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Sample records for human fecal pollution

  1. Quantitative PCR for Genetic Markers of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantificationapproach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for quantification of two recently described human-...

  2. Quantitative PCR for Genetic Markers of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantificationapproach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for quantification of two recently described human-...

  3. Quantitative PCR for genetic markers of human fecal pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantification approach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described hum...

  4. Quantitative PCR for genetic markers of human fecal pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantification approach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described hum...

  5. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal Pollution Measurement

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, cr...

  6. Fecal Pollution of Water.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of water from a health point of view is the contamination of water with disease-causing organisms (pathogens) that may inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, but with particular attention to human fecal sources as the most relevant source of human illnesse...

  7. Fecal Pollution of Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of water from a health point of view is the contamination of water with disease-causing organisms (pathogens) that may inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, but with particular attention to human fecal sources as the most relevant source of human illnesse...

  8. Fecal Pollution of Water.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of water from a health point of view is the contamination of water with disease-causing organisms (pathogens) that may inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, but with particular attention to human fecal sources as the most relevant source of human illnesse...

  9. Fecal Pollution of Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of water from a health point of view is the contamination of water with disease-causing organisms (pathogens) that may inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, but with particular attention to human fecal sources as the most relevant source of human illnesse...

  10. Performance of PCR-based assays targeting Bacteroidales genetic markers of human fecal pollution in sewage and fecal samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous PCR-based methods available to characterize human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct oligonucleotides and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method performance. Laboratory comparisons ...

  11. Distributions of Fecal Markers in Wastewater from Different Climatic Zones for Human Fecal Pollution Tracking in Australian Surface Waters.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Sidhu, J P S; Smith, K; Beale, D J; Gyawali, P; Toze, S

    2015-12-18

    Recreational and potable water supplies polluted with human wastewater can pose a direct health risk to humans. Therefore, sensitive detection of human fecal pollution in environmental waters is very important to water quality authorities around the globe. Microbial source tracking (MST) utilizes human fecal markers (HFMs) to detect human wastewater pollution in environmental waters. The concentrations of these markers in raw wastewater are considered important because it is likely that a marker whose concentration is high in wastewater will be more frequently detected in polluted waters. In this study, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were used to determine the concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp., HFMs Bacteroides HF183, human adenoviruses (HAdVs), and polyomaviruses (HPyVs) in raw municipal wastewater influent from various climatic zones in Australia. E. coli mean concentrations in pooled human wastewater data sets (from various climatic zones) were the highest (3.2 × 10(6) gene copies per ml), followed by those of HF183 (8.0 × 10(5) gene copies per ml) and Enterococcus spp. (3.6 × 10(5) gene copies per ml). HAdV and HPyV concentrations were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than those of FIB and HF183. Strong positive and negative correlations were observed between the FIB and HFM concentrations within and across wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To identify the most sensitive marker of human fecal pollution, environmental water samples were seeded with raw human wastewater. The results from the seeding experiments indicated that Bacteroides HF183 was more sensitive for detecting human fecal pollution than HAdVs and HPyVs. Since the HF183 marker can occasionally be present in nontarget animal fecal samples, it is recommended that HF183 along with a viral marker (HAdVs or HPyVs) be used for tracking human fecal pollution in Australian environmental waters.

  12. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF BACTEROIDES DNA PROBES FOR THE SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers s...

  13. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF BACTEROIDES DNA PROBES FOR THE SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers s...

  14. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  15. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  16. Differential Decay of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the decomposition of different human fecal pollution sources is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decay of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fe...

  17. Differential Decay of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the decomposition of different human fecal pollution sources is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decay of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fe...

  18. Detection and Quantification of Human Fecal Pollution with Real-Time PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described ...

  19. Detection and Quantification of Human Fecal Pollution with Real-Time PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described ...

  20. Detection of human-derived fecal pollution in environmental waters by use of a PCR-based human polyomavirus assay.

    PubMed

    McQuaig, Shannon M; Scott, Troy M; Harwood, Valerie J; Farrah, Samuel R; Lukasik, Jerzy O

    2006-12-01

    Regulatory agencies mandate the use of fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli or Enterococcus spp., as microbial indicators of recreational water quality. These indicators of fecal pollution do not identify the specific sources of pollution and at times underestimate health risks associated with recreational water use. This study proposes the use of human polyomaviruses (HPyVs), which are widespread among human populations, as indicators of human fecal pollution. A method was developed to concentrate and extract HPyV DNA from environmental water samples and then to amplify it by nested PCR. HPyVs were detected in as little as 1 microl of sewage and were not amplified from dairy cow or pig wastes. Environmental water samples were screened for the presence of HPyVs and two additional markers of human fecal pollution: the Enterococcus faecium esp gene and the 16S rRNA gene of human-associated Bacteroides. The presence of human-specific indicators of fecal pollution was compared to fecal coliform and Enterococcus concentrations. HPyVs were detected in 19 of 20 (95%) samples containing the E. faecium esp gene and Bacteroides human markers. Weak or no correlation was observed between the presence/absence of human-associated indicators and counts of indicator bacteria. The sensitivity, specificity, and correlation with other human-associated markers suggest that the HPyV assay could be a useful predictor of human fecal pollution in environmental waters and an important component of the microbial-source-tracking "toolbox."

  1. Blautia and Prevotella sequences distinguish human and animal fecal pollution in Brazil surface waters.

    PubMed

    Koskey, Amber M; Fisher, Jenny C; Eren, A Murat; Ponce-Terashima, Rafael; Reis, Mitermayer G; Blanton, Ronald E; McLellan, Sandra L

    2014-12-01

    Untreated sewage discharges and limited agricultural manure management practices contribute to fecal pollution in rural Brazilian waterways. Most microbial source tracking studies have focused on Bacteroidales, and few have tested host-specific indicators in underdeveloped regions. Sequencing of sewage and human and animal feces with Illumina HiSeq revealed Prevotellaceae as the most abundant family in humans, with Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae also comprising a large proportion of the microbiome. These same families were also dominant in animals. Bacteroides, the genus containing the most commonly utilized human-specific marker in the United States was present in very low abundance. We used oligotyping to identify Prevotella and Blautia sequences that can distinguish human fecal contamination. Thirty-five of 61 Blautia oligotypes and 13 of 108 Prevotella oligotypes in humans were host-specific or highly abundant (i.e. host-preferred) compared to pig, dog, horse and cow sources. Certain human Prevotella and Blautia oligotypes increased more than an order of magnitude along a polluted river transect in rural Brazil, but traditional fecal indicator levels followed a steady or even decreasing trend. While both Prevotella and Blautia oligotypes distinguished human and animal fecal pollution in Brazil surface waters, Blautia appears to contain more discriminatory and globally applicable markers for tracking sources of fecal pollution.

  2. Differential decomposition of bacterial and viral fecal indicators in common human pollution types.

    PubMed

    Wanjugi, Pauline; Sivaganesan, Mano; Korajkic, Asja; Kelty, Catherine A; McMinn, Brian; Ulrich, Robert; Harwood, Valerie J; Shanks, Orin C

    2016-11-15

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decomposition of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fecal pollution originating from fresh human feces, septage, and primary effluent sewage in a subtropical marine environment was assessed over a six day period with an emphasis on the influence of ambient sunlight and indigenous microbiota. Ambient water mixed with each fecal pollution type was placed in dialysis bags and incubated in situ in a submersible aquatic mesocosm. Genetic and cultivated fecal indicators including fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci, E. coli, and Bacteroidales), coliphage (somatic and F+), Bacteroides fragilis phage (GB-124), and human-associated genetic indicators (HF183/BacR287 and HumM2) were measured in each sample. Simple linear regression assessing treatment trends in each pollution type over time showed significant decay (p ≤ 0.05) in most treatments for feces and sewage (27/28 and 32/40, respectively), compared to septage (6/26). A two-way analysis of variance of log10 reduction values for sewage and feces experiments indicated that treatments differentially impact survival of cultivated bacteria, cultivated phage, and genetic indicators. Findings suggest that sunlight is critical for phage decay, and indigenous microbiota play a lesser role. For bacterial cultivated and genetic indicators, the influence of indigenous microbiota varied by pollution type. This study offers new insights on the decomposition of common human fecal pollution types in a subtropical marine environment with important implications for water quality management applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Assessment of bifidobacteria as indicators of human fecal pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, I G; Levin, M A

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of bifidobacteria in the environment has been examined by using YN-6 medium. Although feces of humans, chickens, cows, dogs, pigs, horses, cats, sheep, beavers, goats, and turkeys were examined, bifidobacteria were isolated only from the feces of humans and swine. The frequency and distribution of component species of human fecal isolates were as in isolates from raw sewage. Bifidobacterium longum and B. adolescentis were most often isolated and in the highest densities. The levels of bifidobacteria in raw sewage were in the range of 10(6) organisms/100 ml, and the effect of primary and secondary sewage treatment on the number of viable organisms present was not significant. High densities of bifidobacteria were found in all samples from septic tanks. It was found that bifidobacteria did not survive as well as Escherichia coli in either fresh or marine waters. The ratio of bifidobacteria to E. coli is an indication of the age and of the effectiveness of treatment of sewage effluent. PMID:7294781

  4. The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molloy, S.L.; Liu, L.B.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Jenkins, T.M.; Wong, M.V.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risk associated with swimming at these beaches, the near-shore waters of Mt Baldy Beach, Lake Michigan and Trail Creek, a tributary discharging into the lake were examined for fecal pollution indicators. A model of surf zone hydrodynamics coupled with a transport model with first-order inactivation of pollutant was used to understand the relative importance of different processes operating in the surf zone (e.g. physical versus biological processes). The Enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factor, the enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) from the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) from Lake Michigan beaches. Preliminary analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bactateria variation and water quality changes at the beaches can be explained by inputs from the influential stream and hydrometeorological conditions. Using modeling methods to predict impaired water quality may help reduce potential health threats to recreational visitors.

  5. Detection of Human-Derived Fecal Pollution in Environmental Waters by Use of a PCR-Based Human Polyomavirus Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    McQuaig, Shannon M.; Scott, Troy M.; Harwood, Valerie J.; Farrah, Samuel R.; Lukasik, Jerzy O.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory agencies mandate the use of fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli or Enterococcus spp., as microbial indicators of recreational water quality. These indicators of fecal pollution do not identify the specific sources of pollution and at times underestimate health risks associated with recreational water use. This study proposes the use of human polyomaviruses (HPyVs), which are widespread among human populations, as indicators of human fecal pollution. A method was developed to concentrate and extract HPyV DNA from environmental water samples and then to amplify it by nested PCR. HPyVs were detected in as little as 1 μl of sewage and were not amplified from dairy cow or pig wastes. Environmental water samples were screened for the presence of HPyVs and two additional markers of human fecal pollution: the Enterococcus faecium esp gene and the 16S rRNA gene of human-associated Bacteroides. The presence of human-specific indicators of fecal pollution was compared to fecal coliform and Enterococcus concentrations. HPyVs were detected in 19 of 20 (95%) samples containing the E. faecium esp gene and Bacteroides human markers. Weak or no correlation was observed between the presence/absence of human-associated indicators and counts of indicator bacteria. The sensitivity, specificity, and correlation with other human-associated markers suggest that the HPyV assay could be a useful predictor of human fecal pollution in environmental waters and an important component of the microbial-source-tracking “toolbox.” PMID:16997988

  6. Assessment and impact of microbial fecal pollution and human enteric pathogens in a coastal community.

    PubMed

    Lipp, E K; Farrah, S A; Rose, J B

    2001-04-01

    The goals of this study were to assess watersheds impacted by high densities of OSDS (onsite sewage disposal systems) for evidence of fecal contamination and evaluate the occurrence of human pathogens in coastal waters off west Florida. Eleven stations (representing six watersheds) were intensively sampled for microbial indicators of fecal pollution (fecal coliform bacteria, enterococci, Clostridium perfringens and coliphage) and the human enteric pathogens, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and enteroviruses during the summer rainy season (May-September 1996). Levels of all indicators ranged between < 5 and > 4000 CFU/100 ml. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected infrequently (6.8% and 2.3% of samples tested positive, respectively). Conversely, infectious enteroviruses were detected at low levels in 5 of the 6 watersheds sampled. Using cluster analysis, sites were grouped into two categories, high and low risks, based on combined levels of indicators. These results suggest that stations of highest pollution risk were located within areas of high OSDS densities. Furthermore, data indicate a subsurface transport of contaminated water to surface waters. The high prevalence of enteroviruses throughout the study area suggests a chronic pollution problem and potential risk to recreational swimmers in and around Sarasota Bay.

  7. QMRAcatch: Human-Associated Fecal Pollution and Infection Risk Modeling for a River/Floodplain Environment.

    PubMed

    Derx, Julia; Schijven, Jack; Sommer, Regina; Zoufal-Hruza, Christa M; van Driezum, Inge H; Reischer, Georg; Ixenmaier, Simone; Kirschner, Alexander; Frick, Christina; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-07-01

    Protection of drinking water resources requires addressing all relevant fecal pollution sources in the considered catchment. A freely available simulation tool, QMRAcatch, was recently developed to simulate concentrations of fecal indicators, a genetic microbial source tracking (MST) marker, and intestinal pathogens in water resources and to conduct a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). At the same time, QMRAcatch was successfully applied to a region of the Danube River in Austria, focusing on municipal wastewater emissions. Herein, we describe extension of its application to a Danube River floodplain, keeping the focus on fecal sources of human origin. QMRAcatch was calibrated to match measured human-associated MST marker concentrations for a dry year and a wet year. Appropriate performance characteristics of the human-associated MST assay were proven by simulating correct and false-positive marker concentrations, as determined in human and animal feces. With the calibrated tool, simulated and measured enterovirus concentrations in the rivers were compared. Finally, the calibrated tool allowed demonstrating that 4.5 log enterovirus and 6.6 log norovirus reductions must be achieved to convert current surface water to safe drinking water that complies with a health-based target of 10 infections person yr. Simulations of the low- and high-pollution scenarios showed that the required viral reductions ranged from 0 to 8 log. This study has implications for water managers with interests in assessing robust catchment protection measures and water treatment criteria by considering the fate of fecal pollution from its sources to the point of abstraction.

  8. Fecal pollution source tracking in waters intended for human supply based on archaeal and bacterial genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Kayo; Barreto, Camila; Oliveira, Samara Sant'Anna; Pinto, Leonardo Henriques; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Miranda, Catia Chaia; Clementino, Maysa Mandetta

    2015-12-01

    The determination of fecal pollution sources in aquatic ecosystems is essential to estimate associated health risks. In this study, we evaluate eight microbial source tracking (MST) markers including host-specific Bacteroidales and Methanobrevibacter spp. for discrimination between human, bovine, equine, and swine fecal contamination in waters intended for human supply. Overall, the novel host-specific archaeal and bacterial primers proposed in this study demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. Markers for the Archaea domain were more prevalent in the fecal and water samples studied. We conclude that the investigations regarding the sources of fecal pollution in public water supplies can contribute to improve the quality of human health. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis using both archaeal and bacterial fecal MST markers on tropical water bodies of Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil.

  9. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1995-04-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans. Although the B. vulgatus probes detected high levels of their target DNA in most of the house pets, similarly high levels of target DNA were found only in a few individuals from other groups of nonhumans. Therefore, the results indicate that these probes can distinguish human from non human feces in many cases. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Overview of Microbial Source Tracking Methods Targeting Human Fecal Pollution Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to human fecal waste can be a public health risk dueto the presence of human pathogens. Human fecal pollutioncan be introduced into water resources from damagedsewer lines, faulty septic systems, combined sewer overflows,illicit dumping activities, and even recreational ...

  11. Overview of Microbial Source Tracking Methods Targeting Human Fecal Pollution Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to human fecal waste can be a public health risk dueto the presence of human pathogens. Human fecal pollutioncan be introduced into water resources from damagedsewer lines, faulty septic systems, combined sewer overflows,illicit dumping activities, and even recreational ...

  12. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster are considered to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In response, the United States Environmental Protectio...

  13. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster are considered to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In response, the United States Environmental Protectio...

  14. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Real-time quantitative PCR assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster have been found to be some of the top performing methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. The United States Environmental Protection Agency is planning to conduct a ...

  15. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method ...

  16. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods available to detect and enumerate human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and/or probes and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method p...

  17. Combining land use information and small stream sampling with PCR-based methods for better characterization of diffuse sources of human fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Peed, Lindsay A; Nietch, Christopher T; Kelty, Catherine A; Meckes, Mark; Mooney, Thomas; Sivaganesan, Mano; Shanks, Orin C

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between human and other animal sources of fecal pollution making it difficult to identify diffuse pollution sources. Human-associated quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods in combination with low-order headwatershed sampling, precipitation information, and high-resolution geographic information system land use data can be useful for identifying diffuse source of human fecal pollution in receiving waters. To test this assertion, this study monitored nine headwatersheds over a two-year period potentially impacted by faulty septic systems and leaky sanitary sewer lines. Human fecal pollution was measured using three different human-associated qPCR methods and a positive significant correlation was seen between abundance of human-associated genetic markers and septic systems following wet weather events. In contrast, a negative correlation was observed with sanitary sewer line densities suggesting septic systems are the predominant diffuse source of human fecal pollution in the study area. These results demonstrate the advantages of combining water sampling, climate information, land-use computer-based modeling, and molecular biology disciplines to better characterize diffuse sources of human fecal pollution in environmental waters.

  18. Combining Land Use Information and Small Stream Sampling with PCR-Based Methods for Better Characterization of Diffuse Sources of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between...

  19. Combining Land Use Information and Small Stream Sampling with PCR-Based Methods for Better Characterization of Diffuse Sources of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between...

  20. Fluoroquinolones and qnr genes in sediment, water, soil, and human fecal flora in an environment polluted by manufacturing discharges.

    PubMed

    Rutgersson, Carolin; Fick, Jerker; Marathe, Nachiket; Kristiansson, Erik; Janzon, Anders; Angelin, Martin; Johansson, Anders; Shouche, Yogesh; Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2014-07-15

    There is increasing concern that environmental antibiotic pollution promotes transfer of resistance genes to the human microbiota. Here, fluoroquinolone-polluted river sediment, well water, irrigated farmland, and human fecal flora of local villagers within a pharmaceutical industrial region in India were analyzed for quinolone resistance (qnr) genes by quantitative PCR. Similar samples from Indian villages farther away from industrial areas, as well as fecal samples from Swedish study participants and river sediment from Sweden, were included for comparison. Fluoroquinolones were detected by MS/MS in well water and soil from all villages located within three km from industrially polluted waterways. Quinolone resistance genes were detected in 42% of well water, 7% of soil samples and in 100% and 18% of Indian and Swedish river sediments, respectively. High antibiotic concentrations in Indian sediment coincided with high abundances of qnr, whereas lower fluoroquinolone levels in well water and soil did not. We could not find support for an enrichment of qnr in fecal samples from people living in the fluoroquinolone-contaminated villages. However, as qnr was detected in 91% of all Indian fecal samples (24% of the Swedish) it suggests that the spread of qnr between people is currently a dominating transmission route.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human a...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human a...

  3. Evaluating sewage-associated JCV and BKV polyomaviruses for sourcing human fecal pollution in a coastal river in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Wan, C; Goonetilleke, A; Gardner, T

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the host-sensitivity and host-specificity of JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV) polyomaviruses were evaluated by testing wastewater and fecal samples from nine host groups in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The JCV and BKV polyomaviruses were detected in 63 human wastewater samples collected from primary and secondary effluent, suggesting high sensitivity of these viruses in human wastewater. In the 81 animal wastewater and fecal samples tested, 80 were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) negative for the JCV and BKV markers. Only one sample (out of 81 animal wastewater and fecal samples) from pig wastewater was positive. Nonetheless, the overall host-specificity of these viruses to differentiate between human and animal wastewater and fecal samples was 0.99. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Australia that reports on the high specificity of JCV and BKV polyomaviruses. To evaluate the field application of these viral markers for detecting human fecal pollution, 20 environmental samples were collected from a coastal river. In the 20 samples tested, 15% (3/20) and 70% (14/20) samples exceeded the regulatory guidelines for Escherichia coli and enterococci levels for marine waters. In all, five (25%) samples were PCR positive for JCV and BKV, indicating the presence of human fecal pollution in the coastal river investigated. The results suggest that JCV and BKV detection using PCR could be a useful tool for identifying human-sourced fecal pollution in coastal waters.

  4. Improved HF183 quantitative real-time PCR assay for characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; Haugland, Richard A; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T; Borchardt, Mark A; Field, Katharine G; Walters, William A; Knight, R; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters.

  5. Improved HF183 Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Characterization of Human Fecal Pollution in Ambient Surface Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Green, Hyatt C.; Haugland, Richard A.; Varma, Manju; Millen, Hana T.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Field, Katharine G.; Walters, William A.; Knight, R.; Sivaganesan, Mano; Kelty, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays that target the human-associated HF183 bacterial cluster within members of the genus Bacteroides are among the most widely used methods for the characterization of human fecal pollution in ambient surface waters. In this study, we show that a current TaqMan HF183 qPCR assay (HF183/BFDrev) routinely forms nonspecific amplification products and introduce a modified TaqMan assay (HF183/BacR287) that alleviates this problem. The performance of each qPCR assay was compared in head-to-head experiments investigating limits of detection, analytical precision, predicted hybridization to 16S rRNA gene sequences from a reference database, and relative marker concentrations in fecal and sewage samples. The performance of the modified HF183/BacR287 assay is equal to or improves upon that of the original HF183/BFDrev assay. In addition, a qPCR chemistry designed to combat amplification inhibition and a multiplexed internal amplification control are included. In light of the expanding use of PCR-based methods that rely on the detection of extremely low concentrations of DNA template, such as qPCR and digital PCR, the new TaqMan HF183/BacR287 assay should provide more accurate estimations of human-derived fecal contaminants in ambient surface waters. PMID:24610857

  6. Discovering new indicators of fecal pollution

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Sandra L.; Eren, A. Murat

    2014-01-01

    Fecal pollution indicators are essential to identify and remediate contamination sources and protect public health. Historically, easily cultured facultative anaerobes such as fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, or enterococci have been used, but these indicators generally provide no information as to their source. More recently, molecular methods have targeted fecal anaerobes, which are much more abundant in humans and other mammals and some strains appear to be associated with certain host sources. Next-generation sequencing and microbiome studies have created an unprecedented inventory of microbial communities associated with fecal sources, allowing reexamination of which taxonomic groups are best suited as informative indicators. The use of new computational methods, such as oligotyping coupled with well-established machine learning approaches, is providing new insights into patterns of host association. In this review we examine the basis for host-specificity and the rationale for using 16S rRNA gene targets for alternative indicators and highlight two taxonomic groups, Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae, which are rich in host-specific bacterial organisms. Finally, we discuss considerations for using alternative indicators for water quality assessments with a particular focus on detecting human sewage sources of contamination. PMID:25199597

  7. Evaluation of five microbial and four mitochondrial DNA markers for tracking human and pig fecal pollution in freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiwei; Liu, Peng; Zheng, Guolu; Chen, Huimei; Shi, Wei; Cui, Yibin; Ren, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    This study systematically evaluated five microbial and four mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers, including sensitivities and specificities under PCR method, and fecal concentrations and decay rates in water under qPCR method. The microbial DNA markers were the three human-associated (BacH, HF183 and B.adolescentis) and two pig-associated (Pig-2-Bac and L.amylovorus), while the mtDNA ones were two human- (H-ND6 and H-ND5) and two pig-associated (P-CytB and P-ND5). All the mtDNA markers showed higher sensitivity (100%) than the microbial ones (84.0–88.8%) except Pig-2-Bac (100%). Specificities of the human mtDNA markers (99.1 and 98.1%) were higher than those of the human-associated microbial ones (57.0–88.8%). But this pattern was not observed in the pig-associated markers where Pig-2-Bac had 100% specificity. The reliability of H-ND6 and H-ND5 was further evidenced to identify locations of the most polluted within the Taihu Lake watershed of China. In general, the microbial DNA markers demonstrated a higher fecal concentration than the mtDNA ones; increasing temperature and sunlight exposure accelerated significantly the decay of all the DNA markers. Results of this study suggest that DNA markers H-ND6, H-ND5, and Pig-2-Bac may be among the best for fecal source tracking in water.

  8. Evaluation of five microbial and four mitochondrial DNA markers for tracking human and pig fecal pollution in freshwater

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiwei; Liu, Peng; Zheng, Guolu; Chen, Huimei; Shi, Wei; Cui, Yibin; Ren, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    This study systematically evaluated five microbial and four mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers, including sensitivities and specificities under PCR method, and fecal concentrations and decay rates in water under qPCR method. The microbial DNA markers were the three human-associated (BacH, HF183 and B.adolescentis) and two pig-associated (Pig-2-Bac and L.amylovorus), while the mtDNA ones were two human- (H-ND6 and H-ND5) and two pig-associated (P-CytB and P-ND5). All the mtDNA markers showed higher sensitivity (100%) than the microbial ones (84.0–88.8%) except Pig-2-Bac (100%). Specificities of the human mtDNA markers (99.1 and 98.1%) were higher than those of the human-associated microbial ones (57.0–88.8%). But this pattern was not observed in the pig-associated markers where Pig-2-Bac had 100% specificity. The reliability of H-ND6 and H-ND5 was further evidenced to identify locations of the most polluted within the Taihu Lake watershed of China. In general, the microbial DNA markers demonstrated a higher fecal concentration than the mtDNA ones; increasing temperature and sunlight exposure accelerated significantly the decay of all the DNA markers. Results of this study suggest that DNA markers H-ND6, H-ND5, and Pig-2-Bac may be among the best for fecal source tracking in water. PMID:27734941

  9. Probabilistic analysis showing that a combination of Bacteroides and Methanobrevibacter source tracking markers is effective for identifying waters contaminated by human fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald; Ufnar, Jennifer A; Whitman, Richard L; Stewart, Jill R

    2013-01-01

    Microbial source tracking assays to identify sources of waterborne contamination typically target genetic markers of host-specific microorganisms. However, no bacterial marker has been shown to be 100% host-specific, and cross-reactivity has been noted in studies evaluating known source samples. Using 485 challenge samples from 20 different human and animal fecal sources, this study evaluated microbial source tracking markers including the Bacteroides HF183 16S rRNA, M. smithii nifH, and Enterococcus esp gene targets that have been proposed as potential indicators of human fecal contamination. Bayes' Theorem was used to calculate the conditional probability that these markers or a combination of markers can correctly identify human sources of fecal pollution. All three human-associated markers were detected in 100% of the sewage samples analyzed. Bacteroides HF183 was the most effective marker for determining whether contamination was specifically from a human source, and greater than 98% certainty that contamination was from a human source was shown when both Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH markers were present. A high degree of certainty was attained even in cases where the prior probability of human fecal contamination was as low as 8.5%. The combination of Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH source tracking markers can help identify surface waters impacted by human fecal contamination, information useful for prioritizing restoration activities or assessing health risks from exposure to contaminated waters.

  10. Probabilistic analysis showing that a combination of bacteroides and methanobrevibacter source tracking markers is effective for identifying waters contaminated by human fecal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Christopher; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald; Ufnar, Jennifer A.; Whitman, Richard L.; Stewart, Jill R.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial source tracking assays to identify sources of waterborne contamination typically target genetic markers of host-specific microorganisms. However, no bacterial marker has been shown to be 100% host-specific, and cross-reactivity has been noted in studies evaluating known source samples. Using 485 challenge samples from 20 different human and animal fecal sources, this study evaluated microbial source tracking markers including the Bacteroides HF183 16S rRNA, M. smithii nifH, and Enterococcus esp gene targets that have been proposed as potential indicators of human fecal contamination. Bayes' Theorem was used to calculate the conditional probability that these markers or a combination of markers can correctly identify human sources of fecal pollution. All three human-associated markers were detected in 100% of the sewage samples analyzed. Bacteroides HF183 was the most effective marker for determining whether contamination was specifically from a human source, and greater than 98% certainty that contamination was from a human source was shown when both Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH markers were present. A high degree of certainty was attained even in cases where the prior probability of human fecal contamination was as low as 8.5%. The combination of Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH source tracking markers can help identify surface waters impacted by human fecal contamination, information useful for prioritizing restoration activities or assessing health risks from exposure to contaminated waters.

  11. Distribution of Human-Specific Bacteroidales and Fecal Indicator Bacteria in an Urban Watershed Impacted by Sewage Pollution, Determined Using RNA- and DNA-Based Quantitative PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Vikram; Pitkänen, Tarja; Ryu, Hodon; Elk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The identification of fecal pollution sources is commonly carried out using DNA-based methods. However, there is evidence that DNA can be associated with dead cells or present as “naked DNA” in the environment. Furthermore, it has been shown that rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays can be more sensitive than rRNA gene-based qPCR assays since metabolically active cells usually contain higher numbers of ribosomes than quiescent cells. To this end, we compared the detection frequency of host-specific markers and fecal bacteria using RNA-based RT-qPCR and DNA-based qPCR methods for water samples collected in sites impacted by combined sewer overflows. As a group, fecal bacteria were more frequently detected in most sites using RNA-based methods. Specifically, 8, 87, and 85% of the samples positive for general enterococci, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium markers, respectively, were detected using RT-qPCR, but not with the qPCR assay counterpart. On average, two human-specific Bacteroidales markers were not detected when using DNA in 12% of the samples, while they were positive for all samples when using RNA (cDNA) as the template. Moreover, signal intensity was up to three orders of magnitude higher in RT-qPCR assays than in qPCR assays. The human-specific Bacteroidales markers exhibited moderate correlation with conventional fecal indicators using RT-qPCR results, suggesting the persistence of nonhuman sources of fecal pollution or the presence of false-positive signals. In general, the results from this study suggest that RNA-based assays can increase the detection sensitivity of fecal bacteria in urban watersheds impacted with human fecal sources. PMID:25326295

  12. Polymorphism of the glucosyltransferase gene (ycjM) in Escherichia coli and its use for tracking human fecal pollution in water.

    PubMed

    Deng, Daiyong; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Reed, Mary; Liu, Fengjing; Zheng, Guolu

    2015-12-15

    This study examined polymorphism of the glucosyltransferase gene (ycjM) in fecal Escherichia coli isolates and evaluated the use of the sequence polymorphism for measuring human fecal pollution in water. Significant nucleotide variations were observed through comparative analysis of the ycjM sequences of 70 E. coli strains isolated from the feces of humans, domestic livestock, and wild animals. Three distinct types of ycjM sequences were found: universal-ycjM, human/chicken-ycjM, and human-ycjM. Using the human-ycjM sequences, both a polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Hycj-PCR and a quantitative PCR, Hycj-qPCR, were developed. As shown by the Hycj-PCR amplification, the human-ycjM marker appeared to be highly associated with the E. coli strains isolated from human feces, based on the analysis of 370 E. coli strains isolated from humans and seven other animal species. Similarly, the human-ycjM marker was highly linked with human feces, as demonstrated by the Hycj-PCR assay, when using 337 fecal DNA samples from 16 host animal sources, including both domestic and wild animals. Overall, the specificity and sensitivity of the human-ycjM marker for differentiating between the feces of humans and those of nonhuman groups were 99.7% and 100%, respectively; the prevalence of the marker appeared to be greater than 50% in the human-feces-associated E. coli population. In addition, our study showed that the quantification of human E. coli by the Hycj-qPCR was linearly correlated with the anthropogenic activity within a watershed. Our study suggests that this novel human-ycjM marker and the resulting PCR-based methods developed should be useful for measuring human-associated E. coli and human fecal pollution in water.

  13. Evaluation of the host-specificity and prevalence of enterococci surface protein (esp) marker in sewage and its application for sourcing human fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Stewart, J; Powell, D; Gardner, T

    2008-01-01

    The suitability of the enterococci surface protein (esp) marker to detect human fecal pollution was evaluated by testing 197 fecal samples from 13 host groups in Southeast Queensland, Australia. Overall, this marker was detected in 90.5% of sewage and septic system samples and could not be detected in any fecal samples from 12 animal host groups. The sensitivity of the esp primer to detect the human-specific esp marker in sewage and septic samples was 100 and 67%, respectively. The overall specificity of this marker to distinguish between human and animal fecal pollution was 100%. Its prevalence in sewage was also determined by testing samples from the raw sewage, secondary effluent, and treated effluent of a sewage treatment plant (STP) over five consecutive days. Of the 15 samples tested, 12 (80%) were found to be positive for this marker. In contrast, it was not found in three samples from the treated effluent and these samples did not contain any culturable enterococci. The PCR limit of detection of this marker in freshwater samples was up to dilution 1 x 10(-4) and the number of culturable enterococci at this dilution was 4.8 x 10(1) +/- 7.0 x 10 degrees colony forming unit (CFU). The utility of this marker was evaluated by testing water samples from three non-sewered catchments in Pine Rivers in Southeast Queensland. Of the 13 samples tested, eight were positive for this marker with the number of enterococci ranging between 1.8 x 10(3) to 8.5 x 10(3) CFU per 100 mL of water. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the esp marker appears to be sewage specific and could be used as a reliable marker to detect human fecal pollution in surface waters in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

  14. Fecal pollution source tracking toolbox for identification, evaluation and characterization of fecal contamination in receiving urban surface waters and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Han; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2015-12-15

    The quality of surface waters/groundwater of a geographical region can be affected by anthropogenic activities, land use patterns and fecal pollution sources from humans and animals. Therefore, the development of an efficient fecal pollution source tracking toolbox for identifying the origin of the fecal pollution sources in surface waters/groundwater is especially helpful for improving management efforts and remediation actions of water resources in a more cost-effective and efficient manner. This review summarizes the updated knowledge on the use of fecal pollution source tracking markers for detecting, evaluating and characterizing fecal pollution sources in receiving surface waters and groundwater. The suitability of using chemical markers (i.e. fecal sterols, fluorescent whitening agents, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, and artificial sweeteners) and/or microbial markers (e.g. F+RNA coliphages, enteric viruses, and host-specific anaerobic bacterial 16S rDNA genetic markers) for tracking fecal pollution sources in receiving water bodies is discussed. In addition, this review also provides a comprehensive approach, which is based on the detection ratios (DR), detection frequencies (DF), and fate of potential microbial and chemical markers. DR and DF are considered as the key criteria for selecting appropriate markers for identifying and evaluating the impacts of fecal contamination in surface waters/groundwater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantification of human-associated fecal indicators reveal sewage from urban watersheds as a source of pollution to Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templar, Hayley A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Bootsma, Melinda J.; Corsi, Steven; McLellan, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Sewage contamination of urban waterways from sewer overflows and failing infrastructure is a major environmental and public health concern. Fecal coliforms (FC) are commonly employed as fecal indicator bacteria, but do not distinguish between human and non-human sources of fecal contamination. Human Bacteroides and humanLachnospiraceae, two genetic markers for human-associated indicator bacteria, were used to identify sewage signals in two urban rivers and the estuary that drains to Lake Michigan. Grab samples were collected from the rivers throughout 2012 and 2013 and hourly samples were collected in the estuary across the hydrograph during summer 2013. Human Bacteroides and human Lachnospiraceae were highly correlated with each other in river samples (Pearson’s r = 0.86), with average concentrations at most sites elevated during wet weather. These human indicators were found during baseflow, indicating that sewage contamination is chronic in these waterways. FC are used for determining total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) in management plans; however, FC concentrations alone failed to prioritize river reaches with potential health risks. While 84% of samples with >1000 CFU/100 ml FC had sewage contamination, 52% of samples with moderate (200–1000 CFU/100 ml) and 46% of samples with low (<200 CFU/100 ml) FC levels also had evidence of human sewage. Load calculations in the in the Milwaukee estuary revealed storm-driven sewage contamination varied greatly among events and was highest during an event with a short duration of intense rain. This work demonstrates urban areas have unrecognized sewage inputs that may not be adequately prioritized for remediation by the TMDL process. Further analysis using these approaches could determine relationships between land use, storm characteristics, and other factors that drive sewage contamination in urban waterways.

  16. Pepper mild mottle virus as an indicator of fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Karyna; Symonds, Erin M; Sinigalliano, Christopher; Stewart, Jill; Breitbart, Mya

    2009-11-01

    Accurate indicators of fecal pollution are needed in order to minimize public health risks associated with wastewater contamination in recreational waters. However, the bacterial indicators currently used for monitoring water quality do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Here we demonstrate that the plant pathogen Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) is widespread and abundant in wastewater from the United States, suggesting the utility of this virus as an indicator of human fecal pollution. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the abundance of PMMoV in raw sewage, treated wastewater, seawater exposed to wastewater, and fecal samples and/or intestinal homogenates from a wide variety of animals. PMMoV was present in all wastewater samples at concentrations greater than 1 million copies per milliliter of raw sewage. Despite the ubiquity of PMMoV in human feces, this virus was not detected in the majority of animal fecal samples tested, with the exception of chicken and seagull samples. PMMoV was detected in four out of six seawater samples collected near point sources of secondary treated wastewater off southeastern Florida, where it co-occurred with several other pathogens and indicators of fecal pollution. Since PMMoV was not found in nonpolluted seawater samples and could be detected in surface seawater for approximately 1 week after its initial introduction, the presence of PMMoV in the marine environment reflects a recent contamination event. Together, these data demonstrate that PMMoV is a promising new indicator of fecal pollution in coastal environments.

  17. Determining Sources of Fecal Pollution in a Rural Virginia Watershed with Antibiotic Resistance Patterns in Fecal Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Charles; Robinson, Sandra L.; Filtz, Jennifer R.; Grubbs, Sarah M.; Angier, Theresa A.; Reneau, Raymond B.

    1999-01-01

    Nonpoint sources of pollution that contribute fecal bacteria to surface waters have proven difficult to identify. Knowledge of pollution sources could aid in restoration of the water quality, reduce the amounts of nutrients leaving watersheds, and reduce the danger of infectious disease resulting from exposure to contaminated waters. Patterns of antibiotic resistance in fecal streptococci were analyzed by discriminant and cluster analysis and used to identify sources of fecal pollution in a rural Virginia watershed. A database consisting of patterns from 7,058 fecal streptococcus isolates was first established from known human, livestock, and wildlife sources in Montgomery County, Va. Correct fecal streptococcus source identification averaged 87% for the entire database and ranged from 84% for deer isolates to 93% for human isolates. To field test the method and the database, a watershed improvement project (Page Brook) in Clarke County, Va., was initiated in 1996. Comparison of 892 known-source isolates from that watershed against the database resulted in an average correct classification rate of 88%. Combining all animal isolates increased correct classification rates to ≥95% for separations between animal and human sources. Stream samples from three collection sites were highly contaminated, and fecal streptococci from these sites were classified as being predominantly from cattle (>78% of isolates), with small proportions from waterfowl, deer, and unidentified sources (≈7% each). Based on these results, cattle access to the stream was restricted by installation of fencing and in-pasture watering stations. Fecal coliforms were reduced at the three sites by an average of 94%, from prefencing average populations of 15,900 per 100 ml to postfencing average populations of 960 per 100 ml. After fencing, <45% of fecal streptococcus isolates were classified as being from cattle. These results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance profiles in fecal streptococci can

  18. Determining sources of fecal pollution in a rural Virginia watershed with antibiotic resistance patterns in fecal streptococci.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, C; Robinson, S L; Filtz, J R; Grubbs, S M; Angier, T A; Reneau, R B

    1999-12-01

    Nonpoint sources of pollution that contribute fecal bacteria to surface waters have proven difficult to identify. Knowledge of pollution sources could aid in restoration of the water quality, reduce the amounts of nutrients leaving watersheds, and reduce the danger of infectious disease resulting from exposure to contaminated waters. Patterns of antibiotic resistance in fecal streptococci were analyzed by discriminant and cluster analysis and used to identify sources of fecal pollution in a rural Virginia watershed. A database consisting of patterns from 7,058 fecal streptococcus isolates was first established from known human, livestock, and wildlife sources in Montgomery County, Va. Correct fecal streptococcus source identification averaged 87% for the entire database and ranged from 84% for deer isolates to 93% for human isolates. To field test the method and the database, a watershed improvement project (Page Brook) in Clarke County, Va., was initiated in 1996. Comparison of 892 known-source isolates from that watershed against the database resulted in an average correct classification rate of 88%. Combining all animal isolates increased correct classification rates to > or = 95% for separations between animal and human sources. Stream samples from three collection sites were highly contaminated, and fecal streptococci from these sites were classified as being predominantly from cattle (>78% of isolates), with small proportions from waterfowl, deer, and unidentified sources ( approximately 7% each). Based on these results, cattle access to the stream was restricted by installation of fencing and in-pasture watering stations. Fecal coliforms were reduced at the three sites by an average of 94%, from prefencing average populations of 15,900 per 100 ml to postfencing average populations of 960 per 100 ml. After fencing, <45% of fecal streptococcus isolates were classified as being from cattle. These results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance profiles in fecal

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES OF FECAL POLLUTION IN ENVIRONMENTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of Microbial Source Tracking (MST) methods are currently used to determine the origin of fecal pollution impacting environmental waters. MST is based on the assumption that given the appropriate method and indicator organism, the source of fecal microbial pollution can ...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES OF FECAL POLLUTION IN ENVIRONMENTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of Microbial Source Tracking (MST) methods are currently used to determine the origin of fecal pollution impacting environmental waters. MST is based on the assumption that given the appropriate method and indicator organism, the source of fecal microbial pollution can ...

  1. Exposure to human source fecal indicators and self-reported illness among bathers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Indicator microorganisms are used to predict the presence of fecal pollution in water and assess associated health risks, usually gastrointestinal illness and diarrhea. Few studies have characterized the health risks associated with human fecal sources using microbi...

  2. Exposure to human source fecal indicators and self-reported illness among bathers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Indicator microorganisms are used to predict the presence of fecal pollution in water and assess associated health risks, usually gastrointestinal illness and diarrhea. Few studies have characterized the health risks associated with human fecal sources using microbi...

  3. Diversity of Bacteroides fragilis Strains in Their Capacity To Recover Phages from Human and Animal Wastes and from Fecally Polluted Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Anna; Queralt, Nuria; Jofre, Juan; Araujo, Rosa

    1999-01-01

    Great differences in capability to detect bacteriophages from urban sewage of the area of Barcelona existed among 115 strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The capability of six of the strains to detect phages in a variety of feces and wastewater was studied. Strains HSP40 and RYC4023 detected similar numbers of phages in urban sewage and did not detect phages in animal feces. The other four strains detected phages in the feces of different animal species and in wastewater of both human and animal origin. Strain RYC2056 recovered consistently higher counts than the other strains and also detected counts ranging from 101 to approximately 103 phages per ml in urban sewage from different geographical areas. This strain detected bacteriophages in animal feces even though their relative concentration with respect to the other fecal indicators was significantly lower in wastewater polluted with animal feces than in urban sewage. PMID:10103280

  4. A Microbial Signature Approach to Identify Fecal Pollution in the Waters Off an Urbanized Coast of Lake Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan J.; Bootsma, Melinda J.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2014-01-01

    Urban coasts receive watershed drainage from ecosystems that include highly developed lands with sewer and stormwater infrastructure. In these complex ecosystems, coastal waters are often contaminated with fecal pollution, where multiple delivery mechanisms that often contain multiple fecal sources make it difficult to mitigate the pollution. Here, we exploit bacterial community sequencing of the V6 and V6V4 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to identify bacterial distributions that signal the presence of sewer, fecal, and human fecal pollution. The sequences classified to three sewer infrastructure-associated bacterial genera, Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Trichococcus, and five fecal-associated bacterial families, Bacteroidaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, Clostridiaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae, served as signatures of sewer and fecal contamination, respectively. The human fecal signature was determined with the Bayesian source estimation program SourceTracker, which we applied to a set of 40 sewage influent samples collected in Milwaukee, WI, USA to identify operational taxonomic units (≥97 % identity) that were most likely of human fecal origin. During periods of dry weather, the magnitudes of all three signatures were relatively low in Milwaukee's urban rivers and harbor and nearly zero in Lake Michigan. However, the relative contribution of the sewer and fecal signature frequently increased to >2 % of the measured surface water communities following sewer overflows. Also during combined sewer overflows, the ratio of the human fecal pollution signature to the fecal pollution signature in surface waters was generally close to that of sewage, but this ratio decreased dramatically during dry weather and rain events, suggesting that nonhuman fecal pollution was the dominant source during these weather-driven scenarios. The qPCR detection of two human fecal indicators, human Bacteroides and Lachno2, confirmed the urban fecal footprint in

  5. A microbial signature approach to identify fecal pollution in the waters off an urbanized coast of Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ryan J; Bootsma, Melinda J; Morrison, Hilary G; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L

    2013-05-01

    Urban coasts receive watershed drainage from ecosystems that include highly developed lands with sewer and stormwater infrastructure. In these complex ecosystems, coastal waters are often contaminated with fecal pollution, where multiple delivery mechanisms that often contain multiple fecal sources make it difficult to mitigate the pollution. Here, we exploit bacterial community sequencing of the V6 and V6V4 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to identify bacterial distributions that signal the presence of sewer, fecal, and human fecal pollution. The sequences classified to three sewer infrastructure-associated bacterial genera, Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Trichococcus, and five fecal-associated bacterial families, Bacteroidaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, Clostridiaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae, served as signatures of sewer and fecal contamination, respectively. The human fecal signature was determined with the Bayesian source estimation program SourceTracker, which we applied to a set of 40 sewage influent samples collected in Milwaukee, WI, USA to identify operational taxonomic units (≥ 97 % identity) that were most likely of human fecal origin. During periods of dry weather, the magnitudes of all three signatures were relatively low in Milwaukee's urban rivers and harbor and nearly zero in Lake Michigan. However, the relative contribution of the sewer and fecal signature frequently increased to > 2 % of the measured surface water communities following sewer overflows. Also during combined sewer overflows, the ratio of the human fecal pollution signature to the fecal pollution signature in surface waters was generally close to that of sewage, but this ratio decreased dramatically during dry weather and rain events, suggesting that nonhuman fecal pollution was the dominant source during these weather-driven scenarios. The qPCR detection of two human fecal indicators, human Bacteroides and Lachno2, confirmed the urban fecal footprint

  6. [Uncultivated host-specific Bacteroidales markers identification of fecal source pollution--a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Changxiong; Zhu, Honghui

    2011-07-01

    Bacteroidales has been proposed as a fecal pollution indicator. microbial source tracking (MST) based on Bacteroidales host-specific gene markers has recently been applied in the fecal pollution identification, which does not require culturing the fecal pollution indicator organisms. This method needs to design specific primers. The primers are designed based on Bacteroidales specific 16S rRNA gene. Once a pair of specific primers was amplified, the fecal pollution can be identified. In this paper, the progress of specific primers of Bacteroidales in human, swine, ruminant feces were reviewed and discussed. The advantages and disadvantages were put forward. Future researchers should be focused on the new biological markers and the combination of different MST methods.

  7. FECAL POLLUTION, PUBLIC HEALTH AND MICROBIAL SOURCE TRACKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) seeks to provide information about sources of fecal water contamination. Without knowledge of sources, it is difficult to accurately model risk assessments, choose effective remediation strategies, or bring chronically polluted waters into complian...

  8. FECAL POLLUTION, PUBLIC HEALTH AND MICROBIAL SOURCE TRACKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) seeks to provide information about sources of fecal water contamination. Without knowledge of sources, it is difficult to accurately model risk assessments, choose effective remediation strategies, or bring chronically polluted waters into complian...

  9. Combining Watershed Variables with PCR-based Methods for Better Characterization and Management of Fecal Pollution in Small Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ability to distinguish between human and animal fecal pollution is important for risk assessment and watershed management, particularly in bodies of water used as sources of drinking water or for recreation. PCR-based methods were used to determine the source of fecal pollution ...

  10. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, crAssphage, was discovered by metagenomic data mining and reported to be abundant in and closely associated with human fecal waste. To confirm bioinformatic predictions, 384 primer sets were designed along the length of the crAssphage genome. Based upon initial screening, two novel crAssphage qPCR assays (CPQ_056 and CPQ_064) were designed and evaluated in reference fecal samples and water matrices. The assays exhibited high specificities (98.6%) when tested against a large animal fecal reference library and were highly abundant in raw sewage and sewage impacted water samples. In addition, CPQ_056 and CPQ_064 assay performance was compared to HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 methods in paired experiments. Findings confirm viral crAssphage qPCR assays perform at a similar level to well established bacterial human-associated fecal source identification technologies. These new viral based assays could become important water quality management and research tools. To inform the public.

  11. Gulls identified as major source of fecal pollution in coastal waters: a microbial source tracking study.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Susana; Henriques, Isabel S; Leandro, Sérgio Miguel; Alves, Artur; Pereira, Anabela; Correia, António

    2014-02-01

    Gulls were reported as sources of fecal pollution in coastal environments and potential vectors of human infections. Microbial source tracking (MST) methods were rarely tested to identify this pollution origin. This study was conducted to ascertain the source of water fecal contamination in the Berlenga Island, Portugal. A total of 169 Escherichia coli isolates from human sewage, 423 isolates from gull feces and 334 water isolates were analyzed by BOX-PCR. An average correct classification of 79.3% was achieved. When an 85% similarity cutoff was applied 24% of water isolates were present in gull feces against 2.7% detected in sewage. Jackknifing resulted in 29.3% of water isolates classified as gull, and 10.8% classified as human. Results indicate that gulls constitute a major source of water contamination in the Berlenga Island. This study validated a methodology to differentiate human and gull fecal pollution sources in a real case of a contaminated beach. © 2013.

