measured after laser irradiation and compared with un-irradiated control. The blood samples with poor erythrocyte deformability were prepared by adding Ca(2+) to the normal erythrocytes of a healthy person for investigating the laser effect on erythrocyte deformability further. Laser irradiation reduced the erythrocyte sedimentation rate of blood samples, which had a hyper-sedimentation rate originally. The blood viscosity of samples in hyper-values was lowered by laser irradiation in all shear rates measured (10-110 S(-1)), with a relative variation of approximately 10%. The deformability of erythrocytes from pathological samples and Ca(2+)-treated samples was improved after laser irradiation. The positive effects of laser irradiation on improving the rheological properties of blood were demonstrated in vitro.

  10. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J P; Costa, Tamara G F; Silva, Lilian N D; Renó, Cristiane O; Oliveira, Eneida S; Tilelli, Cristiane Q; Santos, Luciana L; Cortes, Vanessa F; Santos, Herica L; Barbosa, Leandro A

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels.

  11. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J. P.; Costa, Tamara G. F.; Silva, Lilian N. D.; Renó, Cristiane O.; Oliveira, Eneida S.; Tilelli, Cristiane Q.; Santos, Luciana L.; Cortes, Vanessa F.; Santos, Herica L.; Barbosa, Leandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels. PMID:26197432

  12. Variations of intracellular pH in human erythrocytes via K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchange under low ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Kummerow, D; Hamann, J; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R; Ellory, J C; Bernhardt, I

    2000-08-01

    The change of intracellular pH of erythrocytes under different experimental conditions was investigated using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF and correlated with (ouabain + bumetanide + EGTA)-insensitive K(+) efflux and Cl(-) loss. When human erythrocytes were suspended in a physiological NaCl solution (pH(o) = 7.4), the measured pH(i) was 7.19 + or - 0.04 and remained constant for 30 min. When erythrocytes were transferred into a low ionic strength (LIS) solution, an immediate alkalinization increased the pH(i) to 7.70 + or - 0.15, which was followed by a slower cell acidification. The alkalinization of cells in LIS media was ascribed to a band 3 mediated effect since a rapid loss of approximately 80% of intracellular Cl(-) content was observed, which was sensitive to known anion transport inhibitors. In the case of cellular acidification, a comparison of the calculated H(+) influx with the measured unidirectional K(+) efflux at different extracellular ionic strengths showed a correlation with a nearly 1:1 stoichiometry. Both fluxes were enhanced by decreasing the ionic strength of the solution resulting in a H(+) influx and a K(+) efflux in LIS solution of 108.2 + or - 20.4 mmol (l(cells) hr)(-1) and 98.7 + or - 19.3 mmol (l(cells) hr)(-1), respectively. For bovine and porcine erythrocytes, in LIS media, H(+) influx and K(+) efflux were of comparable magnitude, but only about 10% of the fluxes observed in human erythrocytes under LIS conditions. Quinacrine, a known inhibitor of the mitochondrial K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger, inhibited the K(+) efflux in LIS solution by about 80%. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger in the human erythrocyte membrane.

  13. Lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolases of human erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain: Sensitive targets of conserved specificity for organophosphorus delayed neurotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Holland, Nina T.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Casida, John E.

    2007-10-01

    Brain neuropathy target esterase (NTE), associated with organophosphorus (OP)-induced delayed neuropathy, has the same OP inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles assayed in the classical way (paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive hydrolysis of phenyl valerate) or with lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) as the substrate. Extending our earlier observation with mice, we now examine human erythrocyte, lymphocyte, and brain LysoPC hydrolases as possible sensitive targets for OP delayed neurotoxicants and insecticides. Inhibitor profiling of human erythrocytes and lymphocytes gave the surprising result of essentially the same pattern as with brain. Human erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolases are highly sensitive to OP delayed neurotoxicants, with in vitro IC{sub 50} values of 0.13-85 nM for longer alkyl analogs, and poorly sensitive to the current OP insecticides. In agricultural workers, erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolyzing activities are similar for newborn children and their mothers and do not vary with paraoxonase status but have high intersample variation that limits their use as a biomarker. Mouse erythrocyte LysoPC hydrolase activity is also of low sensitivity in vitro and in vivo to the OP insecticides whereas the delayed neurotoxicant ethyl n-octylphosphonyl fluoride inhibits activity in vivo at 1-3 mg/kg. Overall, inhibition of blood LysoPC hydrolases is as good as inhibition of brain NTE as a predictor of OP inducers of delayed neuropathy. NTE and lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) both hydrolyze LysoPC, yet they are in distinct enzyme families with no sequence homology and very different catalytic sites. The relative contributions of NTE and LysoPLAs to LysoPC hydrolysis and clearance from erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and brain remain to be defined.

  14. Lipid transfer between phosphatidylcholine vesicles and human erythrocytes: exponential decrease in rate with increasing acyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, J E; Lee, K J; Huestis, W H

    1985-06-04

    The rate of phospholipid transfer from sonicated phospholipid vesicles to human erythrocytes has been studied as a function of membrane concentration and lipid acyl chain composition. Phospholipid transfer exhibits saturable first-order kinetics with respect to both cell and vesicle membrane concentrations. This kinetic behavior is consistent either with transfer during transient contact between cell and vesicle surfaces (but only if the fraction of the cell surface susceptible to such interaction is small) or with transfer of monomers through the aqueous phase. The acyl chain composition of the transferred phospholipid affects the transfer kinetics profoundly; for homologous saturated phosphatidylcholines, the rate of transfer decreases exponentially with increasing acyl chain length. This behavior is consistent with passage of phospholipid monomers through a polar phase, which might be the bulk aqueous phase( as in the monomer transfer model) or the hydrated head-group regions of a cell-vesicle complex (transient collision model). Collisional transfer also predicts that intercell transfer of phospholipids should be slow compared to cell-vesicle transfer, as surface charge and steric effects should prevent close apposition of donor and acceptor membranes. This is not found; dilauroylphosphatidylcholine transfers rapidly between red cells. Thus, the observed relationship between acyl chain length and intermembrane phospholipid transfer rates likely reflects the energetics of monomer transfer through the aqueous phase.

  15. Exclusion of erythrocyte-specific membrane proteins from clathrin- coated pits during differentiation of human erythroleukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    When human erythroleukemic cells are induced to differentiate, they produce globin and redistribute glycophorin and spectrin to one pole of the cell. This process was accompanied by an alteration in the clathrin- coated pits at the cell surface. In nondifferentiating cells, receptors for Concanavalin A have been shown, using electron microscopy, to be concentrated into coated pits and rapidly internalized. Glycophorin was also internalized via coated pits, but was not greatly concentrated into these portions of the surface membrane. Ligands attached to glycophorin were, therefore, cleared from the cell surface more slowly than Concanavalin A. In nondifferentiating cells, immunoelectron microscopy showed that spectrin is largely excluded from coated pits. After erythroid differentiation proceeded for several days, glycophorin was totally excluded from the coated pits along with spectrin. This did not reflect a general cessation of endocytosis, however, because Concanavalin A receptors continued to be internalized. It is possible that the specific exclusion of glycophorin from coated pits is part of the remodeling process that occurs when the precursor cell membrane differentiates into that of the mature erythrocyte. PMID:6144685

  16. Membrane proteins in human erythrocytes during cell fusion induced by oleoylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Susan J.; Ahkong, Quet Fah; Botham, Gaynor M.; Vos, Jan; Lucy, Jack A.

    1978-01-01

    1. The fusion of human erythrocytes into multicellular bodies that is induced by microdroplets of oleoylglycerol was investigated by optical and electron microscopy, and by gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins. 2. At the highest concentrations of oleoylglycerol and Ca2+ used, at least 80% of the cells fused after 30min at 37°C and only about 5% of the cells had completely lysed; the shapes of fused multicellular bodies were usually retained in `ghosts' prepared by hypo-osmotic lysis. 3. The rate of cell fusion was related to the concentration of Ca2+, although some cells fused when no exogenous Ca2+ was present. 4. Interactions of microdroplets of oleoylglycerol with the cells led to abnormalities in the structural appearance of the erythrocyte membrane; subsequent membrane fusion occurred, at least in some instances, at the sites of the microdroplets. 5. The intramembranous particles on the P-fracture face of the treated cells were more randomly distributed, but not significantly increased in number by comparison with the control cells. 6. Gel electrophoresis of the proteins of `ghosts' prepared from fused human erythrocytes showed a production of material of very high molecular weight, the development of a new component in the band-3 region, an increased staining of bands 4.3 and 4.5, and a new component moving slightly faster than band 6. 7. Bands 2.1–2.3 were altered, band 3 was decreased and band 4.1 was lost. 8. Most, but not all, of the changes in the membrane proteins appeared to result from the entry of Ca2+ into the cell. 9. 1-Chloro-4-phenyl-3-l-toluene-p-sulphonamidobutan-2-one partially inhibited both cell fusion and the associated decrease in band-3 protein. 10. The possibility that proteolytic degradation of membrane proteins may be involved in cell fusion induced by oleoylglycerol is considered, and some implications of this possibility are discussed. ImagesPLATE 4PLATE 1PLATE 2PLATE 3 PMID:728105

  17. Interaction of steroids with the transport system of glucose in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lacko, L; Wittke, B; Geck, P

    1975-12-01

    Steroids inhibit the exchange transport of glucose in human erythrocytes. The extent of inhibition is roughly correlated to the affinity of the steroids to the membrane lipids. All C-21-steroids tested show a competitive inhibition while the C-19-steriods show different types of inhibition. 5Beta-androstane-3,17-dione acts as a competitive inhibitor. The inhibition by testosterone is of mixed type, while with androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and 5alpha-androstane-3,17-dione a non-competitive inhibition is observed. In this case two inhibitor molecules can be bound per transport molecule. The "non-competitive" inhibitors compete also to some extent with the glucose binding. This effect, however, is at high inhibitor concentrations masked by the more powerful non-competitive inhibition. Competitive and non-competitive inhibitors compete with each other. The structural requirements for the different types of inhibition are discussed.

  18. Design of Artificial Glycosidases: Metallopeptides that Remove H Antigen from Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen; Cowan, James Allan

    2017-03-01

    Catalysts that promote carbohydrate degradation have a wide range of potential applications, but the use of either enzyme glycosidases or small-molecule catalysts in biological systems raises significant challenges. Herein, we demonstrate a novel strategy for the design of synthetic agents that mimic natural glycosidases and address current problems for biological use. This strategy is illustrated by application to the development of potential blood substitutes for the rare Bombay blood type that is characterized by a deficiency of H2 antigen. Metallopeptides with 16 to 20 amino acids were constructed as artificial fucosidases that exhibit selective carbohydrate cleavage reactivity toward l-fucose over d-glucose. Selective fucose cleavage from the H2-antigen saccharide enables efficient removal of H2 antigen from erythrocytes and thereby accomplishes the conversion of regular human type-O blood into a potential blood substitute for the rare Bombay blood type. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Transmembrane exchange of hyperpolarized 13C-urea in human erythrocytes: subminute timescale kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W

    2013-11-05

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. (13)C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of (13)C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse (13)C NMR spectra, every second for up to ~2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo.

  20. Crystal structure of the anion exchanger domain of human erythrocyte band 3.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takatoshi; Kobayashi-Yurugi, Takami; Alguel, Yilmaz; Iwanari, Hiroko; Hatae, Hinako; Iwata, Momi; Abe, Yoshito; Hino, Tomoya; Ikeda-Suno, Chiyo; Kuma, Hiroyuki; Kang, Dongchon; Murata, Takeshi; Hamakubo, Takao; Cameron, Alexander D; Kobayashi, Takuya; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Iwata, So

    2015-11-06

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1), also known as band 3 or SLC4A1, plays a key role in the removal of carbon dioxide from tissues by facilitating the exchange of chloride and bicarbonate across the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. An isoform of AE1 is also present in the kidney. Specific mutations in human AE1 cause several types of hereditary hemolytic anemias and/or distal renal tubular acidosis. Here we report the crystal structure of the band 3 anion exchanger domain (AE1(CTD)) at 3.5 angstroms. The structure is locked in an outward-facing open conformation by an inhibitor. Comparing this structure with a substrate-bound structure of the uracil transporter UraA in an inward-facing conformation allowed us to identify the anion-binding position in the AE1(CTD), and to propose a possible transport mechanism that could explain why selected mutations lead to disease.

  1. Aggregates of human erythrocyte membrane sialoglycoproteins in the presence of deoxycholate and dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Liljas, L

    1978-02-15

    Gel electrophoresis in the presence of deoxycholate of human erythrocyte membranes solubilized with deoxycholate resolves four glycoprotein zones. Electrophoresis in dodecyl sulfate in a second dimension reveals several components, three of which migrate in the region of PAS-2. One of the zones in deoxycholate gel electrophoresis contains component PAS-3, and this glycoprotein seems to exist as a monomer in deoxycholate, but aggregates partially upon addition of dodecyl sulfate. The major sialoglycoprotein migrates as a diffuse zone in dodecyl sulfate. The major sialoglycoprotein migrates as a diffuse zone in deoxycholate gel electrophoresis, indicating association and dissociation during the electrophoresis. The use of deoxycholate followed by dodecyl sulfate in two-dimentional electrophoresis gave high resolution of membrane proteins and can be used for detection of complexes in one of the detergents.

  2. Human erythrocyte membrane proteins of zone 4.5 exist as families of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, C F; Coleman, D B; Kay, M M; Shiffer, K A; Miller, J; Goodman, S R

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the polypeptide composition of zone 4.5 of human erythrocyte membranes has been done by immunoautoradiographic and two-dimensional peptide mapping techniques. Results of these studies demonstrated that the Coomassie blue profile was constant, with 14 well-resolved bands present. Zone 4.5 polypeptides existed as at least four families of two or more components with closely related polypeptide backbones. The families could be distinguished on the basis of their extraction characteristics, immunological cross-reactivity, and two-dimensional peptide maps. One family was related to protein 4.1, one family was related to band 3, and two families were independent and not similar to other larger membrane proteins. The data show that all of the visualized bands in zone 4.5 do not have the same protein composition and that several closely related forms of some polypeptides are present.

  3. Discovery of a novel and conserved Plasmodium falciparum exported protein that is important for adhesion of PfEMP1 at the surface of infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Claes, Aurélie; Roberts, Amy; Scheidig-Benatar, Christine; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Mattei, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum virulence is linked to its ability to sequester in post-capillary venules in the human host. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is the main variant surface antigen implicated in this process. Complete loss of parasite adhesion is linked to a large subtelomeric deletion on chromosome 9 in a number of laboratory strains such as D10 and T9-96. Similar to the cytoadherent reference line FCR3, D10 strain expresses PfEMP1 on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes, however without any detectable cytoadhesion. To investigate which of the deleted subtelomeric genes may be implicated in parasite adhesion, we selected 12 genes for D10 complementation studies that are predicted to code for proteins exported to the red blood cell. We identified a novel single copy gene (PF3D7_0936500) restricted to P. falciparum that restores adhesion to CD36, termed here virulence-associated protein 1 (Pfvap1). Protein knockdown and gene knockout experiments confirmed a role of PfVAP1 in the adhesion process in FCR3 parasites. PfVAP1 is co-exported with PfEMP1 into the host cell via vesicle-like structures called Maurer's clefts. This study identifies a novel highly conserved parasite molecule that contributes to parasite virulence possibly by assisting PfEMP1 to establish functional adhesion at the host cell surface. PMID:25703704

  4. Influence of the albumin concentration and temperature on the lysis of human erythrocytes by sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, L C; Arvelos, L R; Netto, R C M; Lins, A B; Garrote-Filho, M S; Penha-Silva, N

    2010-10-01

    The stability of human erythrocytes to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was assessed spectrophotometrically in the presence of different concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and at different temperatures (27-45 °C). The absorbance at 540 nm (A₅₄₀) was correlated with the SDS concentration by sigmoidal regression based on the Boltzmann equation. Erythrocyte stability was characterized on the basis of the SDS concentration that induces hemolysis in 50% of the cells (D₅₀). Progressive increases in the albumin concentration led to increases in the D₅₀ value. The protective effect of BSA against SDS-induced hemolysis was attributed to the binding of the surfactant to the hydrophobic binding sites of this protein. The D₅₀ values decreased sigmoidally with an increase in the temperature. This trend, which could not be explained by changes in the spectral properties of hemoglobin, maybe due to heterogeneity in the erythrocyte population.

  5. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  6. Demonstration of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (/sup 3/H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for /sup 3/H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane.

  7. Peptide sequence analysis and molecular cloning reveal two calcium pump isoforms in the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Strehler, E E; James, P; Fischer, R; Heim, R; Vorherr, T; Filoteo, A G; Penniston, J T; Carafoli, E

    1990-02-15

    The sequence of more than 1,000 amino acid residues, derived from two different isoforms, has been determined from peptides generated from purified human erythrocyte membrane Ca2(+)-ATPase (hPMCA). Several of these peptide sequences correspond to the previously reported, cDNA deduced sequence of the "teratoma" Ca2+ pump isoform hPMCA1 (Verma, A. K., Filoteo, A. G., Stanford, D. R., Wieben, E. D., Penniston, J. T., Strehler, E. E., Fischer, R., Heim, R., Vogel, G., Matthews, S., Strehler-Page, M.-A., James, P., Vorherr, T., Krebs, J., and Carafoli, E. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 14152-14159). The complete primary structure of a novel isoform (hPMCA3) has been determined by molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of its corresponding cDNA. This new member of the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump family consists of 1,205 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 133,930, and it shows 88% similarity (75% identity) with the previously sequenced pump isoform. Specific probes detect major mRNA species of 5.6 kilobases for hPMCA1, and of 7.5 kilobases for hPMCA3, on Northern blots of human K562 erythroleukemic cell RNA. A large number of peptide sequences match perfectly with only one or the other of these isoforms and all peptides (with 6 exceptions corresponding to a contaminant protein or to a third minor Ca2+ pump isoform) are found in either only one or in both of the isoforms. The two erythrocyte Ca2+ pumps display high sequence divergence in a few localized regions that may determine isoform-specific functional specializations; for example, the putative extracellular loop separating transmembrane domains 1 and 2, the highly negatively charged region previously suggested to be involved in Ca2+ binding, and the site of cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation.

  8. Insulin inhibits human erythrocyte cAMP accumulation and ATP release: role of PDE3 and PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Madelyn S.; Stephenson, Alan H.; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2010-01-01

    In non – erythroid cells, insulin stimulates a signal transduction pathway that results in the activation of phosphoinositide 3 – kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3). Erythrocytes possess insulin receptors, PI3K, and PDE3B. These cells release ATP via a signaling pathway that requires activation of the G protein, Gi, as well as increases in cAMP. Although insulin inhibits ATP release from human erythrocytes in response to Gi activation with mastoparan 7 (Mas 7), no effect on cAMP was described. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that insulin activates PDE3 in human erythrocytes via a PI3K – mediated mechanism resulting in cAMP hydrolysis and inhibition of ATP release. We show that insulin attenuates Mas 7 – induced increases in cAMP and that selective inhibitors of PDE3 (cilostazol) or PI3K (LY294002) rescue this effect of insulin. In addition, we demonstrated that both cilostazol and LY294002 prevent insulin – induced attenuation of Mas 7 – induced ATP release. These results provide support for the hypothesis that insulin activates PDE3 in erythrocytes via a PI3K – dependent mechanism. Once activated, PDE3 limits Mas 7 – induced increases in intracellular cAMP. This effect of insulin leads, ultimately, to decreased ATP release in response to Mas 7. Since the activation of Gi is required for reduced O2 tension – induced ATP release from erythrocytes, and insulin has been shown to inhibit that release, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which supraphysiological levels of plasma insulin, such as those reported in humans with prediabetes, could inhibit ATP release from erythrocytes. Erythrocyte – derived ATP has been shown to participate in the matching of O2 supply with demand in skeletal muscle. Thus, pathological increases in circulating insulin could, via activation of PDE3, inhibit ATP release from erythrocytes depriving the peripheral circulation of a mechanism that regulates delivery of O2 to meet tissue

  9. Effects of flaxseed oil on anti-oxidative system and membrane deformation of human peripheral blood erythrocytes in high glucose level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The erythrocyte membrane lesion is a serious diabetic complication. A number of studies suggested that n-3 fatty acid could reduce lipid peroxidation and elevate α- or γ-tocopherol contents in membrane of erythrocytes. However, evidence regarding the protective effects of flaxseed oil, a natural product rich in n-3 fatty acid, on lipid peroxidation, antioxidative capacity and membrane deformation of erythrocytes exposed to high glucose is limited. Methods Human peripheral blood erythrocytes were isolated and treated with 50 mM glucose to mimic hyperglycemia in the absence or presence of three different doses of flaxseed oil (50, 100 or 200 μM) in the culture medium for 24 h. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and L-glutathione (GSH) were measured by HPLC and LC/MS respectively. The phospholipids symmetry and membrane fatty acid composition of human erythrocytes were detected by flow cytometry and gas chromatograph (GC). The morphology of human erythrocyte was illuminated by ultra scanning electron microscopy. Results Flaxseed oil attenuated hyperglycemia-induced increase of MDA and decrease of GSH in human erythrocytes. Human erythrocytes treated with flaxseed oil contained higher C22:5 and C22:6 than those in the 50 mM glucose control group, indicating that flaxseed oil could reduce lipid asymmetric distribution and membrane perturbation. The ultra scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometer have also indicated that flaxseed oil could protect the membrane of human erythrocytes from deformation at high glucose level. Conclusion The flaxseed oil supplementation may prevent lipid peroxidation and membrane dysfunction of human erythrocytes in hyperglycemia. PMID:22768971

  10. Affinity of human erythrocyte transglutaminase for a 42-kDa gelatin-binding fragment of human plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Radek, J T; Jeong, J M; Murthy, S N; Ingham, K C; Lorand, L

    1993-01-01

    Complex formation between the human erythrocyte transglutaminase (protein-glutamine:amine gamma-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13) and fibronectin or its fragments was examined by immunoanalytical procedures and by fluorescence polarization. A 42-kDa gelatin-binding structure, obtained from human plasma fibronectin by thermolytic digestion, showed as high an affinity for the cytosolic enzyme as the parent fibronectin chains themselves. A 21-kDa fragment comprising type I modules 8 and 9, the last two modules in the 42-kDa fragment, bound with an affinity 100-fold less than the 42-kDa fragment. Binding was remarkably specific and could be exploited for the affinity purification of transglutaminase directly from the hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte lysate. In spite of the high affinity, it was possible to elute active enzyme from the 42-kDa fragment column with 0.25% monochloroacetic acid. This solvent might have general applicability in other systems involving separation of tightly bound ligands. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8097314

  11. The size of erythrocyte ghosts.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, N

    1981-02-20

    The volume of resealed erythrocyte ghosts formed during hypotonic hemolysis of normal human erythrocytes was measured by means of a continuous mean corpuscular volume analyzer. The final volume of resealed ghosts was 140.6 +/- 15.2 fl. Strong correlations exist between the volume of ghosts and the initial mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin of the erythrocyte, and between the enlargement ratio and the mean corpuscular volume or mean corpuscular hemoglobin of the erythrocyte.

  12. Quantifying local characteristics of velocity, aggregation and hematocrit of human erythrocytes in a microchannel flow.

