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Sample records for human femoral arteries

  1. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  2. Distinct Differences on Neointima Formation in Immunodeficient and Humanized Mice after Carotid or Femoral Arterial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Jill; van Ark, Joris; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is widely adopted to treat patients with coronary artery disease. However, restenosis remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. The role of the systemic and local immune response in the development of restenosis is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the human immune system on subsequent neointima formation elicited by vascular injury in a humanized mouse model. Immunodeficient NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIL2rgtm1Wjl(NSG) mice were reconstituted with human (h)PBMCs immediately after both carotid wire and femoral cuff injury were induced in order to identify how differences in the severity of injury influenced endothelial regeneration, neointima formation, and homing of human inflammatory and progenitor cells. In contrast to non-reconstituted mice, hPBMC reconstitution reduced neointima formation after femoral cuff injury whereas hPBMCs promoted neointima formation after carotid wire injury 4 weeks after induction of injury. Neointimal endothelium and smooth muscle cells in the injured arteries were of mouse origin. Our results indicate that the immune system may differentially respond to arterial injury depending on the severity of injury, which may also be influenced by the intrinsic properties of the arteries themselves, resulting in either minimal or aggravated neointima formation. PMID:27759053

  3. Differential mechanical response and microstructural organization between non-human primate femoral and carotid arteries

    PubMed Central

    Raykin, Julia; Li, Haiyan; Gleason, Rudolph L.

    2014-01-01

    Unique anatomic locations and physiologic functions predispose different arteries to varying mechanical responses and pathologies. However, the underlying causes of these mechanical differences are not well understood. The objective of this study was to first identify structural differences in the arterial matrix that would account for the mechanical differences between healthy femoral and carotid arteries and second to utilize these structural observations to perform a microstructurally motivated constitutive analysis. Femoral and carotid arteries were subjected to cylindrical biaxial loading and their microstructure was quantified using two-photon microscopy. The femoral arteries were found to be less compliant than the carotid arteries at physiologic loads, consistent with previous studies, despite similar extracellular compositions of collagen and elastin (P > 0.05). The femoral arteries exhibited significantly less circumferential dispersion of collagen fibers (P < 0.05), despite a similar mean fiber alignment direction as the carotid arteries. Elastin transmural distribution, in vivo axial stretch, and opening angles were also found to be distinctly different between the arteries. Lastly, we modeled the arteries’ mechanical behaviors using a microstructural-based, distributed collagen fiber constitutive model. With this approach, the material parameters of the model were solved using the experimental microstructural observations. The findings of this study support an important role for microstructural organization in arterial stiffness. PMID:24532266

  4. In vitro quantitation of human femoral artery atherosclerosis using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, Ava C.; Anastasiadis, Pavlos; Allen, John S., III; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2012-06-01

    Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy has been used in vitro to identify calcified atherosclerotic plaques in human femoral arteries. Raman techniques allow for the identification of these plaques in a nondestructive manner, which may allow for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in cardiac patients in the future. As Raman spectroscopy also reveals chemical information about the composition of the arteries, it can also be used as a prognostic tool. The in vivo detection of atherosclerotic plaques at risk for rupture in cardiac patients will enhance treatment methods while improving clinical outcomes for these procedures. Raman spectra were excited by an Invictus 785-nm NIR laser and measured with a fiber-coupled micro-Raman RXN system (Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI) equipped with a 785 nm CW laser and CCD detector. Chemical mapping of arteries obtained post mortem allowed for the discrete location of atherosclerotic plaques. Raman peaks at 961 and 1073 cm-1 reveal the presence of calcium hydroxyapatite and carbonate apatite, which are known to be present in calcified plaques. By mapping the locations of these peaks the boundaries of the plaques can be precisely determined. Areas of varying degrees of calcification were also identified. Because this can be useful in determining the degree of plaque calcification and vessel stenosis, this may have a significant impact on the clinical treatment of atherosclerotic plaques in the future.

  5. A method to quantify and visualize femoral head intraosseous arteries by micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xing; Shi, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Dachuan; Zhao, Dewei

    2016-08-01

    We describe a technique for perfusing a barium sulphate suspension into the intraosseous artery. Following the perfusion of abarium sulphate suspension into 14 fresh lower limbs of Chinese cadavers, micro-CT scanning was applied to digitize, quantify and visualize the intraosseous arteries in the human femoral heads. Then, the femoral heads were removed and subjected to micro-CT scanning. The data were imported into the amira and mimics programs to reconstruct and quantify the intraosseous arteries. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas, volumes, and femoral head bone volumes were quantified. The artery densities and artery ratios were calculated and analysed with independent-samples t-tests. The intraosseous vasculature volume renderings were displayed as screenshots and videos made with amira. Many intraosseous artery study technologies were compared. The barium sulphate suspension was milky white in colour. The perfusion of the barium sulphate suspension followed by micro-CT scanning provided a good representation of the intraosseous artery. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas and volumes, and the femoral head bone volumes were displayed as the X¯±S . No differences were observed between the left and right femoral head intraosseous arteries in terms of the artery densities or artery ratios. The volume renderings and 3-D orthogonal projections displayed the overall distributions of the intraosseous arteries. The videos clearly demonstrated the entry sites of the nutrition-carrying arteries, their courses and branches, and the intraosseous arterial anastomoses. Our technique is the simplest and least time-consuming method of producing accurate vascular three-dimensional reconstructions. The perfusion of a barium sulphate suspension into intraosseous arteries combined with micro-CT scanning can deliver high-resolution 3-D digitized data and images of intraosseous arteries. This technique does not require bone decalcification or bone

  6. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Profunda Femoral Artery Branch After Fogarty Thrombectomy of a Femoro-Femoral Crossover Arterial Graft: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Manousaki, Eirini; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Kostas, Theodoros; Katsamouris, Asterios

    2010-02-15

    We present a very rare case of a life-threatening rupture of a profunda femoral artery distal branch after a Fogarty thrombectomy of a thrombosed crossover synthetic graft between the ipsilateral common femoral artery and a contralateral iliac-popliteal graft; the bleeding profunda femoral artery branch was successfully embolized with metallic coils through the axillary artery approach.

  8. Hemodynamic analysis of a compliant femoral artery bifurcation model using a fluid structure interaction framework.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Jong-Eun; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M; Brott, Brigitta; Anayiotos, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    The influence of wall motion on the hemodynamic characteristics of the human femoral bifurcation and its effects on the development of peripheral artery disease has not been previously investigated. This study aimed in investigating the hemodynamics of a compliant patient-specific femoral artery bifurcation model by a fluid structure interaction (FSI) scheme. The complex physiological geometry of the femoral artery bifurcation was reproduced from sequentially obtained transverse CT scan images. Velocity waveforms derived from phase contrast MR images were extracted and mapped to define boundary conditions. Equations governing blood flow and wall motion were solved using an FSI framework that utilizes commercial codes: FLUENT for computational fluid dynamics and ANSYS for computational structural dynamics. The results showed that wall compliance decreased flow velocities at the relatively high curvature geometries including common and superficial femoral artery (SFA), and it created strong recirculation in the profunda femoris artery close to the bifurcation. In the SFA region near the apex, time averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) differences up to 25% between compliant and rigid models were observed. The compliant model also exhibited lower TAWSS and oscillatory shear at the superior section of the common femoral artery close to the bifurcation. The presence of wall motion, however, created minor differences in the general flow-field characteristics. We conclude that wall motion does not have significant influence on the global fluid dynamic characteristics of the femoral artery bifurcation. Longer arterial segments need to be simulated to see the effect of wall motion on tortuousity which was previously cited as an important factor in the development of atherosclerosis at the femoral artery. PMID:18792781

  9. In vitro angioplasty of atherosclerotic human femoral arteries: analysis of the geometrical changes in the individual tissues using MRI and image processing.

    PubMed

    Auer, Martin; Stollberger, Rudolf; Regitnig, Peter; Ebner, Franz; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2010-04-01

    Existing atherosclerotic plaque imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, optical coherence tomography, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hrMRI) require computerized methods to separate and analyze the plaque morphology. In this work, we perform in vitro balloon angioplasty experiments with 10 human femoral arteries using hrMRI and image processing. The vessel segments contain low-grade to high-grade lesions with very different plaque compositions. The experiments are designed to mimic the in vivo situation. We use a semi-automatic image processing tool to extract the three-dimensional (3D) geometries of the tissue components at four characteristic stages of the angioplasty procedure. The obtained geometries are then used to determine geometrical and mechanical indices in order to characterize, classify, and analyze the atherosclerotic plaques by their specific geometrical changes. During inflation, three vessels ruptured via helical crack propagation. The adventitia, media, and intima did not preserve their area/volume during inflation; the area changes of the lipid pool during inflation were significant. The characterization of changes in individual 3D tissue geometries, together with tissue-specific mechanical properties, may serve as a basis for refined finite element (FE) modeling, which is key to better understand stress evolution in various atherosclerotic plaque configurations. PMID:20148308

  10. High-Permittivity Thin Dielectric Padding Improves Fresh Blood Imaging of Femoral Arteries at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Marc D; Kim, Daniel; Morrell, Glen; Heilbrun, Marta E; Storey, Pippa; Hanrahan, Christopher J; Lee, Vivian S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Fresh blood imaging (FBI) is a useful non-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (NC-MRA) method for assessment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), particularly in patients with poor renal function. Compared with 1.5T, 3T enables higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) and/or spatio-temporal resolution in FBI, as demonstrated successfully for the calf station. However, FBI of the thigh station at 3T has been reported to suffer from signal void in the common femoral artery of one thigh only due to the radial symmetry in transmit radio-frequency field (B1+) variation. We sought to increase the femoral arterial signal attenuated by B1+ variation in FBI at 3T using high permittivity dielectric padding. Materials and Methods We performed FBI of the thigh station in 13 human subjects at 3T to compare the following 3 settings: no padding, commercially available thick (~ 5 cm) dielectric padding, and high-permittivity thin (~2 cm) dielectric padding. B1+ mapping was also performed in the common femoral arteries to characterize the radial symmetry in B1+ variation and quantify the improvement in B1+ excitation. We characterized the impact of radial symmetry in B1+ variation on the FBI signal and FBI MRA of the right common femoral artery using quantitative (i.e., contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) and qualitative (i.e., conspicuity) analyses. Results The radial symmetry in B1+ variation attenuates signal in the right common femoral artery, which can be partially improved with commercial padding and improved further with high permittivity padding. Averaging the results over 13 subjects, the B1+, CNR and conspicuity scores in the right common femoral artery were significantly better with high-permittivity padding than with commercial padding and baseline (p<0.001). Conclusions Our study shows that high-permittivity dielectric padding can be used to increase the femoral arterial signal attenuated by B1+ variation in FBI at 3T. PMID:25329606

  11. The femoral artery and its branches in the baboon Papio anubis.

    PubMed

    Dyl, L; Topol, M

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the research was to examine the anatomy of the arterial system in the inguinal region, hip and thigh of Papio anubis. No description of this was found in the available scientific literature, although, at the same time, the baboon is considered to be a good animal model in biomedical research. Macroscopic anatomical research was carried out on 20 hind limbs (10 cadavers: 9 male and 1 female) of adult Papio anubis and the results were then compared with the anatomy of the arterial hind limb systems of other apes as described in the literature. The circulatory system of the whole body was filled with coloured latex via the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein, and traditional methods were then used to prepare the vessels. The arterial system in the hind extremity of Papio anubis was recorded. The anatomical names of human arteries were used as well as the names of those of apes as applied in the literature. The femoral artery was the only artery supplying the hind limb of Papio anubis. It started under the inguinal ligament as a continuation of the external iliac artery. It went down and divided into the popliteal artery, which coursed in the popliteal fossa, and the saphenous artery, which passed on the medial side of the thigh and leg. The number of smaller branches and the way in which they issued from the larger arteries were documented. The external diameter and length of the hind limb arteries were measured. It was observed that the cutaneous branches of the femoral artery supplied the inguinal and genital regions and the abdominal wall, while the deep artery of the thigh was the main vessel of the hip and thigh.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  13. Surgical treatment of noniatrogenic trauma of the femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Wolosker, N; Guadêncio, A; Kuzniec, S; Rosoky, R A; Kalume, C; Neves, C A; Aun, R; Langer, B

    1996-01-01

    Trauma to the femoral arteries corresponds to 30 percent of all arterial traumas. The authors reviewed 74 patients with noniatrogenic trauma of the femoral arteries treated from January 1991 to December 1993. Ages ranged from 11 to 50 years, with a mean of 24. Seventy-one patients were male and three female. Fifty-two patients (70.2 percent) were white, 20 (27 percent) were black and two (2.8 percent) were Asian. Trauma due to firearms had the highest incidence, with 61 cases (82.4 percent). Absence of pulse was the most frequent clinical symptom (62.5 percent). Severe ischemia, with risk of loss of limb, was found in 66.2 percent of the cases. The superficial femoral artery was impaired in 77 percent of the cases. A preoperative arteriography was performed on only five patients, victims of multiple penetrating trauma or an asymptomatic penetrating wound along a vessel passage. In six cases, arterial and venous ligature was the chosen procedure. In three cases, a primary arterial anantomosis was performed. Simple arterriorraphy was feasible in one patient. In 64 of the patients, a venous graft was undertaken using a segment of the inverted great saphenous vein withdrawn from the other lower limb. Fasciotomoy was used in 32 patients (43.2 percent), all of whom exhibited pasting of the lower limb muscles at admission. One patient died during the immediate postoperative period as the result of multiple organ failure caused by polytraumatism. Preservation of the limb was attained in 72 patients (97.3 percent) Severe, previously-incurred ischemia was responsible for the only two amputations, aggravated by an exceedingly long delay between the time of injury and surgery. One of these patients, in addition to severe ischemia, had extensive injuries to the soft tissues. We conclude that trauma of the femoral arteries, attended while the limb still maintains its vitality, has a positive clinical outcome with a high rate of limb preservation. Mortality usually results from

  14. Applied anatomy of the fasciocutaneous branch of the third perforator artery of the deep femoral artery

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Netto, Belmino Corrêa; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; de Oliveira Santos, Ivan Dunshee Abranches

    2003-01-01

    A study of the anatomy of the fasciocutaneous branch of the third perforator artery of the deep femoral artery was performed to help the elaboration of a fasciocutaneous flap for the reconstruction of skin and subcutaneous and deep fascia of the knee and popliteal region. Forty thighs in 27 fresh cadavers were dissected. In all of the thighs, the third perforator artery was found to arise from the deep femoral artery and reach the posterior aspect of the thigh after perforating the adductor magnus muscle. At that point it was also found that the third perforator artery gives off a branch that emerges through the intermuscular septum between the vast lateral muscle and the long head of the biceps femoral muscle, then crosses the posterior cutaneous nerve and moves directly on to perforate the deep fascia and then to bifurcate into two other branches: one ascending and one descending. The cutaneous area of the flap of the thigh’s posterior region, nourished by the fasciocutaneous branch, was evaluated through the injection of dye. Dying of the upper medial, middle medial, lower medial and lower lateral areas of the flap was not successful in all of the dissected thighs. Nevertheless, the upper lateral and the middle lateral areas were dyed successfully in all 40 dissected thighs of the 27 cadavers. PMID:24115846

  15. Successful Angioplasty of a Superficial Femoral Artery Stenosis Caused by a Suture-Mediated Closure Device

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmete, Joseph J. Dasika, Narasimham; Forauer, Andrew R.; Cho, Kyung; Williams, David M.

    2003-08-15

    We report the successful angioplasty of an acute arterial narrowing after suture-mediated closure (SMC) of a femoral arterial puncture. A 75-year-old woman underwent a cerebral arteriogramvia a right common femoral artery puncture. The arteriotomy site was closed with a SMC device. Four days after placement the patient complained of pain in her right calf after walking. An arteriogram 7 days after SMC showed a severe focal stenosis at the origin of the superficial femoral artery involving the presumed puncture site. The lesion was successfully treated with balloon angioplasty. The patient at 6 months was asymptomatic.

  16. Superficial Femoral Artery Plaque and Functional Performance in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Carroll, Timothy J.; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Li, Debiao; Carr, James; Guralnik, Jack M.; Kibbe, Melina; Pearce, William H.; Yuan, Chun; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M.; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; Clark, Elizabeth Talley; Xu, Dongxiang; Berry, Jarett; Orozco, Jennifer; Sharma, Leena; Criqui, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We studied associations of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of plaque area and relative percent lumen reduction in the proximal superficial femoral artery with functional performance among participants with peripheral arterial disease. BACKGROUND The clinical significance of directly imaged plaque characteristics in lower extremity arteries is not well established. METHODS A total of 454 participants with an ankle brachial index <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance cross-sectional imaging of the proximal superficial femoral artery and completed a 6-min walk test, measurement of 4-m walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and measurement of physical activity with a vertical accelerometer. RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, statin use, comorbidities, and other covariates, higher mean plaque area (1st quintile [least plaque]: 394 m, 2nd quintile: 360 m, 3rd quintile: 359 m, 4th quintile: 329 m, 5th quintile [greatest plaque]: 311 m; p trend <0.001) and smaller mean percent lumen area (1st quintile [greatest plaque]: 319 m, 2nd quintile: 330 m, 3rd quintile: 364 m, 4th quintile: 350 m, 5th quintile: 390 m; p trend <0.001) were associated with shorter distance achieved in the 6-min walk test. Greater mean plaque area was also associated with slower usual-paced walking velocity (p trend = 0.006) and slower fastest-paced 4-m walking velocity (p trend = 0.003). Associations of mean plaque area and mean lumen area with 6-min walk distance remained statistically significant even after additional adjustment for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Among participants with peripheral arterial disease, greater plaque burden and smaller lumen area in the proximal superficial femoral artery are associated independently with poorer functional performance, even after adjusting for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. PMID:21757163

  17. Flow measurements in a model of the mildly curved femoral artery of man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Kwack, E. Y.; Crawford, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of curvature on the flow rate near the wall in the vicinity of the mildly curved femoral artery of man, and on the pressure distributions along the curved segment, were investigated using glass and tygon flow models constructed to conform to the shape of the femoral angiogram of a human subject. The test fluid was 33 percent aqueous sucrose. Steady flow observations, made using a dye flow visualization system, revealed a flow pattern like that observed in coiled pipes. A double helical type flow was found to develop, with converging streamlines in the wall vicinity from the upper and lower plane of curvature merging asymptotically along the inner curvature in a stable manner. Pressure measurements for steady flow revealed progressively larger pressure drops with distance along the entrance region of the curved segment, relative to that for a straight lumen.