  12. Flow fingerprinting fecal pollution and suspended solids in stormwater runoff from an urban coastal watershed.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Cristiane Q; Jiang, Sunny C; Ahn, Jong Ho; Grant, Stanley B

    2006-07-15

    Field studies were conducted to characterize the concentration vs streamflow relationships (or "flow fingerprints") of fecal pollution and suspended solids in stormwater runoff from the Santa Ana River watershed, the largest watershed in southern California. The concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and F+ coliphages (viruses infecting E. coli) exhibit little-to-no dependence on streamflow rates, whereas the concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) exhibit a very strong (power-law) dependence on streamflow rates. The different flow fingerprints observed for fecal pollutants, on one hand, and TSS, on the other hand, reflect different sources and transport pathways for these stormwater constituents. The flow-independent nature of fecal indicator bacteria and F+ coliphages is consistent with the idea that these contaminants are ubiquitously present on the surface of the urban landscape and rapidly partition into the surface water as the landscape is wetted by rainfall. The flow-dependent nature of TSS, on the other hand, is usually ascribed to the shear-induced erosion of channel bed sediments and/or the expansion of drainage area contributing to runoff. The apparent ubiquity of fecal indicator bacteria and F+ coliphages, together with the very high storm-loading rates of fecal indicator bacteria and the low detection frequency of human adenovirus and human enterovirus, suggest that fecal pollution in stormwater runoff from the Santa Ana River watershed is primarily of nonhuman waste origin.

  13. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with <50 EC 100 mL-1, human pharmaceuticals or chemical indicators of wastewater treatment plant effluent occurred in six, veterinary antibiotics were detected in three, and stx1 or stx2 genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sheridan K; Duris, Joseph W; Fogarty, Lisa R; Kolpin, Dana W; Focazio, Michael J; Furlong, Edward T; Meyer, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with <50 EC 100 mL(-1), human pharmaceuticals or chemical indicators of wastewater treatment plant effluent occurred in six, veterinary antibiotics were detected in three, and stx1 or stx2 genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions.

  15. Identification of hotspots and trends of fecal surface water pollution in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reder, Klara; Flörke, Martina; Alcamo, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Water is the essential resource ensuring human life on earth, which can only prosper when water is available and accessible. But of importance is not only the quantity of accessible water but also its quality, which in case of pollution may pose a risk to human health. The pollutants which pose a risk to human health are manifold, covering several groups such as pathogens, nutrients, human pharmaceuticals, heavy metals, and others. With regards to human health, pathogen contamination is of major interest as 4% of all death and 5.7% of disability or ill health in the world can be attributed to poor water supply, sanitation and personal and domestic hygiene. In developing countries, 2.6 billion people lacked access to improved sanitation in 2011. The lack of sanitation poses a risk to surface water pollution which is a threat to human health. A typical indicator for pathogen pollution is fecal coliform bacteria. The objective our study is to assess fecal pollution in the developing regions Africa, Asia and Latin America using the large-scale water quality model WorldQual. Model runs were carried-out to calculate in-stream concentrations and the respective loadings reaching rivers for the time period 1990 to 2010. We identified hotspots of fecal coliform loadings and in-stream concentrations which were further analyzed and ranked in terms of fecal surface water pollution. Main findings are that loadings mainly originate from the domestic sector, thus loadings are high in highly populated areas. In general, domestic loadings can be attributed to the two subsectors domestic sewered and domestic non sewered. The spatial distribution of both sectors varies across catchments. Hotspot pattern of in-stream concentrations are similar to the loadings pattern although they are different in seasonality. As the dilution varies with climate its dilution capacity is high during seasons with high precipitation, which in turn decreases the in-stream concentrations. The fecal

  16. Development of Cross-Assembly Phage PCR-Based Methods for Human Fecal Source Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technologies that can characterize human fecal pollution in environmental waters offer many advantages over traditional general indicator approaches. However, many human-associated methods cross-react with non-human animal sources and lack suitable sensitivity for fecal source id...

  17. Development of Cross-Assembly Phage PCR-Based Methods for Human Fecal Source Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technologies that can characterize human fecal pollution in environmental waters offer many advantages over traditional general indicator approaches. However, many human-associated methods cross-react with non-human animal sources and lack suitable sensitivity for fecal source id...

  18. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk management. The transition from a research subject to a management tool requires the integration of standardized water sampling, laboratory, and data analysis procedures. In this study, a standardized HF183/BacR287 qPCR method was combined with a water sampling strategy and Bayesian data algorithm to establish a human fecal contamination index that can be used to rank impaired recreational water sites polluted with human waste. Stability and bias of index predictions were investigated under various parameters including siteswith different pollution levels, sampling period time range (1-15 weeks), and number of qPCR replicates per sample (2-14 replicates). Sensitivity analyses were conducted with simulated data sets (100 iterations) seeded with HF183/BacR287 qPCR laboratory measurements from water samples collected from three Southern California sites (588 qPCR measurements). Findings suggest that site ranking is feasible and that all parameters tested influence stability and bias in human fecal contamination indexscoring. Trends identified by sensitivity analyses will provide managers with the information needed to design and conduct field studies to rank impaired recreational water sites based

  19. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk management. The transition from a research subject to a management tool requires the integration of standardized water sampling, laboratory, and data analysis procedures. In this study, a standardized HF183/BacR287 qPCR method was combined with a water sampling strategy and Bayesian data algorithm to establish a human fecal contamination index that can be used to rank impaired recreational water sites polluted with human waste. Stability and bias of index predictions were investigated under various parameters including siteswith different pollution levels, sampling period time range (1-15 weeks), and number of qPCR replicates per sample (2-14 replicates). Sensitivity analyses were conducted with simulated data sets (100 iterations) seeded with HF183/BacR287 qPCR laboratory measurements from water samples collected from three Southern California sites (588 qPCR measurements). Findings suggest that site ranking is feasible and that all parameters tested influence stability and bias in human fecal contamination indexscoring. Trends identified by sensitivity analyses will provide managers with the information needed to design and conduct field studies to rank impaired recreational water sites based

  20. COLIPHAGES AS POTENTIAL VIRAL INDICATORS OF FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Friedman, Stephanie D. In press. Coliphages as Potential Viral Indicators of Fecal Pollution (Abstract). To be presented at the SWS/GERS Fall Joint Society Meeting: Communication and Collaboration: Coastal Systems of the Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern United States, 6-9 October ...

  1. COLIPHAGES AS POTENTIAL VIRAL INDICATORS OF FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Friedman, Stephanie D. In press. Coliphages as Potential Viral Indicators of Fecal Pollution (Abstract). To be presented at the SWS/GERS Fall Joint Society Meeting: Communication and Collaboration: Coastal Systems of the Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern United States, 6-9 October ...

  2. Association of fecal indicator bacteria with human viruses and microbial source tracking markers at coastal beaches impacted by nonpoint source pollution.

    PubMed

    McQuaig, Shannon; Griffith, John; Harwood, Valerie J

    2012-09-01

    Water quality was assessed at two marine beaches in California by measuring the concentrations of culturable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and by library-independent microbial source tracking (MST) methods targeting markers of human-associated microbes (human polyomavirus [HPyV] PCR and quantitative PCR, Methanobrevibacter smithii PCR, and Bacteroides sp. strain HF183 PCR) and a human pathogen (adenovirus by nested PCR). FIB levels periodically exceeded regulatory thresholds at Doheny and Avalon Beaches for enterococci (28.5% and 31.7% of samples, respectively) and fecal coliforms (20% and 5.8%, respectively). Adenoviruses were detected at four of five sites at Doheny Beach and were correlated with detection of HPyVs and human Bacteroides HF183; however, adenoviruses were not detected at Avalon Beach. The most frequently detected human source marker at both beaches was Bacteroides HF183, which was detected in 27% of samples. Correlations between FIBs and human markers were much more frequent at Doheny Beach than at Avalon Beach; e.g., adenovirus was correlated with HPyVs and HF183. Human sewage markers and adenoviruses were routinely detected in samples meeting FIB regulatory standards. The toolbox approach of FIB measurement coupled with analysis of several MST markers targeting human pathogens used here demonstrated that human sewage is at least partly responsible for the degradation of water quality, particularly at Doheny Beach, and resulted in a more definitive assessment of recreational water quality and human health risk than reliance on FIB concentrations alone could have provided.

  3. Modeling the Transport and Fate of Fecal Pollution and Nutrients of Miyun Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Fu, X.; Wang, G.

    2009-12-01

    Miyun Reservoir, a mountain valley reservoir, is located 100 km northeast of Beijing City. Besides the functions of flood control, irrigation and fishery for Beijing area, Miyun Reservoir is the main drinking water storage for Beijing city. The water quality is therefore of great importance. Recently, the concentration of fecal pollution and nutrients in the reservoir are constantly rising to arrest the attention of Beijing municipality. Fecal pollution from sewage is a significant public health concern due to the known presence of human viruses and parasites in these discharges. To investigate the transport and fate of the fecal pollution and nutrients at Miyun reservoir and the health risks associated with drinking and fishery, the reservoir and two tributaries, Chaohe river and Baihe river discharging into it are being examined for bacterial, nutrients and other routine pollution. To understand the relative importance of different processes influencing pollution transport and inactivation, a finite-element model of surf-zone hydrodynamics (coupled with models for temperature, fecal pollution, nutrients and other routine contaminants) is used. The developed models are being verified by the observed water quality data including water temperature, conductivities and dissolved oxygen from the reservoir and its tributaries. Different factors impacting the inactivation of fecal pollution and the transport of nutrients such as water temperature, sedimentation, sunlight insolation are evaluated for Miyun reservoir by a sensitivity analysis analogized from the previous research of Lake Michigan (figure 1, indicating that solar insolation dominates the inactivation of E. Coli, an indicator of fecal pollution, Liu et al. 2006). The calibrated modeling system can be used to temporally and spatially simulate and predict the variation of the concentration of fecal pollution and nutrients of Miyun reservoir. Therefore this research can provide a forecasting tool for the

  4. Pepper Mild Mottle Virus as an Indicator of Fecal Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Karyna; Symonds, Erin M.; Sinigalliano, Christopher; Stewart, Jill; Breitbart, Mya

    2009-01-01

    Accurate indicators of fecal pollution are needed in order to minimize public health risks associated with wastewater contamination in recreational waters. However, the bacterial indicators currently used for monitoring water quality do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Here we demonstrate that the plant pathogen Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) is widespread and abundant in wastewater from the United States, suggesting the utility of this virus as an indicator of human fecal pollution. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the abundance of PMMoV in raw sewage, treated wastewater, seawater exposed to wastewater, and fecal samples and/or intestinal homogenates from a wide variety of animals. PMMoV was present in all wastewater samples at concentrations greater than 1 million copies per milliliter of raw sewage. Despite the ubiquity of PMMoV in human feces, this virus was not detected in the majority of animal fecal samples tested, with the exception of chicken and seagull samples. PMMoV was detected in four out of six seawater samples collected near point sources of secondary treated wastewater off southeastern Florida, where it co-occurred with several other pathogens and indicators of fecal pollution. Since PMMoV was not found in nonpolluted seawater samples and could be detected in surface seawater for approximately 1 week after its initial introduction, the presence of PMMoV in the marine environment reflects a recent contamination event. Together, these data demonstrate that PMMoV is a promising new indicator of fecal pollution in coastal environments. PMID:19767474

  5. Correlative Assessment of Fecal Indicators Using Human Mitochondrial DNA as a Direct Marker

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the source of surface water fecal contamination is paramount to mitigating pollution and risk to human health. Fecal bacteria such as E. coli have been staple indicator organisms for over a century, however there remains uncertainty with E. coli-based metrics since t...

  6. Correlative Assessment of Fecal Indicators Using Human Mitochondrial DNA as a Direct Marker

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the source of surface water fecal contamination is paramount to mitigating pollution and risk to human health. Fecal bacteria such as E. coli have been staple indicator organisms for over a century, however there remains uncertainty with E. coli-based metrics since t...

  7. Comparison of Sewage and Animal Fecal Microbiomes by using Oligotyping Reveals Potential Human Fecal Indicators in Multiple Taxonomic Groups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) approaches target host-associated organisms within the order Bacteroidales, but human and other animal gut microbiota contain an array of other taxonomic groups that might serve as indicators for sources of fecal pollution. High thr...

  8. Comparison of Sewage and Animal Fecal Microbiomes by using Oligotyping Reveals Potential Human Fecal Indicators in Multiple Taxonomic Groups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) approaches target host-associated organisms within the order Bacteroidales, but human and other animal gut microbiota contain an array of other taxonomic groups that might serve as indicators for sources of fecal pollution. High thr...

  9. Comparison of Sewage and Animal Fecal Microbiomes by Using Oligotyping Reveals Potential Human Fecal Indicators in Multiple Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jenny C.; Eren, A. Murat; Green, Hyatt C.; Shanks, Orin C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Vineis, Joseph H.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2015-01-01

    Most DNA-based microbial source tracking (MST) approaches target host-associated organisms within the order Bacteroidales, but the gut microbiota of humans and other animals contain organisms from an array of other taxonomic groups that might provide indicators of fecal pollution sources. To discern between human and nonhuman fecal sources, we compared the V6 regions of the 16S rRNA genes detected in fecal samples from six animal hosts to those found in sewage (as a proxy for humans). We focused on 10 abundant genera and used oligotyping, which can detect subtle differences between rRNA gene sequences from ecologically distinct organisms. Our analysis showed clear patterns of differential oligotype distributions between sewage and animal samples. Over 100 oligotypes of human origin occurred preferentially in sewage samples, and 99 human oligotypes were sewage specific. Sequences represented by the sewage-specific oligotypes can be used individually for development of PCR-based assays or together with the oligotypes preferentially associated with sewage to implement a signature-based approach. Analysis of sewage from Spain and Brazil showed that the sewage-specific oligotypes identified in U.S. sewage have the potential to be used as global alternative indicators of human fecal pollution. Environmental samples with evidence of prior human fecal contamination had consistent ratios of sewage signature oligotypes that corresponded to the trends observed for sewage. Our methodology represents a promising approach to identifying new bacterial taxa for MST applications and further highlights the potential of the family Lachnospiraceae to provide human-specific markers. In addition to source tracking applications, the patterns of the fine-scale population structure within fecal taxa suggest a fundamental relationship between bacteria and their hosts. PMID:26231648

  10. Tracing fecal pollution sources in karst groundwater by Bacteroidales genetic biomarkers, bacterial indicators, and environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Kelly, Walton R; Panno, Samuel V; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-08-15

    Fecal contamination in Midwestern karst regions was evaluated by simultaneously measuring traditional bacterial indicators (coliforms and Escherichia coli), Bacteroidales-based biomarkers, and environmental variables. Water samples from springs and wells were collected from karst regions in Illinois (IL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), and Missouri (MO). Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with seven primer sets targeting different members of Bacteroidales was used to determine the origin of fecal contamination (i.e., from human waste, livestock waste, or both). Most samples were contaminated by both human and animal waste, with a few samples showing pollution solely by one or the other. Spring water tended to have higher levels of contamination than well water, and higher concentrations of fecal biomarkers were detected in urban springs compared to rural spring systems. However, there were discrepancies on contamination profile determined by Bacteroidales-based biomarkers and by traditional bacterial indicators. Among all the environmental parameters examined, E. coli, sulfate, total dissolved solids (TDS), and silicon were significantly correlated (p<0.05) with the level of Bacteroidales-based fecal indicators. A rapid screening method using total nitrogen (TN) and chloride (Cl(-)) concentrations to determine fecal contamination was shown to be effective and correlated well with Bacteroidales-based MST. The results suggest that human and livestock feces co-contaminated a large portion of karst groundwater systems in Midwestern regions, and the inclusion of traditional bacterial indicators, environmental variables, and Bacteroidales-based MST is an effective approach for identifying fecal contamination in karst regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in Escherichia coli to Cryptosporidium ratios for various fecal pollution sources and drinking water intakes.

    PubMed

    Lalancette, Cindy; Papineau, Isabelle; Payment, Pierre; Dorner, Sarah; Servais, Pierre; Barbeau, Benoit; Di Giovanni, George D; Prévost, Michèle

    2014-05-15

    Assessing the presence of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium oocysts in surface water remains a significant water treatment and public health challenge. Most drinking water suppliers rely on fecal indicators, such as the well-established Escherichia coli (E. coli), to avoid costly Cryptosporidium assays. However, the use of E. coli has significant limitations in predicting the concentration, the removal and the transport of Cryptosporidium. This study presents a meta-analysis of E. coli to Cryptosporidium concentration paired ratios to compare their complex relationships in eight municipal wastewater sources, five agricultural fecal pollution sources and at 13 drinking water intakes (DWI) to a risk threshold based on US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulations. Ratios lower than the USEPA risk threshold suggested higher concentrations of oocysts in relation to E. coli concentrations, revealing an underestimed risk for Cryptosporidium based on E. coli measurements. In raw sewage (RS), high ratios proved E. coli (or fecal coliforms) concentrations were a conservative indicator of Cryptosporidium concentrations, which was also typically true for secondary treated wastewater (TWW). Removals of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and parasites were quantified in WWTPs and their differences are put forward as a plausible explanation of the sporadic ratio shift. Ratios measured from agricultural runoff surface water were typically lower than the USEPA risk threshold and within the range of risk misinterpretation. Indeed, heavy precipitation events in the agricultural watershed led to high oocyst concentrations but not to E. coli or enterococci concentrations. More importantly, ratios established in variously impacted DWI from 13 Canadian drinking water plants were found to be related to dominant fecal pollution sources, namely municipal sewage. In most cases, when DWIs were mainly influenced by municipal sewage, E. coli or fecal coliforms concentrations agreed with

  12. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired recreational watersusing the HF183 quantitative real-time PCR method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk managem...

  13. Human-, Ovine-, and Bovine-Specific Viral Source Tracking Tools to Discriminate Between the Major Fecal Sources in Agricultural Waters.

    PubMed

    Rusiñol, Marta; Moriarty, Elaine; Lin, Susan; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia; Gilpin, Brent

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the sources of fecal contamination in different river catchments, using a combination of microbial source tracking tools, for human, ruminant, ovine and bovine livestock, in order to define appropriate water management strategies. Every source of waterway pollution was evaluated in river water samples from one urban river catchment and two important farming regions in New Zealand. Fecal pollution was initially measured by testing Escherichia coli and evaluating the presence of human- and ruminant-associated DNA markers of Bacteroidales (BiAdo, BacHum-UCD, BacH, and BacR) and human and ruminant fecal sterols/stanols ratios. Then specific fecal pollution sources were assessed with previously reported quantitative PCR assays targeting human-, bovine-, and ovine-specific viruses: human adenoviruses (HAdV), human JC polyomaviruses, bovine polyomaviruses (BPyV), and ovine polyomaviruses (OPyV). High level of ruminant fecal contamination was detected all over the farming areas, whereas no ruminant sources were identified in the urban river sampling sites. BacR was the most frequently observed ruminant marker and OPyV and BPyV allowed the identification of ovine and bovine fecal sources. The human fecal viral marker (HAdV) was the most frequently observed human marker, highly abundant in the urban sites, and also present in farming areas. This is the first study using simultaneously the ovine and the bovine viral markers to identify and quantify both bovine and ovine fecal pollution.

  14. A human fecal contamination index for ranking impaired recreational watersusing the HF183 quantitative real-time PCR method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human fecal pollution of surface water remains a public health concern worldwide. As a result, there is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for recreational water quality risk managem...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA-BASED ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate between ruminant and human fecal pollution. These assays are rapid and relatively inexpensive but have been used in a limited number of studies. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy o...

  16. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA-BASED ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate between ruminant and human fecal pollution. These assays are rapid and relatively inexpensive but have been used in a limited number of studies. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy o...

  17. Distribution and Differential Survival of Traditional and Alternative Indicators of Fecal Pollution at Freshwater Beaches.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Danielle D; McLellan, Sandra L

    2017-02-15

    Alternative indicators have been developed that can be used to identify host sources of fecal pollution, yet little is known about how their distribution and fate compare to traditional indicators. Escherichia coli and enterococci were widely distributed at the six beaches studied and were detected in almost 95% of water samples (n = 422) and 100% of sand samples (n = 400). Berm sand contained the largest amount of E. coli (P < 0.01), whereas levels of enterococci were highest in the backshore (P < 0.01). E. coli and enterococci were the lowest in water, using a weight-to-volume comparison. The gull-associated Catellicoccus marimammalium (Gull2) marker was found in over 80% of water samples, regardless of E. coli levels, and in 25% of sand samples. Human-associated Bacteroides (HB) and Lachnospiraceae (Lachno2) were detected in only 2.4% of water samples collected under baseflow and post-rain conditions but produced a robust signal after a combined sewage overflow, despite low E. coli concentrations. Burdens of E. coli and enterococci in water and sand were disproportionately high in relation to alternative indicators when comparing environmental samples to source material. In microcosm studies, Gull2, HB, and Lachno2 quantitative PCR (qPCR) signals were reduced twice as quickly as those from E. coli and enterococci and approximately 20% faster than signals from culturable E. coli High concentrations of alternative indicators in source material illustrated their high sensitivity for the identification of fecal sources; however, differential survival and the potential for long-term persistence of traditional fecal indicators complicate the use of alternative indicator data to account for the levels of E. coli and enterococci in environmental samples. E. coli and enterococci are general indicators of fecal pollution and may persist in beach sand, making their use problematic for many applications. This study demonstrates that gull fecal pollution is widespread at

  18. Distribution and Differential Survival of Traditional and Alternative Indicators of Fecal Pollution at Freshwater Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Danielle D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative indicators have been developed that can be used to identify host sources of fecal pollution, yet little is known about how their distribution and fate compare to traditional indicators. Escherichia coli and enterococci were widely distributed at the six beaches studied and were detected in almost 95% of water samples (n = 422) and 100% of sand samples (n = 400). Berm sand contained the largest amount of E. coli (P < 0.01), whereas levels of enterococci were highest in the backshore (P < 0.01). E. coli and enterococci were the lowest in water, using a weight-to-volume comparison. The gull-associated Catellicoccus marimammalium (Gull2) marker was found in over 80% of water samples, regardless of E. coli levels, and in 25% of sand samples. Human-associated Bacteroides (HB) and Lachnospiraceae (Lachno2) were detected in only 2.4% of water samples collected under baseflow and post-rain conditions but produced a robust signal after a combined sewage overflow, despite low E. coli concentrations. Burdens of E. coli and enterococci in water and sand were disproportionately high in relation to alternative indicators when comparing environmental samples to source material. In microcosm studies, Gull2, HB, and Lachno2 quantitative PCR (qPCR) signals were reduced twice as quickly as those from E. coli and enterococci and approximately 20% faster than signals from culturable E. coli. High concentrations of alternative indicators in source material illustrated their high sensitivity for the identification of fecal sources; however, differential survival and the potential for long-term persistence of traditional fecal indicators complicate the use of alternative indicator data to account for the levels of E. coli and enterococci in environmental samples. IMPORTANCE E. coli and enterococci are general indicators of fecal pollution and may persist in beach sand, making their use problematic for many applications. This study demonstrates that gull fecal pollution

  19. Identifying human and livestock sources of fecal contamination in Kenya with host-specific Bacteroidales assays.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Marion W; Tiwari, Sangam; Lorente, Mario; Gichaba, Charles Maina; Wuertz, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Microbial source tracking to distinguish between human, livestock and wildlife fecal pollution using molecular techniques is a rapidly evolving approach in many developed countries, but has not previously been applied on the African continent. DNA extracts from cow, donkey, and human fecal specimens and raw domestic sewage samples collected in Kenya were tested against five existing quantitative PCR assays designed to detect universal (2), human-specific (2), and cow-specific (1) fecal Bacteroidales genetic markers. Water samples from the River Njoro in Kenya were evaluated using the five tested Bacteroidales markers and a multi-species assay for Cryptosporidium in a preliminary exploration of fecal pollution sources and health risks in this watershed. Diagnostic sensitivity on the validation set varied from 18 to 100% for the five assays while diagnostic specificity was 100%. Of the 2 universal assays, Total Bacteroidales [Dick, L.K, Field, K.G., 2004. Rapid estimation of numbers of fecal Bacteroidetes by use of a quantitative PCR assay for 16S rRNA genes. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70, 5695-5697] showed lower generic fecal diagnostic sensitivity, at 55%, than BacUni-UCD, at 100%, in detecting fecal markers on the 42-sample validation set. Human-specific assay HF183 demonstrated 65% sensitivity overall, and 80% on the human sewage samples, compared to 18% overall and 0% sewage for human-specific assay BacHum-UCD. Cow-specific assay BacCow-UCD had 94% sensitivity. Testing of 18 water samples indicates cows are a likely predominant source of fecal contamination in the Njoro Watershed (78% prevailing rate). Probabilistic assessment of human assay results indicates at most three of the river water samples contained human Bacteroidales. Cryptosporidium spp. markers were detected in samples from nine of the 12 sampling locations. Evidence suggesting widespread contamination by cow feces and Cryptosporidium in the Njoro watershed raises serious concerns for human and

  20. Assessment of a new Bacteroidales marker targeting North American beaver (Castor canadensis) fecal pollution by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Marti, Romain; Zhang, Yun; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Lapen, David R; Topp, Edward

    2013-11-01

    In many settings wildlife can be a significant source of fecal pathogen input into surface water. The North American beaver (Castor canadensis) is a zoonotic reservoir for several human pathogens including Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. In order to specifically detect fecal pollution by beavers, we have developed and validated a beaver-specific Bacteroidales marker, designated Beapol01, based on the 16S rRNA gene. The marker is suitable for quantifying pollution using real-time PCR. The specificity and sensitivity of the marker was excellent, Beaver signal was detected in water of a mixed-activity watershed harbouring this rodent. Overall, Beapol01 will be useful for a better understanding of fecal source inputs in drainage basins inhabited by the beaver. © 2013.

  1. Development of Bacteroides 16S rRNA Gene TaqMan-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Estimation of Total, Human, and Bovine Fecal Pollution in Water

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Alice; McKay, Larry; Williams, Dan; Garrett, Victoria; Gentry, Randall; Sayler, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Bacteroides species are promising indicators for differentiating livestock and human fecal contamination in water because of their high concentration in feces and potential host specificity. In this study, a real-time PCR assay was designed to target Bacteroides species (AllBac) present in human, cattle, and equine feces. Direct PCR amplification (without DNA extraction) using the AllBac assay was tested on feces diluted in water. Fecal concentrations and threshold cycle were linearly correlated, indicating that the AllBac assay can be used to estimate the total amount of fecal contamination in water. Real-time PCR assays were also designed for bovine-associated (BoBac) and human-associated (HuBac) Bacteroides 16S rRNA genes. Assay specificities were tested using human, bovine, swine, canine, and equine fecal samples. The BoBac assay was specific for bovine fecal samples (100% true-positive identification; 0% false-positive identification). The HuBac assay had a 100% true-positive identification, but it also had a 32% false-positive rate with potential for cross-amplification with swine feces. The assays were tested using creek water samples from three different watersheds. Creek water did not inhibit PCR, and results from the AllBac assay were correlated with those from Escherichia coli concentrations (r2 = 0.85). The percentage of feces attributable to bovine and human sources was determined for each sample by comparing the values obtained from the BoBac and HuBac assays with that from the AllBac assay. These results suggest that real-time PCR assays without DNA extraction can be used to quantify fecal concentrations and provide preliminary fecal source identification in watersheds. PMID:16751534

  2. DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION OF COW FECAL POLLUTION WITH REAL-TIME PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with cow fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described cow-specific g...

  3. DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION OF COW FECAL POLLUTION WITH REAL-TIME PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with cow fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described cow-specific g...

  4. Characterization of sources and loadings of fecal pollutants using microbial source tracking assays in urban and rural areas of the Grand River Watershed, Southwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T; Weir, Susan C; Thomas, Janis L; Habash, Marc

    2014-04-15

    Sources of fecal water pollution were assessed in the Grand River and two of its tributaries (Ontario, Canada) using total and host-specific (human and bovine) Bacteroidales genetic markers in conjunction with reference information, such as land use and weather. In-stream levels of the markers and culturable Escherichia coli were also monitored during multiple rain events to gain information on fecal loadings to catchment from diffuse sources. Elevated human-specific marker levels were accurately identified in river water impacted by a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent and at a downstream site in the Grand River. In contrast, the bovine-specific marker showed high levels of cattle fecal pollution in two tributaries, both of which are characterized as intensely farmed areas. The bovine-specific Bacteroidales marker increased with rainfall in the agricultural tributaries, indicating enhanced loading of cattle-derived fecal pollutants to river from non-point sources following rain events. However, rain-triggered fecal loading was not substantiated in urban settings, indicating continuous inputs of human-originated fecal pollutants from point sources, such as WWTP effluent. This study demonstrated that the Bacteroidales source tracking assays, in combination with land use information and hydrological data, may provide additional insight into the spatial and temporal distribution of source-specific fecal contamination in streams impacted by varying land uses. Using the approach described in this study may help to characterize impacted water sources and to design targeted land use management plans in other watersheds in the future.

  5. Bacteriophages as indicators of fecal pollution and enteric virus removal.

    PubMed

    McMinn, Brian R; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Korajkic, Asja

    2017-03-17

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport, due to their closer morphological and biological properties. Based on a review of published data, we summarize densities of coliphages (F+ and somatic), Bacteroides spp. and enterococci bacteriophages (phages) in individual human waste, raw wastewater, ambient fresh and marine waters and removal through wastewater treatment processes utilizing traditional treatments. We also provide comparisons with FIB and enteric viruses whenever possible. Lastly, we examine fate and transport characteristics in the aquatic environment and provide an overview of the environmental factors affecting their survival. In summary, concentrations of bacteriophages in various sources were consistently lower than FIB, but more reflective of infectious enteric virus levels. Overall, our investigation indicates that bacteriophages may be adequate viral surrogates, especially in built systems, such as wastewater treatment plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Microplate fecal coliform method to monitor stream water pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Maul, A; Block, J C

    1983-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the Moselle River by means of a microtechnique based on the most-probable-number method for fecal coliform enumeration. This microtechnique, in which each serial dilution of a sample is inoculated into all 96 wells of a microplate, was compared with the standard membrane filter method. It showed a marked overestimation of about 14% due, probably, to the lack of absolute specificity of the method. The high precision of the microtechnique (13%, in terms of the coefficient of variation for log most probable number) and its relative independence from the influence of bacterial density allowed the use of analysis of variance to investigate the effects of spatial and temporal bacterial heterogeneity on the estimation of coliforms. Variability among replicate samples, subsamples, handling, and analytical errors were considered as the major sources of variation in bacterial titration. Variances associated with individual components of the sampling procedure were isolated, and optimal replications of each step were determined. Temporal variation was shown to be more influential than the other three components (most probable number, subsample, sample to sample), which were approximately equal in effect. However, the incidence of sample-to-sample variability (16%, in terms of the coefficient of variation for log most probable number) caused by spatial heterogeneity of bacterial populations in the Moselle River is shown and emphasized. Consequently, we recommend that replicate samples be taken on each occasion when conducting a sampling program for a stream pollution survey. PMID:6360044

  7. INFLUENCE OF DIET ON THE PERFORMANCE OF BOVINE FECAL POLLUTION DETECTION METHODS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Background and Aims. Waterborne diseases originating from bovine fecal material are a significant public health issue. Ensuring water quality requires the use of methods that can consistently identify pollution across a broad range of management practices. One practi...

  8. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  9. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  10. INFLUENCE OF DIET ON THE PERFORMANCE OF BOVINE FECAL POLLUTION DETECTION METHODS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Background and Aims. Waterborne diseases originating from bovine fecal material are a significant public health issue. Ensuring water quality requires the use of methods that can consistently identify pollution across a broad range of management practices. One practi...

  11. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING PCR AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES OF BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for assessing fecal pollution in environmental systems, such as monitoring for fecal coliforms are not capable of discriminating between different sources fecal pollution. Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate betw...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF FECAL POLLUTION SOURCES IN PLUM CREEK WATERSHED USING PCR AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSES OF BACTEROIDETES 16S RDNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for assessing fecal pollution in environmental systems, such as monitoring for fecal coliforms are not capable of discriminating between different sources fecal pollution. Recently, 16S rDNA Bacteroidetes-targeted PCR assays were developed to discriminate betw...

  13. Fecal pathogen pollution: sources and patterns in water and sediment samples from the upper Cook Inlet, Alaska ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Norman, Stephanie A; Hobbs, Roderick C; Wuertz, Stefan; Melli, Ann; Beckett, Laurel A; Chouicha, Nadira; Kundu, Arti; Miller, Woutrina A

    2013-05-01

    Fecal pathogens are transported from a variety of sources in multi-use ecosystems such as upper Cook Inlet (CI), Alaska, which includes the state's urban center and is highly utilized by humans and animals. This study used a novel water quality testing approach to evaluate the presence and host sources of potential fecal pathogens in surface waters and sediments from aquatic ecosystems in upper CI. Matched water and sediment samples, along with effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment facility, were screened for Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., and noroviruses. Additionally, Bacteroidales spp. for microbial source tracking, and the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus spp. as well as fecal coliforms were evaluated. Overall, Giardia and Vibrio were the most frequently detected potential pathogens, followed by Cryptosporidium and norovirus, while Salmonella was not detected. Sample month, matrix type, and recent precipitation were found to be significant environmental factors for protozoa or host-associated Bacteroidales marker detection, whereas location and water temperature were not. The relative contribution of host-associated markers to total fecal marker concentration was estimated using a Monte Carlo method, with the greatest relative contribution to the Bacteroidales marker concentration coming from human sources, while the remainder of the universal fecal host source signal was uncharacterized by available host-associated assays, consistent with wildlife fecal sources. These findings show how fecal indicator and pathogen monitoring, along with identifying contributing host sources, can provide evidence of coastal pathogen pollution and guidance as to whether to target human and/or animal sources for management.

  14. Detection of spatial fluctuations of non-point source fecal pollution in coral reef surrounding waters in southwestern Puerto Rico using PCR-based assays.

    PubMed

    Bonkosky, M; Hernández-Delgado, E A; Sandoz, B; Robledo, I E; Norat-Ramírez, J; Mattei, H

    2009-01-01

    Human fecal contamination of coral reefs is a major cause of concern. Conventional methods used to monitor microbial water quality cannot be used to discriminate between different fecal pollution sources. Fecal coliforms, enterococci, and human-specific Bacteroides (HF183, HF134), general Bacteroides-Prevotella (GB32), and Clostridium coccoides group (CP) 16S rDNA PCR assays were used to test for the presence of non-point source fecal contamination across the southwestern Puerto Rico shelf. Inshore waters were highly turbid, consistently receiving fecal pollution from variable sources, and showing the highest frequency of positive molecular marker signals. Signals were also detected at offshore waters in compliance with existing microbiological quality regulations. Phylogenetic analysis showed that most isolates were of human fecal origin. The geographic extent of non-point source fecal pollution was large and impacted extensive coral reef systems. This could have deleterious long-term impacts on public health, local fisheries and in tourism potential if not adequately addressed.

  15. Methods of targeting animal sources of fecal pollution in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, proposed chemical and biological MST indicators for the determination of animal fecal sources are discussed. The biological indicators are grouped based on the phylogenetic description of the proposed target (eukarya, bacteria, and virus). A comprehensive descrip...

  16. Methods of targeting animal sources of fecal pollution in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, proposed chemical and biological MST indicators for the determination of animal fecal sources are discussed. The biological indicators are grouped based on the phylogenetic description of the proposed target (eukarya, bacteria, and virus). A comprehensive descrip...

  17. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin; Fong, Theng-Theng; Bibby, Kyle; Molina, Marirosa

    2012-09-15

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infection, enteric viruses replicate and are excreted in high numbers in the hosts' feces and urine. Due to the specificity in host infection, enteric viruses have been considered one of the most accurate library-independent culture-independent MST tools. In an assessment of molecular viral assays based on sensitivity, specificity and the density of the target virus in fecal-impacted samples, human adenovirus and human polyomavirus were found to be the most promising human-specific viral markers. However, more research is needed to identify promising viral markers for livestock because of cross-reactions that were observed among livestock species or the limited number of samples tested for specificity. Other viral indicators of fecal origin, F+ RNA coliphage and pepper mild mottle virus, have also been proposed as potential targets for developing MST markers. Enhancing the utility of enteric viruses for MST applications through next generation sequencing (NGS) and virus concentration technology is discussed in the latter part of this review. The massive sequence databases generated by shotgun and gene-targeted metagenomics enable more efficient and reliable design of MST assays. Finally, recent studies revealed that alternative virus concentration methodologies may be more cost-effective than standard technologies such as 1MDS; however, improvements in the recovery efficiency and consistency are still needed. Overall, developments in metagenomic information combined with efficient concentration methodologies, as well as high host-specificity, make enteric viruses a promising tool in MST applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. EVALUATION OF HOST SPECIFIC PCR-BASED METHODS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial Source Tracking (MST) is an approach to determine the origin of fecal pollution impacting a body of water. MST is based on the assumption that, given the appropriate method and indicator, the source of microbial pollution can be identified. One of the key elements of...

  19. EVALUATION OF HOST SPECIFIC PCR-BASED METHODS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial Source Tracking (MST) is an approach to determine the origin of fecal pollution impacting a body of water. MST is based on the assumption that, given the appropriate method and indicator, the source of microbial pollution can be identified. One of the key elements of...

  20. Removal of bacterial fecal indicators, coliphages and enteric adenoviruses from waters with high fecal pollution by slow sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rosalie; Dizer, Halim; Graeber, Ingeborg; Rosenwinkel, Karl-Heinz; López-Pila, Juan M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the performance of slow sand filtration (SSF) facilities, including the time needed for reaching stabilization (maturation), operated with surface water bearing high fecal contamination, representing realistic conditions of rivers in many emerging countries. Surface water spiked with wastewater was infiltrated at different pore water velocities (PWV) and samples were collected at different migration distances. The samples were analyzed for phages and to a lesser extent for fecal bacteria and enteric adenoviruses. At the PWV of 50 cm/d, at which somatic phages showed highest removal, their mean log(10) removal after 90 cm migration was 3.2. No substantial differences of removal rates were observed at PWVs between 100 and 900 cm/d (2.3 log(10) mean removal). The log(10) mean removal of somatic phages was less than the observed for fecal bacteria and tended more towards that of enteric adenoviruses This makes somatic phages a potentially better process indicator than Escherichia coli for the removal of viruses in SSF. We conclude that SSF, and by inference in larger scale river bank filtration (RBF), is an excellent option as a component in multi-barrier systems for drinking water treatment also in areas where the sources of raw water are considerably fecally polluted, as often found in many emerging countries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothesis-driven approach for the identification of fecal pollution sources in water resources.

    PubMed

    Reischer, G H; Kollanur, D; Vierheilig, J; Wehrspaun, C; Mach, R L; Sommer, R; Stadler, H; Farnleitner, A H

    2011-05-01

    Water resource management must strive to link catchment information with water quality monitoring. The present study attempted this for the field of microbial fecal source tracking (MST). A fecal pollution source profile based on catchment data (e.g., prevalence of fecal sources) was used to formulate a hypothesis about the dominant sources of pollution in an Austrian mountainous karst spring catchment. This allowed a statistical definition of methodical requirements necessary for an informed choice of MST methods. The hypothesis was tested in a 17-month investigation of spring water quality. The study followed a nested sampling design in order to cover the hydrological and pollution dynamics of the spring and to assess effects such as differential persistence between parameters. Genetic markers for the potential fecal sources as well as microbiological, hydrological, and chemo-physical parameters were measured. The hypothesis that ruminant animals were the dominant sources of fecal pollution in the catchment was clearly confirmed. It was also shown that the concentration of ruminant markers in feces was equally distributed in different ruminant source groups. The developed approach provides a tool for careful decision-making in MST study design and might be applied on various types of catchments and pollution situations.

  2. Hypothesis-Driven Approach for the Identification of Fecal Pollution Sources in Water Resources

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Water resource management must strive to link catchment information with water quality monitoring. The present study attempted this for the field of microbial fecal source tracking (MST). A fecal pollution source profile based on catchment data (e.g., prevalence of fecal sources) was used to formulate a hypothesis about the dominant sources of pollution in an Austrian mountainous karst spring catchment. This allowed a statistical definition of methodical requirements necessary for an informed choice of MST methods. The hypothesis was tested in a 17-month investigation of spring water quality. The study followed a nested sampling design in order to cover the hydrological and pollution dynamics of the spring and to assess effects such as differential persistence between parameters. Genetic markers for the potential fecal sources as well as microbiological, hydrological, and chemo−physical parameters were measured. The hypothesis that ruminant animals were the dominant sources of fecal pollution in the catchment was clearly confirmed. It was also shown that the concentration of ruminant markers in feces was equally distributed in different ruminant source groups. The developed approach provides a tool for careful decision-making in MST study design and might be applied on various types of catchments and pollution situations. PMID:21466151

  3. Toolbox Approaches Using Molecular Markers and 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Data Sets for Identification of Fecal Pollution in Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Staley, C; Sadowsky, M J; Gyawali, P; Sidhu, J P S; Palmer, A; Beale, D J; Toze, S

    2015-10-01

    In this study, host-associated molecular markers and bacterial 16S rRNA gene community analysis using high-throughput sequencing were used to identify the sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters in Brisbane, Australia. A total of 92 fecal and composite wastewater samples were collected from different host groups (cat, cattle, dog, horse, human, and kangaroo), and 18 water samples were collected from six sites (BR1 to BR6) along the Brisbane River in Queensland, Australia. Bacterial communities in the fecal, wastewater, and river water samples were sequenced. Water samples were also tested for the presence of bird-associated (GFD), cattle-associated (CowM3), horse-associated, and human-associated (HF183) molecular markers, to provide multiple lines of evidence regarding the possible presence of fecal pollution associated with specific hosts. Among the 18 water samples tested, 83%, 33%, 17%, and 17% were real-time PCR positive for the GFD, HF183, CowM3, and horse markers, respectively. Among the potential sources of fecal pollution in water samples from the river, DNA sequencing tended to show relatively small contributions from wastewater treatment plants (up to 13% of sequence reads). Contributions from other animal sources were rarely detected and were very small (<3% of sequence reads). Source contributions determined via sequence analysis versus detection of molecular markers showed variable agreement. A lack of relationships among fecal indicator bacteria, host-associated molecular markers, and 16S rRNA gene community analysis data was also observed. Nonetheless, we show that bacterial community and host-associated molecular marker analyses can be combined to identify potential sources of fecal pollution in an urban river. This study is a proof of concept, and based on the results, we recommend using bacterial community analysis (where possible) along with PCR detection or quantification of host-associated molecular markers to provide information on

  4. Toolbox Approaches Using Molecular Markers and 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Data Sets for Identification of Fecal Pollution in Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Staley, C.; Sadowsky, M. J.; Gyawali, P.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Palmer, A.; Beale, D. J.; Toze, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, host-associated molecular markers and bacterial 16S rRNA gene community analysis using high-throughput sequencing were used to identify the sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters in Brisbane, Australia. A total of 92 fecal and composite wastewater samples were collected from different host groups (cat, cattle, dog, horse, human, and kangaroo), and 18 water samples were collected from six sites (BR1 to BR6) along the Brisbane River in Queensland, Australia. Bacterial communities in the fecal, wastewater, and river water samples were sequenced. Water samples were also tested for the presence of bird-associated (GFD), cattle-associated (CowM3), horse-associated, and human-associated (HF183) molecular markers, to provide multiple lines of evidence regarding the possible presence of fecal pollution associated with specific hosts. Among the 18 water samples tested, 83%, 33%, 17%, and 17% were real-time PCR positive for the GFD, HF183, CowM3, and horse markers, respectively. Among the potential sources of fecal pollution in water samples from the river, DNA sequencing tended to show relatively small contributions from wastewater treatment plants (up to 13% of sequence reads). Contributions from other animal sources were rarely detected and were very small (<3% of sequence reads). Source contributions determined via sequence analysis versus detection of molecular markers showed variable agreement. A lack of relationships among fecal indicator bacteria, host-associated molecular markers, and 16S rRNA gene community analysis data was also observed. Nonetheless, we show that bacterial community and host-associated molecular marker analyses can be combined to identify potential sources of fecal pollution in an urban river. This study is a proof of concept, and based on the results, we recommend using bacterial community analysis (where possible) along with PCR detection or quantification of host-associated molecular markers to provide information on

  5. Antibiotic resistance analysis of fecal coliforms to determine fecal pollution sources in a mixed-use watershed.

    PubMed

    Burnes, Brian S

    2003-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance analysis was performed on fecal coliform (FC) bacteria from a mixed-use watershed to determine the source, human or nonhuman, of fecal coliform contamination. The study consisted of discriminant analysis of antibiotic resistance patterns generated by exposure to four concentrations of six antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin sulfate, kanamycin, spectinomycin dihydrochloride, streptomycin sulfate, and tetracycline hydrochloride). A reference database was constructed from 1125 fecal coliform isolates from the following sources: humans, domestic animals (cats and dogs), agricultural animals (chickens, cattle, and horses), and wild animals. Based on similar antibiotic resistance patterns, cat and dog isolates were grouped as domestic animals and horse and cattle isolates were grouped as livestock. The resulting average rate of correct classification (ARCC) for human and nonhuman isolates was 94%. A total of 800 FC isolates taken from the watershed during either a dry event or a wet event were classified according to source. Human sources contribute a majority (> 50%) of the baseflow FC isolates found in the watershed in urbanized areas. Chicken and livestock sources are responsible for the majority of the baseflow FC isolates found in the rural reaches of the watershed. Stormwater introduces FC isolates from domestic (approximately 16%) and wild (approximately 21%) sources throughout the watershed and varying amounts (up to 60%) from chicken and livestock sources. These results suggest that antibiotic resistance patterns of FC may be used to determine sources of fecal contamination and aid in the direction of water quality improvement.

  6. Isolating the impact of septic systems on fecal pollution in streams of suburban watersheds in Georgia, United States.

    PubMed

    Sowah, Robert A; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Radcliffe, David E; Bauske, Ellen; Risse, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The presence of multiple sources of fecal pollution at the watershed level presents challenges to efforts aimed at identifying the influence of septic systems. In this study multiple approaches including targeted sampling and monitoring of host-specific Bacteroidales markers were used to identify the impact of septic systems on microbial water quality. Twenty four watersheds with septic density ranging from 8 to 373 septic units/km(2) were monitored for water quality under baseflow conditions over a 3-year period. The levels of the human-associated HF183 marker, as well as total and ruminant Bacteroidales, were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Human-associated Bacteroidales yield was significantly higher in high density watersheds compared to low density areas and was negatively correlated (r = -0.64) with the average distance of septic systems to streams in the spring season. The human marker was also positively correlated with the total Bacteroidales marker, suggesting that the human source input was a significant contributor to total fecal pollution in the study area. Multivariable regression analysis indicates that septic systems, along with forest cover, impervious area and specific conductance could explain up to 74% of the variation in human fecal pollution in the spring season. The results suggest septic system impact through contributions to groundwater recharge during baseflow or failing septic system input, especially in areas with >87 septic units/km(2). This study supports the use of microbial source tracking approaches along with traditional fecal indicator bacteria monitoring and land use characterization in a tiered approach to isolate the influence of septic systems on water quality in mixed-use watersheds.

  7. Detection of human-derived fecal contamination in Puerto Rico using carbamazepine, HF183 Bacteroides, and fecal indicator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wade, Christina; Otero, Ernesto; Poon-Kwong, Brennan; Rozier, Ralph; Bachoon, Dave

    2015-12-30

    The level of fecal pollution in 17 sites in Puerto Rico was determined by Escherichia coli (E.coli) enumeration using an enzyme substrate medium and Quanti-Tray®/2000. Human fecal pollution was identified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of carbamazepine (CBZ) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection of the human Bacteroides marker, HF183. Carbamazepine was detected in 16 out of 17 sites, including Condado Lagoon, a popular recreational area. Elevated E.coli levels (>410 CFU 100 mL(-1)) were detected in 13 sites. Average CBZ concentrations ranged from 0.005 μg L(-1) to 0.482 μg L(-1) and 7 sites were positive for HF183. Higher CBZ concentrations were associated with the detection of HF183 (Mann-Whitney test; U=42.0; df=7; 1-tailed P value=0.013). This was the second study to determine surface water concentrations of CBZ in the Caribbean and the first in Puerto Rico. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and validation of a microbial source tracking marker for the detection of fecal pollution by muskrats.

    PubMed

    Marti, Romain; Zhang, Yun; Lapen, David R; Topp, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Surface waters in mixed-activity watersheds can be compromised by fecal pollution from livestock production, sewage outflows or leaking septic systems, or avian or mammalian wildlife. While undertaking water quality research in Eastern Ontario Canada, we observed an abundance of muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) in some waterways, and sought to determine their significance with respect to fecal pollution loads. To that end, we developed and validated here a sensitive and specific marker, designated MuBa01, based on the 16S rRNA gene that distinguishes muskrat feces from human, livestock, or other wildlife sources. DNA from waterways inhabited by muskrats carried the marker. The widely used pig-specific marker Pig-2-Bac yielded a product with some muskrat feces, suggesting that it lacks specificity required to establish the significance of swine production in areas inhabited by muskrats. Overall, the MuBa01 marker will be useful for distinguishing the significance of this wide-ranging semi-aquatic mammal in the context of other fecal pollution sources.