    PubMed

    Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Dusting, Jonathan; Sherwood, Joseph M; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-09-25

    The effect of erythrocyte aggregation on blood viscosity and microcirculatory flow is a poorly understood area of haemodynamics, especially with relevance to serious pathological conditions. Advances in microfluidics have made it possible to study the details of blood flow in the microscale, however, important issues such as the relationship between the local microstructure and local flow characteristics have not been investigated extensively. In the present study an experimental system involving simple brightfield microscopy has been successfully developed for simultaneous, time-resolved quantification of velocity fields and local aggregation of human red blood cells (RBC) in microchannels. RBCs were suspended in Dextran and phosphate buffer saline solutions for the control of aggregation. Local aggregation characteristics were investigated at bulk and local levels using statistical and edge-detection image processing techniques. A special case of aggregating flow in a microchannel, in which hematocrit gradients were present, was studied as a function of flowrate and time. The level of aggregation was found to strongly correlate with local variations in velocity in both the bulk flow and wall regions. The edge detection based analysis showed that near the side wall large aggregates are associated with regions corresponding to high local velocities and low local shear. On the contrary, in the bulk flow region large aggregates occurred in regions of low velocity and high erythrocyte concentration suggesting a combined effect of hematocrit and velocity distributions on local aggregation characteristics. The results of this study showed that using multiple methods for aggregation quantification, albeit empirical, could help towards a robust characterisation of the structural properties of the fluid.

  13. Protective effect of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) fruit against oxidative hemolysis of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana S; Silva, Branca M; Pereira, José A; Andrade, Paula B; Valentão, Patrícia; Carvalho, Márcia

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the phenolic content and evaluate the antioxidant activity of quince (Cydonia oblonga) fruit. For this purpose, fruits were separated into pulps, peels and seeds and methanolic extracts were prepared. The phenolic profiles were determined by HPLC/UV and antioxidant properties were studied for their ability to quench the stable free radical 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and to inhibit the 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced oxidative hemolysis of human erythrocytes. The main phenolic compounds were 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid for pulp and peel (57% and 29%, respectively) and stellarin-2 for seed (18%). Total phenolics content was 2.5, 6.3 and 0.4g/kg of methanolic extract for pulp, peel and seed, respectively. Pulp and peel extracts showed similar DPPH free radical scavenging activities (EC(50) of 0.6 and 0.8 mg/ml, respectively), while seed extract presented much lower antioxidant potential (EC(50) of 12.2mg/ml). Under the oxidative action of AAPH, pulp and peel extracts showed significant protection of the erythrocyte membrane from hemolysis, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Seed extracts by themselves induced extensive hemolysis. These results indicate higher antioxidant activity for certain parts of quince fruit, namely pulp and peel, that may therefore represent accessible sources of natural antioxidants with potential application in nutritional/pharmaceutical fields, as preventive or therapeutic agents in diseases in which free radicals are implicated.

  14. A novel method for measuring the ATP-related compounds in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel Hugo; Galicia, Othir; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario Alberto; Martinez-Morales, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-related compounds in whole blood or red blood cells have been used to evaluate the energy status of erythrocytes and the degradation level of the phosphorylated compounds under various conditions, such as chronic renal failure, drug monitoring, cancer, exposure to environmental toxics, and organ preservation. The complete interpretation of the energetic homeostasis of erythrocytes is only performed using the compounds involved in the degradation pathway for adenine nucleotides alongside the uric acid value. For the first time, we report a liquid chromatographic method using a diode array detector that measures all of these compounds in a small human whole blood sample (125 μL) within an acceptable time of 20 min. The stability was evaluated for all of the compounds and ranged from 96.3 to 105.1% versus the day zero values. The measurement had an adequate sensitivity for the ATP-related compounds (detection limits from 0.001 to 0.097 μmol/L and quantification limits from 0.004 to 0.294 μmol/L). This method is particularly useful for measuring inosine monophosphate, inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid. Moreover, this assay had acceptable linearity (r > 0.990), precision (coefficients of variation ranged from 0.1 to 2.0%), specificity (similar retention times and spectra in all samples) and recoveries (ranged from 89.2 to 104.9%). The newly developed method is invaluable for assessing the energetic homeostasis of red blood cells under diverse conditions, such as in vitro experiments and clinical settings.

  15. The effect of aspartame metabolites on human erythrocyte membrane acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Stylianos; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H

    2006-01-01

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) with neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in human erythrocyte membranes after incubation with the sum of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (met) and aspartic acid (aspt), or with each one separately. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from 12 healthy individuals and were incubated with ASP hydrolysis products for 1 h at 37 degrees C. AChE was measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of membranes with ASP metabolites corresponding with 34 mg/kg, 150 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of ASP consumption resulted in an enzyme activity reduction by -33%, -41%, and -57%, respectively. Met concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.60 mM, and 0.80 mM decreased the enzyme activity by -20%, -32% or -40%, respectively. Aspt concentrations 2.80 mM, 7.60 mM or 10.0 mM inhibited membrane AChE activity by -20%, -35%, and -47%, respectively. Phe concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.35 mM or 0.50mM reduced the enzyme activity by -11%, -33%, and -35%, respectively. Aspt or Phe concentrations 0.82 mM or 0.07 mM, respectively, did not alter the membrane AChE activity. It is concluded that low concentrations of ASP metabolites had no effect on the membrane enzyme activity, whereas high or toxic concentrations partially or remarkably decreased the membrane AChE activity, respectively. Additionally, neurological symptoms, including learning and memory processes, may be related to the high or toxic concentrations of the sweetener metabolites.

  16. Evidence that forskolin binds to the glucose transporter of human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lavis, V.R.; Lee, D.P.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-10-25

    Binding of (4-/sup 3/H)cytochalasin B and (12-/sup 3/H)forskolin to human erythrocyte membranes was measured by a centrifugation method. Glucose-displaceable binding of cytochalasin B was saturable, with KD = 0.11 microM, and maximum binding approximately 550 pmol/mg of protein. Forskolin inhibited the glucose-displaceable binding of cytochalasin B in an apparently competitive manner, with K1 = 3 microM. Glucose-displaceable binding of (12-/sup 3/H)forskolin was also saturable, with KD = 2.6 microM and maximum binding approximately equal to 400 pmol/mg of protein. The following compounds inhibited binding of (12-/sup 3/H)forskolin and (4-/sup 3/H)cytochalasin B equivalently, with relative potencies parallel to their reported affinities for the glucose transport system: cytochalasins A and D, dihydrocytochalasin B, L-rhamnose, L-glucose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, phloretin, and phlorizin. A water-soluble derivative of forskolin, 7-hemisuccinyl-7-desacetylforskolin, displaced equivalent amounts of (4-/sup 3/H)cytochalasin B or (12-/sup 3/H)forskolin. Rabbit erythrocyte membranes, which are deficient in glucose transporter, did not bind either (4-/sup 3/H)cytochalasin B or (12-/sup 3/H)forskolin in a glucose-displaceable manner. These results indicate that forskolin, in concentrations routinely employed for stimulation of adenylate cyclase, binds to the glucose transporter. Endogenous ligands with similar specificities could be important modulators of cellular metabolism.

  17. Erythrocyte rheology.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J

    1985-09-01

    Erythrocyte deformability was formerly measured by its contribution to whole blood viscosity. It is now more commonly measured by filtration of erythrocytes through, or aspiration into, pores of 3-5 microns diameter and by the measurement of shear induced erythrocyte elongation using laser diffractometry. Recent improvements in the technology for erythrocyte filtration have included the removal of acute phase reactants from test erythrocyte suspensions, ultrasonic cleaning and reuse of filter membranes, awareness of the importance of mean cell volume as a determinant of flow through 3 microns diameter pores, and the ability to detect subpopulations of less deformable erythrocytes. Measurements of erythrocyte elongation by laser diffractometry, using the Ektacytometer, are also influenced by cell size and need to be corrected for mean cell volume. These advances have greatly improved the sensitivity and specificity of rheological methods for measuring the deformability of erythrocytes and for investigating the mode of action of rheologically active drugs.

  18. Effect of L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitine on the human erythrocyte membrane stability and deformability.

    PubMed

    Arduini, A; Rossi, M; Mancinelli, G; Belfiglio, M; Scurti, R; Radatti, G; Shohet, S B

    1990-01-01

    In this study we examined the effect of carnitine and acetylcarnitine on the human erythrocyte membrane stability and membrane deformability. Since erythrocyte membranes are impermeable to these compounds, we resealed erythrocyte ghosts in the presence of different concentrations of carnitine or acetylcarnitine. Resealed ghosts can be adequately studied in their cellular deformability and membrane stability properties by means of ektacytometry. Both carnitine and acetylcarnitine alter the membrane stability but not membrane deformability of the red cell membrane. Resealed ghosts containing 20, 50, 150, and 300 microM carnitine had 1.1, 1.6, 0.9, and 0.7 times the normal stability. While resealed ghosts containing 20, 50, 150, and 300 microM acetylcarnitine had 1.1, 1.5, 1.3, and 1.2 times the normal stability. Such changes were found to be reversible. We also conducted SDS PAGE of cytoskeletal membrane proteins from membrane fragments and residual membranes produced during membrane stability analysis, and unsheared resealed membranes in those samples where we observed an increase or a decrease of membrane stability. No changes in the cytoskeletal membrane proteins were noticed, even when the samples, prior SDS PAGE analysis, were treated with or without dithiothreitol. In addition, fluorescence steady state anisotropy of DPH in the erythrocyte membrane treated with carnitine or acetylcarnitine shows no modification of the lipid order parameter. Our results would suggest that both carnitine and its acetyl-ester, at physiological concentrations, may increase membrane stability in mature erythrocytes, most likely via a specific interaction with one or more cytoskeletal proteins, and that this effect would manifest when the erythrocytes are subjected to high shear stress.

  19. Variations in the distribution of selenium between erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and hemoglobin in different human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Whanger, P.D.; Robinson, M.F.; Feldman, E.B.; Beilstein, M.A.; Butler, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    The majority of erythrocyte (RBC) selenium (Se) is associated with glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in animals, but most of it is with hemoglobin (Hb) in human RBCs. Dietary forms of Se may influence this distribution since a rat study showed that selenite promoted the deposition of Se in GPx but selenomethionine (SeMet) resulted in greater amounts with Hb. Three different populations of people were chosen to investigate some possible reasons for the Se distribution in human RBC proteins. An average of 12% of the RBC Se (0.71 ng Se/mg Hb) was associated with GPx in people living in Oregon, but nearly 30% of the Se was associated with GPx in RBC (0.26 ng Se/mg Hb) from New Zealanders. Georgia residents with low RBC Se levels (0.35 ng Se/mg Hb) had 38% of the Se associated with GPx as compared to 29% for those with higher RBC levels (0.56 ng Se/mg Hb). In a third group of people the amount of Se tended to be higher in RBC GPx from non-vegetarian OSU students than from vegetarians. The predominant form of Se in meat appears to be selenocysteine, which is metabolized similarly to selenite, and presumably contributes to this difference since many plant foods contain Se as SeMet. These are examples of many possible factors affecting the relative distribution of Se in human RBC proteins.

  20. Topology of the membrane domain of human erythrocyte anion exchange protein, AE1.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, J; Tang, X B; Casey, J R

    1999-03-05

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is the chloride/bicarbonate exchange protein of the erythrocyte membrane. By using a combination of introduced cysteine mutants and sulfhydryl-specific chemistry, we have mapped the topology of the human AE1 membrane domain. Twenty-seven single cysteines were introduced throughout the Leu708-Val911 region of human AE1, and these mutants were expressed by transient transfection of human embryonic kidney cells. On the basis of cysteine accessibility to membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and to membrane-impermeant lucifer yellow iodoacetamide, we have proposed a model for the topology of AE1 membrane domain. In this model, AE1 is composed of 13 typical transmembrane segments, and the Asp807-His834 region is membrane-embedded but does not have the usual alpha-helical conformation. To identify amino acids that are important for anion transport, we analyzed the anion exchange activity for all introduced cysteine mutants, using a whole cell fluorescence assay. We found that mutants G714C, S725C, and S731C have very low transport activity, implying that this region has a structurally and/or catalytically important role. We measured the residual anion transport activity after mutant treatment with the membrane-impermeant, cysteine-directed compound, sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate) (MTSES). Only two mutants, S852C and A858C, were inhibited by MTSES, indicating that these residues may be located in a pore-lining region.

  1. An assay for human erythrocyte catechol-O-methyltransferase activity using a catechol estrogen as the substrate.

    PubMed

    Bates, G W; Edman, C D; Porter, J C; Johnston, J M; MacDonald, P C

    1979-05-16

    A radiometric assay for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity in human erythrocytes is described that employs 2-hydroxy[3H]estrone, and non-radiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the cosubstrates. The ease of separation of the product of the reaction, 2-methoxy[3H]estrone from 2-hydroxy[3H]estrone makes it possible to achieve low reaction blanks. The assay is very sensitive, and only 200 microliter of whole blood are used per determination. The assay is highly reproducible. The interassay variability (coefficient of variation) was 6.5% for 24 assays of COMT activity in red blood cells in blood obtained daily for 24 days from one person. In incubations conducted at 37 degrees C for 30 min, the catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was a linear function of enzyme concentration (equivalent to 11 to 180 microliter of packed red blood cells). Employing this assay, we evaluated the catalytic conversion of 2-hydroxyestrone to 2-methoxyestrone by catechol-O-methyltransferase from human red blood cells and found that the apparent Michaelis constant and the apparent maximal rate of reaction were 3 x 10(-7) M and 6.7 x 10(-9) mol . ml-1 erythrocytes . h-1, respectively. The catechol-O-methyltransferase activity measured in erythrocytes obtained from 100 healthy subjects (men and nonpregnant women) was 8.2 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- S.E.) nmol 2-methoxyestrone . ml-1 erythrocytes . h-1.

  2. Protective Effect of Selenium-Based Medicines on Toxicity of Three Common Organophosphorus Compounds in Human Erythrocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mostafalou, Sara; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Organophosphorus (OP) compounds are used to control pests, however they can reach the food chain and enter the human body causing serious health problems by means of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and oxidative stress (OS). Among the OPs, chlorpyrifos (CHP), malathion (MAL), and diazinon (DIA) are commonly used for commercial extermination purposes, in addition to veterinary practices, domestic, agricul- ture and public health applications. Two new recently registered medicines that contain selenium and other antioxidants, IMOD and angipars (ANG), have shown beneficial ef- fects for OS related disorders. This study examines the effect of selenium-based medi- cines on toxicity of three common OP compounds in erythrocytes. Materials and Methods In the present experimental study, we determined the ef- ficacy of IMOD and ANG on OS induced by three mentioned OP pesticides in human erythrocytes in vitro. After dose-response studies, AChE, lipid peroxidation (LPO), total antioxidant power (TAP) and total thiol molecules (TTM) were measured in eryth- rocytes after exposure to OPs alone and in combined treatment with IMOD or ANG. Results AChE activity, TAP and TTM reduced in erythrocytes exposed to CHP, MAL and DIA while they were restored in the presence of ANG and IMOD. ANG and IMOD reduced the OPs-induced elevation of LPO. Conclusion The present study shows the positive effects of IMOD and ANG in re- duction of OS and restoration of AChE inhibition induced by CHP, MAL and DIA in erythrocytes in vitro. PMID:26862533

  3. Spectral dependence of resolving power of optical method of detection of ultrasonically enhanced agglutination of human blood erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovski, V. A.; Dvoretski, K. N.; Dolmashkin, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    The spectral dependence of the resolving power of an acoustooptic method of monitoring agglutination of human blood erythrocytes is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, in principle, the resolving power of this method can be increased by several dozen times. The results of the work can be used to create instruments for determining the human blood type in the AB0 system and in the Rhesus system.

  4. Effect of carbon black nanomaterial on biological membranes revealed by shape of human erythrocytes, platelets and phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pajnič, Manca; Drašler, Barbara; Šuštar, Vid; Krek, Judita Lea; Štukelj, Roman; Šimundić, Metka; Kononenko, Veno; Makovec, Darko; Hägerstrand, Henry; Drobne, Damjana; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika

    2015-03-28

    We studied the effect of carbon black (CB) agglomerated nanomaterial on biological membranes as revealed by shapes of human erythrocytes, platelets and giant phospholipid vesicles. Diluted human blood was incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by different microscopic techniques. Giant unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (GUVs) created by electroformation were incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by optical microscopy. Populations of erythrocytes and GUVs were analyzed: the effect of CB nanomaterial was assessed by the average number and distribution of erythrocyte shape types (discocytes, echinocytes, stomatocytes) and of vesicles in test suspensions, with respect to control suspensions. Ensembles of representative images were created and analyzed using computer aided image processing and statistical methods. In a population study, blood of 14 healthy human donors was incubated with CB nanomaterial. Blood cell parameters (concentration of different cell types, their volumes and distributions) were assessed. We found that CB nanomaterial formed micrometer-sized agglomerates in citrated and phosphate buffered saline, in diluted blood and in blood plasma. These agglomerates interacted with erythrocyte membranes but did not affect erythrocyte shape locally or globally. CB nanomaterial agglomerates were found to mediate attractive interaction between blood cells and to present seeds for formation of agglomerate - blood cells complexes. Distortion of disc shape of resting platelets due to incubation with CB nanomaterial was not observed. CB nanomaterial induced bursting of GUVs while the shape of the remaining vesicles was on the average more elongated than in control suspension, indicating indirect osmotic effects of CB nanomaterial. CB nanomaterial interacts with membranes of blood cells but does not have a direct effect on local or global membrane shape in physiological in vitro conditions. Blood cells and GUVs are convenient and ethically acceptable

  5. A Volume Regulatory Response Can Be Triggered by Nucleosides in Human Erythrocytes, a Perfect Osmometer No Longer*

    PubMed Central

    Pafundo, Diego E.; Alvarez, Cora L.; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2010-01-01

    Human erythrocytes have been regarded as perfect osmometers, which swell or shrink as dictated by their osmotic environment. In contrast, in most other cells, swelling elicits a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) modulated by the activation of purinic and pyrimidinic receptors (P receptors). For human erythrocytes this modulation has not been tested, and we thus investigated whether P receptor activation can induce RVD in these cells. Further, because ectonucleotidases may scavenge ATP or ADP or act as a source for extracellular adenosine and therefore modulate P receptor activation and RVD, we also determined their activity in intact erythrocytes. We found relatively low ectoATPase but significant ectoADPase and ectoAMPase activities. When erythrocytes were exposed to hypotonic medium alone, they swelled as expected for an osmometric response and showed no RVD. Activation of P2 receptors by exogenous ATP or ADP did not trigger RVD, whereas P1 agonists adenosine and adenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide induced significant RVD. The effect of adenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide was dose-dependent (maximal RVD of 27%; apparent K½ of 1.6 ± 1.7 μm). The RVD induced by adenosine was blocked 80% with the non-selective P1 antagonist 8-(p-sulfophenyl theophylline) or the P1-A2B inhibitor MRS1754, but not by inhibitors of P1 subtypes A1, A2A, and A3. In addition, forskolin (an inducer of intracellular cAMP formation) could mimic the effect of adenosine, supporting the idea of P1-A2B receptor activation. In conclusion, we report a novel P1-A2B receptor-mediated RVD activation in mature human erythrocytes and thus indicate that these long held perfect osmometers are not so perfect after all. PMID:20040601

  6. A volume regulatory response can be triggered by nucleosides in human erythrocytes, a perfect osmometer no longer.

    PubMed

    Pafundo, Diego E; Alvarez, Cora L; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J

    2010-02-26

    Human erythrocytes have been regarded as perfect osmometers, which swell or shrink as dictated by their osmotic environment. In contrast, in most other cells, swelling elicits a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) modulated by the activation of purinic and pyrimidinic receptors (P receptors). For human erythrocytes this modulation has not been tested, and we thus investigated whether P receptor activation can induce RVD in these cells. Further, because ectonucleotidases may scavenge ATP or ADP or act as a source for extracellular adenosine and therefore modulate P receptor activation and RVD, we also determined their activity in intact erythrocytes. We found relatively low ectoATPase but significant ectoADPase and ectoAMPase activities. When erythrocytes were exposed to hypotonic medium alone, they swelled as expected for an osmometric response and showed no RVD. Activation of P2 receptors by exogenous ATP or ADP did not trigger RVD, whereas P1 agonists adenosine and adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide induced significant RVD. The effect of adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide was dose-dependent (maximal RVD of 27%; apparent K((1/2)) of 1.6 +/- 1.7 microM). The RVD induced by adenosine was blocked 80% with the non-selective P1 antagonist 8-(p-sulfophenyl theophylline) or the P1-A(2B) inhibitor MRS1754, but not by inhibitors of P1 subtypes A(1), A(2A), and A(3). In addition, forskolin (an inducer of intracellular cAMP formation) could mimic the effect of adenosine, supporting the idea of P1-A(2B) receptor activation. In conclusion, we report a novel P1-A(2B) receptor-mediated RVD activation in mature human erythrocytes and thus indicate that these long held perfect osmometers are not so perfect after all.

  7. Bile Acid-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Pozdeev, Vitaly I; Gatidis, Sergios; Qadri, Syed M; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Lang, Florian; Lang, Karl S; Lang, Philipp A

    2016-01-01

    In nucleated cells, bile acids may activate cation channels subsequently leading to entry of Ca2+. In erythrocytes, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity triggers eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Eryptosis is triggered by bile duct ligation, an effect partially attributed to conjugated bilirubin. The present study explored, whether bile acids may stimulate eryptosis. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes have been identified utilizing annexin V binding, cell volume estimated from forward scatter, cytosolic Ca2+ activity determined using Fluo-3 fluorescence, and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface utilizing specific antibodies. The exposure of human erythrocytes to glycochenodesoxycholic (GCDC) and taurochenodesoxycholic (TCDC) acid was followed by a significant decrease of forward scatter and significant increase of Fluo-3 fluorescence, ceramide abundance as well as annexin V binding. The effect on annexin V binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Bile acids stimulate suicidal cell death, an effect paralleled by and in part due to Ca2+ entry and ceramide. The bile acid induced eryptosis may in turn lead to accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes and, thus, may contribute to anemia in cholestatic patients. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Comparative in vitro study of interactions between particles and respiratory surface macrophages, erythrocytes, and epithelial cells of the chicken and the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kiama, S G; Adekunle, J S; Maina, J N

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, surface macrophages (SMs) play a foremost role in protecting the respiratory system by engulfing and destroying inhaled pathogens and harmful particulates. However, in birds, the direct defense role(s) that SMs perform remains ambiguous. Paucity and even lack of SMs have been reported in the avian respiratory system. It has been speculated that the pulmonary defenses in birds are inadequate and that birds are exceptionally susceptible to pulmonary diseases. In an endeavour to resolve the existing controversy, the phagocytic capacities of the respiratory SMs of the domestic fowl and the rat were compared under similar experimental conditions by exposure to polystyrene particles. In cells of equivalent diameters (8.5 µm in the chicken and 9.0 µm in the rat) and hence volumes, with the volume density of the engulfed polystyrene particles, i.e. the volume of the particles per unit volume of the cell (SM) of 23% in the chicken and 5% in the rat cells, the avian cells engulfed substantially more particles. Furthermore, the avian SMs phagocytized the particles more efficiently, i.e. at a faster rate. The chicken erythrocytes and the epithelial cells of the airways showed noteworthy phagocytic activity. In contrast to the rat cells that did not, 22% of the chicken erythrocytes phagocytized one to six particles. In birds, the phagocytic efficiencies of the SMs, erythrocytes, and epithelial cells may consolidate pulmonary defense. The assorted cellular defenses may explain how and why scarcity of SMs may not directly lead to a weak pulmonary defense. The perceived susceptibility of birds to respiratory diseases may stem from the human interventions that have included extreme genetic manipulation and intensive management for maximum productivity. The stress involved and the structural–functional disequilibria that have occurred from a ‘directed evolutionary process’, rather than weak immunological and cellular immunity, may explain the alleged

  9. Comparative in vitro study of interactions between particles and respiratory surface macrophages, erythrocytes, and epithelial cells of the chicken and the rat.