  18. Haemodynamic analysis of femoral artery bifurcation models under different physiological flow waveforms.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Lotfi, Azadeh; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus in a femoral artery may form under stagnant flow conditions which vary depending on the local arterial waveform. Four different physiological flow waveforms - poor (blunt) monophasic, sharp monophasic, biphasic and triphasic - can exist in the femoral artery as a result of different levels of peripheral arterial disease progression. This study aims to examine the effect of different physiological waveforms on femoral artery haemodynamics. In this regard, a fluid-structure interaction analysis was carried out in idealised models of bifurcated common femoral artery. The results showed that recirculation zones occur in almost all flow waveforms; however, the sites at where these vortices are initiated, the size and structure of vortices are highly dependent on the type of flow waveform being used. It was shown that the reverse diastolic flow in biphasic and triphasic waveforms leads to the occurrence of a retrograde flow which aids in 'washout' of the disturbed flow regions. This may limit the likelihood of thrombus formation, indicating the antithrombotic role of retrograde flow in femoral arteries. Furthermore, our data revealed that the flow particles experience considerably higher residence time under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic waveforms. This confirms that the risk of atherothrombotic plaque initiation and development in femoral arteries is higher under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic flow waveforms.

  19. Decreased femoral arterial flow during simulated microgravity in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roer, Robert D.; Dillaman, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    To determine whether the blood supply to the hindlimbs of rats is altered by the tail-suspension model of weightlessness, rats were chronically instrumented for the measurement of femoral artery flow. Ultrasonic transit-time flow probes were implanted into 8-wk-old Wistar-Furth rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia, and, after 24 h of recovery, flow was measured in the normal ambulatory posture. Next, rats were suspended and flow was measured immediately and then daily over the next 4-7 days. Rats were subsequently returned to normal posture, and flow was monitored daily for 1-3 days. Mean arterial flow decreased immediately on the rats being suspensed and continued to decrease until a new steady state of approximately 60% of control values was attained at 5 days. On the rats returning to normal posture, flow increased to levels observed before suspension. Quantile-quantile plots of blood flow data revealed a decrease in flow during both systole and diastole. The observed decrease in hindlimb blood flow during suspension suggests a possible role in the etiology of muscular atrophy and bone loss in microgravity.

  20. Midterm Outcome of Femoral Artery Stenting and Factors Affecting Patency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae Seoung; Park, Keun-Myoung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Kee Chun; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Shin, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early and midterm results of superficial femoral artery (SFA) stenting with self-expanding nitinol stents and to identify the factors affecting patency. Materials and Methods: SFA stenting was performed in 165 limbs of 117 patients from January 2009 to December 2013. Patients were followed-up for the first occurrence of occlusion or stenosis based on computed tomography and duplex scan results and a decrease in ankle brachial index of >15%. Results: During the follow-up period (mean, 15.3±3.2 months), no early thrombotic reocclusions occurred within 30 days, but in-stent restenosis developed in 78 limbs. The primary patency rates at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months were 78%, 66%, 42%, and 22%, respectively, and the secondary patency rates were 85%, 72%, 58%, and 58%, respectively. TASC II C or D lesions, stent length >8 cm, number of patent tibial arteries and diabetes were significantly associated with reintervention. Conclusion: The midterm results of stenting for SFA occlusive disease were disappointing because the primary and secondary patency rates at two years were 22% and 58%, respectively. Reintervention after SFA stenting remains a major problem, particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus or long TASC II C or D lesions. PMID:26719837

  1. Prospective Study of Elective Bilateral Versus Unilateral Femoral Arterial Puncture for Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M. J.; Ramachandran, N.; Sheppard, N.; Kyriou, J.; Munneke, G. M.; Belli, A.-M.

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of elective bilateral femoral arterial punctures for uterine artery embolization (UAE) of symptomatic fibroids on fluoroscopy and procedural time, patient dose, and ease of procedure. We conducted a prospective study of UAE with either the intention to catheterize both uterine arteries using a single femoral puncture (n = 12) or elective bilateral arterial punctures from the outset (n = 12). The same two operators undertook each case. Main outcome measures were total procedure time, fluoroscopy time, dose-area product (DAP), and total skin dose. A simulation was then performed on an anthropomorphic phantom using the mean in vivo fluoroscopy parameters to estimate the ovarian dose. Bilateral UAE was achieved in all patients. None of the patients with initial unilateral arterial puncture required further contralateral arterial puncture. The mean fluoroscopy time in the group with elective bilateral punctures was 12.8 min, compared with a mean of 16.6 min in patients with unilateral puncture (p = 0.046). There was no significant difference in overall procedure time (p = 0.68). No puncture-site complications were found. Additional catheters were required only following unilateral puncture. The simulated dose was 25% higher with unilateral puncture. Although there was no significant difference in measured in vivo patient dose between the two groups (DAP, p = 0.32), this is likely to reflect the wide variation in other patient characteristics. Allowing for the small study size, our results show that the use of elective bilateral arterial punctures reduces fluoroscopy time, requires less catheter manipulation, and, according to the simulation model, has the potential to reduce patient dose. The overall procedure time, however, is not significantly reduced.

  2. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity: Impact of Different Arterial Path Length Measurements.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yokoi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most established index of arterial stiffness. Yet there is no consensus on the methodology in regard to the arterial path length measurements conducted on the body surface. Currently, it is not known to what extent the differences in the arterial path length measurements affect absolute PWV values. METHODS: Two hundred fifty apparently healthy adults (127 men and 123 women, 19-79 years) were studied. Carotid-femoral PWV was calculated using (1) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites (PWV(car-fem)), (2) the straight distance between suprasternal notch and femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV((ssn-fem)-(ssn-car))), (3) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites minus carotid arterial length (PWV((car-fem)-(ssn-car))), and (4) the combined distance from carotid site to the umbilicus and from the umbilicus to femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV((ssn-umb-fem)-(ssn-car))). RESULTS: All the calculated PWV were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.966-0.995). PWV accounting for carotid arterial length were 16-31% lower than PWV(car-fem). PWV(car-fem) value of 12 m/sec corresponded to 8.3 m/sec for PWV((ssn-fem)-(ssn-car)), 10.0 m/sec for PWV((car-fem)-(ssn-car)), and 8.9 m/sec for PWV((ssn-umb-fem)-(ssn-car)). CONCLUSION: Different body surface measurements used to estimate arterial path length would produce substantial variations in absolute PWV values.

  3. Femoral artery pseudoaneurysm due to Candida albicans in an injection drug user.

    PubMed

    Kocovski, Linda; Butany, Jagdish; Nair, Vidhya

    2014-01-01

    Candida arteritis is an uncommon condition but important to recognize due to the risk of significant morbidity and the difficulty in management of the enduring fungal infection. The authors report a rare case of a man with a femoral artery pseudoaneurysm with persistent Candida albicans infection, as a complication of infective endocarditis. The 23-year-old man, with a history of chronic intravenous drug use and Type I diabetes mellitus, presented with left groin pain, paresthesia of his left foot, and a pulsatile mass in the inguinal region. On imaging, he was found to have a pseudoaneurysm of the left common femoral artery, which later ruptured. Further investigation revealed vegetations on the mitral and aortic valves as well. Initial blood cultures were negative. He underwent multiple surgical interventions including replacement of the mitral and aortic valves and resection of the left common femoral artery with autogenous revascularization. In addition, he was commenced on intravenous antifungal therapy. Postoperatively, he continued to experience significant pain in the left groin and had two episodes of rerupture of the femoral artery that was consequently surgically repaired. Histological examination of the resected valves revealed vegetations with a mixture of fungal elements and bacterial cocci. The femoral artery resection specimens revealed evidence of infectious arteritis and the presence and persistence of C. albicans organisms in subsequent specimens. This case highlights the importance of an accurate diagnosis and aggressive management of fungal mycotic aneurysms in at-risk populations.

  4. Profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm following revision for femoral shaft fracture nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Federico; Teli, Marco GA; Innocenti, Marco; Vercelli, Ruggero; Prestamburgo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (FAPs) have been described following internal fixation of intertrocantheric, subtrocantheric and intracapsular femoral neck fractures as well as core decompression of the femoral head. The diagnosis of FAP is usually delayed because of non-specific clinical features like pain, haematoma, swelling, occasional fever and unexplained anaemia. Because of the insidious onset and of the possible delayed presentation of pseudoaneurysms, orthopaedic and trauma surgeons should be aware of this complication. We report a case of Profunda Femoris arterial branch pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed in a 40-year-old male 4 wk after revision with Kuntscher intramedullary nail of a femoral shaft nonunion. The diagnosis was achieved by computed tomography angiography and the lesion was effectively managed by endovascular repair. The specific literature and suggestions for treatment are discussed in the paper. PMID:23878785

  5. Suitability of Exoseal Vascular Closure Device for Antegrade Femoral Artery Puncture Site Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelter, Christopher Liebl, Andrea; Poullos, Nektarios; Ruppert, Volker; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of the Exoseal vascular closure device for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods. In a prospective study from February 2011 to January 2012, a total of 93 consecutive patients received a total of 100 interventional procedures via an antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. An Exoseal vascular closure device (6F) was used for closure in all cases. Puncture technique, duration of manual compression, and use of compression bandages were documented. All patients were monitored by vascular ultrasound and color-coded duplex sonography of their respective femoral artery puncture site within 12 to 36 h after angiography to check for vascular complications. Results. In 100 antegrade interventional procedures, the Exoseal vascular closure device was applied successfully for closure of the femoral artery puncture site in 96 cases (96 of 100, 96.0 %). The vascular closure device could not be deployed in one case as a result of kinking of the vascular sheath introducer and in three cases because the bioabsorbable plug was not properly delivered to the extravascular space adjacent to the arterial puncture site, but instead fully removed with the delivery system (4.0 %). Twelve to 36 h after the procedure, vascular ultrasound revealed no complications at the femoral artery puncture site in 93 cases (93.0 %). Minor vascular complications were found in seven cases (7.0 %), with four cases (4.0 %) of pseudoaneurysm and three cases (3.0 %) of significant late bleeding, none of which required surgery. Conclusion. The Exoseal vascular closure device was safely used for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery, with a high rate of procedural success (96.0 %), a low rate of minor vascular complications (7.0 %), and no major adverse events.

  6. [Prevention of postpuncture iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms of femoral arteries after coronary interventions for myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Fokin, A A; Kireev, K A; Moskvicheva, M G; Kireeva, T S

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at analysing strategies of prevention of puncture-related complications in patients with myocardial infarction undergoing subjected to emergency coronary interventions by means of a femoral arterial access. We carried out a retrospective comparative analysis of two strategies aimed at preventing false aneurysms of femoral arteries: Group One (232 cases) - elective use of special devices for closure of puncture defects in patients with high risk of haemorrhage (previously performed thrombolytic therapy; exogenous obesity of the second-third degree, 2-3 degree arterial hypertension, use of 2b/3a blood platelet receptors inhibitors); Group Two (525) cases - conventional routine use of these technologies. Puncture defects were closed using by means of devices Cordis Exoseal and St.Jude Angio-Seal. The obtained results suggested advantage of the conventional approach: demonstrating a statistically significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the total incidence of false aneurysms of femoral arteries (from 5.2 to 1.9%) and the frequency of cases requiring surgical suturing of the defect in the femoral artery (from 1.7 to 0.2%). In the conditions of an intensive flow of emergency patients presenting with acute coronary pathology and requiring coronary interventions, devices for closing defects in the femoral arterial access make it possible to level puncture complications. Over the examined period of 2013-2014 there were performed more than 600 closures of defects of the femoral artery by means of the Cordis ExoSeal. These devices proved to be efficient, reliable, and very simple to use. A decrease in the incidence rate of puncture-related complications was also associated with rational prescription administration of drugs influencing positively various links of haemostasis. PMID:27336346

  7. Iliac Artery Stent Placement Relieves Claudication in Patients with Iliac and Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of iliac artery stent placement for relief of claudication in patients with both iliac and superficial femoral artery (SFA) lesions. Methods. Stent placement for only iliac artery occlusive disease was performed in 94 limbs (74 patients) with both iliac and SFA occlusive disease on the same limb. All procedures were performed because intermittent claudication did not improve after continuation of antiplatelet medication therapy and home-based exercise for 3 months. Rutherford classification was 2 in 20 limbs and 3 in 74 limbs. Patients with critical limb ischemia were excluded. Median duration of follow-up was 40 months. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent, clinical improvement rates, and risk factors for requiring additional SFA procedures were evaluated. Results. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 97, 93, 79, and 79 %, respectively. The initial clinical improvement rate was 87 %. Continued clinical improvement rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 87, 81, 69, and 66 %, respectively. SFA Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C/D lesion was a significant risk factor for requiring additional SFA procedures. Conclusion. Intermittent claudication was relieved by iliac stent placement in most patients with both iliac and SFA lesions. Thus, the indications for treatment of the SFA intended for claudicants should be evaluated after treatment of the iliac lesion.

  8. Profunda anchor technique for ipsilateral antegrade approach in endovascular treatment of superficial femoral artery ostial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Pua, Uei

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular treatment of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is challenging in the presence of flush ostial occlusion. One of the main challenges is the availability of access sites for intervention. Contralateral retrograde femoral access followed by cross-over and antegrade intervention while commonly used, may not be feasible in cases of altered iliac anatomy (e.g. kissing iliac stents). Ipsilateral antegrade intervention using common femoral artery (CFA) access in these instances while possible is typically challenging due to inadequate working length of the CFA for interrogation of the SFA ostium, compounded by the lack of sheath stability. The "profunda anchor" technique uses a buddy wire in the profunda femoris artery (PFA) to stabilize the sheath and allow catheter manipulation for antegrade intervention at the level of the SFA ostium. The PFA is further used as a conduit for deployment of closure device to avoid interference with the treated SFA. PMID:25522981

  9. Profunda Anchor Technique for Ipsilateral Antegrade Approach in Endovascular Treatment of Superficial Femoral Artery Ostial Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2015-04-15

    Endovascular treatment of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is challenging in the presence of flush ostial occlusion. One of the main challenges is the availability of access sites for intervention. Contralateral retrograde femoral access followed by cross-over and antegrade intervention while commonly used, may not be feasible in cases of altered iliac anatomy (e.g. kissing iliac stents). Ipsilateral antegrade intervention using common femoral artery (CFA) access in these instances while possible is typically challenging due to inadequate working length of the CFA for interrogation of the SFA ostium, compounded by the lack of sheath stability. The “profunda anchor” technique uses a buddy wire in the profunda femoris artery (PFA) to stabilize the sheath and allow catheter manipulation for antegrade intervention at the level of the SFA ostium. The PFA is further used as a conduit for deployment of closure device to avoid interference with the treated SFA.

  10. [Injury of femoral artery complicated with infection from injection of heroine].

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Li, L; Zhao, H

    1998-11-01

    Drug addiction has been one of the serious social problems. The peripheral phlebitis caused by drug injection is common, but the occurrence of pseudoaneurysm with infection of femoral artery from injection injury was rarely reported in China. From January 1995 to March 1996, six cases of injury of femoral artery with infection from heroine injection were admitted. The characteristics of the injury were described. The therapeutic measures and details of attention to be needed were discussed. It was concluded that this type of injury was different from the injury caused in agricultural, industrial or traffic accidents. The treatment of choice depended upon the type of injury.

  11. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway.

  12. Internal diameter of the common femoral artery in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, T; Neubauer, B

    1988-01-01

    By means of an ultrasonographic technique the systolic and diastolic diameters of the common femoral artery were investigated in a group of 50 young insulin-dependent diabetics selected as being free from late diabetic complications and atherosclerotic involvement. After correction for normal physiologic variations there was no correlation of arterial diameters to duration of diabetes and no statistical difference in relation to a control group. It is known that there is a progressive increase of the arterial wall thickness in medium-sized arteries in diabetes. Therefore, it is concluded that there is a corresponding dilatation of the arteries. The reasons for this dilatation are discussed from a biophysical point of view. Furthermore, it is concluded that the increased arterial wall stiffness caused by an increasing elastic modulus and thickness reflects the earliest changes in the diabetic macroangiopathy. Occlusions and narrowing seem only to exist in patients with severe late diabetic complications.

  13. Intra-operative Hemostasis of Punctured Femoral Artery Using HIFU: A Survival Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Keshavarzi, Amid; Noble, Misty L.; Paun, Marla; Sharar, Sam R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Martin, Roy W.; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The objective was to investigate the long-term efficacy of hemostasis and healing of arteries after HIFU application. The femoral arteries of 22 adult rabbits were surgically exposed. Fifteen arteries were punctured with a needle and treated with HIFU, and 7 arteries were sham-treated (no puncture or HIFU was applied). The tip of the HIFU applicator was positioned on the bleeding site, and HIFU energy was applied until hemostasis was achieved. The focal intensity was approximately 3,000 W/cm2, at the resonant frequency of 9.6 MHz. Serial ultrasound images, blood and tissue samples were collected immediately and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 60 after the treatment. Eleven of the arteries were patent after the treatment, and four arteries were occluded, as confirmed using Doppler imaging. One of the occluded arteries reopened at day 14. HIFU exposure time to achieve hemostasis was 27 ±17 seconds for patent arteries and 101±38 seconds for the occluded arteries. The blood flow velocities were not statistically different between HIFU-treated patent vessels and sham-treated vessels. The tunica adventitia and media, disrupted and coagulated immediately after the treatment, recovered to normal appearance within 28 days, with localized thinning of the tunica media observed up to day 60. Neo-intimal hyperplasia was observed in the arteries at days 14 and 28. HIFU produced an effective and long-term (up to 60 days) hemostasis of injured femoral arteries while preserving a normal blood flow and vessel wall structure in the majority of vessels.