  9. Correlative assessment of fecal indicators using human mitochondrial DNA as a direct marker.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; Smith, Christopher; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Lu, Ting; Wendell, David

    2013-09-17

    Identifying the source of surface water fecal contamination is paramount to mitigating pollution and risk to human health. Fecal bacteria such as E. coli have been staple indicator organisms for over a century, however there remains uncertainty with E. coli-based metrics since these bacteria are abundant in the environment. The relationships between the presence of direct indicator of human waste (human mitochondrial DNA), human-specific Bacteroidales, and E. coli were studied for water samples taken from an urban creek system (Duck Creek Watershed, Cincinnati, OH) impacted by combined sewer overflows. Logistic regression analysis shows that human-specific Bacteroidales correlates much more closely to human mitochondrial DNA (R = 0.62) relative to E. coli (R = 0.33). We also examine the speciation of Bacteroidales within the Duck Creek Watershed using next-generation sequencing technology (Ion Torrent) and show the most numerous populations to be associated with sewage. Here we demonstrate that human-specific Bacteroidales closely follow the dynamics of human mitochondrial DNA concentration changes, indicating that these obligate anaerobes are more accurate than E. coli for fecal source tracking, lending further support to risk overestimation using coliforms, especially fecal coliforms and E. coli.

  10. Human-Induced Trophic Cascades along the Fecal Detritus Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Uriarte, María; Peres, Carlos A.; Louzada, Julio; Braga, Rodrigo Fagundes; Schiffler, Gustavo; Endo, Whaldener; Spector, Sacha H.

    2013-01-01

    Human presence and activity in tropical forest is thought to exert top-down regulation over the various ‘green-world’ pathways of plant-based foodwebs. However, these effects have never been explored for the ‘brown-world’ pathways of fecal-detritus webs. The strong effects of humans on tropical game mammals are likely to indirectly influence fecal detritivores (including Scarabaeine dung beetles), with subsequent indirect impacts on detrivore-mediated and plant-facilitating detrital processes. Across a 380-km gradient of human influence in the western Brazilian Amazon, we conducted the first landscape-level assessment of human-induced cascade effects on the fecal detritus pathway, by coupling data on human impact, game mammal and detritivore community structure, and rate measurements of a key detritus process (i.e. dung beetle-mediated secondary seed dispersal). We found evidence that human impact indirectly influences both the diversity and biomass of fecal detritivores, but not detritivore-mediated processes. Cascade strength varied across detritivore groups defined by species' traits. We found smaller-bodied dung beetles were at higher risk of local decline in areas of human presence, and that body size was a better predictor of cascade structure than fecal resource manipulation strategy. Cascade strength was also stronger in upland, unflooded forests, than in seasonally flooded forests. Our results suggest that the impact of human activity in tropical forest on fecal-detritus food web structure is mediated by both species' traits and habitat type. Further research will be required to determine the conditions under which these cascade effects influence fecal-detritus web function. PMID:24146780

  11. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamin...

  12. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamin...

  13. Quantitative PCR for Detection and Enumeration of Genetic Markers of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of health risks associated with bovine (cattle) fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for the detection of two recently described cow feces-spec...

  14. Single Laboratory Comparison of Host-Specific PCR Assays for the Detection of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous PCR-based methods available to detect bovine fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each method targets a different gene and microorganism leading to differences in method performance, making it difficult to determine which approach is most suitable for field appl...

  15. Quantitative PCR for Detection and Enumeration of Genetic Markers of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of health risks associated with bovine (cattle) fecal pollution requires a reliable host-specific genetic marker and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for the detection of two recently described cow feces-spec...

  16. Single Laboratory Comparison of Host-Specific PCR Assays for the Detection of Bovine Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous PCR-based methods available to detect bovine fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each method targets a different gene and microorganism leading to differences in method performance, making it difficult to determine which approach is most suitable for field appl...

  17. Single Laboratory Comparison of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for the Detection of Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays available to detect and enumerate fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct primers and probes that target different rRNA genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in concentration es...

  18. Caffeine as an indicator of human fecal contamination in the Sinos River: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Linden, R; Antunes, M V; Heinzelmann, L S; Fleck, J D; Staggemeier, R; Fabres, R B; Vecchia, A D; Nascimento, C A; Spilki, F R

    2015-05-01

    The preservation of hydric resources is directly related to fecal contamination monitoring, in order to allow the development of strategies for the management of polluting sources. In the present study, twenty-five water samples from six water public supply collection sites were used for the evaluation of the presence of caffeine, total and fecal coliforms. Caffeine was detected in all samples, with concentrations ranging from 0.15 ng mL-1 to 16.72 ng mL-1. Total coliforms were detected in all samples, with concentrations in the range of 52 NMP/100 mL to higher than 24196 NMP/100 mL, whether the concentration range for fecal coliforms was in the range of below 1 NMP/100 mL to 7800 NMP/100 mL. No significant correlation was found between total coliforms and caffeine concentrations (rs = 0.35, p = 0.09). However, a moderate correlation between fecal coliforms and caffeine concentrations was found (rs = 0.412, p <0.05), probably indicating a human source for these bacteria. Caffeine determination in water may be a useful strategy to evaluate water contamination by human fecal waste.

  19. Norfloxacin binds to human fecal material.

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, C; Lindqvist, L; Nord, C E

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies have reported very high (120 to 2,700 mg/kg) concentrations of norfloxacin in feces after therapeutic doses. MICs for fecal microorganisms are with few exceptions far below these levels. Nevertheless, clinical investigations show that the main part of the aerobic gram-positive and the anaerobic microflora remains unaffected after norfloxacin administration. In this study, the binding of [14C]norfloxacin to fecal material was analyzed. The binding of a group of nonlabeled quinolones to feces and the interactions between Enterococcus faecium, Bacteroides fragilis, and norfloxacin were also investigated. The results showed that norfloxacin has the ability to bind to feces. The specific binding was reversible, saturated after 90 min of incubation at 37 degrees C, and increased linearly with fecal concentration. Scatchard plots and nonlinear regression computer analyses revealed two different binding classes. The primary specific binding had a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.0 microM and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.12 mumol/g of feces. The KD and Bmax of the secondary, more unspecific binding were 450 microM and 11.8 mumol/g of feces, respectively. The binding of unlabeled ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin to feces was comparable to that of [14C]norfloxacin. The results of norfloxacin binding to suspensions of B. fragilis suggested that the main part of the binding is to the bacterial fraction of feces. In the presence of 8.0 g (dry weight) of B. fragilis per liter, the MBC of norfloxacin for E. faecium increased from 8 to 256 micrograms/ml. The finding of the present study indicated that binding of norfloxacin to feces may explain the paradox of high fecal concentrations of norfloxacin versus the actual effect on the normal gastrointestinal microflora. PMID:2854456

  20. Regional Assessment of Human Fecal Contamination in Southern California Coastal Drainages

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith R.; Smith, Paul D.; Griffith, John F.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Sheldon, Andrew; Crompton, Chris; Gregory, Jason; Guzman, Joe; Othman, Laila; Manasjan, Mayela; Choi, Samuel; Rapoport, Shana; Steele, Syreeta; Nguyen, Tommy; Yu, Xueyuan

    2017-01-01

    Host-associated genetic markers that allow for fecal source identification have been used extensively as a diagnostic tool to determine fecal sources within watersheds, but have not been used in routine monitoring to prioritize remediation actions among watersheds. Here, we present a regional assessment of human marker prevalence among drainages that discharge to the U.S. southern California coast. Approximately 50 samples were analyzed for the HF183 human marker from each of 22 southern California coastal drainages under summer dry weather conditions, and another 50 samples were targeted from each of 23 drainages during wet weather. The HF183 marker was ubiquitous, detected in all but two sites in dry weather and at all sites during wet weather. However, there was considerable difference in the extent of human fecal contamination among sites. Similar site ranking was produced regardless of whether the assessment was based on frequency of HF183 detection or site average HF183 concentration. However, site ranking differed greatly between dry and wet weather. Site ranking also differed greatly when based on enterococci, which do not distinguish between pollution sources, vs. HF183, which distinguishes higher risk human fecal sources from other sources, indicating the additional value of the human-associated marker as a routine monitoring tool. PMID:28777324

  1. Regional Assessment of Human Fecal Contamination in Southern California Coastal Drainages.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith R; Smith, Paul D; Griffith, John F; Weisberg, Stephen B; Schriewer, Alexander; Sheldon, Andrew; Crompton, Chris; Amenu, Geremew G; Gregory, Jason; Guzman, Joe; Goodwin, Kelly D; Othman, Laila; Manasjan, Mayela; Choi, Samuel; Rapoport, Shana; Steele, Syreeta; Nguyen, Tommy; Yu, Xueyuan

    2017-08-04

    Host-associated genetic markers that allow for fecal source identification have been used extensively as a diagnostic tool to determine fecal sources within watersheds, but have not been used in routine monitoring to prioritize remediation actions among watersheds. Here, we present a regional assessment of human marker prevalence among drainages that discharge to the U.S. southern California coast. Approximately 50 samples were analyzed for the HF183 human marker from each of 22 southern California coastal drainages under summer dry weather conditions, and another 50 samples were targeted from each of 23 drainages during wet weather. The HF183 marker was ubiquitous, detected in all but two sites in dry weather and at all sites during wet weather. However, there was considerable difference in the extent of human fecal contamination among sites. Similar site ranking was produced regardless of whether the assessment was based on frequency of HF183 detection or site average HF183 concentration. However, site ranking differed greatly between dry and wet weather. Site ranking also differed greatly when based on enterococci, which do not distinguish between pollution sources, vs. HF183, which distinguishes higher risk human fecal sources from other sources, indicating the additional value of the human-associated marker as a routine monitoring tool.

  2. Application of phylogenetic microarray analysis to discriminate sources of fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Eric A; Esmaili, Laleh; Hulls, John R; Cao, Yiping; Griffith, John F; Andersen, Gary L

    2012-04-17

    Conventional methods for fecal source tracking typically use single biomarkers to systematically identify or exclude sources. High-throughput DNA sequence analysis can potentially identify all sources of microbial contaminants in a single test by measuring the total diversity of fecal microbial communities. In this study, we used phylogenetic microarray analysis to determine the comprehensive suite of bacteria that define major sources of fecal contamination in coastal California. Fecal wastes were collected from 42 different populations of humans, birds, cows, horses, elk, and pinnipeds. We characterized bacterial community composition using a DNA microarray that probes for 16S rRNA genes of 59,316 different bacterial taxa. Cluster analysis revealed strong differences in community composition among fecal wastes from human, birds, pinnipeds, and grazers. Actinobacteria, Bacilli, and many Gammaproteobacteria taxa discriminated birds from mammalian sources. Diverse families within the Clostridia and Bacteroidetes taxa discriminated human wastes, grazers, and pinnipeds from each other. We found 1058 different bacterial taxa that were unique to either human, grazing mammal, or bird fecal wastes. These OTUs can serve as specific identifier taxa for these sources in environmental waters. Two field tests in marine waters demonstrate the capacity of phylogenetic microarray analysis to track multiple sources with one test.

  3. Assessment of fecal pollution sources in a small northern-plains watershed using PCR and phylogenetic analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamendella, R.; Domingo, J.W.S.; Oerther, D.B.; Vogel, J.R.; Stoeckel, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy, sensitivity, host-specificity, and spatial/temporal dynamics of human- and ruminant-specific 16S rRNA gene Bacteroidetes markers used to assess the sources of fecal pollution in a fecally impacted watershed. Phylogenetic analyses of 1271 fecal and environmental 16S rRNA gene clones were also performed to study the diversity of Bacteroidetes in this watershed. The host-specific assays indicated that ruminant feces were present in 28-54% of the water samples and in all sampling seasons, with increasing frequency in downstream sites. The human-targeted assays indicated that only 3-5% of the water samples were positive for human fecal signals, although a higher percentage of human-associated signals (19-24%) were detected in sediment samples. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 57% of all water clones clustered with yet-to-be-cultured Bacteroidetes species associated with sequences obtained from ruminant feces, further supporting the prevalence of ruminant contamination in this watershed. However, since several clusters contained sequences from multiple sources, future studies need to consider the potential cosmopolitan nature of these bacterial populations when assessing fecal pollution sources using Bacteroidetes markers. Moreover, additional data is needed in order to understand the distribution of Bacteroidetes host-specific markers and their relationship to water quality regulatory standards. ?? 2006 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. Physical dynamics controlling variability in nearshore fecal pollution: fecal indicator bacteria as passive particles.

    PubMed

    Rippy, M A; Franks, P J S; Feddersen, F; Guza, R T; Moore, D F

    2013-01-15

    We present results from a 5-h field program (HB06) that took place at California's Huntington State Beach. We assessed the importance of physical dynamics in controlling fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations during HB06 using an individual based model including alongshore advection and cross-shore variable horizontal diffusion. The model was parameterized with physical (waves and currents) and bacterial (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) observations made during HB06. The model captured surfzone FIB dynamics well (average surfzone model skill: 0.84 {E. coli} and 0.52 {Enterococcus}), but fell short of capturing offshore FIB dynamics. Our analyses support the hypothesis that surfzone FIB variability during HB06 was a consequence of southward advection and diffusion of a patch of FIB originating north of the study area. Offshore FIB may have originated from a different, southern, source. Mortality may account for some of the offshore variability not explained by the physical model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative identification of fecal water pollution sources by TaqMan real-time PCR assays using Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Young; Weir, Susan C; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T

    2010-12-01

    PCR-based analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes has emerged as a promising tool to identify sources of fecal water pollution. In this study, three TaqMan real-time PCR assays (BacGeneral, BacHuman, and BacBovine) were developed and evaluated for their ability to quantitatively detect general (total), human-specific, and bovine-specific Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genetic markers. The detection sensitivity was determined to be 6.5 copies of 16S rRNA gene for the BacGeneral and BacHuman assays and 10 copies for the BacBovine assay. The assays were capable of detecting approximately one to two cells per PCR. When tested with 70 fecal samples from various sources (human, cattle, pig, deer, dog, cat, goose, gull, horse, and raccoon), the three assays positively identified the target markers in all samples without any false-negative results. The BacHuman and BacBovine assays exhibited false-positive reactions with non-target samples in a few cases. However, the level of the false-positive reactions was about 50 times smaller than that of the true-positive ones, and therefore, these cross-reactions were unlikely to cause misidentifications of the fecal pollution sources. Microbial source-tracking capability was tested at two freshwater streams of which water quality was influenced by human and cattle feces, respectively. The assays accurately detected the presence of the corresponding host-specific markers upon fecal pollution and the persistence of the markers in downstream areas. The assays are expected to reliably determine human and bovine fecal pollution sources in environmental water samples.

  6. [Microbial source tracking of water fecal pollution: a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Guan-da; Deng, Ming-rong; Zhu, Hong-hui; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Chang-xiong; Liang, Hao-liang

    2010-12-01

    Livestock feces and domestic sewage are the one of the main factors inducing water pollution, while the identification of the pollution source is particularly important in pollution control and management. Because of this, microbial source tracking (MST) has recently been paid more and more attention by the related researchers around the world. In this paper, the research progress of two types of MST methods, their advantages and disadvantages, and existing problems in application were reviewed and discussed. It was considered that in the library- and culture-dependent MST methods, PCR genotyping based on repetitive sequences was most practicable, while in the library- and culture-independent MST methods, PCR-DGGE based on the gene of specificity in Escherichia coli had a very glaring sight. Future researches should be more focused on the library- and culture-independent MST, and the combination of library- and culture-dependent MST with library- and culture-independent MST could make the tracking results more credible.

  7. High abundance of genetic Bacteroidetes markers for total fecal pollution in pristine alpine soils suggests lack in specificity for feces

    PubMed Central

    Vierheilig, Julia; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Kollanur, Denny; Blöschl, Günter; Reischer, Georg H.

    2012-01-01

    Two frequently applied genetic Bacteroidetes markers for total fecal pollution (AllBac and BacUni) were found in high numbers in pristine soil samples of two alpine catchment areas casting doubt on their value as fecal indicators. This finding underlines the necessity to evaluate assays locally and against non-intestinal samples before application. PMID:22285854

  8. A biomarker for the identification of swine fecal pollution in water, using the STII toxin gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khatib, L A; Tsai, Y L; Olson, B H

    2003-12-01

    This research developed a PCR method to identify swine fecal pollution in water, using a portion of the STII toxin gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli as the target sequence. This method showed the gene to have a wide-spread geographical distribution and temporal stability; and the primers demonstrated high specificity, sensitivity, and reliability. A total of 110 DNA extracts from different animal fecal and human sewage samples were screened using the primers and no positives resulted. Centrifugation and filtration methods for concentrating E. coli seeded into stream, ocean, secondary effluent, and dairy lagoon waters resulted in detection limits at the femtogram and attogram levels. E. coli with the biomarker seeded into stream, ocean, and secondary effluent waters remained stable for approximately 2 weeks for all water types. Of the farm lagoon and waste samples tested, 94% were positive for the STII trait, regardless of the number of E. coli screened and 100% were positive when > or =35 E. coli isolates were screened. As the PCR product of the target sequence yielded a single band, the method is applicable to dot blot detection methodology, yielding great accuracy in determining the presence of swine fecal sources.

  9. Towards standards for human fecal sample processing in metagenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Costea, Paul I; Zeller, Georg; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Pelletier, Eric; Alberti, Adriana; Levenez, Florence; Tramontano, Melanie; Driessen, Marja; Hercog, Rajna; Jung, Ferris-Elias; Kultima, Jens Roat; Hayward, Matthew R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Bertrand, Laurie; Blaut, Michael; Brown, Jillian R M; Carton, Thomas; Cools-Portier, Stéphanie; Daigneault, Michelle; Derrien, Muriel; Druesne, Anne; de Vos, Willem M; Finlay, B Brett; Flint, Harry J; Guarner, Francisco; Hattori, Masahira; Heilig, Hans; Luna, Ruth Ann; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Junick, Jana; Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Langella, Philippe; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Mai, Volker; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Martin, Jennifer C; Mery, Clémentine; Morita, Hidetoshi; O'Toole, Paul W; Orvain, Céline; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Penders, John; Persson, Søren; Pons, Nicolas; Popova, Milena; Salonen, Anne; Saulnier, Delphine; Scott, Karen P; Singh, Bhagirath; Slezak, Kathleen; Veiga, Patrick; Versalovic, James; Zhao, Liping; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Dore, Joel; Bork, Peer

    2017-10-02

    Technical variation in metagenomic analysis must be minimized to confidently assess the contributions of microbiota to human health. Here we tested 21 representative DNA extraction protocols on the same fecal samples and quantified differences in observed microbial community composition. We compared them with differences due to library preparation and sample storage, which we contrasted with observed biological variation within the same specimen or within an individual over time. We found that DNA extraction had the largest effect on the outcome of metagenomic analysis. To rank DNA extraction protocols, we considered resulting DNA quantity and quality, and we ascertained biases in estimates of community diversity and the ratio between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We recommend a standardized DNA extraction method for human fecal samples, for which transferability across labs was established and which was further benchmarked using a mock community of known composition. Its adoption will improve comparability of human gut microbiome studies and facilitate meta-analyses.

  10. Human Fecal Source Identification: Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method Standardization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  11. HUMAN FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION: REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR METHOD STANDARDIZATION - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  12. HUMAN FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION: REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR METHOD STANDARDIZATION - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  13. Human Fecal Source Identification: Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method Standardization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  14. Occurrence of bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides host strains (ARABA 84 and GB-124) in fecal samples of human and animal origin.

    PubMed

    Diston, David; Wicki, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophage-based microbial source-tracking studies are an economical and simple way of identifying fecal sources in polluted water systems. Recently isolated Bacteroides spp. strains ARABA 84, and GB-124 have been shown to detect bacteriophages exclusively in aquatic systems impacted by human fecal material. To date, limited examination of the occurrence or concentration of phages capable of infecting Bacteroides fragilis strain GB-124 or B. thetaiotaomicron strain ARABA 84 in human and animal feces has been carried out. This study reports the prevalence rates and concentrations of phages infecting ARABA 84 and GB-124 host strains in human and a range of animal feces. Discrete human fecal samples (n=55) and pooled animal samples (n=46, representing the feces of over 230 animals) were examined for phages infecting the host strains ARABA 84, GB-124, and E. coli strain WG5. Both human Bacteroides host strains were highly specific (95% and 100% for ARABA 84 and GB-124, respectively), challenging results from previous studies. This study supports the use of Bacteroides strains GB-124 and ARABA 84 in fecal source tracking studies for the detection of human fecal contamination.

  15. Lachnospiraceae and Bacteroidales Alternative Fecal Indicators Reveal Chronic Human Sewage Contamination in an Urban Harbor▿†

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan J.; VandeWalle, Jessica L.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Gorelick, Marc H.; McLellan, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of fecal microbial communities and overlap among human and other animal sources have made it difficult to identify source-specific fecal indicator bacteria. However, the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies now provides increased sequencing power to resolve microbial community composition within and among environments. These data can be mined for information on source-specific phylotypes and/or assemblages of phylotypes (i.e., microbial signatures). We report the development of a new genetic marker for human fecal contamination identified through microbial pyrotag sequence analysis of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequence analysis of 37 sewage samples and comparison with database sequences revealed a human-associated phylotype within the Lachnospiraceae family, which was closely related to the genus Blautia. This phylotype, termed Lachno2, was on average the second most abundant fecal bacterial phylotype in sewage influent samples from Milwaukee, WI. We developed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for Lachno2 and used it along with the qPCR-based assays for human Bacteroidales (based on the HF183 genetic marker), total Bacteroidales spp., and enterococci and the conventional Escherichia coli and enterococci plate count assays to examine the prevalence of fecal and human fecal pollution in Milwaukee's harbor. Both the conventional fecal indicators and the human-associated indicators revealed chronic fecal pollution in the harbor, with significant increases following heavy rain events and combined sewer overflows. The two human-associated genetic marker abundances were tightly correlated in the harbor, a strong indication they target the same source (i.e., human sewage). Human adenoviruses were routinely detected under all conditions in the harbor, and the probability of their occurrence increased by 154% for every 10-fold increase in the human indicator concentration. Both Lachno2 and human Bacteroidales increased specificity to

  16. Microbial source tracking markers for detection of fecal contamination in environmental waters: relationships between pathogens and human health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Valerie J; Staley, Christopher; Badgley, Brian D; Borges, Kim; Korajkic, Asja

    2014-01-01

    Microbial source tracking (MST) describes a suite of methods and an investigative strategy for determination of fecal pollution sources in environmental waters that rely on the association of certain fecal microorganisms with a particular host. MST is used to assess recreational water quality and associated human health risk, and total maximum daily load allocations. Many methods rely on signature molecules (markers) such as DNA sequences of host-associated microorganisms. Human sewage pollution is among the greatest concerns for human health due to (1) the known risk of exposure to human waste and (2) the public and regulatory will to reduce sewage pollution; however, methods to identify animal sources are receiving increasing attention as our understanding of zoonotic disease potential improves. Here, we review the performance of MST methods in initial reports and field studies, with particular emphasis on quantitative PCR (qPCR). Relationships among human-associated MST markers, fecal indicator bacteria, pathogens, and human health outcomes are presented along with recommendations for future research. An integrated understanding of the advantages and drawbacks of the many MST methods targeting human sources advanced over the past several decades will benefit managers, regulators, researchers, and other users of this rapidly growing area of environmental microbiology.

  17. In vitro fermentability of sugar beet pulp derived oligosaccharides using human and pig fecal inocula.

    PubMed

    Leijdekkers, Antonius G M; Aguirre, Marisol; Venema, Koen; Bosch, Guido; Gruppen, Harry; Schols, Henk A

    2014-02-05

    The in vitro fermentation characteristics of different classes of sugar beet pectic oligosaccharides (SBPOS) were studied using human and pig fecal inocula. The SBPOS consisted mainly of partially acetylated rhamnogalacturonan oligosaccharides and partially methyl-esterified/acetylated homogalacturonan oligosaccharides. Some SBPOS contained an unsaturated galacturonic acid residue at their non-reducing end. It was shown that SBPOS could be completely fermented by human and pig fecal microbiota, thereby producing butyrate yet mainly acetate and propionate as metabolites. The degradation of SBPOS by pig fecal microbiota was different and much slower compared to human fecal microbiota. In general, rhamnogalacturonan oligosaccharides were degraded slower than homogalacturonan oligosaccharides. Acetylation of rhamnogalacturonan oligosaccharides lowered the degradation rate by pig fecal microbiota but not by human fecal microbiota. No classic bifidogenic effect was shown for SBPOS using human fecal inoculum. However, several other potentially interesting modifications in the microbiota composition that can be associated with host health were observed, which are discussed.

  18. Correlation between the human fecal microbiota and depression.

    PubMed

    Naseribafrouei, A; Hestad, K; Avershina, E; Sekelja, M; Linløkken, A; Wilson, R; Rudi, K

    2014-08-01

    Depression is a chronic syndrome with a pathogenesis linked to various genetic, biological, and environmental factors. Several links between gut microbiota and depression have been established in animal models. In humans, however, few correlations have yet been demonstrated. The aim of our work was therefore to identify potential correlations between human fecal microbiota (as a proxy for gut microbiota) and depression. We analyzed fecal samples from 55 people, 37 patients, and 18 non-depressed controls. Our analyses were based on data generated by Illumina deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. We found several correlations between depression and fecal microbiota. The correlations, however, showed opposite directions even for closely related Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU's), but were still associated with certain higher order phylogroups. The order Bacteroidales showed an overrepresentation (p = 0.05), while the family Lachnospiraceae showed an underrepresentation (p = 0.02) of OTU's associated with depression. At low taxonomic levels, there was one clade consisting of five OTU's within the genus Oscillibacter, and one clade within Alistipes (consisting of four OTU's) that showed a significant association with depression (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). The Oscillibacter type strain has valeric acid as its main metabolic end product, a homolog of neurotransmitter GABA, while Alistipes has previously been shown to be associated with induced stress in mice. In conclusion, the taxonomic correlations detected here may therefore correspond to mechanistic models. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Fecal Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  1. Solid-Phase Microextraction and the Human Fecal VOC Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Emma; Clubb, Cynthia; Pittman, Sara; Ammann, Larry; Rasheed, Zeehasham; Kazmi, Nazia; Keshavarzian, Ali; Gillevet, Pat; Rangwala, Huzefa; Couch, Robin D.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic potential and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in human feces has begun to receive considerable attention. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has greatly facilitated the isolation and analysis of VOCs from human feces. Pioneering human fecal VOC metabolomic investigations have utilized a single SPME fiber type for analyte extraction and analysis. However, we hypothesized that the multifarious nature of metabolites present in human feces dictates the use of several diverse SPME fiber coatings for more comprehensive metabolomic coverage. We report here an evaluation of eight different commercially available SPME fibers, in combination with both GC-MS and GC-FID, and identify the 50/30 µm CAR-DVB-PDMS, 85 µm CAR-PDMS, 65 µm DVB-PDMS, 7 µm PDMS, and 60 µm PEG SPME fibers as a minimal set of fibers appropriate for human fecal VOC metabolomics, collectively isolating approximately 90% of the total metabolites obtained when using all eight fibers. We also evaluate the effect of extraction duration on metabolite isolation and illustrate that ex vivo enteric microbial fermentation has no effect on metabolite composition during prolonged extractions if the SPME is performed as described herein. PMID:21494609

  2. Effect of fecal pollution on Vibrio parahaemolyticus densities in an estuarine environment.

    PubMed

    Watkins, W D; Cabelli, V J

    1985-05-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus densities in the Narragansett Bay, R.I., estuary were found to significantly correlate with the level of fecal pollution in the water. Results of field investigations showed a definite association between the levels of this organism and those of Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, and enterococci. Densities of V. parahaemolyticus were greatest in the near-surface waters of contaminated areas and decreased sharply with both the distance from the sources of fecal pollution and the depth of the water column. A positive association with the amount of particulate matter in the water and specifically with its zooplankton content also was found. No association was obtained with any of the physical or chemical parameters examined except dissolved oxygen. The results of laboratory studies on the growth of V. parahaemolyticus in collected estuarine waters were consistent with the field observations in that nutrients in sewage did not directly produce any increase in natural or inoculated levels of the organism. Of several particulates added to the water, only chitin and net zooplankters (live or dead) supported the growth of V. parahaemolyticus. The addition of sewage to the water had no measurable effect, whether or not the various particulates also were present. The data show that wastewater effluents have an effect on V. parahaemolyticus densities in this estuary and indicate that the effect is indirect, probably mediated by biostimulation of the food chain and manifested at the level of the microfauna.

  3. The effect of drinking milk containing conjugated linoleic acid on fecal microbiological profile, enzymatic activity, and fecal characteristics in humans.

    PubMed

    Farnworth, Edward R; Chouinard, Yvan P; Jacques, Helene; Venkatramanan, Sudha; Maf, Akier A; Defnoun, Sabrina; Jones, Peter J H

    2007-07-09

    The primary objective was to determine whether consumption of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) affected the fecal microbiota composition, fecal enzyme activity or fecal composition. Human subjects consumed (1 L/day) cows' milk (4% fat) containing (5 mg/g fat) cis-9, trans-11 CLA (CONT), (32 mg/g fat) cis-9, trans-11 CLA (NAT) and (32 mg/g fat) trans-10, cis-12 CLA and cis-9, trans-11 CLA (SYN) for 8 weeks, in addition to their normal diet. Milk feeding periods were separated by 4 week washout periods. Fecal samples were obtained at the beginning (day 0) and the end (day 56) of each milk feeding period. Fecal samples were analysed for microbiological profile, enzyme activity, pH and short chain fatty acid content. Samples taken at day 0 and day 56 indicated that the numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria significantly decreased after consumption of all experimental milks; total aerobes, total anaerobes, enterobacteria, and enterococci + streptococci did not change. At day 56, the activities of beta-glucosidase, nitroreductase, and urease enzymes had decreased compared to samples taken on day 0 for all treatments. beta-glucuronidase activity did not change. Fecal pH and ammonia content did not change. It was concluded that observed changes could have been attributed to increased milk intake; no differences could be attributed to consumption of the different CLAs.

  4. A biomarker for the identification of cattle fecal pollution in water using the LTIIa toxin gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khatib, L A; Tsai, Y L; Olson, B H

    2002-06-01

    This research describes a method based on PCR to identify cattle fecal pollution in water using a portion of the heat labile toxin IIA (LTIIa) gene from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). We describe the development of the primers and target. DNA extracts (221) from different animal fecal and human sewage samples were screened and showed no cross-reactivity. Minimum detection limits using centrifugation and filtration methods to concentrate E. coli seeded into stream, ocean, and secondary effluent waters were found to be at femtogram and attogram levels, respectively. Stability of the biomarker in stream, ocean, and secondary effluent waters was 2-4 weeks for all water types. Finally, 33 farm lagoon and waste samples were collected and 31 tested to validate the method; 93% were positive for the LTIIa trait when >1,000 E. coli were screened and 100% positive when >10(5) E. coli were screened. Prevalence of the toxin gene in the E. coli population affected the outcome of the analyses. The cow biomarker can be used in watershed studies to identify cattle waste with great accuracy if the appropriate numbers of E. coli are screened.

  5. Distribution of genetic markers of fecal pollution on a freshwater sandy shoreline in proximity to wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, Jessica J; Hicks, Randall E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-04-02

    Water, sand, and sediment from a Lake Superior harbor site continuously receiving wastewater effluent was sampled monthly for June to October 2010 and from May to September 2011. Understanding the dynamics of genetic markers of fecal bacteria in these matrices is essential to accurately characterizing health risks. Genetic markers for enterococci, total Bacteroides, and human-associated Bacteroides were measured in site-water, sand, and sediment and in final effluent by quantitative PCR. The similarity between the quantity of molecular markers in the water column and effluent indicated that the abundance of genetic markers in the water column was likely controlled by effluent inputs. Effluent turbidity was positively correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with AllBac and HF183 in final effluent and AllBac in the water column. In sand and sediment, Entero1 and AllBac were most abundant in the upper 1-3 cm depths, whereas HF183 was most abundant in the upper 1 cm of sand and at 7 cm in sediment. The AllBac and Entero1 markers were 1- and 2-orders of magnitude more abundant in sand and sediment relative to the water column per unit mass. These results indicate that sand and sediment may act as reservoirs for genetic markers of fecal pollution at some freshwater sites.

  6. Determination of Escherichia coli Contamination with Chromocult Coliform Agar Showed a High Level of Discrimination Efficiency for Differing Fecal Pollution Levels in Tropical Waters of Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Byamukama, Dennis; Kansiime, Frank; Mach, Robert L.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli, total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and sulfite-reducing anaerobic spore formers from different polluted sites in a tropical environment were determined in order to test for their indication ability for fecal contamination. Quantification of E. coli contamination with Chromocult coliform agar proved to be efficient and feasible for determining fecal pollutions in the investigated area within 24 h. The other microbial parameters showed a lower ability to differentiate sites and cannot be recommended for monitoring fecal pollution in the studied tropical surface waters. PMID:10653767

  7. Tracking the Primary Sources of Fecal Pollution in a Tropical Watershed in a One-Year Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the primary sources of fecal pollution in a subtropical watershed using host-specific assays developed in temperate regions. Water samples (n=534) from 10 different sites along the Rio Grande de Arecibo watershed were collected every two-three w...

  8. Combining Watershed Variables with PCR-based Methods for Better Characterization and Management of Fecal Pollution in Small Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culture- and PCR-based measurements of fecal pollution were determined and compared to hydrologic and land use indicators. Stream water samples (n = 235) were collected monthly over a two year period from ten streams draining headwatersheds with different land use intensities ra...

  9. Application of multivariate statistical methodology to model factors influencing fate and transport of fecal pollution in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kimberlee K; Evanshen, Brian G; Maier, Kurt J; Scheuerman, Phillip R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of polluted watersheds and water bodies with total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) has resulted in increased research to find methods that effectively and universally identify fecal pollution sources. A fundamental requirement to identify such methods is understanding the microbial and chemical processes that influence fate and transport of fecal indicators from various sources to receiving streams. Using the Watauga River watershed in northeast Tennessee as a model to better understand these processes, multivariate statistical analyses were conducted on data collected from four creeks that have or are expected to have pathogen TMDLs. The application of canonical correlation and discriminant analyses revealed spatial and temporal variability in the microbial and chemical parameters influencing water quality, suggesting that these creeks differ in terms of the nature and extent of fecal pollution. The identification of creeks within a watershed that have similar sources of fecal pollution using this data analysis approach could change prioritization of best management practices selection and placement. Furthermore, this suggests that TMDL development may require multiyear and multisite data using a targeted sampling approach instead of a 30-d geometric mean in large, complex watersheds. This technique may facilitate the choice between watershed TMDLs and single segment or stream TMDLs.

  10. Combining Watershed Variables with PCR-based Methods for Better Characterization and Management of Fecal Pollution in Small Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culture- and PCR-based measurements of fecal pollution were determined and compared to hydrologic and land use indicators. Stream water samples (n = 235) were collected monthly over a two year period from ten streams draining headwatersheds with different land use intensities ra...

  11. Tracking the Primary Sources of Fecal Pollution in a Tropical Watershed in a One-Year Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the primary sources of fecal pollution in a subtropical watershed using host-specific assays developed in temperate regions. Water samples (n=534) from 10 different sites along the Rio Grande de Arecibo watershed were collected every two-three w...

  12. Targeting the Sources of Fecal Contamination using Dog-, Human-, and Ruminant- Specific Markers in the Lake Herrick Watershed, Georgia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintil, T.; Radcliffe, D. E.; Rasmussen, T. C.; Habteselassie, M.; Sowah, R.; Kannan, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Lake Herrick Watershed is about 1.5 km2 and covers portions of the University of Georgia's East campus, the Oconee Forest, residential and commercial landuse. Lake Herrick, a recreational site on the University of Georgia campus, was closed in 2002 due to fecal contamination. Subsequent monitoring confirmed persistent contamination, which led to a permanent closure to swimming, boating, and fishing. While fecal coliform abundance is a standard metric for determining human health risks, Geldreich (1970) showed that fecal abundance does not necessarily correlate with the presence of pathogens. Nor does it identify pollution sources, which are needed to mitigate health risks. Two inflow tributaries and the outlet stream were monitored for discharge, fecal coliform, forms of nitrogen and phosphorus and other water-quality data to quantify lake influent and effluent bacteria loads. Fecal sources were identified using the human HF183 genetic marker (Seurinck et al., 2005), the ruminant BacR marker (Reischer et al., 2006), and the dog mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker (Tambalo et al., 2012). Preliminary results confirm high concentrations of E. coli and Enterococci, above the State's limit of 124 MPN/100 mL, in both baseflows and stormflows. The findings also suggest that the E. coli and Enterococci loads from the inlet tributaries are on average higher compared to the bacteria loads coming out of the outlet stream. The human markers were detectable at all three sites but most of the samples were not quantifiable. The ruminant markers were quantifiable at both inlets but no ruminant markers were found at the outlet. The dog markers were detectable but not quantifiable at both inlets and no dog markers were detected at the outlet. Statistical analyses will be used to establish relationships between the nutrients data, the fecal concentrations, and the gene-specific markers.

  13. A PILOT STUDY TO COMPARE MICROBIAL AND CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limitations exist in applying traditional microbial methods for the detection of human fecal contamination of water. A pilot study was undertaken to compare the microbial and chemical indicators of human fecal contamination of water. Sixty-four water samples were collected in O...

  14. A PILOT STUDY TO COMPARE MICROBIAL AND CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limitations exist in applying traditional microbial methods for the detection of human fecal contamination of water. A pilot study was undertaken to compare the microbial and chemical indicators of human fecal contamination of water. Sixty-four water samples were collected in O...

  15. Sanitation in constructed wetlands: A review on the removal of human pathogens and fecal indicators.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shubiao; Carvalho, Pedro N; Müller, Jochen A; Manoj, Valsa Remony; Dong, Renjie

    2016-01-15

    Removal of human pathogens from wastewater is a critical factor with linkage to human health. Constructed Wetlands (CWs) are environmental friendly ecosystems that are applicable not only for chemical pollution control, but also for the reduction of pathogens from wastewater. Yet the knowledge on the fate and removal of such indicator bacteria in CWs is still not sufficient due to the complexity of removal mechanisms and influencing factors. This review serves to provide a better understanding of this state-of-the-art technology, which is necessary for further investigations and design development. The fecal indicator bacteria in CWs mainly come from three sources, namely, influent wastewaters, regrowth within the CWs, and animal activities. The properties of microbial contamination vary depending on the different sources. The removal of pathogens is a complex process that is influenced by operational parameters such as hydraulic regime and retention time, vegetation, seasonal fluctuation, and water composition. The most frequent and well-validated removal mechanisms include natural die-off due to starvation or predation, sedimentation and filtration, and adsorption. The concentration of the main fecal indicator bacteria in the effluent was found to be exponentially related to the loading rate. Generally, horizontal subsurface flow CWs have better reduction capacity than free water surface flow CWs, and hybrid wetland systems were found to be the most efficient due to a longer retention time. Further improvement of fecal indicator bacteria removal in CWs is needed, however, levels in CW effluents are still higher than most of the regulation standards for reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  17. Differential decay of Enterococci and Escherichia coli originating from two fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using in situ subtropical aquatic mesocosms, fecal source (cattle manure versus sewage) was shown to be the most important contributor to differential loss in viability of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), specifically enterococci in freshwater and Escherichia coli in marine habita...

  18. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, R.L.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n = 64) and animal (n = 233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (espfm) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (espfs/fm). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of espfs/fm for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% espfm and 100% espfs/fm in raw sewage influent; 30% for both espfm and espfs/fm in septic waste; and 0% espfm and 80% espfs/fm in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (espfs/fm) and 4.7% (espfm); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all espfm), gulls (10/34, espfs/fm; 2/34, espfm), mice (3/22, all espfs/fm), and songbirds (5/55, all espfs/fm). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both espfm and espfs/fm were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  19. Evaluation of pepper mild mottle virus, human picobirnavirus and Torque teno virus as indicators of fecal contamination in river water.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Ibrahim Ahmed; Jurzik, Lars; Uberla, Klaus; Wilhelm, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A reliable indicator is needed to predict and reduce the risk of infection associated with fecal contamination of surface water. Since Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), human picobirnaviruses (hPBV) and Torque teno virus (TTV) have been detected at substantial levels in human feces, we explored whether detection of nucleic acids of these viruses is a suitable indicator of fecal contamination in river water. From September 2008 to December 2009, water samples (n = 111) were collected from the Ruhr and Rhine rivers and from the influents and effluents of a wastewater plant (n = 12). Quantitative real time (RT-) PCR was used to determine the abundance of PMMoV, hPBV, and TTV in comparison to human adenoviruses (HAdV) and human polyomaviruses (HPyV) that are frequently detected in surface water and were previously proposed as indicators. While PMMoV was detected in all river water samples, the other viruses were detected less frequently. The concentration of the studied viruses in positive river water ranged from 5 × 10(1) to 1.07 × 10(6) genome equivalents per liter (gen.equ./l). All wastewater samples were positive for PMMoV, HAdV and HPyV, while TTV and hPBV were detected in 6/12 and 3/12 of samples, respectively. To determine if PMMoV is specific to human-derived fecal waste, fecal samples from human (n = 20) and animal (n = 53) were also tested. In contrast to the ubiquity of PMMoV in human feces (19/20) the virus was only detected at low concentration in a minority of the animal fecal samples tested (7/15 from chicken, 1/10 from Geese and 1/6 from cows). Therefore, in this setting TTV and hPBV do not seem to be suitable indicators of fecal contamination in water. Whereas, the high excretion level and dissemination of PMMoV in human sewage and river water suggest that PMMoV could be a promising indicator of fecal pollution in surface water.

  20. Method for Isolation of Bacteroides Bacteriophage Host Strains Suitable for Tracking Sources of Fecal Pollution in Water

    PubMed Central

    Payan, Andrey; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw; Gantzer, Christophe; Ottoson, Jakob; Papageorgiou, Georgos T.; Blanch, Anicet R.; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides are potentially a good tool for fecal source tracking, but different Bacteroides host strains are needed for different geographic areas. A feasible method for isolating Bacteroides host strains for phages present in human fecal material is described. Useful strains were identified for application in Spain and the United Kingdom. One strain, GA-17, identified as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, was tested in several locations in Europe with excellent performance in Southern Europe. PMID:16151173

  1. DYNAMICS OF AQUATIC FECAL CONTAMINATION, FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION, AND CORRELATION OF BACTEROIDALES HOST-SPECIFIC MARKERS DETECTION WITH FECAL PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution impairs the health and productivity of coastal waters and causes human disease. PCR of host-specific 16S rDNA sequences from anaerobic Bacteroidales bacteria offers a promising method of tracking fecal contamination and identifying its source(s). Before Bacteroida...

  2. DYNAMICS OF AQUATIC FECAL CONTAMINATION, FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION, AND CORRELATION OF BACTEROIDALES HOST-SPECIFIC MARKERS DETECTION WITH FECAL PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution impairs the health and productivity of coastal waters and causes human disease. PCR of host-specific 16S rDNA sequences from anaerobic Bacteroidales bacteria offers a promising method of tracking fecal contamination and identifying its source(s). Before Bacteroida...

  3. Locating sources of surf zone pollution: a mass budget analysis of fecal indicator bacteria at Huntington Beach, California.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Ha; Grant, Stanley B; McGee, Charles D; Sanders, Brett F; Largier, John L

    2004-05-01

    The surf zone is the unique environment where ocean meets land and a place of critical ecological, economic, and recreational importance. In the United States, this natural resource is increasingly off-limits to the public due to elevated concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and other contaminants, the sources of which are often unknown. In this paper, we describe an approach for calculating mass budgets of pollutants in the surf zone from shoreline monitoring data. The analysis reveals that fecal indicator bacteria pollution in the surf zone at several contiguous beaches in Orange County, California, originates from well-defined locations along the shore, including the tidal outlets of the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh. Fecal pollution flows into the ocean from the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh outlets during ebb tides and from there is transported parallel to the shoreline by wave-driven surf zone currents and/or offshore tidal currents, frequently contaminating >5 km of the surf zone. The methodology developed here for locating and quantifying sources of surf zone pollution should be applicable to a wide array of contaminants and coastal settings.

  4. Lachnospiraceae- and Bacteroidales alternative fecal indicators reveal chronic human sewage contamination in an urban harbor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complexity of fecal microbial communities and overlap among human and other animal sources has made it difficult to identify source-specific fecal indicator bacteria. However, the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has provided increased power to resolve microbial community compos...

  5. Fecal Sterol and Runoff Analysis for Nonpoint Source Tracking.

    PubMed

    Fahrenfeld, N L; Del Monaco, N; Coates, J T; Elzerman, A W

    2016-01-01

    Fecal pollution source identification is needed to quantify risk, target installation of source controls, and assess performance of best management practices in impaired surface waters. Sterol analysis is a chemical method for fecal source tracking that allows for differentiation between several fecal pollution sources. The objectives of this study were to use these chemical tracers for quantifying human fecal inputs in a mixed-land-use watershed without point sources of pollution and to determine the relationship between land use and sterol ratios. Fecal sterol analysis was performed on bed and suspended sediment from impaired streams. Human fecal signatures were found at sites with sewer overflow and septic inputs. Different sterol ratios used to indicate human fecal pollution varied in their sensitivity. Next, geospatial data was used to determine the runoff volumes associated with each land-use category in the watersheds. Fecal sterol ratios were compared between sampling locations and correlations were tested between ratio values and percentage of runoff for a given land-use category. Correlation was not observed between percentage of runoff from developed land and any of the five tested human-indicating sterol ratios in streambed sediments, confirming that human fecal inputs were not evenly distributed across the urban landscape. Several practical considerations for adopting this chemical method for microbial source tracking in small watersheds are discussed. Results indicate that sterol analysis is useful for identifying the location of human fecal nonpoint-source inputs.

  6. SPECIFICITY AND SENSITIVITY OF FECAL BACTEROIDETES HUMAN-SPECIFIC PRIMERS WITH FECAL AND WASTEWATER SAMPLES FROM THE U.S. MIDWEST AND NORTHEAST REGIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous watersheds throughout the United States are impaired due to fecal contamination. Fecal Bacteroidetes is a group of anaerobic bacteria present in high concentrations in animal feces that has shown promise as a microbial source tracking indicator of human and othe...

  7. SPECIFICITY AND SENSITIVITY OF FECAL BACTEROIDETES HUMAN-SPECIFIC PRIMERS WITH FECAL AND WASTEWATER SAMPLES FROM THE U.S. MIDWEST AND NORTHEAST REGIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous watersheds throughout the United States are impaired due to fecal contamination. Fecal Bacteroidetes is a group of anaerobic bacteria present in high concentrations in animal feces that has shown promise as a microbial source tracking indicator of human and othe...

  8. Fecapentaene excretion and fecal mutagenicity in relation to nutrient intake and fecal parameters in humans on omnivorous and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    de Kok, T M; van Faassen, A; Bausch-Goldbohm, R A; ten Hoor, F; Kleinjans, J C

    1992-02-14

    Fecapentaenes are strong fecal mutagenic compounds presumably occurring in the majority of Western human individuals, and are possibly essential initiators of colon carcinogenesis. Dietary factors have been shown to influence colorectal cancer risk and to modulate both fecal mutagenicity and fecapentaene concentrations. Therefore, in this study, excretion of fecapentaenes is determined in humans consuming either vegetarian or omnivorous diets. The results show that the most predominant fecapentaene forms are excreted in higher concentrations by vegetarians. Consumption of cereal fiber, calcium and carotene as well as fecal concentrations of iso-lithocholic acid were found to correlate positively with excreted concentrations of one or more fecapentaene analogues. On average, 22% of excreted fecapentaene concentrations was found to be related to nutrient intake in stepwise regression models. Dietary calcium intake was found to be the most significant factor positively correlating with excreted fecapentaene concentrations. Intake of mono-unsaturated fatty acids or fiber from vegetables and fruit could be shown to correlate with fecapentaene excretion to a lesser degree. Despite high fecapentaene concentrations in fecal dichloromethane extracts, only 1 out of 20 samples revealed significant mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium TA 100. Further, aqueous extracts of feces from omnivores appeared to be equally mutagenic as feces from vegetarians and contained non-detectable concentrations of fecapentaenes. It is concluded that dietary factors do affect excreted fecapentaene levels, but only to a relatively minor extent. Since vegetarians at low risk for colorectal cancer excrete higher concentrations of fecapentaenes, it could be hypothesized that relatively increased fecapentaene excretion in combination with antimutagenic compounds in feces represents colon cancer prevention.