    PubMed

    Kiama, S G; Adekunle, J S; Maina, J N

    2008-10-01

    In mammals, surface macrophages (SMs) play a foremost role in protecting the respiratory system by engulfing and destroying inhaled pathogens and harmful particulates. However, in birds, the direct defense role(s) that SMs perform remains ambiguous. Paucity and even lack of SMs have been reported in the avian respiratory system. It has been speculated that the pulmonary defenses in birds are inadequate and that birds are exceptionally susceptible to pulmonary diseases. In an endeavour to resolve the existing controversy, the phagocytic capacities of the respiratory SMs of the domestic fowl and the rat were compared under similar experimental conditions by exposure to polystyrene particles. In cells of equivalent diameters (8.5 microm in the chicken and 9.0 microm in the rat) and hence volumes, with the volume density of the engulfed polystyrene particles, i.e. the volume of the particles per unit volume of the cell (SM) of 23% in the chicken and 5% in the rat cells, the avian cells engulfed substantially more particles. Furthermore, the avian SMs phagocytized the particles more efficiently, i.e. at a faster rate. The chicken erythrocytes and the epithelial cells of the airways showed noteworthy phagocytic activity. In contrast to the rat cells that did not, 22% of the chicken erythrocytes phagocytized one to six particles. In birds, the phagocytic efficiencies of the SMs, erythrocytes, and epithelial cells may consolidate pulmonary defense. The assorted cellular defenses may explain how and why scarcity of SMs may not directly lead to a weak pulmonary defense. The perceived susceptibility of birds to respiratory diseases may stem from the human interventions that have included extreme genetic manipulation and intensive management for maximum productivity. The stress involved and the structural-functional disequilibria that have occurred from a 'directed evolutionary process', rather than weak immunological and cellular immunity, may explain the alleged

  10. Photolysis and membrane lipid peroxidation of human erythrocytes by m-chloroperbenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Abou-Seif, M A; Elgendy, E M

    1998-09-14

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the biological hazard of photooxidation products of m-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA), as a novel photo-sensitizer, on lysis and membrane lipid peroxidation of human red blood cells (RBC). The photohemolysis activity of mCPBA oxidative products was concentration- and exposure time-dependent. Ten minutes photoexposure time and 100 micromol/L of mCPBA concentration were optimum to study the effect of generated superoxide (O2.-) and hydroxyl (.OH) radicals on RBC. The hemolytic effect of mCPBA was highly significantly inhibited by formate (as an .OH radical scavenger) compared with the partial inhibition effect of SOD-like Cu(II) complex (as O2.- radical Scavenger). The MDA value (an end product of membrane lipid peroxidation of RBC) induced by mCPBA was highly significantly decreased by formate. The generation of O2.- radicals by mCPBA was also confirmed by the partial hemolytic effect of phenazine methosulfate (PMS., O2.- radical generation). The data suggest the molecular mechanism of the oxygen radical species (O2.- and .OH through the photosensitization reaction of mCPBA and explain that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) play an active role in the photohemolysis process and peroxidation of membrane lipids of human erythrocytes.

  11. Differential time‐dependent volumetric and surface area changes and delayed induction of new permeation pathways in P. falciparum‐infected hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Waldecker, Mailin; Dasanna, Anil K.; Lansche, Christine; Linke, Marco; Srismith, Sirikamol; Cyrklaff, Marek; Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During intraerythrocytic development, Plasmodium falciparum increases the ion permeability of the erythrocyte plasma membrane to an extent that jeopardizes the osmotic stability of the host cell. A previously formulated numeric model has suggested that the parasite prevents premature rupture of the host cell by consuming hemoglobin (Hb) in excess of its own anabolic needs. Here, we have tested the colloid‐osmotic model on the grounds of time‐resolved experimental measurements on cell surface area and volume. We have further verified whether the colloid‐osmotic model can predict time‐dependent volumetric changes when parasites are grown in erythrocytes containing the hemoglobin variants S or C. A good agreement between model‐predicted and empirical data on both infected erythrocyte and intracellular parasite volume was found for parasitized HbAA and HbAC erythrocytes. However, a delayed induction of the new permeation pathways needed to be taken into consideration for the latter case. For parasitized HbAS erythrocyte, volumes diverged from model predictions, and infected erythrocytes showed excessive vesiculation during the replication cycle. We conclude that the colloid‐osmotic model provides a plausible and experimentally supported explanation of the volume expansion and osmotic stability of P. falciparum‐infected erythrocytes. The contribution of vesiculation to the malaria‐protective function of hemoglobin S is discussed. PMID:27450804

  12. ABO Blood Groups Influence Macrophage-mediated Phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Donald R.; Hult, Annika K.; Olsson, Martin L.; Liles, W. Conrad; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M.; Kain, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte polymorphisms associated with a survival advantage to Plasmodium falciparum infection have undergone positive selection. There is a predominance of blood group O in malaria-endemic regions, and several lines of evidence suggest that ABO blood groups may influence the outcome of P. falciparum infection. Based on the hypothesis that enhanced innate clearance of infected polymorphic erythrocytes is associated with protection from severe malaria, we investigated whether P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes are more efficiently cleared by macrophages than infected A and B erythrocytes. We show that human macrophages in vitro and mouse monocytes in vivo phagocytose P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes more avidly than infected A and B erythrocytes and that uptake is associated with increased hemichrome deposition and high molecular weight band 3 aggregates in infected O erythrocytes. Using infected A1, A2, and O erythrocytes, we demonstrate an inverse association of phagocytic capacity with the amount of A antigen on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Finally, we report that enzymatic conversion of B erythrocytes to type as O before infection significantly enhances their uptake by macrophages to observed level comparable to that with infected O wild-type erythrocytes. These data provide the first evidence that ABO blood group antigens influence macrophage clearance of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and suggest an additional mechanism by which blood group O may confer resistance to severe malaria. PMID:23071435

  13. Diminution of Oxidative Damage to Human Erythrocytes and Lymphocytes by Creatine: Possible Role of Creatine in Blood.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Neha; Mahmood, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) is naturally produced in the body and stored in muscles where it is involved in energy generation. It is widely used, especially by athletes, as a staple supplement for improving physical performance. Recent reports have shown that Cr displays antioxidant activity which could explain its beneficial cellular effects. We have evaluated the ability of Cr to protect human erythrocytes and lymphocytes against oxidative damage. Erythrocytes were challenged with model oxidants, 2, 2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence and absence of Cr. Incubation of erythrocytes with oxidant alone increased hemolysis, methemoglobin levels, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. This was accompanied by decrease in glutathione levels. Antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant power of the cell were compromised while the activity of membrane bound enzyme was lowered. This suggests induction of oxidative stress in erythrocytes by AAPH and H2O2. However, Cr protected the erythrocytes by ameliorating the AAPH and H2O2 induced changes in these parameters. This protective effect was confirmed by electron microscopic analysis which showed that oxidant-induced cell damage was attenuated by Cr. No cellular alterations were induced by Cr alone even at 20 mM, the highest concentration used. Creatinine, a by-product of Cr metabolism, was also shown to exert protective effects, although it was slightly less effective than Cr. Human lymphocytes were similarly treated with H2O2 in absence and presence of different concentrations of Cr. Lymphocytes incubated with oxidant alone had alterations in various biochemical and antioxidant parameters including decrease in cell viability and induction of DNA damage. The presence of Cr attenuated all these H2O2-induced changes in lymphocytes. Thus, Cr can function as a blood antioxidant, protecting cells from oxidative damage, genotoxicity and can potentially increase their lifespan.

  14. Membrane skeleton-bilayer interaction is not the major determinant of membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gudi, S R; Kumar, A; Bhakuni, V; Gokhale, S M; Gupta, C M

    1990-03-30

    Transbilayer phospholipid distribution, membrane skeleton dissociation/association, and spectrin structure have been analysed in human erythrocytes after subjecting them to heating at 50 degrees C for 15 min. The membrane skeleton dissociation/association was determined by measuring the Tris-induced dissociation of Triton-insoluble membrane skeletons (Triton shells), the spectrin-actin extractability under low ionic conditions, and the binding of spectrin-actin with normal erythrocyte membrane inside-out vesicles (IOVs). The spectrin structure was ascertained by measuring the spectrin dimer-to-tetramer ratio as well as the spectrin tryptophan fluorescence. Both the Tris-induced Triton shell dissociation and the spectrin-actin extractability under low ionic conditions were considerably reduced by the heat treatment. Also, the binding of heated erythrocyte spectrin-actin to IOVs was significantly smaller than that observed with the normal cell spectrin-actin. Further, the quantity of spectrin dimers was appreciably increased in heat-treated erythrocytes as compared to the normal cells. This change in the spectrin dimer-to-tetramer ratio was accompanied by marked changes in the spectrin tryptophan fluorescence. In spite of these heat-induced alterations in structure and bilayer interactions of the membrane skeleton, the inside-outside glycerophospholipid distribution remained virtually unaffected in the heat-treated cells, as judged by employing bee venom and pancreatic phospholipase A2, fluorescamine and Merocyanine 540 as the external membrane probes. These results strongly indicate that membrane bilayer-skeleton interaction is not the major factor in determining the transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in human erythrocyte membrane.

  15. Diminution of Oxidative Damage to Human Erythrocytes and Lymphocytes by Creatine: Possible Role of Creatine in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Neha; Mahmood, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) is naturally produced in the body and stored in muscles where it is involved in energy generation. It is widely used, especially by athletes, as a staple supplement for improving physical performance. Recent reports have shown that Cr displays antioxidant activity which could explain its beneficial cellular effects. We have evaluated the ability of Cr to protect human erythrocytes and lymphocytes against oxidative damage. Erythrocytes were challenged with model oxidants, 2, 2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence and absence of Cr. Incubation of erythrocytes with oxidant alone increased hemolysis, methemoglobin levels, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. This was accompanied by decrease in glutathione levels. Antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant power of the cell were compromised while the activity of membrane bound enzyme was lowered. This suggests induction of oxidative stress in erythrocytes by AAPH and H2O2. However, Cr protected the erythrocytes by ameliorating the AAPH and H2O2 induced changes in these parameters. This protective effect was confirmed by electron microscopic analysis which showed that oxidant-induced cell damage was attenuated by Cr. No cellular alterations were induced by Cr alone even at 20 mM, the highest concentration used. Creatinine, a by-product of Cr metabolism, was also shown to exert protective effects, although it was slightly less effective than Cr. Human lymphocytes were similarly treated with H2O2 in absence and presence of different concentrations of Cr. Lymphocytes incubated with oxidant alone had alterations in various biochemical and antioxidant parameters including decrease in cell viability and induction of DNA damage. The presence of Cr attenuated all these H2O2-induced changes in lymphocytes. Thus, Cr can function as a blood antioxidant, protecting cells from oxidative damage, genotoxicity and can potentially increase their lifespan. PMID

  16. Agglutination of human erythrocytes by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine-651 on the extracellular domain of band 3.

    PubMed

    Kiyotake, Kento; Ochiai, Hideharu; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Clustering of band 3, chloride/bicarbonate exchanger, has been reported in Zn(2+)-treated human erythrocytes. However, the agglutination of human erythrocytes is also induced by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine on band 3. Identification of histidine that interacts with Zn(2+)ion remains to be determined. The Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes was unaffected by chymotrypsin cleavage of the small loop region containing His-547 in the extracellular domain of band 3. On the other hand, papain digestion of the large loop region containing His-651 in band 3 inhibited such Zn(2+)-induced agglutination. Moreover, Zn(2+)-induced erythrocyte agglutination was inhibited by the peptide (ARGWVIHPLG) containing His-651, but not by the peptide such as ARGWVIRPLG, which His-651 was substituted by arginine. Among 10 kinds of animal erythrocytes tested, interestingly, no agglutination by Zn(2+)ions was observed in cow cells only that the forth amino acid in the upstream from His-669 on the large loop of cow band 3 is aspartate (Asp-665) instead of glycine. As expected, the agglutination of human erythrocytes by Zn(2+) ions was inhibited in the presence of aspartate. These data indicate that the interaction of Zn(2+) ion with His-651 residue of band 3 plays an important role in the Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes.

  17. Sodium chlorite increases production of reactive oxygen species that impair the antioxidant system and cause morphological changes in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shaikh Nisar; Mahmood, Riaz

    2017-04-01

    Sodium chlorite (NaClO2 ) is used in the production of chlorine dioxide for bleaching and stripping of textiles, pulp, and paper. It is also used as disinfectant in municipal water treatment and as a component in therapeutic rinses and gels. The effect of NaClO2 on human erythrocytes has been studied under in vitro conditions. Incubation of 5% suspension of erythrocytes with NaClO2 (0.1-2.0 mM) at 37°C for 30 min resulted in marked cell lysis (1.2-3.8 fold) and increased their osmotic fragility. Several parameters were assayed in cell lysates prepared from NaClO2 -treated and -untreated (control) erythrocytes. Compared to controls, exposure to NaClO2 caused significant increase in protein oxidation (1.1-8.07 fold), lipid peroxidation (1.08-4.95 fold) with decrease in total sulfhydryl (-5 to -61%), and glutathione levels (-7 to -86%). Methemoglobin content was tremendously increased, by 5-52 fold when compared to control, while methemoglobin reductase activity decreased (-17 to -93%) upon NaClO2 treatment. NaClO2 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species by 3-21 fold and lowered the metal reducing and free radical quenching ability of erythrocytes. It also caused an increase in nitric oxide levels (2.7-15.4 fold) showing generation of nitrosative stress too. The activities of major antioxidant and membrane bound enzymes were significantly altered. Gross morphological changes, from discocytes to echinocytes, were seen in NaClO2 -treated erythrocytes under electron microscope. These results show that NaClO2 induces oxidative stress in human erythrocytes, damages the membrane, and impairs the cellular antioxidant defence system. This oxidative damage can shorten the life span of erythrocytes in blood resulting in red cell senescence. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1343-1353, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. SO4(=) uptake and catalase role in preconditioning after H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Rossana; Remigante, Alessia; Di Pietro, Maria Letizia; Giannetto, Antonino; La Spada, Giuseppina; Marino, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Preconditioning (PC) is an adaptive response to a mild and transient oxidative stress, shown for the first time in myocardial cells and not described in erythrocytes so far. The possible adaptation of human erythrocytes to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress has been here verified by monitoring one of band 3 protein functions, i.e., Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange, through rate constant for SO4(=) uptake measurement. With this aim, erythrocytes were exposed to a mild and transient oxidative stress (30 min to either 10 or 100 μM H2O2), followed by a stronger oxidant condition (300- or, alternatively, 600-μM H2O2 treatment). SO4(=) uptake was measured by a turbidimetric method, and the possible role of catalase (CAT, significantly contributing to the anti-oxidant system in erythrocytes) in PC response has been verified by measuring the rate of H2O2 degradation. The preventive exposure of erythrocytes to 10 μM H2O2, and then to 300 μM H2O2, significantly ameliorated the rate constant for SO4(=) uptake with respect to 300 μM H2O2 alone, showing thus an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Our results show that (i) SO4(=) uptake measurement is a suitable model to monitor the effects of a mild and transient oxidative stress in human erythrocytes, (ii) band 3 protein anion exchange capability is retained after 10 μM H2O2 treatment, (iii) PC response induced by the 10 μM H2O2 pretreatment is clearly detected, and (iv) PC response, elicited by low-concentrated H2O2, is mediated by CAT enzyme and does not involve band 3 protein tyrosine phosphorylation pathways. Erythrocyte adaptation to a short-term oxidative stress may serve as a basis for future studies about the impact of more prolonged oxidative events, often associated to aging, drug consumption, chronic alcoholism, hyperglycemia, or neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Induction of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Nelfinavir

    PubMed Central

    Bissinger, Rosi; Waibel, Sabrina; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The HIV protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, primarily used for the treatment of HIV infections, has later been shown to be effective in various infectious diseases including malaria. Nelfinavir may trigger mitochondria-independent cell death. Erythrocytes may undergo eryptosis, a mitochondria-independent suicidal cell death characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include oxidative stress and increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i). During malaria, accelerated death of infected erythrocytes may decrease parasitemia and thus favorably influence the clinical course of the disease. In the present study, phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with nelfinavir significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥5µg/mL), significantly decreased forward scatter (≥2.5µg/mL), significantly increased ROS abundance (10 µg/mL), and significantly increased [Ca2+]i (≥5 µg/mL). The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding following nelfinavir treatment was significantly blunted, but not abolished by either addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (1 mM) or removal of extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, exposure of erythrocytes to nelfinavir induces oxidative stress and Ca2+ entry, thus leading to suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling. PMID:26008229

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 1-induced hemagglutination: glycoprotein C mediates virus binding to erythrocyte surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Trybala, E; Svennerholm, B; Bergström, T; Olofsson, S; Jeansson, S; Goodman, J L

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can cause agglutination of murine erythrocytes (E. Trybala, Z. Larski, and J. Wisniewski, Arch. Virol. 113:89-94, 1990). We now demonstrate that the mechanism of this hemagglutination is glycoprotein C-mediated binding of virus to heparan sulfate moieties at the surface of erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was found to be a common property of all gC-expressing laboratory strains and clinical isolates of HSV-1 tested. Mutants of HSV-1 deficient in glycoprotein C caused no specific hemagglutination, whereas their derivatives transfected with a functional gC-1 gene, thus reconstituting gC expression, regained full hemagglutinating activity. Hemagglutination activity was inhibited by antibodies against gC-1 but not by antibodies with specificity for glycoproteins gB, gD, or gE or by murine antiserum raised against the MP strain of HSV-1, which is gC deficient. Finally, purified gC-1 protein, like whole HSV-1 virions, showed high hemagglutinating activity which was inhibited by heparan sulfate and/or heparin and was completely prevented by pretreatment of erythrocytes with heparitinase, providing evidence that gC-1 mediates hemagglutination by binding to heparan sulfate at the cell surface. Thus, HSV-1-induced hemagglutination is gC-1 dependent and resembles the recently proposed mechanism by which HSV-1 attaches to surface heparans on susceptible cells, providing a simple model for initial events in the virus-cell interaction. Images PMID:8382294

  1. A novel two-layer, coupled finite element approach for modeling the nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic behavior of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Thomas; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2011-07-01

    A novel finite element approach is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of human red blood cells (RBC, erythrocytes). As the RBC membrane comprises a phospholipid bilayer with an intervening protein network, we propose to model the membrane with two distinct layers. The fairly complex characteristics of the very thin lipid bilayer are represented by special incompressible solid shell elements and an anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model. Properties of the protein network are modeled with an isotropic hyperelastic third-order material. The elastic behavior of the model is validated with existing optical tweezers studies with quasi-static deformations. Employing material parameters consistent with literature, simulation results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Available models in literature neglect either the surface area conservation of the RBC membrane or realistic loading conditions of the optical tweezers experiments. The importance of these modeling assumptions, that are both included in this study, are discussed and their influence quantified. For the simulation of the dynamic motion of RBC, the model is extended to incorporate the cytoplasm. This is realized with a monolithic fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation, where the fluid is described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian framework. It is shown that both membrane viscosity and cytoplasm viscosity have significant influence on simulation results. Characteristic recovery times and energy dissipation for varying strain rates in dynamic laser trap experiments are calculated for the first time and are found to be comparable with experimental data.

  2. Redox-active biflavonoids from Garcinia brasiliensis as inhibitors of neutrophil oxidative burst and human erythrocyte membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Saroni Arwa, Phanuel; Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva; Siqueira Silva, Dulce Helena

    2015-11-04

    Garcinia brasiliensis, a plant native to the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation of the urinary tract, peptic ulcers, arthritis and other conditions. The purposes of this study were to analyze the chemical constituents of G. brasiliensis branches and leaves and to evaluate the potential of isolated compounds to act as inhibitors of both the oxidative burst of stimulated neutrophils and oxidative damage in human erythrocyte membranes to verify the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of this plant. Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of healthy donors by Ficoll-Paque density gradient centrifugation. Superoxide anion and total reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by stimulated neutrophils were measured by WST-1 reduction and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays, respectively. Radical-induced lipoperoxidation and hemolysis were performed using erythrocytes from the blood of healthy donors. Compounds were isolated from G. brasiliensis branches and leaves by HPLC microfractionation, and structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was performed based on NMR and HR-MS analyses. The biflavonoids procyanidin, fukugetin, amentoflavone and podocarpusflavone isolated from G. brasiliensis showed potent inhibitory effects on the oxidative burst of human neutrophils, inhibiting ROS production by 50% at 1 μmol L(-1). These biflavonoids also proved to be potent inhibitors of hemolysis (with 88 ± 7% inhibition at 50 µmol L(-1) for procyanidin) and lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes, with a malondialdehyde level (a biomarker of oxidative stress) of 8.5 ± 0.3 nmol/mg Hb at 50 µmol L(-1) for procyanidin. These findings indicate that the biflavonoids extracted from G. brasiliensis branches and leaves modulate oxidative stress via inhibition of NADPH oxidase and ROS production by stimulated human neutrophils. Furthermore, the biflavonoids exhibited potent inhibition of oxidant hemolysis and lipid peroxidation

  3. Anti-Self Phosphatidylserine Antibodies Recognize Uninfected Erythrocytes Promoting Malarial Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Rudlaff, Rachel; Fernandez, Clemente; Roussel, Camille; Götz, Anton; Gonzalez, Sandra; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel; Buffet, Pierre; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Rodriguez, Ana

    2016-02-10

    Plasmodium species, the parasitic agents of malaria, invade erythrocytes to reproduce, resulting in erythrocyte loss. However, a greater loss is caused by the elimination of uninfected erythrocytes, sometimes long after infection has been cleared. Using a mouse model, we found that Plasmodium infection induces the generation of anti-self antibodies that bind to the surface of uninfected erythrocytes from infected, but not uninfected, mice. These antibodies recognize phosphatidylserine, which is exposed on the surface of a fraction of uninfected erythrocytes during malaria. We find that phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes are reticulocytes expressing high levels of CD47, a "do-not-eat-me" signal, but the binding of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies mediates their phagocytosis, contributing to anemia. In human patients with late postmalarial anemia, we found a strong inverse correlation between the levels of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies and plasma hemoglobin, suggesting a similar role in humans. Inhibition of this pathway may be exploited for treating malarial anemia.

  4. Carotenoids are effective inhibitors of in vitro hemolysis of human erythrocytes, as determined by a practical and optimized cellular antioxidant assay.

    PubMed

    Chisté, Renan C; Freitas, Marisa; Mercadante, Adriana Z; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-09-01

    β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein, β-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene are liposoluble pigments widely distributed in vegetables and fruits and, after ingestion, these compounds are usually detected in human blood plasma. In this study, we evaluated their potential to inhibit hemolysis of human erythrocytes, as mediated by the toxicity of peroxyl radicals (ROO•). Thus, 2,2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH) was used as ROO• generator and the hemolysis assay was carried out in experimental conditions optimized by response surface methodology, and successfully adapted to microplate assay. The optimized conditions were verified at 30 × 10(6) cells/mL, 17 mM of AAPH for 3 h, at which 48 ± 5% of hemolysis was achieved in freshly isolated erythrocytes. Among the tested carotenoids, lycopene (IC(50) = 0.24 ± 0.05 μM) was the most efficient to prevent the hemolysis, followed by β-carotene (0.32 ± 0.02 μM), lutein (0.38 ± 0.02 μM), and zeaxanthin (0.43 ± 0.02 μM). These carotenoids were at least 5 times more effective than quercetin, trolox, and ascorbic acid (positive controls). β-Cryptoxanthin did not present any erythroprotective effect, but rather induced a hemolytic effect at the highest tested concentration (3 μM). These results suggest that selected carotenoids may have potential to act as important erythroprotective agents by preventing ROO•-induced toxicity in human erythrocytes. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Erythrocyte Aggregation due to Surface Nanobubble Interactions During the Onset of Thermal Burn Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidner, Harrison S.