  14. Femoral artery remodeling after aerobic exercise training without weight loss in women

    PubMed Central

    Sabatier, Manning J; Schwark, Earl H; Lewis, Richard; Sloan, Gloria; Cannon, Joseph; McCully, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background It is currently unclear whether reductions in adiposity mediate the improvements in vascular health that occur with aerobic exercise. The purpose of this longitudinal study of 13 healthy women (33 ± 4 years old) was to determine whether 14 weeks of aerobic exercise would alter functional measures of vascular health, namely resting aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV, an index of arterial stiffness), femoral artery diameter (DFA), and femoral artery blood flow (BFFA) independent of changes in adiposity. Methods Aerobic fitness was assessed as VO2peak normalized to fat-free mass, and adiposity (percent body fat) was determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Serum concentrations of proteins associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, including C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and leptin, were also measured. Subjects cycled for 50 minutes, 3 times per week. Results Aerobic fitness normalized to fat-free mass increased 6% (P = 0.03) whereas adiposity did not change. Resting DFA increased 12% (P < 0.001) and resting shear rate decreased 28% (P = 0.007). Aortic PWV, and serum sICAM-1, CRP and leptin did not change with training. Conclusion Significant reductions in adiposity were not necessary for aerobic exercise training to bring about improvements in aerobic fitness and arterial remodeling. Peripheral arterial remodeling occurred without changes in central arterial stiffness or markers of inflammation. PMID:18775082

  15. Effect of Arterial Deprivation on Growing Femoral Epiphysis: Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One; Kim, Woo Sun; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion MRI for the evaluation of femoral head ischemia. Materials and Methods Unilateral femoral head ischemia was induced by selective embolization of the medial circumflex femoral artery in 10 piglets. All MRIs were performed immediately (1 hour) and after embolization (1, 2, and 4 weeks). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated for the femoral head. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters (Kep and Ve from two-compartment model) and semi-quantitative parameters including peak enhancement, time-to-peak (TTP), and contrast washout were evaluated. Results The epiphyseal ADC values of the ischemic hip decreased immediately (1 hour) after embolization. However, they increased rapidly at 1 week after embolization and remained elevated until 4 weeks after embolization. Perfusion MRI of ischemic hips showed decreased epiphyseal perfusion with decreased Kep immediately after embolization. Signal intensity-time curves showed delayed TTP with limited contrast washout immediately post-embolization. At 1-2 weeks after embolization, spontaneous reperfusion was observed in ischemic epiphyses. The change of ADC (p = 0.043) and Kep (p = 0.043) were significantly different between immediate (1 hour) after embolization and 1 week post-embolization. Conclusion Diffusion MRI and pharmacokinetic model obtained from the DCE-MRI are useful in depicting early changes of perfusion and tissue damage using the model of femoral head ischemia in skeletally immature piglets. PMID:25995692

  16. Proximal Superficial Femoral Artery Occlusion, Collateral Vessels, and Walking Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Carroll, Timothy J.; Kibbe, Melina; Kramer, Christopher M.; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Keeling, Aoife N.; Criqui, Michael H.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Yuan, Chun; Tian, Lu; Liao, Yihua; Berry, Jarrett; Zhao, Lihui; Carr, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective We studied associations of MRI-measured SFA occlusions with functional performance, leg symptoms, and collateral vessel number in PAD. We studied associations of collateral vessel number with functional performance in PAD. Background Associations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected superficial femoral artery (SFA) occlusion and collateral vessel number with functional performance among individuals with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have not been reported. Methods 457 participants with an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 1.00 had MRI measurement of the proximal SFA with twelve consecutive 2.5 millimeter cross-sectional images. An occluded SFA was defined as an SFA in which at least one segment was occluded. A non-occluded SFA was defined as absence of any occluded slices. Collateral vessels were visualized with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Lower extremity functional performance was measured with the six-minute walk, four-meter walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and the short physical performance battery (SPPB) (0-12 scale, 12=best). Results Adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other confounders, the presence of an SFA occlusion was associated with poorer six-minute walk performance (1,031 vs. 1,169 feet, P=0.006), slower fast-paced walking velocity (1.15 vs. 1.22 meters/second, P =0.042), and lower SPPB score (9.07 vs. 9.75, P=0.038) compared to the absence of an SFA occlusion. More numerous collateral vessels were associated with better six-minute walk performance (0-3 collaterals-1,064 feet, 4-7 collaterals-1,165 feet, ≥ 8 collaterals-1,246 feet, P trend=0.007), faster usual-paced walking speed (0-3 collaterals-0.84 meters/second, 4-7 collaterals-0.88 meters/second, ≥ 8 collaterals-0.91 meters/second, P trend=0.029), and faster rapid-paced walking speed (0-3 collaterals-1.17 meters/second, 4-7 collaterals-1.22 meters/second, ≥ 8 collaterals-1.29 meters/second, P trend=0.002), adjusting for age, sex, race

  17. Entrapment of the StarClose Vascular Closure System After Attempted Common Femoral Artery Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Durack, Jeremy C. Thor Johnson, D.; Fidelman, Nicholas; Kerlan, Robert K.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.

    2012-08-15

    A complication of the StarClose Vascular Closure System (Abbott, Des Plaines, IL) after a transarterial hepatic chemoembolization is described. After attempted clip deployment, the entire device became lodged in the tissues overlying the common femoral artery and could not be removed percutaneously. Successful removal of the device required surgical cutdown for removal and arterial repair. Entrapment of the StarClose vascular closure deployment system is a potentially serious complication that has been reported in the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, but has not been recognized in the literature.

  18. Experimental investigations of the steady flow through an idealized model of a femoral artery bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgea, Corina; Bode, Florin; Ioan Budiu, Octavian; Nascutiu, Lucian; Banyai, Daniel; Damian, Mihai

    2014-03-01

    The present paper presents the steps taken by the authors in the first stage of an experimental program within a larger national research project whose objective is to characterize the flow through a femoral artery bypass with a view to finding solutions for its optimization. The objective of the stage is to investigate by means of the PIV method the stationary flow through a bypass model with an idealized geometry. A bypass assembly which reunites the idealized geometry models of the proximal and distal anastomoses, and which respects the lengths of a femoral artery bypass was constructed on the basis of data for a real patient provided by medical investigations. With the aim of testing the model and the established experimental set-up with regard to their suitability for the assessment of the velocity field associated to the steady flow through the bypass, three zones that can restore the whole distal anastomosis were PIV investigated. The measurements were taken in the conditions of maintained inflow at the bypass entry of 0.9 l / min (Re = 600). The article presents comparatively the flow spectra and the velocity fields for each zone obtained in two situations: with the femoral artery completely occluded and completely open.

  19. In vivo imaging of superficial femoral artery (SFA) stents for deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Schneider, A.; Keck, B.; Bennett, N. R.; Fahrig, R.

    2008-03-01

    A high-resolution (198 μm) C-arm CT imaging system (Axiom Artis dTA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) was optimized for imaging superficial femoral artery (SFA) stents in humans. The SFA is susceptible to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. These are typically treated with angioplasty and stent deployment. However, these stents can have a fracture rate as high as 35%. Fracture is usually accompanied by restenosis and reocclusion. The exact cause of breakage is unknown and is hypothesized to result from deforming forces due to hip and knee flexion. Imaging was performed with the leg placed in both straight and bent positions. Projection images obtained during 20 s scans with ~200° of rotation of the C-arm were back-projected to obtain 3D volumes. Using a semi-automatic software algorithm developed in-house, the stent centerlines were found and ellipses were fitted to the slice normals. Image quality was adequate for calculations in 11/13 subjects. Bending the leg was found to shorten the stents in 10/11 cases with the maximum change being 9% (12 mm in a 133 mm stent), and extend the stent in one case by 1.6%. The maximum eccentricity change was 36% with a bend angle of 72° in a case where the stent extended behind the knee.

  20. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection of a Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Simultaneous Venous Balloon Occlusion of a Communicating Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Mittleider, Derek Cicuto, Kenneth; Dykes, Thomas

    2008-07-15

    An 82-year-old woman developed acute occlusion of her right coronary artery. She underwent percutaneous coronary stent placement and aortic balloon pump installation. In the postprocedural period, she developed a common femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (PSA) that communicated with the common femoral vein via an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). After unsuccessful ultrasound-guided compression, ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of the PSA was performed, with simultaneous balloon occlusion of the common femoral vein at the level of the AVF. There was complete thrombosis of the PSA and AVF.

  1. Melioidosis presenting as an infected intrathoracic subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm treated with femoral vein interposition graft.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Nancy; Calligaro, Keith D; Dougherty, Matthew J; Diehl, James; Modi, Ketang H; Braffman, Michael N

    2002-03-01

    We present the first case of in situ replacement of an infected subclavian artery using superficial femoral vein and the fourth reported case of an infected arterial pseudoaneurysm caused by pseudomonas pseudomallei. Sepsis and hoarseness developed in a 58-year-old man after recent travel to Borneo, Indonesia. Indirect laryngoscopy revealed a paralyzed right vocal cord. Computed tomography and arteriography revealed a 6.5-cm pseudoaneurysm of the proximal right subclavian artery. Blood cultures grew pseudomonas pseudomallei. An abnormal cardiac stress test prompted a coronary angiography, which revealed severe coronary artery disease.The patient underwent coronary artery bypass and in situ replacement of the infected subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm with a superficial femoral vein, along with placement of a pectoralis major muscle flap to cover the vein graft. Operative cultures of the pseudoaneurysm grew pseudomonas pseudomallei. The patient was treated with a 6-week course of intravenous ceftazidime and oral doxycycline and then continued on oral amoxicillin-clavulanate. One week after discontinuing intravenous antibiotics, the patient presented to the emergency department with a rapidly expanding, pulsatile mass in the right supraclavicular space. He was taken emergently to the operating room. After hypothermic circulatory arrest was accomplished, the disrupted vein graft and aneurysm cavity were resected and the subclavian artery was oversewn proximally and distally. Parenteral ceftazidime was continued for 3 months and oral amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin) was continued indefinitely. There was no evidence of infection clinically or by computed tomographic scan 2 years later. Although autogenous vein replacement of infected arteries and grafts may be successful in the majority of cases, this strategy should probably be avoided when particularly virulent bacteria such as the organism in this case are present.

  2. Multiple steno-obstructive vascular lesions and femoral superficial artery dissection in a young Caucasian male with antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Rosario; Gigante, Antonietta; Barbano, Biagio; Zaccaria, Alvaro; Polidori, Lelio; Borghesi, Francesca; Gasperini, Ludovica; Di Donato, Domenico; Amoroso, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A young Caucasian male was admitted for claudication intermittens, hyposphygmia on the right lower limb, high blood pressure and deterioration of renal function. Instrumental investigations documented right renal artery stenosis, multiple steno-obstructive manifestations of the splanchnic artery system, occlusion of the right external iliac artery and dissection of the left superficial femoral artery. The patient had not been previously diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome. Subsequently, the vascular lesions, because of his thrombophilic state, needed endovascular treatment and anticoagulant therapy. PMID:21686361

  3. Feasibility and Safety of Vascular Closure Devices in an Antegrade Approach to Either the Common Femoral Artery or the Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzeit, Andreas Schie, Bram van Schoch, Eric; Hergan, Klaus; Graf, Nicole Binkert, Christoph A.

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to analyze complications following antegrade puncture of the common femoral artery (CFA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using vascular closure systems (VCS). Methods: A single-center, retrospective study was performed after obtaining approval from the institutional review board and informed consent from all patients. At our center, the CFA or SFA are used for arterial access. All patients were evaluated clinically on the same day. If there was any suspicion of an access site problem, Duplex ultrasound was performed. Results: Access location was the CFA in 50 patients and the SFA in 130 patients. The sheath size ranged from 4F to 10F. Two patients had to be excluded because of lack of follow-up. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 162 of 178 cases (91 %). The following complications were observed in 16 patients (8.9 %): 4 pseudoaneurysms (2.2 %), 11 hematomas (6.2 %), and 1 vascular occlusion (0.5 %). The two pseudoaneurysms healed spontaneously, in one case an ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was performed, and one aneurysm was compressed manually. No further medical therapy was needed for the hematomas. The one vascular occlusion was treated immediately with angioplasty using a contralateral approach. No significant difference was noted between the CFA and the SFA group with respect to complications (p = 1.000). Conclusions: The use of closure devices for an antegrade approach up to 10F is feasible and safe. No differences in low complication rates were observed between CFA and SFA.

  4. Implantation of Completely Biological Engineered Grafts Following Decellularization into the Sheep Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Meier, Lee A.; Lahti, Mathew T.; Johnson, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of completely biological, decellularized engineered allografts in a sheep model was evaluated to establish clinical potential of these unique arterial allografts. The 4-mm-diameter, 2–3-cm-long grafts were fabricated from fibrin gel remodeled into an aligned tissue tube in vitro by ovine dermal fibroblasts. Decellularization and subsequent storage had little effect on graft properties, with burst pressure exceeding 4000 mmHg and the same compliance as the ovine femoral artery. Grafts were implanted interpositionally in the femoral artery of six sheep (n=9), with contralateral sham controls (n=3). At 8 weeks (n=5) and 24 weeks (n=4), all grafts were patent and showed no evidence of dilatation or mineralization. Mid-graft lumen diameter was unchanged. Extensive recellularization occurred, with most cells expressing αSMA. Endothelialization was complete by 24 weeks with elastin deposition evident. These completely biological grafts possessed circumferential alignment/mechanical anisotropy characteristic of native arteries and were cultured only 5 weeks prior to decellularization and storage as “off-the-shelf” grafts. PMID:24417686

  5. Retroperitoneal hematoma: an unexpected complication during intervention on an occluded superficial femoral artery via a retrograde popliteal artery approach.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri I; Beedupalli, Jagan; Varma, Jai

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease involvement of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is common. Different endovascular techniques are used successfully for revascularization of this artery. A retrograde approach to chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the SFA through the ipsilateral popliteal artery has been used occasionally if an antegrade approach is not feasible or has failed. Some of the known complications encountered during this approach are arteriovenous fistula formation at the access site, occlusion of the popliteal artery if closure devices are used, and bleeding. There are no reports of perforation or bleeding of the SFA or the external iliac artery (EIA) during a popliteal approach, probably due to lack of flow in the occluded segment of the SFA. We report a case in which a retroperitoneal hematoma occurred due to retrograde blood flow through the established true channel in the proximal SFA and subsequently to the dissection plane with a wire tip perforation in the EIA, which was treated by stopping retrograde filling with prolonged balloon inflation in the distal SFA before the CTO. PMID:23890758

  6. Posterior Wall Capture and Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Use of StarClose Closing Device: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin T.; Szubert, Wojciech; Grzelak, Piotr; Szopinski, Piotr; Majos, Agata

    2013-10-15

    A case of femoral artery obstruction following application of a StarClose type arterial puncture closing device (APCD) is presented. Ultrasonographic and angiographic imaging of this complication was obtained. The posterior wall of the vessel was accidentally caught in the anchoring element of the nitinol clip. This complication was successfully resolved by endovascular treatment and the implantation of a stent.

  7. Successfully Treated Femoral Artery Thrombosis in a Patient with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Kyoung; Baek, Moon Seong; Mok, Young Mi; Kim, Sung-Ai; Lim, Beom Jin; Lee, Ji Eun

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to widely recognized venous thrombotic complications, peripheral arterial thrombosis as a complication of nephrotic syndrome, especially without preceding iatrogenic venous puncture, corticosteroid treatment, or coagulation factor abnormalities, has rarely been reported in adult female patients. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with pain in the right lower leg accompanied by minimal change nephrotic syndrome. Lower-extremity angiography showed total occlusion of the right superficial femoral artery. Thrombectomy was performed with a balloon catheter, and the thrombi were successfully aspirated. Our experience indicates that even if few traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis are identified, a high index of suspicion and aggressive treatment of arterial thrombosis in adult nephrotic syndrome are crucial to minimize serious ischemic injuries. PMID:23678479

  8. Skeletal muscle perfusion and stem cell delivery in muscle disorders using intra-femoral artery canulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Nadine; Hunt, Samuel D; Wu, Jianbo; Darabi, Radbod

    2015-11-15

    Muscular dystrophies are among major inherited muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle damage and fibrosis with no definitive cure. Recently, gene or cell based therapies have been developed to restore the missing gene expression or replace the damaged tissues. In order to test the efficiency of these therapies in mice models of muscular dystrophies, the arterial route of delivery is very advantageous as it provides uniform muscle exposure to the therapeutic agents or cells. Although there are few reports of arterial delivery of the therapeutic agents or cells in mice, there is no in-depth description and evaluation of its efficacy in perfusion of downstream muscles. This study is aimed to develop a practical method for intra-femoral artery perfusion in mice and to evaluate perfusion efficiency using near-infrared-fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as well as histology following stem cell delivery. Our results provide a practical guide to perform this delicate method in mice. By using a sensitive fluorescent dye, different muscle groups of the hindlimb have been evaluated for proper perfusion. As the final step, we have validated the efficiency of arterial cell delivery into muscles using human iPS-derived myogenic cells in an immunodeficient mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (NSG-mdx(4cv)).

  9. Thrombus Formation After Percutaneous Catheterization and Manual Compression of the Femoral Artery in Heparinized Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Hwan; Pavcnik, Dusan Kakizawa, Hideyaki; Uchida, Barry T.; Burke, Allen; Loriaux, Marc; Keller, Frederick S.; Rosch, Josef

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic and histopathologic changes in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) in heparinized sheep shortly after catheterization with an 8-Fr sheath and manual compression hemostasis either with standard manual compression (SMC) or with the use of a procoagulant chitosan-based HemCon Bandage. The evaluation was done in 38 SFAs of 19 heparinized (100 mg/kg) sheep. After a 5-min catheterization with an 8-Fr sheath, a 5-min compression was applied. Follow-up angiograms to evaluate hemostasis were done immediately after release of compression and then at 2.5-min intervals until no extravasation was present. Compression was reapplied between angiograms. Final angiograms were performed approximately 30 min after hemostasis and after 3 min of passive flexion and extension of sheep hind limbs. Sheep were then euthanized and SFA specimens with surrounding tissues excised for histopathologic evaluation. Both types of compression caused similar changes in the catheterized SFAs. Follow-up angiograms showed mild arterial narrowing in 14 SFAs and intraluminal clots in 9 SFAs. Histology revealed periarterial hematoma in all 38 specimens. Intraluminal thrombi consisting predominantly of platelets and fibrin were present in 32 SFAs. Their size varied from superficial elevations (8 arteries) to medium-sized, 1- to 2-mm, polypoid protrusions (15 arteries) to large polypoid clots, 3-4 mm long (9 arteries). In six SFAs, the arterial access sites were not included in the obtained specimens. In conclusion, hemostasis with manual compression is achieved in the acute phase by formation of a predominantly platelet-fibrin thrombus occluding the arterial wall access site and often extending significantly into the arterial lumen. The healing process of arterial access sites should be explored several days after catheterization.