  9. Identification of Human and Animal Fecal Contamination after Rainfall in the Han River, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Heetae; Lee, Jung Eun; Chung, Myung-Sub; Ko, Gwang Pyo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of rainfall on the levels and sources of microbial contamination in the Han River, Korea. Thirty-four samples were collected at two sampling sites located upstream and downstream in the river from July 2010 to February 2011. Various fecal indicator microorganisms, including total coliform, fecal coliform, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., somatic and male-specific (F+) coliphage, and four major enteric viruses were analyzed. Rainfall was positively correlated with the levels of fecal coliform and norovirus at both sampling sites. Additionally, rainfall was positively correlated with the levels of total coliform, E. coli, Enterococcus spp., and F+ coliphage at the upstream site. To identify the source of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking (MST) was conducted using both male-specific (F+) RNA coliphage and the Enterococcus faecium esp gene as previously described. Our results clearly indicated that the majority of fecal contamination at the downstream Han River site was from a human source. At the upstream sampling site, contamination from human fecal matter was very limited; however, fecal contamination from non-point animal sources increased following rainfall. In conclusion, our data suggest that rainfall significantly affects the level and source of fecal contamination in the Han River, Korea. PMID:23666535

  10. Identification of human and animal fecal contamination after rainfall in the Han River, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Heetae; Lee, Jung Eun; Chung, Myung-Sub; Ko, Gwang Pyo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of rainfall on the levels and sources of microbial contamination in the Han River, Korea. Thirty-four samples were collected at two sampling sites located upstream and downstream in the river from July 2010 to February 2011. Various fecal indicator microorganisms, including total coliform, fecal coliform, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., somatic and male-specific (F+) coliphage, and four major enteric viruses were analyzed. Rainfall was positively correlated with the levels of fecal coliform and norovirus at both sampling sites. Additionally, rainfall was positively correlated with the levels of total coliform, E. coli, Enterococcus spp., and F+ coliphage at the upstream site. To identify the source of fecal contamination, microbial source tracking (MST) was conducted using both male-specific (F+) RNA coliphage and the Enterococcus faecium esp gene as previously described. Our results clearly indicated that the majority of fecal contamination at the downstream Han River site was from a human source. At the upstream sampling site, contamination from human fecal matter was very limited; however, fecal contamination from non-point animal sources increased following rainfall. In conclusion, our data suggest that rainfall significantly affects the level and source of fecal contamination in the Han River, Korea.

  11. Utility of Helicobacter spp. associated GFD markers for detecting avian fecal pollution in natural waters of two continents.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Harwood, V J; Nguyen, K; Young, S; Hamilton, K; Toze, S

    2016-01-01

    Avian fecal droppings may negatively impact environmental water quality due to the presence of high concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and zoonotic pathogens. This study was aimed at evaluating the performance characteristics and utility of a Helicobacter spp. associated GFD marker by screening 265 fecal and wastewater samples from a range of avian and non-avian host groups from two continents (Brisbane, Australia and Florida, USA). The host-prevalence and -specificity of this marker among fecal and wastewater samples tested from Brisbane were 0.58 and 0.94 (maximum value of 1.00). These values for the Florida fecal samples were 0.30 (host-prevalence) and 1.00 (host-specificity). The concentrations of the GFD markers in avian and non-avian fecal nucleic acid samples were measured at a test concentration of 10 ng of nucleic acid at Brisbane and Florida laboratories using the quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. The mean concentrations of the GFD marker in avian fecal nucleic acid samples (5.2 × 10(3) gene copies) were two orders of magnitude higher than non-avian fecal nucleic acid samples (8.6 × 10(1) gene copies). The utility of this marker was evaluated by testing water samples from the Brisbane River, Brisbane and a freshwater creek in Florida. Among the 18 water samples tested from the Brisbane River, 83% (n = 18) were positive for the GFD marker, and the concentrations ranged from 6.0 × 10(1)-3.2 × 10(2) gene copies per 100 mL water. In all, 92% (n = 25) water samples from the freshwater creek in Florida were also positive for the GFD marker with concentrations ranging from 2.8 × 10(1)-1.3 × 10(4) gene copies per 100 mL water. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the GFD marker is highly specific to avian host groups, and could be used as a reliable marker to detect the presence and amount of avian fecal pollution in environmental waters. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Alternative indicators of fecal pollution: relations with pathogens and conventional indicators, current methodologies for direct pathogen monitoring and future application perspectives.

    PubMed

    Savichtcheva, Olga; Okabe, Satoshi

    2006-07-01

    The ecological and survival characteristics of bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens vary under environmental conditions, indicating that probably no single indicator organism can predict the presence of all enteric pathogens for all types of waters and different host-associated fecal pollution. If there are true correlations between indicator organisms and pathogens, it is necessary to find out to what extent and under which circumstances these organisms can be used as reliable indicators of fecal pollution. Application of conventional and alternative fecal indicators has greatly enhanced our abilities to predict and reduce health risk associated with the use of surface waters. New molecular-based techniques have shown that combined use of conventional and alternative indicators for fecal pollution increases both the detection sensitivity and specificity of fecal pollution and associated pathogens. In this review, we, therefore, summarize the advantages and limitations of conventional and alternative fecal indicators in terms of predicting pathogen presence as well as current and future methodologies for direct pathogen monitoring in environmental waters. This manuscript is mainly focused on the relationships between microbial fecal indicators and the presence of pathogens, which have not previously been summarized yet and could nicely supplement with recent literature reviews on microbial source tracking.

  13. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes.

    PubMed

    Abeles, Shira R; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances.

  14. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Shira R.; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  15. Microbial Source Tracking Markers for Detection of Fecal Contamination in Environmental Waters: Relationships Between Pathogens and Human Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) describes a suite of methods and an investigative strategy designed to identify the dominant sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. The methods rely on the close association of certain fecal microorganisms with a particular host speci...

  16. Microbial Source Tracking Markers for Detection of Fecal Contamination in Environmental Waters: Relationships Between Pathogens and Human Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) describes a suite of methods and an investigative strategy designed to identify the dominant sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. The methods rely on the close association of certain fecal microorganisms with a particular host speci...

  17. Detection of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin in human fecal samples and anti-enterotoxin in sera.

    PubMed Central

    Naik, H S; Duncan, C L

    1978-01-01

    By using counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP), Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin was successfully demonstrated in fecal samples collected within 1 day of attack from sick individuals involved in a bacteriologically and epidemiologically proven outbreak of C. perfringens food poisoning. In contrast, enterotoxin was not demonstrable in fecal samples of apparently healthy individuals both at high- and low-risk exposure to the organism and enterotoxin or in fecal samples collected 4 to 5 days after a food poisoning outbreak. A 100% prevalence of C. perfringens anti-enterotoxin in sera of human volunteers at high- as well as low-risk exposure to the organism and enterotoxin was recorded with CIEP. PMID:211142

  18. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Richard L; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna; Shively, Dawn A; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N

    2007-09-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n=64) and animal (n=233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (esp(fm)) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (esp(fs/fm)). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of esp(fs/fm) for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% esp(fm) and 100% esp(fs/fm) in raw sewage influent; 30% for both esp(fm) and esp(fs/fm) in septic waste; and 0% esp(fm) and 80% esp(fs/fm) in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (esp(fs/fm)) and 4.7% (esp(fm)); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all esp(fm)), gulls (10/34, esp(fs/fm); 2/34, esp(fm)), mice (3/22, all esp(fs/fm)), and songbirds (5/55, all esp(fs/fm)). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both esp(fm) and esp(fs/fm) were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  19. Human parvovirus 4 in nasal and fecal specimens from children, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria

    2012-10-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤ 6-7 log(10) copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal-oral modes of PARV4 transmission.

  20. Sunlight Inactivation of Fecal Bacteriophages and Bacteria in Sewage-Polluted Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Sinton, Lester W.; Finlay, Rochelle K.; Lynch, Philippa A.

    1999-01-01

    Sunlight inactivation rates of somatic coliphages, F-specific RNA bacteriophages (F-RNA phages), and fecal coliforms were compared in seven summer and three winter survival experiments. Experiments were conducted outdoors, using 300-liter 2% (vol/vol) sewage-seawater mixtures held in open-top chambers. Dark inactivation rates (kDs), measured from exponential survival curves in enclosed (control) chambers, were higher in summer (temperature range: 14 to 20°C) than in winter (temperature range: 8 to 10°C). Winter kDs were highest for fecal coliforms and lowest for F-RNA phages but were the same or similar for all three indicators in summer. Sunlight inactivation rates (kS), as a function of cumulative global solar radiation (insolation), were all higher than the kDs with a consistent kS ranking (from greatest to least) as follows: fecal coliforms, F-RNA phages, and somatic coliphages. Phage inactivation was exponential, but bacterial curves typically exhibited a shoulder. Phages from raw sewage exhibited kSs similar to those from waste stabilization pond effluent, but raw sewage fecal coliforms were inactivated faster than pond effluent fecal coliforms. In an experiment which included F-DNA phages and Bacteroides fragilis phages, the kS ranking (from greatest to least) was as follows: fecal coliforms, F-RNA phages, B. fragilis phages, F-DNA phages, and somatic coliphages. In a 2-day experiment which included enterococci, the initial concentration ranking (from greatest to least: fecal coliforms, enterococci, F-RNA phages, and somatic coliphages) was reversed during sunlight exposure, with only the phages remaining detectable by the end of day 2. Inactivation rates under different optical filters decreased with the increase in spectral cutoff wavelength (50% light transmission) and indicated that F-RNA phages and fecal coliforms are more susceptible than somatic coliphages to longer solar wavelengths, which predominate in seawater. The consistently superior survival

  1. Analysis of human and animal fecal microbiota for microbial source tracking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2011-02-01

    Microbial compositions of human and animal feces from South Korea were analyzed and characterized. In total, 38 fecal samples (14 healthy adult humans, 6 chickens, 6 cows, 6 pigs and 6 geese) were analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing of the V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Four major phyla, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were identified in the samples. Principal coordinate analysis suggested that microbiota from the same host species generally clustered, with the exception of those from humans, which exhibited sample-specific compositions. A network-based analysis revealed that several operational taxonomic units (OTUs), such as Lactobacillus sp., Clostridium sp. and Prevotella sp., were commonly identified in all fecal sources. Other OTUs were present only in fecal samples from a single organism. For example, Yania sp. and Bifidobacterium sp. were identified specifically in chicken and human fecal samples, respectively. These specific OTUs or their respective biological markers could be useful for identifying the sources of fecal contamination in water by microbial source tracking.

  2. Consumption of a structured triacylglycerol containing behenic and oleic acids increases fecal fat excretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Makiko; Arishima, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Ryoma; Kohno, Mitsutaka; Kida, Haruyasu; Hirotsuka, Motohiko; Ikeda, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    We examined the fecal fat excretion of mildly hypertriacylglycerolemic subjects who ingested soft cookies containing 1(3)-behenoyl-2,3(1)-dioleoyl-rac-glycerol (BOO) for 7 days. The subjects included 14 healthy men (average age; 44.9 ± 1.7) whose fasting plasma triacylglycerol level ranged from 150 to 250 mg/dL. Every day for 7 days, the subjects ate 5 soft cookies containing margarine with the BOO-rich experimental oil (BOO intake, 2.46 g/day). The placebo group ate soft cookies containing margarine without BOO. This study was a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Feces were collected for 3 days prior to the end of the treatment period, and fecal fat and fatty acid composition were determined. The fecal wet weight was significantly increased in BOO group compared with that in the placebo group. Moreover, fecal fat and fatty acid level were significantly higher in the BOO group than in the placebo group. There were no significant differences in the fecal fatty acid composition of the BOO and placebo groups. These results suggest that dietary BOO increases fecal excretion of dietary fat in humans. However, BOO does not increase the excretion of specific fatty acids; it increases the excretion of all fatty acids of dietary origin, which may lead to lower and delay intestinal absorption of dietary fat.

  3. Isolation of Bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2013-12-01

    Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID 32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

  4. SPACE/TIME ANALYSIS OF FECAL POLLUTION AND RAINFALL IN AN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA ESTUARY

    PubMed Central

    Coulliette, Angela D.; Money, Eric S.; Serre, Marc L.; Noble, Rachel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Newport River Estuary (NPRE) is a high priority shellfish harvesting area in eastern North Carolina (NC) that is impaired due to fecal contamination, specifically exceeding recommended levels for fecal coliforms. A hydrologic-driven mean trend model was developed, as a function of antecedent rainfall, in the NPRE to predict levels of E. coli (EC, measured as a proxy for fecal coliforms). This mean trend model was integrated in a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) framework to produce informative Space/Time (S/T) maps depicting fecal contamination across the NPRE during winter and summer months. These maps showed that during dry winter months, corresponding to the oyster harvesting season in NC (October 1st to March 30th), predicted EC concentrations were below the shellfish harvesting standard (14 MPN per 100 ml). However, after substantial rainfall 3.81 cm (1.5 inches), the NPRE did not appear to meet this requirement. Warmer months resulted in the predicted EC concentrations exceeding the threshold for the NPRE. Predicted ENT concentrations were generally below the recreational water quality threshold (104 MPN per 100 ml), except for warmer months after substantial rainfall. Once established, this combined approach produces near real-time visual information on which to base water quality management decisions. PMID:19544880

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gen...

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gen...

  7. The Impact of Handling and Storage of Human Fecal Material on Bacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Karatza, Eleni; Vertzoni, Maria; Muenster, Uwe; Reppas, Christos

    2016-11-01

    Fecal material prepared from human stools is frequently used for the assessment of bacterial degradation of active pharmaceutical ingredients as relevant data are useful for evaluating the potential for colonic drug delivery. The impact of handling and storage of human fecal material on bacterial activity was assessed by evaluating the degradation characteristics of metronidazole and olsalazine. Multiple freeze (-70°C)-thaw cycles should be avoided. Incubation of frozen material for about 2 h in the anaerobic workstation ensures regeneration of the highest possible bacterial activity. Material could be stored at -70°C for at least 12 months.

  8. Identifying fecal pollution sources using 3M(™) Petrifilm (™) count plates and antibiotic resistance analysis in the Horse Creek Watershed in Aiken County, SC (USA).

    PubMed

    Harmon, S Michele; West, Ryan T; Yates, James R

    2014-12-01

    Sources of fecal coliform pollution in a small South Carolina (USA) watershed were identified using inexpensive methods and commonly available equipment. Samples from the upper reaches of the watershed were analyzed with 3M(™) Petrifilm(™) count plates. We were able to narrow down the study's focus to one particular tributary, Sand River, that was the major contributor of the coliform pollution (both fecal and total) to a downstream reservoir that is heavily used for recreation purposes. Concentrations of total coliforms ranged from 2,400 to 120,333 cfu/100 mL, with sharp increases in coliform counts observed in samples taken after rain events. Positive correlations between turbidity and fecal coliform counts suggested a relationship between fecal pollution and stormwater runoff. Antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA) compared antibiotic resistance profiles of fecal coliform isolates from the stream to those of a watershed-specific fecal source library (equine, waterfowl, canines, and untreated sewage). Known fecal source isolates and unknown isolates from the stream were exposed to six antibiotics at three concentrations each. Discriminant analysis grouped known isolates with an overall average rate of correct classification (ARCC) of 84.3 %. A total of 401 isolates from the first stream location were classified as equine (45.9 %), sewage (39.4 %), waterfowl (6.2 %), and feline (8.5 %). A similar pattern was observed at the second sampling location, with 42.6 % equine, 45.2 % sewage, 2.8 % waterfowl, 0.6 % canine, and 8.8 % feline. While there were slight weather-dependent differences, the vast majority of the coliform pollution in this stream appeared to be from two sources, equine and sewage. This information will contribute to better land use decisions and further justify implementation of low-impact development practices within this urban watershed.

  9. Resilience of the dominant human fecal microbiota upon short-course antibiotic challenge.

    PubMed

    De La Cochetière, M F; Durand, T; Lepage, P; Bourreille, A; Galmiche, J P; Doré, J

    2005-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that the human fecal microbiota is composed of a consortium of species specific to the host and resistant to modifications over time. Antibiotics are known to affect the intestinal microflora, and ensuing changes may result in antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is therefore important to characterize the nature and amplitude of these modifications and the ability of this ecosystem to return to its original profile-i.e., its resilience. Six healthy volunteers received oral amoxicillin (1.5 g/day) for 5 days. Fecal samples were collected at day 0 (D0) before antibiotic treatment and at set intervals until 60 days thereafter. Fecal DNA was isolated, and V6-to-V8 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR with general primers and analyzed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis. Dominant species profiles were compared on the basis of similarity (Pearson correlation coefficient). Dominant species profiles at D0 were used as a reference. The fecal microbiota showed a major shift in dominant species upon antibiotic treatment, starting 24 h after treatment initiation and reaching an average similarity of only 74% after 4 days. Within 30 days following antibiotic treatment, the fecal microbiota tended to reach an average similarity of 88% to the D0 value; within 60 days, the average similarity to the D0 value was 89%. However, in one subject, important modifications persisted for at least 2 months, with similarity to the D0 value remaining below 70%. We demonstrated the resilience of the dominant human fecal microbiota upon short-course antibiotic challenge. Yet the persistence of long-term alterations in some subjects may explain susceptibilities to antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Furthermore, these findings suggest that strategies reinforcing the ability of the fecal microbiota to resist modifications would be of clinical relevance.

  10. Alcohol induced alterations to the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    PubMed

    Couch, Robin D; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies.

  11. Comparison of human fecal and serum parvo-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Paver, W K; Clarke, S K

    1976-07-01

    Parvovirus-like particles found in the sera of two blood donors had the size and appearance on electron microscopy of a virus (B19) found in the serum of a blood donor by Cossart et al. (1975), and those of a virus found in the feces of a normal subject. Antibody to these viruses was detected by immune electron microscopy and immunoelectro-osmophoresis in the sera of 50 children aged 10 to 15 years. Of these, 36% had antibody to the fecal virus, 36% had antibody to B19, and 54% had antibody to the two other serum viruses. The results of these tests suggest that serologically the three serum viruses were similar to one another, but that the fecal virus was distinct. The two blood donors had nonspecific symptoms at the time of viremia. Both donors had developed immunoglobulin M antibody to the virus when tested 3.5 and 4.5 weeks later, but no viruses were detected in the feces or urine.

  12. Alcohol Induced Alterations to the Human Fecal VOC Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Robin D.; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies. PMID:25751150

  13. Linking Near Real-Time Water Quality Measurements to Fecal Coliforms and Trace Organic Pollutants in Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henjum, M.; Wennen, C.; Hondzo, M.; Hozalski, R. M.; Novak, P. J.; Arnold, W. A.

    2009-05-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants, including pesticides, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, and estrogens are detected in urban water bodies. Effective examination of dilute organic and microbial pollutant loading rates within surface waters is currently prohibitively expensive and labor intensive. Effort is being placed on the development of improved monitoring methodologies to more accurately assess surface water quality and evaluate the effectiveness of water quality management practices. Throughout the summer and fall of 2008 a "real-time" wireless network equipped with high frequency fundamental water quality parameter sensors measured turbidity, conductivity, pH, depth, temperature, dissolved oxygen and nitrate above and below stormwater inputs at two urban stream locations. At each location one liter grab samples were concurrently collected by ISCO automatic samplers at two hour intervals for 24 hour durations during three dry periods and five rain events. Grab samples were analyzed for fecal coliforms, atrazine (agricultural herbicide), prometon (residential herbicide) and caffeine (wastewater indicator). Surrogate relationships between easy-to-measure water quality parameters and difficult-to-measure pollutants were developed, subsequently facilitating monitoring of these pollutants without the development of new, and likely costly, technologies. Additionally, comparisons were made between traditional grab sampling techniques and the "real-time" monitoring to assess the accuracy of Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) calculations.

  14. Assessment of sources of human pathogens and fecal contamination in a Florida freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Reckhow, Kenneth H; Lukasik, Jerzy; Harwood, Valerie J

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the potential for a variety of environmental reservoirs to harbor or contribute fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), DNA markers of human fecal contamination, and human pathogens to a freshwater lake. We hypothesized that submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), sediments, and stormwater act as reservoirs and/or provide inputs of FIB and human pathogens to this inland water. Analysis included microbial source tracking (MST) markers of sewage contamination (Enterococcus faecium esp gene, human-associated Bacteroides HF183, and human polyomaviruses), pathogens (Salmonella, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and enteric viruses), and FIB (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, and enterococci). Bayesian analysis was used to assess relationships among microbial and physicochemical variables. FIB in the water were correlated with concentrations in SAV and sediment. Furthermore, the correlation of antecedent rainfall and major rain events with FIB concentrations and detection of human markers and pathogens points toward multiple reservoirs for microbial contaminants in this system. Although pathogens and human-source markers were detected in 55% and 21% of samples, respectively, markers rarely coincided with pathogen detection. Bayesian analysis revealed that low concentrations (<45 CFU × 100 ml(-1)) of fecal coliforms were associated with 93% probability that pathogens would not be detected; furthermore the Bayes net model showed associations between elevated temperature and rainfall with fecal coliform and enterococci concentrations, but not E. coli. These data indicate that many under-studied matrices (e.g. SAV, sediment, stormwater) are important reservoirs for FIB and potentially human pathogens and demonstrate the usefulness of Bayes net analysis for water quality assessment.

  15. Implications of Fecal Bacteria Input from Latrine-Polluted Ponds for Wells in Sandy Aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Knappett, Peter S. K.; McKay, Larry D.; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel E.; Alam, Md. J.; Huq, Md. R.; Mey, Jacob; Feighery, John E.; Culligan, Patricia J.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Zhuang, Jie; Escamilla, Veronica; Emch, Michael; Perfect, Edmund; Sayler, Gary S.; Ahmed, Kazi M.; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Ponds receiving latrine effluents may serve as sources of fecal contamination to shallow aquifers tapped by millions of tube-wells in Bangladesh. To test this hypothesis, transects of monitoring wells radiating away from four ponds were installed in a shallow sandy aquifer underlying a densely populated village and monitored for 14 months. Two of the ponds extended to medium sand. Another pond was sited within silty sand and the last in silt. The fecal indicator bacterium E. coli was rarely detected along the transects during the dry season and was only detected near the ponds extending to medium sand up to 7 m away during the monsoon. A log-linear decline in E. coli and Bacteroidales concentrations with distance along the transects in the early monsoon indicates that ponds excavated in medium sand were the likely source of contamination. Spatial removal rates ranged from 0.5-1.3 log10/m. After the ponds were artificially filled with groundwater to simulate the impact of a rain storm, E. coli levels increased near a pond recently excavated in medium sand, but no others. These observations show that adjacent sediment grain-size and how recently a pond was excavated influence how much fecal contamination ponds receiving latrine effluents contribute to neighboring groundwater. PMID:22191430

  16. Space/time analysis of fecal pollution and rainfall in an eastern North Carolina estuary.

    PubMed

    Coulliette, Angela D; Money, Eric S; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel T

    2009-05-15

    The Newport River Estuary (NPRE) is a high-priority shellfish harvesting area in eastern North Carolina that is impaired due to fecal contamination, specifically exceeding recommended levels for fecal coliforms. A hydrologic-driven mean trend model was developed, as a function of antecedent rainfall, in the NPRE to predict levels of Escherichia coli (EC, measured as a proxyforfecal coliforms). This mean trend model was integrated in a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) framework to produce informative space/time (S/T) maps depicting fecal contamination across the NPRE during winter and summer months. These maps showed that during dry winter months, corretponding to the oyster harvesting season in North Carolina (October 1-March 30), predicted EC concentrations were below the shellfish harvesting standard (14 MPN/100 mL). However, after substantial rainfall of 3.81 cm (1.5 in.), the NPRE did not appear to mee this requirement. Warmer months resulted in the predicted EC concentrations exceeding the threshold for the NPRE. Predicted ENT concentrations were generally below the recreational water quality threshold (104 MPN/100 mL), except for warmer months after substantial rainfall. Once established, this combined approach produces near real-time visual information on which to base water quality management decisions.

  17. Implications of fecal bacteria input from latrine-polluted ponds for wells in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Knappett, Peter S K; McKay, Larry D; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel E; Alam, Md J; Huq, Md R; Mey, Jacob; Feighery, John E; Culligan, Patricia J; Mailloux, Brian J; Zhuang, Jie; Escamilla, Veronica; Emch, Michael; Perfect, Edmund; Sayler, Gary S; Ahmed, Kazi M; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-02-07

    Ponds receiving latrine effluents may serve as sources of fecal contamination to shallow aquifers tapped by millions of tube-wells in Bangladesh. To test this hypothesis, transects of monitoring wells radiating away from four ponds were installed in a shallow sandy aquifer underlying a densely populated village and monitored for 14 months. Two of the ponds extended to medium sand. Another pond was sited within silty sand and the last in silt. The fecal indicator bacterium E. coli was rarely detected along the transects during the dry season and was only detected near the ponds extending to medium sand up to 7 m away during the monsoon. A log-linear decline in E. coli and Bacteroidales concentrations with distance along the transects in the early monsoon indicates that ponds excavated in medium sand were the likely source of contamination. Spatial removal rates ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 log(10)/m. After the ponds were artificially filled with groundwater to simulate the impact of a rain storm, E. coli levels increased near a pond recently excavated in medium sand, but no others. These observations show that adjacent sediment grain-size and how recently a pond was excavated influence the how much fecal contamination ponds receiving latrine effluents contribute to neighboring groundwater.

  18. Enzymatic Modification of Corn Starch Influences Human Fecal Fermentation Profiles.

    PubMed

    Dura, Angela; Rose, Devin J; Rosell, Cristina M

    2017-06-14

    Enzymatically modified starches have been widely used in food applications to develop new products, but information regarding digestion and fecal fermentation of these products is sparse. The objective of this study was to determine the fermentation properties of corn starch modified with α-amylase, amyloglucosidase, or cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase and the possible role of hydrolysis products. Samples differed in their digestibility and availability to be fermented by the microbiota, resulting in differences in microbial metabolites produced during in vitro fermentation. The presence or absence of hydrolysis products and gelatinization affected starch composition and subsequent metabolite production by the microbiota. Amyloglucosidase-treated starch led to the greatest production of short- and branched-chain fatty acid production by the microbiota. Results from this study could be taken into consideration to confirm the possible nutritional claims and potential health benefits of these starches as raw ingredients for food development.

  19. An Improved Methodology to Overcome Key Issues in Human Fecal Metagenomic DNA Extraction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Manoj; Gupta, Shashank; Ahmed, Vasim; Bhambi, Manu; Pandey, Rajesh; Chauhan, Nar Singh

    2016-12-01

    Microbes are ubiquitously distributed in nature, and recent culture-independent studies have highlighted the significance of gut microbiota in human health and disease. Fecal DNA is the primary source for the majority of human gut microbiome studies. However, further improvement is needed to obtain fecal metagenomic DNA with sufficient amount and good quality but low host genomic DNA contamination. In the current study, we demonstrate a quick, robust, unbiased, and cost-effective method for the isolation of high molecular weight (>23kb) metagenomic DNA (260/280 ratio >1.8) with a good yield (55.8±3.8ng/mg of feces). We also confirm that there is very low human genomic DNA contamination (eubacterial: human genomic DNA marker genes=2(27.9):1) in the human feces. The newly-developed method robustly performs for fresh as well as stored fecal samples as demonstrated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing using 454 FLX+. Moreover, 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated that compared to other DNA extraction methods tested, the fecal metagenomic DNA isolated with current methodology retains species richness and does not show microbial diversity biases, which is further confirmed by qPCR with a known quantity of spike-in genomes. Overall, our data highlight a protocol with a balance between quality, amount, user-friendliness, and cost effectiveness for its suitability toward usage for culture-independent analysis of the human gut microbiome, which provides a robust solution to overcome key issues associated with fecal metagenomic DNA isolation in human gut microbiome studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Air Pollution and Human Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lave, Lester B.; Seskin, Eugene P.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews studies statistically relating air pollution to mortality and morbidity rates for respiratory, and cardiovascular diseases, cancer and infant mortality. Some data recalculated. Estimates 50 percent air pollution reduction will save 4.5 percent (2080 million dollars per year) of all economic loss (hospitalization, income loss) associated…

  1. The Effects of Water Matrix on Decay of Human Fecal Molecular Markers and Campylobacter spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although molecular source tracking for human fecal contamination is used on a wide range of sample types, little is known about comparative decay of proposed molecular markers under different conditions, or correlation with pathogen decay. Our purpose was to measure correlations ...

  2. PERSISTENCE OF PHARMACEUTICALS AND OTHER WASTEWATER RELATED COMPOUNDS: UTILITY AS INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently ascertained using indicator bacteria. The tests to analyze for these bacteria require a considerable length of time to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal fecal material sources. To shorten the t...

  3. Rural origin, age, and endoparasite fecal prevalence in dogs surrendered to the Regina Humane Society, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Schurer, Janna M.; Hamblin, Brie; Davenport, Laura; Wagner, Brent; Jenkins, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of fecal parasite surveillance in dogs surrendered to the Regina Humane Society, Saskatchewan, Canada, between May and November 2013. Overall, 23% of 231 dogs were infected with at least 1 intestinal parasite. Endoparasite infection was positively associated with rural origin (P = 0.002) and age (< 12 months; P < 0.001). PMID:25477549

  4. The Effects of Water Matrix on Decay of Human Fecal Molecular Markers and Campylobacter spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although molecular source tracking for human fecal contamination is used on a wide range of sample types, little is known about comparative decay of proposed molecular markers under different conditions, or correlation with pathogen decay. Our purpose was to measure correlations ...

  5. Levels of fecal corticosterone in sandhill cranes during a human-led migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartup, B.K.; Olsen, G.H.; Czekala, Nancy M.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Langenberg, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen captive-reared greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were conditioned to follow ultralight aircraft to promote migration between Wisconsin and Florida (U SA) after release. Fecal samples were collected throughout the training period in Wisconsin and during a 1,977-km human-led migration to Florida to determine fecal corticosterone (FC) concentrations by radioimmunoassay. The mean (?SE) FC concentration during the training period was 1O9.5?7.5 ng/g and was representative of baseline levels recorded previously from sandhill cranes. Fecal corticosterone concentrations increased in early migration compared to concentrations 1 mo prior to departure (P<0.01) but were not different from baseline concentrations at the end of the 6-wk migration period. The variability of FC concentrations in individual samples was greater throughout the migration than the training period. Increases in FC during migration were modest and generally consistent with normal corticosterone elevations observed in migrating birds.

  6. Fecal pollution in coastal marine sediments from a semi-enclosed deep embayment subjected to anthropogenic activities: an issue to be considered in environmental quality management frameworks development.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, D; Garrido-Pérez, M C; Nebot-Sanz, E; Sales-Márquez, D

    2010-12-01

    Sewage discharge is a major source of pollution in marine environments. Urban wastewaters can directly enter marine environments carrying pathogen organisms, organic loads, and nutrients. Because marine sediments can act as the ultimate fate of a wide range of pollutants, environmental quality assessment in this compartment can help to identify pollution problems in coastal areas. In the present study, characterization of surficial marine sediments allowed assessment of fecal pollution in a semi-enclosed deep embayment that is subjected to anthropogenic activities. Physicochemical parameters and fecal indicators presented a great spatial heterogeneity. Fecal coliform and Clostridium perfringens showed accumulation in an extensive area, not only in proximity to sewage discharge points, but also in sediments at 100 meters depth. Results included herein demonstrated that, in coastal areas, urban wastewater discharge can affect the whole ecosystem through accumulation of fecal matter in bottom sediments. Application of multivariate techniques provided useful information with applicability for management of coastal areas in such complex systems. Environmental implications of wastewater discharge in coastal areas indicate the need to implement and include sediment quality control strategies in legislative frameworks.

  7. Air pollution and human fertility rates.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Basagaña, Xavier; Dadvand, Payam; Martinez, David; Cirach, Marta; Beelen, Rob; Jacquemin, Bénédicte

    2014-09-01

    Some reports have suggested effects of air pollution on semen quality and success rates of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in humans and lower fertility rates in mice. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of air pollution on human fertility rates. We assessed the association between traffic related air pollution and fertility rates in humans in Barcelona, Spain (2011-2012). We hypothesized that higher air pollution levels would be associated with lower fertility rates. We calculated the general fertility rate which is the number of live births per 1000 women between the ages of 15 and 44 years per census tract. We used land use regression (LUR) modeling to estimate the air pollution concentrations (particulate matter, NO2/NOx) per census tract. We used Besag-York-Mollié models to quantify the relationship between air pollution and fertility rates with adjustment for a number of potential confounders such as maternal age and area level socio-economic status. We found a statistically significant reduction of fertility rates with an increase in traffic related air pollution levels, particularly for the coarse fraction of particulate matter (IRR=0.87 95% CI 0.82, 0.94 per IQR). This is the first study in humans to show an association between reduced fertility rates and higher traffic related air pollution levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposing water samples to ultraviolet light improves fluorometry for detecting human fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Peter G; Hagedorn, Charles; McDonald, Jennifer L; Fisher, Jared A; Saluta, Michael A; Dickerson, Jerold W; Gentit, Lisa C; Smith, Steven L; Mantripragada, Nehru S; Ritter, Kerry J; Belcher, Carolyn N

    2007-08-01

    Fluorometry identifies human fecal contamination by detecting optical brighteners in environmental waters. Because optical brighteners are sensitive to sunlight, we determined if we could improve fluorometry by exposing water samples to ultraviolet (UV) light to differentiate between optical brighteners and other fluorescing organic compounds. Optical brighteners were likely present when the relative percentage difference in fluorometric value of the water before and after UV light exposure was >30% (glass cuvettes, 30 min exposure) or >15% (polymethacrylate cuvettes, 5 min exposure). In a blind study, we correctly identified the presence or absence of optical brighteners in 178 of 180 (99%) of the samples tested with a more expensive field fluorometer and in 175 of 180 (97%) of the samples tested with a less expensive handheld fluorometer. In the field, the method correctly identified two negative and three positive locations for human fecal contamination. When combined with counts of fecal bacteria, the new fluorometric method may be a simple, quick, and easy way to identify human fecal contamination in environmental waters.

  9. Probiotic E. coli treatment mediates antimicrobial human beta-defensin synthesis and fecal excretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Möndel, M; Schroeder, B O; Zimmermann, K; Huber, H; Nuding, S; Beisner, J; Fellermann, K; Stange, E F; Wehkamp, J

    2009-03-01

    Inducible epithelial human beta-defensins (hBD) play an important role in intestinal barrier function. In vitro studies showed that clinically effective probiotics induce antimicrobial hBD-2. Here, we aimed to assess the in vivo effect in healthy volunteers and also addressed how defensins affect probiotic survival. Symbioflor 2 containing one strain of several viable genotypes of Escherichia coli was administered to 23 healthy individuals. After 3 weeks, fecal hBD-2 peptide was increased in 78% (mean 3.7-fold; P<0.0001). Interestingly, the fecal hBD-2 peptide was still elevated 9 weeks after treatment (P=0.008). In vitro studies revealed that this effect was mediated by only one out of three tested E. coli genotypes and comparable to probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 (10- to 15-fold). Functional assays showed that all tested bacteria were similarly killed by defensins allowing to speculate about a suicidal character of this effect. Defensin induction seems to be a common and important mechanism of probiotic treatment.

  10. Tracking the relative concentration between Bacteroidales DNA markers and culturable Escherichia coli in fecally polluted subtropical seawater: potential use in differentiating fresh and aged pollution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rulong; Yeung, Leo T C; Ho, Pui-Hei; Lau, Stanley C K

    2017-03-01

    Routine water quality monitoring practices based on the enumeration of culturable Escherichia coli provides no information about the source or age of fecal pollution. An emerging strategy is to use culturable E. coli and the DNA markers of Bacteroidales complementarily for microbial source tracking. In this study, we consistently observed in seawater microcosms of 3 different conditions that culturable E. coli decayed faster (T99 = 1.14 - 4.29 days) than Bacteroidales DNA markers did (T99 = 1.81 - 200.23 days). Concomitantly, the relative concentration between Bacteroidales DNA markers and culturable E. coli increased over time in all treatments. Particularly, the increase during the early stage of the experiments (before T99 of E. coli was reached) was faster than during the later stage (after T99 of E. coli was attained). We propose that the tracking of the relative concentration between Bacteroidales DNA markers and culturable E. coli provides an opportunity to differentiate a pollution that is relatively fresh from one that has aged. This method, upon further investigation and validation, could be useful in episodic pollution events where the surge of E. coli concentration causes noncompliance to the single sample maximum criterion that mandates high frequency follow-up monitoring.

  11. Heritable components of the human fecal microbiome are associated with visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Michelle; Goodrich, Julia K; Jackson, Matthew A; Yet, Idil; Davenport, Emily R; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Debelius, Justine; Pallister, Tess; Mangino, Massimo; Raes, Jeroen; Knight, Rob; Clark, Andrew G; Ley, Ruth E; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T

    2016-09-26

    Variation in the human fecal microbiota has previously been associated with body mass index (BMI). Although obesity is a global health burden, the accumulation of abdominal visceral fat is the specific cardio-metabolic disease risk factor. Here, we explore links between the fecal microbiota and abdominal adiposity using body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a large sample of twins from the TwinsUK cohort, comparing fecal 16S rRNA diversity profiles with six adiposity measures. We profile six adiposity measures in 3666 twins and estimate their heritability, finding novel evidence for strong genetic effects underlying visceral fat and android/gynoid ratio. We confirm the association of lower diversity of the fecal microbiome with obesity and adiposity measures, and then compare the association between fecal microbial composition and the adiposity phenotypes in a discovery subsample of twins. We identify associations between the relative abundances of fecal microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and abdominal adiposity measures. Most of these results involve visceral fat associations, with the strongest associations between visceral fat and Oscillospira members. Using BMI as a surrogate phenotype, we pursue replication in independent samples from three population-based cohorts including American Gut, Flemish Gut Flora Project and the extended TwinsUK cohort. Meta-analyses across the replication samples indicate that 8 OTUs replicate at a stringent threshold across all cohorts, while 49 OTUs achieve nominal significance in at least one replication sample. Heritability analysis of the adiposity-associated microbial OTUs prompted us to assess host genetic-microbe interactions at obesity-associated human candidate loci. We observe significant associations of adiposity-OTU abundances with host genetic variants in the FHIT, TDRG1 and ELAVL4 genes, suggesting a potential role for host genes to mediate the link between the fecal microbiome

  12. 16S rRNA-based assays for quantitative detection of universal, human-, cow-, and dog-specific fecal Bacteroidales: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Kildare, Beverly J; Leutenegger, Christian M; McSwain, Belinda S; Bambic, Dustin G; Rajal, Veronica B; Wuertz, Stefan

    2007-08-01

    We report the design and validation of new TaqMan((R)) assays for microbial source tracking based on the amplification of fecal 16S rRNA marker sequences from uncultured cells of the order Bacteroidales. The assays were developed for the detection and enumeration of non-point source input of fecal pollution to watersheds. The quantitative "universal"Bacteroidales assay BacUni-UCD detected all tested stool samples from human volunteers (18 out of 18), cat (7 out of 7), dog (8 out of 8), seagull (10/10), cow (8/8), horse (8/8), and wastewater effluent (14/14). The human assay BacHum-UCD discriminated fully between human and cow stool samples but did not detect all stool samples from human volunteers (12/18). In addition, there was 12.5% detection of dog stool (1/8), but no cross-reactivity with cat, horse, or seagull fecal samples. In contrast, all wastewater samples were positive for the BacHum-UCD marker, supporting its designation as 100% sensitive for mixed-human source identification. The cow-specific assay BacCow-UCD fully discriminated between cow and human stool samples. There was 38% detection of horse stool (3/8), but no cross-specificity with any of the other animal stool samples tested. The dog assay BacCan-UCD discriminated fully between dog and cow stool or seagull guano samples and detected 62.5% stool samples from dogs (5/8). There was some cross-reactivity with 22.2% detection of human stool (4/18), 14.3% detection of cat stool (1/7), and 28.6% detection of wastewater samples (4/14). After validation using stool samples, single-blind tests were used to further demonstrate the efficacy of the developed markers; all assays were sensitive, reproducible, and accurate in the quantification of mixed fecal sources present in aqueous samples. Finally, the new assays were compared with previously published sequences, which showed the new methodologies to be more specific and sensitive. Using Bayes' Theorem, we calculated the conditional probability that the

  13. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fecal pollution originating from fresh human feces, septage, and primary effluent sewage in a subtropical marine environment was assessed over a six day period with an emphasis on the influence of ambient sunlight and indigenous microbiota. Ambient water mixed with each fecal pollution type was placed in dialysis bags and incubated in situ in a submersible aquatic mesocosm. Genetic and cultivated fecal indicators including fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci, E. coli, and Bacteroidales), coliphage (somatic and F+), Bacteroides fragilis phage (GB-124), and human-associated geneticindicators (HF183/BacR287 and HumM2) were measured in each sample. Simple linearregression assessing treatment trends in each pollution type over time showed significant decay (p ≤ 0.05) in most treatments for feces and sewage (27/28 and 32/40, respectively), compared to septage (6/26). A two-way analysis of variance of log10 reduction values for sewage and feces experiments indicated that treatments differentially impact survival of cultivated bacteria, cultivated phage, and genetic indicators. Findings suggest that sunlight is critical for phage decay, and indigenous microbio

  14. Pepper mild mottle virus as an indicator and a tracer of fecal pollution in water environments: comparative evaluation with wastewater-tracer pharmaceuticals in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Nakada, Norihide; Hanamoto, Seiya; Inaba, Manami; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Do, An Thuan; Nga, Tran Thi Viet; Oguma, Kumiko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2015-02-15

    We analyzed pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) in 36 samples taken from surface water, wastewater, groundwater, tap water and bottled water in Hanoi, Vietnam. We then compared the occurrence and fates of PMMoV with pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), which are known wastewater tracers. PMMoV was detected in 94% of the surface water samples (ponds, water from irrigated farmlands and rivers) and in all the wastewater samples. The PMMoV concentration ranged from 5.5×10(6)-7.2×10(6)copies/L in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influents, 6.5×10(5)-8.5×10(5)copies/L in WWTP effluents and 1.0×10(4)-1.8×10(6)copies/L in surface water. Among the sixty PPCPs analyzed, caffeine and carbamazepine had high detection rates in surface water (100% and 88%, respectively). In surface water, the concentration ratio of PMMoV to caffeine remained unchanged than that in WWTP influents, suggesting that the persistence of PMMoV in surface water was comparable to that of caffeine. The persistence and the large concentration ratio of PMMoV in WWTP influents to the method detection limit would account for its ubiquitous detection in surface water. In comparison, human enteric viruses (HEV) were less frequently detected (18-59%) than PMMoV in surface water, probably because of their faster decay. Together with the reported high human feces-specificity, our results suggested that PMMoV is useful as a sensitive fecal indicator for evaluating the potential occurrence of pathogenic viruses in surface water. Moreover, PMMoV can be useful as a moderately conservative fecal tracer for specifically tracking fecal pollution of surface water. PMMoV was detected in 38% of the groundwater samples at low concentrations (up to 19copies/L). PMMoV was not detected in the tap water and bottled water samples. In groundwater, tap water and bottled water samples, the occurrence of PPCPs and HEV disagreed with that of PMMoV, suggesting that PMMoV is not suitable as an indicator or a tracer in

  15. Predicting fecal sources in waters with diverse pollution loads using general and molecular host-specific indicators and applying machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Sánchez, David; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R

    2015-03-15

    In this study we use a machine learning software (Ichnaea) to generate predictive models for water samples with different concentrations of fecal contamination (point source, moderate and low). We applied several MST methods (host-specific Bacteroides phages, mitochondrial DNA genetic markers, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium dentium markers, and bifidobacterial host-specific qPCR), and general indicators (Escherichia coli, enterococci and somatic coliphages) to evaluate the source of contamination in the samples. The results provided data to the Ichnaea software, that evaluated the performance of each method in the different scenarios and determined the source of the contamination. Almost all MST methods in this study determined correctly the origin of fecal contamination at point source and in moderate concentration samples. When the dilution of the fecal pollution increased (below 3 log10 CFU E. coli/100 ml) some of these indicators (bifidobacterial host-specific qPCR, some mitochondrial markers or B. dentium marker) were not suitable because their concentrations decreased below the detection limit. Using the data from source point samples, the software Ichnaea produced models for waters with low levels of fecal pollution. These models included some MST methods, on the basis of their best performance, that were used to determine the source of pollution in this area. Regardless the methods selected, that could vary depending on the scenario, inductive machine learning methods are a promising tool in MST studies and may represent a leap forward in solving MST cases.

  16. Differentiation of fecal Escherichia coli from human, livestock, and poultry sources by rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting on the shellfish culture area of East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Jia; Fu, Ling-Lin; Li, Jian-Rong

    2011-05-01

    The rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting performed with REP, BOX A1R, and (GTG)(5) primers was investigated as a way to differentiate between human, livestock, and poultry sources of fecal pollution on the area of Xiangshan Bay, East China Sea. Of the three methods, the BOX-PCR DNA fingerprints analyzed by jack-knife algorithm were revealed high rate of correct classification (RCC) with 91.30, 80.39, 89.39, 86.14, 93.24, 87.72, and 89.28% of human, cattle, swine, chicken, duck, sheep, and goose E. coli isolates classified into the correct host source, respectively. The average rate of correct classification (ARCC) of REP-, BOX-, and (GTG)(5)-PCR patterns was 79.88, 88.21, and 86.39%, respectively. Although the highest amount of bands in (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprints could be observed, the discriminatory efficacy of BOX-PCR was superior to both REP- and (GTG)(5)-PCR. Moreover, the similarity of 459 isolates originated from shellfish and growing water was compared with fecal-obtained strains. The results showed that 92.4 and 96.2% E. coli strains isolated from midstream and downstream shellfish samples, respectively, had a ≥ 80% similarity with corresponding strains isolated from fecal samples. It was indicated that E. coli in feces could spread from human sewage or domestic farms to the surrounding shellfish culture water, and potentially affect the quality of shellfish. This work suggests that rep-PCR fingerprinting can be a promising genotypic tool applied in the shellfish growing water management on East China Sea for source identification of fecal pollution.

  17. Evaluation of an optimal preparation of human standardized fecal inocula for in vitro fermentation studies.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Marisol; Eck, Anat; Koenen, Marjorie E; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Budding, Andries E; Venema, Koen

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the optimal preservation approach to prepare human feces as inoculum for in vitro fermentations as an alternative to the use of fresh feces. The four treatments studied were: Treatment 1) fresh feces resuspended in dialysate solution+glycerol; Treatment 2) fresh feces resuspended in dialysate solution+glycerol and then stored at -80°C; Treatment 3) fecal sample frozen with 1.5 g glycerol; and Treatment 4) fecal sample frozen. All the treatments contained 8.75 g of feces, 3.5 ml dialysate and 4.9 ml glycerol when inoculated in TIM-2 in vitro system. Treatment 1 (fresh fecal preparation) was used as a reference. The effects were evaluated in terms of i) metabolic activity and ii) composition of the microbiota using fermentation experiments in the TIM-2 in vitro system. In all treatments, high levels of acetate were produced followed by n-butyrate and propionate. However, the metabolic activity of the bacteria, in terms of short-chain fatty acid production, was affected by the different treatments. Microbiota composition was analyzed using the IS-pro profiling technique. Diversity in Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and Proteobacteria groups seemed to be preserved in all treatments whereas it was observed to decline in the Bacteroidetes group. Preparing a human fecal inoculum resuspended in dialysate solution with glycerol and then stored at -80°C showed high similarities to the results obtained with fresh feces, and is proposed as the optimal way to freeze fecal material as an alternative to fresh feces for in vitro fermentation studies.

  18. Natural soil reservoirs for human pathogenic and fecal indicator bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boschiroli, Maria L; Falkinham, Joseph; Favre-Bonte, Sabine; Nazaret, Sylvie; Piveteau, Pascal; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Delaquis, Pascal; Hartmann, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Soils receive inputs of human pathogenic and indicator bacteria through land application of animal manures or sewage sludge, and inputs by wildlife. Soil is an extremely heterogeneous substrate and contains meso- and macrofauna that may be reservoirs for bacteria of human health concern. The ability to detect and quantify bacteria of human health concern is important in risk assessments and in evaluating the efficacy of agricultural soil management practices that are protective of crop quality and protective of adjacent water resources. The present chapter describes the distribution of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in soils. Methods for detecting and quantifying soilborne bacteria including extraction, enrichment using immunomagnetic capture, culturing, molecular detection and deep sequencing of metagenomic DNA to detect pathogens are overviewed. Methods for strain phenotypic and genotypic characterization are presented, as well as how comparison with clinical isolates can inform the potential for human health risk.

  19. Human health effects of air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Folinsbee, L J

    1993-01-01

    Over the past three or four decades, there have been important advances in the understanding of the actions, exposure-response characteristics, and mechanisms of action of many common air pollutants. A multidisciplinary approach using epidemiology, animal toxicology, and controlled human exposure studies has contributed to the database. This review will emphasize studies of humans but will also draw on findings from the other disciplines. Air pollutants have been shown to cause responses ranging from reversible changes in respiratory symptoms and lung function, changes in airway reactivity and inflammation, structural remodeling of pulmonary airways, and impairment of pulmonary host defenses, to increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. Quantitative and qualitative understanding of the effects of a small group of air pollutants has advanced considerably, but the understanding is by no means complete, and the breadth of effects of all air pollutants is only partially understood. PMID:8354181

  20. Human Parvovirus 4 in Nasal and Fecal Specimens from Children, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤6–7 log10 copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal–oral modes of PARV4 transmission. PMID:23018024

  1. EVALUATION OF WASTEWATER CHEMICALS AS INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently ascertained using indicator bacteria. The traditional tests that analyze for these bacteria require approximately 24 hours to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal sources. One solution is to use hum...

  2. EVALUATION OF WASTEWATER CHEMICALS AS INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently ascertained using indicator bacteria. The traditional tests that analyze for these bacteria require approximately 24 hours to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal sources. One solution is to use hum...