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) aggregation is an important hemorheological phenomenon especially in microcirculation. In healthy individuals, RBCs are known to aggregate and gravitate toward the faster flow in the center of vessels to increase their throughput for more efficient oxygen delivery. Their aggregation is known to occur during a variety of environmental, pathological, and physiological conditions and is reversible when aggregates are subject to the relatively high shear forces in the circulation. The likelihood that aggregates will monodisperse in flow is dependent on the conditions during which they form. In situations where such aggregates are not sheared to monodispersion their presence can impact the perfusion of microvascular networks. More specifically, aggregates subject to the low shear rates in the zone of stasis near regions of thermal burn injury are capable of occluding vessels in the microcirculation and inhibiting the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue downstream. The basic mechanism leading to erythrocyte aggregation at the onset of thermal injury is unknown. This dissertation investigates parameters involved in erythrocyte aggregation, methods of measuring and testing erythrocyte aggregation, and incorporates modeling based on first principles ultimately to propose a mechanism of this phenomenon.

  6. An expanding toolkit for preclinical pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine development: bridging traditional mouse malaria models and human trials.

    PubMed

    Steel, Ryan Wj; Kappe, Stefan Hi; Sack, Brandon K

    2016-12-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health burden with 214 million new infections and over 400,000 deaths in 2015. Elucidating relevant Plasmodium parasite biology can lead to the identification of novel ways to control and ultimately eliminate the parasite within geographic areas. Particularly, the development of an effective vaccine that targets the clinically silent pre-erythrocytic stages of infection would significantly augment existing malaria elimination tools by preventing both the onset of blood-stage infection/disease as well as spread of the parasite through mosquito transmission. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of small animal models in pre-erythrocytic stage vaccine development, highlighting how human liver-chimeric and human immune system mice are emerging as valuable components of these efforts.

  7. Menadione-induced cytotoxicity effects on human erythrocyte membranes studied by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Trad, C H; Butterfield, D A

    1994-08-01

    Menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is cytotoxic to hepatocytes. In order to begin to investigate the changes in the physical state of membranes induced by this cytotoxic substance, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling techniques were used in conjunction with spin labels specific for cytoskeletal proteins, bilayer lipids, or cell-surface sialic acid or galactose to investigate erythrocyte membranes. We studied the molecular effects of oxidation of 200 microM menadione on the different membrane domains. The major findings are: (1) menadione increases protein-protein interactions (P < 0.001) of cytoskeletal proteins, (2) there is a slightly significant increase in the rotational motion of spin-labeled sialic acid (P < 0.05), while (3) the physical state of galactose residues was unaffected by menadione. Since glycophorin is coupled to the major cytoskeletal protein, spectrin, by protein 4.1, we suggest that menadione-induced oxidation could alter the conformation of protein 4.1. As a consequence, single or multiple sites of weakness could be induced leading to the alteration of the interactions of the cytoskeletal network and its anchoring domains in the membrane. These results are discussed with reference to possible mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic action of menadione.

  8. Large-scale isolation of human erythrocyte Ca2+-transport ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Gietzen, K; Kolandt, J

    1982-01-01

    A rapid procedure for preparing large quantities of purified erythrocyte Ca2+-transport ATPase is presented. The method involves: (1) fast preparation of calmodulin-deficient, essentially haemoglobin-free, erythrocyte membranes by molecular filtration using Pellicon filters; (2) solubilization of membrane proteins by deoxycholate; and (3) a batch procedure using calmodulin-Sepharose 4B gel for purification of Ca2+-transport ATPase. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6217813

  9. Gas chromatography determination of fatty acids in the human erythrocyte membranes - A review.

    PubMed

    Bystrická, Zuzana; Ďuračková, Zdeňka

    2016-12-01

    Blood fatty acid measurements can reflect exogenously consumed fatty acids allowing to resolve some metabolic disorders (e.g. diabetes, anorexia) or mental disorders (e.g. depression, anxiety, schizophrenia). For this purpose, fatty acids can be determined in the whole blood or various blood fractions such as the plasma, serum or erythrocytes. Measurement of fatty acids in the whole blood by dried blood spot technique is becoming increasingly popular and is often used mainly for the screening of newborns due to the use of the small sample volume. The most popular is determination of fatty acids in plasma or serum samples. While the profile of plasma fatty acids fluctuates based on daily dietary intake, the red blood cell membrane composition of fatty acids reflects the 2-3 month dietary intake. Such results can be more reflective in contrast to the plasma/serum and therefore the present review will summarize available information on gas chromatography determination of fatty acids in human red blood cell membranes. Selection of extraction and derivatization reagents as well as presentation of chromatographic conditions will be discussed here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity in human erythrocytes of multifunctional, magnetic, and luminescent nanocrystalline rare earth fluorides.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Tomasz; Mrówczyńska, Lucyna; Szczeszak, Agata; Śniadecki, Zbigniew; Runowski, Marcin; Idzikowski, Bogdan; Lis, Stefan

    Multifunctional nanoparticles exhibiting red or green luminescence properties and magnetism were synthesized and thoroughly analyzed. The hydrothermal method was used for the synthesis of Eu(3+)- or Tb(3+)-doped GdF3-, NaGdF4-, and BaGdF5-based nanocrystalline materials. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples confirmed the desired compositions of the materials. Transmission electron microscope images revealed the different morphologies of the products, including the nanocrystal sizes, which varied from 12 nm in the case of BaGdF5-based nanoparticles to larger structures with dimensions exceeding 300 nm. All of the samples presented luminescence under ultraviolet irradiation, as well as when the samples were in the form of water colloids. The highest luminescence was observed for BaGdF5-based materials. The obtained nanoparticles exhibited paramagnetism along with probable evidence of superparamagnetic behavior at low temperatures. The particles' magnetic characteristics were also preserved for samples in the form of a suspension in distilled water. The cytotoxicity studies against the human erythrocytes indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles are non-toxic because they did not cause the red blood cells shape changes nor did they alter their membrane structure and permeabilization.

  11. Structurally Similar but Functionally Diverse ZU5 Domains in Human Erythrocyte Ankyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunaga, Mai; Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2014-10-02

    The metazoan cell membrane is highly organized. Maintaining such organization and preserving membrane integrity under different conditions are accomplished through intracellular tethering to an extensive, flexible protein network. Spectrin, the principal component of this network, is attached to the membrane through the adaptor protein ankyrin, which directly bridges the interaction between {beta}-spectrin and membrane proteins. Ankyrins have a modular structure that includes two tandem ZU5 domains. The first domain, ZU5A, is directly responsible for binding {beta}-spectrin. Here, we present a structure of the tandem ZU5 repeats of human erythrocyte ankyrin. Structural and biophysical experiments show that the second ZU5 domain, ZU5B, does not participate in spectrin binding. ZU5B is structurally similar to the ZU5 domain found in the netrin receptor UNC5b supramodule, suggesting that it could interact with other domains in ankyrin. Comparison of several ZU5 domains demonstrates that the ZU5 domain represents a compact and versatile protein interaction module.

  12. A novel instrument for studying the flow behaviour of erythrocytes through microchannels simulating human blood capillaries.

    PubMed

    Sutton, N; Tracey, M C; Johnston, I D; Greenaway, R S; Rampling, M W

    1997-05-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to study the microrheology of erythrocytes as they flow through channels of dimensions similar to human blood capillaries. The channels are produced in silicon substrates using microengineering technology. Accurately defined, physiological driving pressures and temperatures are employed whilst precise, real-time image processing allows individual cells to be monitored continuously during their transit. The instrument characterises each cell in a sample of ca. 1000 in terms of its volume and flow velocity profile during its transit through a channel. The unique representation of the data in volume/velocity space provides new insight into the microrheological behaviour of blood. The image processing and subsequent data analysis enable the system to reject anomalous events such as multiple cell transits, thereby ensuring integrity of the resulting data. By employing an array of microfluidic flow channels we can integrate a number of different but precise and highly reproducible channel sizes and geometries within one array, thereby allowing multiple, concurrent isobaric measurements on one sample. As an illustration of the performance of the system, volume/velocity data sets recorded in a microfluidic device incorporating multiple channels of 100 microns length and individual widths ranging between 3.0 and 4.0 microns are presented.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity in human erythrocytes of multifunctional, magnetic, and luminescent nanocrystalline rare earth fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzyb, Tomasz; Mrówczyńska, Lucyna; Szczeszak, Agata; Śniadecki, Zbigniew; Runowski, Marcin; Idzikowski, Bogdan; Lis, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles exhibiting red or green luminescence properties and magnetism were synthesized and thoroughly analyzed. The hydrothermal method was used for the synthesis of Eu3+- or Tb3+-doped GdF3-, NaGdF4-, and BaGdF5-based nanocrystalline materials. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples confirmed the desired compositions of the materials. Transmission electron microscope images revealed the different morphologies of the products, including the nanocrystal sizes, which varied from 12 nm in the case of BaGdF5-based nanoparticles to larger structures with dimensions exceeding 300 nm. All of the samples presented luminescence under ultraviolet irradiation, as well as when the samples were in the form of water colloids. The highest luminescence was observed for BaGdF5-based materials. The obtained nanoparticles exhibited paramagnetism along with probable evidence of superparamagnetic behavior at low temperatures. The particles' magnetic characteristics were also preserved for samples in the form of a suspension in distilled water. The cytotoxicity studies against the human erythrocytes indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles are non-toxic because they did not cause the red blood cells shape changes nor did they alter their membrane structure and permeabilization.

  14. Anatomy of acetylcholinesterase catalysis: reaction dynamics analogy for human erythrocyte and electric eel enzymes.

    PubMed

    Acheson, S A; Quinn, D M

    1990-09-03

    The anatomy of catalysis (i.e., reaction dynamics, thermodynamics and transition state structures) is compared herein for acetylcholinesterases from human erythrocytes and Electrophorus electricus. The two enzymes have similar relative activities for the substrate o-nitrochloroacetanilide and o-nitrophenyl acetate. In addition, with each substrate K values and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects for kES and kE are similar for the two enzymes. Solvent isotope effects in mixed isotopic buffers indicate that the acylation stages of o-nitrochloroacetanilide turnover by the two enzymes are rate-limited by virtual transition states that are weighted averages of contributions from transition states of serial chemical and physical steps. Similar experiments show that the transition states for Vmax of o-nitrophenyl acetate turnover by the two enzymes are stabilized by simple general acid-base (i.e., one-proton) catalysis. These comparisons demonstrate that acetylcholinesterases from diverse sources display functional analogy in that reaction dynamics and transition state structures are closely similar.

  15. Human Erythrocyte Glucose Transporter: Normal Asymmetric Orientation and Function in Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Kurokawa, Tomonori; Shaw, Shyh-Yu; Tillotson, Loyal G.; Kalled, Susan; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1986-04-01

    The transport function and orientation of the reconstituted human erythrocyte glucose transporter was studied with liposomes made with bovine brain lipid or Escherichia coli lipid. Reconstitution was achieved by a simple octyl glucoside dilution method. The reconstituted transporters with either lipid showed identical counterflow transport activity, the same response to various inhibitors, and characteristic cytochalasin B (CB) labeling. Functional location and purification of the glucose transporter was performed by using gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography with octyl glucoside-containing buffer. The reconstituted transport activity was associated only with band 4.5 protein (preactin) and not with band 3 protein. Both CB binding and transport function of the reconstituted transporters were resistant to trypsin but susceptible to chymotrypsin digestion. However, both trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment of unsealed ghosts completely eliminated the CB labeling and transport function of the glucose transporter. In our reconstitution system the glucose transporters maintained a normal asymmetrical (rightside-out) orientation and good transport function. A specific monoclonal antibody against the glucose transporter inhibited CB labeling of the transporters on unsealed ghosts. This was not found with the reconstituted system; however, after freeze-thawing there was a significant inhibition of CB binding by the antibody. These findings suggest that the CB-binding site of the reconstituted transporter is on the inner side of the proteoliposomes.

  16. Recombinant human erythropoietin modulates erythrocyte complement receptor 1 functional activity in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kiss, E; Kávai, M; Csipõ, I; Szegedi, G

    1998-06-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) is an important step in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Impairment of IC-clearance contributes to the accumulation of IC. It may be partly attributed to decreased complement containing immune complex (ICC) binding by erythrocytic complement receptor 1 (ECR1). Stimulating erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) may enhance the IC-clearance as increasing ECR1 expression and/or functional activity. Ten anemic patients with lupus nephritis were treated with 50 IU rHuEPO (Eprex) per kg body weight three times a week during a five week period. ICC-binding capacity of ECR1 was determined with 125I-labelled, C3ib containing BSA-anti-BSA complexes. In addition to effective correction of anemia, indicated by increased red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration and reticulocyte ratio, rHuEPO significantly improved decreased ECR1 functional (ICC-binding) activity in patients with lupus nephritis. This improvement correlated with the increase in reticulocyte ratio. Although patients were kept on their previous therapy during Eprex administration, their clinical condition also improved. That was shown by a decrease in Westergreen ratio, serum creatinine concentration and anti-dsDNA level and also by an increase in creatinine clearance. Results suggest a beneficial immune modulatory effect of rHuEPO in lupus nephritis.

  17. Enhanced choline and Rb+ transport in human erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, K; Wong, H Y; Elford, B C; Newbold, C I; Ellory, J C

    1991-01-01

    Human erythrocytes infected in vitro with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum showed a markedly increased rate of choline influx compared with normal cells. Choline transport into uninfected cells (cultured in parallel with infected cells) obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km approximately 11 microM). In malaria-parasite-infected cells there was an additional choline-transport component which failed to saturate at extracellular concentrations of up to 500 microM. This component was less sensitive than the endogenous transporter to inhibition by the Cinchona bark alkaloids quinine, quinidine, cinchonine and cinchonidine, but showed a much greater sensitivity than the native system to inhibition by piperine. The sensitivity of the induced choline transport to these reagents was similar to that of the malaria-induced (ouabain- and bumetanide-resistant) Rb(+)-transport pathway; however, the relative magnitudes of the piperine-sensitive choline and Rb+ fluxes in malaria-parasite-infected cells varied between cultures. This suggests either that the enhanced transport of the two cations was via functionally distinct (albeit pharmacologically similar) pathways, or that the transport was mediated by a pathway with variable substrate selectivity. PMID:1898345

  18. Metabolic alterations in the human erythrocyte produced by increases in glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Susan F.; Morrison, Anthony D.; Clements, Rex S.; Winegrad, Albert I.; Oski, Frank A.

    1971-01-01

    Human erythrocytes incubated in medium containing 50 mM glucose have increased intracellular sorbitol and fructose concentrations as compared with samples incubated with 5 mM glucose. Increased medium glucose concentration did not significantly alter total glucose consumption or lactate production. However, the intracellular lactate:pyruvate ratio rose, the concentrations of fructose diphosphate, and triose phosphates increased, and the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration fell. [14C]O2 production from glucose-1-14C also increased with increased medium glucose concentration. These changes are believed to reflect changes in the redox states of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide/reduced form of diphosphopyridine nucleotide (NAD/NADH) and nicotinamide—adenine dinucleotide phosphate/reduced form of nicotinamide—adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP/NADPH) couples resulting from increased activity of the polyol pathway. Addition of pyruvate to the incubation media prevented these changes. These studies illustrate that an increase in the red cell's normal substrate, glucose, can produce changes in red cell metabolism. PMID:4398937

  19. Alcohols produce reversible and irreversible acceleration of phospholipid flip-flop in the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Schwichtenhövel, C; Deuticke, B; Haest, C W

    1992-10-19

    The slow, non-mediated transmembrane movement of the lipid probes lysophosphatidylcholine, NBD-phosphatidylcholine and NBD-phosphatidylserine in human erythrocytes becomes highly enhanced in the presence of 1-alkanols (C2-C8) and 1,2-alkane diols (C4-C8). Above a threshold concentration characteristic for each alcohol, flip rates increase exponentially with the alcohol concentration. The equieffective concentrations of the alcohols decrease about 3-fold per methylene added. All 1-alkanols studied are equieffective at comparable calculated membrane concentrations. This is also observed or the 1,2-alkane diols, albeit at a 5-fold lower membrane concentration. At low alcohol concentrations, flip enhancement is reversible to a major extent upon removal of the alcohol. In contrast, a residual irreversible flip acceleration is observed following removal of the alcohol after a treatment at higher concentrations. The threshold concentrations to produce irreversible flip acceleration by 1-alkanols and 1,2-alkane diols are 1.5- and 3-fold higher than those for flip acceleration in the presence of the corresponding alcohols. A causal role in reversible flip-acceleration of a global increase of membrane fluidity or membrane polarity seems to be unlikely. Alcohols may act by increasing the probability of formation of transient structural defects in the hydrophobic barrier that already occur in the native membrane. Membrane defects responsible for irreversible flip-acceleration may result from alterations of membrane skeletal proteins by alcohols.

  20. A role for the membrane proteome in human chronic kidney disease erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Zubiri, Irene; Maroto, Aroa S; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Posada-Ayala, María; Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Barderas, María G; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ramos, Ana; Ortiz, Alberto; Vivanco, Fernando

    2012-11-01

    The molecular basis of the reduced half-life of chronic kidney disease (CKD) erythrocytes is unclear. The erythrocyte membrane plays a key role in the erythrocyte mechanical properties and survival. The aim of the present work is to uncover erythrocyte membrane proteins whose expression could be altered in CKD. The erythrocyte membrane subproteome was analyzed by a non-biased approach where the whole set of proteins was simultaneously investigated by 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis without preselection of potential targets. Proteins significantly altered in CKD were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and results validation was performed by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Nine differentially expressed spots among healthy individuals, non-dialyzed CKD and erythropoietin/dialysis-treated CKD patients were identified by MS/MS corresponding to 5 proteins (beta-adducin, HSP71/72, tropomodulin-1, ezrin, and radixin). Ezrin and radixin were higher in dialyzed CKD patients than in the other 2 groups. Beta-adducin was increased in CKD patients (dialyzed or not). Three spots were normalized in patients on the dialysis/erythropoietin combination compared with non-dialyzed CKD. Among these, a spot corresponding to tropomodulin 1, was found to be of higher abundance in non-dialyzed CKD patients compared with controls or dialyzed CKD. In conclusion, this study identifies changes in erythrocyte membrane proteins in CKD, which may be relevant for the pathogenesis of red cell abnormalities in uremia.

  1. Sodium nitrite-induced oxidative stress causes membrane damage, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and alters major metabolic pathways in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Fariheen Aisha; Ali, Shaikh Nisar; Mahmood, Riaz

    2015-10-01

    Nitrite salts are present as contaminants in drinking water and in the food and feed chain. In this work, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) on human erythrocytes was studied under in vitro conditions. Incubation of erythrocytes with 0.1-10.0 mM NaNO2 at 37 °C for 30 min resulted in dose dependent decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, total sulfhydryl and amino groups. It was accompanied by increase in hemoglobin oxidation and aggregation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and hydrogen peroxide levels suggesting the induction of oxidative stress. Activities of all major erythrocyte antioxidant defense enzymes were decreased in NaNO2-treated erythrocytes. The activities of enzymes of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were also compromised. However, there was a significant increase in acid phosphatase and also AMP deaminase, a marker of erythrocyte oxidative stress. Thus, the major metabolic pathways of cell were altered. Erythrocyte membrane damage was suggested by lowered activities of membrane bound enzymes and confirmed by electron microscopic images. These results show that NaNO2-induced oxidative stress causes hemoglobin denaturation and aggregation, weakens the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism, damages the cell membrane and also perturbs normal energy metabolism in erythrocytes. This nitrite-induced damage can reduce erythrocyte life span in the blood.

  2. Carotenoids inhibit lipid peroxidation and hemoglobin oxidation, but not the depletion of glutathione induced by ROS in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-03-18

    Despite the presence of endogenous antioxidants in erythrocytes, these cells are highly susceptible to oxidative damage and some exogenous antioxidants, such as carotenoids, are able to inhibit the pro-oxidant effect provided by reactive oxygen species. In this study, we evaluated the potential of carotenoids usually detected in human blood plasma (β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein, β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene) to prevent the oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Human erythrocytes were subjected to induced oxidative damage and the following biomarkers of oxidative stress were monitored: lipid peroxidation [induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) or by 2,2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH)] and AAPH-induced oxidation of hemoglobin and depletion of glutathione. When tBHP was used to induce lipid peroxidation, lycopene was the most efficient carotenoid (IC50=2.2 ± 0.4 μM), while lutein was the most efficient (IC50=2.5 ± 0.7 μM) when peroxyl radicals (ROO) were generated by AAPH. In relation to the hemoglobin oxidation induced by AAPH, β-carotene and zeaxanthin were the most efficient antioxidants (IC50=2.9 ± 0.3 μM and 2.9 ± 0.1 μM, respectively). Surprisingly β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene did not inhibit hemoglobin oxidation or lipid peroxidation when induced by AAPH, even at the highest tested concentration (3 μM). Additionally, the tested carotenoids did not prevent ROO-mediated GSH depletion and GSSG formation probably due to the lack of interaction between carotenoids (apolar) and glutathione (polar). Our study contributes with important insights that carotenoids may exert therapeutical potential to act as a natural antioxidant to prevent ROO-induced toxicity in human erythrocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Two glycoprotein populations of band 3 dimers are present in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Landolt-Marticorena, C; Charuk, J H; Reithmeier, R A

    1998-01-01

    The human erythrocyte Band 3 anion exchanger contains a single site of N-glycosylation that contains either a short complex oligosaccharide or an extended polylactosaminyl oligosaccharide. Approximately equal amounts of the different glycosylated forms of Band 3 are found in human red cells. As Band 3 exists predominantly as dimers, they may be uniform and consist of a subunit containing an extended oligosaccharide paired with a subunit containing a short oligosaccharide chain. Alternatively, Band 3 dimers may be comprised of subunits that either contain polylactosaminyl or short oligosaccharide chains. To distinguish between these two extremes, the ability of Band 3 membrane domain dimers to bind to immobilized tomato lectin, which specifically binds polylactosaminyl oligosaccharide, was tested. The dimeric membrane domain of Band 3 could be resolved into two fractions by tomato lectin chromatography. This shows that Band 3 dimers are not homogeneous and that two pools exist in red cells, some with a long polylactosaminyl oligosaccharide and the other with a short complex type. The amount of short chain form recovered in the unbound fraction was higher than expected for a random distribution of oligosaccharide chains on Band 3 dimers. Detergent extraction experiments showed that Band 3 glycoforms did not display a differential interaction with the cytoskeleton. The ability to separate Band 3 dimers into two glycoform populations suggests that subunit exchange between dimers does not occur in the membrane or in detergent solution. Furthermore, the results show that while one population of Band 3 dimers is processed to contain polylactosaminyl oligosaccharide, the other largely escapes this processing step.

  4. Mechanisms of C-peptide-mediated rescue of low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer P; Bowles, Elizabeth A; Gordon, Weston R; Ellsworth, Mary L; Stephenson, Alan H; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-03-01

    The circulating erythrocyte, by virtue of the regulated release of ATP in response to reduced oxygen (O2) tension, plays a key role in maintaining appropriate perfusion distribution to meet tissue needs. Erythrocytes from individuals with Type 2 diabetes (DM2) fail to release ATP in response to this stimulus. However, the administration of C-peptide and insulin at a 1:1 ratio was shown to restore this important physiological response in humans with DM2. To begin to investigate the mechanisms by which C-peptide influences low O2-induced ATP release, erythrocytes from healthy humans and humans with DM2 were exposed to reduced O2 in a thin-film tonometer, and ATP release under these conditions was compared with release during normoxia. We determined that 1) low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes is rescued by C-peptide in the presence and absence of insulin, 2) the signaling pathway activated by C-peptide in human erythrocytes involves PKC, as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and 3) inhibitors of cGMP degradation rescue low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes. These results provide support for the hypothesis that both PKC and sGC are components of a signaling pathway activated by C-peptide in human erythrocytes. In addition, since both C-peptide and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors rescue low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with DM2, their administration to humans with DM2 could aid in the treatment and/or prevention of the vascular disease associated with this condition.