  10. Role played by interleukin-6 in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats: effect of femoral artery ligation.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Stone, Audrey J; Li, Jianhua; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-07-01

    IL-6 signaling via the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6r) has been shown to increase primary afferent responsiveness to noxious stimuli. This finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that IL-6 and sIL-6r would increase the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We also tested the hypothesis that soluble glycoprotein (sgp)130, an inhibitor of IL-6/sIL-6r signaling, would decrease the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex that is found in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. In rats with freely perfused femoral arteries, coinjection of 50 ng of IL-6 and sIL-6r into the arterial supply of the hindlimb significantly increased the peak pressor response to static (control: 14 ± 3 mmHg and IL-6/sIL-6r: 17 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.03) and intermittent isometric (control: 10 ± 2 mmHg and IL-6/sIL-6r: 15 ± 4 mmHg, P = 0.03) hindlimb muscle contraction. In rats with ligated femoral arteries, injection of 50 ng of sgp130 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the peak pressor response to static (control: 24 ± 2 mmHg and sgp130: 16 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.01) and intermittent isometric (control: 16 ± 2 mmHg and sgp130: 13 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.04) hindlimb muscle contraction, whereas there was no effect of sgp130 on the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We conclude that coinjection of exogenous IL-6 and sIL-6r increased the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. More importantly, we also conclude that IL-6 and sIL-6r play an endogenous role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries but not in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries.

  11. Role played by interleukin-6 in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats: effect of femoral artery ligation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Li, Jianhua; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 signaling via the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6r) has been shown to increase primary afferent responsiveness to noxious stimuli. This finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that IL-6 and sIL-6r would increase the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We also tested the hypothesis that soluble glycoprotein (sgp)130, an inhibitor of IL-6/sIL-6r signaling, would decrease the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex that is found in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. In rats with freely perfused femoral arteries, coinjection of 50 ng of IL-6 and sIL-6r into the arterial supply of the hindlimb significantly increased the peak pressor response to static (control: 14 ± 3 mmHg and IL-6/sIL-6r: 17 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.03) and intermittent isometric (control: 10 ± 2 mmHg and IL-6/sIL-6r: 15 ± 4 mmHg, P = 0.03) hindlimb muscle contraction. In rats with ligated femoral arteries, injection of 50 ng of sgp130 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the peak pressor response to static (control: 24 ± 2 mmHg and sgp130: 16 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.01) and intermittent isometric (control: 16 ± 2 mmHg and sgp130: 13 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.04) hindlimb muscle contraction, whereas there was no effect of sgp130 on the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We conclude that coinjection of exogenous IL-6 and sIL-6r increased the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. More importantly, we also conclude that IL-6 and sIL-6r play an endogenous role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries but not in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. PMID:25910806

  12. Vascular brachytherapy after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of superficial femoral arteries--Polish pilot group

    SciTech Connect

    Walichiewicz, Piotr; Piecuch, Jerzy; Bialas, Brygida; Orkisz, Witold; Fijalkowski, Marek; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2002-03-01

    Purpose: The article presents the results of treatment with vascular brachytherapy (VBT) in superficial femoral arteries. This method aims to minimize frequency of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Method: Treatment was carried out in 20 cases. The patients with severe stenoses or total occlusions verified in angiography were selected. In the group of 19 patients, two were women (the average age of the patients was 58.7 years). VBT was performed immediately after PTA. A 15-Gy dose, with high dose rate, was applied. The dose was calculated based on individually chosen distance from the internal surface of the artery wall, which varied from 2 to 3 mm. The mean observation time after treatment was 8 months. The shortest time was 1 month and the longest 14 months. At the end of the observation time, the control DSA angiography was performed on every patient. Results: During the first 2 months, in three cases, an acute thrombosis in treated artery was observed. In the third month, one treated artery occluded. In the sixth month of observation, one case of acute thrombosis was observed. The rest of the patients were free of restenoses. Conclusions: (1) In superficial femoral arteries, a low value of ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI; below 0.4) is very probably responsible for acute thrombosis after PTA with or without stent implantation followed by VBT. (2) Diabetes, rest ischaemia before treatment, poor vessel status confirmed in angiography may also be responsible for acute thrombosis after VBT. (3) Anticoagulants or antiplatelet (ticlipidine) treatment must be ordered for 6 months after VBT in patients with implanted stents.

  13. Effects of factor Xa on the expression of proteins in femoral arteries from type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Farré, Antonio J; Rodriguez-Sierra, Pablo; Modrego, Javier; Segura, Antonio; Martín-Palacios, Naiara; Saiz, Ana M; Zamorano-León, José J; Duarte, Juan; Serrano, Javier; Moñux, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Aim Further to its pivotal role in haemostasis, factor Xa (FXa) promotes effects on the vascular wall. The purpose of the study was to evaluate if FXa modifies the expression level of energy metabolism and oxidative stress-related proteins in femoral arteries obtained from type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage vasculopathy. Methods Femoral arteries were obtained from 12 type 2 diabetic patients who underwent leg amputation. Segments from the femoral arteries were incubated in vitro alone and in the presence of 25 nmol l−1 FXa and 25 nmol l−1 FXa + 50 nmol l−1 rivaroxaban. Results In the femoral arteries, FXa increased triosephosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isotype 1 expression but decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase expression. These facts were accompanied by an increased content of acetyl-CoA. Aconitase activity was reduced in FXa-incubated femoral arteries as compared with control. Moreover, FXa increased the protein expression level of oxidative stress-related proteins which was accompanied by an increased malonyldialdehyde arterial content. The FXa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, failed to prevent the reduced expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase induced by FXa but reduced acetyl-CoA content and reverted the decreased aconitase activity observed with FXa alone. Rivaroxaban + FXa but not FXa alone increased the expression level of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II, two mitochondrial long chain fatty acid transporters. Rivaroxaban also prevented the increased expression of oxidative stress-related proteins induced by FXa alone. Conclusions In femoral isolated arteries from type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage vasculopathy, FXa promoted disruption of the aerobic mitochondrial metabolism. Rivaroxaban prevented such effects and even seemed to favour long chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. PMID:25041869

  14. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Duterloo, Dirk Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-06-15

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successful angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent.

  15. Alterations in Vasoreactivity of Femoral Artery Induced by Hindlimb Unweighting are Related to the Changes of Contractile Protein in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jin; Ren, Xinling; Meng, Qinjun; Zhang, Lifan; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2005-01-01

    Responses of endothelium removed femoral arterial rings to vasoactive compounds were examined in vitro, and the expression of Myosin and Actin of femoral artery were observed by Western Blotting and Immunohistochemistry in hndlimb unweighting rats and control rats. The results showed that contractile responses of femoral arterial rings evoked by Phenylephrine, Endothelin-1, Vasopressin, KCl, Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 were decreased in hindlimb unweighting rats as compared with that of controls. But vasoddatory responses induced by SNPand cGMP were not different between groups. No significant differences have been found in expressions of Calponin, Myosin, Actin, and the ratio of MHC SM1/SM2 between the two groups, but expression of alpha-SM-Actin decreased in hindlimb unweighting rats. The data indicated that the diminished contractile responsiveness probably result from altered contractile apparatus, especially the contractile proteins.

  16. Fluid particle motion and Lagrangian velocities for pulsatile flow through a femoral artery branch model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Crawford, D. W.; Back, L. H.; Back, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization study using selective dye injection and frame by frame analysis of a movie provided qualitative and quantitative data on the motion of marked fluid particles in a 60 degree artery branch model for simulation of physiological femoral artery flow. Physical flow features observed included jetting of the branch flow into the main lumen during the brief reverse flow period, flow separation along the main lumen wall during the near zero flow phase of diastole when the core flow was in the downstream direction, and inference of flow separation conditions along the wall opposite the branch later in systole at higher branch flow ratios. There were many similarities between dye particle motions in pulsatile flow and the comparative steady flow observations.

  17. Elasticity assessment of electrospun nanofibrous vascular grafts: a comparison with femoral ovine arteries.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, D Suarez; Ballarin, F Montini; Cymberknop, L J; Balay, G; Negreira, C; Abraham, G A; Armentano, R L

    2014-12-01

    Development of successful small-diameter vascular grafts constitutes a real challenge to biomaterial engineering. In most cases these grafts fail in-vivo due to the presence of a mechanical mismatch between the native vessel and the vascular graft. Biomechanical characterization of real native vessels provides significant information for synthetic graft development. Electrospun nanofibrous vascular grafts emerge as a potential tailor made solution to this problem. PLLA-electrospun nanofibrous tubular structures were prepared and selected as model bioresorbable grafts. An experimental setup, using gold standard and high resolution ultrasound techniques, was adapted to characterize in vitro the poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun structures. The grafts were subjected to near physiologic pulsated pressure conditions, following the pressure-diameter loop approach and the criteria stated in the international standard for cardiovascular implants-tubular vascular prostheses. Additionally, ovine femoral arteries were subjected to a similar evaluation. Measurements of pressure and diameter variations allowed the estimation of dynamical compliance (%C, 10(-2) mmHg) and the pressure-strain elastic modulus (E(Pε), 10(6) dyn cm(-2)) of the abovementioned vessels (grafts and arteries). Nanofibrous PLLA showed a decrease in %C (1.38±0.21, 0.93±0.13 and 0.76±0.15) concomitant to an increase in EPε (10.57±0.97, 14.31±1.47 and 17.63±2.61) corresponding to pressure ranges of 50 to 90 mmHg, 80 to 120 mmHg and 100 to 150 mmHg, respectively. Furthermore, femoral arteries exhibited a decrease in %C (8.52±1.15 and 0.79±0.20) and an increase in E(Pε) (1.66±0.30 and 15.76±4.78) corresponding to pressure ranges of 50-90 mmHg (elastin zone) and 100-130 mmHg (collagen zone). Arterial mechanics framework, extensively applied in our previous works, was successfully used to characterize PLLA vascular grafts in vitro, although its application can be directly extended to in vivo

  18. Elasticity assessment of electrospun nanofibrous vascular grafts: a comparison with femoral ovine arteries.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, D Suarez; Ballarin, F Montini; Cymberknop, L J; Balay, G; Negreira, C; Abraham, G A; Armentano, R L

    2014-12-01

    Development of successful small-diameter vascular grafts constitutes a real challenge to biomaterial engineering. In most cases these grafts fail in-vivo due to the presence of a mechanical mismatch between the native vessel and the vascular graft. Biomechanical characterization of real native vessels provides significant information for synthetic graft development. Electrospun nanofibrous vascular grafts emerge as a potential tailor made solution to this problem. PLLA-electrospun nanofibrous tubular structures were prepared and selected as model bioresorbable grafts. An experimental setup, using gold standard and high resolution ultrasound techniques, was adapted to characterize in vitro the poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun structures. The grafts were subjected to near physiologic pulsated pressure conditions, following the pressure-diameter loop approach and the criteria stated in the international standard for cardiovascular implants-tubular vascular prostheses. Additionally, ovine femoral arteries were subjected to a similar evaluation. Measurements of pressure and diameter variations allowed the estimation of dynamical compliance (%C, 10(-2) mmHg) and the pressure-strain elastic modulus (E(Pε), 10(6) dyn cm(-2)) of the abovementioned vessels (grafts and arteries). Nanofibrous PLLA showed a decrease in %C (1.38±0.21, 0.93±0.13 and 0.76±0.15) concomitant to an increase in EPε (10.57±0.97, 14.31±1.47 and 17.63±2.61) corresponding to pressure ranges of 50 to 90 mmHg, 80 to 120 mmHg and 100 to 150 mmHg, respectively. Furthermore, femoral arteries exhibited a decrease in %C (8.52±1.15 and 0.79±0.20) and an increase in E(Pε) (1.66±0.30 and 15.76±4.78) corresponding to pressure ranges of 50-90 mmHg (elastin zone) and 100-130 mmHg (collagen zone). Arterial mechanics framework, extensively applied in our previous works, was successfully used to characterize PLLA vascular grafts in vitro, although its application can be directly extended to in vivo

  19. A Clinical Decision Support System for Femoral Peripheral Arterial Disease Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yurtkuran, Alkın; Tok, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges of providing reliable healthcare services is to diagnose and treat diseases in an accurate and timely manner. Recently, many researchers have successfully used artificial neural networks as a diagnostic assessment tool. In this study, the validation of such an assessment tool has been developed for treatment of the femoral peripheral arterial disease using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). A data set for training the RBFNN has been prepared by analyzing records of patients who had been treated by the thoracic and cardiovascular surgery clinic of a university hospital. The data set includes 186 patient records having 16 characteristic features associated with a binary treatment decision, namely, being a medical or a surgical one. K-means clustering algorithm has been used to determine the parameters of radial basis functions and the number of hidden nodes of the RBFNN is determined experimentally. For performance evaluation, the proposed RBFNN was compared to three different multilayer perceptron models having Pareto optimal hidden layer combinations using various performance indicators. Results of comparison indicate that the RBFNN can be used as an effective assessment tool for femoral peripheral arterial disease treatment. PMID:24382983

  20. In vivo oxygen transport in the normal rabbit femoral arterial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, D W; Back, L H; Cole, M A

    1980-01-01

    In vivo measurements of tissue oxygen tension were made at 10-micrometer intervals through functioning in situ rabbit femoral arterial walls, using inhalation anesthesia and recessed microcathodes with approximately 4-micrometer external diameters. External environment was controlled with a superfusion well at 30 torr PO2, 35 torr PCO2. Blood pressure, gas tension levels, and blood pH were held within the normal range. Radial PO2 measurements closely fit a mathematical model for unidimensional diffusion into a thick-walled artery with uniform oxygen consumption, and the distances traversed fit measured dimensions of quick-frozen in vivo sections. Using standard values of diffusion and solubility coefficients, mean calculated medial oxygen consumption was 99 nl0/ml-s. Mural oxygen consumption appeared to be related linearly to mean tangential wall stress. Differences in experimental design and technique were compared with previous in vivo and in vitro measurements of wall oxygenation, and largely account for the varying results obtained. Control of environment external to the artery, and maintenance of normally flowing blood in the lumen in vivo appeared critical to an understanding of mural oxygenation in life. If the conditions of this experiment prevailed in arteries with thicker avascular layers, PO2 could have been 20 torr at approximately 156 micrometer and 10 torr at 168 micrometer from blood (average values). Images PMID:7410554

  1. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation.

  2. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation. PMID:24303111

  3. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  4. Access to the Superficial Femoral Artery in the Presence of a 'Hostile Groin': A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Adrian J.; Lotzof, Kevin; Howard, Adam

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. Lower limb angioplasty is commonly performed via antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture, followed by selective superficial femoral artery (SFA) catheterization. Arterial access can be complicated by a 'hostile groin' (scarring, obesity, or previous failed CFA puncture). We prospectively investigated color duplex ultrasound (CDU)-guided SFA access for radiological interventions. Methods. Antegrade CDU-guided CFA and SFA puncture were compared in 30 patients requiring intervention for severe leg ischemia who had hostile groins. Demographics, screen time, radiation dose, intervention, and complications were prospectively recorded. Results. Treatment in 30 patients involved 44 angioplasties (40 transluminal, 4 subintimal) and 2 diagnostic angiograms. Fifteen of these patients had CDU-guided CFA punctures; in 8 of these patients CDU-guided CFA puncture 'failed' (i.e., there was failure to pass a guidewire or catheter into the CFA or SFA), necessitating immediate direct CDU-guided SFA puncture. Overall, the mean screen time and radiation dosage, via direct CDU-guided SFA puncture in 30 patients, was 4.8 min and 464 Gy cm{sup 2} respectively. With CDU-guided CFA puncture, mean screen time (10 min), radiation dose (2023 Gy cm{sup 2}), and complications (13%) were greater when compared with the SFA puncture results overall and in the same patients at subsequent similar procedures (2.7 min, 379 Gy cm{sup 2} (p < 0.05), no complications in this subgroup). Five complications occurred: 2 each at CFA and SFA entry sites, and 1 angioplasty embolus. Conclusions. The CDU-guided SFA puncture technique was both more effective than CDU-guided CFA access in patients with scarred groins, obesity, or failed CFA punctures and safer, with reduced screen times, radiation doses, and complications.

  5. Potent vasoconstrictor actions of cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin on femoral arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yukiko; Asano, Masahisa; Ito, Katsuaki; Uyama, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Yuji; Watanabe, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    The Ca2+ buffering function of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in the resting state of arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was examined. Differences in the effects of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and thapsigargin, agents which inhibit the Ca2+-ATPase of SR, on tension and cellular Ca2+ level were assessed in endothelium-denuded strips of femoral arteries from 13-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY).In resting strips preloaded with fura-PE3, the addition of CPA (10 μM) or thapsigargin (100 nM) caused an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i) and a contraction. These responses were significantly greater in SHR than in WKY.The addition of verapamil (3 μM) to the resting strips caused a decrease in resting [Ca2+]i, which was significantly greater in SHR than in WKY. In SHR, but not in WKY, this decrease was accompanied by a relaxation from the resting tone, suggesting the maintenance of myogenic tone in the SHR artery.Verapamil (3 μM) abolished differences between SHR and WKY. The effects of verapamil were much greater on the contraction than on the [Ca2+]i.The resting Ca2+ influx in arteries measured after a 5 min incubation of the artery with 45Ca was not increased by CPA or thapsigargin in either SHR or WKY. The net Ca2+ entry measured after a 30 min incubation of the artery with 45Ca was decreased by CPA or thapsigargin in both SHR and WKY. The resting Ca2+ influx was significantly higher in SHR than in WKY, and was decreased by nifedipine (100 nM) in the SHR artery, but was unchanged in the WKY artery.The resting 45Ca efflux from the artery was increased during the addition of CPA (10 μM). This increase was less in SHR than in WKY. The resting 45Ca efflux was the same in SHR and WKY.These results suggest that (1) the Ca2+ influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) was increased in the resting state of the SHR femoral artery, (2) the greater part of the increased Ca2+ influx was buffered by Ca2

  6. Role of the endothelium in the response to cholinoceptor stimulation of rabbit ear and femoral arteries during cooling.