  3. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layton, Blythe A.; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Ballesté, Elisenda; Brandão, João; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Converse, Reagan; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Gourmelon, Michèle; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung; Lozach, Solen; Madi, Tania; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Peed, Lindsay; Reischer, Georg H.; Rodrigues, Raquel; Rose, Joan B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Sinigalliano, Chris; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Stewart, Jill; ,; Laurie, C.; Wang, Dan; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Jay, Jenny; Holden, Patricia A.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Shanks, Orin; Griffith, John F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing in large multi-laboratory studies. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtH), BsteriF1, gyrB, HF183 endpoint, HF183 SYBR, HF183 Taqman®, HumM2, and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH (Mnif)) using 64 blind samples prepared in one laboratory. The blind samples contained either one or two fecal sources from human, wastewater or non-human sources. The assay results were assessed for presence/absence of the human markers and also quantitatively while varying the following: 1) classification of samples that were detected but not quantifiable (DNQ) as positive or negative; 2) reference fecal sample concentration unit of measure (such as culturable indicator bacteria, wet mass, total DNA, etc); and 3) human fecal source type (stool, sewage or septage). Assay performance using presence/absence metrics was found to depend on the classification of DNQ samples. The assays that performed best quantitatively varied based on the fecal concentration unit of measure and laboratory protocol. All methods were consistently more sensitive to human stools compared to sewage or septage in both the presence/absence and quantitative analysis. Overall, HF183 Taqman® was found to be the most effective marker of human fecal contamination in this California-based study.

  4. USE OF COMPETITIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION TO ENRICH FOR GENOME-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO CLOSELY RELATED HUMAN FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently used as indicators of fecal pollution in surface waters. To accelerate the identification of Enterococcus faecalis-specific DNA sequences, we employed a comparative genomic strategy utilizing a positive selection process to compare E. faec...

  5. USE OF COMPETITIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION TO ENRICH FOR GENOME-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO CLOSELY RELATED HUMAN FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enterococci are frequently used as indicators of fecal pollution in surface waters. To accelerate the identification of Enterococcus faecalis-specific DNA sequences, we employed a comparative genomic strategy utilizing a positive selection process to compare E. faec...

  6. In Vitro Effects of Dietary Inulin on Human Fecal Microbiota and Butyrate Production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Jeon, Woo-Min; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Administration of dietary fibers has various health benefits, mainly by increasing numbers of beneficial bacteria and enhancing production of short-chain fatty acids in the colon. There has been growing interest in the addition of dietary fiber to human diet, due to its prebiotic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the prebiotic activity of inulin using an in vitro batch fermentation system with human fecal microbiota. Fermentation of inulin resulted in a significantly greater ratio of Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria to Enterobacteria strains as an index of healthy human intestine and elevated butyrate concentration, which are related to improvement of gut health.

  7. Greater apparent absorption of flavonoids is associated with lesser human fecal flavonoid disappearance rates.

    PubMed

    Simons, Andrean L; Renouf, Mathieu; Murphy, Patricia A; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2010-01-13

    It was hypothesized that 5,7,4'-OH-flavonoids disappeared more rapidly from human fecal incubations and were less absorbable by humans than flavonoids without 5-OH moieties. Anaerobic fecal disappearance rates over 24 h were determined for 15 flavonoids in samples from 20 men and 13 women. In these anaerobic fecal mixtures, flavonoids with 5,7,4'-OH groups, genistein, apigenin, naringenin, luteolin, kaempferol, and quercetin (disappearance rate, k=0.46+/-0.10 h(-1)), and methoxylated flavonoids, hesperetin and glycitein (k=0.24+/-0.21 h(-1)), disappeared rapidly compared with flavonoids lacking 5-OH (e.g., daidzein, k=0.07+/-0.03 h(-1)). Apparent absorption of flavonoids that disappeared rapidly from in vitro fecal incubations, genistein, naringenin, quercetin, and hesperetin, was compared with that of daidzein, a slowly disappearing flavonoid, in 5 men and 5 women. Subjects ingested 104 micromol of genistein and 62 micromol of daidzein (soy milk), 1549 micromol of naringenin and 26 micromol of hesperetin (grapefruit juice), and 381 micromol of quercetin (onions) in three test meals, each separated by 1 week. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 h after each test meal. Plasma flavonoid concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 1 microM. The apparent absorption, expressed as percentage of ingested dose excreted in urine, was significantly less for naringenin (3.2+/-1.7%), genistein (7.2+/-4.6%), hesperetin (7.3+/-3.2%), and quercetin (5.6+/-3.7%) compared with daidzein (43.4+/-15.5%, p=0.02). These data affirmed the hypothesis that the 5,7,4'-OH of flavonoids limited apparent absorption of these compounds in humans.

  8. The Seasonality of Fecal Coliform Bacteria Pollution and its Influence on Closures of Shellfish Harvesting Areas in Mississippi Sound

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, Paulinus; Gordon, Scott; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    fecal coliforms in Mississippi Sound. Models consisting of one or more of the variables: Pearl River stage, water temperature, and salinity were developed to predict FC concentrations in the Sound. The model parameter(s) explained 56 to 91% of the variations in FC counts. Management of shellfish in Mississippi Sound can be improved by utilizing information on the forecasted three to seven years occurrence of ENSO events. In addition, since Pearl River stage was the most important variable predicting FC concentration in the Sound, a study of the levels and sources of FC bacteria in the river, especially the middle and lower sections, is needed for developing a management plan for reducing FC bacteria pollution in the Sound. PMID:16705840

  9. In vitro fermentation of sulfated polysaccharides from E. prolifera and L. japonica by human fecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Dong, Shiyuan; Gao, Jian; Jiang, Chaoyu

    2016-10-01

    In vitro fermentation of the sulfated polysaccharides from seaweeds Enteromorpha prolifera and Laminaria japonica and their prebiotic effects on human fecal microbiota were investigated in this study. The sulfated polysaccharides were fermented in vitro for 48h by human fecal cultures. When 0.8g MWCOL (polysaccharides MWCO<30kD) from L. japonica was fermented, the pH in fecal cultures decreased from 6.5 to 5.1 and the levels of short chain fatty acids, such as acetic, butyric and lactic acids all significantly increased. After 48h fermentation, 0.8g MWCOL showed good effect on modulating the gut microflora balance, because the beneficial strains (Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium) were both significantly higher than those in control group (p<0.05). As far as we know, this is the first report that consumption of sulfated polysaccharides from E. prolifera and L. japonica is beneficial to the ecosystem of the intestinal tract by increasing the populations of probiotics and short chain fatty acids. Furthermore, our reports indicated that molecular weight of sulfated polysaccharide from marine algae is related to its prebiotic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of green tea consumption on human fecal microbiota with special reference to Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Touyama, Mutsumi; Hisada, Takayoshi; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-11-01

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. Its beneficial health effects and components have been extensively reviewed. However, little is known about the influence of green tea consumption on the human intestinal microbiota (HIM), which plays a crucial role in human health. Ten volunteers who did not usually consume green tea, drank it for 10 days and then stopped drinking it for 7 days. Their fecal samples were collected at three time points: before beginning the 10-day green-tea regime, at the conclusion of that 10 days, and 7 days after stopping the regime. Their fecal samples were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism with specific primer-restriction enzyme systems for HIM and by using a real-time PCR method for the Bifidobacterium species. Although the HIM of each subject was relatively stable, the proportion of Bifidobacterium species played an important role in the classification of their fecal microbiota. Although there were inter-individual differences in the Bifidobacterium species, an overall tendency for the proportion of bifidobacteria to increase because of green tea consumption was noted. However, little change was observed in the composition of Bifidobacterium species in each sample. This suggests that the change in proportion was induced, not by an inter-species transition, but by an intra-species increase and/or decrease. In conclusion, green tea consumption might act as a prebiotic and improve the colon environment by increasing the proportion of the Bifidobacterium species.

  11. Discrimination efficacy of fecal pollution detection in different aquatic habitats of a high-altitude tropical country, using presumptive coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores.

    PubMed

    Byamukama, Denis; Mach, Robert L; Kansiime, Frank; Manafi, Mohamad; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2005-01-01

    The performance of rapid and practicable techniques that presumptively identify total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores (CP) by testing them on a pollution gradient in differing aquatic habitats in a high-altitude tropical country was evaluated during a 12-month period. Site selection was based on high and low anthropogenic influence criteria of paired sites including six spring, six stream, and four lakeshore sites spread over central and eastern parts of Uganda. Unlike the chemophysical water quality, which was water source type dependent (i.e., spring, lake, or stream), fecal indicators were associated with the anthropogenic influence status of the respective sites. A total of 79% of the total variability, including all the determined four bacteriological and five chemophysical parameters, could be assigned to either a pollution, a habitat, or a metabolic activity component by principal-component analysis. Bacteriological indicators revealed significant correlations to the pollution component, reflecting that anthropogenic contamination gradients were followed. Discrimination sensitivity analysis revealed high ability of E. coli to differentiate between high and low levels of anthropogenic influence. CP also showed a reasonable level of discrimination, although FC and TC were found to have worse discrimination efficacy. Nonpoint influence by soil erosion could not be detected during the study period by correlation analysis, although a theoretical contamination potential existed, as investigated soils in the immediate surroundings often contained relevant concentrations of fecal indicators. The outcome of this study indicates that rapid techniques for presumptive E. coli and CP determination may be reliable for fecal pollution monitoring in high-altitude tropical developing countries such as those of Eastern Africa.

  12. Discrimination Efficacy of Fecal Pollution Detection in Different Aquatic Habitats of a High-Altitude Tropical Country, Using Presumptive Coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens Spores

    PubMed Central

    Byamukama, Denis; Mach, Robert L.; Kansiime, Frank; Manafi, Mohamad; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of rapid and practicable techniques that presumptively identify total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores (CP) by testing them on a pollution gradient in differing aquatic habitats in a high-altitude tropical country was evaluated during a 12-month period. Site selection was based on high and low anthropogenic influence criteria of paired sites including six spring, six stream, and four lakeshore sites spread over central and eastern parts of Uganda. Unlike the chemophysical water quality, which was water source type dependent (i.e., spring, lake, or stream), fecal indicators were associated with the anthropogenic influence status of the respective sites. A total of 79% of the total variability, including all the determined four bacteriological and five chemophysical parameters, could be assigned to either a pollution, a habitat, or a metabolic activity component by principal-component analysis. Bacteriological indicators revealed significant correlations to the pollution component, reflecting that anthropogenic contamination gradients were followed. Discrimination sensitivity analysis revealed high ability of E. coli to differentiate between high and low levels of anthropogenic influence. CP also showed a reasonable level of discrimination, although FC and TC were found to have worse discrimination efficacy. Nonpoint influence by soil erosion could not be detected during the study period by correlation analysis, although a theoretical contamination potential existed, as investigated soils in the immediate surroundings often contained relevant concentrations of fecal indicators. The outcome of this study indicates that rapid techniques for presumptive E. coli and CP determination may be reliable for fecal pollution monitoring in high-altitude tropical developing countries such as those of Eastern Africa. PMID:15640171

  13. Impact of Different Fecal Processing Methods on Assessments of Bacterial Diversity in the Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Peterson, Courtney M.; Raggio, Anne; Keenan, Michael J.; Martin, Roy J.; Ravussin, Eric; Marco, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota are integral to understanding the relationships between nutrition and health. Therefore, fecal sampling and processing protocols for metagenomic surveys should be sufficiently robust, accurate, and reliable to identify the microorganisms present. We investigated the use of different fecal preparation methods on the bacterial community structures identified in human stools. Complete stools were collected from six healthy individuals and processed according to the following methods: (i) randomly sampled fresh stool, (ii) fresh stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, (iii) randomly sampled frozen stool, and (iv) frozen stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, or (v) homogenized in a pneumatic mixer for either 10, 20, or 30 min. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 regions of bacterial community DNA extracted from the stools showed that the fecal microbiota remained distinct between individuals, independent of processing method. Moreover, the different stool preparation approaches did not alter intra-individual bacterial diversity. Distinctions were found at the level of individual taxa, however. Stools that were frozen and then homogenized tended to have higher proportions of Faecalibacterium, Streptococcus, and Bifidobacterium and decreased quantities of Oscillospira, Bacteroides, and Parabacteroides compared to stools that were collected in small quantities and not mixed prior to DNA extraction. These findings indicate that certain taxa are at particular risk for under or over sampling due to protocol differences. Importantly, homogenization by any method significantly reduced the intra-individual variation in bacteria detected per stool. Our results confirm the robustness of fecal homogenization for microbial analyses and underscore the value of collecting and mixing large stool sample quantities in human nutrition intervention studies. PMID:27812352

  14. Quantification of human norovirus GII, human adenovirus, and fecal indicator organisms in wastewater used for irrigation in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Andrea I; Akrong, Mark O; Amoah, Philip; Drechsel, Pay; Nelson, Kara L

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is frequently used to estimate health risks associated with wastewater irrigation and requires pathogen concentration estimates as inputs. However, human pathogens, such as viruses, are rarely quantified in water samples, and simple relationships between fecal indicator bacteria and pathogen concentrations are used instead. To provide data that can be used to refine QMRA models of wastewater-fed agriculture in Accra, stream, drain, and waste stabilization pond waters used for irrigation were sampled and analyzed for concentrations of fecal indicator microorganisms (human-specific Bacteroidales, Escherichia coli, enterococci, thermotolerant coliform, and somatic and F+ coliphages) and two human viruses (adenovirus and norovirus genogroup II). E. coli concentrations in all samples exceeded limits suggested by the World Health Organization, and human-specific Bacteroidales was found in all but one sample, suggesting human fecal contamination. Human viruses were detected in 16 out of 20 samples, were quantified in 12, and contained 2-3 orders of magnitude more norovirus than predicted by norovirus to E. coli concentration ratios assumed in recent publications employing indicator-based QMRA. As wastewater irrigation can be beneficial for farmers and municipalities, these results should not discourage water reuse in agriculture, but provide motivation and targets for wastewater treatment before use on farms.

  15. The influence of serial fecal sampling on the diagnosis of giardiasis in humans, dogs, and cats.

    PubMed

    Uchôa, Flávia Fernandes de Mendonça; Sudré, Adriana Pittella; Macieira, Daniel de Barros; Almosny, Nádia Regina Pereira

    2017-08-24

    Giardia infection is a common clinical problem in humans and pets. The diagnosis of giardiasis is challenging as hosts intermittently excrete protozoan cysts in their feces. In the present study, we comparatively evaluated two methods of serial fecal sampling in humans, dogs, and cats from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Faust et al. technique was used to examine fecal specimens collected in triplicate from 133 patients (52 humans, 60 dogs, and 21 cats). Specimens from 74 patients were received from the group assigned to carry out sampling on consecutive days - 34 humans, 35 dogs, and 5 cats, and specimens from 59 patients were received from the group assigned to carry out sampling on non-consecutive, separate days - 18 human beings, 25 dogs, and 16 cats. G. duodenalis cysts were found in stools of 30 individuals. Multiple stool sampling resulted in an increase in the number of samples that were positive for Giardia in both groups. The authors therefore conclude that multiple stool sampling increases the sensitivity of the Faust et al . technique to detect G. duodenalis cysts in samples from humans, cats and dogs.

  16. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W.; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-01-01

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01), suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001), which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05), possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid. PMID:26378564

  17. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-09-11

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01), suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001), which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05), possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid.

  18. Age, dietary fiber, breath methane, and fecal short chain fatty acids are interrelated in Archaea-positive humans.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Judlyn; Wang, Angela; Su, Wen; Rozenbloom, Sari Rahat; Taibi, Amel; Comelli, Elena M; Wolever, Thomas M S

    2013-08-01

    Recent attention has focused on the significance of colonic Archaea in human health and energy metabolism. The main objectives of this study were to determine the associations among the number of fecal Archaea, body mass index (BMI), fecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations, and dietary intakes of healthy humans. We collected demographic information, 3-d diet records, and breath and fecal samples from 95 healthy participants who were divided into 2 groups: detectable Archaea (>10(6) copies/g; Arch+ve) and undetectable Archaea. Dietary intakes, BMI, and fecal SCFAs were similar in both groups. The mean number of Archaea 16S rRNA gene copies detected in Arch+ve participants' feces was 8.9 ± 0.2 log/g wet weight. In Arch+ve participants, there were positive correlations between breath methane and age (r = 0.52; P = 0.001), total dietary fiber (TDF) intake (r = 0.57; P = 0.0003), and log number of fecal Archaea 16S rRNA gene copies (r = 0.35; P = 0.03). In the Arch+ve group, negative correlations were observed between TDF/1000 kcal and fecal total SCFA (r = -0.46; P ≤ 0.01) and between breath methane and fecal total SCFA (r = -0.42; P = 0.01). Principal component analysis identified a distinct Archaea factor with positive loadings of age, breath methane, TDF, TDF/1000 kcal, and number of log Archaea 16S rRNA gene copies. The results suggest that colonic Archaea is not associated with obesity in healthy humans. The presence of Archaea in humans may influence colonic fermentation by altering SCFA metabolism and fecal SCFA profile.

  19. The human fecal microbiota metabolizes deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and may be responsible for urinary deepoxy-deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Silvia W; Duncan, Gary; Richardson, Anthony J

    2013-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a potent mycotoxin produced by Fusarium molds and affects intestinal nutrient absorption and barrier function in experimental and farm animals. Free DON and the plant metabolite DON-3-β-d-glucoside (D3G) are frequently found in wheat and maize. D3G is stable in the upper human gut, but some human intestinal bacteria release DON from D3G in vitro. Furthermore, some bacteria derived from animal digestive systems degrade DON to a less toxic metabolite, deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1). The metabolism of D3G and DON by the human microbiota has not been fully assessed. We therefore conducted in vitro batch culture experiments assessing the activity of the human fecal microbiota to release DON from D3G. We also studied detoxification of DON to DOM-1 by the microbiota and its potential effect on urinary DON excretion in humans. Fecal slurry from five volunteers was spiked with DON or D3G and incubated anaerobically (from 1 h to 7 days), and mycotoxins were extracted into acetonitrile. Mycotoxins were detected in fecal extracts and urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The fecal microbiota released DON from D3G very efficiently, with hydrolysis peaking after 4 to 6 h. The fecal microbiota from one volunteer transformed DON to DOM-1. Urine from the same volunteer also contained DOM-1 (4.7% of DON), whereas DOM-1 was not detectable in urine from other volunteers. Our results confirm that the fecal microbiota releases DON from its glycosylated form, hence increasing the toxic burden in exposed individuals. Furthermore, this is first evidence that the human fecal microbiota of one volunteer detoxifies DON, resulting in the appearance of DOM-1 in urine.

  20. Water quality indicators and the risk of illness at beaches with nonpoint sources of fecal contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Indicator bacteria are a good predictor of illness at marine beaches that have point sources of pollution with human fecal content. Few studies have addressed the utility of indicator bacteria where nonpoint sources are the dominant fecal input. Extrapolating current ...

  1. Inspection of fecal contamination on strawberries using line-Scan LED-induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States, fecal contamination of produce is a food safety issue associated with pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella that can easily pollute agricultural products via animal and human fecal matters. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with consuming raw fruits and ve...

  2. Water quality indicators and the risk of illness at beaches with nonpoint sources of fecal contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Indicator bacteria are a good predictor of illness at marine beaches that have point sources of pollution with human fecal content. Few studies have addressed the utility of indicator bacteria where nonpoint sources are the dominant fecal input. Extrapolating current ...

  3. Stimulation of fecal bacteria in ambient waters by experimental inputs of organic and inorganic phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Chudoba, Elizabeth A; Mallin, Michael A; Cahoon, Lawrence B; Skrabal, Stephen A

    2013-06-15

    Fecal microbial pollution of recreational and shellfishing waters is a major human health and economic issue. Microbial pollution sourced from stormwater runoff is especially widespread, and strongly associated with urbanization. However, non-point source nutrient pollution is also problematic, and may come from sources different from fecal-derived pollution (i.e. fertilization of farm fields, lawns and gardens, and ornamental urban areas). Fecal bacteria require nutrients; thus the impact of such nutrient loading on survival and abundance of fecal coliform bacteria in ambient waters was experimentally investigated in a constructed wetland in coastal North Carolina, USA. A series of nutrient-addition bioassays testing impacts of inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus demonstrated that additions of neither organic nor inorganic nitrogen stimulated fecal coliform bacteria. However, phosphorus additions provided significant stimulation of fecal coliform growth at times; on other occasions such additions did not. Dilution bioassays combined with nutrient additions were subsequently devised to assess potential impacts of microzooplankton grazing on the target fecal bacteria populations. Results demonstrated grazing to be a significant bacterial reduction factor in 63% of tests, potentially obscuring nutrient effects. Thus, combining dilution experiments with nutrient addition bioassays yielded simultaneous information on microzooplankton grazing rates on fecal bacteria, fecal bacterial growth rates, and nutrient limitation. Overall, when tested against a non-amended control, additions of either organic or inorganic phosphorus significantly stimulated fecal coliform bacterial growth on 50% of occasions tested, with organic phosphorus generally providing greater stimulation. The finding of significant phosphorus stimulation of fecal bacteria indicates that extraneous nutrient loading can, at times, augment the impacts of fecal microbial pollution of shellfishing

  4. Quantification of Human Polyomaviruses JC Virus and BK Virus by TaqMan Quantitative PCR and Comparison to Other Water Quality Indicators in Water and Fecal Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    McQuaig, Shannon M.; Scott, Troy M.; Lukasik, Jerzy O.; Paul, John H.; Harwood, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, total maximum daily load standards for bodies of water that do not meet bacterial water quality standards are set by each state. The presence of human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) can be used as an indicator of human-associated sewage pollution in these waters. We have developed and optimized a TaqMan quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay based on the conserved T antigen to both quantify and simultaneously detect two HPyVs; JC virus and BK virus. The QPCR assay was able to consistently quantify ≥10 gene copies per reaction and is linear over 5 orders of magnitude. HPyVs were consistently detected in human waste samples (57 of 64) and environmental waters with known human fecal contamination (5 of 5) and were not amplified in DNA extracted from 127 animal waste samples from 14 species. HPyV concentrations in sewage decreased 81.2 and 84.2% over 28 days incubation at 25 and 35°C, respectively. HPyVs results were compared to Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and enterococci concentrations and the presence of three other human-associated microbes: Bacteroidetes, Methanobrevibacter smithii, and adenovirus. HPyVs were the most frequently detected of these in human and contaminated environmental samples and were more human specific than the Bacteroidetes (HF183) or M. smithii. HPyVs and M. smithii more closely mimicked the persistence of adenovirus in sewage than the other microbes. The use of this rapid and quantitative assay in water quality research could help regulatory agencies to identify sources of water pollution for improved remediation of contaminated waters and ultimately protect humans from exposure to pathogens. PMID:19346361

  5. Characterizing climate change impacts on human exposures to air pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to air pollutants such as ozone (O3) have the potential to be altered by changes in climate through multiple factors that drive population exposures, including: ambient pollutant concentrations, human activity patterns, population sizes and distributions, and hous...

  6. Characterizing climate change impacts on human exposures to air pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to air pollutants such as ozone (O3) have the potential to be altered by changes in climate through multiple factors that drive population exposures, including: ambient pollutant concentrations, human activity patterns, population sizes and distributions, and hous...

  7. Fecal Microbiota Composition of Breast-fed Infants is Correlated with Human Milk Oligosaccharides Consumed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Li, Min; Wu, Shuai; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Ivanov, Ivan; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study tested the hypothesis that the fecal bacterial genera of breast-fed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants differ and that human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) modulate the microbiota of BF infants. Methods Fecal samples were obtained from BF (n = 16) or FF (n = 6) infants at 3-month postpartum. Human milk were collected on the same day when feces were collected. The microbiota was assessed by pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. HMO were measured by HPLC-Chip time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Results The overall microbiota of BF differed from that of FF (P = 0.005). Compared to FF, BF had higher relative abundances of Bacteroides, lower proportions of Clostridium XVIII, Lachnospiracea incertae sedis, Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Veillonella (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterium predominated in both BF and FF infants, with no difference in abundance between the two groups. The most abundant HMO were lacto-N-tetraose + lacto-N-neotetraose (LNT + LNnT, 22.6%), followed by 2′-fucosyllactose (2′FL, 14.5%) and lacto-N-fucopentaose I (LNFP I, 9.5%). Partial least squares regression of HMO and microbiota showed several infant fecal bacterial genera could be predicted by their mothers’ HMO profiles and the important HMO for the prediction of bacterial genera were identified by variable importance in the projection scores. Conclusions These results strengthen the established relationship between HMO and the infant microbiota, identify statistical means whereby infant bacterial genera can be predicted by milk HMO. Future studies are needed to validate these findings and determine if supplementation of formula with defined HMO could selectively modify the gut microbiota. PMID:25651488

  8. Factors Influencing Fecal Contamination in Pond of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappett, P. S.; Escamilla, V.; Layton, A.; McKay, L. D.; Emch, M.; Mailloux, B. J.; Williams, D. E.; Huq, M. R.; Alam, M.; Farhana, L.; Ferguson, A. S.; Sayler, G. S.; Ahmed, K.; Serre, M. L.; Akita, Y.; Yunus, M.; van Geen, A.

    2010-12-01

    Occurrence of diarrheal disease in villages in rural Bangladesh remains relatively common, even though many households have switched to tubewell water for drinking and cooking. One factor contributing to this may be exposure to fecal contamination in ponds, which are often used for bathing and fishing. The objective of this study is to determine the dominant sources of fecal pollution in typical ponds and to explore the relationship between local population, latrine density, latrine quality and concentrations of fecal bacteria and pathogens in pond water. Forty-three ponds were sampled and analyzed for E. coli using culture-based methods and for E. coli, Bacteroides and adenovirus using quantitative PCR. Population and sanitation infrastructure were surveyed and compared to levels of pond fecal contamination. Molecular fecal source tracking using Bacteroides, determined that humans were the dominant source of fecal contamination in 79% of the ponds. Ponds directly receiving latrine effluent had the highest concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria. Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria correlated with population surveyed within a distance of 30-70 m (p<0.01) and total latrines surveyed within 50-70 m (p<0.05). Unsanitary latrines with visible effluent within the pond drainage basin were also significantly correlated to fecal indicator concentrations (p<0.05). The vast majority of the surveyed ponds contained unsafe levels of fecal contamination primarily due to unsanitary latrines, and to lesser extent to sanitary latrines and cattle. Since the majority of fecal pollution is from humans, use of pond water could help explain the persistence of diarrheal disease in rural Bangladesh.

  9. Rapid detection of human fecal Eubacterium species and related genera by nested PCR method.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, A; Benno, Y

    2001-01-01

    PCR procedures based on 16S rDNA gene sequence specific for seven Eubacterium spp. and Eggerthella lenta that predominate in the human intestinal tract were developed, and used for direct detection of these species in seven human feces samples. Three species of Eggerthella lenta, Eubacterium rectale, and Eubacterium eligens were detected from seven fecal samples. Eubacterium biforme was detected from six samples. It was reported that E. rectale, E. eligens, and E. biforme were difficult to detect by traditional culture method, but the nested PCR method is available for the detection of these species. This result shows that the nested PCR method utilizing a universal primer pair, followed by amplification with species-specific primers, would allow rapid detection of Eubacterium species in human feces.

  10. Fecal collection, ambient preservation, and DNA extraction for PCR amplification of bacterial and human markers from human feces.

    PubMed

    Nechvatal, Jordan M; Ram, Jeffrey L; Basson, Marc D; Namprachan, Phanramphoei; Niec, Stephanie R; Badsha, Kawsar Z; Matherly, Larry H; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Kato, Ikuko

    2008-02-01

    Feces contain intestinal bacteria and exfoliated epithelial cells that may provide useful information concerning gastrointestinal tract health. Intestinal bacteria that synthesize or metabolize potential carcinogens and produce anti-tumorigenic products may have relevance to colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer deaths in the USA. To facilitate epidemiological studies relating bacterial and epithelial cell DNA and RNA markers, preservative/extraction methods suitable for self-collection and shipping of fecal samples at room temperature were tested. Purification and PCR amplification of fecal DNA were compared after preservation of stool samples in RNAlater (R) or Paxgene (P), or after drying over silica gel (S) or on Whatman FTA cards (W). Comparisons were made to samples frozen in liquid nitrogen (N2). DNA purification methods included Whatman (accompanying FTA cards), Mo-Bio Fecal (MB), Qiagen Stool (QS), and others. Extraction methods were compared for amount of DNA extracted, DNA amplifiable in a real-time SYBR-Green quantitative PCR format, and the presence of PCR inhibitors. DNA can be extracted after room temperature storage for five days from W, R, S and P, and from N2 frozen samples. High amounts of total DNA and PCR-amplifiable Bacteroides spp. DNA (34%+/-9% of total DNA) with relatively little PCR inhibition were especially obtained with QS extraction applied to R preserved samples (method QS-R). DNA for human reduced folate carrier (SLC19A1) genomic sequence was also detected in 90% of the QS-R extracts. Thus, fecal DNA is well preserved by methods suitable for self-collection that may be useful in future molecular epidemiological studies of intestinal bacteria and human cancer markers.

  11. Comparison of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR methods for the characterization of ruminant and cattle fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The state of California has mandated the preparation of a guidance document on the application of fecal source identification methods for recreational water quality management. California contains the fifth highest population of cattle in the United States, making the inclusio...

  12. Comparison of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR methods for the characterization of ruminant and cattle fecal pollution sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The state of California has mandated the preparation of a guidance document on the application of fecal source identification methods for recreational water quality management. California contains the fifth highest population of cattle in the United States, making the inclusio...

  13. Semi-quantitative evaluation of fecal contamination potential by human and ruminant sources using multiple lines of evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeckel, D.M.; Stelzer, E.A.; Stogner, R.W.; Mau, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Protocols for microbial source tracking of fecal contamination generally are able to identify when a source of contamination is present, but thus far have been unable to evaluate what portion of fecal-indicator bacteria (FIB) came from various sources. A mathematical approach to estimate relative amounts of FIB, such as Escherichia coli, from various sources based on the concentration and distribution of microbial source tracking markers in feces was developed. The approach was tested using dilute fecal suspensions, then applied as part of an analytical suite to a contaminated headwater stream in the Rocky Mountains (Upper Fountain Creek, Colorado). In one single-source fecal suspension, a source that was not present could not be excluded because of incomplete marker specificity; however, human and ruminant sources were detected whenever they were present. In the mixed-feces suspension (pet and human), the minority contributor (human) was detected at a concentration low enough to preclude human contamination as the dominant source of E. coli to the sample. Without the semi-quantitative approach described, simple detects of human-associated marker in stream samples would have provided inaccurate evidence that human contamination was a major source of E. coli to the stream. In samples from Upper Fountain Creek the pattern of E. coli, general and host-associated microbial source tracking markers, nutrients, and wastewater-associated chemical detections-augmented with local observations and land-use patterns-indicated that, contrary to expectations, birds rather than humans or ruminants were the predominant source of fecal contamination to Upper Fountain Creek. This new approach to E. coli allocation, validated by a controlled study and tested by application in a relatively simple setting, represents a widely applicable step forward in the field of microbial source tracking of fecal contamination. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Novel encapsulation improves recovery of probiotic strains in fecal samples of human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mai, Volker; Waugh, Sheldon; Byrd, Doratha; Simpson, Damion; Ukhanova, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Probiotic supplements can contribute to maintaining health and ameliorating various disease symptoms. Probiotics can be delivered in many forms with crucial differences in their survival during gastrointestinal (GI) passage. Previously, a novel encapsulation, Probiotic Pearls™ Acidophilus, Integrative Therapeutics, LLC, USA (Pearls), was shown to increase survival in vitro after exposure to gastric conditions. Here, we compare fecal recovery in human volunteers consuming Pearls or a conventional hard-shelled gelatin capsule. We performed a randomized double-blinded, two-armed trial, with six healthy subjects in each 12-day study arm. In fecal samples collected at baseline, twice during the intervention period, and after washout, we compared colony counts between the two encapsulation methods. The identity of the colonies was confirmed by colony morphology, strain-specific PCR, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We further performed a comprehensive 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based analysis to identify differential effects on overall microbiota composition. We detected an average log increase in bifidobacteria of 0.152 cfu/g with gelatin and 0.651 cfu/g with Pearls capsules (p > 0.05). Total lactobacilli counts increased in both groups with no difference between the groups. However, the supplemented Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM decreased to baseline levels within 7 days after end of supplementation with gelatin capsules while 3.11 log cfu/g higher counts compared to baseline (p = 0.05) remained for Pearls. Targeted qPCR largely confirmed the trends observed by viable plate counts. Protecting the probiotic strains by Pearls encapsulation results in higher recovery rates of the supplemented lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in fecal samples and increased persistence, suggesting an improved survival and viability that might increase efficacy towards achieving desired health benefits.

  15. Susceptibility to Campylobacter infection is associated with the species composition of the human fecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Dicksved, Johan; Ellström, Patrik; Engstrand, Lars; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2014-09-16

    The gut microbiota is essential for human health, but very little is known about how the composition of this ecosystem can influence and respond to bacterial infections. Here we address this by prospectively studying the gut microbiota composition before, during, and after natural Campylobacter infection in exposed poultry abattoir workers. The gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S amplicon sequencing of fecal samples from poultry abattoir workers during the peak season of Campylobacter infection in Sweden. The gut microbiota compositions were compared between individuals who became culture positive for Campylobacter and those who remained negative. Individuals who became Campylobacter positive had a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.007) and Escherichia (P = 0.002) species than those who remained culture negative. Furthermore, this group had a significantly higher abundance of Phascolarctobacterium (P = 0.017) and Streptococcus (P = 0.034) sequences than the Campylobacter-negative group, which had an overrepresentation of Clostridiales (P = 0.017), unclassified Lachnospiraceae (P = 0.008), and Anaerovorax (P = 0.015) sequences. Intraindividual comparisons of the fecal microbiota compositions yielded small differences over time in Campylobacter-negative participants, but significant long-term changes were found in the Campylobacter-positive group (P < 0.005). The results suggest that the abundance of specific genera in the microbiota reduces resistance to Campylobacter colonization in humans and that Campylobacter infection can have long-term effects on the composition of the human fecal microbiota. Studies using mouse models have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of the gut microbiota in resistance to bacterial enteropathogen colonization. The relative abundances of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides species have been pointed out as important determinants of susceptibility to Gram-negative pathogens in

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF POLLUTED WATERS USING SOURCE TRACKING MOLECULAR TOOLS: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different approaches have been used to identify fecal pollution sources in water samples. Early on, the fecal coliforms - fecal streptococci ratio was proposed as a method that could discriminate between human and animal contamination. Several studies showed that the latter appro...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF POLLUTED WATERS USING SOURCE TRACKING MOLECULAR TOOLS: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different approaches have been used to identify fecal pollution sources in water samples. Early on, the fecal coliforms - fecal streptococci ratio was proposed as a method that could discriminate between human and animal contamination. Several studies showed that the latter appro...

  18. Fecal Source Identification with Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne diseases that originate from fecal pollution remain a significant public health issue. Current fecal indicator technologies recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for water quality testing do not discriminate between different animal sources of fecal ...

  19. Fecal Source Identification with Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne diseases that originate from fecal pollution remain a significant public health issue. Current fecal indicator technologies recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for water quality testing do not discriminate between different animal sources of fecal ...

  20. Validation of Bacteroidales quantitative PCR assays targeting human and animal fecal contamination in the public and domestic domains in India.

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Wuertz, Stefan; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-01-01

    We compared host-associated Bacteroidales qPCR assays developed in the continental United States and Europe for the purpose of measuring the effect of improved sanitation on human fecal exposure in rural Indian communities where both human and animal fecal loading are high. Ten candidate Bacteroidales qPCR assays were tested against fecal samples (human, sewage, cow, buffalo, goat, sheep, dog and chicken) from a test set of 30 individual human, 5 sewage, and 60 pooled animal samples collected in coastal Odisha, India. The two universal/general Bacteroidales assays tested (BacUni, GenBac3) performed equally well, achieving 100% sensitivity on the test set. Across the five human-associated assays tested (HF183 Taqman, BacHum, HumM2, BacH, HF183 SYBR), we found low sensitivity (17 to 49%) except for HF183 SYBR (89%), and moderate to high cross-reactivity with dog (20 to 80%) and chicken fecal samples (60 to 100%). BacHum had the highest accuracy (67%), amplified all sewage samples within the range of quantification (ROQ), and did not cross-react with any fecal samples from cows, the most populous livestock animal in India. Of the ruminant- and cattle-associated assays tested (BacCow, CowM2), BacCow was more sensitive in detecting the full range of common Indian livestock animal fecal sources, while CowM2 only detected cow sources with 50% sensitivity. Neither assay cross-reacted with human sources. BacCan, the dog-associated assay tested, showed no cross-reactivity with human sources, and high sensitivity (90%) for dog fecal samples. Overall, our results indicate BacUni, BacHum, HumM2, BacCan and BacCow would be the most suitable MST assays to distinguish and quantify relative amounts of human-associated and livestock/domestic animal-associated contributions to fecal contamination in Odisha, India. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Francesco; Gherarducci, Giulia; Marchi, Benedetta; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics. In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed. In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible. PMID:19578503

  2. A preliminary insight of correlation between human fecal microbial diversity and blood lipid profile.

    PubMed

    Madeeha, Ilyas Rana; Ikram, Aamer; Imran, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of human gut-derived lactic acid bacteria and yeast on cholesterol levels. Fecal samples from five healthy volunteers were examined for the level and diversity of dominant microbiota. Pichia kudriavzevii (QAUPK01, QAUPK02, QAUPK03, QAUPK04 and QAUPK05) and Candida tropicalis (QAUCT06) were identified by phenotypic methods and DNA sequencing and tested for in vitro cholesterol assimilation ability. Significant correlations (p < 0.05) between fecal microbial diversity, volunteers' age, body mass index (BMI) and serum lipid profile were established. From biochemical tests, eight strains of lactic acid bacteria (M1.1, M1.2, M2.1, M3.1, M3.2, M4.1, M5.1 and M5.2) were identified but no bsh activity was found in them. However, all yeast strains were able to assimilate cholesterol and maximum assimilation ability was shown by QAUPK03 (83.6%) and QAUPK05 (85.2%) after 72 h of growth at 37 °C.

  3. SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH PHOTODIODE ARRAY DETECTION OF CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Faster and more sensitive analysis of water that is contaminated by human fecal matter is very important for health. The current microbiological methods to assess water quality do not meet this need. Alternate non-microbial human fecal indicators have been proposed by various r...

  4. SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH PHOTODIODE ARRAY DETECTION OF CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Faster and more sensitive analysis of water that is contaminated by human fecal matter is very important for health. The current microbiological methods to assess water quality do not meet this need. Alternate non-microbial human fecal indicators have been proposed by various r...

  5. Evaluation of transport media for Campylobacter jejuni in human fecal specimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Reller, L B; Smallwood, B; Luechtefeld, N W; Blaser, M J

    1983-10-01

    It is not always possible to culture feces immediately, and appropriate methods for transport of human specimens, unlike those from animals, have not been fully evaluated. Therefore, we took serial subcultures in two phases from six transport media inoculated with human diarrheal stools known to be positive for Campylobacter jejuni. In phase 1, Cary-Blair medium and buffered glycerol saline did not preserve C. jejuni as well as did alkaline peptone-water (APW), modified Cary-Blair medium, thioglycolate broth (Thio), and Campy-Thio. The four best media (APW, Cary-Blair medium, Thio, and Campy-Thio) preserved 20 fecal samples with C. jejuni better at 4 degrees C (90% survival for 5 to 8 days) than at 25 degrees C (90% survival for 1.7 to 2 days). In phase 2, APW and Thio, along with four modifications of the best media in phase 1, were tested with 23 positive strains. The ranges of survival times with modified media at 25 degrees C were 1.3 to 2.2 days (90%) and 4.7 to 6.8 days (50%). APW with reducing agents preserved C. jejuni better than did APW alone, Thio plus ox bile, or Campy-Thio plus ox bile (P less than 0.05). Thio at pH 8.5 was better at preserving C. jejuni than was APW or Thio plus ox bile (P less than 0.05). If human fecal specimens cannot be refrigerated during transport or storage, we recommend the use of Thio at pH 8.5 or APW with reducing agents for preservation of C. jejuni at 25 degrees C.

  6. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in suscep...

  7. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in suscep...

  8. Pollution's Price--The Cost in Human Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newill, Vaun A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the detrimental effects of air pollution, and especially sulfur dioxide, on human health. Any relaxation of existing national air pollution standards because of the energy crisis could be costly in terms of the nation's health. (JR)

  9. Pollution's Price--The Cost in Human Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newill, Vaun A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the detrimental effects of air pollution, and especially sulfur dioxide, on human health. Any relaxation of existing national air pollution standards because of the energy crisis could be costly in terms of the nation's health. (JR)

  10. Civil aviation, air pollution and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Roy M.; Masiol, Mauro; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    2015-04-01

    Air pollutant emissions from aircraft have been subjected to less rigorous control than road traffic emissions, and the rapid growth of global aviation is a matter of concern in relation to human exposures to pollutants, and consequent effects upon health. Yim et al (2015 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 034001) estimate exposures globally arising from aircraft engine emissions of primary particulate matter, and from secondary sulphates and ozone, and use concentration-response functions to calculate the impact upon mortality, which is monetised using the value of statistical life. This study makes a valuable contribution to estimating the magnitude of public health impact at various scales, ranging from local, near airport, regional and global. The results highlight the need to implement future mitigation actions to limit impacts of aviation upon air quality and public health. The approach adopted in Yim et al only accounts for the air pollutants emitted by aircraft engine exhausts. Whilst aircraft emissions are often considered as dominant near runways, there are a number of other sources and processes related to aviation that still need to be accounted for. This includes impacts of nitrate aerosol formed from NOx emissions, but probably more important, are the other airport-related emissions from ground service equipment and road traffic. By inclusion of these, and consideration of non-fatal impacts, future research will generate comprehensive estimates of impact related to aviation and airports.

  11. Arcobacter in Lake Erie beach waters: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen linked with human-associated fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2012-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P < 0.001). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that most of the identified Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches.

  12. Arcobacter in Lake Erie Beach Waters: an Emerging Gastrointestinal Pathogen Linked with Human-Associated Fecal Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P < 0.001). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that most of the identified Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches. PMID:22660704

  13. Meeting Report: Atmospheric Pollution and Human Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Rémy; Darrow, Lyndsey; Parker, Jennifer; Woodruff, Tracey J.; Strickland, Matthew; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Glinianaia, Svetlana; Hoggatt, Katherine J.; Kannan, Srimathi; Hurley, Fintan; Kalinka, Jaroslaw; Šrám, Radim; Brauer, Michael; Wilhelm, Michelle; Heinrich, Joachim; Ritz, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a growing body of epidemiologic literature reporting associations between atmospheric pollutants and reproductive outcomes, particularly birth weight and gestational duration. Objectives The objectives of our international workshop were to discuss the current evidence, to identify the strengths and weaknesses of published epidemiologic studies, and to suggest future directions for research. Discussion Participants identified promising exposure assessment tools, including exposure models with fine spatial and temporal resolution that take into account time–activity patterns. More knowledge on factors correlated with exposure to air pollution, such as other environmental pollutants with similar temporal variations, and assessment of nutritional factors possibly influencing birth outcomes would help evaluate importance of residual confounding. Participants proposed a list of points to report in future publications on this topic to facilitate research syntheses. Nested case–control studies analyzed using two-phase statistical techniques and development of cohorts with extensive information on pregnancy behaviors and biological samples are promising study designs. Issues related to the identification of critical exposure windows and potential biological mechanisms through which air pollutants may lead to intrauterine growth restriction and premature birth were reviewed. Conclusions To make progress, this research field needs input from toxicology, exposure assessment, and clinical research, especially to aid in the identification and exposure assessment of feto-toxic agents in ambient air, in the development of early markers of adverse reproductive outcomes, and of relevant biological pathways. In particular, additional research using animal models would help better delineate the biological mechanisms underpinning the associations reported in human studies. PMID:18560536

  14. TRANSPORT OF CHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS FROM KNOWN WSTEWATER DISCHARGES: POTENTIAL CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently ascertained using indicator bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and fecal enterococci. However, the tests to analyze for these bacteria require 24 to 48 hours to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal...

  15. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal sourceidentification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data q...

  16. TRANSPORT OF CHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL COMPOUNDS FROM KNOWN WASTEWATER DISCHARGES: POTENTIAL FOR USE AS INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water currently (2005) is determined using indicator bacteria. However, the culture tests used to analyze for these bacteria require a long time to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal fecal material sources. One co...

  17. TRANSPORT OF CHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS FROM KNOWN WSTEWATER DISCHARGES: POTENTIAL CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently ascertained using indicator bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and fecal enterococci. However, the tests to analyze for these bacteria require 24 to 48 hours to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal...

  18. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal sourceidentification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data q...

  19. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, B. thetaiotaomic...

  20. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, B. thetaiotaomic...

  1. Improved technique for measuring fecal energy loss in normal and malabsorbing humans.

    PubMed

    Zarling, E J; Ruchim, M A; Makino, D

    1986-01-01

    Fecal energy concentration is measured by bomb calorimetry on freeze-dried stool samples. Some of the energy-containing fecal compounds are volatile in the pH ranges of normal stool and hence may be lost during sample preparation. We found that significant amounts of volatile fatty acids and lactic acid are lost during lyophilization. Fecal alkalization caused an increase of 9.8% of measurable energy in stools from normal individuals and 25% in stools from patients with untreated exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. We conclude that previous reports of fecal energy concentration that did not use an alkalization procedure are probably underestimations. We recommend fecal alkalization before lyophilization in future measurements of fecal energy excretion.

  2. Environmental occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene is an unreliable indicator of human fecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna; Shively, Dawn A; Whitman, Richard L

    2008-11-01

    The enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene found in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium has recently been explored as a marker of sewage pollution in recreational waters but its occurrence and distribution in environmental enterococci has not been well-documented. If the esp gene is found in environmental samples, there are potential implications for microbial source tracking applications. In the current study, a total of 452 samples (lake water, 100; stream water, 129; nearshore sand, 96; and backshore sand, 71; Cladophora sp. (Chlorophyta), 41; and periphyton (mostly Bacillariophyceae), 15) collected from the coastal watersheds of southern Lake Michigan were selectively cultured for enterococci and then analyzed for the esp gene by PCR, targeting E. faecalis/ E. faecium (esp(fs/fm)) and E. faecium (esp(fm)). Overall relative frequencies for esp(fs/fm) and esp(fm) were 27.4 and 5.1%. Respective percent frequency for the esp(fs/fm) and esp(fm) was 36 and 14% in lake water, 38.8 and 2.3% in stream water, 24 and 6.3% in nearshore sand; 0% in backshore sand; 24.4 and 0% in Cladophora sp.; and 33.3 and 0% in periphyton. The overall occurrence of both esp(fs/fm) and esp(fm) was significantly related (chi2 = 49, P < 0.0001). Post-rain incidence of esp(fs/fm) increased in lake and stream water and nearshore sand. Further, E. coli and enterococci cell densities were significant predictors for esp(fs/fm) occurrence in post-rain lake water, but esp(fm) was not F+ coliphage densities were not significant predictors for esp(fm) or esp(fs/fm) gene incidence. In summary, the differential occurrence of the esp gene in the environment suggests that it is not limited to human fecal sources and thus may weaken its use as a reliable tool in discriminating contaminant sources (i.e., human vs. nonhuman).

  3. Environmental occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene is an unreliable indicator of human fecal contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Whitman, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene found in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium has recently been explored as a marker of sewage pollution in recreational waters but its occurrence and distribution in environmental enterococci has not been well-documented. If the esp gene is found in environmental samples, there are potential implications for microbial source tracking applications. In the current study, a total of 452 samples (lake water, 100; stream water, 129; nearshore sand, 96; and backshore sand, 71; Cladophora sp. (Chlorophyta), 41; and periphyton (mostly Bacillariophyceae), 15) collected from the coastal watersheds of southern Lake Michigan were selectively cultured for enterococci and then analyzed for the esp gene by PCR, targeting E. faecalis/ E. faecium (espfs/fm) and E. faecium (espfm). Overall relative frequencies for espfs/fm and espfm were 27.4 and 5.1%. Respective percent frequency for the espfs/fm and espfm was 36 and 14% in lake water; 38.8 and 2.3% in stream water; 24 and 6.3% in nearshore sand; 0% in backshore sand; 24.4 and 0% in Cladophora sp.; and 33.3 and 0% in periphyton. The overall occurrence of both espfs/fm and espfm was significantly related (χ2 = 49, P espfs/fm increased in lake and stream water and nearshore sand. Further, E. coli and enterococci cell densities were significant predictors for espfs/fm occurrence in post-rain lake water, but espfm was not. F+ coliphage densities were not significant predictors for espfm or espfs/fm gene incidence. In summary, the differential occurrence of the esp gene in the environment suggests that it is not limited to human fecal sources and thus may weaken its use as a reliable tool in discriminating contaminant sources (i.e., human vs nonhuman).

  4. Effect of Sunlight on the Divergence of Community Structure of Fecal Bacteria in Cowpats Collected from Three Different Farms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of environmental waters is a major concern for the general public because exposure to fecal-associated pathogens can have severe impacts on human health. In the last few years, numerous metagenomic studies applied next generation sequencing to understand the shift...

  5. Effect of Sunlight on the Divergence of Community Structure of Fecal Bacteria in Cowpats Collected from Three Different Farms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution of environmental waters is a major concern for the general public because exposure to fecal-associated pathogens can have severe impacts on human health. In the last few years, numerous metagenomic studies applied next generation sequencing to understand the shift...

  6. Variability in the characterization of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and escherichia coli in recreational water supplies of North Mississippi, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fecal coliform, Escherichia coli, is a historical organism for the detection of fecal pollution in water supplies. The presence of E. coli indicates a potential contamination of the water supply by other more hazardous human pathogens. In order to accurately determine the presence and degree o...