  5. [Raman spectra of single human living erythrocyte with the effect of pH and serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Zheng-Chun; Jiao, Qing-Ze

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, a cell environment which mimicked the real body environment according to the concentration radio between serum albumin and hemoglobin was built, and the cell morphology, the membrane deformation capacity, and the structure of intracellular hemoglobin of single human living erythrocyte under the effect of pH and serum albumin were studied. It was found that at different suspension pH, the magnitude of variations in cell shape and membrane deformation capacity changes with the structural changes of the intracellular hemoglobin. At pH 4. 14, 4. 76 and 10. 18, the loss of helical structure for hemoglobin, exposing of the hydrophobic amino acid in the globin chains, and changing of the combination of heme and globin, would completely destroy the stability of hemoglobin's structure, which seriously changes RBC's morphology and membrane deformation capacity. While at pH 6. 51 and 7. 80, the Raman spectra of erythrocytes are found to have no such changes, indicating that the structure of intracellular hemoglobin was not varied, thus the cell morphology and membrane deformation capacity are quite close to the normal values. At pH 5. 49 and 8. 76, RBC's morphology and membrane deformation capacity have different degrees of variation, but the structure of intracellular hemoglobin has not changed, suggesting that the cell morphology and membrane deformation capacity may be reversible. The results suggest that in the suspension solution containing serum albumin, erythrocytes have better ability to regulate and control the variation of the extracellular pH. In summary, upon building an environment which contains the same concentration radio of serum albumin to hemoglobin in the blood, this work performed systematic studies on the effect of pH on human erythrocytes. It can not only help to solve the problems about the mechanism of the structural and functional changes of erythrocytes induced by environmental pH, but also elucidates the possible variation of

  6. Decreased calcium pump expression in human erythrocytes is connected to a minor haplotype in the ATP2B4 gene.

    PubMed

    Zámbó, Boglárka; Várady, György; Padányi, Rita; Szabó, Edit; Németh, Adrienn; Langó, Tamás; Enyedi, Ágnes; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2017-02-03

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases are key calcium exporter proteins in most tissues, and PMCA4b is the main calcium transporter in the human red blood cells (RBCs). In order to assess the expression level of PMCA4b, we have developed a flow cytometry and specific antibody binding method to quantitatively detect this protein in the erythrocyte membrane. Interestingly, we found several healthy volunteers showing significantly reduced expression of RBC-PMCA4b. Western blot analysis of isolated RBC membranes confirmed this observation, and indicated that there are no compensatory alterations in other PMCA isoforms. In addition, reduced PMCA4b levels correlated with a lower calcium extrusion capacity in these erythrocytes. When exploring the potential genetic background of the reduced PMCA4b levels, we found no missense mutations in the ATP2B4 coding regions, while a formerly unrecognized minor haplotype in the predicted second promoter region closely correlated with lower erythrocyte PMCA4b protein levels. In recent GWA studies, SNPs in this ATP2B4 haplotype have been linked to reduced mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations (MCHC), and to protection against malaria infection. Our data suggest that an altered regulation of gene expression is responsible for the reduced RBC-PMCA4b levels that is probably linked to the development of human disease-related phenotypes.

  7. Bio-inspired artemether-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles for effective control of malaria-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sidhaye, Aditi A; Bhuran, Kanchan C; Zambare, Sneha; Abubaker, Munna; Nirmalan, Niroshini; Singh, Kamalinder K

    2016-10-19

    The intra-erythrocytic development of the malarial parasite is dependent on active uptake of nutrients, including human serum albumin (HSA), into parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs). We have designed HSA-based nanoparticles as a potential drug-delivery option for antimalarials. Artemether-loaded nanoparticles (AANs) were designed and antimalarial activity evaluated in vitro/in vivo using Plasmodium falciparum/Plasmodium berghei species, respectively. Selective internalization of AAN into Plasmodium-infected RBCs in preference to healthy erythrocytes was observed using confocal imaging. In vitro studies showed 50% dose reduction for AAN as compared with drug-only controls to achieve IC50 levels of inhibition. The nanoparticles exhibited twofold higher peak drug concentrations in RBCs with antimalarial activity at 50% of therapeutic doses in P. bergei infected mice. Novel HSA-based nanoparticles offer safe and effective approach for selective targeting of antimalarial drugs.

  8. Effect of bacterial peptidoglycan on erythrocyte death and adhesion to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abed, Majed; Towhid, Syeda T; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Alesutan, Ioana; Götz, Friedrich; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian

    2013-05-01

    Peptidoglycans, bacterial wall components, have previously been shown to trigger eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes adhere to the vascular wall at least partially by interaction of erythrocytic phosphatidylserine with endothelial CXC chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16). The present study explored whether peptidoglycan exposure fosters the adhesion of erythrocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To this end, HUVEC were treated for 48 h with peptidoglycan (10 μg/ml) and CXCL16 abundance determined by confocal microscopy and FACS analysis. Moreover, human erythrocytes were exposed for 48 h to peptidoglycan (10 μg/ml) and phosphatidylserine exposure estimated from binding of fluorescent annexin-V, cell volume from forward scatter in FACS analysis and erythrocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) from trapping of labeled erythrocytes in a flow chamber. As a result, bacterial peptidoglycan exposure was followed by increased CXCL16 expression in HUVEC as well as erythrocyte shrinkage, phosphatidylserine exposure and adhesion to HUVEC under flow conditions at arterial shear rates. The adhesion was significantly attenuated but not abrogated in the presence of either, erythrocyte phosphatidylserine-coating annexin-V (5 μl/ml) or CXCL16 neutralizing antibody directed against endothelial CXCL16 (4 μg/ml). In conclusion, exposure to peptidoglycan increases endothelial CXCL16 expression and leads to eryptosis followed by phosphatidylserine- and CXCL16-mediated adhesion of eryptotic erythrocytes to vascular endothelial cells.

  9. Ex vivo encapsulation of dexamethasone sodium phosphate into human autologous erythrocytes using fully automated biomedical equipment.

    PubMed

    Mambrini, Giovanni; Mandolini, Marco; Rossi, Luigia; Pierigè, Francesca; Capogrossi, Giovanni; Salvati, Patricia; Serafini, Sonja; Benatti, Luca; Magnani, Mauro

    2017-01-30

    Erythrocyte-based drug delivery systems are emerging as potential new solutions for the release of drugs into the bloodstream. The aim of the present work was to assess the performance of a fully automated process (EDS) for the ex-vivo encapsulation of the pro-drug dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) into autologous erythrocytes in compliance with regulatory requirements. The loading method was based on reversible hypotonic hemolysis, which allows the opening of transient pores in the cell membrane to be crossed by DSP. The efficiency of encapsulation and the biochemical and physiological characteristics of the processed erythrocytes were investigated in blood samples from 34 healthy donors. It was found that the processed erythrocytes maintained their fundamental properties and the encapsulation process was reproducible. The EDS under study showed greater loading efficiency and reduced variability compared to previous EDS versions. Notably, these results were confirmed using blood samples from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients, 9.33±1.40 and 19.41±2.10mg of DSP (mean±SD, n=134) by using 62.5 and 125mg DSP loading quantities, respectively. These results support the use of the new EDS version 3.2.0 to investigate the effect of erythrocyte-delivered dexamethasone in regulatory trials in patients with AT.

  10. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity and indices of plasmatic oxidative damage after acute physical exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Berzosa, C; Gómez-Trullén, E M; Piedrafita, E; Cebrián, I; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Miana-Mena, F J; Fuentes-Broto, L; García, J J

    2011-06-01

    Optimal levels of membrane fluidity are essential for numerous cell functions including cell growth, solute transport and signal transduction. Since exercise enhances free radical production, our aim was to evaluate in healthy male subjects the effects of an acute bout of maximal and submaximal exercise on the erythrocyte membrane fluidity and its possible relation to the oxidative damage overproduction due to exercise. Subjects (n = 34) performed three cycloergometric tests: a continuous progressive exercise, a strenuous exercise until exhaustion and an acute bout of exercise at an intensity corresponding to 70% of maximal work capacity for 30 min. Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after these exercises. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HDA) concentrations and carbonyl content of plasmatic proteins were used as an index of lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. Exercise produced a dramatic drop in the erythrocyte membrane fluidity as compared to resting time, but this was not accompanied by significant changes in the plasmatic MDA and 4-HDA concentrations. The highest erythrocyte membrane rigidity was detected immediately after strenuous exercise until exhaustion was performed. Protein carbonyl levels were higher after exhaustive exercises than at rest. Continuous progressive and strenuous exercises until exhaustion, but not submaximal workload, resulted in a significant enhanced accumulation of carbonylated proteins in the plasma. These findings are consistent with the idea that exercise exaggerates oxidative damage, which may contribute, at least partially, to explain the rigidity in the membrane of the erythrocytes due to acute exercise.

  11. Cytoplasmic remodeling of erythrocyte raft lipids during infection by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C.; Fernandez-Pol, Sebastian; Chung, Paul H.; Prasanna Murthy, S. N.; Milne, Stephen B.; Salomao, Marcela; Brown, H. Alex; Lomasney, Jon W.; Mohandas, Narla

    2007-01-01

    Studies of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts in mature erythrocytes have facilitated identification of proteins that regulate formation of endovacuolar structures such as the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) induced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. However, analyses of raft lipids have remained elusive because detergents interfere with lipid detection. Here, we use primaquine to perturb the erythrocyte membrane and induce detergent-free buoyant vesicles, which are enriched in cholesterol and major raft proteins flotillin and stomatin and contain low levels of cytoskeleton, all characteristics of raft microdomains. Lipid mass spectrometry revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol are depleted in endovesicles while phosphoinositides are highly enriched, suggesting raft-based endovesiculation can be achieved by simple (non–receptor-mediated) mechanical perturbation of the erythrocyte plasma membrane and results in sorting of inner leaflet phospholipids. Live-cell imaging of lipid-specific protein probes showed that phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2) is highly concentrated in primaquine-induced vesicles, confirming that it is an erythrocyte raft lipid. However, the malarial PVM lacks PIP2, although another raft lipid, phosphatidylserine, is readily detected. Thus, different remodeling/sorting of cytoplasmic raft phospholipids may occur in distinct endovacuoles. Importantly, erythrocyte raft lipids recruited to the invasion junction by mechanical stimulation may be remodeled by the malaria parasite to establish blood-stage infection. PMID:17526861

  12. Effect of vitamin C, deferoxamine, quercetin and rutin against tert-butyl hydroperoxide oxidative damage in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krukoski, Daniel Witchmichen; Comar, Samuel Ricardo; Claro, Ligia Maria; Leonart, Maria Suely Soares; do Nascimento, Aguinaldo José

    2009-06-01

    The mature human erythrocyte, when submitted to oxidative stress, can demonstrate depletion of reduced glutathione, oxidation of the hemoglobin molecule and aggregation of complexes of iron close to the membrane. These can produce abnormalities in the erythrocyte membrane and hemolysis. The aim of this work was to study the antioxidative action of vitamin C (vit. C), deferroxamine (DFO) and the flavonoids quercetin and rutin in normal human erythrocytes, submitted to in vitro oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide ((t)BHP). Venous blood was collected in citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) solution, as anticoagulant, from healthy adult individuals after informed consent. The erythrocytes were resuspended in PBS to obtain 35% globular volume, and then submitted to the oxidative action of (t)BHP for up to 30 min, with or without previous incubation for 60 min with vit. C, DFO, quercetin and rutin. Decrease in the GSH concentration, G6-PD and GR activities, and increase in the methemoglobin and Heinz bodies (HB) formation, occurred with the increase in (t)BHP concentration. (t)BHP did not effect on the membrane proteins detected by SDS-PAGE. Quercetin, partially prevented the GSH decrease and the formation of HB, but did not prevent MetHb formation from oxidative damage by (t)BHP. Rutin, after (t)BHP induction, prevented the GSH decrease and the formation of HB. Vit. C, had no influence on the depletion of GSH, inhibited partially the metHb formation, and it protected GR, but not G6-PD from oxidative damage by (t)BHP. DFO partially inhibited the metHb formation and GSH decrease, but it did not protect GR and G6-PD from oxidative damage by (t)BHP. The results obtained suggest that vit. C, DFO and the flavonoids quercetin and rutin contribute to the decrease in the oxidative stress caused by (t)BHP.

  13. The human erythrocyte plasma membrane: a Rosetta Stone for decoding membrane-cytoskeleton structure.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Velia M

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian erythrocyte, or red blood cell (RBC), is a unique experiment of nature: a cell with no intracellular organelles, nucleus or transcellular cytoskeleton, and a plasma membrane with uniform structure across its entire surface. By virtue of these specialized properties, the RBC membrane has provided a template for discovery of the fundamental actin filament network machine of the membrane skeleton, now known to confer mechanical resilience, anchor membrane proteins, and organize membrane domains in all cells. This chapter provides a historical perspective and critical analysis of the biochemistry, structure, and physiological functions of this actin filament network in RBCs. The core units of this network are nodes of ~35-37 nm-long actin filaments, interconnected by long strands of (α1β1)₂-spectrin tetramers, forming a 2D isotropic lattice with quasi-hexagonal symmetry. Actin filament length and stability is critical for network formation, relying upon filament capping at both ends: tropomodulin-1 at pointed ends and αβ-adducin at barbed ends. Tropomodulin-1 capping is essential for precise filament lengths, and is enhanced by tropomyosin, which binds along the short actin filaments. αβ-adducin capping recruits spectrins to sites near barbed ends, promoting network formation. Accessory proteins, 4.1R and dematin, also promote spectrin binding to actin and, with αβ-adducin, link to membrane proteins, targeting actin nodes to the membrane. Dissection of the molecular organization within the RBC membrane skeleton is one of the paramount achievements of cell biological research in the past century. Future studies will reveal the structure and dynamics of actin filament capping, mechanisms of precise length regulation, and spectrin-actin lattice symmetry. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction of human and chick DNA repair functions in UV-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum-chick erythrocyte heterokaryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bootsma, D.; Keijzer, W.; Vander Veer, E.; Rainald, G.; De Weerd-Kastelein, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusion of chick erythrocytes with human primary fibroblasts results in the formation of heterokaryons in which the inactive chick nuclei become reactivated. The expression of chick DNA repair functions was investigated by the analysis of the DNA repair capacity after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of such heterokaryons obtained after fusion of chick erythrocytes with normal human or xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells of complementation groups A, B, C and D. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in normal human nuclei in these heterokaryons is suppressed during the first 2-4 days after fusion. The extent and duration of this suppression is positively correlated with the number of chick nuclei in the heterokaryons. Suppression is absent in heterokaryons obtained after fusion of chicken embryonic fibroblasts with XP cells (complementation group A and C). Restoration of DNA repair synthesis is found after fusion in XP nuclei of all complementation groups studied. It occurs rapidly in XP group A nuclei, starting one day after fusion and reaching near normal human levels after 5-8 days. In nuceli of the B, C and D group increased levels of UDS are found 5 days after fusion. At 8 days after fusion the UDS level is about 50% of that found in normal human nuclei. The pattern of UDS observed in the chick nuclei parallels that of the human counterpart in the fusion. In heterokaryons obtained after fusion of chick fibroblasts with XP group C cells UDS remains at the level of chick cells. These suggest that reactivation of chick erythrocyte nuclei results in expression of repair functions which are able to complement the defects in the XP complementation groups A, B, C and D.

  15. THE ACTION OF ENZYMES FROM CLOSTRIDIUM TERTIUM ON THE I ANTIGENIC DETERMINANT OF HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Donald M.; Kabat, Elvin A.; Rosenfield, Richard E.

    1963-01-01

    A method was described for the partial purification of beta galactosidase and beta glucosaminidase from Clostridium tertium culture supernatants. Treatment of erythrocytes with preparations containing both enzymes decreases their ability to react with anti-I cold agglutinins, and with Type XIV antipneumococcal horse serum. Erythrocytes of blood group A1 are altered more rapidly and extensively than are group O cells. The enzymatic treatment of stroma results in a decrease in ability to absorb anti-I agglutinins and the release of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine as monosaccharides. The data suggest that these two sugars may be structural units of the erythrocyte I determinant, but no direct evidence is available. PMID:14074383

  16. [Regulation of electrokinetic properties of human blood erythrocytes following exposure to emotional stressor].

    PubMed

    Matiushichev, V B; Shamratova, V G

    2003-01-01

    Using the factor analysis, we studied the influence of psychoemotional strain, experienced by students under taking examinations, on the electrophoretic mobility of their erythrocytes. Under stress condition, redistribution of shares of cells with different mobility occurs, directed to the maintenance of the optimal value of the index average level in the total pool of erythrocytes of an individual. Under stress, five factors, taken in different combinations, participate in the control of erythrokinetic properties: those of restriction of cell accumulation with abnormal mobility, and of the population quantity heterogeneity control, in addition to factors of total functional condition, emotional tension, and individual psychological steadiness of students before examination. The expression and character of stress influence on the state of erythrocyte population depend on the intensity of the functional load of the organism.

  17. [Pesticide detection in Costarican vegetables based on the inhibition of serum and erythrocytic human cholinesterases].

    PubMed

    Nevermann, Karl Schosinsky; Guzmán, Eugenia Quintana

    2004-12-01

    A simple and low cost method able to detect the presence of pesticides, organophosphates and carbamates based on the inhibition of serum and erythrocytic cholinesterases, was used in lettuce (Lactuca sativa), cilantro (Coriandum santivum) and celery (Apium graveolens) obtained from the Ferias del Agricultor from Valle Central of Costa Rica. The percentage inhibition of cholinesterases is related to the presence of plaguicide in the vegetable. Thirteen percent of the analyzed samples were positive for plaguicides using serum cholinesterase and 33% for erythrocytic cholinesterase. Washing and cooking the vegetables does not eliminate the presence of plaguicides but they lower slightly the concentration. Statistical evidence (p = 0.0001) indicates that erythrocytic cholinesterase has higher analytical sensitivity than serum cholinesterase. It is very important to establish the degree of contamination with pesticides in these agricultural products because they are exposed to direct contamination by fumigation, soil contamination and irrigation water, and are products that are often consumed without adequate cooking and washing.

  18. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  19. Glutamine and α-ketoglutarate as glutamate sources for glutathione synthesis in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Whillier, Stephney; Garcia, Barbara; Chapman, Bogdan E; Kuchel, Philip W; Raftos, Julia E

    2011-09-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an intracellular antioxidant synthesized from glutamate, cysteine and glycine. The human erythrocyte (red blood cell, RBC) requires a continuous supply of glutamate to prevent the limitation of GSH synthesis in the presence of sufficient cysteine, but the RBC membrane is almost impermeable to glutamate. As optimal GSH synthesis is important in diseases associated with oxidative stress, we compared the rate of synthesis using two potential glutamate substrates, α-ketoglutarate and glutamine. Both substrates traverse the RBC membrane rapidly relative to many other metabolites. In whole RBCs partially depleted of intracellular GSH and glutamate, 10 mm extracellular α-ketoglutarate, but not 10 mm glutamine, significantly increased the rate of GSH synthesis (0.85 ± 0.09 and 0.61 ± 0.18 μmol·(L RBC)(-1) ·min(-1), respectively) compared with 0.52 ± 0.09 μmol·(L RBC)(-1) ·min(-1) for RBCs without an external glutamate source. Mathematical modelling of the situation with 0.8 mm extracellular glutamine returned a rate of glutamate production of 0.36 μmol·(L RBC)(-1) ·min(-1), while the initial rate for 0.8 mM α-ketoglutarate was 0.97 μmol·(L RBC)(-1) ·min(-1). However, with normal plasma concentrations, the calculated rate of GSH synthesis was higher with glutamine than with α-ketoglutarate (0.31 and 0.25 μmol·(L RBC)(-1) ·min(-1), respectively), due to the substantially higher plasma concentration of glutamine. Thus, a potential protocol to maximize the rate of GSH synthesis would be to administer a cysteine precursor plus a source of α-ketoglutarate and/or glutamine.

  20. Biological Activity of Japanese Quince Extract and Its Interactions with Lipids, Erythrocyte Membrane, and Human Albumin.

    PubMed

    Strugała, Paulina; Cyboran-Mikołajczyk, Sylwia; Dudra, Anna; Mizgier, Paulina; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Olejniczak, Teresa; Gabrielska, Janina

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine in vitro biological activity of fruit ethanol extract from Chaenomeles speciosa (Sweet) Nakai (Japanese quince, JQ) and its important constituents (-)-epicatechin (EC) and chlorogenic acid (CA). The study also investigated the structural changes in phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, and erythrocyte membranes (RBC) induced by the extract. It was found that the extract effectively inhibits oxidation of RBC, induced by 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), and PC liposomes, induced by UVB radiation and AAPH. Furthermore, JQ extract to a significant degree inhibited the activity of the enzymes COX-1 and COX-2, involved in inflammatory reactions. The extract has more than 2 times greater activity in relation to COX-2 than COX-1 (selectivity ratio 0.48). JQ extract stimulated growth of the beneficial intestinal bacteria Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum. In the fluorimetric method by means of the probes Laurdan, DPH and TMA-DPH, and (1)H-NMR, we examined the structural changes induced by JQ and its EC and CA components. The results show that JQ and its components induce a considerable increase of the packing order of the polar heads of lipids with a slight decrease in mobility of the acyl chains. Lipid membrane rigidification could hinder the diffusion of free radicals, resulting in inhibition of oxidative damage induced by physicochemical agents. JQ extract has the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of human serum albumin through static quenching. This report thus could be of huge significance in the food industry, pharmacology, and clinical medicine.

  1. The orientation of eosin-5-maleimide on human erythrocyte band 3 measured by fluorescence polarization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blackman, S M; Cobb, C E; Beth, A H; Piston, D W

    1996-07-01

    The dominant motional mode for membrane proteins is uniaxial rotational diffusion about the membrane normal axis, and investigations of their rotational dynamics can yield insight into both the oligomeric state of the protein and its interactions with other proteins such as the cytoskeleton. However, results from the spectroscopic methods used to study these dynamics are dependent on the orientation of the probe relative to the axis of motion. We have employed polarized fluorescence confocal microscopy to measure the orientation of eosin-5-maleimide covalently reacted with Lys-430 of human erythrocyte band 3. Steady-state polarized fluorescence images showed distinct intensity patterns, which were fit to an orientation distribution of the eosin absorption and emission dipoles relative to the membrane normal axis. This orientation was found to be unchanged by trypsin treatment, which cleaves band 3 between the integral membrane domain and the cytoskeleton-attached domain. this result suggests that phosphorescence anisotropy changes observed after trypsin treatment are due to a rotational constraint change rather than a reorientation of eosin. By coupling time-resolved prompt fluorescence anisotropy with confocal microscopy, we calculated the expected amplitudes of the e-Dt and e-4Dt terms from the uniaxial rotational diffusion model and found that the e-4Dt term should dominate the anisotropy decay. Delayed fluorescence and phosphorescence anisotropy decays of control and trypsin-treated band 3 in ghosts, analyzed as multiple uniaxially rotating populations using the amplitudes predicted by confocal microscopy, were consistent with three motional species with uniaxial correlation times ranging from 7 microseconds to 1.4 ms.