    PubMed Central

    Monge, L.; García-Villalón, A. L.; Montoya, J. J.; García, J. L.; Fernández, N.; Gómez, B.; Diéguez, G.

    1993-01-01

    1. The role of the endothelium in the effects of cooling on the response to cholinoceptor stimulation of the rabbit central ear (cutaneous) and femoral (non-cutaneous) arteries was studied using 2 mm long cylindrical segments. 2. Concentration-response curves for acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-5) M), methacholine (10(-9)-10(-5) M) and sodium nitroprusside (10(-9)-10(-4) M) were isometrically recorded in arteries under conditions, with and without endothelium or following pretreatment with the nitric oxide-synthesis inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-6)-3 x 10(-4) M) at 37 degrees C and at 24 degrees C (cooling). 3. Ear and femoral arteries showed endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and methacholine at 37 degrees C and 24 degrees C. The extent of relaxation of the control ear arteries, but not of the control femoral arteries, to acetylcholine and methacholine increased during cooling. 4. L-NAME (10(-6)-3 x 10(-4) M) reduced in a concentration-dependent way the response of ear arteries to acetylcholine at both 37 degrees C and 24 degrees C, this reduction being more potent at 37 degrees C. L-Arginine (10(-5)-10(-3) M) reversed in a concentration-dependent manner the inhibitor effects of 10(-5) M L-NAME at both temperatures. 5. Sodium nitroprusside caused a concentration-dependent relaxation in both arteries that was endothelium-independent. However, the extent of relaxation to this nitrovasodilator in ear and femoral arteries was lower at 24 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495247

  7. Late Complication after Superficial Femoral Artery (SFA) Aneurysm: Stent-graft Expulsion Outside the Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, Felice Sabatino, Ermanno R.; Dinoto, Ettore; Rosa, Giuliana La; Corte, Giuseppe; Bajardi, Guido

    2015-10-15

    A 78-year-old man presented with a 7-cm aneurysm in the left superficial femoral artery, which was considered unfit and anatomically unsuitable for conventional open surgery for multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with stent-graft [Viabhan stent-graft (WL Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ)]. Two years from stent-graft implantation, the patient presented a purulent secretion and a spontaneous external expulsion through a fistulous channel. No claudication symptoms or hemorrhagic signs were present. The pus and device cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam. Patient management consisted of fistula drainage, systemic antibiotic therapy, and daily wound dressing. At 1-month follow-up, the wound was closed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of this type of stent-graft complication presenting with external expulsion.

  8. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  9. Far red/near infrared light treatment promotes femoral artery collateralization in the ischemic hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Nicole L; Ninomiya, James T; Warltier, David C; Weihrauch, Dorothée

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a crucial mediator of hindlimb collateralization and angiogenesis. Within tissues there are nitrosyl-heme proteins which have the potential to generate NO under conditions of hypoxia or low pH. Low level irradiation of blood and muscle with light in the far red/near infrared spectrum (670 nm, R/NIR) facilitates NO release. Therefore, we assessed the impact of red light exposure on the stimulation of femoral artery collateralization. Rabbits and mice underwent unilateral resection of the femoral artery and chronic R/NIR treatment. The direct NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME were also administered in the presence of R/NIR. DAF fluorescence assessed R/NIR changes in NO levels within endothelial cells. In vitro measures of R/NIR induced angiogenesis were assessed by endothelial cell proliferation and migration. R/NIR significantly increased collateral vessel number which could not be attenuated with L-NAME. R/NIR induced collateralization was abolished with c-PTIO. In vitro, NO production increased in endothelial cells with R/NIR exposure, and this finding was independent of NOS inhibition. Similarly R/NIR induced proliferation and tube formation in a NO dependent manner. Finally, nitrite supplementation accelerated R/NIR collateralization in wild type C57Bl/6 mice. In an eNOS deficient transgenic mouse model, R/NIR restores collateral development. In conclusion, R/NIR increases NO levels independent of NOS activity, and leads to the observed enhancement of hindlimb collateralization.

  10. Denervation in Femoral Artery-Ligated Hindlimbs Diminishes Ischemic Recovery Primarily via Impaired Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yuansen; Liu, Ruiming; Wang, Huijin; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Shenming; Hu, Zuojun

    2016-01-01

    Aims Multiple factors regulate arteriogenesis. Peripheral nerves play a crucial role in vascular remodeling, but the function of peripheral nerves during arteriogenesis is obscure. Our study investigated the contribution of denervation to arteriogenesis during post-ischemic recovery from hindlimb femoral artery ligation. Methods and Results Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into four groups of normal control (NC), hindlimb ischemia (HI), hindlimb ischemia with denervation (HID) and hindlimb simple denervation (HD). Hindlimb ischemic recovery was assessed by clinical assessment and tibialis anterior muscle remodeling on day 28 post-surgery. Blood flow was determined by laser Doppler imaging on day 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28 post-surgery. Collateral number of hindlimb was observed by angiography and gracilis muscles were tested by immunostaining on day 7 and 28 post-surgery. Angiogenesis was accessed by counting CD31 positive capillaries in tibialis anterior muscles on day 28 post-surgery. Group HID showed impaired ischemic recovery compared with the other 3 groups and impaired blood flow recovery compared with group HI on day 28 post-surgery. The collateral number and capillary density of group HID were lower than group HI. The collateral diameter of both group HID and group HI significantly increased compared with group NC. However, the lumen diameter was much narrower and the vessel wall was much thicker in group HID than group HI. We also demonstrated that the thickened neointima of collaterals in group HID comprised of smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Conclusions Denervation of the ligated femoral artery in the hindlimb impairs ischemic recovery via impaired perfusion. The possible mechanisms of impaired perfusion are lower collateral number, lower capillary density and most likely narrower lumen, which damage ischemic recovery. This study illustrates the crucial role of peripheral nerves in arteriogenesis using a model combined ischemia with

  11. Heterogeneity of endothelium-dependent responses to acetylcholine in canine femoral arteries and veins. Separation of the role played by endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rubanyi, G M; Vanhoutte, P M

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether heterogeneity in endothelium-dependent responses to acetylcholine between canine blood vessels of different anatomical origin reflects variations in endothelial function or in responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle cells. Experiments were conducted in a bioassay system, where segments of femoral artery or vein with endothelium were perfused intraluminally and the perfusate used to superfuse rings of femoral arteries or veins without endothelium. Indomethacin was present in all experiments to prevent the synthesis of prostanoids. The blood vessels were contracted by phenylephrine. Measurement of wall tension in both the perfused segment and bioassay ring allowed simultaneous detection of endothelium-derived relaxing factor(s) released abluminally (segment) and intraluminally (ring). Intraluminal infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) induced relaxations in the perfused artery but not in vein segments. During arterial superfusion ACh induced relaxation in femoral arterial rings but contraction in venous rings. After treatment with atropine the arterial perfusate evoked relaxations in venous rings. Infusion of ACh through the femoral vein evoked only moderate relaxations in arterial rings. These data demonstrate that depressed endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh in femoral veins compared to femoral arteries is due to a masking effect of the direct stimulating action of ACh and decreased release of the same mediator or the release of a different relaxing factor from venous endothelium.

  12. Five years' experience of transverse groin incision for femoral artery access in arterial reconstructive surgery: parallel observational longitudinal group comparison study.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Christopher; Martin, Fiachra; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif

    2008-01-01

    Vertical groin incisions (VGIs) have been used to access femoral vessels, but reports allude to wound complications. Our aim was to compare VGI with transverse groin incision (TGI) for femoral artery exposure. Over a 5-year interval, 196 patients with 284 femoral artery exposures for supra- and infrainguinal procedures were studied. Primary endpoints were surgical skin site wound infection, seroma, haematoma formation, and major lower limb amputation. Secondary endpoints were graft patency, wound paresthesias, and length of hospital stay. There were 160 TGIs and 124 VGIs. The demographics and risk factor profile were not statistically different between groups. Seroma developed in 4.4% of TGIs and 13.7% of VGIs (p= .005). The complicated skin and soft tissue infection rate was five times greater with VGI (p= .001). The VGI group had a significantly higher rate of major amputation (p= .0005). Significantly higher graft failure rates were observed in the VGI group (p= .011). No paresthesia was reported in any TGI wound. The mean hospital stay was also significantly shorter in the TGI group (p= .006). The study data support and expound on the theory that an alternative incision to VGI offers lower short- and long-term morbidity. Our findings sustain the selection of the TGI in femoral artery surgery for both supra- and infrainguinal procedures without compromise of vessel exposure. PMID:18845101

  13. Laser scoop desobliteration: a method for minimally invasive remote recanalization of chronically occluded superficial femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneweer, Carola; Siggelkow, Markus; Helle, Michael; Petzina, Rainer; Wulff, Asmus; Schaefer, Joost P.; Berndt, Rouven; Rusch, Rene; Wedel, Thilo; Klaws, Guenther; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Röcken, Christoph; Jansen, Olav; Lutter, Georg; Cremer, Joachim; Groß, Justus

    2015-02-01

    Stenosis and occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) are most common in arterial occlusive disease. There are numerous interventional, surgical, and combined approaches to reconstitute maximum blood supply to the lower limb; however, despite intense clinical research, the long-term success rates are still poor. We present the first results with a catheter prototype for laser-based minimal invasive endarterectomy, called laser scoop desobliteration (LSD). The tip of a glass fiber containing a catheter was modified with a spatula head design and connected to an ultraviolet laser. It was tested in cadavers fixed with the Thiel embalming technique preserving tissue consistency, flexibility, and plasticity. After longitudinal arteriotomy of the SFA, a circular dissection between media and adventitia was performed. Then the LSD catheter was inserted and propagated with a progress of 1 mm/s. Afterward, the atheroma core, which showed a plain surface without substantial attaching tissue debris, was removed. Histological examination of the vessel wall showed that the dissection was performed at the media/adventitia interface. In summary, the constructed LSD catheter allowed a rapid and easy way to perform an endarterectomy, thereby offering an innovative approach in the treatment of chronic occluded SFA.

  14. Acoustic hemostasis of porcine superficial femoral artery: Simulation and in-vivo experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Mitchell, Stuart; Miller, Matthew; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Crum, Lawrence A.; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Sekins, K. Michael

    2012-10-01

    In-vivo focused ultrasound studies were computationally simulated and conducted experimentally with the aim of occluding porcine superficial femoral arteries (SFA) via thermal coagulation. A multi-array HIFU applicator was used which electronically scanned multiple beam foci around the target point. The spatio-temporally averaged acoustic and temperature fields were simulated in a fluid dynamics and acousto-thermal finite element model with representative tissue fields, including muscle, vessel and blood. Simulations showed that with an acoustic power of 200W and a dose time of 60s, perivascular tissue reached 91°C; and yet blood reached a maximum 59°C, below the coagulation objective for this dose regime (75°C). Per simulations, acoustic-streaming induced velocity in blood reached 6.1cm/s. In in-vivo experiments, several arteries were treated. As simulated, thermal lesions were observed in muscle surrounding SFA in all cases. In dosing limited to 30 to 60 seconds, it required 257W to provide occlusion (one complete and one partial occlusion). Angiography and histology showed evidence of thrombogenesis and collagen shrinkage-based vessel constriction at these doses.

  15. Abnormal structure and increased stiffness of the femoral arterial wall in young patients with sustained essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, T; Pedersen, E B

    1989-10-01

    Thickness, elastic modulus, and stiffness of the common femoral arterial wall were estimated in 11 patients with essential hypertension and in 11 age-matched normotensive control subjects by use of an in vivo, non-invasive, ultrasound time-motion display technique (M-mode). Hypertensive patients had significantly higher levels than normotensive subjects with regard to arterial wall thickness (0.23 cm vs. 0.18 cm, medians; P less than 0.01), elastic modulus (10.6 x 10(7) Pa vs. 6.18 x 10(7) Pa, medians; P less than 0.05) and arterial wall stiffness (3.80 x 10(7) Pa vs. 2.07 +/- 10(7) Pa, medians; P less than 0.01). It is concluded that structural changes in the wall of the large arteries contribute to the increase in arterial wall stiffness in young patients with sustained essential hypertension.

  16. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  17. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration.

    PubMed

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4-15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4-8; 8-12; 12-15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children.

  18. Transvenous Embolization of a Spontaneous Femoral AVF 5 Years After an Incomplete Treatment with Arterial Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora Ozkan, Murat; Dogan, Omer Faruk; Cil, Barbaros E.; Dogan, Riza

    2008-03-15

    A 66-year-old man with complex left femoral arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was first diagnosed after a deep venous thrombosis incident approximately 5 years ago. Partial treatment was performed by means of endografts along the superficial femoral artery, which remained patent for 5 years. The patient had been doing well until a couple of months ago when he developed severe venous stasis and ulcers of the left cruris, due to a high-flow nonhealing complex AVF with additional iliac vein occlusion. Therefore; the definitive treatment was performed by a unique endovascular technique combined with surgical venous bypass (femoro-femoral crossover saphenous bypass, the Palma operation). A novel percutaneous transvenous technique for occlusion of a complex high-flow AVF is reported with a review of the literature. The case is unique with spontaneous AVF, transvenous embolization with detachable coils and ONYX, and the hybrid treatment technique as well as the long-term patency of superficial femoral artery stent-grafts.

  19. Pressure difference-flow rate variation in a femoral artery branch casting of man for steady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    In-vitro, steady flow in a casting of the profunda femoris branch of the femoral artery of man was studied by measuring pressure differences in the main lumen and also in the branch over a large Reynolds number range from 200 to 1600. Effects of viscous and inviscid flows in this femoral artery branch were demonstrated quantitatively. The critical ratio of the flow rate in the branch to the upstream main lumen in this casting was found to be 0.4, above which the inviscid flow analysis indicated a pressure rise and below which it yielded a pressure drop in the main lumen across the branch junction. Pressure rises were experimentally found to occur both in the main lumen and in the branch for certain ranges of the aforementioned ratio.

  20. Ruptured Mycotic Common Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Fatal Pulmonary Embolism after Emergency Stent-Grafting in a Drug Abuser

    PubMed Central

    Kalogirou, Thomas E.; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T.; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O.

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of a mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser is a limb- and life-threatening condition that necessitates emergency intervention. Emergency stent-grafting appears to be a viable, minimally invasive alternative, or a bridge, to subsequent open surgery. Caution is required in cases of suspected concomitant deep vein thrombosis in order to minimize the possibility of massive pulmonary embolism during stent-grafting, perhaps by omitting stent-graft postdilation or by inserting an inferior vena cava filter first. We describe the emergency endovascular management, in a 60-year-old male intravenous drug abuser, of a ruptured mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, which was complicated by a fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:25593530

  1. Ruptured mycotic common femoral artery pseudoaneurysm: fatal pulmonary embolism after emergency stent-grafting in a drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Karkos, Christos D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O

    2014-12-01

    The rupture of a mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser is a limb- and life-threatening condition that necessitates emergency intervention. Emergency stent-grafting appears to be a viable, minimally invasive alternative, or a bridge, to subsequent open surgery. Caution is required in cases of suspected concomitant deep vein thrombosis in order to minimize the possibility of massive pulmonary embolism during stent-grafting, perhaps by omitting stent-graft postdilation or by inserting an inferior vena cava filter first. We describe the emergency endovascular management, in a 60-year-old male intravenous drug abuser, of a ruptured mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, which was complicated by a fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:25593530

  2. Diminished Neurogenic Femoral Artery Vasoconstrictor Response in a Zucker Obese Rat Model: Differential Regulation of NOS and COX Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ana Cristina; Hernández, Medardo; Novella, Susana; Martínez, María Pilar; Pagán, Rosa María; Hermenegildo, Carlos; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Benedito, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Objective Peripheral arterial disease is one of the macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study addresses femoral artery regulation in a prediabetic model of obese Zucker rats (OZR) by examining cross-talk between endothelial and neural factors. Methods and Results Arterial preparations from lean (LZR) and OZR were subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS) on basal tone. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform expression patterns were determined by immunohistochemical labelling and Western blotting. Results indicate significantly reduced noradrenergic contractions in preparations from OZR compared with those of LZR. Functional inhibition of endothelial NOS (eNOS) indicated a predominant role of this isoform in LZR and its modified activity in OZR. Neural (nNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) were activated and their expression was higher in femoral arteries from OZR. Neurotransmission modulated by large-conductance Ca2+-activated (BKCa) or voltage-dependent (KV) K+ channels did not seem compromised in the obese animals. Endothelial COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in LZR and an additional adventitial location of COX-2 was also observed in OZR, explaining the higher COX-2 protein levels detected in this group. Prostanoids derived from both isoforms helped maintain vasoconstriction in LZR while in OZR only COX-2 was active. Superoxide anion inhibition reduced contractions in endothelium-intact arteries from OZR. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction led to reduced neurogenic vasoconstriction in femoral arteries from OZR. In a setting of obesity, NO-dependent nNOS and iNOS dilation activity could be an alternative mechanism to offset COX-2- and reactive oxygen species-mediated vasoconstriction, along with impaired endothelial NO relaxation. PMID:25216050

  3. Randomized Trial of the SMART Stent versus Balloon Angioplasty in Long Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions: The SUPER Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, Nicholas; Walker, Paul T.; Belli, Anna-Maria; Thorpe, Anthony P.; Sidhu, Paul S.; Robinson, Graham; Ransbeeck, Mariella van

    2013-04-15

    To determine whether primary stenting reduces the rate of restenosis compared with balloon angioplasty alone in the endovascular treatment of long superficial femoral artery lesions; and to assess the effect of treatment on quality of life. A total of 150 patients with superior femoral artery occlusion or severe stenosis of 5-22 cm length from 17 UK centers were randomized to either primary stenting with the SMART stent or balloon angioplasty (i.e., percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, PTA). Bailout stent placement was permitted in case of inadequate result from PTA. The primary end point was restenosis measured by duplex ultrasound at 1 year. Quality-of-life assessments were performed by the EuroQol (EQ)-5D questionnaire. Mean lesion length was 123.0 mm in the stent group and 116.8 mm in the PTA group. A total of 140 (93.3 %) of 150 had total occlusions. At 12 months' follow-up, restenosis measured by Duplex ultrasound was not significantly different between the stent and PTA groups by intention-to-treat or as-treated analyses: 47.2 versus 43.5 % (p = 0.84) and 40.8 versus 46.7 % (p = 0.68), respectively. There were fewer target lesion revascularizations in patients randomized to stenting, but this did not reach statistical significance (12.5 vs. 20.8 %, p = 0.26). There was no difference in the rate of amputation. Patients in both groups reported improved quality of life. Primary stenting of long lesions in predominantly occluded superficial femoral arteries does not reduce the rate of binary restenosis compared with balloon angioplasty and bailout stenting. Both treatment strategies conferred a meaningful and sustained improvement to the quality of life of patients with severe superficial femoral artery disease.