  7. Human and Animal Fecal Contamination of Community Water Sources, Stored Drinking Water and Hands in Rural India Measured with Validated Microbial Source Tracking Assays.

    PubMed

    Schriewer, Alexander; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Wuertz, Stefan; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-09-01

    We examined pathways of exposure to fecal contamination of human and animal origin in 24 villages in Odisha, India. In a cross-sectional study during the monsoon season, fecal exposure via community water sources (N = 123) and in the home (N = 137) was assessed using human- and nonhuman-associated Bacteroidales microbial source tracking (MST) markers and fecal coliforms (FCs). Detection rates and marker concentrations were examined to pinpoint pathways of human fecal exposure in the public and domestic domains of disease transmission in study communities. Human fecal markers were detected much more frequently in the domestic domain (45% of households) than in public domain sources (8% of ponds; 4% of groundwater drinking sources). Animal fecal markers were widely detected in both domains (74% of ponds, 96% of households, 10% of groundwater drinking sources), indicating ubiquitous risks of exposure to animal feces and zoonotic pathogens. This study confirms an often suggested contamination link from hands to stored water in the home in developing countries separately for mothers' and children's hands and both human and animal fecal contamination. In contrast to MST markers, FCs provided a poor metric to assess risks of exposure to fecal contamination of human origin in this rural setting.

  8. Human and Animal Fecal Contamination of Community Water Sources, Stored Drinking Water and Hands in Rural India Measured with Validated Microbial Source Tracking Assays

    PubMed Central

    Schriewer, Alexander; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Wuertz, Stefan; Misra, Pravas R.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined pathways of exposure to fecal contamination of human and animal origin in 24 villages in Odisha, India. In a cross-sectional study during the monsoon season, fecal exposure via community water sources (N = 123) and in the home (N = 137) was assessed using human- and nonhuman-associated Bacteroidales microbial source tracking (MST) markers and fecal coliforms (FCs). Detection rates and marker concentrations were examined to pinpoint pathways of human fecal exposure in the public and domestic domains of disease transmission in study communities. Human fecal markers were detected much more frequently in the domestic domain (45% of households) than in public domain sources (8% of ponds; 4% of groundwater drinking sources). Animal fecal markers were widely detected in both domains (74% of ponds, 96% of households, 10% of groundwater drinking sources), indicating ubiquitous risks of exposure to animal feces and zoonotic pathogens. This study confirms an often suggested contamination link from hands to stored water in the home in developing countries separately for mothers' and children's hands and both human and animal fecal contamination. In contrast to MST markers, FCs provided a poor metric to assess risks of exposure to fecal contamination of human origin in this rural setting. PMID:26149868

  9. Geographic information systems and multivariate analysis to evaluate fecal bacterial pollution in coastal waters of Andaman, India.

    PubMed

    Dheenan, Palaiyaa Sukumaran; Jha, Dilip Kumar; Das, Apurba Kumar; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Devi, Marimuthu Prashanthi; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2016-07-01

    Urbanization of coastal areas in recent years has driven us to consider a new approach for visually delineating sites that are contaminated with fecal bacteria (FB) in the coastal waters of the Andaman Islands in India. Geo-spatial analysis demarcated harbor, settlement, and freshwater/discharge influenced zones as hot spots for FB, while the open sea was demarcated as a cold spot. The land use types, such as developed and agriculture, with more anthropogenic activities increasing the FB counts while open sea showed the least FB. Box whisker plot indicated an increasing FB trend in the coastal waters during monsoon. Furthermore, principal component analysis revealed 67.35%, 78.62% and 70.43% of total variance at Port Blair, Rangat and Aerial bays, respectively. Strong factor loading was observed for depth (0.95), transparency (0.93), dissolved oxygen (0.93) and fecal streptococci (0.85). Distance proximity analysis revealed that fecal contaminations diluted significantly (P < 0.05) at the distance of 2.1 km toward the deeper or open sea water. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of an integrated approach in identifying the sources of fecal contamination and thus helping in better monitoring and management of coastal waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Barbara A.; Ahmed, Imad A. M.; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A.; Foulds, Penelope G.; Allsop, David; Mann, David M. A.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-09-01

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683-7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <˜200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health.

  11. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Barbara A.; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A.; Foulds, Penelope G.; Allsop, David; Mann, David M. A.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683–7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <∼200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health. PMID:27601646

  12. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Maher, Barbara A; Ahmed, Imad A M; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A; Foulds, Penelope G; Allsop, David; Mann, David M A; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-09-27

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683-7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <∼200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health.

  13. Broad scope method for creating humanized animal models for animal health and disease research through antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hintze, Korry J; Cox, James E; Rompato, Giovanni; Benninghoff, Abby D; Ward, Robert E; Broadbent, Jeff; Lefevre, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, mouse humanization studies have used human fecal transfer to germ-free animals. This practice requires gnotobiotic facilities and is restricted to gnotobiotic mouse lines, which limits humanized mouse research. We have developed a generalizable method to humanize non germ-free mice using antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer. The method involves depleting resident intestinal microbiota with broad-spectrum antibiotics, introducing human microbiota from frozen fecal samples by weekly gavage, and maintaining mice in HEPA-filtered microisolator cages. Pyrosequencing cecal microbiota 16S rRNA genes showed that recipient mice adopt a humanized microbiota profile analogous to their human donors, and distinct from mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) or untreated control mice. In the humanized mice, 75% of the sequence mass was observed in their respective human donor and conversely, 68% of the donor sequence mass was recovered in the recipient mice. Principal component analyses of GC- and HPLC-separated cecal metabolites were performed to determine effects of transplanted microbiota on the metabolome. Cecal metabolite profiles of mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) and control mice were dissimilar from each other and from humanized mice. Metabolite profiles for mice humanized from different donor samples clustered near each other, yet were sufficiently distinct that separate clusters were apparent for each donor. Also, cecal concentrations of 57 metabolites were significantly different between humanization treatments. These data demonstrate that our protocol can be used to humanize non germ-free mice and is sufficiently robust to generate metabolomic differences between mice humanized from different human donors. PMID:24637796

  14. Broad scope method for creating humanized animal models for animal health and disease research through antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Korry J; Cox, James E; Rompato, Giovanni; Benninghoff, Abby D; Ward, Robert E; Broadbent, Jeff; Lefevre, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, mouse humanization studies have used human fecal transfer to germ-free animals. This practice requires gnotobiotic facilities and is restricted to gnotobiotic mouse lines, which limits humanized mouse research. We have developed a generalizable method to humanize non germ-free mice using antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer. The method involves depleting resident intestinal microbiota with broad-spectrum antibiotics, introducing human microbiota from frozen fecal samples by weekly gavage, and maintaining mice in HEPA-filtered microisolator cages. Pyrosequencing cecal microbiota 16S rRNA genes showed that recipient mice adopt a humanized microbiota profile analogous to their human donors, and distinct from mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) or untreated control mice. In the humanized mice, 75% of the sequence mass was observed in their respective human donor and conversely, 68% of the donor sequence mass was recovered in the recipient mice. Principal component analyses of GC- and HPLC-separated cecal metabolites were performed to determine effects of transplanted microbiota on the metabolome. Cecal metabolite profiles of mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) and control mice were dissimilar from each other and from humanized mice. Metabolite profiles for mice humanized from different donor samples clustered near each other, yet were sufficiently distinct that separate clusters were apparent for each donor. Also, cecal concentrations of 57 metabolites were significantly different between humanization treatments. These data demonstrate that our protocol can be used to humanize non germ-free mice and is sufficiently robust to generate metabolomic differences between mice humanized from different human donors.

  15. Pathways of acetate, propionate, and butyrate formation by the human fecal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Miller, T L; Wolin, M J

    1996-05-01

    The pathways of short-chain fatty acid (SCFA; acetate, propionate, and butyrate) formation from glucose were determined for the human fecal microbial communities of two subjects. The pathways were identified by radioisotope analysis of the SCFA and CO2 obtained after incubation of fecal suspensions with glucose under 20% CO2 with [1-14C]glucose, [3,4-14C]glucose, or 14CO2. Acetate was chemically degraded to learn the labeling of the methyl and carboxyl carbons. The labeling of CO2 and acetate showed that the major route of glucose catabolism was the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, with production of CO2 from pyruvate carboxyl carbon. Labeling of the methyl and carboxyl carbons of acetate by 14CO2 or [3,4-14C]glucose proved that acetate was formed from CO2 by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. CO2 reduction accounted for about one-third of the acetate formed by suspensions from subject 1 and about one-fourth of the acetate formed by suspensions from subject 2. Propionate was formed by a CO2 fixation pathway, and butyrate was formed by classical routes of acetyl-S coenzyme A condensation. The amount of CO2 formed from [1-14C] glucose and acetate labeling patterns obtained with the other 14C precursors indicated that the Entner-Doudoroff, transketolase-transaldolase, and heterolactic pathways were not significant. Fermentation of cabbage cellulose by subject 1 followed the same pathways as were used for glucose. The results with suspensions from subject 2 suggested that some radioactive acetate was formed from the C-3 of glucose by the Bifidobacterium pathway.

  16. Effects of Crude Oil, Dispersant, and Oil-Dispersant Mixtures on Human Fecal Microbiota in an In Vitro Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Nam; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kim, Seong-Jae; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010 raised concerns that dispersant and dispersed oil, as well as crude oil itself, could contaminate shellfish and seafood habitats with hazardous residues that had potential implications for human health and the ecosystem. However, little is known about the effects of crude oil and dispersant on the human fecal microbiota. The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential effects of Deepwater Horizon crude oil, Corexit 9500 dispersant, and their combination on human fecal microbial communities, using an in vitro culture test system. Fecal specimens from healthy adult volunteers were made into suspensions, which were then treated with oil, dispersant, or oil-dispersant mixtures under anaerobic conditions in an in vitro culture test system. Perturbations of the microbial community, compared to untreated control cultures, were assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time PCR, and pyrosequencing methods. DGGE and pyrosequencing analysis showed that oil-dispersant mixtures reduced the diversity of fecal microbiota from all individuals. Real-time PCR results indicated that the copy numbers of 16S rRNA genes in cultures treated with dispersed oil or oil alone were significantly lower than those in control incubations. The abundance of the Bacteroidetes decreased in crude oil-treated and dispersed-oil-treated cultures, while the Proteobacteria increased in cultures treated with dispersed oil. In conclusion, the human fecal microbiota was affected differently by oil and dispersed oil, and the influence of dispersed oil was significantly greater than that of either oil or dispersant alone compared to control cultures. PMID:23093387

  17. Frequent occurrence of the human-specific Bacteroides fecal marker at an open coast marine beach: relationship to waves, tides and traditional indicators.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Alyson E; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2007-08-01

    Molecular genetic markers, such as those from fecal Bacteroides microorganisms, can link microbial pollution with its source, and have been used successfully in studies of sheltered aquatic environments. Their applicability to wave-driven, open coast environments has not been tested. We assessed the contribution of a tidal outlet to surf zone water quality in coastal Orange County, California, USA by measuring three traditional culture-based fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) as well as the human-specific Bacteroides molecular marker (HF marker) at four shoreline locations. We found that total and fecal coliform levels were higher during low tides than high tides at two of the four stations, and that this effect was strongest at the mouth of the tidal lagoon and decayed with distance from the outlet. The HF marker was detected in 23% and 47% of samples from the tidal outlet and 26% and 41% of samples from an adjacent recreational beach in 2005 and 2006 respectively. Surprisingly, the station farthest from the tidal outlet had the highest occurrence of the HF marker. We found no relationship between FIB abundance and occurrence of the HF marker for individual samples, but that when the data were considered together by year, higher FIB abundance was correlated with a higher incidence of the HF marker. DNA sequences of the HF marker recovered from this site were > 99% similar to those recovered from other states and countries, suggesting low global diversity of this marker. These data provide strong support for the idea that multiple time points and physical conditions should be considered when assessing coastal water quality.

  18. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marirosa; Hunter, Shayla; Cyterski, Mike; Peed, Lindsay A; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Prieto, Lourdes; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-11-01

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamination could be present at beaches solely impacted by urban runoff. Accurately estimating risk requires understanding sources, concentrations, and transport mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these environments. By applying microbial source tracking methods and empirical modeling, we assessed the presence and level of human contamination at urban runoff impacted recreational beaches. We also identified environmental parameters and pollution sources that can influence the concentration and transport of culturable and molecular fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in systems impacted solely by urban runoff. Water samples and physico-chemical parameters were collected from shoreline locations from three South Carolina (SC) beaches (five locations per beach) and two Florida (FL) beaches (three locations per beach). Each SC beach was directly impacted by swashes or tidal creeks receiving stormwater runoff from the urbanized area and therefore were designated as swash drain associated (SDA) beaches, while FL beaches were designated as non-swash drain associated (NSDA). Sampling in swash drains (SD; three sites per SD) directly impacting each SC beach was also conducted. Results indicate that although culturable (enterococci) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (EC23S857, Entero1, and GenBac3) FIB concentrations were, on average, higher at SD locations, SDA beaches did not have consistently higher molecular FIB signals compared to NSDA beaches. Both human-associated markers (HF183 and HumM2) were concomitantly found only at SDA beaches. Bacteroidales species-specific qPCR markers (BsteriF1 and BuniF2) identified differences in the Bacteroidales community, depending on beach

  19. Identification of the sources of fecal coliforms in an urban watershed using antibiotic resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, John E; Jones, David T; Harwood, Valerie J

    2002-10-01

    Bacteria such as fecal coliforms are used as indicators of fecal pollution in natural waters. These bacteria are found in the feces of most wild and domestic animals and thus provide no information as to the source of fecal contamination, yet identification of indicator bacteria sources allows improved risk assessment, remediation, and total daily maximum load (TDML) assessment of environmental waters. This bacterial source tracking study was initiated in order to identify the dominant source(s) of fecal contamination in the urban watershed of Stevenson Creek in Clearwater, Florida. Five sites that represent areas where routine monitoring has previously shown high levels of fecal coliforms were sampled over 7 months. Fecal coliforms were enumerated by membrane filtration, and antibiotic resistance analysis was used to "fingerprint" a subset of randomly selected isolates and statistically match them to fingerprints of fecal coliforms from known sources (the library). A field test of the classification accuracy of the library was carried out by isolating fecal coliforms from the soil and waters surrounding a failing onsite wastewater treatment and disposal system (OSTDS). The vast majority of the isolates were classified into the human category. The major sources of fecal pollution in Stevenson Creek over the course of the study were wild animal, human, and, to a lesser extent, dog. Overall, wild animal feces were identified as the dominant source when fecal coliform levels were high, but when fecal coliform levels were low, the dominant source was identified as human. The results of this study demonstrate that the sources of fecal indicator bacteria within one urban watershed can vary substantially over temporal and spatial distances.

  20. Metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in human adults: Identification and quantification of urinary and fecal metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Chenard, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine is not totally absorbed and is in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of methyl-{sup 3}H L-carnitine with a meal to subjects who had been adapted to a low-carnitine diet or a high-carnitine diet. Urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 d following administration of the test dose. Total radioactive metabolites excreted ranged from 13 to 34% (low carnitine diet) and 27 to 46% (high carnitine diet) of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were ({sup 3}H)trimethylamine N-oxide (8 to 39% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and ({sup 3}H)gamma-butyrobetaine (0.09 to 8% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 42 to 95% (high carnitine diet) and 190 to 364% (low carnitine diet) of intake. These results indicate that oral carnitine is 54 to 87% bioavailable from normal Western diets; the percentage of intake absorbed is related to the quantity ingested.

  1. Human fecal and pathogen exposure pathways in rural Indian villages and the effect of increased latrine coverage.

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Daniels, Miles E; Wuertz, Stefan; Smith, Woutrina A; Clasen, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Jin, Yujie; Torondel, Belen; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2016-09-01

    Efforts to eradicate open defecation and improve sanitation access are unlikely to achieve health benefits unless interventions reduce microbial exposures. This study assessed human fecal contamination and pathogen exposures in rural India, and the effect of increased sanitation coverage on contamination and exposure rates. In a cross-sectional study of 60 villages of a cluster-randomized controlled sanitation trial in Odisha, India, human and domestic animal fecal contamination was measured in community tubewells and ponds (n = 301) and via exposure pathways in homes (n = 354), using Bacteroidales microbial source tracking fecal markers validated in India. Community water sources were further tested for diarrheal pathogens (rotavirus, adenovirus and Vibrio cholerae by quantitative PCR; pathogenic Escherichia coli by multiplex PCR; Cryptosporidium and Giardia by immunomagnetic separation and direct fluorescent antibody microscopy). Exposure pathways in intervention and control villages were compared and relationships with child diarrhea examined. Human fecal markers were rarely detected in tubewells (2.4%, 95%CI: 0.3-4.5%) and ponds (5.6%, 95%CI: 0.8-10.3%), compared to homes (35.4%, 95%CI: 30.4-40.4%). In tubewells, V. cholerae was the most frequently detected pathogen (19.8%, 95%CI: 14.4-25.2%), followed by Giardia (14.8%, 95%CI: 10.0-19.7%). In ponds, Giardia was most often detected (74.5%, 95%CI: 65.7-83.3%), followed by pathogenic E. coli (48.1%, 95%CI: 34.8-61.5%) and rotavirus (44.4%, 95%CI: 34.2-54.7%). At village-level, prevalence of fecal pathogen detection in community drinking water sources was associated with elevated prevalence of child diarrhea within 6 weeks of testing (RR 2.13, 95%CI: 1.25-3.63) while within homes, higher levels of human and animal fecal marker detection were associated with increased risks of subsequent child diarrhea (P = 0.044 and 0.013, respectively). There was no evidence that the intervention, which increased

  2. Microbial community analysis and identification of alternative host-specific fecal indicators in fecal and river water samples using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ju-Yong; Park, Hee-Deung; Lee, Kyong-Hee; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2011-08-01

    It is important to know the comprehensive microbial communities of fecal pollution sources and receiving water bodies for microbial source tracking. Pyrosequencing targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene was used to investigate the characteristics of bacterial and Bacteroidales communities in major fecal sources and river waters. Diversity analysis indicated that cow feces had the highest diversities in the bacterial and Bacteroidales group followed by the pig sample, with human feces having the lowest value. The Bacteroidales, one of the potential fecal indicators, totally dominated in the fecal samples accounting for 31%-52% of bacterial sequences, but much less (0.6%) in the river water. Clustering and Venn diagram analyses showed that the human sample had a greater similarity to the pig sample in the bacterial and Bacteroidales communities than to samples from other hosts. Traditional fecal indicators, i.e., Escherichia coli, were detected in the human and river water samples at very low rates and Clostridium perfringens and enterococci were not detected in any samples. Besides the Bacteroidales group, some microorganisms detected in the specific hosts, i.e., Parasutterella excrementihominis, Veillonella sp., Dialister invisus, Megamonas funiformis, and Ruminococcus lactaris for the human and Lactobacillus amylovorus and Atopostipes sp. for the pig, could be used as potential host-specific fecal indicators. These microorganisms could be used as multiple fecal indicators that are not dependent on the absence or presence of a single indicator. Monitoring for multiple indicators that are highly abundant and host-specific would greatly enhance the effectiveness of fecal pollution source tracking.

  3. Safety assessment of genetically modified rice expressing human serum albumin from urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Chen, Siyuan; Sheng, Yao; Guo, Mingzhang; Liu, Yifei; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2015-02-01

    The genetically modified (GM) rice expressing human serum albumin (HSA) is used for non-food purposes; however, its food safety assessment should be conducted due to the probability of accidental mixture with conventional food. In this research, Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing 50% (wt/wt) GM rice expressing HSA or non-GM rice for 90 days. Urine metabolites were detected by (1)H NMR to examine the changes of the metabolites in the dynamic process of metabolism. Fecal bacterial profiles were detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to reflect intestinal health. Additionally, short chain fatty acids and fecal enzymes were investigated. The results showed that compared with rats fed the non-GM rice, some significant differences were observed in rats fed with the GM rice; however, these changes were not significantly different from the control diet group. Additionally, the gut microbiota was associated with blood indexes and urine metabolites. In conclusion, the GM rice diet is as safe as the traditional daily diet. Furthermore, urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profiles provide a non-invasive food safety assessment rat model for genetically modified crops that are used for non-food/feed purposes. Fecal bacterial profiles have the potential for predicting the change of blood indexes in future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Jan; Birkett, Anne; Hulshof, Toine; Verbeke, Kristin; Gibes, Kernon

    2016-01-01

    Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of <48 h. In those with an initial transit time ≥48 h, transit time was reduced by approximately 30 min per gram of cereal, fruit or vegetable fibers, regardless of fermentability. Cereal fibers have been studied more than any other kind in relation to regularity. This is the first comprehensive review comparing the effects of the three major food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993. PMID:26950143

  5. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; Birkett, Anne; Hulshof, Toine; Verbeke, Kristin; Gibes, Kernon

    2016-03-02

    Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of <48 h. In those with an initial transit time ≥48 h, transit time was reduced by approximately 30 min per gram of cereal, fruit or vegetable fibers, regardless of fermentability. Cereal fibers have been studied more than any other kind in relation to regularity. This is the first comprehensive review comparing the effects of the three major food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993.

  6. Human exposure to pollutants in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, J.J.; Jedrychowski, W.; Flak, E. )

    1992-07-01

    Serious environmental problems caused by decades of mismanagement of Poland's natural resources have been brought to light in recent years. All environmental media--air, water, food, and soil--have been burdened with toxic chemicals. Some environmental problems are so severe that the sources of pollution and the mitigation techniques needed are obvious, requiring no further research, but rather common sense, monies, and determination to implement the necessary controls and mitigation procedures. This paper will not address these obvious cases. Rather it will address that spectrum of environmental problems which requires a better understanding of public health risk in order to develop effective risk management strategies. Because these problems are numerous and monies limited, policy makers will need to set priorities both for research projects and control options. Using environmental concentration data presently available from Poland (especially for air), the paper will estimate human exposures, will point out research and monitoring needs, and hopefully, will lend credence to the concept that environmental policies and risk reduction strategies will be most effective if the Total Human Exposure Concept is used as the guiding scientific principle in risk assessment and management programs.

  7. Water pollution and human health in China.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C; Maurer, C; Wang, Y; Xue, S; Davis, D L

    1999-01-01

    China's extraordinary economic growth, industrialization, and urbanization, coupled with inadequate investment in basic water supply and treatment infrastructure, have resulted in widespread water pollution. In China today approximately 700 million people--over half the population--consume drinking water contaminated with levels of animal and human excreta that exceed maximum permissible levels by as much as 86% in rural areas and 28% in urban areas. By the year 2000, the volume of wastewater produced could double from 1990 levels to almost 78 billion tons. These are alarming trends with potentially serious consequences for human health. This paper reviews and analyzes recent Chinese reports on public health and water resources to shed light on what recent trends imply for China's environmental risk transition. This paper has two major conclusions. First, the critical deficits in basic water supply and sewage treatment infrastructure have increased the risk of exposure to infectious and parasitic disease and to a growing volume of industrial chemicals, heavy metals, and algal toxins. Second, the lack of coordination between environmental and public health objectives, a complex and fragmented system to manage water resources, and the general treatment of water as a common property resource mean that the water quality and quantity problems observed as well as the health threats identified are likely to become more acute. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10090702

  8. Detection of human fecal contamination by nifH gene quantification of marine waters in the coastal beaches of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Samara Sant'Anna; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Bianco, Kayo; Pinto, Leonardo Henriques; Barreto, Camila; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Cardoso, Alexander Machado; Clementino, Maysa Mandetta

    2016-12-01

    The identification of fecal pollution in aquatic ecosystems is one of the requirements to assess the possible risks to human health. In this report, physicochemical parameters, Escherichia coli enumeration and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH gene quantification were conducted at 13 marine waters in the coastal beaches of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and conductivity, carried out by mobile equipment, revealed varied levels due to specific conditions of the beaches. The bioindicators' enumerations were done by defined substrate method, conventional, and real-time PCR. Six marine beach sites (46 %) presenting E. coli levels in compliance with Brazilian water quality guidelines (<2500 MPN/100 mL) showed nifH gene between 5.7 × 10(9) to 9.5 × 10(11) copies. L(-1) revealing poor correlation between the two approaches. To our knowledge, this is the first inquiry in qPCR using nifH gene as a biomarker of human-specific sources of sewage pollution in marine waters in Brazil. In addition, our data suggests that alternative indicator nifH gene could be used, in combination with other markers, for source tracking studies to measure the quality of marine ecosystems thereby contributing to improved microbial risk assessment.

  9. Biotic interactions and sunlight affect persistence of fecal indicator bacteria and microbial source tracking genetic markers in the Upper Mississippi River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary quality of recreational waters is assessed by enumerating fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (Escherichia coli and enterococci); organisms present in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many other animals, hence providing no information about the pollution source. Micro...

  10. Biotic interactions and sunlight affect persistence of fecal indicator bacteria and microbial source tracking genetic markers in the Upper Mississippi River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary quality of recreational waters is assessed by enumerating fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (Escherichia coli and enterococci); organisms present in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many other animals, hence providing no information about the pollution source. Micro...

  11. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ISOLATION OF CYCLOSPORA CAYETANENSIS OOCYSTS FROM HUMAN FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is the causative agent of cyclosporiasis, an emerging infections disease. A new method for the purification of Cycloposra cayetanensis oocysts from fecal matter has been developed, using a modified detachment solution and a Renocal-sucrose gradient sedimen...

  12. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ISOLATION OF CYCLOSPORA CAYETANENSIS OOCYSTS FROM HUMAN FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is the causative agent of cyclosporiasis, an emerging infections disease. A new method for the purification of Cycloposra cayetanensis oocysts from fecal matter has been developed, using a modified detachment solution and a Renocal-sucrose gradient sedimen...

  13. In Vitro Fermentation of Xylooligosaccharides Produced from Miscanthus × giganteus by Human Fecal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsu; Swanson, Kelly S; Fahey, George C; Dien, Bruce S; Beloshapka, Alison N; Bauer, Laura L; Rausch, Kent D; Tumbleson, M E; Singh, Vijay

    2016-01-13

    Purified xylooligosaccharides from Miscanthus × giganteus (M×G XOS) were used in an in vitro fermentation experiment inoculated with human fecal microbiota. A commercial XOS product and pectin were used as controls. Decreases in pH by 2.3, 2.4, and 2.0 units and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; acetic acid, 7764.2, 6664.1, and 6387.9 μmol/g; propionic acid, 1006.7, 1089.5, and 661.5 μmol/g; and butyric acid, 955.5, 1252.9, and 917.7 μmol/g) were observed in M×G XOS, commercial XOS, and pectin medium after 12 h of fermentation, respectively. Titers of Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Escherichia coli increased when fed all three substrates as monitored by qPCR. There was no significant trend for Clostridium perfringens. During fermentation, M×G XOS was statistically equivalent in performance to the commercial XOS sample as measured by culture acidification and growth of health-promoting bacteria and resulted in the highest SCFA production among the three substrates.

  14. In vitro fermentation of the polysaccharides from Cyclocarya paliurus leaves by human fecal inoculums.

    PubMed

    Min, Fang-Fang; Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Xie, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2014-11-04

    In vitro fermentation of polysaccharide from Cyclocarya paliurus leaves by human fecal inoculums was investigated by determining the changes in contents of neutral and reducing sugar and pH value, consumption of monosaccharide and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). During fermentation, the content of neutral sugar and reducing sugar decreased as fermentation time increased except that the content of reducing sugar increased within the fermentation time 0.5h. The pH value significantly dropped from 7.2 to 6.04. Remarkably, the greatest yields and the fastest consumption of galacturonic acid were found and the yield of glucose and arabinose were relatively high. The dominant SCFAs, which were acetic acid, propionic acid and n-butyric acid, significantly increased. These results showed that polysaccharide was partly fermented, glycosidic bonds with galacturonic acid being more susceptible to be attacked by gut bacteria and galacturonic acid might be deemed as the main producer of acetic acid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary fibers from mushroom sclerotia: 3. In vitro fermentability using human fecal microflora.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Wong, King-Yee; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Peter C K

    2005-11-30

    The in vitro fermentability of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) prepared from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Polyporous rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, was investigated and compared with that of the cellulose control. All DF samples (0.5 g each) were fermented in vitro with a human fecal homogenate (10 mL) in a batch system (total volume, 50 mL) under strictly anaerobic conditions (using oxygen reducing enzyme and under argon atmosphere) at 37 degrees C for 24 h. All three novel sclerotial DFs exhibited notably higher dry matter disappearance (P. tuber-regium, 8.56%; P. rhinocerus, 13.5%; and W. cocos, 53.4%) and organic matter disappearance (P. tuber-regium, 9.82%; P. rhinocerus, 14.6%; and W. cocos, 57.4%) when compared with those of the cellulose control. Nevertheless, only the W. cocos DF was remarkably degraded to produce considerable amounts of total short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) (5.23 mmol/g DF on organic matter basis, with a relatively higher molar ratio of propionate) that lowered the pH of its nonfermented residue to a slightly acidic level (5.89). Variations on the in vitro fermentability among the three sclerotial DFs might mainly be attributed to their different amounts of interwoven hyphae present (different amounts of enzyme inaccessible cell wall components) as well as the possible different structural arrangement (linkage and degree of branching) of their beta-glucans.

  16. Inspection of fecal contamination on strawberries using fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yung-Kun; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Lo, Y. Martin; Chen, Suming; Chan, Diane E.

    2013-05-01

    Fecal contamination of produce is a food safety issue associated with pathogens such as Escherichia coli that can easily pollute agricultural products via animal and human fecal matters. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with consuming raw fruits and vegetables have occurred more frequently in recent years in the United States. Among fruits, strawberry is one high-potential vector of fecal contamination and foodborne illnesses since the fruit is often consumed raw and with minimal processing. In the present study, line-scan LED-induced fluorescence imaging techniques were applied for inspection of fecal material on strawberries, and the spectral characteristics and specific wavebands of strawberries were determined by detection algorithms. The results would improve the safety and quality of produce consumed by the public.

  17. Diversity, abundance, and possible sources of fecal bacteria in the Yangtze River.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haohao; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Bing; Ren, Hongqiang

    2017-03-01

    The fecal bacteria in natural waters may pose serious risks on human health. Although many source tracking methods have been developed and used to determine the possible sources of the fecal pollution, little is known about the overall diversity and abundance of fecal bacterial community in natural waters. In this study, a method based on fecal bacterial sequence library was introduced to evaluate the fecal bacterial profile in the Yangtze River (Nanjing section). Our results suggested that the Yangtze River water harbors diverse fecal bacteria. Fifty-eight fecal operational taxonomic units (97% identity level) were detected in the Yangtze River water samples and the relative abundance of fecal bacteria in these samples ranged from 0.1 to 8%. It was also found that the relative abundances of the fecal bacteria in locations near to the downstream of wastewater treatment plants were obviously higher than those in other locations. However, the high abundance of fecal bacteria could decrease to the normal level in 2~4 km in the river due to degradation or dilution, and the overall fecal bacteria level changed little when the Yangtze River flew through the Nanjing City. Moreover, the fecal bacteria in the Yangtze River water were found to be highly associated (Spearman rho = 0.804, P < 0.001) with the potential pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, the findings in this study reveal the diversity, abundance, and possible sources of fecal bacteria in the Yangtze River and advance our understandings of the fecal bacteria community in the natural waters.

  18. Host Distributions of Uncultivated Fecal Bacteroidales Bacteria Reveal Genetic Markers for Fecal Source Identification

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Linda K.; Bernhard, Anne E.; Brodeur, Timothy J.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Simpson, Joyce M.; Walters, Sarah P.; Field, Katharine G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine host distribution patterns among fecal bacteria in the order Bacteroidales, with the goal of using endemic sequences as markers for fecal source identification in aquatic environments. We analyzed Bacteroidales 16S rRNA gene sequences from the feces of eight hosts: human, bovine, pig, horse, dog, cat, gull, and elk. Recovered sequences did not match database sequences, indicating high levels of uncultivated diversity. The analysis revealed both endemic and cosmopolitan distributions among the eight hosts. Ruminant, pig, and horse sequences tended to form host- or host group-specific clusters in a phylogenetic tree, while human, dog, cat, and gull sequences clustered together almost exclusively. Many of the human, dog, cat, and gull sequences fell within a large branch containing cultivated species from the genus Bacteroides. Most of the cultivated Bacteroides species had very close matches with multiple hosts and thus may not be useful targets for fecal source identification. A large branch containing cultivated members of the genus Prevotella included cloned sequences that were not closely related to cultivated Prevotella species. Most ruminant sequences formed clusters separate from the branches containing Bacteroides and Prevotella species. Host-specific sequences were identified for pigs and horses and were used to design PCR primers to identify pig and horse sources of fecal pollution in water. The primers successfully amplified fecal DNAs from their target hosts and did not amplify fecal DNAs from other species. Fecal bacteria endemic to the host species may result from evolution in different types of digestive systems. PMID:15933020

  19. Effects of crude oil, dispersant, and oil-dispersant mixtures on human fecal microbiota in an in vitro culture system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Nam; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kim, Seong-Jae; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2012-10-23

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010 raised concerns that dispersant and dispersed oil, as well as crude oil itself, could contaminate shellfish and seafood habitats with hazardous residues that had potential implications for human health and the ecosystem. However, little is known about the effects of crude oil and dispersant on the human fecal microbiota. The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential effects of Deepwater Horizon crude oil, Corexit 9500 dispersant, and their combination on human fecal microbial communities, using an in vitro culture test system. Fecal specimens from healthy adult volunteers were made into suspensions, which were then treated with oil, dispersant, or oil-dispersant mixtures under anaerobic conditions in an in vitro culture test system. Perturbations of the microbial community, compared to untreated control cultures, were assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time PCR, and pyrosequencing methods. DGGE and pyrosequencing analysis showed that oil-dispersant mixtures reduced the diversity of fecal microbiota from all individuals. Real-time PCR results indicated that the copy numbers of 16S rRNA genes in cultures treated with dispersed oil or oil alone were significantly lower than those in control incubations. The abundance of the Bacteroidetes decreased in crude oil-treated and dispersed-oil-treated cultures, while the Proteobacteria increased in cultures treated with dispersed oil. In conclusion, the human fecal microbiota was affected differently by oil and dispersed oil, and the influence of dispersed oil was significantly greater than that of either oil or dispersant alone compared to control cultures. IMPORTANCE There have been concerns whether human health is adversely affected by exposure to spilled crude oil, which contains regulated carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, we determined the effect of BP Deepwater Horizon crude oil and oil dispersant on the

  20. Human exposure to urban air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Boström, C E; Almén, J; Steen, B; Westerholm, R

    1994-01-01

    This study deals with some methods of making human exposure estimates, aimed at describing the human exposure for selected air pollutants in Sweden that are suspected carcinogens. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) have been chosen as an indicator substance for estimating the concentration of the urban plume. Earlier investigations have shown that the traffic in Swedish cities contributes around 85% to the measured NOx concentrations, and that most of the mutagenicity in urban air originates from traffic. The first section of this paper describes measurements in Stockholm of some unregulated light hydrocarbons, such as ethene, ethyne, propane, propene, butane, and isobutane. In addition, measurements of some volatile aromatic hydrocarbons are presented. Simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) were made. The ratios between CO and the individual specific compounds were determined by linear regression analysis. By analysis of relationships between CO and NOx, NOx concentrations can be used as a tracer to describe the exposure for these specific compounds. NOx are considered to be a better tracer than CO, because NOx or NO2 values exist for many places over a long time, while CO is measured mostly in streets with high concentrations. At low concentrations, instruments that measure normal CO levels give no detectable signals. Through use of atmospheric dispersion models and models that describe how people live and work in urban areas it has been possible to describe the average exposure to NOx in cities of different sizes. The exposure to NOx for people living in the countryside has also been estimated. In this way, it has been possible to calculate the average exposure dose for NOx for the Swedish population. This figure is 23 micrograms/m3. By use of the relationships between NOx and specific compounds the average dose has been calculated for the following compounds: polyaromatic compounds (PAH); ethene, propene, and butadiene; benzene, toluene, and xylene; formaldehyde

  1. Molecular detection of Campylobacter spp. and fecal indicator bacteria during the northern migration of Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Central Platte River

    EPA Science Inventory

    The annual Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) migration through Nebraska is thought to be a major source of fecal pollution to the Platte River, but of unknown human health risk. To better understand potential risks, the presence of Campylobacter species and fecal bacteria were exa...

  2. Molecular detection of Campylobacter spp. and fecal indicator bacteria during the northern migration of Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Central Platte River

    EPA Science Inventory

    The annual Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) migration through Nebraska is thought to be a major source of fecal pollution to the Platte River, but of unknown human health risk. To better understand potential risks, the presence of Campylobacter species and fecal bacteria were exa...

  3. Selective antimicrobial modulation of the intestinal tract by norfloxacin in human volunteers and in gnotobiotic mice associated with a human fecal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Pecquet, S; Andremont, A; Tancrède, C

    1986-01-01

    Intestinal endogenous members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were eliminated in 12 human volunteers treated with 400 or 800 mg of oral norfloxacin per day for 5 days. No clones resistant to quinolone derivatives were isolated. Counts of aerotolerant streptococci were affected to various degrees, depending on their susceptibility to norfloxacin. During treatment, counts of anaerobes remained above 9.8 log10 CFU/g of feces. A total of 932 anaerobic isolates from the predominant flora (over 10(9) CFU/g) in fecal samples obtained before or during norfloxacin treatment were classified by a simple morphological and physiological scheme. The composition of this flora was fairly stable from one sample to another before treatment and was not substantially modified by norfloxacin. Intestinal resistance to colonization by exogenous microorganisms was studied in gnotobiotic mice associated with a human fecal flora. The composition of the fecal flora of the human donor and the fecal concentrations of norfloxacin in the volunteers were reproduced in the intestine of the mice. Resistance to colonization by exogenous microorganisms was reduced by norfloxacin for only 2 of 14 (14%) of the strains tested. These results suggest that norfloxacin is a good candidate for selective antimicrobial modulation of the intestinal tract in humans. PMID:3729360

  4. Automatic identification of human helminth eggs on microscopic fecal specimens using digital image processing and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Park, D K; Kim, H C; Choi, M H; Chai, J Y

    2001-06-01

    In order to automate routine fecal examination for parasitic diseases, we propose in this study a computer processing algorithm using digital image processing techniques and an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier. The morphometric characteristics of eggs of human parasites in fecal specimens were extracted from microscopic images through digital image processing. An ANN then identified the parasite species based on those characteristics. We selected four morphometric features based on three morphological characteristics representing shape, shell smoothness, and size. A total of 82 microscopic images containing seven common human helminth eggs were used. The first stage (ANN-1) of the proposed ANN classification system isolated eggs from confusing artifacts. The second stage (ANN-2) classified eggs by species. The performance of ANN was evaluated by the tenfold cross-validation method to obviate the dependency on the selection of training samples. Cross-validation results showed 86.1% average correct classification ratio for ANN-1 and 90.3% for ANN-2 with small variances of 46.0 and 39.0, respectively. The algorithm developed will be an essential part of a completely automated fecal examination system.

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli Isolates from an Urban Lake Receiving Water from a Wastewater Treatment Plant in Mexico City: Fecal Pollution and Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Irma; Salinas, Eva; Martínez, Leticia; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2015-10-01

    The presence of enteric bacteria in water bodies is a cause of public health concerns, either by directly causing water- and food-borne diseases, or acting as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance determinants. Water is used for crop irrigation; and sediments and aquatic plants are used as fertilizing supplements and soil conditioners. In this work, the bacterial load of several micro-environments of the urban lake of Xochimilco, in Mexico City, was characterized. We found a differential distribution of enteric bacteria between the water column, sediment, and the rhizoplane of aquatic plants, with human fecal bacteria concentrating in the sediment, pointing to the need to assess such bacterial load for each micro-environment, for regulatory agricultural purposes, instead of only the one of the water, as is currently done. Resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was common among Escherichia coli isolates, but was also differentially distributed, being again higher in sediment isolates. A distinct distribution of chloramphenicol minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) among these isolates suggests the presence of a local selective pressure favoring lower MICs than those of isolates from treated water. Fecal bacteria of human origin, living in water bodies along with their antibiotic resistance genes, could be much more common than typically considered, and pose a higher health risk, if assessments are only made on the water column of such bodies.

  6. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modern air pollution regulation is first and foremost motivated by concerns about the effects of air pollutants on human health and secondarily by concerns about its effects on ecosystems, cultural artifacts, and quality of life values such as visibility. This order of priority ...

  7. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modern air pollution regulation is first and foremost motivated by concerns about the effects of air pollutants on human health and secondarily by concerns about its effects on ecosystems, cultural artifacts, and quality of life values such as visibility. This order of priority ...

  8. Ape conservation physiology: fecal glucocorticoid responses in wild Pongo pygmaeus morio following human visitation.

    PubMed

    Muehlenbein, Michael P; Ancrenaz, Marc; Sakong, Rosman; Ambu, Laurentius; Prall, Sean; Fuller, Grace; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Nature-based tourism can generate important revenue to support conservation of biodiversity. However, constant exposure to tourists and subsequent chronic activation of stress responses can produce pathological effects, including impaired cognition, growth, reproduction, and immunity in the same animals we are interested in protecting. Utilizing fecal samples (N = 53) from 2 wild habituated orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio) (in addition to 26 fecal samples from 4 wild unhabituated orangutans) in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, we predicted that i) fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations would be elevated on the day after tourist visitation (indicative of normal stress response to exposure to tourists on the previous day) compared to samples taken before or during tourist visitation in wild, habituated orangutans, and ii) that samples collected from habituated animals would have lower fecal glucocorticoid metabolites than unhabituated animals not used for tourism. Among the habituated animals used for tourism, fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were significantly elevated in samples collected the day after tourist visitation (indicative of elevated cortisol production on the previous day during tourist visitation). Fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were also lower in the habituated animals compared to their age-matched unhabituated counterparts. We conclude that the habituated animals used for this singular ecotourism project are not chronically stressed, unlike other species/populations with documented permanent alterations in stress responses. Animal temperament, species, the presence of coping/escape mechanisms, social confounders, and variation in amount of tourism may explain differences among previous experiments. Acute alterations in glucocorticoid measures in wildlife exposed to tourism must be interpreted conservatively. While permanently altered stress responses can be detrimental, preliminary results

  9. Ape Conservation Physiology: Fecal Glucocorticoid Responses in Wild Pongo pygmaeus morio following Human Visitation

    PubMed Central

    Muehlenbein, Michael P.; Ancrenaz, Marc; Sakong, Rosman; Ambu, Laurentius; Prall, Sean; Fuller, Grace; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Nature-based tourism can generate important revenue to support conservation of biodiversity. However, constant exposure to tourists and subsequent chronic activation of stress responses can produce pathological effects, including impaired cognition, growth, reproduction, and immunity in the same animals we are interested in protecting. Utilizing fecal samples (N = 53) from 2 wild habituated orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio) (in addition to 26 fecal samples from 4 wild unhabituated orangutans) in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, we predicted that i) fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations would be elevated on the day after tourist visitation (indicative of normal stress response to exposure to tourists on the previous day) compared to samples taken before or during tourist visitation in wild, habituated orangutans, and ii) that samples collected from habituated animals would have lower fecal glucocorticoid metabolites than unhabituated animals not used for tourism. Among the habituated animals used for tourism, fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were significantly elevated in samples collected the day after tourist visitation (indicative of elevated cortisol production on the previous day during tourist visitation). Fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were also lower in the habituated animals compared to their age-matched unhabituated counterparts. We conclude that the habituated animals used for this singular ecotourism project are not chronically stressed, unlike other species/populations with documented permanent alterations in stress responses. Animal temperament, species, the presence of coping/escape mechanisms, social confounders, and variation in amount of tourism may explain differences among previous experiments. Acute alterations in glucocorticoid measures in wildlife exposed to tourism must be interpreted conservatively. While permanently altered stress responses can be detrimental, preliminary

  10. Viral Pollution in the Environment and in Shellfish: Human Adenovirus Detection by PCR as an Index of Human Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Sonia; Puig, Montserrat; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Joan; Girones, Rosina

    1998-01-01

    A study of the presence of human viruses (adenoviruses, enteroviruses, and hepatitis A viruses [HAVs]) in environmental and shellfish samples was carried out by applying DNA and cDNA amplification techniques by PCR. The detection of human adenoviruses by PCR was also examined as a potential molecular test to monitor viral pollution. The samples studied were urban and slaughterhouse sewage, river water, seawater, and shellfish. Enteroviruses were quantified by PFU in Buffalo green monkey kidney cells and fecal coliforms and phages of Bacteroides fragilis HSP40 were also evaluated in some of the samples. The amplification of viral DNA and cDNA has shown a high prevalence of human viruses that would not be detected by the use of classical techniques, such as the quantification of PFU in cell lines. The results of the analysis of slaughterhouse sewage samples together with the test of farm animal feces indicate that the adenoviruses and the HAVs detected in the environment are mostly of human origin. A significative correlation between the detection of human viruses by PCR and the values of bacteriophages of B. fragilis HSP40 in urban raw sewage was observed. Human adenoviruses were the viruses most frequently detected throughout the year, and all the samples that were positive for enteroviruses or HAVs were also positive for human adenoviruses. The results suggest that the detection of adenoviruses by PCR could be used as an index of the presence of human viruses in the environment where a molecular index is acceptable. PMID:9726885

  11. Effect of Whole-Grain Barley on the Human Fecal Microbiota and Metabolome.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Maria; Montemurno, Eustacchio; Vannini, Lucia; Cosola, Carmela; Cavallo, Noemi; Gozzi, Giorgia; Maranzano, Valentina; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota and metabolomes of 26 healthy subjects before (HS) and after (HSB) 2 months of diet intervention based on the administration of durum wheat flour and whole-grain barley pasta containing the minimum recommended daily intake (3 g) of barley β-glucans. Metabolically active bacteria were analyzed through pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and community-level catabolic profiles. Pyrosequencing data showed that levels of Clostridiaceae (Clostridium orbiscindens and Clostridium sp.), Roseburia hominis, and Ruminococcus sp. increased, while levels of other Firmicutes and Fusobacteria decreased, from the HSB samples to the HS fecal samples. Community-level catabolic profiles were lower in HSB samples. Compared to the results for HS samples, cultivable lactobacilli increased in HSB fecal samples, while the numbers of Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, and Bacteroides, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, and Aeromonas bacteria decreased. Metabolome analyses were performed using an amino acid analyzer and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry solid-phase microextraction. A marked increase in short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as 2-methyl-propanoic, acetic, butyric, and propionic acids, was found in HSB samples with respect to the HS fecal samples. Durum wheat flour and whole-grain barley pasta containing 3% barley β-glucans appeared to be effective in modulating the composition and metabolic pathways of the intestinal microbiota, leading to an increased level of SCFA in the HSB samples. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Effect of Whole-Grain Barley on the Human Fecal Microbiota and Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Maria; Montemurno, Eustacchio; Vannini, Lucia; Cosola, Carmela; Cavallo, Noemi; Gozzi, Giorgia; Maranzano, Valentina; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota and metabolomes of 26 healthy subjects before (HS) and after (HSB) 2 months of diet intervention based on the administration of durum wheat flour and whole-grain barley pasta containing the minimum recommended daily intake (3 g) of barley β-glucans. Metabolically active bacteria were analyzed through pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and community-level catabolic profiles. Pyrosequencing data showed that levels of Clostridiaceae (Clostridium orbiscindens and Clostridium sp.), Roseburia hominis, and Ruminococcus sp. increased, while levels of other Firmicutes and Fusobacteria decreased, from the HSB samples to the HS fecal samples. Community-level catabolic profiles were lower in HSB samples. Compared to the results for HS samples, cultivable lactobacilli increased in HSB fecal samples, while the numbers of Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, and Bacteroides, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, and Aeromonas bacteria decreased. Metabolome analyses were performed using an amino acid analyzer and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry solid-phase microextraction. A marked increase in short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as 2-methyl-propanoic, acetic, butyric, and propionic acids, was found in HSB samples with respect to the HS fecal samples. Durum wheat flour and whole-grain barley pasta containing 3% barley β-glucans appeared to be effective in modulating the composition and metabolic pathways of the intestinal microbiota, leading to an increased level of SCFA in the HSB samples. PMID:26386056

  13. Impact of Population and Latrines on Fecal Contamination of Ponds in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Knappett, Peter S. K.; Escamilla, Veronica; Layton, Alice; McKay, Larry D.; Emch, Michael; Williams, Daniel E.; Huq, Md. R.; Alam, Md. J.; Farhana, Labony; Mailloux, Brian J.; Ferguson, Andy; Sayler, Gary S.; Ahmed, Kazi M.; van Geen, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A majority of households in Bangladesh rely on pond water for hygiene. Exposure to pond water fecal contamination could therefore still contribute to diarrheal disease despite the installation of numerous tubewells for drinking. The objectives of this study are to determine the predominant sources (human or livestock) of fecal pollution in ponds and examine the association between local population, latrine density, latrine quality and concentrations of fecal bacteria and pathogens in pond water. Forty-three ponds were analyzed for E. coli using culture-based methods and E. coli, Bacteroidales and adenovirus using quantitative PCR. Population and sanitation spatial data were collected and measured against pond fecal contamination. Humans were the dominant source of fecal contamination in 79% of the ponds according to Bacteroidales measurements. Ponds directly receiving latrine effluent had the highest concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (up to 106 Most Probable Number (MPN) of culturable E. coli per 100 mL). Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria correlated with population surveyed within a distance of 30-70 m (p<0.05) and total latrines surveyed within 50-70 m (p<0.05). Unsanitary latrines (visible effluent or open pits) within the pond drainage basin were also significantly correlated to fecal indicator concentrations (p<0.05). Water in the vast majority of the surveyed ponds contained unsafe levels of fecal contamination attributable primarily to unsanitary latrines, and to lesser extent to sanitary latrines and cattle. Since the majority of fecal pollution is derived from human waste, continued use of pond water could help explain the persistence of diarrheal disease in rural South Asia. PMID:21632095

  14. Epidemiology of human parechovirus, Aichi virus and salivirus in fecal samples from hospitalized children with gastroenteritis in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cyril C Y; Lo, Kin-Land; Que, Tak-Lun; Lee, Rodney A; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P

    2014-10-18

    Emerging human picornaviruses, including human parechovirus (HPeV), Aichi virus (AiV) and salivirus (SalV) were found to be associated with gastroenteritis, but their roles in enteric infections are not fully understood. In addition, no report on the circulation of these viruses in Hong Kong is available. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of HPeV, AiV and SalV in fecal samples from hospitalized children with gastroenteritis in Hong Kong. Fecal samples from hospitalized children with gastroenteritis were subject to detection of HPeV, AiV and SalV by RT-PCR using consensus primers targeted to their 5'UTRs. Positive samples were subject to capsid and/or 3CD region analysis for genotype determination. The epidemiology of HPeV, AiV and SalV infections was analyzed. Among 1,708 fecal samples subjected to RT-PCR using primers targeted to 5'UTR of HPeV, AiV and SalV, viruses were detected in 55 samples, with 50 positive for HPeV only, 3 positive for AiV only, 1 positive for both HPeV and AiV, and 1 positive for both HPeV and SalV. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial VP1 gene of the 33 HPeV strains revealed the presence of genotypes of HPeV- 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, among which HPeV-1 was the predominant genotype circulating in our population. The peak activity of HPeV infection was in fall. Of the 3 children with AiV infection, the 3 AiV strains were found to belong to genotype A based on the phylogenetic analysis of their partial VP1 and 3CD regions. The genotype of a SalV strain detected in this study could not be determined. Co-detection of different pathogens was observed in 24 samples (43.6%) of 55 fecal samples positive for HPeV, AiV and SalV. HPeV, AiV and SalV were detected in fecal samples of hospitalized children with gastroenteritis in Hong Kong, with the former having the highest prevalence. HPeV-1 was the predominant genotype among HPeVs, while genotype A was the predominant genotype among AiVs in this study.