  2. Comparative study of the effect of BPA and its selected analogues on hemoglobin oxidation, morphological alterations and hemolytic changes in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maćczak, Aneta; Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to provoke many deleterious impacts on human health, and thus it is now successively substituted by BPA analogues, whose effects have been poorly investigated. Up to now, only one study has been realized to assess the effect of BPA on human erythrocytes, which showed its significant hemolytic and oxidative potential. Moreover, no study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of BPA analogues on red blood cells. The purpose of the present study was to compare the impact of BPA and its selected analogues such as bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on hemolytic and morphological changes and hemoglobin oxidation (methemoglobin formation) of human erythrocytes. The erythrocytes were incubated with different bisphenols concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 500μg/ml for 1, 4 and 24h. The compounds examined caused hemolysis in human erythrocytes with BPAF exhibiting the strongest effect. All bisphenols examined caused methemoglobin formation with BPA inducing the strongest oxidative potential. Flow cytometry analysis showed that all bisphenols (excluding BPS) induced significant changes in erythrocytes size. Changes in red blood cells shape were conducted using phase contrast microscopy. It was noticed that BPA and BPAF induced echinocytosis, BPF caused stomatocytosis, while BPS did not provoke significant changes in shape of red blood cells. Generally, the results showed that BPS, which is the main substituent of bisphenol A in polymers and thermal paper production, exhibited significantly lower disturbance of erythrocyte functions than BPA.

  3. Chemical activation of a high-affinity glutamate transporter in human erythrocytes and its implications for malaria-parasite-induced glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Winterberg, Markus; Rajendran, Esther; Baumeister, Stefan; Bietz, Sven; Kirk, Kiaran; Lingelbach, Klaus

    2012-04-12

    Human erythrocytes have a low basal permeability to L-glutamate and are not known to have a functional glutamate transporter. Here, treatment of human erythrocytes with arsenite was shown to induce the uptake of L-glutamate and D-aspartate, but not that of D-glutamate or L-alanine. The majority of the arsenite-induced L-glutamate influx was via a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent system showing characteristics of members of the "excitatory amino acid transporter" (EAAT) family. Western blots and immunofluorescence assays revealed the presence of a member of this family, EAAT3, on the erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum take up glutamate from the extracellular environment. Although the majority of uptake is via a low-affinity Na(+)-independent pathway there is, in addition, a high-affinity uptake component, raising the possibility that the parasite activates the host cell glutamate transporter.

  4. Analysis of density and epitopes of D antigen on the surface of erythrocytes from DEL phenotypic individuals carrying the RHD1227A allele.

    PubMed

    Gu, Juan; Sun, An-Yuan; Wang, Xue-Dong; Shao, Chao-Peng; Li, Zheng; Huang, Li-Hua; Pan, Zhao-Lin; Wang, Qing-Ping; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2014-04-01

    The characteristics of the D antigen are important as they influence the immunogenicity of D variant cells. Several studies on antigenic sites have been reported in normal D positive, weak D and partial D cases, including a comprehensive analysis of DEL types in Caucasians. The aim of this study was to assess D antigen density and epitopes on the erythrocyte surface of Asian type DEL phenotypic individuals carrying the RHD1227A allele in the Chinese population. A total of 154 DEL phenotypic individuals carrying the RHD1227A allele were identified through adsorption and elution tests and polymerase chain reaction analysis with sequence-specific primers in the Chinese population. D antigen density on the erythrocyte surface of these individuals was detected using a flow cytometric method. An erythrocyte sample with known D antigen density was used as a standard. Blood samples from D-negative and D-positive individuals were used as controls. In addition, D antigen epitopes on the erythrocyte surface of DEL individuals carrying the RHD1227A allele were investigated with 18 monoclonal anti-D antibodies specific for different D antigen epitopes. The means of the median fluorescence intensity of D antigen on the erythrocyte membrane surface of D-negative, D-positive and DEL individuals were 2.14±0.25, 193.61±11.43 and 2.45±0.82, respectively. The DEL samples were estimated to have approximately 22 D antigens per cell. The samples from all 154 DEL individuals reacted positively with 18 monoclonal anti-D antibodies specific for different D antigen epitopes. In this study, D antigen density on the erythrocyte surface of DEL individuals carrying the RHD1227A allele was extremely low, there being only very few antigenic molecules per cell, but the D antigen epitopes were grossly complete.

  5. The Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion Ligand Pfrh4 as a Target of Functional and Protective Human Antibodies against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, Linda; Richards, Jack S.; Fowkes, Freya J. I.; Wilson, Danny W.; Chokejindachai, Watcharee; Barry, Alyssa E.; Tham, Wai-Hong; Stubbs, Janine; Langer, Christine; Donelson, John; Michon, Pascal; Tavul, Livingstone; Crabb, Brendan S.; Siba, Peter M.; Cowman, Alan F.; Mueller, Ivo; Beeson, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acquired antibodies are important in human immunity to malaria, but key targets remain largely unknown. Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding-homologue-4 (PfRh4) is important for invasion of human erythrocytes and may therefore be a target of protective immunity. Methods IgG and IgG subclass-specific responses against different regions of PfRh4 were determined in a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Human PfRh4 antibodies were tested for functional invasion-inhibitory activity, and expression of PfRh4 by P. falciparum isolates and sequence polymorphisms were determined. Results Antibodies to PfRh4 were acquired by children exposed to P. falciparum malaria, were predominantly comprised of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, and were associated with increasing age and active parasitemia. High levels of antibodies, particularly IgG3, were strongly predictive of protection against clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia. Human affinity-purified antibodies to the binding region of PfRh4 effectively inhibited erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and antibody levels in protected children were at functionally-active concentrations. Although expression of PfRh4 can vary, PfRh4 protein was expressed by most isolates derived from the cohort and showed limited sequence polymorphism. Conclusions Evidence suggests that PfRh4 is a target of antibodies that contribute to protective immunity to malaria by inhibiting erythrocyte invasion and preventing high density parasitemia. These findings advance our understanding of the targets and mechanisms of human immunity and evaluating the potential of PfRh4 as a component of candidate malaria vaccines. PMID:23028883

  6. Enhancement of (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity of human erythrocyte membranes by hemolysis in isosmotic imidazole buffer. I. General properties of variously prepared membranes and the mechanism of the isosmotic imidazole effect.

    PubMed

    Farrance, M L; Vincenzi, F F

    1977-11-15

    1. Membranes prepared from human erythrocytes hemolyzed in isosmotic (310 imosM) imidazole buffer, pH 7.4, show enhanced and stabilized (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity compared with membranes prepared from erythrocytes hemolyzed in hypotonic (20 imosM) phosphate or imidazole buffer, pH 7.4. 2. Exposure of intact erythrocytes or well-washed erythrocyte membranes to isosmotic imidazole does not cause enhanced (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity. 3. Exposure of erythrocyte membranes, in the presence of isosmotic imidazole, to the supernatant of erythrocyte hemolysis or to a partially purified endogenous (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activator, promotes enhanced (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity. Under appropriate conditions, NaCl can be shown to substitute for imidazole. The results demonstrate that imidazole does not act directly on the erythrocyte membrane but rather by promoting interaction between an endogenous (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activator and the erythrocyte membrane.

  7. Flow behavior of erythrocytes in microvessels and glass capillaries: effects of erythrocyte deformation and erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Soutani, M; Maeda, N

    1996-01-01

    Flow behavior of erythrocytes in microvessels and glass capillaries with an inner diameter of 10-50 microns was compared in relation to erythrocyte deformation and erythrocyte aggregation. This study was focused on the formation of a marginal cell-free layer, and the thickness was determined using an image processor. Human erythrocytes were perfused through a part of microvascular networks isolated from rabbit mesentery and through glass capillaries. Erythrocyte deformability was modified by treating erythrocytes with diamide, diazene-dicarboxylic acid bis[N,N-dimethylamide], and erythrocyte aggregation was accelerated by adding dextran (with a molecular weight of 70,400) to the perfusion medium. The thickness of the cell-free layer increased with an increase of the inner diameter of flow channel, with lowering the hematocrit, and with increasing the flow velocity of erythrocytes, in both microvessels and glass capillaries. Furthermore, the thickness of cell-free layer decreased with decreasing erythrocyte deformability, while it increased with accelerating erythrocyte aggregation. However, the alteration of the cell-free layer in response to the changes of these hemorheological conditions was more sensitive in microvessels than in glass capillaries. The present study concludes that flow behavior of erythrocytes in microvessels is qualitatively similar to, but quantitatively different from those in glass capillaries, as far as evaluated by the change of the thickness of the marginal cell-free layer.

  8. Dematin, a human erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, is a substrate for a recombinant FIKK kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gabriel S; Bailey, Scott

    2013-09-01

    P. falciparum causes the most deadly form of malaria, resulting from the adherence of infected red blood cells to blood vessels. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite secretes a large number of proteins into the host erythrocyte. The secretion of a 20-member family of protein kinases known as FIKK kinases, after a conserved Phe-Ile-Lys-Lys sequence motif, is unique to P. falciparum. Identification of physiological substrates of these kinases may provide perspective on the importance of FIKK kinase activity to P. falciparum virulence. We demonstrate, for the first time, the heterologous expression and purification of a FIKK kinase (PfFk4.1, PFD1165w). The recombinant kinase is active against general substrates and phosphorylates itself. Having demonstrated kinase activity, we incubated recombinant Fk4.1 with parasite and human erythrocyte lysates. No parasite-derived substrates were identified. However, treatment of erythrocyte ghosts shows that the FIKK kinase Fk4.1 phosphorylates dematin, a cytoskeletal protein found at the red blood cell spectrin-actin junction.

  9. On the mechanism of ATP-induced shape changes in the human erythrocyte membranes: the role of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Birchmeier, W; Singer, SJ

    1977-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Sheetz, M. and S.J. Singer. 1977. J Cell Biol. 73:638-646) it was shown that erythrocyte ghosts undergo pronounced shape changes in the presence of mg-ATP. The biochemical effects of the action of ATP are herein examined. The biochemical effects of the action of ATP are herein examined. Phosphorylation by ATP of spectrin component 2 of the erythrocyte membrane is known to occur. We have shown that it is only membrane protein that is significantly phosphorylated under the conditions where the shape changes are produced. The extent of this phosphorylation rises with increasing ATP concentration, reaching nearly 1 mol phosphoryle group per mole of component 2 at 8mM ATP. Most of this phosphorylation appears to occur at a single site on the protein molecule, according to cyanogen bromide peptide cleavage experiments. The degree of phosphorylation of component 2 is apparently also regulated by a membrane-bound protein phosphatase. This activity can be demonstrated in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from intact cells prelabeled with [(32)P]phosphate. In addition to the phosphorylation of component 2, some phosphorylation of lipids, mainly of phosphatidylinositol, is also known to occur. The ghost shape changes are, however, shown to be correlated with the degree of phosphorylation of component 2. In such experiment, the incorporation of exogenous phosphatases into ghosts reversed the shape changes produced by ATP, or by the membrane-intercalating drug chlorpromazine. The results obtained in this and the preceding paper are consistent with the proposal that the erythrocyte membrane possesses kinase and phosphates activities which produce phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of a specific site on spectrin component 2 molecules; the steady-state level of this phosphorylation regulates the structural state of the spectrin complex on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane, which in turn exerts an important control on the shape of the cell. PMID:194904

  10. Radiographic contrast media alterate the localization of actin/band4.9 in the membrane cytoskeleton of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Franke, R P; Scharnweber, T; Fuhrmann, R; Mrowietz, C; Wenzel, F; Krüger, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    Different radiographic contrast media (RCM) were shown to induce morphological changes of blood cells (e.g. erythrocytes or thrombocytes) and endothelial cells. The echinocytic shape change of erythrocytes, particularly, affords alterations of the membrane cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton plays a crucial role for the shape and deformability of the red blood cell. Disruption of the interaction between components of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton may cause a loss of structural and functional integrity of the membrane. In this study band4.9 and actin as components of the cytoskeletal junctional complex were examined in human erythrocytes after suspension in autologous plasma or in plasma RCM mixtures (30% v/v Iodixanol-320 or Iopromide-370) followed by a successive double staining with TRITC-/FITC-coupled monoclonal antibodies. After adding Iopromide-370 to the plasma in practically none of the cells the rounded conformation of the membrane cytoskeleton - as it appeared in cells suspended in autologous plasma - was found. In addition, Iopromide-370 induced thin lines and coarse knob-like structures of band4.9 at the cell periphery while most cell centers were devoid of band4.9, and a box-like arrangement of bands of band4.9. A dissociation between colours red (actin) and green (band4.9) occurred as well. In contrast, erythrocytes suspended in a plasma/Iodixanol-320 mixture showed a membrane cytoskeleton comparable to cells suspended in autologous plasma, Similar results were found with respect to the distribution of actin. This study revealed for the first time RCM-dependent differences in band4.9 activities as possible pathophysiological mechanism for the chemotoxicity of radiographic contrast media.

  11. Effect of copper-hydroquinone complex on oxidative stress-related parameters in human erythrocytes (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chandan; Mitra, Prasanta Kumar; Saha, Shyamaprasad; Nayak, Chittaranjan; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2009-02-01

    The effect of in vitro exposure of human erythrocytes to micromolar concentrations of hydroquinone and copper simultaneously on oxidative status-related biochemical parameters was studied. Hydroquinone is a component of cigarette smoke and serum copper level is increased in smokers. Copper forms a complex with hydroquinone and enhances its auto-oxidation to benzoquinone which covalently binds to sulfhydryl group containing compounds like reduced glutathione. In this study, copper increased H(2)O(2) production by hydroquinone. Hydroquinone either alone or in the presence of copper produced a decrease of reduced glutathione level without altering methemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte lipid peroxidation. Catalase inhibition by sodium azide depleted reduced glutathione level further. Copper-hydroquinone complex mediated glutathione depletion in the catalase containing RBC was not decreased by antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene. From the known facts and above findings, it is suggested that depletion of reduced glutathione by hydroquinone in the presence of copper in catalase active RBC may be due to the formation of 1, 4 benzoquinone adduct of reduced glutathione and to some extent due to binding of copper to the thiol group of reduced glutathione rather than conversion to oxidized glutathione via reactive oxygen species. Depletion of reduced glutathione by N-ethylmaleimide pretreatment followed by copper-hydroquinone treatment had no effect on methemoglobin level or lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, copper-hydroquinone complex did not increase erythrocyte susceptibility to oxidative stress. This suggests hydroquinone in the presence of copper does not contribute to erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation seen in smokers. Criteria for ideal antioxidant supplementation in smokers were suggested.

  12. Expression, purification, and characterization of the functional dimeric cytoplasmic domain of human erythrocyte band 3 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. C.; Badylak, J. A.; Lux, S. E.; Moriyama, R.; Dixon, J. E.; Low, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of the human erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3 (cdb3), contains binding sites for hemoglobin, several glycolytic enzymes, band 4.1, band 4.2, and ankyrin, and constitutes the major linkage between the membrane skeleton and the membrane. Although erythrocyte cdb3 has been partially purified from proteolyzed red blood cells, further separation of the water-soluble 43-kDa and 41-kDa proteolytic fragments has never been achieved. In order to obtain pure cdb3 for crystallization and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we constructed an expression plasmid that has a tandemly linked T7 promoter placed upstream of the N-terminal 379 amino acids of the erythrocyte band 3 gene. Comparison of several Escherichia coli strains led to the selection of the BL21 (DE3) strain containing the pLysS plasmid as the best host for efficient production of cdb3. About 10 mg of recombinant cdb3 can be easily purified from 4 L of E. coli culture in two simple steps. Comparison of cdb3 released from the red blood cell by proteolysis with recombinant cdb3 reveals that both have the same N-terminal sequence, secondary structure, and pH-dependent conformational change. The purified recombinant cdb3 is also a soluble stable dimer with the same Stokes radius as erythrocyte cdb3. The affinities of the two forms of cdb3 for ankyrin are essentially identical; however, recombinant cdb3 with its unblocked N-terminus exhibits a slightly lower affinity for aldolase. PMID:1304397

  13. Comparison of urinary monitoring, faecal monitoring and erythrocyte analysis of stable isotope labels to determine magnesium absorption in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Torsten; Walczyk, Thomas; Davidsson, Lena; Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Klingbeil, Patrick; Vogl, Jochen; Hurrell, Richard F

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated urinary monitoring and erythrocyte analysis to determine Mg absorption in human subjects as alternatives to the conventional technique of faecal monitoring by stable-isotope techniques. Ten healthy adults received 2.2 mmol (25)Mg in water, together with wheat bread, followed 15 min later by intravenous injection of 0.6 mmol (26)Mg (day 1). Brilliant blue and Yb (given on day 0 and day 1 respectively) served as qualitative and quantitative faecal markers. Urine was collected for 6 d after test meal intake. Complete collections of faeces were made until excretion of the second brilliant blue marker (given on day 7). Mg isotope ratios were determined by thermal ionisation-MS in urine and faeces and by inductively coupled plasma-MS in erythrocytes. Absorption was determined based on: (1) 6 d urine pools; (2) 24 h urine pools (collected 22-46 h after test meal intake); (3) erythrocytes from a blood sample drawn on day 14; (4) complete 6 d faecal pools; (5) faecal pools based on the first three consecutive stools after excretion of the first brilliant blue marker. Differences in mean Mg absorption (42 44 %) were statistically insignificant between techniques, except when based on 6 d urine pools for which the value was significantly lower (33 (sd 7) %, P=0.0003, ANOVA). The results indicate that Mg absorption can be determined from 24 h urine pools or erythrocytes obtained 14 d after test meal intake, an alternative method to the more time-consuming and labour-intense faecal monitoring. The choice of technique depends on practical and financial considerations.

  14. Enhanced erythrocyte suspension layer stability achieved by surface tension lowering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, S. N.; Snyder, R. S.; Absolom, D. R.; Van Oss, C. J.; Neumann, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with a fractionation procedure involving the separation of particles, a dilute suspension of these particles in a liquid is carefully layered on a dense liquid. Under ideal conditions, the suspension forms a zone of finite thickness with a 'sharp' interface between the suspension layer and the supporting liquid. Under an applied field, e.g., gravitational or electrical, the particles in the suspension layer migrate to form different layers according to their size and/or density or according to their electrophoretic mobilities. However, in many cases the ideal conditions necessary for the fractionation process are not obtained. Many studies have been conducted to explore the reasons for suspension layer 'instability'. The present investigation represents an extension of a study conducted by Omenyi et al. (1981). An electrostatic repulsion-van der Waals mechanism was used to study the stability of fixed erythrocyte suspensions layered on a D2O cushion.

  15. Enhanced erythrocyte suspension layer stability achieved by surface tension lowering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, S. N.; Snyder, R. S.; Absolom, D. R.; Van Oss, C. J.; Neumann, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with a fractionation procedure involving the separation of particles, a dilute suspension of these particles in a liquid is carefully layered on a dense liquid. Under ideal conditions, the suspension forms a zone of finite thickness with a 'sharp' interface between the suspension layer and the supporting liquid. Under an applied field, e.g., gravitational or electrical, the particles in the suspension layer migrate to form different layers according to their size and/or density or according to their electrophoretic mobilities. However, in many cases the ideal conditions necessary for the fractionation process are not obtained. Many studies have been conducted to explore the reasons for suspension layer 'instability'. The present investigation represents an extension of a study conducted by Omenyi et al. (1981). An electrostatic repulsion-van der Waals mechanism was used to study the stability of fixed erythrocyte suspensions layered on a D2O cushion.

  16. Binding specificities of eight monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A - studies with M/sup c/M, and M/sub k/En(UK) variant human erythrocytes and M- and MN/sup V/-type chimpanzee erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, W.L.; Langlois, R.G.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1984-12-01

    Four newly derived mouse monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A are described. Three of these antibodies bind preferentially to the N form of glycophorin A; the fourth recognizes a shared determinant of the M and N forms. All four antibodies are directed toward the 39 amino acid, amino-terminal portion of the protein, and the N-specific antibodies require for binding the presence of N-acetyl-neuraminic acid on the glycosidically linked oligosaccharides. Cross-reaction of the N-specific antibodies to homozygous MM erythrocytes appears to result from binding to glycophorin B. In addition, these antibodies together with four previously reported glycophorin monoclonal antibodies, including two that specifically recognize the M form of glycophorin A, were tested for binding to M/sup c/M and M/sup k/En(UK) variant human erythrocytes. Results obtained for five of the six M- or N-specific monoclonal antibodies point to the general immunodominance of the amino-terminal serine-leucine polymorphism and the requirement for sialic acid. The epitopes for all three N-specific monoclonal antibodies include the amino terminal leucine that occurs in the N form of glycophorin A and may also include the glutamic acid that occurs at position five. Their studies support the proposed Lepore-type glycophorin A-B hybrid gene rearrangement for the En(UK) allele found in the English En(a-) family. The data also confirm the expression of the M-like glycoprotein on chimpanzee erythrocytes and the presence of a human glycophorin B-like antigen on the MN/sup V/-type cells.

  17. Seasonal variations in the responses of glycolytic intermediates of human erythrocytes to acute cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, H.; Yahata, T.; Yamashita, K.; Kuroshima, A.

    1988-03-01

    Seven male students were studied to observe the effects of acute cold exposure (at 10°C for 60 min) on erythrocyte concentrations of glycolytic intermediates in summer and in winter. The subjects shivered slightly but frankly in both experiments. Significant decreases were observed in the concentrations of pyruvate and lactate during body cooling in summer, but not in winter. The lactate concentration remained significantly reduced 15 min after cold exposure. After 60 min of cold exposure in summer, a negative crossover point appeared to exist between phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate and erythrocyte pyruvate kinase activity showed a significant decrease. No seasonal difference was observed in the initial control values of the intermediates measured. From these results and the fact that glucose, pyruvate and lactate are evenly distributed between erythrocytes and plasma, it is likely that erythrocytes and skeletal muscles need less fuel substrate, glucose during cold exposure in winter than in summer, suggesting that an increased economy of energy for homeostasis is achieved.

  18. Effect of calcium on the hemolytic activity of Stichodactyla helianthus toxin sticholysin II on human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Celedón, Gloria; González, Gustavo; Lissi, Eduardo; Cerda, Tania; Martinez, Diana; Soto, Carmen; Pupo, Mario; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, Maria E; Alvarez, Carlos

    2009-11-01

    Sticholysin II (St II) is a toxin from the sea anemona Stichodactyla helianthus that produces erythrocytes lysis at low concentration and its activity depends on the presence of calcium. Calcium may act modifying toxin interaction with erythrocyte membranes or activating cellular processes which may result in a modified St II lytic action. In this study we are reporting that, in the presence of external K(+), extracellular calcium decreased St II activity on erythrocytes. On the other hand an increase of intracellular calcium promotes Sty II lytic activity. The effect of intracellular calcium was specifically studied in relation to membrane lipid translocation elicited by scramblases and how this action influence St II lytic activity on erythrocytes. We used 0.5 mmol/L calcium and 10 mmol/L A23187, as calcium ionophore, for scramblases activation and found increased St II activity associated to increase of intracellular calcium. N-ethyl maleimide (activator) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (inhibitor) were used as scramblases modulators in the assays which produced an increase and a decrease of the calcium effect, respectively. Results reported suggest an improved St II membrane pore-forming capacity promoted by intracellular calcium associated to membrane phospholipids translocation.

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Fluoride on Na+,K+ ATPase Activity in Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    A, Shashi; G, Meenakshi

    2015-12-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the role of long-term consumption of excessive fluoride on electrolyte homeostasis and their transporting mechanisms in erythrocytes of subjects afflicted with dental and skeletal fluorosis. A total of 620 adult (20-50 years) Indian residents participated in this study: 258 men and 242 women exposed to high concentrations of fluoride and 120 age and gender-matched control subjects. Erythrocytes were isolated from blood samples, washed, and used for the estimation of intraerythrocyte sodium and potassium concentrations. Na+,K+ ATPase activity was determined spectrophotometrically from a ghost erythrocyte membrane prepared by osmotic lysis. Erythrocyte analytes were correlated with the water and serum fluoride concentrations by Pearson's bivariate correlation and regression analysis. Results indicated a significant increase in intraerythrocyte sodium (F=14306.265, P<0.0001) in subjects from endemic fluorosis study groups as compared to controls. A significant (P<0.05) positive correlation of intracellular sodium was found with water and serum fluoride concentrations. Mean concentration of intraerythrocytic potassium ions showed significant reduction (F=9136.318, P<0.0001) in subjects exposed to fluoride. A significant (P<0.05) negative correlation of potassium ions was noted with water and serum fluoride concentrations. Na+,K+ ATPase activity was significantly declined (F=1572.763, P<0.0001) in subjects exposed to fluoride. A significant (P<0.05) inverse relationship of Na+,K+ ATPase activity was revealed with water and serum fluoride concentrations.