  4. Human Arterial Ring Angiogenesis Assay.

    PubMed

    Seano, Giorgio; Primo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a model of human angiogenesis where artery explants from umbilical cords are embedded in gel matrices and subsequently produce capillary-like structures. The human arterial ring (hAR) assay is an innovative system that enables three-dimensional (3D) and live studies of human angiogenesis. This ex vivo model has the advantage of recapitulating several steps of angiogenesis, including endothelial sprouting, migration, and differentiation into capillaries. Furthermore, it can be exploited for (1) identification of new genes regulating sprouting angiogenesis, (2) screening for pro- or anti-angiogenic drugs, (3) identification of biomarkers to monitor the efficacy of anti-angiogenic regimens, and (4) dynamic analysis of tumor microenvironmental effects on vessel formation. PMID:27172955

  5. Emergency Stent Grafting After Unsuccessful Surgical Repair of a Mycotic Common Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Drug Abuser

    SciTech Connect

    Lupattelli, Tommaso; Garaci, Francesco Giuseppe; Basile, Antonio; Minnella, Daniela Paola; Casini, Andrea; Clerissi, Jacques

    2009-03-15

    Mycotic false aneurysm caused by local arterial injury from attempted intravenous injections in drug addicts remains a challenging clinical problem. The continued increase in drug abuse has resulted in an increased incidence of this problem, particularly in high-volume urban centres. In the drug-abusing population, mycotic arterial pseudoaneurysms most often occur because of missed venous injection and are typically seen in the groin, axilla, and antecubital fossa. Mycotic aneurysms may lead to life-threatening haemorrhage, limb loss, sepsis, and even death. Any soft-tissue swelling in the vicinity of a major artery in an intravenous drug abuser should be suspected of being a false aneurysm until proven otherwise and should prompt immediate referral to a vascular surgeon for investigation and management. We report a case of rupturing mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the left common femoral artery treated by surgical resection followed by vessel reconstruction with autologous material. Unfortunately, at the time of discharge a sudden leakage from the vein graft anastomosis occurred, with subsequent massive bleeding, and required emergent endovascular covered stenting. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of femoral artery bleeding in a drug abuser treated by stent graft placement.

  6. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes spontaneous femoral artery aneurysm formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Kikuo; Kitagaki, Manabu; Niida, Tomiharu; Kondo, Harumi; Matsubara, Osamu; Kikuchi, Makoto; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Adachi, Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    Femoral artery aneurysms (FAAs) are very rare, and their natural history is not well understood. In this study, we sought to analyze the pathogenesis of inflammatory FAAs in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist-deficient (IL-1Ra(-/-)) B6 mice. Systolic arterial pressures and plasma lipid levels of IL-1Ra(-/-) mice and wild-type (WT) mice did not differ significantly. However, IL-1Ra(-/-) mice spontaneously developed fusiform FAAs. Real-time PCR of 9-month-old IL-1Ra(-/-) mice revealed significantly increased mRNA levels of IL-1β (6.6-fold), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (12.4-fold), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (6.0-fold) compared with WT mice. Histological analysis revealed numerous inflammatory cells around the FAAs in IL-1Ra(-/-) mice, and elastin staining showed destruction of both the internal and external elastic lamina in IL-1Ra(-/-) mice. Afterward, macrophage function was studied. After lipopolysaccharide (1 μg/mL) stimulation, IL-1Ra-deficient macrophages produced much higher levels of TNF-α than those from WT mice. Finally, we performed bone marrow cell transplantation. FAAs with many inflammatory cells in the adventitia were detected in several WT mice that received bone marrow cells from IL-1Ra(-/-) mice (44%), but not from WT mice (0%). Our study is the first to demonstrate that IL-1Ra deficiency in inflammatory cells disrupts immune system homeostasis and induces inflammatory FAAs in IL-1Ra(-/-) B6 mice. We believe that these mice will provide much information about the natural history and management of FAAs.

  7. Subintimal angioplasty for superficial femoral artery occlusion: poor patency in critical ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B. M.; Stechman, M.; Gibson, M.; Torrie, E. P. H.; Magee, T. R.; Galland, R. B.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Subintimal angioplasty has been proposed for the treatment of long segment occlusive disease and for patients with critical limb ischaemia (CLI) with significant co-morbidity. There is no consensus as to short- and long-term patency. We present our experience with this technique. METHODS: Between 1995 and 2000, 43 consecutive patients (48 limbs) underwent subintimal angioplasty for superficial femoral artery occlusions. Outcome measures were haemodynamic and/or symptomatic patency. RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in 14/17 limbs with CLI (82%) and 30/31 (97%) with intermittent claudication (IC). There were 7 complications (15%), 6 occurring in the claudicant group. The median occlusion length was 10 cm for CLI and 6 cm for IC. Patency at 12 and 36 months, on an intention-to-treat basis, was 69% and 58% for claudicants and 25% and 25% for patients with CLI (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.0044, respectively). Following only technically successful procedures, 12-month patency was 72% (IC) and 31% (CLI) (P = 0.009). Patients with occlusions > or = 10 cm were more likely to re-occlude than those < 10 cm (12-month patency 60% versus 25%;P = 0.037). CONCLUSIONS: In this series, short- and long-term patency in patients with CLI is poor. Subintimal angioplasty in the treatment of CLI should be reserved for those patients not fit for surgical bypass. PMID:16176697

  8. Femoral artery neointimal hyperplasia is reduced after wire injury in Ref-1+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Basi, David L; Adhikari, Neeta; Mariash, Ami; Li, Qinglu; Kao, Esther; Mullegama, Sureni V; Hall, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    Redox factor-1 (Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that regulates redox, DNA repair, and the response to cell stress. We previously demonstrated that Ref-1(+/-) mice exhibit a significantly reduced Ref-1 mRNA and protein levels within the vasculature, which are associated with increased oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that partial loss of Ref-1 altered the cellular response to vascular injury. Fourteen days after femoral artery wire injury, we found that vessel intima-to-media ratio was significantly reduced in Ref-1(+/-) mice compared with that in wild-type mice (P < 0.01). Bromodeoxyuridine labeling and transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining at 14 days did not differ in the Ref-1(+/-) mice. In vitro studies found no significant changes in either serum-induced proliferation or baseline apoptosis in Ref-1(+/-) vascular smooth muscle cells. Exposure to Fas ligand; however, did result in increased susceptibility of Ref-1(+/-) vascular smooth muscle cells to apoptosis (P < 0.001). Ref-1(+/-) mice exhibited an increase in circulating baseline levels of IL-10, IL-1alpha, and VEGF compared with those in wild-type mice but a marked impairment in these pathways in response to injury. In sum, loss of a single allele of Ref-1 is sufficient to reduce intimal lesion formation and to alter circulating cytokine and growth factor expression.

  9. Effects of exercise training on common femoral artery blood flow in patients with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E C; Voyles, W F; Atterbom, H A; Pathak, D; Sutton, M F; Greene, E R

    1989-11-01

    Exercise training is a commonly used rehabilitative therapy for patients with intermittent claudication (IC). However, it is not known whether blood flow through the major conduit vessel of the leg, the common femoral artery (CFA), increases with exercise training. We tested the hypothesis that peak CFA blood flow will increase with a supervised, lengthy, and individualized exercise training program. Subjects were 10 IC patients (eight men, two women) with a mean age of 61 +/- 7 (mean +/- SD) years who had either aortoiliac (n = 7) or femoropopliteal (n = 3) stenosis. Using noninvasive Doppler flowmetry, we measured CFA blood flow and ankle pressure at rest and after a maximum symptom-limited graded treadmill test before (T1) and after 3 (T2) and 5 (T3) months of exercise training. Variables were measured in the supine and upright postures at rest and during recovery. Total walking distance and claudication distance on the treadmill were determined for T1, T2, and T3. After training, CFA blood flow and ankle pressure were not significantly higher at rest or at 1 minute after exercise compared with pretraining despite significant increases in claudication and total walking distances. The rate of CFA blood flow recovery was slower at T3, suggesting the accrual of a larger metabolic debt during exercise due to more work performed. We conclude that changes in CFA blood flow are not responsible for measured changes in performance with exercise training in IC patients. PMID:2680161

  10. The mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 reduces the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising from contracting muscles evoke the exercise pressor reflex. This reflex is greater in a rat model of simulated peripheral arterial disease in which a femoral artery is chronically ligated than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The role played by the mechanically sensitive component of the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in ligated rats is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4, a relatively selective inhibitor of mechano-gated Piezo channels, reduces the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. Injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the pressor response to Achilles tendon stretch (a purely mechanical stimulus) but had no effect on the pressor responses to intra-arterial injection of α,β-methylene ATP or lactic acid (purely metabolic stimuli). Moreover, injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced both the integrated pressor area (control 535 ± 21, GsMTx4 218 ± 24 mmHg·s; P < 0.01), peak pressor (control 29 ± 2, GsMTx4 14 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.01), and renal sympathetic nerve responses to electrically induced intermittent hindlimb muscle contraction (a mixed mechanical and metabolic stimulus). The reduction of the integrated pressor area during contraction caused by GsMTx4 was greater in rats with ligated femoral arteries than it was in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We conclude that the mechanically sensitive component of the reflex contributes to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex during intermittent hindlimb muscle contractions in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:26921442

  11. Identification by ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries of high-risk subjects missed by three validated cardiovascular disease risk algorithms.

    PubMed

    Postley, John E; Luo, Yanting; Wong, Nathan D; Gardin, Julius M

    2015-11-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events are the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. Traditional global risk algorithms may miss 50% of patients who experience ASCVD events. Noninvasive ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries can identify subjects at high risk for ASCVD events. We examined the ability of different global risk algorithms to identify subjects with femoral and/or carotid plaques found by ultrasound. The study population consisted of 1,464 asymptomatic adults (39.8% women) aged 23 to 87 years without previous evidence of ASCVD who had ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries. Three ASCVD risk algorithms (10-year Framingham Risk Score [FRS], 30-year FRS, and lifetime risk) were compared for the 939 subjects who met the algorithm age criteria. The frequency of femoral plaque as the only plaque was 18.3% in the total group and 14.8% in the risk algorithm groups (n = 939) without a significant difference between genders in frequency of femoral plaque as the only plaque. Those identified as high risk by the lifetime risk algorithm included the most men and women who had plaques either femoral or carotid (59% and 55%) but had lower specificity because the proportion of subjects who actually had plaques in the high-risk group was lower (50% and 35%) than in those at high risk defined by the FRS algorithms. In conclusion, ultrasound evaluation of the carotid and femoral arteries can identify subjects at risk of ASCVD events missed by traditional risk-predicting algorithms. The large proportion of subjects with femoral plaque only supports the use of including both femoral and carotid arteries in ultrasound evaluation.

  12. Safety and Effectiveness of Closure Devices Applied to a Stented Common Femoral Artery: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Harris, Thomas; Voelliger, Cara M; Shammas, Andrew N; Jerin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Bailout stenting of the common femoral artery (CFA) may become necessary with failed balloon angioplasty or atherectomy or in case of bleeding requiring a covered stent over the arteriotomy site. Reaccessing the CFA through a previously placed stent may occur during angiography. The safety and effectiveness of applying a closure device, or manual compression to achieve hemostasis through an accessed stented CFA are unknown. All patients in our practice that underwent CFA stenting were identified using billing records for 3 years (January 1, 2010-February 28, 2013). Patients were included if there has been documentation of access through the stented CFA segment on angiography. In-hospital and up to 2 weeks postdischarge major adverse events were recorded from medical records. A total of 48 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 65.9 ± 10.9 years, males 60.4%. Perclose (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA) was used in 85.7%, AngioSeal (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN) in 8.3%, Mynx (Access Closure, Santa Clara, CA) in 2%, and manual compression in 4% of the patients. Major adverse events consisted of in-hospital mortality in two patients: one probably related to index access-site thrombosis complicated by subsequent acute renal failure following reintervention; the other mortality was related to major bleeding possibly related to the index access site. The remaining patients had no adverse events and there were no reported problems at 2 weeks follow-up. Accessing and applying closure device in stented CFA can be accomplished successfully in approximately 96% of the patients with low major adverse events. PMID:27574383

  13. Immediate reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator flaps after breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Ken; Fujikawa, Masakazu; Tashima, Hiroki; Saito, Takuya; Sotsuka, Yohei; Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in perforator flap surgical techniques have allowed for safe and reliable autologous tissue transfer with minimal donor-site morbidity. Between April 2012 and January 2013, we performed immediate breast reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator (MCFAP) flaps in 15 patients after breast-conserving surgery. The flaps were harvested from patients in the lithotomy position, while a second surgical team simultaneously conducted tumour resection. Of the 15 procedures performed, three flaps were dissected as true perforator flaps, while 12 flaps were dissected as muscle-sparing perforator flaps. The mean flap weight was 138.5 g (range, 77-230 g) and the mean pedicle length was 5.7 cm (range, 3.0-9.0 cm). Recipient vessels for anastomosis were serratus branches in 10 patients, internal mammary vessels in three patients and thoracodorsal vessels in two patients. The mean duration of surgery was 6.74 h (range, 5.65-9.45 h). There were no major complications requiring surgical intervention. Researchers observed partial flap necrosis, which manifested as small firm lesions in two patients, as well as local wound infection and dehiscence in one patient, which resolved spontaneously. There were no instances of donor-site seroma formation or lymphoedema in any of the patients. An objective assessment of postoperative photographs showed that cosmetic results were mostly satisfactory. Donor-site scars along the medial groin crease were inconspicuous and readily concealed by clothing. Given its reliable vascularity and minimal donor-site morbidity, the free MCFAP flap can be a good alternative for partial breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery.

  14. Fracture toughness of human femoral neck: effect of microstructure, composition, and age.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Y N; Norman, T L

    2000-05-01

    The effects of porosity and pore size; osteonal area, size, and density; mineral content; water content; wet and dry apparent densities; and age on mode I (tensile) and mode II (shear) strain energy release rate were investigated for femoral neck cortical bone from human cadavers aged >/=50 years. The results suggest that porosity- and density-based parameters that are related to bone quantity are more consistently determinant for femoral neck fracture toughness than morphology-based parameters that are related to microstructural organization. Bone features examined here were more explanatory for shear than tension fracture toughness. Tension and shear fracture toughness did not change with age, unlike in previous reports investigating the femoral and tibial shaft. It was concluded that the femoral neck is different from the femoral and tibial shaft in terms of its microstructure and composition and in its relationship of fracture toughness to its constituents and age. PMID:10773590

  15. Effect of Atherosclerosis on the Lateral Circumflex Femoral Artery and Its Descending Branch: Comparative Study to Nonatherosclerotic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Nanasilp, Tirapat; Kunaphensaeng, Paiboon; Ruamthanthong, Anuchit

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been widely used for reconstructions. Nevertheless, the atherosclerotic risk factors that affect the lateral circumflex femoral artery (LCFA) are still inconclusive. The aim was to study the effect of atherosclerosis on the LCFA and descending branch (dLCFA) visualized by computer tomographic angiography (CTA) between nonatherosclerosis and atherosclerosis. Methods: Retrospective studies of CTA of lower extremity were reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups: nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic risk factors. The angiographic study of LCFA and dLCFA was analyzed, and atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic risk factors were compared. Results: Ninety-seven patients with 194 lower extremities were enrolled. Atherosclerotic risks comprised 76 patients. A total of 14, 16, and 46 patients had 1, 2, and 3 risk factors, respectively. Musculocutaneous perforator was 79.38%. The LCFA originated from deep femoral, common femoral, and superficial femoral artery was 97.42%, 2.06%, and 0.52%, respectively. The dLCFA was classified into 5 types depending on its origin. Diameters of LCFA in nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic patients were 4.03 ± 0.71 and 4.07 ± 0.97 mm, respectively. No statistical significance was found between both groups in diameters of LCFA. Diameters of dLCFA in nonatherosclerotic patients were 2.28 ± 0.28 mm and in atherosclerotic patients were 2.11 ± 0.28 mm. Statistical significance of diameters of dLCFA was found in patients having 3 risk factors and smoker groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions: LCFA is not atherosclerosis resistant. Stenosis of the LCFA and dLCFA occurred in varying degrees in atherosclerosis-risk patients. Preoperative CTA should be considered to evaluate the patency in multiple risk factors patients. PMID:27757321

  16. The origin of the medial circumflex femoral artery: a meta-analysis and proposal of a new classification system.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Henry, Brandon M; Vikse, Jens; Roy, Joyeeta; Pękala, Przemysław A; Svensen, Maren; Guay, Daniel L; Saganiak, Karolina; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The medial circumflex femoral artery (MCFA) is a common branch of the deep femoral artery (DFA) responsible for supplying the femoral head and the greater trochanteric fossa. The prevalence rates of MCFA origin, its branching patterns and its distance to the mid-inguinal point (MIP) vary significantly throughout the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the true prevalence of these characteristics and to study their associated anatomical and clinical relevance. Methods. A search of the major electronic databases Pubmed, EMBASE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, SciELO, BIOSIS, and CNKI was performed to identify all articles reporting data on the origin of the MCFA, its branching patterns and its distance to the MIP. No data or language restriction was set. Additionally, an extensive search of the references of all relevant articles was performed. All data on origin, branching and distance to MIP was extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis using MetaXL v2.0. Results. A total of 38 (36 cadaveric and 2 imaging) studies (n = 4,351 lower limbs) were included into the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of the MCFA originating from the DFA was 64.6% (95% CI [58.0-71.5]), while the pooled prevalence of the MCFA originating from the CFA was 32.2% (95% CI [25.9-39.1]). The CFA-derived MCFA was found to originate as a single branch in 81.1% (95% CI [70.1-91.7]) of cases with a mean pooled distance of 50.14 mm (95% CI [42.50-57.78]) from the MIP. Conclusion. The MCFA's variability must be taken into account by surgeons, especially during orthopedic interventions in the region of the hip to prevent iatrogenic injury to the circulation of the femoral head. Based on our analysis, we present a new proposed classification system for origin of the MCFA.