  15. Red meat intake-induced increases in fecal water genotoxicity correlate with pro-carcinogenic gene expression changes in the human colon.

    PubMed

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; Sveje, Kirstine M; de Kok, Marloes C; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Engels, Leopold G J B; Vleugels-Simon, Carla B E M; Mares, Wout G N; Pierik, Marieke; Masclee, Ad A M; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2012-02-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, which may be due to an increased endogenous formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs). To assess the impact of red meat consumption on potential risk factors of CRC, we investigated the effect of a 7-day dietary red meat intervention in human subjects on endogenous NOC formation and fecal water genotoxicity in relation to genome-wide transcriptomic changes induced in colonic tissue. The intervention showed no effect on fecal NOC excretion but fecal water genotoxicity significantly increased in response to red meat intake. Colonic inflammation caused by inflammatory bowel disease, which has been suggested to stimulate endogenous nitrosation, did not influence fecal NOC excretion or fecal water genotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that genes significantly correlating with the increase in fecal water genotoxicity were involved in biological pathways indicative of genotoxic effects, including modifications in DNA damage repair, cell cycle, and apoptosis pathways. Moreover, WNT signaling and nucleosome remodeling pathways were modulated which are implicated in human CRC development. We conclude that the gene expression changes identified in this study corroborate the genotoxic potential of diets high in red meat and point towards a potentially increased CRC risk in humans.

  16. Outdoor air pollution and human infertility: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Checa Vizcaíno, Miguel A; González-Comadran, Mireia; Jacquemin, Benedicte

    2016-09-15

    Air pollution is a current research priority because of its adverse effects on human health, including on fertility. However, the mechanisms through which air pollution impairs fertility remain unclear. In this article, we perform a systematic review to evaluate currently available evidence on the impact of air pollution on fertility in humans. Several studies have assessed the impact of air pollutants on the general population, and have found reduced fertility rates and increased risk of miscarriage. In subfertile patients, women exposed to higher concentrations of air pollutants while undergoing IVF showed lower live birth rates and higher rates of miscarriage. After exposure to similar levels of air pollutants, comparable results have been found regardless of the mode of conception (IVF versus spontaneous conception), suggesting that infertile women are not more susceptible to the effects of pollutants than the general population. In addition, previous studies have not observed impaired embryo quality after exposure to air pollution, although evidence for this question is sparse. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fecal shedding of thermophilic Campylobacter in a dairy herd producing raw milk for direct human consumption.

    PubMed

    Merialdi, Giuseppe; Giacometti, Federica; Bardasi, Lia; Stancampiano, Laura; Taddei, Roberta; Serratore, Patrizia; Serraino, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Factors affecting the fecal shedding of thermophilic Campylobacter in Italian dairy farms were investigated in a 12-month longitudinal study performed on a dairy farm authorized to sell raw milk in Italy. Fifty animals were randomly selected from 140 adult and young animals, and fecal samples were collected six times at 2-month intervals. At each sampling time, three trough water samples and two trough feed samples also were collected for both adult and young animals. Samples were analyzed with real-time PCR assay and culture examination. Overall, 33 samples (9.7%) were positive for thermophilic Campylobacter by real-time PCR: 26 (9.2%) of 280 fecal samples, 6 (16.6%) of 36 water samples, and 1 (4.2%) of 24 feed samples. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from 6 of 280 samples; no other Campylobacter species was isolated. A higher (but not significantly) number of positive fecal samples were found in younger animals (11.33 versus 6.92% of adult animals), and a significantly higher number of positive water samples were collected from the water troughs of young animals. A distinct temporal trend was observed during the study period for both cows and calves, with two prevalence peaks between November and December and between May and July. Several factors such as calving, housing practices, herd size, management practices forcing together a higher number of animals, and variations in feed or water sources (previously reported as a cause of temporal variation in different farming conditions) were excluded as the cause of the two seasonal peaks in this study. The factors affecting the seasonality of Campylobacter shedding in the dairy herds remain unclear and warrant further investigation. The results of the present study indicate that special attention should be paid to farm hygiene management on farms authorized to produce and sell raw milk, with increased surveillance by the authorities at certain times of the year.

  18. Red wine consumption is associated with fecal microbiota and malondialdehyde in a human population.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Adriana; Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G de Los; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Lopez, Patricia; Suarez, Ana; Gueimonde, Miguel; González, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Red wine intake has been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease; its polyphenol content is the primary cause of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties attributed to this beverage. However, the way in which these activities are exerted is not yet clear, although some authors have proposed that intestinal microbiota could be implicated. The association between red wine intake, inflammation, and oxidative stress parameters and fecal microbial populations has been explored in 38 adult volunteers. Food intake was recorded by means of an annual food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Energy, cholesterol, and ethanol intake were analyzed using the nutrient Food Composition Tables developed by Centro de Enseñanza Superior de Nutrición y Dietética (CESNID) and polyphenol intake was obtained from the Phenol-Explorer Database. Fecal levels of Akkermansia, Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Blautia coccoides group, Clostridium leptum group, Lactobacillus group, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose were analyzed by standard methods. Subjects with regular consumption of red wine (mean = 100 ml/day) had lower serum concentrations of MDA and lower fecal levels of B. coccoides, C. leptum, Bifidobacterium, and Lactobacillus. A positive association between MDA levels and B. coccoides and Lactobacillus was also found. Regular consumption of red wine appears to be associated with a reduced serum lipoperoxidation in which the intestinal microbiota may be involved.

  19. Fecal impaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard and dry. This makes it difficult to pass. Fecal impaction often occurs in people who have ... Small, semi-formed stools Straining when trying to pass stools Other possible symptoms include: Bladder pressure or ...

  20. Fecal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fecal culture is a lab test to find organisms in the stool (feces) that can cause gastrointestinal ... Results There are no abnormal bacteria or other organisms in the sample. Talk to your provider about ...

  1. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fecal Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  2. Detection and remediation of human-origin pollution at two public beaches in Virginia using multiple source tracking methods.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, J W; Hagedorn, C; Hassall, A

    2007-08-01

    Two public beaches (Anderson and Hilton) in Newport News, Virginia, were frequently closed to swimming in 2004 due to high Enterococcus spp. counts that exceeded the regulatory standard. The microbial source tracking (MST) methods of antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA) and fluorometry (to detect optical brighteners) were used in the summer of 2004 to determine the origins of fecal pollution at the two beaches. Both MST methods detected substantial human-origin pollution at the two beaches, in locations producing consistently high levels of Enterococcus spp. Investigations by municipal officials led to the fluorometric detection and subsequent repair of sewage infrastructure problems at both beaches. The success of the mitigation efforts was confirmed during the summer of 2005 using ARA and fluorometry, with the results cross-validated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE).

  3. Detection of human and animal sources of pollution by microbial and chemical methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multi-indicator approach comprising Enterococcus, bacterial source tracking (BST), and sterol analysis was tested for pollution source identification. Fecal contamination was detected in 100% of surface water sites tested. Enterococcus faecium was the dominant species in aged litter samples from p...

  4. Isolation and maintenance of Balantidium coli (Malmsteim, 1857) cultured from fecal samples of pigs and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alynne da Silva; Bastos, Otilio Machado Pereira; Uchôa, Claudia M Antunes; Pissinatti, Alcides; Ferreira Filho, Paulo Ricardo; Dib, Lais Verdan; Azevedo, Eduarda Peixoto; de Siqueira, Mayara Perlingeiro; Cardozo, Matheus Lessa; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2015-06-15

    Balantidium coli is a protozoa that can determine dysentery in humans, pigs and non-human primates having zoonotic potential. The lack of standardization in isolation and maintenance hinders the development of research on its biology and epidemiology. This study is aimed to standardize the isolation and maintenance of this parasite from animal feces, in culture medium, Pavlova modified. From 2012 to 2014, 1905 fecal samples were collected from captive animals of Rio de Janeiro. Were selected for isolation samples with a minimum of 10 trophozoites and/or 30 cysts of B. coli, totaling 88 pigs, 26 Cynomolgus and 90 rhesus macaques. In the presence of cysts, the sample was homogenized in saline solution, 500 μL was removed and inoculated into culture medium. The material that contained trophozoites the inoculum was made from 240 μL of fecal solution. All inoculate tubes with the subcultures were kept at 36°C, and sterile rice starch was always added to the medium. The parasites isolate from pigs, 34%, and from Cynomolgus 38.4% were maintained in vitro for a period of more than 24 months. These procedures proved to be adequate for isolation and maintenance of B. coli from different animals, they were found to be inexpensive and easy to perform.

  5. Human Activity and Pollution in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, H.-F.; Shirsat, S. V.; Podzun, R.

    2009-04-01

    A regional climate chemistry model is used to determine the level of pollution of the Antarctic continent due to anthropogenic and natural emission of sulphur species. Based on an emission inventory for the year 2004/2005 including emissions from energy use and ground traffic at and between Antarctic research stations, flight activity, tourist and scientific ship operations, and emissions from the Mt. Erebus volcano, atmospheric concentration and deposition rates of sulphur species and black carbon were simulated at 0.5 degree resolution for the whole Antarctic continent. The biggest anthropogenic source of pollution is ship operations. These concentrate near the Antarctic Peninsula and close to the big scientific stations at Queen Maud Land and in the Ross sea area. The prevailing winds guarantee that most of the anthropogenic emissions from sources near the coast will be blown to lower latitudes and do not affect the continent. While atmospheric concentrations over vast areas remain extremely low, in some places locally concentrations and deposition rates are reached that may be detectable by in-situ measurements and give rise to concern. Especially at the Peninsula atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of sulphur and soot are dominated by ship emissions. The largest part of shipping activity in this region is from tourist ships, a strongly increasing business. The by far biggest source of sulphur species in Antarctica is the Mt. Erebus volcano. It is also the only source that remains equally strong in polar winter. However, due to its high altitude and the long life time of SO2, especially in winter resulting in long range transport and dilution, Erebus emissions contribute relatively little to deposition of sulphur in the most anthropogenic polluted areas while they dominate the sulphur deposition in central Antarctica.

  6. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  7. Monitoring human exposure to urban air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Barale, R.; Barrai, I.; Marrazzini, A.

    1993-10-01

    A multidisciplinary study on a general population exposed to vehicle exhaust was undertaken in Pisa in 1991. Environmental factors such as air pollution and those associated with lifestyle were studied. Meanwhile, biological and medical indicators of health condition were investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), and micronuclei in lymphocytes were included for the assessment of the genotoxic risk. Because of the large number (3800) of subjects being investigated, standardization of protocols was compulsory. The results on data reproducibility are reported. To assess the reliability of the protocol on a large scale, the population of Porto Tolle, a village located in northeast Italy, was studied and compared to a subset of the Pisa population. Preliminary results showed that probable differences between the two populations and individuals were present in terms of SCE frequencies. The study was potentially able to detect the effects of several factors such as age, smoking, genetics, and environment. The in vitro treatment of lymphocytes with diepoxybutane confirmed the presence of more responsive individuals and permitted us to investigate the genetic predisposition to genetic damage. The possible influence of environmental factors was studied by correlation analyses with external exposure to air pollutants as well as with several lifestyle factors. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The Approach to Sample Acquisition and Its Impact on the Derived Human Fecal Microbiome and VOC Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Robin D.; Navarro, Karl; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Gillevet, Pat; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have illustrated the importance of the microbiota in maintaining a healthy state, as well as promoting disease states. The intestinal microbiota exerts its effects primarily through its metabolites, and metabolomics investigations have begun to evaluate the diagnostic and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) isolated from human feces, enabled by specialized sampling methods such as headspace solid-phase microextraction (hSPME). The approach to stool sample collection is an important consideration that could potentially introduce bias and affect the outcome of a fecal metagenomic and metabolomic investigation. To address this concern, a comparison of endoscopically collected (in vivo) and home collected (ex vivo) fecal samples was performed, revealing slight variability in the derived microbiomes. In contrast, the VOC metabolomes differ widely between the home collected and endoscopy collected samples. Additionally, as the VOC extraction profile is hyperbolic, with short extraction durations more vulnerable to variation than extractions continued to equilibrium, a second goal of our investigation was to ascertain if hSPME-based fecal metabolomics studies might be biased by the extraction duration employed. As anticipated, prolonged extraction (18 hours) results in the identification of considerably more metabolites than short (20 minute) extractions. A comparison of the metabolomes reveals several analytes deemed unique to a cohort with the 20 minute extraction, but found common to both cohorts when the VOC extraction was performed for 18 hours. Moreover, numerous analytes perceived to have significant fold change with a 20 minute extraction were found insignificant in fold change with the prolonged extraction, underscoring the potential for bias associated with a 20 minute hSPME. PMID:24260553

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN AND CATTLE FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  10. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human and Cattle Fecal Pollution - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  11. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human and Cattle Fecal Pollution - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN AND CATTLE FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  13. Development and testing of real-time PCR assays for determining fecal loading and source identification (cattle, human, etc.) in surface water and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, L. D.; Layton, A.; Gentry, R.

    2004-12-01

    A multi-disciplinary group of researchers at the University of Tennessee is developing and testing a series of microbial assay methods based on real-time PCR to detect fecal bacterial concentrations and host sources in water samples. Real-time PCR is an enumeration technique based on the unique and conserved nucleic acid sequences present in all organisms. The first research task was development of an assay (AllBac) to detect total amount of Bacteroides, which represents up to 30 percent of fecal mass. Subsequent assays were developed to detect Bacteroides from cattle (BoBac) and humans (HuBac) using 16sRNA genes based on DNA sequences in the national GenBank, as well as sequences from local fecal samples. The assays potentially have significant advantages over conventional bacterial source tracking methods because: 1. unlike traditional enumeration methods, they do not require bacterial cultivation; 2. there are no known non-fecal sources of Bacteroides; 3. the assays are quantitative with results for total concentration and for each species expressed in mg/l; and 4. they show little regional variation within host species, meaning that they do not require development of extensive local gene libraries. The AllBac and BoBac assays have been used in a study of fecal contamination in a small rural watershed (Stock Creek) near Knoxville, TN, and have proven useful in identification of areas where cattle represent a significant fecal input and in development of BMPs. It is expected that these types of assays (and future assays for birds, hogs, etc.) could have broad applications in monitoring fecal impacts from Animal Feeding Operations, as well as from wildlife and human sources.

  14. Contamination of nonylphenolic compounds in creek water, wastewater treatment plant effluents, and sediments from Lake Shihwa and vicinity, Korea: Comparison with fecal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, Minkyu; Furlong, Edward T.; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Yu, Jun; Choi, Hee-Gu

    2011-01-01

    Nonylphenolic compounds (NPs), coprostanol (COP), and cholestanol, major contaminants in industrial and domestic wastewaters, were analyzed in creek water, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and sediment samples from artificial Lake Shihwa and its vicinity, one of the most industrialized regions in Korea. We also determined mass discharge of NPs and COP, a fecal sterol, into the lake, to understand the linkage between discharge and sediment contamination. Total NP (the sum of nonylphenol, and nonylphenol mono- and di-ethoxylates) were 0.32–875 μg L-1 in creeks, 0.61–87.0 μg L-1 in WWTP effluents, and 29.3–230 μg g-1 TOC in sediments. Concentrations of COP were 0.09–19.0 μg L-1 in creeks, 0.11–44.0 μg L-1 in WWTP effluents, and 2.51–438 μg g-1 TOC in sediments. The spatial distributions of NPs in creeks and sediments from the inshore region were different from those of COP, suggesting that Lake Shihwa contamination patterns from industrial effluents differ from those from domestic effluents. The mass discharge from the combined outfall of the WWTPs, located in the offshore region, was 2.27 kg d-1 for NPs and 1.00 kg d-1 for COP, accounting for 91% and 95% of the total discharge into Lake Shihwa, respectively. The highest concentrations of NPs and COP in sediments were found in samples at sites near the submarine outfall of the WWTPs, indicating that the submarine outfall is an important point source of wastewater pollution in Lake Shihwa.

  15. Contamination of nonylphenolic compounds in creek water, wastewater treatment plant effluents, and sediments from Lake Shihwa and vicinity, Korea: comparison with fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minkyu; Furlong, Edward T; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Yu, Jun; Choi, Hee-Gu

    2011-11-01

    Nonylphenolic compounds (NPs), coprostanol (COP), and cholestanol, major contaminants in industrial and domestic wastewaters, were analyzed in creek water, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and sediment samples from artificial Lake Shihwa and its vicinity, one of the most industrialized regions in Korea. We also determined mass discharge of NPs and COP, a fecal sterol, into the lake, to understand the linkage between discharge and sediment contamination. Total NP (the sum of nonylphenol, and nonylphenol mono- and di-ethoxylates) were 0.32-875 μg L(-1) in creeks, 0.61-87.0 μg L(-1) in WWTP effluents, and 29.3-230 μg g(-1) TOC in sediments. Concentrations of COP were 0.09-19.0 μg L(-1) in creeks, 0.11-44.0 μg L(-1) in WWTP effluents, and 2.51-438 μg g(-1) TOC in sediments. The spatial distributions of NPs in creeks and sediments from the inshore region were different from those of COP, suggesting that Lake Shihwa contamination patterns from industrial effluents differ from those from domestic effluents. The mass discharge from the combined outfall of the WWTPs, located in the offshore region, was 2.27 kg d(-1) for NPs and 1.00 kg d(-1) for COP, accounting for 91% and 95% of the total discharge into Lake Shihwa, respectively. The highest concentrations of NPs and COP in sediments were found in samples at sites near the submarine outfall of the WWTPs, indicating that the submarine outfall is an important point source of wastewater pollution in Lake Shihwa.

  16. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kelty, Catherine A.; Oshiro, Robin; Haugland, Richard A.; Madi, Tania; Brooks, Lauren; Field, Katharine G.; Sivaganesan, Mano

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data quality across laboratories. Data quality is typically determined through a series of specifications that ensure good experimental practice and the absence of bias in the results due to DNA isolation and amplification interferences. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on how best to evaluate and interpret human fecal source identification qPCR experiments. This is, in part, due to the lack of standardized protocols and information on interlaboratory variability under conditions for data acceptance. The aim of this study is to provide users and reviewers with a complete series of conditions for data acceptance derived from a multiple laboratory data set using standardized procedures. To establish these benchmarks, data from HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 human-associated qPCR methods were generated across 14 laboratories. Each laboratory followed a standardized protocol utilizing the same lot of reference DNA materials, DNA isolation kits, amplification reagents, and test samples to generate comparable data. After removal of outliers, a nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to establish proficiency metrics that include lab-to-lab, replicate testing within a lab, and random error for amplification inhibition and sample processing controls. Other data acceptance measurements included extraneous DNA contamination assessments (no-template and extraction blank controls) and calibration model performance (correlation coefficient, amplification efficiency, and lower limit of quantification). To demonstrate the implementation of the proposed standardized protocols and data acceptance criteria, comparable data from two additional laboratories were reviewed. The data acceptance criteria

  17. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Kelty, Catherine A; Oshiro, Robin; Haugland, Richard A; Madi, Tania; Brooks, Lauren; Field, Katharine G; Sivaganesan, Mano

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data quality across laboratories. Data quality is typically determined through a series of specifications that ensure good experimental practice and the absence of bias in the results due to DNA isolation and amplification interferences. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on how best to evaluate and interpret human fecal source identification qPCR experiments. This is, in part, due to the lack of standardized protocols and information on interlaboratory variability under conditions for data acceptance. The aim of this study is to provide users and reviewers with a complete series of conditions for data acceptance derived from a multiple laboratory data set using standardized procedures. To establish these benchmarks, data from HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 human-associated qPCR methods were generated across 14 laboratories. Each laboratory followed a standardized protocol utilizing the same lot of reference DNA materials, DNA isolation kits, amplification reagents, and test samples to generate comparable data. After removal of outliers, a nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to establish proficiency metrics that include lab-to-lab, replicate testing within a lab, and random error for amplification inhibition and sample processing controls. Other data acceptance measurements included extraneous DNA contamination assessments (no-template and extraction blank controls) and calibration model performance (correlation coefficient, amplification efficiency, and lower limit of quantification). To demonstrate the implementation of the proposed standardized protocols and data acceptance criteria, comparable data from two additional laboratories were reviewed. The data acceptance criteria

  18. Do environmental pollutants increase obesity risk in humans?

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Hollis-Hansen, K; Ren, X; Qiu, Y; Qu, W

    2016-12-01

    Obesity has become a global epidemic and threat to public health. A good understanding of the causes can help attenuate the risk and spread. Environmental pollutants may have contributed to the rising global obesity rates. Some research reported associations between chemical pollutants and obesity, but findings are mixed. This study systematically examined associations between chemical pollutants and obesity in human subjects. Systematic review of relevant studies published between 1 January 1995 and 1 June 2016 by searching PubMed and MEDLINE®. Thirty-five cross-sectional (n = 17) and cohort studies (n = 18) were identified that reported on associations between pollutants and obesity measures. Of them, 16 studies (45.71%) reported a positive association; none reported a sole inverse association; three (8.57%) reported a null association only; six (17.14%) reported both a positive and null association; seven (20.00%) reported a positive and inverse association; and three studies (8.57%) reported all associations (positive, inverse and null). Most studies examined the association between multiple different pollutants, different levels of concentration and in subsamples, which results in mixed results. Thirty-three studies reported at least one positive association between obesity and chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, biphenyl A, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene and more. Certain chemicals, such as biphenyl A, were more likely to have high ORs ranging from 1.0 to 3.0, whereas highly chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls were more likely to have negative ORs. Effects of chemicals on the endocrine system and obesity might vary by substance, exposure level, measure of adiposity and subject characteristics (e.g. sex and age). Accumulated evidences show positive associations between pollutants and obesity in humans. Future large, long-term, follow-up studies are needed to assess impact of chemical pollutants on obesity

  19. Human exposure to endotoxins and fecal indicators originating from water features.

    PubMed

    de Man, H; Heederik, D D J; Leenen, E J T M; de Roda Husman, A M; Spithoven, J J G; van Knapen, F

    2014-03-15

    Exposure to contaminated aerosols and water originating from water features may pose public health risks. Endotoxins in air and water and fecal bacteria in water of water features were measured as markers for exposure to microbial cell debris and enteric pathogens, respectively. Information was collected about wind direction, wind force, distance to the water feature, the height of the water feature and the tangibility of water spray. The mean concentration of endotoxins in air nearby and in water of 31 water features was 10 endotoxin units (EU)/m(3) (Geometric Mean (GM), range 0-85.5 EU/m(3) air) and 773 EU/mL (GM, range 9-18,170 EU/mL water), respectively. Such mean concentrations may be associated with respiratory health effects. The water quality of 26 of 88 water features was poor when compared to requirements for recreational water in the Bathing Water Directive 2006/7/EC. Concentrations greater than 1000 colony forming units (cfu) Escherichia coli per 100 mL and greater than 400 cfu intestinal enterococci per 100 mL increase the probability of acquiring gastrointestinal health complaints. Regression analyses showed that the endotoxin concentration in air was significantly influenced by the concentration of endotoxin in water, the distance to the water feature and the tangibility of water spray. Exposure to air and water near water features was shown to lead to exposure to endotoxins and fecal bacteria. The potential health risks resulting from such exposure to water features may be estimated by a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), however, such QMRA would require quantitative data on pathogen concentrations, exposure volumes and dose-response relationships. The present study provides estimates for aerosolisation ratios that can be used as input for QMRA to quantify exposure and to determine infection risks from exposure to water features.

  20. Environmental Pollutant Benzo[a]Pyrene Impacts the Volatile Metabolome and Transcriptome of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Defois, Clémence; Ratel, Jérémy; Denis, Sylvain; Batut, Bérénice; Beugnot, Réjane; Peyretaillade, Eric; Engel, Erwan; Peyret, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a ubiquitous, persistent, and carcinogenic pollutant that belongs to the large family of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Population exposure primarily occurs via contaminated food products, which introduces the pollutant to the digestive tract. Although the metabolism of B[a]P by host cells is well known, its impacts on the human gut microbiota, which plays a key role in health and disease, remain unexplored. We performed an in vitro assay using 16S barcoding, metatranscriptomics and volatile metabolomics to study the impact of B[a]P on two distinct human fecal microbiota. B[a]P exposure did not induce a significant change in the microbial structure; however, it altered the microbial volatolome in a dose-dependent manner. The transcript levels related to several metabolic pathways, such as vitamin and cofactor metabolism, cell wall compound metabolism, DNA repair and replication systems, and aromatic compound metabolism, were upregulated, whereas the transcript levels related to the glycolysis-gluconeogenesis pathway and bacterial chemotaxis toward simple carbohydrates were downregulated. These primary findings show that food pollutants, such as B[a]P, alter human gut microbiota activity. The observed shift in the volatolome demonstrates that B[a]P induces a specific deviation in the microbial metabolism.

  1. Environmental Pollutant Benzo[a]Pyrene Impacts the Volatile Metabolome and Transcriptome of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Defois, Clémence; Ratel, Jérémy; Denis, Sylvain; Batut, Bérénice; Beugnot, Réjane; Peyretaillade, Eric; Engel, Erwan; Peyret, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a ubiquitous, persistent, and carcinogenic pollutant that belongs to the large family of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Population exposure primarily occurs via contaminated food products, which introduces the pollutant to the digestive tract. Although the metabolism of B[a]P by host cells is well known, its impacts on the human gut microbiota, which plays a key role in health and disease, remain unexplored. We performed an in vitro assay using 16S barcoding, metatranscriptomics and volatile metabolomics to study the impact of B[a]P on two distinct human fecal microbiota. B[a]P exposure did not induce a significant change in the microbial structure; however, it altered the microbial volatolome in a dose-dependent manner. The transcript levels related to several metabolic pathways, such as vitamin and cofactor metabolism, cell wall compound metabolism, DNA repair and replication systems, and aromatic compound metabolism, were upregulated, whereas the transcript levels related to the glycolysis-gluconeogenesis pathway and bacterial chemotaxis toward simple carbohydrates were downregulated. These primary findings show that food pollutants, such as B[a]P, alter human gut microbiota activity. The observed shift in the volatolome demonstrates that B[a]P induces a specific deviation in the microbial metabolism. PMID:28861070

  2. Sample Size, Library Composition, and Genotypic Diversity among Natural Populations of Escherichia coli from Different Animals Influence Accuracy of Determining Sources of Fecal Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, LeeAnn K.; Brown, Mary B.; Carruthers, Ethan A.; Ferguson, John A.; Dombek, Priscilla E.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A horizontal, fluorophore-enhanced, repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (rep-PCR) DNA fingerprinting technique (HFERP) was developed and evaluated as a means to differentiate human from animal sources of Escherichia coli. Box A1R primers and PCR were used to generate 2,466 rep-PCR and 1,531 HFERP DNA fingerprints from E. coli strains isolated from fecal material from known human and 12 animal sources: dogs, cats, horses, deer, geese, ducks, chickens, turkeys, cows, pigs, goats, and sheep. HFERP DNA fingerprinting reduced within-gel grouping of DNA fingerprints and improved alignment of DNA fingerprints between gels, relative to that achieved using rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting. Jackknife analysis of the complete rep-PCR DNA fingerprint library, done using Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient, indicated that animal and human isolates were assigned to the correct source groups with an 82.2% average rate of correct classification. However, when only unique isolates were examined, isolates from a single animal having a unique DNA fingerprint, Jackknife analysis showed that isolates were assigned to the correct source groups with a 60.5% average rate of correct classification. The percentages of correctly classified isolates were about 15 and 17% greater for rep-PCR and HFERP, respectively, when analyses were done using the curve-based Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient, rather than the band-based Jaccard algorithm. Rarefaction analysis indicated that, despite the relatively large size of the known-source database, genetic diversity in E. coli was very great and is most likely accounting for our inability to correctly classify many environmental E. coli isolates. Our data indicate that removal of duplicate genotypes within DNA fingerprint libraries, increased database size, proper methods of statistical analysis, and correct alignment of band data within and between gels improve the accuracy of microbial source tracking methods. PMID:15294775

  3. Human-associated fecal qPCR measurements and predicted risk of gastrointestinal illness in recreational waters contaminated with raw sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  4. Human-Associated Fecal Quantitative Polymerase Chain ReactionMeasurements and Simulated Risk of Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters Contaminated with Raw Sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  5. Human-associated fecal qPCR measurements and predicted risk of gastrointestinal illness in recreational waters contaminated with raw sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  6. Human-Associated Fecal Quantitative Polymerase Chain ReactionMeasurements and Simulated Risk of Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters Contaminated with Raw Sewage

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness associated with swimming in recreational waters containing different concentrations of human-associated fecal qPCR markers from raw sewage– HF183 and HumM2. The volume/volu...

  7. Assessment of human exposure to gaseous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, L.B.; Falco, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A mathematical model to aid in assessment of human environmental exposure to volatile organic substances is presented. The model simulates the convective and diffusive transport of gas from the ambient environment into the human body by way of the respiratory and circulatory systems. Data required include easily obtained physical and chemical properties of substances as well as several estimated or measured physiological parameters. Transient and steady-state tissue concentrations resulting from an input atmospheric partial pressure are predicted. From these concentrations, an effective dose may be calculated, allowing for the determination of an exposure-response relationship based upon independently obtained dose-response data. The model's results compare favorably to experimental data on oxygen and halothane. Steady-state conditions are reached very rapidly. These results suggest that uptake of these substances is limited by both ventilation and perfusion. Rates are demonstrated to be essentially linear within the current neighborhoods. Conditions in which the primary processes of ventilation, diffusion, perfusion, and elimination limit uptake of gases are considered. Expressions describing the conditions necessary for a single process to limit gas uptake are derived. Accompanying equations for estimating tissue concentrations under these limiting conditions are presented.

  8. Conclusions and future use of fecal indicator bacteria for monitoring water quality and protecting human health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the focus and the recurring theme of the book is presented in this chapter. It includes the use of faecal bacteria as an indicator of faecal pollution and water quality, ubiquity of faecal bacteria, and sources and movement of faecal bacteria in the environment.

  9. Sulfite-reducing clostridia in the sediment of a high mountain lake (Laguna Grande, Gredos, Spain) as indicators of fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Robles, S; Rodríguez, J M; Granados, I; Guerrero, M C

    2000-09-01

    We studied the vertical distribution of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the sediment of a Spanish high-mountain lagoon (Laguna Grande de Gredos, central Spain), with optimal sediment characteristics (temperature < 20 degrees C) to maintain spores without growing. This allowed us to assess the original numbers of sulfite-reducing clostridia endospores settled, without postdepositional growing. Sulfite-reducing clostridia are normal inhabitants of the intestinal microbiota of humans and other mammals. These microorganisms may form endospores, which allow the bacteria to survive in almost any habitat, either terrestrial or aquatic, waiting for favorable conditions for growth. Sulfite-reducing clostridia could be suitable indicators of past human pollution because they have a great longevity in natural habitats and they cannot multiply at temperatures below 20 degrees C or in the presence of O2. We found a great increase in the numbers of clostridia (expressed as colony-forming units per gram [CFU/g] of dry weight of sediment) since the 1970s, which reflects the rise of human pressure caused by the practice of outdoor activities. Clostridia CFU/g rose dramatically after the faulty operation of the depuration system of a mountain refuge built close to the lagoon. We compared the vertical distribution of clostridia CFU/g from Laguna Grande sediments with those from a neighbor lagoon (Laguna Cimera), which showed less tourist pressure and no direct disposal of sewage. Finally, we agree with the usefulness of the numbers of sulfite-reducing clostridia as indicators of past pollution.

  10. Quantification of Human Fecal Bifidobacterium Species by Use of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis Targeting the groEL Gene

    PubMed Central

    Junick, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays targeting the groEL gene for the specific enumeration of 12 human fecal Bifidobacterium species were developed. The housekeeping gene groEL (HSP60 in eukaryotes) was used as a discriminative marker for the differentiation of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, B. angulatum, B. animalis, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. catenulatum, B. dentium, B. gallicum, B. longum, B. pseudocatenulatum, B. pseudolongum, and B. thermophilum. The bifidobacterial chromosome contains a single copy of the groEL gene, allowing the determination of the cell number by quantification of the groEL copy number. Real-time PCR assays were validated by comparing fecal samples spiked with known numbers of a given Bifidobacterium species. Independent of the Bifidobacterium species tested, the proportion of groEL copies recovered from fecal samples spiked with 5 to 9 log10 cells/g feces was approximately 50%. The quantification limit was 5 to 6 log10 groEL copies/g feces. The interassay variability was less than 10%, and variability between different DNA extractions was less than 23%. The method developed was applied to fecal samples from healthy adults and full-term breast-fed infants. Bifidobacterial diversity in both adults and infants was low, with mostly ≤3 Bifidobacterium species and B. longum frequently detected. The predominant species in infant and adult fecal samples were B. breve and B. adolescentis, respectively. It was possible to distinguish B. catenulatum and B. pseudocatenulatum. We conclude that the groEL gene is a suitable molecular marker for the specific and accurate quantification of human fecal Bifidobacterium species by real-time PCR. PMID:22307308

  11. Dieldrin pollution of a human food chain.

    PubMed

    Bell, D; MacLeod, A F

    1983-01-01

    1 An incident is described in which excessive mortality amongst a poultry flock alerted veterinarians. Investigation revealed dieldrin in the carcasses and in the wood litter used in the nesting boxes. 2 Because high levels of dieldrin were found also in eggs the Department of Community Medicine was alerted. 3 Those most at risk were the workers who could have absorbed dieldrin by inhalation and percutaneously, and by eating contaminated eggs. A number of other people were at risk having eaten contaminated eggs. 4 Twenty-one workers or members of their families were investigated by case histories and blood levels. They were all clinically well. The highest estimated daily intake of dieldrin in the diet was 3.8 mgm. The highest blood dieldrin level found was 0.016 microgram/ml. This intake was of the same order as the upper limit of no-toxic-effect of long-term daily dosage, but the blood level is well below the level at which symptoms may be expected. The fall in mean blood level over a year is consistent with a long half-life of dieldrin in the human. 5 The conflict of interest in conducting a comprehensive investigation and preventing undue public alarm is discussed, and how this was resolved in this episode is described.

  12. The Effects of Organic Pollutants in Soil on Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lynn

    2013-04-01

    The soil has always been depository of the organic chemicals produced naturally or anthropogenically. Soil contamination is a serious human and environmental problem. A large body of evidence has shown the risks of adverse health effects with the exposure to contaminated soil due to the large quantities of organic chemicals used in agriculture and urban areas that have a legacy of environmental pollution linked to industrial activities, coal burning, motor vehicle emissions, waste incineration and waste dumping. In agricultural areas, because of the effort to provide adequate quantities of agricultural products, farmers have been using an increasing amount of organic chemicals, but the resulting pollution has enormous potential for environmental damage. The types of organic pollutants commonly found in soils are polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides, herbicides and organic fuels, especially gasoline and diesel. Another source of soil pollution is the complex mixture of organic chemicals, metals and microorganisms in the effluent from septic systems, animal wastes and other sources of biowaste. The soils of the world are a vast mixture of chemicals and although conditions are such that an individual is rarely exposed to a single compound, the great majority of people are exposed to a vast chemical mixture of organics, their metabolites, and other compounds at low concentrations Human exposure to organic pollutants in the soil is an area of toxicology that is very difficult to study due to the low concentration of the pollutants. The toxicological studies of single organic pollutants found in soils are limited and research on the metabolites and of chemical mixtures is very limited. The majority of toxicological studies are conducted at relatively high doses and for short periods of exposure. This makes the application of this data to exposure

  13. Fecal Microbiomes of Non-Human Primates in Western Uganda Reveal Species-Specific Communities Largely Resistant to Habitat Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    McCORD, ALEIA I.; CHAPMAN, COLIN A.; WENY, GEOFFREY; TUMUKUNDE, ALEX; HYEROBA, DAVID; KLOTZ, KELLY; KOBLINGS, AVERY S.; MBORA, DAVID N.M.; CREGGER, MELISSA; WHITE, BRYAN A.; LEIGH, STEVEN R.; GOLDBERG, TONY L.

    2014-01-01

    Primate gastrointestinal microbial communities are becoming increasingly appreciated for their relevance to comparative medicine and conservation, but the factors that structure primate “microbiomes” remain controversial. This study examined a community of primates in Kibale National Park, Uganda, to assess the relative importance of host species and location in structuring gastrointestinal microbiomes. Fecal samples were collected from primates in intact forest and from primates in highly disturbed forest fragments. People and livestock living nearby were also included, as was a geographically distant population of related red colobus in Kenya. A culture-free microbial community fingerprinting technique was used to analyze fecal microbiomes from 124 individual red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus), 100 individual black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza), 111 individual red-tailed guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius), 578 human volunteers, and 364 domestic animals, including cattle (Bos indicus and B. indicus × B. taurus crosses), goats (Caprus hircus), sheep (Ovis aries), and pigs (Sus scrofa). Microbiomes sorted strongly by host species, and forest fragmentation did not alter this pattern. Microbiomes of Kenyan red colobus sorted distinctly from microbiomes of Ugandan red colobus, but microbiomes from these two red colobus populations clustered more closely with each other than with any other species. Microbiomes from red colobus and black-and-white colobus were more differentiated than would be predicted by the phylogenetic relatedness of these two species, perhaps reflecting heretofore underappreciated differences in digestive physiology between the species. Within Kibale, social group membership influenced intra-specific variation among microbiomes. However, intra-specific variation was higher among primates in forest fragments than among primates in intact forest, perhaps reflecting the physical separation of fragments. These results suggest that, in this

  14. Are marine environmental pollutants influencing global patterns of human disease?

    PubMed

    Depledge, M H; Tyrrell, J; Fleming, L E; Holgate, S T

    2013-02-01

    Thousands of toxic chemicals, many of which pollute marine ecosystems, potentially cause diseases, but building a consensus view of the significance of human body burdens of environmental chemicals is proving difficult. Causative mechanisms are often lacking. Older members of the population, of which there are increasing numbers worldwide, accumulate higher body burdens than the young, and may be especially at risk. It also remains unclear when crucially sensitive periods for chemical exposures occur across the life course. Very early exposures may lead to diseases much later on. The current lack of robust science upon which to base high quality expert advice is hampering effective policymaking that leads to further reductions in marine pollution, greater protection of marine life and lowering of risks to human health.

  15. Transport of chemical and microbial compounds from known wastewater discharges: Potential for use as indicators of human fecal contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glassmeyer, S.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Kolpin, D.W.; Cahill, J.D.; Zaugg, S.D.; Werner, S.L.; Meyer, M.T.; Kryak, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently (2005) determined using indicator bacteria. However, the culture tests used to analyze for these bacteria require a long time to complete and do not discriminate between human and animal fecal material sources. One complementary approach is to use chemicals found in human wastewater, which would have the advantages of (1) potentially shorter analysis times than the bacterial culture tests and (2) being selected for human-source specificity. At 10 locations, water samples were collected upstream and at two successive points downstream from a wastewaster treatment plant (WWTP); a treated effluent sample was also collected at each WWTP. This sampling plan was used to determine the persistence of a chemically diverse suite of emerging contaminants in streams. Samples were also collected at two reference locations assumed to have minimal human impacts. Of the 110 chemical analytes investigated in this project, 78 were detected at least once. The number of compounds in a given sample ranged from 3 at a reference location to 50 in a WWTP effluent sample. The total analyte load at each location varied from 0.018 μg/L at the reference location to 97.7 μg/L in a separate WWTP effluent sample. Although most of the compound concentrations were in the range of 0.01−1.0 μg/L, in some samples, individual concentrations were in the range of 5−38 μg/L. The concentrations of the majority of the chemicals present in the samples generally followed the expected trend:  they were either nonexistent or at trace levels in the upstream samples, had their maximum concentrations in the WWTP effluent samples, and then declined in the two downstream samples. This research suggests that selected chemicals are useful as tracers of human wastewater discharge.

  16. Transintestinal Cholesterol Transport Is Active in Mice and Humans and Controls Ezetimibe-Induced Fecal Neutral Sterol Excretion.

    PubMed

    Jakulj, Lily; van Dijk, Theo H; de Boer, Jan Freark; Kootte, Ruud S; Schonewille, Marleen; Paalvast, Yared; Boer, Theo; Bloks, Vincent W; Boverhof, Renze; Nieuwdorp, Max; Beuers, Ulrich H W; Stroes, Erik S G; Groen, Albert K

    2016-12-13

    Except for conversion to bile salts, there is no major cholesterol degradation pathway in mammals. Efficient excretion from the body is therefore a crucial element in cholesterol homeostasis. Yet, the existence and importance of cholesterol degradation pathways in humans is a matter of debate. We quantified cholesterol fluxes in 15 male volunteers using a cholesterol balance approach. Ten participants repeated the protocol after 4 weeks of treatment with ezetimibe, an inhibitor of intestinal and biliary cholesterol absorption. Under basal conditions, about 65% of daily fecal neutral sterol excretion was bile derived, with the remainder being contributed by direct transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). Surprisingly, ezetimibe induced a 4-fold increase in cholesterol elimination via TICE. Mouse studies revealed that most of ezetimibe-induced TICE flux is mediated by the cholesterol transporter Abcg5/Abcg8. In conclusion, TICE is active in humans and may serve as a novel target to stimulate cholesterol elimination in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Involuntary bioaccumulation of environmental pollutants in nonsmoking heterogeneous human population

    SciTech Connect

    Krotoszynski, B.K.; O'Neill, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical bioaccumulation in nonsmoking heterogeneous human population was determined by a noninvasive expired air technique. Ubiquitous and nonubiquitous environmental pollutants were isolated and identified and the respective distribution and inhalation hazards were evaluated. Attempts were made to isolate and identify the state of health related expired air constituents. The selected 291 environmental pollutants or the total estimated bioaccumulation, were distributed among the heterogenous and homogenous study populations as the constituents of the respective chemical bioaccumulation. The bioaccumulation of the environmental pollutants observed in the heterogenous population, including controls, prediabetics and diabetics, consisted of 176 compounds or 60.5% of the total estimated bioaccumulation. The constituents of this bioaccumulation are termed ubiquitous pollutants because they have accumulated in the heterogenous population as the result of the prolonged body exposures irrespectively of the residence, age, height, weight, sex, occupation, diet and the state of health of the exposed individuals. The major contribution to the bioaccumulation in the heterogenous population arose from 150 hydrocarbons (85.2% of total bioaccumulation) which presents serious exposure health hazards to this population. This is supported by the known toxicity and the possible mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of these hydrocarbons. Such health hazards will augment with the increasing utilization of petroleum products in industry and automobiles. (JMT)

  18. Molecular Monitoring of the Fecal Microbiota of Healthy Human Subjects during Administration of Lactulose and Saccharomyces boulardii

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoutte, Tom; De Preter, Vicky; De Brandt, Evie; Verbeke, Kristin; Swings, Jean; Huys, Geert

    2006-01-01

    Diet is a major factor in maintaining a healthy human gastrointestinal tract, and this has triggered the development of functional foods containing a probiotic and/or prebiotic component intended to improve the host's health via modulation of the intestinal microbiota. In this study, a long-term placebo-controlled crossover feeding study in which each subject received several treatments was performed to monitor the effect of a prebiotic substrate (i.e., lactulose), a probiotic organism (i.e., Saccharomyces boulardii), and their synbiotic combination on the fecal microbiota of three groups of 10 healthy human subjects differing in prebiotic dose and/or intake of placebo versus synbiotic. For this purpose, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to detect possible changes in the overall bacterial composition using the universal V3 primer and to detect possible changes at the subpopulation level using group-specific primers targeting the Bacteroides fragilis subgroup, the genus Bifidobacterium, the Clostridium lituseburense group (cluster XI), and the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group (cluster XIVa). Although these populations remained fairly stable based on DGGE profiling, one pronounced change was observed in the universal fingerprint profiles after lactulose ingestion. Band position analysis and band sequencing revealed that a band appearing or intensifying following lactulose administration could be assigned to the species Bifidobacterium adolescentis. Subsequent analysis with real-time PCR (RT-PCR) indicated a statistically significant increase (P < 0.05) in total bifidobacteria in one of the three subject groups after lactulose administration, whereas a similar but nonsignificant trend was observed in the other two groups. Combined RT-PCR results from two subject groups indicated a borderline significant increase (P = 0.074) of B. adolescentis following lactulose intake. The probiotic yeast S

  19. Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowbotham, N.

    1973-01-01

    Presents the material given in one class period in a course on Environmental Studies at Chesterfield School, England. The topics covered include air pollution, water pollution, fertilizers, and insecticides. (JR)

  20. Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowbotham, N.

    1973-01-01

    Presents the material given in one class period in a course on Environmental Studies at Chesterfield School, England. The topics covered include air pollution, water pollution, fertilizers, and insecticides. (JR)

  1. Assessing human exposure to airborne pollutants: Advances and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J. )

    1991-08-01

    A committee which was convened by the National Research Council, recently completed an analysis of new methods and technologies for assessing exposure to air pollutants. The committee identified three major ways of determining human exposure to airborne pollutants. Monitoring the air around an individual with a portable personal air sampler is, of course, the most comprehensive and most accurate. It is also the costliest and most time consuming. The second method is more indirect and involves techniques such as measuring the amount of a contaminant with a stationary monitor and extrapolating exposure by means of personal activity records or mathematical models. Exposure to carbon monoxide inside a car, for example, might be roughly calculated from the amount of time spent in the car and the quantity of carbon monoxide in the car under typical operating conditions. The third method involves biological markers as a measure of the integrated dose within the body and of past contact with pollutants. For example, a marker for airborne lead exposure can be elevated lead levels in the blood. However, this must be weighed against contributions from other media. A final and major point made in the report is the need to have accurate and realistic assessments to ensure optimal reduction of human exposure. To accomplish this, exposure assessment research should be supported by government programs. Although not stated, such research should also be supported by other sectors, including the regulated community.

  2. Transport of persistent organic pollutants across the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Vizcaino, Esther; Grimalt, Joan O; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Tardon, Adonina

    2014-04-01

    Prenatal life is the most sensitive stage of human development to environmental pollutants. Early exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may increase the risk of adverse health effects during childhood. The mechanisms of transference of POPs during pregnancy are still not well understood. The present study is aimed to investigate the transfer of POPs between mother and fetus. The concentrations of 14 organochlorine pesticides, 7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 14 polybromodiphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners have been measured in 308 maternal serum samples, their respective umbilical cords and 50 placental tissues from a mother-infant cohort representative of Spanish general population. In general, the adjusted lipid-basis concentrations were higher in maternal serum than in cord serum and placenta. The concentrations of most pollutants between maternal serum and cord serum and between maternal serum and placenta were significantly correlated. These distributions were consistent with a predominant maternal source that transfers the pollutants into the placenta and the fetus. However, this distribution did not correspond to passive diffusion of these compounds between these tissues according to lipid content. The compounds more readily metabolized were higher in newborns, which suggest that differences in metabolic capabilities may be responsible of the observed variations in POP distributions between mother and newborns. Prenatal exposure to 4,4'-DDT and some PBDEs such as BDE 99 and BDE 209 is much higher than it could be anticipated from the composition of maternal serum. POP exposure assessment studies of newborns may overlook the effects of some of these pollutants if they only consider maternal determinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Seasonal Environmental Variables on the Distribution of Presumptive Fecal Coliforms around an Antarctic Research Station

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kevin A.