  20. Analysis of radiofrequency energy stored in the altered shapes: Stomatocyte-echinocyte of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Sagrario; Sebastián, José Luis; Sancho, Miguel; Martínez, Genoveva

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the electromagnetic energy stored in stomatocyte, erythrocyte and echinocyte cells exposed to a linearly polarized electromagnetic plane wave at 900, 1800 and 2450MHz radiofrequency signals. This analysis can provide a better understanding of the order of appearance of altered shapes of erythrocytes (RBC) in the stomatocyte-echinocyte transition under radiofrequency exposure in terms of the deposited electromagnetic energy. For this purpose we use a realistic geometrical cell model based on parametric equations that allow for continuous transformations between normal erythrocytes and three stomatocyte subclasses with different degree of invagination and also between normal erythrocytes and echinocytes with an arbitrary number of spicules. We use a finite element technique with adaptive meshing for calculating the electromagnetic energy deposited on the different regions of the cell models. It is found that the echinocyte cell stores the minimum electromagnetic energy and therefore from an energetic point of view it would be the most stable and preferred cell state when this electromagnetic energy is the predominant energy component.

  1. Human Erythrocyte PIG-A Assay: An Easily Monitored Index of Gene Mutation Requiring Low Volume Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Stephen D.; Avlasevich, Svetlana L.; Bemis, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Yuhchyau; MacGregor, James T.

    2015-01-01

    This laboratory has previously described a method for scoring the incidence of rodent blood Pig-a mutant phenotype erythrocytes using immunomag-netic separation in conjunction with flow cytometric analysis (In Vivo MutaFlow®). The current work extends this approach to human blood. The frequencies of CD59- and CD55-negative reticulo-cytes (RETCD59−/CD55−) and erythrocytes (RBCCD59−/CD55−) seve as phenotypic reporters of PIG-A gene mutation. Immunomagnetic separation was found to provide an effective means of increasing the number of reticulocytes and erythro-cytes evaluated. Technical replicates were utilized to provide a sufficient number of cells for precise scoring while at the same time controlling for procedural accuracy by allowing comparison of replicate values. Cold whole blood samples could be held for at least one week without affecting reticulo-cyte, RETCD59−/CD55− or RBCCD59−/CD55− frequencies. Specimens from a total of 52 nonsmoking, self-reported healthy adult subjects were evaluated. The mean frequency of RETCD59−/CD55− and RBCCD592−/CD55− were 6.0 × 10−6 and 2.9 × 10−6, respectively. The difference is consistent with a modest selective pressure against mutant phenotype erythrocytes in the circulation, and suggests advantages of studying both populations of erythrocytes. Whereas intra-subject variability was low, inter-subject variability was relatively high, with RETCD59−/CD55− frequencies differing by more than 30-fold. There was an apparent correlation between age and mutant cell frequencies. Taken together, the results indicate that the frequency of human PIG-A mutant phenotype cells can be efficiently and reliably estimated using a labeling and analysis protocol that is well established for rodent-based studies. The applicability of the assay across species, its simplicity and statistical power, and the relatively non-invasive nature of the assay should benefit myriad research areas involving DNA damage

  2. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  3. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  4. Enzymatic methylation of band 3 anion transporter in intact human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, L.L.; Clarke, S.

    1987-01-13

    Band 3, the anion transport protein of erythrocyte membranes, is a major methyl-accepting substrate of the intracellular erythrocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase (S-adenosyl-L-methionine: protein-D-aspartate O-methyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.77). The localization of methylation sites in intact cells by analysis of proteolytic fragments indicated that sites were present in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain as well as the membranous C-terminal portion of the polypeptide. The amino acid residues that serve as carboxyl methylation sites of the erythrocyte anion transporter were also investigated. /sup 3/H-Methylated band 3 was purified from intact erythrocytes incubated with L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine and from trypsinized and lysed erythrocytes incubated with S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine. After proteolytic digestion with carboxypeptidase Y, D-aspartic acid beta-(/sup 3/H)methyl ester was isolated in low yields (9% and 1%, respectively) from each preparation. The bulk of the radioactivity was recovered as (/sup 3/H)methanol, and the amino acid residue(s) originally associated with these methyl groups could not be determined. No L-aspartic acid beta-(/sup 3/H)methyl ester or glutamyl gamma-(/sup 3/H)methyl ester was detected. The formation of D-aspartic acid beta-(/sup 3/H)methyl esters in this protein in intact cells resulted from protein carboxyl methyltransferase activity since it was inhibited by adenosine and homocysteine thiolactone, which increases the intracellular concentration of the potent product inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine, and cycloleucine, which prevents the formation of the substrate S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine.

  5. Glycophorin B is the erythrocyte receptor of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding ligand, EBL-1

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, D. C. Ghislaine; Cofie, Joann; Jiang, Lubin; Hartl, Daniel L.; Tracy, Erin; Kabat, Juraj; Mendoza, Laurence H.; Miller, Louis H.

    2009-01-01

    In the war against Plasmodium, humans have evolved to eliminate or modify proteins on the erythrocyte surface that serve as receptors for parasite invasion, such as the Duffy blood group, a receptor for Plasmodium vivax, and the Gerbich-negative modification of glycophorin C for Plasmodium falciparum. In turn, the parasite counters with expansion and diversification of ligand families. The high degree of polymorphism in glycophorin B found in malaria-endemic regions suggests that it also may be a receptor for Plasmodium, but, to date, none has been identified. We provide evidence from erythrocyte-binding that glycophorin B is a receptor for the P. falciparum protein EBL-1, a member of the Duffy-binding-like erythrocyte-binding protein (DBL-EBP) receptor family. The erythrocyte-binding domain, region 2 of EBL-1, expressed on CHO-K1 cells, bound glycophorin B+ but not glycophorin B-null erythrocytes. In addition, glycophorin B+ but not glycophorin B-null erythrocytes adsorbed native EBL-1 from the P. falciparum culture supernatants. Interestingly, the Efe pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have the highest gene frequency of glycophorin B-null in the world, raising the possibility that the DBL-EBP family may have expanded in response to the high frequency of glycophorin B-null in the population. PMID:19279206

  6. Glycophorin B is the erythrocyte receptor of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding ligand, EBL-1.

    PubMed

    Mayer, D C Ghislaine; Cofie, Joann; Jiang, Lubin; Hartl, Daniel L; Tracy, Erin; Kabat, Juraj; Mendoza, Laurence H; Miller, Louis H

    2009-03-31

    In the war against Plasmodium, humans have evolved to eliminate or modify proteins on the erythrocyte surface that serve as receptors for parasite invasion, such as the Duffy blood group, a receptor for Plasmodium vivax, and the Gerbich-negative modification of glycophorin C for Plasmodium falciparum. In turn, the parasite counters with expansion and diversification of ligand families. The high degree of polymorphism in glycophorin B found in malaria-endemic regions suggests that it also may be a receptor for Plasmodium, but, to date, none has been identified. We provide evidence from erythrocyte-binding that glycophorin B is a receptor for the P. falciparum protein EBL-1, a member of the Duffy-binding-like erythrocyte-binding protein (DBL-EBP) receptor family. The erythrocyte-binding domain, region 2 of EBL-1, expressed on CHO-K1 cells, bound glycophorin B(+) but not glycophorin B-null erythrocytes. In addition, glycophorin B(+) but not glycophorin B-null erythrocytes adsorbed native EBL-1 from the P. falciparum culture supernatants. Interestingly, the Efe pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have the highest gene frequency of glycophorin B-null in the world, raising the possibility that the DBL-EBP family may have expanded in response to the high frequency of glycophorin B-null in the population.

  7. Quantitative assessment of sensing and sequestration of spherocytic erythrocytes by the human spleen

    PubMed Central

    Buffet, Pierre A.; Deplaine, Guillaume; Perrot, Sylvie; Brousse, Valentine; Ndour, Alioune; Nguyen, Marie; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; David, Peter H.; Milon, Geneviève; Mohandas, Narla

    2012-01-01

    Splenic sequestration of RBCs with reduced surface area and cellular deformability has long been recognized as contributing to pathogenesis of several RBC disorders, including hereditary spherocytosis. However, the quantitative relationship between the extent of surface area loss and splenic entrapment remains to be defined. To address this issue, in the present study, we perfused ex vivo normal human spleens with RBCs displaying various degrees of surface area loss and monitored the kinetics of their splenic retention. Treatment with increasing concentrations of lysophosphatidylcholine resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of RBC surface area at constant volume, increased osmotic fragility, and decreased deformability. The degree of splenic retention of treated RBCs increased with increasing surface area loss. RBCs with a > 18% average surface area loss (> 27% reduced surface area-to-volume ratio) were rapidly and completely entrapped in the spleen. Surface-deficient RBCs appeared to undergo volume loss after repeated passages through the spleen and escape from splenic retention. The results of the present study for the first time define the critical extent of surface area loss leading to splenic entrapment and identify an adaptive volume regulation mechanism that allows spherocytic RBCs to prolong their life span in circulation. These results have significant implications for understanding the clinical heterogeneity of RBC membrane disorders. PMID:22510876

  8. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Leal Denis, M. Florencia; Alvarez, H. Ariel; Lauri, Natalia; Alvarez, Cora L.; Chara, Osvaldo; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs) the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe), interacting with P (purinergic) receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr), we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe. Methods and Treatments We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors. Results In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40–50% and swelling by 40–60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%. Analysis and Discussion Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop

  9. Regulation of Extracellular ATP in Human Erythrocytes Infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Schachter, Julieta; de Sá Pinheiro, Ana Acacia; Silva, Leandro de Souza; Verstraeten, Sandra Viviana; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Schwarzbaum, Pablo Julio

    2014-01-01

    In human erythrocytes (h-RBCs) various stimuli induce increases in [cAMP] that trigger ATP release. The resulting pattern of extracellular ATP accumulation (ATPe kinetics) depends on both ATP release and ATPe degradation by ectoATPase activity. In this study we evaluated ATPe kinetics from primary cultures of h-RBCs infected with P. falciparum at various stages of infection (ring, trophozoite and schizont stages). A “3V” mixture containing isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist), forskolin (adenylate kinase activator) and papaverine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was used to induce cAMP-dependent ATP release. ATPe kinetics of r-RBCs (ring-infected RBCs), t-RBCs (trophozoite-infected RBCs) and s-RBCs (schizont-infected RBCs) showed [ATPe] to peak acutely to a maximum value followed by a slower time dependent decrease. In all intraerythrocytic stages, values of ΔATP1 (difference between [ATPe] measured 1 min post-stimulus and basal [ATPe]) increased nonlinearly with parasitemia (from 2 to 12.5%). Under 3V exposure, t-RBCs at parasitemia 94% (t94-RBCs) showed 3.8-fold higher ΔATP1 values than in h-RBCs, indicative of upregulated ATP release. Pre-exposure to either 100 µM carbenoxolone, 100 nM mefloquine or 100 µM NPPB reduced ΔATP1 to 83–87% for h-RBCs and 63–74% for t94-RBCs. EctoATPase activity, assayed at both low nM concentrations (300–900 nM) and 500 µM exogenous ATPe concentrations increased approx. 400-fold in t94-RBCs, as compared to h-RBCs, while intracellular ATP concentrations of t94-RBCs were 65% that of h-RBCs. In t94-RBCs, production of nitric oxide (NO) was approx. 7-fold higher than in h-RBCs, and was partially inhibited by L-NAME pre-treatment. In media with L-NAME, ΔATP1 values were 2.7-times higher in h-RBCs and 4.2-times higher in t94-RBCs, than without L-NAME. Results suggest that P. falciparum infection of h-RBCs strongly activates ATP release via Pannexin 1 in these cells. Several processes partially counteracted ATPe accumulation

  10. Evidence for two asymmetric conformational states in the human erythrocyte sugar-transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, J E; Holman, G D; Chalkley, R A; Munday, K A

    1975-01-01

    6-O-methyl-, 6-O-propyl-, 6-O-pentyl- and 6-O-benzyl-D-galactose, and 6-O-methyl-, 6-O-propyl- and 6-O-pentyl-D-glucose inhibit the glucose-transport system of the human erythrocyte when added to the external medium. Penetration of 6-O-methyl-D-galactose is inhibited by D-glucose, suggesting that it is transported by the glucose-transport system, but the longer-chain 6-O-alkyl-D-galactoses penetrate by a slower D-glucose-insensitive route at rates proportional to their olive oil/water partition coefficients. 6-O-n-Propyl-D-glucose and 6-O-n-propyl-D-galactose do not significantly inhibit L-sorbose entry or D-glucose exit when present only on the inside of the cells whereas propyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, which also penetrates the membrane slowly by a glucose-insensitive route, only inhibits L-sorbose entry or D-glucose exit when present inside the cells, and not when on the outside. The 6-O-alkyl-D-galactoses, like the other nontransported C-4 and C-6 derivatives, maltose and 4,6-O-ethylidene-D-glucose, protect against fluorodinitrobenzene inactivation, whereas propyl beta-D-glucopyranoside stimulates the inactivation. Of the transported sugars tested, those modified at C-1, C-2 and C-3 enhance fluorodinitrobenzene inactivation, where those modified at C-4 and C-6 do not, but are inert or protect against inactivation. An asymmetric mechanism is proposed with two conformational states in which the sugar binds to the transport system so that C-4 and C-6 are in contact with the solvent on the outside and C-1 is in contact with the solvent on the inside of the cell. It is suggested that fluorodinitrobenzene reacts with the form of the transport system that binds sugars at the inner side of the membrane. An Appendix describes the theoretical basis of the experimental methods used for the determination of kinetic constants for non-permeating inhibitors. PMID:1156368

  11. Dielectric spectroscopy of single human erythrocytes at physiological ionic strength: dispersion of the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Gimsa, J; Müller, T; Schnelle, T; Fuhr, G

    1996-01-01

    Usually dielectrophoretic and electrorotation measurements are carried out at low ionic strength to reduce electrolysis and heat production. Such problems are minimized in microelectrode chambers. In a planar ultramicroelectrode chamber fabricated by semiconductor technology, we were able to measure the dielectric properties of human red blood cells in the frequency range from 2 kHz to 200 MHz up to physiological ion concentrations. At low ionic strength, red cells exhibit a typical electrorotation spectrum with an antifield rotation peak at low frequencies and a cofield rotation peak at higher ones. With increasing medium conductivity, both electrorotational peaks shift toward higher frequencies. The cofield peak becomes antifield for conductivities higher than 0.5 S/m. Because the polarizability of the external medium at these ionic strengths becomes similar to that of the cytoplasm, properties can be measured more sensitively. The critical dielectrophoretic frequencies were also determined. From our measurements, in the wide conductivity range from 2 mS/m to 1.5 S/m we propose a single-shell erythrocyte model. This pictures the cell as an oblate spheroid with a long semiaxis of 3.3 microns and an axial ratio of 1:2. Its membrane exhibits a capacitance of 0.997 x 10(-2) F/m2 and a specific conductance of 480 S/m2. The cytoplasmic parameters, a conductivity of 0.4 S/m at a dielectric constant of 212, disperse around 15 MHz to become 0.535 S/m and 50, respectively. We attribute this cytoplasmic dispersion to hemoglobin and cytoplasmic ion properties. In electrorotation measurements at about 60 MHz, an unexpectedly low rotation speed was observed. Around 180 MHz, the speed increased dramatically. By analysis of the electric chamber circuit properties, we were able to show that these effects are not due to cell polarization but are instead caused by a dramatic increase in the chamber field strength around 180 MHz. Although the chamber exhibits a resonance around 180

  12. Dielectric spectroscopy of single human erythrocytes at physiological ionic strength: dispersion of the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Gimsa, J; Müller, T; Schnelle, T; Fuhr, G

    1996-07-01

    Usually dielectrophoretic and electrorotation measurements are carried out at low ionic strength to reduce electrolysis and heat production. Such problems are minimized in microelectrode chambers. In a planar ultramicroelectrode chamber fabricated by semiconductor technology, we were able to measure the dielectric properties of human red blood cells in the frequency range from 2 kHz to 200 MHz up to physiological ion concentrations. At low ionic strength, red cells exhibit a typical electrorotation spectrum with an antifield rotation peak at low frequencies and a cofield rotation peak at higher ones. With increasing medium conductivity, both electrorotational peaks shift toward higher frequencies. The cofield peak becomes antifield for conductivities higher than 0.5 S/m. Because the polarizability of the external medium at these ionic strengths becomes similar to that of the cytoplasm, properties can be measured more sensitively. The critical dielectrophoretic frequencies were also determined. From our measurements, in the wide conductivity range from 2 mS/m to 1.5 S/m we propose a single-shell erythrocyte model. This pictures the cell as an oblate spheroid with a long semiaxis of 3.3 microns and an axial ratio of 1:2. Its membrane exhibits a capacitance of 0.997 x 10(-2) F/m2 and a specific conductance of 480 S/m2. The cytoplasmic parameters, a conductivity of 0.4 S/m at a dielectric constant of 212, disperse around 15 MHz to become 0.535 S/m and 50, respectively. We attribute this cytoplasmic dispersion to hemoglobin and cytoplasmic ion properties. In electrorotation measurements at about 60 MHz, an unexpectedly low rotation speed was observed. Around 180 MHz, the speed increased dramatically. By analysis of the electric chamber circuit properties, we were able to show that these effects are not due to cell polarization but are instead caused by a dramatic increase in the chamber field strength around 180 MHz. Although the chamber exhibits a resonance around 180

  13. Annotating N termini for the human proteome project: N termini and Nα-acetylation status differentiate stable cleaved protein species from degradation remnants in the human erythrocyte proteome.

    PubMed

    Lange, Philipp F; Huesgen, Pitter F; Nguyen, Karen; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-04-04

    A goal of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project is to identify all human protein species. With 3844 proteins annotated as "missing", this is challenging. Moreover, proteolytic processing generates new protein species with characteristic neo-N termini that are frequently accompanied by altered half-lives, function, interactions, and location. Enucleated and largely void of internal membranes and organelles, erythrocytes are simple yet proteomically challenging cells due to the high hemoglobin content and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations that impedes protein identification. Using the N-terminomics procedure TAILS, we identified 1369 human erythrocyte natural and neo-N-termini and 1234 proteins. Multiple semitryptic N-terminal peptides exhibited improved mass spectrometric identification properties versus the intact tryptic peptide enabling identification of 281 novel erythrocyte proteins and six missing proteins identified for the first time in the human proteome. With an improved bioinformatics workflow, we developed a new classification system and the Terminus Cluster Score. Thereby we described a new stabilizing N-end rule for processed protein termini, which discriminates novel protein species from degradation remnants, and identified protein domain hot spots susceptible to cleavage. Strikingly, 68% of the N-termini were within genome-encoded protein sequences, revealing alternative translation initiation sites, pervasive endoproteolytic processing, and stabilization of protein fragments in vivo. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier .

  14. Erythrocytes in human transplantation: effects of pretreatment with ABO group-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Dausset, J.; Legrand, L.; Barge, A.; Lawrence, H. S.; Converse, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Erythrocyte group antigens A and B can act as potent and group-specific transplantation antigens in man. ABO group-incompatible recipients pretreated with such antigens have rejected skin allografts obtained from donors incompatible for the same antigens in an accelerated (4-5 days) or white graft manner. Skin grafts applied to the same recipients from ABO-compatible donors were accorded first-set survival times. Intact erythrocyte suspensions and antigens isolated from hog (A substance) and horse (B substance) stomachs, were equally capable of inducing this type of allograft sensitivity. The latter observation broadens the spectrum of heterologous antigens capable of inducing allograft sensitivity in the mammalian host and provides a readily available, heat-stable, and water-soluble source of antigens for further studies of allograft rejection mechanisms in man. PMID:4877681

  15. Fine structural and cytochemical identification of microperoxisomes in developing human erythrocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Breton-Gorius, J.; Guichard, J.

    1975-01-01

    An alkaline diaminobenzidine (DAB) medium has been used to identify peroxidase activity in small granules (0.09 to 0.2 mu in diameter) present in all forms of maturing erythrocytic cells with the exception of erythrocytes. These granules, which were more frequent in proerythroblasts (from two to seven by thin section), were distinct from pleomorphic granules present in the close proximity to the Golgi apparatus. They were also distinct from ferritin molecules which were seen as aggregates in siderosomes of polychromatophilic erythroblasts. They often appeared in close association with the smooth membrane of the nuclear envelope. Optimal conditions for the visualization of these granules by incubation in alkaline DAB were obtained when the peroxidase activity of hemoglobin was reduced by addition of low concentrations of potassium cyanide. Lack of hydrogen peroxide in the incubation media completely inhibited the staining reaction of hemoglobin, while the positive reaction persisted in the granules. Aminotriazole in the incubation media prevented the staining of these organelles. These findings suggest that small granules seen in maturing erythroblasts contain catalase and that they correspond to microperoxisomes described in other tissues. The mechanism of their disappearance during reticulocyte maturation is unknown. The relationship between particulate catalase of erythroblasts and soluble erythrocytic catalase has not been elucidated. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Figs 6-8 Fig 9 Figs 10 and 11 Fig 12 PMID:49150

  16. Photoaffinity labeling of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter with /sup 4/H-labelled forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.F.; Edwards, B.M.; Morris, D.P.

    1986-05-01

    Forskolin, a potent activator of adenylate cyclase, is also known to inhibit glucose transport in a number of cells. The authors have investigated photoincorporation of (/sup 3/H)forskolin into erythrocyte membrane proteins using a technique they previously developed for photolabeling the erythrocyte glucose transporter with cytochalasin B (CB). A 30-40s irradiation of erythrocyte ghosts in the presence of (/sup 3/H)forskolin resulted in a concentration-dependent, covalent incorporation of radiolabel into all of the major membrane protein bands. However, most of the incorporation occurred in only three regions of the gel. Peak 1 was a sharp peak near the top of the gel in the region corresponding to spectrin, peak 2 appeared to be associated with band 3 (approx. 90kDa), and the third region labeled was between 41-60 kDa which corresponds to the region of the glucose transporter. This region appeared to contain several overlapping peaks with the largest incorporation of label occurring around 45 kDa in the area of red cell actin. When photolabeling was performed in the presence of 400 ..mu..M cytochalasin B (8.0 ..mu..M forskolin) the labeling in the 41-60 kDa region was totally inhibited while labeling of the 90 kDa peak was partially blocked. CB had no effect on the photolabeling of peak 1 by forskolin.

  17. Two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2012-01-04

    We present a two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for simulating the erythrocyte membrane. The proposed model possesses the key feature of combing the lipid bilayer and the erythrocyte cytoskeleton, thus showing both the fluidic behavior of the lipid bilayer and the elastic properties of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. In this model, three types of coarse-grained particles are introduced to represent clusters of lipid molecules, actin junctions, and band-3 complexes, respectively. The proposed model facilitates simulations that span large length scales (approximately micrometers) and timescales (approximately milliseconds). By tuning the interaction potential parameters, we were able to control the diffusivity and bending rigidity of the membrane model. We studied the membrane under shearing and found that at a low shear strain rate, the developed shear stress was due mainly to the spectrin network, whereas the viscosity of the lipid bilayer contributed to the resulting shear stress at higher strain rates. In addition, we investigated the effects of a reduced spectrin network connectivity on the shear modulus of the membrane.