  17. The origin of the medial circumflex femoral artery: a meta-analysis and proposal of a new classification system.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Henry, Brandon M; Vikse, Jens; Roy, Joyeeta; Pękala, Przemysław A; Svensen, Maren; Guay, Daniel L; Saganiak, Karolina; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The medial circumflex femoral artery (MCFA) is a common branch of the deep femoral artery (DFA) responsible for supplying the femoral head and the greater trochanteric fossa. The prevalence rates of MCFA origin, its branching patterns and its distance to the mid-inguinal point (MIP) vary significantly throughout the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the true prevalence of these characteristics and to study their associated anatomical and clinical relevance. Methods. A search of the major electronic databases Pubmed, EMBASE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, SciELO, BIOSIS, and CNKI was performed to identify all articles reporting data on the origin of the MCFA, its branching patterns and its distance to the MIP. No data or language restriction was set. Additionally, an extensive search of the references of all relevant articles was performed. All data on origin, branching and distance to MIP was extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis using MetaXL v2.0. Results. A total of 38 (36 cadaveric and 2 imaging) studies (n = 4,351 lower limbs) were included into the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of the MCFA originating from the DFA was 64.6% (95% CI [58.0-71.5]), while the pooled prevalence of the MCFA originating from the CFA was 32.2% (95% CI [25.9-39.1]). The CFA-derived MCFA was found to originate as a single branch in 81.1% (95% CI [70.1-91.7]) of cases with a mean pooled distance of 50.14 mm (95% CI [42.50-57.78]) from the MIP. Conclusion. The MCFA's variability must be taken into account by surgeons, especially during orthopedic interventions in the region of the hip to prevent iatrogenic injury to the circulation of the femoral head. Based on our analysis, we present a new proposed classification system for origin of the MCFA. PMID:26966661

  18. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; ...

  19. The Inflammatory Response to Femoral Arterial Closure Devices: A Randomized Comparison Among FemoStop, AngioSeal, and Perclose

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jens Saleh, Nawzad; Jensen, Ulf; Svane, Bertil; Joensson, Anders; Tornvall, Per

    2008-07-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the systemic inflammatory response differs, in patients undergoing coronary angiography, among the arterial closure devices FemoStop, AngioSeal, and Perclose. The study is a prospective and randomized study. We measured pre- and postprocedural C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels and collected clinical and procedural data on 77 patients who underwent coronary angiography because of stable angina pectoris. Patients were randomized to the following device: FemoStop (mechanical compression), AngioSeal (anchor and collagen sponge), or Perclose (nonabsorbable suture). No patient group experienced an increased incidence of vascular complications. There were no differences among the three groups regarding CRP, fibrinogen, or IL-6 values before or after coronary angiography. IL-6 levels increased 6 h after the procedure in all groups (p < 0.01), however, the increase did not differ among the groups. After 30 days there were no increased values of CRP or fibrinogen. We conclude that the femoral arterial closure devices AngioSeal and Perclose do not enhance an inflammatory response after a diagnostic coronary angiography, measured by CRP, fibrinogen, and IL-6, compared to femoral arterial closure using a mechanical compression device.

  20. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  1. Ischemic-reperfusion of unilateral external iliac artery in rat: A new model for vasculitic femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Ramesh, Muthusamy

    2016-08-15

    Clinically, ischemic environment during gynecological surgery at lithotomy position is most common causative factor for the development of vasculitic femoral neuropathy (VFN). The present study was designed to induce the clinically relevant rat model of VFN by ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) injury of unilateral external iliac artery (uEIA). The VFN was induced by 3, 4 and 5h occlusion of uEIA followed by reperfusion. The I/R of uEIA induced VFN was evaluated by (i) behavioral parameters i.e., hind limb temperature; weight bearing capacity; (ii) kinematic analysis i.e., paw posture, splay angle, static sciatic index (SSI), and ankle-angle tests; (iii) evaluation of pain perception i.e., plantar and pin prick; (iv) serum biochemical estimation i.e., nitrate, lipid peroxidation, TNF-α and calcium level; (v) evaluation of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity; and (vi) measurement of nerve fiber density. The 4 and 5h occlusion of uEIA has produced the potential changes in behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biochemical and histopathological assessment. The 5h occlusion of uEIA has shown to produce the mortality. Whereas, 3h occlusion does not produce the significant changes in the development of VFN. The 4h ischemic occlusion of uEIA has shown potential rat model of VFN due to its close mimicking capacity of VFN in human. Therefore, it can be useful to explore the newer anti-neuralgic medicine and with their pharmacodynamic action in the field of various neurovascular disorders. PMID:27288016

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells improve the neurodegeneration of femoral nerve in a diabetic foot ulceration rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nan; Xu, Jin-Mei; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Qing-Song; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Feng

    2015-06-15

    Neuropathy is observed in 50% of diabetic patients with diabetic foot. This study attempted to explore the potential role of human mesenchymal stem cells-umbilical cord blood (hMSCs-UC) in femoral nerve (FN) neuropathy. The model rats were established by one time administration of streptozotocin and empyrosis on the dorsal hind foot. At 3d, 7d, 14d after treatment with hMSCs-UC or saline through left femoral artery, the serum NGF was examined by ELISA; NF-200 expression in FN was evaluated by immunohistochemistry; the diameter and roundness of FN, the ratio of capillary and muscular fiber of gastrocnemius were calculated under light microscope; and neuronal degenerations, such as demyelization, axonal atrophy, and loose arrangement of nerve fibers, were observed by electronic microscope. The results showed that, in hMSCs-UC-treated model rats, serum NGF was increased with higher positive rate of NF-200. Although the difference in FN diameters was not established among groups, improvement of roundness of FN was confirmed with increase in the numbers of capillary in FN-innervated gastrocnemius; additionally, degenerative neuropathy was significantly improved. Importantly, the functional study of electroneurogram (ENG) showed that, slowed conduction of FN in model rats was significantly restored by hMSCs-CU treatment. These data suggested that hMSCs-UC-treatment partially reverse the neuronal degeneration and nerve function of FN, which might be contributed by the upregulation of NGF with dramatic angiogenesis in FN-innervated gastrocnemius, consequently reversing neuronal structure and function, preventing or curing foot ulceration.

  3. The Fate and Distribution of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Intra-Arterial Infusion in Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongting; Xu, Taotao; Chen, Qiqing; Wu, Chengliang; Wang, Pinger; Mao, Qiang; Zhang, Shanxing; Shen, Jiayi; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate if autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) and what the fate and distribution of the cells are in dogs. Twelve Beagle dogs were randomly divided into two groups: MSCs group and SHAM operated group. After three weeks, dogs in MSCs group and SHAM operated group were intra-arterially injected with autologous MSCs and 0.9% normal saline, respectively. Eight weeks after treatment, the necrotic volume of the femoral heads was significantly reduced in MSCs group. Moreover, the trabecular bone volume was increased and the empty lacunae rate was decreased in MSCs group. In addition, the BrdU-positive MSCs were unevenly distributed in femoral heads and various vital organs. But no obvious abnormalities were observed. Furthermore, most of BrdU-positive MSCs in necrotic region expressed osteocalcin in MSCs group and a few expressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Taken together, these data indicated that intra-arterially infused MSCs could migrate into the necrotic field of femoral heads and differentiate into osteoblasts, thus improving the necrosis of femoral heads. It suggests that intra-arterial infusion of autologous MSCs might be a feasible and relatively safe method for the treatment of femoral head necrosis. PMID:26779265

  4. An efficient approach to study the pulsatile blood flow in femoral and coronary arteries by Differential Quadrature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Seiyed E.; Hatami, M.; Hatami, J.; Sahebi, S. A. R.; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, flow analysis for a non-Newtonian third grade blood in coronary and femoral arteries is simulated numerically. Blood is considered as the third grade non-Newtonian fluid under periodic body acceleration motion and pulsatile pressure gradient. Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) and Crank Nicholson Method (CNM) are used to solve the Partial Differential Equation (PDE) governing equation by which a good agreement between them was observed in the results. The influences of some physical parameters such as amplitude, lead angle and body acceleration frequency on non-dimensional velocity and profiles are considered. For instance, the results show that increasing the amplitude, Ag, and reducing the lead angle of body acceleration, ϕ, make higher velocity profiles in the center line of both arteries.

  5. Impact of multiple cardiovascular risk factors on femoral artery intima-media thickness in asymptomatic young adults (the Bogalusa Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Paul, Timir K; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Chen, Wei; Li, Shengxu; Bond, M Gene; Tang, Rong; Berenson, Gerald S

    2005-02-15

    Femoral artery intima-media thickness (IMT), like carotid IMT, is a surrogate indicator of atherosclerotic coronary and peripheral vascular diseases in middle-aged and older adults. Although risk factors for coronary artery disease are also associated with increased IMT, especially as measured in carotid arteries, there is a paucity of information with respect to the femoral artery in this regard in the asymptomatic, younger adult population. This study examined the impact of multiple risk factors on the common femoral artery IMT as measured by B-mode ultrasonography in 1,080 black and white subjects aged 24 to 43 years (71% white and 43% men) enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study. Femoral IMT showed gender difference (men more than women, p = 0.001), but no racial difference. In a multivariate model, systolic blood pressure, age, male gender, cigarette smoking, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratios related independently, in that order, to IMT. Mean IMT increased with an increasing number of risk factors defined as values above the age-, race-, and gender-specific 75th percentile of systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and insulin along with smoking status (p for trend = 0.003), with respective mean IMT values of 0.66, 0.69, 0.73, and 0.79 mm for 0, 1 to 2, 3, and 4 to 5 risk factors. The odds ratio for patients with >/=3 risk factors versus no risk factors having IMT in the top fifth percentile was 4.7 (p = 0.01). The observed adverse trend of increasing femoral IMT with an increasing number of risk factors in free-living, asymptomatic young subjects underscores the need for multiple risk factors profiling in early life. Further, ultrasonography of the femoral artery in conjunction with multiple risk factor profiling can be helpful in risk stratification.

  6. Hypotension in the chronically hypoxic chicken embryo is related to the β-adrenergic response of chorioallantoic and femoral arteries and not to bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Isa; Crossley, Dane; Villamor, Eduardo; Altimiras, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    Prolonged fetal hypoxia leads to growth restriction and can cause detrimental prenatal and postnatal alterations. The embryonic chicken is a valuable model to study the effects of prenatal hypoxia, but little is known about its long-term effects on cardiovascular regulation. We hypothesized that chicken embryos incubated under chronic hypoxia would be hypotensive due to bradycardia and βAR-mediated relaxation of the systemic and/or the chorioallantoic (CA) arteries. We investigated heart rate, blood pressure, and plasma catecholamine levels in 19-day chicken embryos (total incubation 21 days) incubated from day 0 in normoxia or hypoxia (14-15% O(2)). Additionally, we studied α-adrenoceptor (αAR)-mediated contraction, relaxation to the β-adrenoceptor (βAR) agonist isoproterenol, and relaxation to the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin in systemic (femoral) and CA arteries (by wire myography). Arterial pressure showed a trend toward hypotension in embryos incubated under chronic hypoxic conditions compared with the controls (mean arterial pressure 3.19 ± 0.18 vs. 2.59 ± 0.13 kPa, normoxia vs. hypoxia, respectively. P = 0.056), without an accompanied bradycardia and elevation in plasma norepinephrine and lactate levels. All vessels relaxed in response to βAR stimulation with isoproterenol, but the CA arteries completely lacked an αAR response. Furthermore, hypoxia increased the sensitivity of femoral arteries (but not CA arteries) to isoproterenol. Hypoxia also increased the responsiveness of femoral arteries to forskolin. In conclusion, we suggest that hypotension in chronic hypoxic chicken embryos is the consequence of elevated levels of circulating catecholamines acting in vascular beds with exclusive (CA arteries) or exacerbated (femoral arteries) βAR-mediated relaxation, and not a consequence of bradycardia.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of In-Stent Occlusion: New Technique for Recanalization of Long Superficial Femoral Artery Occlusion (Direct Stent Puncture Technique)

    SciTech Connect

    Palena, Luis Mariano Cester, Giacomo; Manzi, Marco

    2012-04-15

    In-stent reocclusion is a frequent complication of endovascular treatment and stenting, especially in the superficial femoral artery. Neointimal hyperplasia is the main cause of this problem, but in many cases, it occurs as a result of the presence of stent strut fractures. The two treatment options are endovascular and surgical intervention. The effectiveness of endovascular interventions in patients with critical limb ischemia has been well established, but in some cases, crossing the occluded stent is difficult. We describe a new technique to recanalize long in-stent superficial femoral artery occlusions characterized by direct stent puncture, followed by retrograde-antegrade recanalization after antegrade failures.

  8. Spontaneous Rupture of Superficial Femoral Artery Repaired with Endovascular Stent-Grafting with use of Rendez-Vous Technique, Followed by Delayed Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Cannavale, Alessandro; Gazzetti, Marianna; Fantozzi, Cristiano; Taurino, Maurizio; Speziale, Francesco

    2013-02-15

    This is the case of a 72-year-old man with lower limb ischemia due to spontaneous rupture of nonaneurysmal superficial femoral artery that developed into thigh hematoma. After failure of a Fogarty revascularization, an emergency endovascular procedure was performed to restore the arterial continuity. A rendezvous procedure was performed with a double femoral and popliteal approach and two covered stent-grafts were deployed. Patient's clinical conditions immediately improved, but 4 months later the stent-grafts were surgically removed for infection and exteriorization. A femoropopliteal bypass was performed. After 1 year follow-up, the patient is in good clinical condition.

  9. [Accessory renal arteries in human fetuses].

    PubMed

    Gościcka, D; Szpinda, M; Kochan, J

    1996-12-01

    Using conventional anatomical methods, renal arteries of 140 human fetuses were studied. It was found (21.1%) that the accessory renal arteries occurred in a three-fold manner: 1. as single arteries (19.2%), 2. as double arteries (2.1%) and 3. as triplex arteries (0.7%). More often they originated from the right part of the circumference of the abdominal aorta, mainly in the female fetuses. These arteries penetrated the following segments of the kidney: the inferior (12.9%), the superior (2.3%), the anterior inferior (2.8%), the posterior (2.1%) and the anterior superior (1.5%). They crossed the renal pelvis more often in front (12.2%) than from behind of it (5%). The frequency of the occurrence of the accessory arteries depends not from the age of the fetus. PMID:9082875

  10. [Use of stents with bioactive coating in treatment of patients with lesions of the superficial femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Generalov, M I; Maĭstrenko, D N; Oleshchuk, A N; Ivanov, A S; Granov, D A; Ovchinnikov, I V; Khmel'nitskiĭ, A V; Gusinskiĭ, A V

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the immediate outcomes of implanting stents with bioactive coating in treatment of patients presenting with atherosclerotic lesions of the superficial femoral artery. Over the period from January 2014 to December 2015, endovascular interventions on the superficial femoral artery were carried out in a total of 18 patients (mean age 61.3±9.2 years). The implants inserted were stents with bioactive coating based on titanium oxinitride, measuring 6 to 8 mm in diameter and being from 50 to 200 mm long. Prior to operation and 7 days after implantation of the stent, the immunoenzymatic assay was used to determine the level of nitrogen nitric oxide (NO) in blood. The stents' patency was assessed by the findings of ultrasound duplex scanning performed at 30 days, and then 6 and 12 months after the intervention. There were no complications either during the operation or in the early postoperative period. An increase in the ankle-brachial index was observed in all patients: with the average value prior to treatment amounting to 0.4±0.3 and equalling 1.1±0.2 after stenting (p<0.0001). Normalization of the blood NO level was revealed (was noted to normalize): the mean value prior to operation amounted to 18.9±2.3 µmol/L and after operation to 28.9±4.1 µmol/L (p<0.05). Primary patency rate of the stents was 100% at 30 days, 94.5% (1 occlusion) at 6 months and 88.8% (1 restenosis and 1 occlusion) at 12 months. The patients with occlusion or restenosis were subjected to repeat endovascular interventions, with restoration of patency of the construction (with the construction's patency restored). By now all the 18 patients show preserved patency (currently patency was preserved) of lower-limb arteries, with no evidence of restenosis in the zones of operations. It was concluded that using stents with bioactive coating based on titanium oxinitride results in normalization of the level of NO in blood, which may contribute favourably to prolongation of the