    2003-01-01

    Factors affecting fecal microorganism survival and distribution in the Antarctic marine environment include solar radiation, water salinity, temperature, sea ice conditions, and fecal input by humans and local wildlife populations. This study assessed the influence of these factors on the distribution of presumptive fecal coliforms around Rothera Point, Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula during the austral summer and winter of February 1999 to September 1999. Each factor had a different degree of influence depending on the time of year. In summer (February), although the station population was high, presumptive fecal coliform concentrations were low, probably due to the biologically damaging effects of solar radiation. However, summer algal blooms reduced penetration of solar radiation into the water column. By early winter (April), fecal coliform concentrations were high, due to increased fecal input by migrant wildlife, while solar radiation doses were low. By late winter (September), fecal coliform concentrations were high near the station sewage outfall, as sea ice formation limited solar radiation penetration into the sea and prevented wind-driven water circulation near the outfall. During this study, environmental factors masked the effect of station population numbers on sewage plume size. If sewage production increases throughout the Antarctic, environmental factors may become less significant and effective sewage waste management will become increasingly important. These findings highlight the need for year-round monitoring of fecal coliform distribution in Antarctic waters near research stations to produce realistic evaluations of sewage pollution persistence and dispersal. PMID:12902283

  4. Persistent organic pollutants in human breast milk from Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shinsuke; Kunisue, Tatsuya

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we concisely reviewed the contamination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in human breast milk collected from Asian countries such as Japan, China, Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Malaysia, and Indonesia during 1999-2003. Dioxins, PCBs, CHLs in Japanese, and DDTs in Vietnamese, Chinese, Cambodian, Malaysian, and HCHs in Chinese, Indian, and HCB in Chinese breast milk were predominant. In India, levels of dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) in the mothers living around the open dumping site were notably higher than those from the reference site and other Asian developing countries, indicating that significant pollution sources of DRCs are present in the dumping site of India and the residents there have been exposed to relatively higher levels of these contaminants possibly via bovine milk.

  5. Characterization of Clostridium difficile isolates from human fecal samples and retail meat from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Jyotika B; Very, Katherine J; Williams, Jen L; Hegarty, John P; Stewart, David B; Lumadue, Jeanne; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2014-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and characterize C. difficile isolates from human stool and retail grocery meat samples. Human stool samples (n=317) were obtained from a clinical laboratory and meat samples (n=303) were collected from 8 retail grocery stores from October 2011 through September 2012 from Centre County of Pennsylvania and were examined for C. difficile. C. difficile was isolated from 16.7% of stool samples (n=317) and 6.9%, 11.5%, 14.5%, and 7.8% of beef (n=72), pork (n=78), turkey (n=76), and chicken (n=77) samples, respectively. Six different toxin gene profiles were detected in all human and meat isolates of C. difficile based on the presence or absence of toxin genes tcdA, tcdB, and cdtA and cdtB. Interestingly, 75.6% of the human C. difficile isolates lacked any deletion in the tcdC gene (139-bp), whereas a 39-bp deletion was observed in 61.3% of the C. difficile strains isolated from meat samples. C. difficile from meat samples were more susceptible to clindamycin, moxifloxacin, vancomycin, and metronidazole than C. difficile isolates from human samples. Twenty-five different ribotypes were identified in human and meat C. difficile isolates. In conclusion, significant genotypic and phenotypic differences were observed between human and meat isolates of C. difficile; however, a few C. difficile isolates from meat-in particular ribotypes 078, PA01, PA05, PA16, and PA22 with unique profiles (toxin gene, tcdC gene size and antimicrobial resistance profiles)-were similar to human C. difficile isolates.

  6. How Does Air Pollution Threaten Basic Human Rights? The Case Study of Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmedova, Aylin Hasanova

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to analyze the relationship between air pollution and human rights. It investigates whether air pollution threatens basic human rights such as the right to health, life, and the environment. Air pollution represents a major threat both to health and to the environment. Despite the adoption of numerous…

  7. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Lactobacillus acidophilus in human oral cavity and fecal samples after 2-week consumption of yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Shen, Da; Zhu, Yunwo; Hao, Yuqing; Lu, Junjun

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether short-term daily consumption of yoghurt leads to colonization by Lactobacillus acidophilus in a group of human subjects who were initially totally devoid of L. acidophilus in their oral cavities. Twenty-three volunteers consumed yogurt containing L. acidophilus during a 14-day trial stage. Oral and fecal samples were collected at the clearance stage and at the post-yoghurt intake stage until L. acidophilus was found. Standard polymerase chain reaction methods using specific primers were adopted for the detection and identification of L. acidophilus. The isolation frequency decreased rapidly 72 h after stopping intake of yoghurt. After 1 week, L. acidophilus was absent in all oral samples. Non-significant differences were found between the survival rates of L. acidophilus in samples of saliva, plaque, tongue surface, and buccal mucosa. L. acidophilus was also found to remain in the gastrointestinal tract for longer than in the oral cavity. Allochthonous L. acidophilus is not likely to permanently colonize the oral cavity and intestine.

  8. In vitro fermentation of oat bran obtained by debranning with a mixed culture of human fecal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Gopal; Vázquez, José A; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris; Pandiella, Severino S

    2009-04-01

    The prebiotic potential of oat samples was investigated by in vitro shaker-flask anaerobic fermentations with human fecal cultures. The oat bran fraction was obtained by debranning and was compared with other carbon sources such as whole oat flour, glucose, and fructo-oligosaccharide. The oat bran fraction showed a decrease in culturable anaerobes and clostridia and an increase in bifidobacteria and lactobacilli populations. A similar pattern was observed in fructo-oligosaccharide. Butyrate production was higher in oat bran compared to glucose and similar to that in fructo-oligosaccharide. Production of propionate was higher in the two oat media than in fructo-oligosaccharide and glucose, which can be used as energy source by the liver. This study suggests that the oat bran fraction obtained by debranning is digested by the gut ecosystem and increases the population of beneficial bacteria in the indigenous gut microbiota. This medium also provides an energy source preferred by colonocytes when it is metabolized by the gut flora.

  9. Protecting drinking water: Rapid detection of human fecal contamination, injured and non-culturable pathogenic microbes in water systems

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Nivens, D.E.; Arrage, A.A.; Appelgate, B.M.; Reardon, S.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1996-05-01

    The rapid, potentially-automatable extraction of filter retentates has allowed quantitative detection of the unique biomarker for human fecal contamination, coprostanol, and the signature lipid biomarkers for total cellular biomass, viable cellular biomass, lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin). This method may be integrated with DNA based gene probe analysis for specific strains and enzyme activities. Not only does the analysis provide for detection of injured and non-culturable microbes but it also provides biomarkers characteristic of microbes exposed to biocides and disinfectants that can be utilized to monitor effectiveness of water mitigation/treatment. The analysis schemes involve filtration of the water or direct extraction of biofilms in sidestream chambers, supercritical fluid and/or liquid extraction, derivatization, and analysis of ``signature`` patterns by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Signature lipid biomarkers of interest are diglycerides, steroids including coprostanol and its isomers, poly-{beta}- hydroxyalcanoates (PHA), phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids (PLFA), and the lipopolysaccharide lipid A hydroxy fatty acids. PLFA found in polar lipid fractions estimate total viable cellular biomass, whereas the total cellular biomass can be calculated from diglyceride/phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids ratios. Furthermore, direct evidence of mitigation/treatment effectiveness can be ascertained by detection of diglycerides, respiratory quinones, PHA, and PLFA markers indicative of metabolic stress and toxicity such as trans monoenoic PLFA as well as oxirane and dicarboxylic fatty acids derived from the PLFA.

  10. Isolation and identification of tyramine-producing enterococci from human fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2009-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are recognized as a group of important microorganisms because of their crucial role in food fermentation and their contribution to the maintenance of health homeostasis, as natural inhabitants of the human mucosa. However, the metabolic activities of some strains, such as the ability to synthesize biogenic amines (BAs), can be detrimental to human health. BAs are low molecular weight compounds synthesized by the enzymatic decarboxylation of amino acids. Tyramine, one of the most biologically active BAs, is produced by certain strains of LAB related to food fermentations. Since no data are available as to whether tyramine originates exclusively from food intake, or, like polyamines, could be formed by gut bacteria, this study was focused on the isolation of tyramine-producing LAB from human feces. Different strains of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis able to produce tyramine in culture conditions were isolated.

  11. Interaction of fecal coliforms with soil aggregates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land-applied manures may contain various contaminants that cause water pollution and concomitant health problems. Some of these pollutants are bacteria, and fecal coliforms (FC) have been widely used as an indicator of bacterial contamination. Experiments on bacteria attachment to soil are tradition...

  12. Effects of environmental pollutants on cellular iron homeostasis and ultimate links to human disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic disease has increased in the last several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanism underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to co...

  13. Effects of environmental pollutants on cellular iron homeostasis and ultimate links to human disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic disease has increased in the last several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanism underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to co...

  14. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  15. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  16. Evaluation of genetic markers from the 16S rRNA gene V2 region for use in quantitative detection of selected Bacteroidales species and human fecal waste by real time PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular methods for rapidly quantifying defined Bacteroidales species from the human gastrointestinal tract may have important clinical and environmental applications, ranging from diagnosis of infections to fecal source tracking in surface waters. In this study, sequences from...

  17. Evaluation of genetic markers from the 16S rRNA gene V2 region for use in quantitative detection of selected Bacteroidales species and human fecal waste by real time PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular methods for rapidly quantifying defined Bacteroidales species from the human gastrointestinal tract may have important clinical and environmental applications, ranging from diagnosis of infections to fecal source tracking in surface waters. In this study, sequences from...

  18. Patterns of Antimicrobial Resistance Observed in Escherichia coli Isolates Obtained from Domestic- and Wild-Animal Fecal Samples, Human Septage, and Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Sayah, Raida S.; Kaneene, John B.; Johnson, Yvette; Miller, RoseAnn

    2005-01-01

    A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the patterns of antimicrobial resistance in 1,286 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human septage, wildlife, domestic animals, farm environments, and surface water in the Red Cedar watershed in Michigan. Isolation and identification of E. coli were done by using enrichment media, selective media, and biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by the disk diffusion method was conducted for neomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, ofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ampicillin, nalidixic acid, nitrofurantoin, cephalothin, and sulfisoxazole. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was demonstrated in isolates from livestock, companion animals, human septage, wildlife, and surface water. In general, E. coli isolates from domestic species showed resistance to the largest number of antimicrobial agents compared to isolates from human septage, wildlife, and surface water. The agents to which resistance was demonstrated most frequently were tetracycline, cephalothin, sulfisoxazole, and streptomycin. There were similarities in the patterns of resistance in fecal samples and farm environment samples by animal, and the levels of cephalothin-resistant isolates were higher in farm environment samples than in fecal samples. Multidrug resistance was seen in a variety of sources, and the highest levels of multidrug-resistant E. coli were observed for swine fecal samples. The fact that water sample isolates were resistant only to cephalothin may suggest that the resistance patterns for farm environment samples may be more representative of the risk of contamination of surface waters with antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria. PMID:15746342

  19. GUTSS: An Alignment-Free Sequence Comparison Method for Use in Human Intestinal Microbiome and Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Heltshe, Sonya L; Hayden, Hillary S; Radey, Matthew C; Weiss, Eli J; Damman, Christopher J; Zisman, Timothy L; Suskind, David L; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of gut microbiomes in clinical studies of human diseases typically rely on identification and quantification of species or genes. In addition to exploring specific functional characteristics of the microbiome and potential significance of species diversity or expansion, microbiome similarity is also calculated to study change in response to therapies directed at altering the microbiome. Established ecological measures of similarity can be constructed from species abundances, however methods for calculating these commonly used ecological measures of similarity directly from whole genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic sequence are lacking. We present an alignment-free method for calculating similarity of WGS metagenomic sequences that is analogous to the Bray-Curtis index for species, implemented by the General Utility for Testing Sequence Similarity (GUTSS) software application. This method was applied to intestinal microbiomes of healthy young children to measure developmental changes toward an adult microbiome during the first 3 years of life. We also calculate similarity of donor and recipient microbiomes to measure establishment, or engraftment, of donor microbiota in fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) studies focused on mild to moderate Crohn's disease. We show how a relative index of similarity to donor can be calculated as a measure of change in a patient's microbiome toward that of the donor in response to FMT. Because clinical efficacy of the transplant procedure cannot be fully evaluated without analysis methods to quantify actual FMT engraftment, we developed a method for detecting change in the gut microbiome that is independent of species identification and database bias, sensitive to changes in relative abundance of the microbial constituents, and can be formulated as an index for correlating engraftment success with clinical measures of disease. More generally, this method may be applied to clinical evaluation of human microbiomes

  20. Relationships among bather density, levels of human waterborne pathogens, and fecal coliform counts in marine recreational beach water.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Sunderland, Deirdre; Awantang, Grace N; Mashinski, Yessika; Lucy, Frances E; Graczyk, Zofi; Chomicz, Lidia; Breysse, Patrick N

    2010-04-01

    During summer months, samples of marine beach water were tested weekly for human waterborne pathogens in association with high and low bather numbers during weekends and weekdays, respectively. The numbers of bathers on weekends were significantly higher than on weekdays (P < 0.001), and this was associated with a significant (P < 0.04) increase in water turbidity. The proportion of water samples containing Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia duodenalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi was significantly higher (P < 0.03) on weekends than on weekdays, and significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with enterococci counts. The concentration of all three waterborne pathogens was significantly correlated with bather density (P < 0.01). The study demonstrated that: (a) human pathogens were present in beach water on days deemed acceptable for bathing according to fecal bacterial standards; (b) enterococci count was a good indicator for the presence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and microsporidian spores in recreational marine beach water; (c) water should be tested for enterococci during times when bather numbers are high; (d) re-suspension of bottom sediments by bathers caused elevated levels of enterococci and waterborne parasites, thus bathers themselves can create a non-point source for water contamination; and (e) exposure to recreational bathing waters can play a role in epidemiology of microsporidiosis. In order to protect public health, it is recommended to: (a) prevent diapered children from entering beach water; (b) introduce bather number limits to recreational areas; (c) advise people with gastroenteritis to avoid bathing; and (d) use showers prior to and after bathing.

  1. Identifying and analyzing bacteriophages in human fecal samples: what could we discover?

    PubMed

    Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is a complex ecosystem, densely populated with microbes including enormous amounts of phages. Metagenomic studies indicate a great diversity of bacteriophages, and because of the variety of gut bacterial species, the human or animal gut is probably a perfect ecological niche for phages that can infect and propagate in their bacterial communities. In addition, some phages have the capacity to mobilize genes, as demonstrated by the enormous fraction of phage particles in feces that contain bacterial DNA. All these facts indicate that, through predation and horizontal gene transfer, bacteriophages play a key role in shaping the size, structure and function of intestinal microbiomes, although our understanding of their effects on gut bacterial populations is only just beginning.

  2. Application of host-specific source-tracking tools for rapid identification of fecal contamination in fresh produce by humans and livestock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-03-30

    Fecal contamination in fresh produce is a public health concern because it may contain human pathogens. We introduced host-specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for the rapid detection and identification of fecal contamination sources from humans and farm animals (cow, pig, chicken) in fresh produce. Each composite fecal sample was spiked on lettuce at two contamination levels (0.2 mg or 2 mg feces g⁻¹), followed by qPCR assays for detecting each host-specific genetic marker: BoBac (cow); PF163 (pig); CP3-49 (chicken); and HF183 and gyrB (human). Two commercial DNA extraction kits were compared to evaluate DNA recovery yields and removal of PCR inhibition. Sketa2 assay was conducted to assess the presence of PCR inhibition in the contaminated lettuce. All the qPCR assays yielded reliable detection from contaminated lettuce (2 mg feces g⁻¹), where their target gene numbers were 1.5-5.0 × 10³ (HF183), 0.8-2.2 × 10³ (gyrB), 0.6-1.6 × 10³ (BoBac), 1.6-3.0 × 10³ (CP3-49) and 1.1-2.2 × 10³ (PF163) copies g⁻¹ of lettuce. Among the two extraction kits, QIAamp DNA Stool Kit resulted in 2-3 times higher sensitivity and 20% less PCR inhibition than the PowerFood™ kit. This study provides information on the optimized host-specific qPCR assay in identifying sources of fecal contamination in fresh produce and is useful for tracking the contamination source and improving agricultural practice. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assays for the determination of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cecal water in rats and fecal water in humans.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Bianca; Leleu, Richard; Bird, Tony; Clifton, Peter; Fenech, Michael

    2007-12-01

    We tested the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay using the WIL2-NS human B lymphoblastoid cell line as a biomarker of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cecal water from rats and fecal water from humans. Cecal water was assessed in rats fed either a diet rich in fat, low in calcium and fiber, and barbecued red meat as the protein source (high colorectal cancer risk diet) or a diet high in fiber and calcium, low in fat, and casein as the protein source (low colorectal cancer risk diet) for 2 weeks. There was a significant 7.6-, 1.8-, and 4.0-fold increase in binucleated (BN) cells with micronuclei (Mn-BN), BN cells with nucleoplasmic bridges (Npb-BN), and necrotic cells (P < 0.001) with 1-h incubation with a 10% dilution of the cecal water isolated from rats fed the high colorectal cancer risk diet compared with rats fed the low colorectal cancer risk diet. In humans, fecal water samples collected from feces of free-living volunteers showed that 24-h exposure to 1% dilution of fecal water produced a significant 2.6-, 6.5-, 7.5-, and 2.2-fold increase in Mn-BN, Npb-BN, BN cells with nuclear buds, and necrotic cells compared with controls (P < 0.05). The coefficients of variations for interindividual differences for Mn-BN, Npb-BN, BN cells with nuclear buds, and necrosis biomarkers were greater than corresponding coefficients of variations for intraindividual variation. These results indicate that the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay can be used successfully to determine the interindividual variation in genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cecal or fecal water and to identify dietary patterns that are likely to increase carcinogenic events in the colon.

  4. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Fecal Source Identification in the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rivers in the Tillamook Basin play a vital role in supporting a thriving dairy and cheese-making industry, as well as providing a safe water resource for local human and wildlife populations. Historical concentrations of fecal bacteria in these waters are at times too high to allow for safe use leading to economic loss, endangerment of local wildlife, and poor conditions for recreational use. In this study, we employ host-associated qPCR methods for human (HF183/BacR287 and HumM2), ruminant (Rum2Bac), cattle (CowM2 and CowM3), canine (DG3 and DG37), and avian (GFD) fecal pollution combined with high-resolution geographic information system (GIS) land use data and general indicator bacteria measurements to elucidatewater quality spatial and temporal trends. Water samples (n=584) were collected over a 1-year period at 29 sites along the Trask, Kilchis, and Tillamook rivers and tributaries (Tillamook Basin, OR). A total of 16.6% of samples (n=97) yielded E. coli levels considered impaired based on Oregon Department of Environmental Quality bacteria criteria (406 MPN/100mL). Hostassociated genetic indicators were detected at frequencies of 39.2% (HF183/BacR287), 16.3% (HumM2), 74.6% (Rum2Bac), 13.0% (CowM2), 26.7% (CowM3), 19.8% (DG3), 3.2% (DG37), and 53.4% (GFD) across all water samples (n=584). Seasonal trends in avian, cattle, and human fecal pollution sources were evident over the study area. On a sample site basis, quantitative fecal source identification and

  5. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of human fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Pablo; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Martínez-Castillo, Alexandre; Miró, Elisenda; Argente, Marc; Jofre, Juan; Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-01-01

    A group of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaTEM, blaCTX-M-1, mecA, armA, qnrA, and qnrS) were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from feces from 80 healthy humans. Seventy-seven percent of the samples were positive in phage DNA for one or more ARGs. blaTEM, qnrA, and, blaCTX-M-1 were the most abundant, and armA, qnrS, and mecA were less prevalent. Free bacteriophages carrying ARGs may contribute to the mobilization of ARGs in intra- and extraintestinal environments.

  6. Heritable components of the human fecal microbiome are associated with visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Le Roy, Caroline I; Beaumont, Michelle; Jackson, Matthew A; Steves, Claire J; Spector, Timothy D; Bell, Jordana T

    2017-08-02

    Obesity and its associated diseases are one of the major causes of death worldwide. The gut microbiota has been identified to have essential regulatory effects on human metabolism and obesity in particular. In a recent study we provided some insights into the link between the gut microbiota (GM) and adiposity, as well as host genetic modulation of these processes. Our results identify novel evidence of association between 6 adiposity phenotypes and faecal microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Accumulation of visceral fat, a key risk factor for cardio-metabolic disease, has the strongest and most pervasive signature on the gut microbiota of the factors we examined. Furthermore, we observe that the adiposity-associated OTUs were classified as heritable and in some cases were also associated with host genetic variation at obesity-associated human candidate genes FHIT, TDRG1 and ELAVL4. This addendum confirms our previously published results in the TwinsUK cohort using a different approach to OTU clustering and multivariate analysis, and discusses further the importance of considering the GM as a complex ecosystem.

  7. Evaluation of Two PCR-Based Swine-Specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the specificity and distribution of these targets have not been adequately assessed. Consequently, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination...

  8. Diversity and Population Structure of Bovine Fecal-Derived Microorganisms from Different Animal Feeding Operations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fecal microbiome of cattle plays a critical role not only in animal health and productivity, but in odor emissions, agricultural land nutrient loading, pathogen shedding, and the performance of fecal pollution detection methods. Unfortunately, our understanding of the specif...

  9. Enterococcus and Escherichia coli fecal source apportionment with microbial source tracking genetic markers - is it feasible?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution is measured in surface waters using culture-based measurements of enterococci and Escherichia coli bacteria. Source apportionment of these two fecal indicator bacteria is an urgent need for prioritizing remediation efforts and quantifying health risks associated...

  10. Enterococcus and Escherichia coli fecal source apportionment with microbial source tracking genetic markers - is it feasible?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal pollution is measured in surface waters using culture-based measurements of enterococci and Escherichia coli bacteria. Source apportionment of these two fecal indicator bacteria is an urgent need for prioritizing remediation efforts and quantifying health risks associated...

  11. Evaluation of Two PCR-Based Swine-Specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the specificity and distribution of these targets have not been adequately assessed. Consequently, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination...

  12. Diversity and Population Structure of Bovine Fecal-Derived Microorganisms from Different Animal Feeding Operations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fecal microbiome of cattle plays a critical role not only in animal health and productivity, but in odor emissions, agricultural land nutrient loading, pathogen shedding, and the performance of fecal pollution detection methods. Unfortunately, our understanding of the specif...

  13. Isolation and Identification of Quercetin Degrading Bacteria from Human Fecal Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichao; Peng, Xichun; Li, Shaoting; Zhang, Ning; wang, Yong; Wei, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin has a wide range of biological properties. The gut microflora can often modulate its biological activity and their potential health effects. There still is a lack of information about gut bacteria involving in this process. The strains of gut microbes from human feces that can transform quercetin were isolated and identified by in vitro fermentation. The results showed that Escherichia coli, Stretococcus lutetiensis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Weissella confusa, Enterococcus gilvus, Clostridium perfringens and Bacteroides fragilis have the various ability of degrading quercetin. Among them, C. perfringens and B. fragilis were discovered to have the strongest ability of degrading quercetin. Additionally, quercetin can't inhibit the growth of C. perfringens. In conclusion, many species of gut microbiota can degrade quercetin, but their ability are different. PMID:24594786

  14. Isolation and identification of quercetin degrading bacteria from human fecal microbes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhichao; Peng, Xichun; Li, Shaoting; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Yong; Wei, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin has a wide range of biological properties. The gut microflora can often modulate its biological activity and their potential health effects. There still is a lack of information about gut bacteria involving in this process. The strains of gut microbes from human feces that can transform quercetin were isolated and identified by in vitro fermentation. The results showed that Escherichia coli, Stretococcus lutetiensis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Weissella confusa, Enterococcus gilvus, Clostridium perfringens and Bacteroides fragilis have the various ability of degrading quercetin. Among them, C. perfringens and B. fragilis were discovered to have the strongest ability of degrading quercetin. Additionally, quercetin can't inhibit the growth of C. perfringens. In conclusion, many species of gut microbiota can degrade quercetin, but their ability are different.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacteriophage DNA Fraction of Human Fecal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Pablo; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Martínez-Castillo, Alexandre; Miró, Elisenda; Argente, Marc; Jofre, Juan; Navarro, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    A group of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaTEM, blaCTX-M-1, mecA, armA, qnrA, and qnrS) were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from feces from 80 healthy humans. Seventy-seven percent of the samples were positive in phage DNA for one or more ARGs. blaTEM, qnrA, and, blaCTX-M-1 were the most abundant, and armA, qnrS, and mecA were less prevalent. Free bacteriophages carrying ARGs may contribute to the mobilization of ARGs in intra- and extraintestinal environments. PMID:24165177

  16. Cigarette pollution effects on humans. November 1986-October 1988 (Citations from Pollution abstracts). Report for November 1986-October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning health consequences to human beings of primary and secondary exposure to cigarette smoke and its various gaseous and particulate components by themselves, and in conjunction with other pollutants encountered in the natural environment and in special types of environments. Technical and economic aspects of cigarette pollution are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 127 citations, 39 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  17. Rapid Estimation of Numbers of Fecal Bacteroidetes by Use of a Quantitative PCR Assay for 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Linda K.; Field, Katharine G.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of health risk associated with fecal pollution requires a reliable fecal indicator and a rapid quantification method. We report the development of a Taq nuclease assay for enumeration of 16S rRNA genes of Bacteroidetes. Sensitivity and correlation with standard fecal indicators provide experimental evidence for application of the assay in monitoring fecal pollution. PMID:15345463

  18. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Murk, Albertinka J; Kok, Dieuwertje E; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2017-04-01

    Ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can accumulate in humans where they might influence differentiation of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation is one of the underlying mechanisms by which POPs affect adipocyte differentiation, and to what extent DNA methylation can be related to gene transcription. Adipocyte differentiation was induced in two human cell models with continuous exposure to different POPs throughout differentiation. From the seven tested POPs, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) decreased lipid accumulation, while tributyltin (TBT) increased lipid accumulation. In human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), TCDD and TBT induced opposite gene expression profiles, whereas after PFOS exposure gene expression remained relatively stable. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis showed that all three POPs affected DNA methylation patterns in adipogenic and other genes, possibly related to the phenotypic outcome, but without concomitant gene expression changes. Differential methylation was predominantly detected in intergenic regions, where the biological relevance of alterations in DNA methylation is unclear. This study demonstrates that POPs, at environmentally relevant levels, are able to induce differential DNA methylation in human differentiating adipocytes. Copyright © 2017 Wageningen University. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for persistent organochlorine pollutants in the human adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fommei, Enza; Turci, Roberta; Ripoli, Andrea; Balzan, Silvana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Morelli, Luca; Coi, Alessio

    2017-03-23

    Environmental pollutants may act as endocrine disruptors in animals. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) enter the food chain and may accumulate in the fatty animal tissues, including adrenals. To our knowledge, no previous study has investigated their presence in the human normal adrenal (NA) cortex and aldosterone-producing adenomas (APA). Surgical fragments of APA from 11 patients and NA from 8 kidney donors were analyzed for 16 PCBs congeners and 10 OCPs. A Matrix Solid-Phase Dispersion (MSPD) method for simultaneous determination of the target compounds in cortex homogenates was developed. A gas-chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (Triple Quad GC-MS) system was used for the analysis. Data were analyzed using Random Forest and Wilcoxon's rank-sum test. OCPs and PCBs were found in specimens from both types. A subset of pollutants characterized APA more than NA. Higher concentrations (μg g(-1) ) in APA were observed for α-, β-, and γ- Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (1.48 ± 3.32 vs. 0.17 ± 0.19, P = 0.028; 2.81 ± 2.10 vs. 0.96 ± 0.98, P = 0.011; 2.16 ± 4.85 vs. 0.17 ± 0.26, P = 0.004, respectively), as well as for Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and for PCBs 28, 52 and 101 (3.41 ± 3.11 vs. 0.97 ± 1.06, P = 0.021; 2.34 ± 4.68 vs. 0.25 ± 0.22, P = 0.039; 0.58 ± 1.19 vs. 0.06 ± 0.02, P = 0.002; 0.26 ± 0.43 vs. 0.05 ± 0.00, P = 0.001, respectively). Environmental organochlorine pollutants were shown to be present in the human normal and abnormal adrenal cortex, deserving future investigation on their possible role as adrenal endocrine disruptors in human disease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Environmental car exhaust pollution damages human sperm chromatin and DNA.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Perdichizzi, A; Valenti, D; Asero, P; Carbone, U; Boggia, B; De Rosa, N; Lombardi, G; D'Agata, R; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E; De Rosa, M

    2011-06-01

    The adverse role of traffic pollutants on male fertility is well known. Aim of this study was to evaluate their effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity. To accomplish this, 36 men working at motorway tollgates and 32 unexposed healthy men (controls) were enrolled. All of them were interviewed about their lifestyle. Hormone, semen samples, and environmental and biological markers of pollution were evaluated. Sperm chromatin and DNA integrity were evaluated by flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. LH, FSH, and testosterone serum levels were within the normal range in tollgate workers. Sperm concentration, total sperm count, total and progressive motility, and normal forms were significantly lower in these men compared with controls. Motorway tollgate workers had a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa with damaged chromatin and DNA fragmentation, a late sign of apoptosis, compared with controls. A significant direct correlation was found between spermatozoa with damaged chromatin or fragmented DNA and the length of occupational exposure, suggesting a time-dependent relationship. This study showed that car exhaust exposure has a genotoxic effect on human spermatozoa. This may be of relevant importance not only for the reproductive performance of the men exposed, but also for the offspring health.

  1. [Mercury levels in humans under conditions of environmental pollution by mercury-containing industrial waste].

    PubMed

    Larionova, T K

    2000-01-01

    Hygienic monitoring of lead, cadmium, and mercury as environmental pollutants should include the analysis of adverse human and environmental effects. The hygienic investigations of environmental pollution with gold-mining waste involved measurements of Hg in the water, soil, foodstuffs and human biological materials. Hg was found in the biological substrata of both industrial workers and the general population since they eat the products of animals and plants from the polluted area.

  2. Biological Monitoring of Air Pollutants and Its Influence on Human Beings.

    PubMed

    Cen, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring air pollutants via plants is an economic, convenient and credible method compared with the traditional ways. Plants show different damage symptoms to different air pollutants, which can be used to determine the species of air pollutants. Besides, pollutants mass concentration scope can be estimated by the damage extent of plants and the span of polluted time. Based on the domestic and foreign research, this paper discusses the principles, mechanism, advantages and disadvantages of plant-monitoring, and exemplifies plenty of such plants and the minimum mass concentration and pollution time of the plants showing damage symptoms. Finally, this paper introduced the human health effects of air pollutants on immune function of the body, such as decrease of the body's immune function, decline of lung function, respiratory and circulatory system changes, inducing and promoting human allergic diseases, respiratory diseases and other diseases.

  3. Human nasal mucosal changes after exposure to urban pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Garcidueñas, L; Rodriguez-Alcaraz, A; Garcia, R; Sanchez, G; Barragan, G; Camacho, R; Ramirez, L

    1994-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are living in areas where ozone (O3) concentrations exceed health standards (an hourly average of 235 micrograms/m3/0.12 ppm, not to be exceeded more than once per year). Ozone induces acute nasal inflammatory responses and significant epithelial lesions in experimental animals and humans. To determine the nasal effects of a 15-day exposure to an urban polluted atmosphere with O3 as the main pollutant, we studied a population of healthy, young males newly arrived to southwest metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC). The study included 49 non-smoking residents in an unpolluted port, Veracruz City; 14 subjects stayed in the port and served as controls, while 35 subjects traveled to SWMMC and had serial nasal lavages at different times after arriving in SWMMC. Subjects had exposures to ambient O3 an average of 10.2 hr/day, with a total cumulative O3 exposure of 10.644 ppm.hr. Nasal inflammatory responses, polymorphonuclear leukocyte PMN-CD11b surface expression, rhinoscopic changes, and respiratory symptoms were evaluated. Exposed subjects had massive nasal epithelial shedding and significant responses in PMN nasal influx (p < 0.00001) and in PMN-CD11b expression (p < 0.05). Cumulative O3 exposure correlated with respiratory symptoms, PMNs (rs = 0.2374, p < 0.01), and CD11b (rs = 0.3094, p < 0.01); 94% of exposed subjects experienced respiratory symptoms, and 97% left the city with an abnormal nasal mucosa by rhinoscopy. Nasal epithelial changes persisted 2 weeks after the exposed subjects returned to their nonpolluted environment. Exposure to an urban polluted atmosphere induces significant and persistent nasal epithelial alterations in healthy subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 2. D Figure 2. E Figure 2. F Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B PMID:7713020

  4. 78 FR 12763 - Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation; Public Workshop AGENCY... ``Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to exchange information... fecal microbiota for transplantation (FMT). ] Date and Time: The public workshop will be held on May...

  5. The currently used commercial DNA-extraction methods give different results of clostridial and actinobacterial populations derived from human fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Maukonen, Johanna; Simões, Catarina; Saarela, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Recently several human health-related microbiota studies have had partly contradictory results. As some differences may be explained by methodologies applied, we evaluated how different storage conditions and commonly used DNA-extraction kits affect bacterial composition, diversity, and numbers of human fecal microbiota. According to our results, the DNA-extraction did not affect the diversity, composition, or quantity of Bacteroides spp., whereas after a week's storage at -20 °C, the numbers of Bacteroides spp. were 1.6-2.5 log units lower (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the numbers of predominant bacteria, Eubacterium rectale (Erec)-group, Clostridium leptum group, bifidobacteria, and Atopobium group were 0.5-4 log units higher (P < 0.05) after mechanical DNA-extraction as detected with qPCR, regardless of storage. Furthermore, the bacterial composition of Erec-group differed significantly after different DNA-extractions; after enzymatic DNA-extraction, the most prevalent genera detected were Roseburia (39% of clones) and Coprococcus (10%), whereas after mechanical DNA-extraction, the most prevalent genera were Blautia (30%), Coprococcus (13%), and Dorea (10%). According to our results, rigorous mechanical lysis enables detection of higher bacterial numbers and diversity from human fecal samples. As it was shown that the results of clostridial and actinobacterial populations are highly dependent on the DNA-extraction methods applied, the use of different DNA-extraction protocols may explain the contradictory results previously obtained.

  6. Fecal microbiota transplantation: in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shaan; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O.

    2016-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of the human gut microbiome to elucidate the therapeutic potential of its manipulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of a solution of fecal matter from a donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient’s gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. FMT has been used to successfully treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. There are preliminary indications to suggest that it may also carry therapeutic potential for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26929784

  7. STR-typing of human DNA from human fecal matter using the QIAGEN QIAamp stool mini kit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Donald J; Martin, Liane R; Roberts, Katherine A

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the QIAGEN QIAamp Stool Mini Kit against a standard phenolchloroform procedure for the extraction, quantitation, and STR-typing of human nuclear DNA from human feces. Stools from six subjects were sampled by swabbing and excision. Samples extracted with the QIAamp kit gave a wide range of DNA yields, whereas those extracted by the organic method yielded no DNA. DNA was not recovered from one subject's stools by either procedure. The QIAamp extracts were amplified with the Profiler Plus and COfiler kits, and PCR inhibition was observed with DNA extracts that were further concentrated. Substitution of water or TE-4 for the QIAamp elution buffer eliminated most, if not all, of the inhibition. A modified QIAamp procedure was used to extract thirty samples, which were subjected to one of five environmental conditions. DNA was recovered from all of these samples, and typing results were obtained on 93% of the samples.

  8. Decay of Bacteroidales genetic markers in relation to traditional fecal indicators for water quality modeling of drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina; Aström, Johan; Pettersson, Thomas J R; Bergstedt, Olof; Hermansson, Malte

    2012-01-17

    The implementation of microbial fecal source tracking (MST) methods in drinking water management is limited by the lack of knowledge on the transport and decay of host-specific genetic markers in water sources. To address these limitations, the decay and transport of human (BacH) and ruminant (BacR) fecal Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genetic markers in a drinking water source (Lake Rådasjön in Sweden) were simulated using a microbiological model coupled to a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The microbiological model was calibrated using data from outdoor microcosm trials performed in March, August, and November 2010 to determine the decay of BacH and BacR markers in relation to traditional fecal indicators. The microcosm trials indicated that the persistence of BacH and BacR in the microcosms was not significantly different from the persistence of traditional fecal indicators. The modeling of BacH and BacR transport within the lake illustrated that the highest levels of genetic markers at the raw water intakes were associated with human fecal sources (on-site sewers and emergency sewer overflow). This novel modeling approach improves the interpretation of MST data, especially when fecal pollution from the same host group is released into the water source from different sites in the catchment.

  9. Changes in the composition of the human fecal microbiome following bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Khoruts, A.; Dicksved, J.; Jansson, J.K.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2009-08-15

    CDAD is the major known cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis, and the disease is thought to result from persistent disruption of commensal gut microbiota. Bacteriotherapy by way of fecal transplantation can be used to treat recurrent CDAD and is thought to re-establish the normal colonic microflora. However, limitations of conventional microbiologic techniques have until recently precluded testing of this idea. In this study we used T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches to characterize the bacterial composition of the colonic microflora in a patient suffering from recurrent CDAD, before and after treatment by fecal transplantation from a healthy donor. While the patient's residual colonic microbiota, prior to therapy, was deficient in members of the bacterial divisions-Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes, transplantation had a dramatic impact on the composition of the patient's gut microbiota. By 14 days post transplantation, the fecal bacterial composition of the recipient was highly similar to the donor and was dominated by Bacteroides spp. strains and an uncharacterized butyrate producing bacterium. The change in bacterial composition was accompanied by resolution of the patient's symptoms. The striking similarity of the recipient's and donor's intestinal microbiota following bacteriotherapy suggests that the donor's bacteria quickly occupied their requisite niches, resulting in restoration of both the structure and function of the microbial communities present.

  10. Molecular epidemiological analysis of Cryptosporidium spp. in the United Kingdom: results of genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in 1,705 fecal samples from humans and 105 fecal samples from livestock animals.

    PubMed

    McLauchlin, J; Amar, C; Pedraza-Díaz, S; Nichols, G L

    2000-11-01

    Cryptosporidium present in 1,705 fecal samples from humans and 105 from livestock animals were analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein. Overall, genotype 1 (human exclusive type) was detected in 37.8% of the samples from humans, genotype 2 (broad host range) was detected in 61.5%, a third genotype designated genotype 3 (Cryptosporidium meleagridis) was detected in 0.3%, and both genotypes 1 and 2 were recovered from 0.4%. All samples from livestock yielded genotype 2. Among 469 patients infected during eight drinking water-related outbreaks, five outbreaks were predominantly due to genotype 1, and three were due to genotype 2. Fifty-four samples were collected from patients involved with five swimming pool-associated outbreaks: two outbreaks were due to genotype 1, one was due to genotype 2, and the remaining two involved both genotypes 1 and 2. Among 26 family outbreaks and 1 children's nursery outbreak (2 to 3 members per group), the same genotype was recovered from the different members of each outbreak: 13 were due to genotype 1, and 14 were due to genotype 2. In eighteen patients reporting contact with animals and/or farms, genotype 1 was recovered from one patient and genotype 2 was recovered from the remaining 17. Among the sporadic cases, there were distinct geographical and temporal variations in the distribution of the genotypes. The spring peak in cases was due to genotype 2. Genotype 1 was significantly more common in patients infected during the late-summer-autumn peak and in those with a history of foreign travel.

  11. Effects of human fecal flora on intestinal morphology and mucosal immunity in human flora-associated piglet.

    PubMed

    Che, C; Pang, X; Hua, X; Zhang, B; Shen, J; Zhu, J; Wei, H; Sun, L; Chen, P; Cui, L; Zhao, L; Yang, Q

    2009-03-01

    Human flora-associated (HFA) piglet model was established to examine the effects of gut microbes from a different donor species on the intestinal morphology and mucosal immunity. Newborn germ-free piglets, obtained by caesarean section, were orally inoculated with a human and a porcine faecal suspension, and artificially fed to establish a HFA group (n = 7) and pig flora-associated (PFA) group (n = 7), respectively. All pigs were killed 6 weeks later. Tissue samples from duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were collected and studied by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry methods for intestinal morphological analyses and detection of immunocompetent cells. In summary, both groups of pigs performed well but HFA pigs had a somewhat better daily weight gain, and their jejunal villus height and crypt depth were significantly higher. In comparison with PFA pigs, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes in jejunum was lower but the number of goblet cells containing neutral mucins was significantly increased in HFA pigs. No difference was observed in the number of mast cells. The areas of IgA producing cells and CD4(+) T cells in the jejunum and IgG producing cells in the small intestine were significantly higher in HFA pigs. However, the areas of MHC class II expressing cells were significantly increased in the duodenum and colon. Additionally, the amount of Bifidobacteria spp. was significantly higher in HFA pigs. This study confirms that the composition of gut microbes differentially affects the host intestinal mucosal immunity and suggests that commensal bacteria have great effects on intestinal health and development.

  12. Air Pollution by Hydrothermal Volcanism and Human Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Diana; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Viveiros, Fátima; Ferreira, Teresa; Rodrigues, Armindo dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether chronic exposure to volcanogenic air pollution by hydrothermal soil diffuse degassing is associated with respiratory defects in humans. This study was carried in the archipelago of the Azores, an area with active volcanism located in the Atlantic Ocean where Eurasian, African, and American lithospheric plates meet. A cross-sectional study was performed on a study group of 146 individuals inhabiting an area where volcanic activity is marked by active fumarolic fields and soil degassing (hydrothermal area) and a reference group of 359 individuals inhabiting an area without these secondary manifestations of volcanism (nonhydrothermal area). Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were adjusted for age, gender, fatigue, asthma, and smoking. The OR for restrictive defects and for exacerbation of obstructive defects (COPD) in the hydrothermal area was 4.4 (95% CI 1.78–10.69) and 3.2 (95% CI 1.82–5.58), respectively. Increased prevalence of restrictions and all COPD severity ranks (mild, moderate, and severe) was observed in the population from the hydrothermal area. These findings may assist health officials in advising and keeping up with these populations to prevent and minimize the risk of respiratory diseases. PMID:26301247

  13. Air Pollution by Hydrothermal Volcanism and Human Pulmonary Function.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Diana; Ventura Garcia, Patrícia; Viveiros, Fátima; Ferreira, Teresa; dos Santos Rodrigues, Armindo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether chronic exposure to volcanogenic air pollution by hydrothermal soil diffuse degassing is associated with respiratory defects in humans. This study was carried in the archipelago of the Azores, an area with active volcanism located in the Atlantic Ocean where Eurasian, African, and American lithospheric plates meet. A cross-sectional study was performed on a study group of 146 individuals inhabiting an area where volcanic activity is marked by active fumarolic fields and soil degassing (hydrothermal area) and a reference group of 359 individuals inhabiting an area without these secondary manifestations of volcanism (nonhydrothermal area). Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were adjusted for age, gender, fatigue, asthma, and smoking. The OR for restrictive defects and for exacerbation of obstructive defects (COPD) in the hydrothermal area was 4.4 (95% CI 1.78-10.69) and 3.2 (95% CI 1.82-5.58), respectively. Increased prevalence of restrictions and all COPD severity ranks (mild, moderate, and severe) was observed in the population from the hydrothermal area. These findings may assist health officials in advising and keeping up with these populations to prevent and minimize the risk of respiratory diseases.

  14. MODELING INHALATION AND MULTIMEDIA MULTIPATHWAY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimation of exposures of children and adults to air toxics or multimedia pollutants require careful consideration of sources and concentrations of pollutants that may be present in different media, as well as various routes and pathways of exposures associated with age-specif...

  15. Novel Approaches for Estimating Human Exposure to Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous health studies have used measurements from a few central-site ambient monitors to characterize air pollution exposures. Relying on solely on central-site ambient monitors does not account for the spatial-heterogeneity of ambient air pollution patterns, the temporal varia...

  16. MODELING INHALATION AND MULTIMEDIA MULTIPATHWAY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimation of exposures of children and adults to air toxics or multimedia pollutants require careful consideration of sources and concentrations of pollutants that may be present in different media, as well as various routes and pathways of exposures associated with age-specif...

  17. Novel Approaches for Estimating Human Exposure to Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous health studies have used measurements from a few central-site ambient monitors to characterize air pollution exposures. Relying on solely on central-site ambient monitors does not account for the spatial-heterogeneity of ambient air pollution patterns, the temporal varia...

  18. Effects of air pollution on human exercise performance

    SciTech Connect

    Frykman, P.N.

    1988-02-01

    The pollutants commonly experienced in cities of the United States are: carbon monoxide, ozone, peroxyacetyl nitrate, aerosols, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. Only carbon monoxide has been show to reduce exercise performance. The investigations which evaluated the impact of other pollutants on performance, may not have been sensitive enough to detect the small performance decrements caused. Suggested ways to avoid performance decrements are included.

  19. FINGERPRINTING OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI BY MATRIX ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fecal enterococci group has been suggested as an indicator of fecal contamination in freshwater and marine water systems and as a potential target for bacterial source tracking of fecal pollution. While many studies have described the diversity of enterococci in environmenta...

  20. A new method for treating fecal incontinence by implanting stem cells derived from human adipose tissue: preliminary findings of a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sarveazad, Arash; Newstead, Graham L; Mirzaei, Rezvan; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Bakhtiari, Mehrdad; Babahajian, Asrin; Mahjoubi, Bahar

    2017-02-21

    Anal sphincter defects are a major cause of fecal incontinence causing negative effects on daily life, social interactions, and mental health. Because human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (hADSCs) are easier and safer to access, secrete high levels of growth factor, and have the potential to differentiate into muscle cells, we investigated the ability of hADSCs to improve anal sphincter incontinence. The present randomized double-blind clinical trial was performed on patients with sphincter defects. They were categorized into a cell group (n = 9) and a control group (n = 9). Either 6 × 10(6) hADSCs per 3 ml suspended in phosphate buffer saline (treatment) or 3 ml phosphate buffer saline (placebo) was injected. Two months after surgery, the Wexner score, endorectal sonography, and electromyography (EMG) results were recorded. Comparing Wexner scores in the cell group and the control group showed no significant difference. In our EMG and endorectal sonography analysis using ImageJ/Fiji 1.46 software, the ratio of the area occupied by the muscle to total area of the lesion showed a 7.91% increase in the cell group compared with the control group. The results of the current study show that injection of hADSCs during repair surgery for fecal incontinence may cause replacement of fibrous tissue, which acts as a mechanical support to muscle tissue with contractile function. This is a key point in treatment of fecal incontinence especially in the long term and may be a major step forward. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT2016022826316N2 . Retrospectively registered 7 May 2016.

  1. Identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the fecal samples of healthy humans and patients with dyspepsia, and determination of their ph, bile, and antibiotic tolerance properties.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Gülden Başyiğit; Karahan, Aynur Gül

    2010-01-01

    The research of novel probiotic strains is important in order to satisfy the increasing request of the market and to obtain functional products in which the probiotic cultures are more active and have better probiotic characteristics than those already on the market. In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus and Enterococcus strains isolated from human feces was investigated. One hundred seven strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from the fecal samples of 19 adult volunteers with stomach problems and the fecal samples of 12 healthy adult volunteers. The strains were identified by 16S rRNA analysis and examined for resistance to gastric acidity (pH 3.5) and bile salts (0.3% bile salt). The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains was also determined. The counts of lactic acid bacteria in the fecal samples ranged from 1.7 x 10(7) to 3.1 x 10(10) CFU/g. The species present in those samples were found to be Lactobacillusplantarum, L. fermentum, Enterococcus faecium and E. durans. Results indicated that L. plantarum (AA1-2, AA17-73, AC18-88, AK4-11, and AK7-28), L. fermentum (AB5-18, BB16-75, and AK4-180), E. faecium (AB20-98 and BK11-50) and E. durans (AK4-14 and BK9-40) showed good pH and bile tolerance. These strains are potentially good candidates for use as health-promoting bacteria.

  2. COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY OF FECAL BACTERIA IN AGRICULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ALTERNATIVE TARGETS FOR MICROBIAL SOURCE TRACKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animals of agricultural significance contribute a large percentage of fecal pollution to waterways via runoff contamination. The premise of microbial source tracking is to utilize fecal bacteria to identify target populations which are directly correlated to specific animal feces...

  3. COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY OF FECAL BACTERIA IN AGRICULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ALTERNATIVE TARGETS FOR MICROBIAL SOURCE TRACKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animals of agricultural significance contribute a large percentage of fecal pollution to waterways via runoff contamination. The premise of microbial source tracking is to utilize fecal bacteria to identify target populations which are directly correlated to specific animal feces...

  4. Fecal carriage rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli among antibiotic naive healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Dilip; Kumar, Vasudevan Anil; Paul, Breezy; Sugumar, Madhan; John, Kamala Russel; Manoharan, Anand; Kesavan, Lalitha Mukkai

    2015-02-01

    Higher prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli fecal carriage has been reported in the nosocomial setting than in the community. We tried to determine the fecal carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli among healthy volunteers in a relatively isolated community. This study was conducted on 115 healthy adult volunteers from wh