  18. Disease-associated glycosylated molecular variants of human C-reactive protein activate complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes in tuberculosis and Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Waliza; Mukhopadhyay, Sumi; Habib, S K Hasan; Basu, Shyamasree; Saha, Bibhuti; Sen, Asish Kumar; Mandal, C N; Mandal, Chitra

    2009-12-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP), as a mediator of innate immunity, removed damaged cells by activating the classical complement pathway. Previous studies have successfully demonstrated that CRPs are differentially induced as glycosylated molecular variants in certain pathological conditions. Affinity-purified CRPs from two most prevalent diseases in India viz. tuberculosis (TB) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) have differential glycosylation in their sugar composition and linkages. As anemia is a common manifestation in TB and VL, we assessed the contributory role of glycosylated CRPs to influence hemolysis via CRP-complement-pathway as compared to healthy control subjects. Accordingly, the specific binding of glycosylated CRPs with erythrocytes was established by flow-cytometry and ELISA. Significantly, deglycosylated CRPs showed a 7-8-fold reduced binding with erythrocytes confirming the role of glycosylated moieties. Scatchard analysis revealed striking differences in the apparent binding constants (10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) and number of binding sites (10(6)-10(7)sites/erythrocyte) for CRP on patients' erythrocytes as compared to normal. Western blotting along with immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the presence of distinct molecular determinants on TB and VL erythrocytes specific to disease-associated CRP. Increased fragility, hydrophobicity and decreased rigidity of diseased-erythrocytes upon binding with glycosylated CRP suggested membrane damage. Finally, the erythrocyte-CRP binding was shown to activate the CRP-complement-cascade causing hemolysis, even at physiological concentration of CRP (10 microg/ml). Thus, it may be postulated that CRP have a protective role towards the clearance of damaged-erythrocytes in these two diseases.

  19. Further characterization of some heterophile agglutinins reacting with alkali-labile carbohydrate chains of human erythrocyte glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dahr, W; Uhlenbruck, G; Bird, G W

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the receptor sites for several agglutinins is characterized by hemagglutination inhibition assays. The inhibitory activity of human erythrocytes glycoproteins, from which sialic acid, sialic acid and galactose or alkali-labile oligosaccharides have been removed, is compared to the inhibitory effect of compounds with known structure. It is shown that the lectin from Arachis hypogea and anti-T bind to alkali-labile galactosyl-residues. Agglutinins from Bauhinia purpurea and variegata (non- or N-specific), Maclura aurantiaca, Iberis amara, sempervirens, umbellata hybrida and umbellata nana (M- or nonspecific), Moluccella laevis (A- plus N-specific), Helix pomatia, Helix aspersa, Helix lucorum and Caucasotachea atrolabiata interact with alkali-labile N-acetylgalactosamine. The results obtained with the anti-A agglutinins from various snails suggest that human erythrocyte glycoproteins contain, besides the alkali-labile tetrasaccharide, a peptide-linked sialyl-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-residue. The investigations do not allow a precise definition of the receptor sites for the lectins having M- or N-specificity.

  20. Mathematical modeling of electro-rotation spectra of small particles in liquid solutions: application to human erythrocyte aggregates.

    PubMed

    Zehe, A; Ramírez, A; Starostenko, O

    2004-02-01

    Electro-rotation can be used to determine the dielectric properties of cells, as well as to observe dynamic changes in both dielectric and morphological properties. Suspended biological cells and particles respond to alternating-field polarization by moving, deforming or rotating. While in linearly polarized alternating fields the particles are oriented along their axis of highest polarizability, in circularly polarized fields the axis of lowest polarizability aligns perpendicular to the plane of field rotation. Ellipsoidal models for cells are frequently applied, which include, beside sphere-shaped cells, also the limiting cases of rods and disks. Human erythrocyte cells, due to their particular shape, hardly resemble an ellipsoid. The additional effect of rouleaux formation with different numbers of aggregations suggests a model of circular cylinders of variable length. In the present study, the induced dipole moment of short cylinders was calculated and applied to rouleaux of human erythrocytes, which move freely in a suspending conductive medium under the effect of a rotating external field. Electro-rotation torque spectra are calculated for such aggregations of different length. Both the maximum rotation speeds and the peak frequencies of the torque are found to depend clearly on the size of the rouleaux. While the rotation speed grows with rouleaux length, the field frequency nu(p) is lowest for the largest cell aggregations where the torque shows a maximum.

  1. Antioxidant capacity and radical scavenging effect of polyphenol rich Mallotus philippenensis fruit extract on human erythrocytes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Mayank; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Tripathi, Yamini B; Goel, R K; Nath, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Mallotus philippinensis is an important source of molecules with strong antioxidant activity widely used medicinal plant. Previous studies have highlighted their anticestodal, antibacterial, wound healing activities, and so forth. So, present investigation was designed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity and radical scavenging effect of 50% ethanol fruit glandular hair extract (MPE) and its role on Human Erythrocytes. MPE was tested for phytochemical test followed by its HPLC analysis. Standard antioxidant assays like DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide radical, nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation assay were determined along with total phenolic and flavonoids content. Results showed that MPE contains the presence of various phytochemicals, with high total phenolic and flavonoid content. HPLC analysis showed the presence of rottlerin, a polyphenolic compound in a very rich quantity. MPE exhibits significant strong scavenging activity on DPPH and ABTS assay. Reducing power showed dose dependent increase in concentration absorption compared to standard, Quercetin. Superoxide, hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide assay showed a comparable scavenging activity compared to its standard. Our finding further provides evidence that Mallotus fruit extract is a potential natural source of antioxidants which have a protective role on human Erythrocytes exhibiting minimum hemolytic activity and this justified its uses in folklore medicines.

  2. Accessibility of sulfhydryl residues induced by cytochalasin B binding and conformational dynamics in the human erythrocyte glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Pinkofsky, H B; Jung, C Y

    1985-07-01

    Studies with intact cells have implicated essential sulfhydryl groups in the carrier-mediated glucose transport of human erythrocytes. In an attempt to identify and characterize such essential sulfhydryl residues we have studied the interaction of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) with a purified glucose transporter preparation (band 4.5) from human erythrocytes, in the presence and absence of its ligands, and the effects of this interaction on the binding of cytochalasin B (CB) to the transporter. At least 3 mol of PCMB reacted per mol of this preparation. A portion of the reaction was significantly enhanced in the presence of cytochalasin B. This enhancement was a saturable function of CB concentration, and was half-maximal at a CB concentration equal to the dissociation constant for the CB binding to the preparation. This CB-sensitive, PCMB reaction product comigrated with the band 4.5 on lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An excess of D-glucose did not affect the PCMB reaction by itself in the absence of CB, but totally abolished the CB-induced enhancement of the PCMB reaction. PCMB inhibited the CB binding activity of the transporter preparation, and this inhibition was also enhanced in the presence of CB. These results suggest that CB binding perturbs the conformational dynamics of the glucose transporter resulting in an exposure of at least two sulfhydryl residues to PCMB reaction, and that some of these CB-sensitive sulfhydryl groups are essential for CB binding to the transporter.

  3. The effects of adriamycin and adriamycin complexes with transitional metals on Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, T K; Gyulkhandanyan, A V; Gambarov, S S; Avanessian, L A; Alexanyan, Y T

    1996-10-17

    The influence of adriamycin (ADR) and ADR complexes with transitional metals Fe2+, Cu2+ and Co2+ on Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels of human erythrocytes was investigated. We show that the anthracycline moiety of ADR increases Ca(2+)-dependent K+ efflux from erythrocytes, induced by low concentrations of propranolol, while the whole molecule of ADR has not any effect on Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels, induced by propranolol or A23187 and on Pb(2+)-dependent K+ efflux. Ethidium bromide, verapamil and trifluoroperazine inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent K+ efflux, induced by high doses of propranolol. The anthracycline moiety of ADR is able to abolish blocking effect of ethidium bromide and verapamil, but does not influence the blocking effect of trifluoroperazine. We further show that ADR complexes with Fe2+, Cu2+ and Co2+ are potent inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ efflux, induced by propranolol, but not of Pb(2+)-dependent K+ efflux. On the contrary, ADR-Fe3+ complex activates K(+)-permeability of human red blood cell. It is suggested that opposite effects of anthracycline moiety of ADR and ADR complexes with transitional metals on Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels, induced by propranolol is due to their influence on the pathways of Ca2+ transport into cells, rather than their action directly on K+ channels.

  4. LC-MS/MS analysis of carboxymethylated and carboxyethylated phosphatidylethanolamines in human erythrocytes and blood plasma[S

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Naoki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Asai, Akira; Fujita, Ikuko; Hashiura, Aya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Oikawa, Shinichi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    An amino group of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is considered as a target for nonenzymatic glycation, and the potential involvement of lipid glycation in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications has generated interest. However, unlike an early glycation product of PE (Amadori-PE), the occurrence and roles of advanced glycation end products of PE (AGE-PE) in vivo have been unclear. Here, we developed an LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of AGE-PE [carboxymethyl-PE (CM-PE) and carboxyethyl-PE (CE-PE)]. Collision-induced dissociation of CM-PE and CE-PE produced characteristic ions, permitting neutral loss scanning (NLS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of AGE-PE. By NLS analysis, a series of AGE-PE molecular species was detected in human erythrocytes and blood plasma. In LC-MS/MS analysis, MRM enabled the separation and determination of the predominant AGE-PE species. Between healthy subjects and diabetic patients, no significant differences were observed in AGE-PE concentrations in erythrocytes and plasma, whereas Amadori-PE concentrations were higher in diabetic patients. These results provide direct evidence for the presence of AGE-PE in human blood, and indicated that, compared with Amadori-PE, AGE-PE is less likely to be accumulated in diabetic blood. The presently developed LC-MS/MS method appears to be a powerful tool for understanding in vivo lipid glycation and its pathophysiological consequence. PMID:20386060

  5. Antioxidant Capacity and Radical Scavenging Effect of Polyphenol Rich Mallotus philippenensis Fruit Extract on Human Erythrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Manish Kumar; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Tripathi, Yamini B.; Goel, R. K.; Nath, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Mallotus philippinensis is an important source of molecules with strong antioxidant activity widely used medicinal plant. Previous studies have highlighted their anticestodal, antibacterial, wound healing activities, and so forth. So, present investigation was designed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity and radical scavenging effect of 50% ethanol fruit glandular hair extract (MPE) and its role on Human Erythrocytes. MPE was tested for phytochemical test followed by its HPLC analysis. Standard antioxidant assays like DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide radical, nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation assay were determined along with total phenolic and flavonoids content. Results showed that MPE contains the presence of various phytochemicals, with high total phenolic and flavonoid content. HPLC analysis showed the presence of rottlerin, a polyphenolic compound in a very rich quantity. MPE exhibits significant strong scavenging activity on DPPH and ABTS assay. Reducing power showed dose dependent increase in concentration absorption compared to standard, Quercetin. Superoxide, hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide assay showed a comparable scavenging activity compared to its standard. Our finding further provides evidence that Mallotus fruit extract is a potential natural source of antioxidants which have a protective role on human Erythrocytes exhibiting minimum hemolytic activity and this justified its uses in folklore medicines. PMID:25525615

  6. Conjugated bilirubin triggers anemia by inducing erythrocyte death.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca(2+) influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. © 2014 The Authors. Hepatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  7. Variation in human erythrocyte membrane unsaturated Fatty acids: correlation with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Jorge L; Tanhehco, Yvette C; Frey, Monica; Guo, Lida; Cropcho, Lorna J; Gibson, K Michael; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Whether cell membrane fatty acid (FA) composition is a useful indicator of vascular disease is unclear. To study variation of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane FA in samples from healthy volunteers, hospitalized patients, and cardiac troponin I-elevated patients with myocardial damage without a priori assumptions as to FA composition. We separated FAs extracted from RBCs by gas chromatography and identified them by mass spectrometry. Fatty acids with abundance greater than 1% of total were quantified and compared: hexadecanoic (C16:0), octadecadienoic (C18:2), cis- and trans-octadecenoic (C18:1), and eicosatetraenoic (C20:4) acids. Deuterated standards established proportionality of FA recovery. The cis- and trans-C18:1 identification was verified by comparison with standards. In troponin-positive samples, C18:2 to C18:1 ratios were increased 30% compared with healthy controls or with random patient samples. Erythrocyte trans-C18:1 had a wide variation, approximately 10-fold, in all groups but without differences between groups. Replicates showed that the wide range of RBC trans-FA load is not due to analytic variation. In healthy subjects, the RBC content of lower- molecular weight FAs (C16-C18) correlated with serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but despite the established relationship between dietary trans-FA and increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipid profiles had no correlation with RBC trans-FA content. Erythrocyte accumulation of unsaturated FA may be a useful indicator of vascular disease, whereas the wide range in trans-FAs suggests that both diet and genetic variation affect RBC trans-FA accumulation. Unsaturated FAs increase membrane fluidity and may reflect a natural response to subclinical vascular changes, which may in turn reflect increased risk of clinical disease.

  8. Interactions of ATP, oestradiol, genistein and the anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) and tamoxifen, with the human erythrocyte glucose transporter, GLUT1.

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    17 beta-Oestradiol (ED when subscript to K) and the phytoestrogen isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibit glucose transport in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts. The selective oestrogen receptor modulators or anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) (FAS) and tamoxifen (TAM), competitively antagonize oestradiol inhibition of glucose exit from erythrocytes (K(i(ED/FAS))=2.84+/-0.16 microM and K(i(ED/TAM))=100+/-2 nM). Faslodex has no significant inhibitory effect on glucose exit, but tamoxifen alone inhibits glucose exit (K(i(TAM))=300+/-100 nM). In ghosts, ATP (1-4 mM) competitively antagonizes oestradiol, genistein and cytochalasin B (CB)-dependent inhibitions of glucose exit, (K(i(ATP/ED))=2.5+/-0.23 mM, K(i(ATP/GEN))=0.99+/-0.17 mM and K(i(ATP/CB))=0.76+/-0.08 mM). Tamoxifen and faslodex reverse oestradiol-dependent inhibition of glucose exit with ATP>1 mM (K(i(ED/TAM))=130+/-5 nM and K(i(ED/FAS))=2.7+/-0.9 microM). The cytoplasmic surface of the glucose transporter (GLUT)1 contains four sequences with close homologies to sequences in the ligand-binding domain of human oestrogen receptor beta (hesr-2). One homology is adjacent to the Walker ATP-binding motif II (GLUT1, residues 225-229) in the large cytoplasmic segment linking transmembrane helices 6 and 7; another GLUT (residues 421-423) contains the Walker ATP-binding motif III. Mapping of these regions on to a three-dimensional template of GLUT indicates that a possible oestrogen-binding site lies between His(337), Arg(349) and Glu(249) at the cytoplasmic entrance to the hydrophilic pore spanning GLUT, which have a similar topology to His(475), Glu(305) and Arg(346) in hesr-2 that anchor the head and tail hydroxy groups of oestradiol and genistein, and thus are suitably placed to provide an ATP-sensitive oestrogen binding site that could modulate glucose export. PMID:12133004

  9. Opsonization of malaria-infected erythrocytes activates the inflammasome and enhances inflammatory cytokine secretion by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibody opsonization of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) plays a crucial role in anti-malarial immunity by promoting clearance of blood-stage infection by monocytes and macrophages. The effects of phagocytosis of opsonized IE on macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine responses are poorly understood. Methods Phagocytic clearance, cytokine response and intracellular signalling were measured using IFN-γ-primed human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) incubated with opsonized and unopsonized trophozoite-stage CS2 IE, a chondroitin sulphate-binding malaria strain. Cytokine secretion was measured by bead array or ELISA, mRNA using quantitative PCR, and activation of NF-κB by Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Data were analysed using the Mann–Whitney U test or the Wilcoxon signed rank test as appropriate. Results Unopsonized CS2 IE were not phagocytosed whereas IE opsonized with pooled patient immune serum (PPS) were (Phagocytic index (PI)=18.4, [SE 0.38] n=3). Unopsonized and opsonized IE induced expression of TNF, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA by MDM and activated NF-κB to a similar extent. Unopsonized IE induced secretion of IL-6 (median= 622 pg/ml [IQR=1,250-240], n=9) but no IL-1β or TNF, whereas PPS-opsonized IE induced secretion of IL-1β (18.6 pg/mL [34.2-14.4]) and TNF (113 pg/ml [421–17.0]) and increased IL-6 secretion (2,195 pg/ml [4,658-1,095]). Opsonized, but not unopsonized, CS2 IE activated caspase-1 cleavage and enzymatic activity in MDM showing that Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis activates the inflammasome. MDM attached to IgG-coated surfaces however secreted IL-1β in response to unopsonized IE, suggesting that internalization of IE is not absolutely required to activate the inflammasome and stimulate IL-1β secretion. Conclusions It is concluded that IL-6 secretion from MDM in response to CS2 IE does not require phagocytosis, whereas secretion of TNF and IL-1β is dependent on Fcγ receptor

  10. The human erythrocyte anion-transport protein. Partial amino acid sequence, conformation and a possible molecular mechanism for anion exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, C J; Tanner, M J; Kempf, C

    1983-01-01

    The N-terminal 72 residues of an integral membrane fragment, P5, of the human erythrocyte anion-transport protein, which is known to be directly involved in the anion-exchange process, was shown to have the following amino acid sequence: Met-Val-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gly-Pro-Leu-Pro-Asn-Thr-Ala-Leu-Leu-Ser-Leu-Val-Leu-Met -Ala-Gly-Thr-Phe-Phe-Phe-Ala-Met-Met-Leu-Arg-Lys-Phe-Lys-Asn-Ser-Ser-Tyr-Phe-Pro-Gly-Lys-Leu-Arg-Arg-Val-Ile-Gly-Asp-Phe-Gly-Val-Pro-Ile-Ser-Ile-Leu-Ile-Met-Val-Leu-Val-Asp-Phe-Phe-Ile-Gln-Asp-Thr-Tyr-Thr-Gln- The structure of this fragment was analysed, with account being taken of the constraints that apply to the folding of integral membrane proteins and the topographical locations of various sites in the sequence. It was concluded that this sequence forms two transmembrane alpha-helices. These are probably part of a cluster of amphipathic transmembrane alpha-helices, which could comprise that part of the protein responsible for transport activity. The presently available evidence relating to the anion-exchange process was considered with the structural features noted in this study and a possible molecular mechanism is proposed. In this model the rearrangement of a network of intramembranous charged pairs mediates the translocation of an anion between anion-binding regions at each surface of the membrane, which are composed of clusters of positively charged amino acids. This model imposes a sequential exchange mechanism on the system. Supplementary material, including Tables and Figures describing the compositions of peptides determined by amino acid analysis and sequence studies, quantitative and qualitative data that provide a residue-by-residue justification for the sequence assignment and a description of modifications to and use of the solid-phase sequencer has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50123 (12 pages) with the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be

  11. Opsonization of malaria-infected erythrocytes activates the inflammasome and enhances inflammatory cytokine secretion by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingling; Ludlow, Louise E; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Jaworowski, Anthony

    2012-10-09

    Antibody opsonization of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) plays a crucial role in anti-malarial immunity by promoting clearance of blood-stage infection by monocytes and macrophages. The effects of phagocytosis of opsonized IE on macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine responses are poorly understood. Phagocytic clearance, cytokine response and intracellular signalling were measured using IFN-γ-primed human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) incubated with opsonized and unopsonized trophozoite-stage CS2 IE, a chondroitin sulphate-binding malaria strain. Cytokine secretion was measured by bead array or ELISA, mRNA using quantitative PCR, and activation of NF-κB by Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test or the Wilcoxon signed rank test as appropriate. Unopsonized CS2 IE were not phagocytosed whereas IE opsonized with pooled patient immune serum (PPS) were (Phagocytic index (PI)=18.4, [SE 0.38] n=3). Unopsonized and opsonized IE induced expression of TNF, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA by MDM and activated NF-κB to a similar extent. Unopsonized IE induced secretion of IL-6 (median= 622 pg/ml [IQR=1,250-240], n=9) but no IL-1β or TNF, whereas PPS-opsonized IE induced secretion of IL-1β (18.6 pg/mL [34.2-14.4]) and TNF (113 pg/ml [421-17.0]) and increased IL-6 secretion (2,195 pg/ml [4,658-1,095]). Opsonized, but not unopsonized, CS2 IE activated caspase-1 cleavage and enzymatic activity in MDM showing that Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis activates the inflammasome. MDM attached to IgG-coated surfaces however secreted IL-1β in response to unopsonized IE, suggesting that internalization of IE is not absolutely required to activate the inflammasome and stimulate IL-1β secretion. It is concluded that IL-6 secretion from MDM in response to CS2 IE does not require phagocytosis, whereas secretion of TNF and IL-1β is dependent on Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis; for IL-1β, this occurs by

  12. Interaction of ferulic acid derivatives with human erythrocytes monitored by pulse field gradient NMR diffusion and NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Bernardi, Francesca; Centini, Marisanna; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2005-04-01

    Ferulic acid (Fer), a natural anti-oxidant and chemo-protector, is able to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in the forestomach, lungs, skin, tongue and colon. Several Fer derivatives have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention, being the biological activity related also to the capacity of partitioning between aqueous and lipid phases. In the present work, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurement and NMR relaxation rates have been adopted for investigating the interaction of three Fer derivatives (Fer-C11, Fer-C12 and Fer-C13) with human erythrocytes. Binding to the erythrocyte membrane has been shown for all derivatives, which displayed a similar interaction mode such that the aromatic moiety and the terminal part of the alkyl chain were the most affected. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion coefficients was used to show that Fer-C12 and Fer-C13 display higher affinity for the cell membrane when compared with Fer-C11. These findings agree with the higher anti-oxidant activity of the two derivatives.

  13. Simultaneous liquid chromatographic assessment of thiamine, thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate in human erythrocytes: a study on alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Rosanna; Ceccanti, Mauro; Guiducci, Maria Soccorsa; Sasso, Guido Francesco; Sebastiani, Gemma; Attilia, Maria Luisa; Allen, John Paul

    2003-06-15

    An isocratic HPLC procedure for the assessment of thiamine (T), thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine diphosphate (TDP) in human erythrocytes is described. Several aspects of the procedure make it suitable for both clinical and research purposes: limits of detection and quantification of 1 and 2.5 nmol/l, respectively, recovery of 102% on average (range 93-112%), intra- and inter-day precisions within 5 and 9%, respectively, total elution time 15 min. This analytical methodology was applied to a case-control study on erythrocyte samples from 103 healthy subjects and 36 alcohol-dependent patients at risk of thiamine deficiency. Mean control values obtained were: T=89.6+/-22.7 nmol/l, TMP=4.4+/-6.6 nmol/l and TDP=222.23+/-56.3 nmol/l. T and TDP mean values of alcoholics were significantly lower than those of control cases: T=69.4+/-35.9 nmol/l (P<0.001) and TDP=127.4+/-62.5 nmol/l (P<10(-5)). The diagnostic role of TDP was evaluated and a significant role for thiamine was established in the study of alcohol related problems.

  14. Detailed methodology for high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of murine malaria parasitized-erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Eri H; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a powerful tool used to investigate object surfaces and has been widely applied in both material science and biology. With respect to the study of malaria, SEM revealed that erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a human parasite, display 'knob-like' structures on their surface comprising parasitized proteins. However, detailed methodology for SEM studies of malaria parasites is lacking in the literature making such studies challenging. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to preparing Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes from two mouse strains for SEM analysis with minimal structural deterioration. We tested three species of murine malaria parasites, P. berghei, P. yoelii, and P. chabaudi, as well as non-parasitized human erythrocytes and P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes for comparisons. Our data demonstrated that the surface structures of parasitized erythrocytes between the three species of murine parasites in the two different strains of mice were indistinguishable and no surface alterations were observed in P. falciparum-erythrocytes. Our SEM observations contribute towards an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of parasite maturation in the erythrocyte cytoplasm and, along with future studies using our detailed methodology, may help to gain insight into the clinical phenomena of human malaria. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Silymarin prevents the toxicity induced by benzo(a)pyrene in human erythrocytes by preserving its membrane integrity: an in vitro study.