  11. Morphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the effect of bromocriptine and cyclosporine on the vasospastic femoral artery of rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Başocak, Kahan; Canaz, Hüseyin; Canaz, Gökhan; İplikçioğlu, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm is the main causes of mortality and morbidity in patiens with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The arterial narrowing mechanism that develops after SAH is not yet fully understood but many studies showed that hypotension, neurogenic reflexes, clots in the subarachnoidal space, spasmogenic agents, humoral and celluler immunity play a role in the etiology. In this study we investigate the effects of Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A in vasospasm secondary to SAH on rat femoral artery from ultrastructural and morphometric perspectives. 120 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 12 groups: Vasospasm (V), control (K), surgical control (CK) groups, vasospasm+Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A groups (VCyA, VBr, VBr+CyA), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A control groups (CK, BK, Br+CyAK), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A surgical control groups (BCK, CyCK, Br+CyACK). In order to create SAH model, 0, 1 cm3 blood injected into silastic sheath wrapped rat femoral artery. Bromocriptine (2 mg/kg/d) and Cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg/d) combinations applied to control, surgical control and vasospastic models. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy used during this study. Statistical evaluation of the morphometric measurement data concerning vascular wall thickness and luminal cross-sectional areas of all groups were performed using Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon-signed rank, and Student-t tests. Cyclosporine A, whose effects in the prevention of vasospasm have been demonstrated in previous studies. In this study we discovered that Bromocriptine demonstrated strong effects similar to Cyclosporine-A. Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A markedly prevent the development of chronic morphologic vasospasm following SAH. The combined use of both drugs does not change this preventive effect. PMID:26770311

  12. The origin of the medial circumflex femoral artery: a meta-analysis and proposal of a new classification system

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brandon M.; Vikse, Jens; Roy, Joyeeta; Pękala, Przemysław A.; Svensen, Maren; Guay, Daniel L.; Saganiak, Karolina; Walocha, Jerzy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The medial circumflex femoral artery (MCFA) is a common branch of the deep femoral artery (DFA) responsible for supplying the femoral head and the greater trochanteric fossa. The prevalence rates of MCFA origin, its branching patterns and its distance to the mid-inguinal point (MIP) vary significantly throughout the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the true prevalence of these characteristics and to study their associated anatomical and clinical relevance. Methods. A search of the major electronic databases Pubmed, EMBASE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, SciELO, BIOSIS, and CNKI was performed to identify all articles reporting data on the origin of the MCFA, its branching patterns and its distance to the MIP. No data or language restriction was set. Additionally, an extensive search of the references of all relevant articles was performed. All data on origin, branching and distance to MIP was extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis using MetaXL v2.0. Results. A total of 38 (36 cadaveric and 2 imaging) studies (n = 4,351 lower limbs) were included into the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of the MCFA originating from the DFA was 64.6% (95% CI [58.0–71.5]), while the pooled prevalence of the MCFA originating from the CFA was 32.2% (95% CI [25.9–39.1]). The CFA-derived MCFA was found to originate as a single branch in 81.1% (95% CI [70.1–91.7]) of cases with a mean pooled distance of 50.14 mm (95% CI [42.50–57.78]) from the MIP. Conclusion. The MCFA’s variability must be taken into account by surgeons, especially during orthopedic interventions in the region of the hip to prevent iatrogenic injury to the circulation of the femoral head. Based on our analysis, we present a new proposed classification system for origin of the MCFA. PMID:26966661

  13. Coaxial electrospinning of P(LLA-CL)/heparin biodegradable polymer nanofibers: potential vascular graft for substitution of femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wei; Qiu, Li-Jun; Mo, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Yun-Fei; Peng, Bo; Liu, Min; Huang, Jun-Hua; Wang, Guang-Chun; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2013-06-01

    Electrospinning is one of the most simple and effective methods to prepare polymer fibers with the diameters ranging from nanometer to several micrometers. Poly(L-lactide)-co-poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) fibers and P(LLA-CL)/heparin coaxial composite fibers herein were successfully prepared by single electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning, respectively. The prepared endothelialized P(LLA-CL) and P(LLA-CL)/heparin vascular grafts were used in the Beagle dogs experiment to evaluate the feasibility of thus made different scaffolds for substitution of dog femoral artery in early period, medium term, and long term, meanwhile the pure P(LLA-CL) vascular graft was used as the control group during all the experiments. The animal model was established by using the graft materials to anastomose both femoral arteries of dogs. The vascular grafts patency rates (i.e., the unobstructed capacity of blood vessel) were detected by color Doppler flow imaging technology and digital subtraction angiography. To observe the histological morphology at different periods, the vascular grafts were removed after 7, 14, and 30 days, and the corresponding histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The experimental results show that in the early period, the patency rates of pure P(LLA-CL) graft, endothelial P(LLA-CL) graft, and P(LLA-CL)/heparin graft were 75%, 75%, and 100%, respectively; in the medium term, the patency rates of pure P(LLA-CL) graft and endothelial P(LLA-CL) graft were 25%, whereas that of P(LLA-CL)/heparin graft was 50%; the patency rates of pure P(LLA-CL) graft and endothelial P(LLA-CL) graft were down to 0%, whereas the patency rate of P(LLA-CL)/heparin graft was 25% in the long term. This preliminary study has demonstrated that P(LLA-CL)/heparin coaxial composite fiber maybe a reliable artificial graft for the replacement of femoral artery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2013.

  14. Gender-specific alteration of adrenergic responses in small femoral arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Luksha, Leonid; Poston, Lucilla; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Aghajanova, Lusine; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2005-11-01

    Estrogen receptor-beta knockout mice become hypertensive as they age, and males have a higher blood pressure than females. We hypothesized that the absence of estrogen receptor-beta may contribute to development of cardiovascular dysfunction by modification of adrenergic responsiveness in the peripheral vasculature. Small femoral arteries (internal diameter <200 microm) were isolated from estrogen receptor-beta knockout and wild-type mice and mounted on a wire myograph. Concentration-response curves to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were compared and the contribution of adrenoceptor subtypes established using specific agonists and antagonists. The involvement of endothelial factors in the modulation of resting tone was also investigated and immunohistochemical analysis used to confirm the presence or absence of estrogen receptor expression. Compared with wild type, arteries from estrogen receptor-beta knockout male, but not female, mice demonstrated gender-specific enhancement of the response to phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist), which was accompanied by elevated basal tension attributable to endothelial factors. Contractile responses to the mixed adrenoceptor agonist norepinephrine did not differ significantly between estrogen receptor-beta knockout and wild type; however, beta-adrenoceptor inhibition unmasked an enhanced underlying alpha1-adrenoceptor responsiveness in estrogen receptor-beta knockout males. beta-adrenoceptor-mediated dilatation was also enhanced in estrogen receptor-beta knockout versus wild-type males. We suggest that estrogen receptor-beta modifies the adrenergic control of small artery tone in males but not in females.

  15. Role of muscular eNOS in skeletal arteries: Endothelium-independent hypoxic vasoconstriction of the femoral artery is impaired in eNOS-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, Hae Young; Lin, Hai Yue; Oh, Goo Taeg; Zhang, Yin Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that hypoxia augments α-adrenergic contraction (hypoxic vasoconstriction, HVC) of skeletal arteries in rats. The underlying mechanism may involve hypoxic inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressed in skeletal arterial myocytes (16). To further explore the novel role of muscular eNOS in the skeletal artery, we compared HVC in femoral arteries (FAs) from eNOS knockout (KO) mice with that from wild-type (WT) and heterozygous (HZ) mice. Immunohistochemical assays revealed that, in addition to endothelia, eNOS is also expressed in the medial layer of FAs, albeit at a much lower level. However, the medial eNOS signal was not evident in HZ FAs, despite strong expression in the endothelium; similar observations were made in WT carotid arteries (CAs). The amplitude of contraction induced by 1 μM phenylephrine (PhE) was greater in HZ than in WT FAs. Hypoxia (3% Po2) significantly augmented PhE-induced contraction in WT FAs but not in HZ or KO FAs. No HVC was observed in PhE-pretreated WT CAs. The NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (0.1 mM) also augmented PhE contraction in endothelium-denuded WT FAs but not in WT CAs. Inhibitors specific to neuronal NOS and inducible NOS did not augment PhE-induced contraction of WT FAs. NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) inhibitor (GKT137831, 5 μM), but not NOX2 inhibitor (apocynin, 100 μM), suppressed HVC. Consistent with the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), HVC was also inhibited by pretreatment with tiron or polyethylene glycol-catalase. Taken together, these data suggest that the eNOS expressed in smooth muscle cells in FAs attenuates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction; this suppression is alleviated under hypoxia, which potentiates vasoconstriction in a NOX4/ROS-dependent mechanism. PMID:27486092

  16. Effects of cold pressor-induced sympathetic stimulation on the mechanical properties of common carotid and femoral arteries in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Tie-Sheng; Duan, Yun-You; Yang, Yi-Lin; Yuan, Li-Jun

    2011-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the effects of sympathetic excitation and elevation of blood pressure on mechanical properties of common carotid and femoral arteries by wave intensity analysis (WIA). The diameters and arterial stiffness parameters of right common carotid artery (RCCA) and right common femoral artery (RCFA) in healthy young men were measured by WIA at baseline and during cold pressor test (CPT). In addition, the blood pressure and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. The heart rates and blood pressures increased during CPT compared with baseline, while the pulse pressures remained unchanged. The diameters of RCCA increased slightly, while those of RCFA did not change. The Peterson's pressure modulus (Ep), augment index (AI), and pulse wave velocity from β (PWVβ) increased obviously, while arterial compliance (AC) decreased with no change in stiffness index (β) of both arteries during CPT when compared with baseline. There was an obvious increase in pulse wave velocity from wave intensity (PWV_WI) of RCCA, while the PWV_WI of RCFA showed no significant change during CPT. The sympathetic nervous system exerts a more marked tonic restraint on RCFA than on RCCA. The Ep, AC, AI, PWVβ of RCCA, and RCFA are much affected by variations in blood pressure and sympathetic status, while the β of both arteries are less vulnerable to these factors and are more reliable in reflecting the actual arterial stiffness; The PWV_WI appears to be suitable only for evaluating the stiffness of RCCA instead of RCFA.

  17. An animal model of coronary thrombosis and thrombolysis--comparisons of vascular damage and thrombus formation in the coronary and femoral arteries after balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Katsuragawa, M; Fujiwara, H; Kawamura, A; Htay, T; Yoshikuni, Y; Mori, K; Sasayama, S

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vascular damage and thrombus formation in the coronary and femoral arteries after balloon angioplasty, and to develop a physiological animal model of intracoronary occlusive thrombus using the balloon angioplasty technique. Angioplasty of the left anterior descending coronary arteries of 14 dogs was performed with an oversized balloon catheter at a high inflation pressure (150 PSI). This was followed angiographically (PTCA protocol). Dogs that showed arterial occlusion were divided into 2 groups. The dogs in 1 group were killed with an overdose of sodium pentobarbital, and those in the other group were infused with a tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA; 300,000 unit/kg). Angioplasty of the femoral and profunda femoris arteries (n = 5) was performed in 5 other dogs (PTA protocol). All of the animals were eventually sacrificed and tissue preparations were made from all 3 types of arteries. In the PTCA protocol, acute arterial occlusion was seen angiographically within 2 h in 10 of the 14 dogs. A histological study of the acutely occluded arteries (n = 5) showed thrombotic occlusion and severe arterial damage with medial tearing. T-PA was infused to 5 of the dogs with acute occlusion, and all showed reperfusion. A histological study of these animals showed severe arterial damage, but no macroscopic thrombus. In 4 dogs without acute occlusion, none of the 10 arteries examined were acutely occluded. In the PTA protocol, none of the 10 arteries were acutely occluded. A histological study showed fewer thrombi and less severe arterial damage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. OUTBACK catheter for treatment of superficial femoral and iliac artery chronic total occlusion: Experience from two centers

    PubMed Central

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Suresh, Balla; Fang, Cheng; Ammar, Thoraya; Botchu, Rajesh; Thava, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The OUTBACK® catheter is a reentry device that enables reentry into a vessel lumen from the subintimal space during subintimal angioplasty. It is reserved for cases where reentry has not been possible using conventional wire and catheter techniques. We report a two-center experience in recanalization of the chronic total occlusions of the common iliac (CIA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using the OUTBACK® catheter in cases where other techniques were unsuccessful. Material and Methods: All cases where recanalization was performed using the OUTBACK® reentry catheter between January 2010 to January 2015 were retrospectively identified and included in this study. 21 patients were identified. The indication for intervention in these cases included claudication and critical leg ischemia. In all cases, conventional recanalization could not be successfully achieved. Results: The OUTBACK® catheter was used to recanalize 10 SFA occlusion and 9 CIA occlusions. In 19 patients (90%), reentry into true arterial lumen was successfully achieved. 17 patients had their recanalization through the transfemoral approach whereas 2 patients had a transpopliteal artery approach. In 2 patients, reentry into the true lumen could not be achieved using the OUTBACK® catheter due to patient's intolerability for the procedure and severe atherosclerotic calcified plaques. There was 100% patency of the vessel intervened on Duplex ultrasound at 24 months of follow up. 16 patients (84%) remained asymptomatic and 2 patients (10.5%) reported worsening of their symptoms due to the development of new lesions within the arterial system. Conclusion: The OUTBACK® catheter is an effective and safe technique for reentry into the vessel lumen when conventional techniques fail. PMID:27413275

  19. Modified T-Graft for Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Patient with Small-Caliber Femoral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Daniel; El-Banayosy, Aly; Koerner, Michael M.; Reed, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is generally used as a last resort to provide cardiopulmonary support in patients whose advanced cardiac or respiratory failure does not respond to less invasive treatments. Lower-limb ischemia secondary to the large diameter of the arterial cannula is one of ECMO's major limitations: in patients who have small-caliber arteries, the cannulas can reduce native blood flow. The creation of a T-graft—a well-described technique to avoid limb ischemia—enables flow into the ECMO cannula without jeopardizing blood flow to the limb. However, leaving the graft exposed through an open groin wound can result in dislodgment, and it increases the risk of infection. We describe our modification of a conventional T-graft in an 18-year-old woman who had systolic heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and small-caliber femoral vessels. We tunneled a polytetrafluoroethylene graft inside a Dacron graft, then ran the combined graft through a subcutaneous tunnel similar to that created for a peripheral bypass. Thus, the graft was protected from environmental exposure and the risk of infection. Our technique seems safer and more secure than the original T-graft technique, and we recommend its consideration during ECMO cannulation. PMID:26664305

  20. Characterization of nerve and microvessel damage and recovery in type 1 diabetic mice after permanent femoral artery ligation.

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Mantsounga, Chris S; Broqueres-You, Dong; Dohan, Anthony; Polivka, Marc; Deroide, Nicolas; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Kubis, Nathalie; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathy is the most common complication of the peripheral nervous system during the progression of diabetes. The pathophysiology is unclear but may involve microangiopathy, reduced endoneurial blood flow, and tissue ischemia. We used a mouse model of type 1 diabetes to study parallel alterations of nerves and microvessels following tissue ischemia. We designed an easily reproducible model of ischemic neuropathy induced by irreversible ligation of the femoral artery. We studied the evolution of behavioral function, epineurial and endoneurial vessel impairment, and large nerve myelinated fiber as well as small cutaneous unmyelinated fiber impairment for 1 month following the onset of ischemia. We observed a more severe hindlimb dysfunction and delayed recovery in diabetic animals. This was associated with reduced density of large arteries in the hindlimb and reduced sciatic nerve epineurial blood flow. A reduction in sciatic nerve endoneurial capillary density was also observed, associated with a reduction in small unmyelinated epidermal fiber number and large myelinated sciatic nerve fiber dysfunction. Moreover, vascular recovery was delayed, and nerve dysfunction was still present in diabetic animals at day 28. This easily reproducible model provides clear insight into the evolution over time of the impact of ischemia on nerve and microvessel homeostasis in the setting of diabetes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25944265

  1. The Use of ExoSeal Vascular Closure Device for Direct Antegrade Superficial Femoral Artery Puncture Site Hemostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri Khaitovich, Boris; Yakubovich, Dmitry; Bensaid, Paul Golan, Gil; Silverberg, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the ExoSeal vascular closure device (VCD) to achieve hemostasis in antegrade access of the superficial femoral artery (SFA).MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the outcome of ExoSeal VCD used for hemostasis in 110 accesses to the SFA in 93 patients between July 2011 and July 2013. All patients had patent proximal SFA based on computer tomography angiography or ultrasound duplex. Arterial calcifications at puncture site were graded using fluoroscopy. The SFA was accessed in an antegrade fashion with ultrasound or fluoroscopic guidance. In all patients, 5–7F vascular sheaths were used. The ExoSeal VCD was applied to achieve hemostasis at the end of the procedure. All patients were clinically examined and had ultrasound duplex exam for any puncture site complications during the 24 h postprocedure.ResultsIn all procedures, the ExoSeal was applied successfully. We did not encounter any device-related technical failure. There were four major complications in four patients (3.6 %): three pseudoaneurysms, which were treated with direct thrombin injection, and one hematoma, which necessitated transfusion of two blood units. All patients with complications were treated with anticoagulation preprocedure or received thrombolytic therapy.ConclusionsThe ExoSeal VCD can be safely used for antegrade puncture of the SFA, with a high procedural success rate (100 %) and a low rate of access site complications (3.6 %)

  2. Retrograde femoral arterial perfusion and stroke risk during minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: is there cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    Recent data have suggested that retrograde arterial perfusion (RAP) during minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) is associated with a higher stroke rate than sternotomy approaches. To assess whether there is genuine cause for concern, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of this data. A multitude of confounding factors obfuscate interpretation of the data including imprecise definitions of MIMVS, the effect of the substantial learning curve, retrospective comparisons of small historic cohorts with baseline differences and differing risk profiles for atherosclerosis, different methods of aortic occlusion and lack of reporting of peripheral vascular disease (PVD)/aortic assessment in patient populations. In patients with severe (grades IV and V) aortic arch/ascending aortic atherosclerosis, RAP has clearly been shown to be associated with an increase in risk of cerebral embolic complications. It would be reasonable to assume that grades IV/V atheroma anywhere along the aorto-iliac axis (from femoral cannulation site to carotid arteries) may also increase the risk of stroke. Hence those at risk of severe atherosclerotic vascular disease should be screened to fully assess the aortoiliac axis. Apart from this patient group, there is no convincing evidence (without confounding variables) that retrograde perfusion per se during minimally invasive mitral surgery increases the risk of stroke. This may be due to the largely differing aetiologies of vascular and mitral degenerative disease. PMID:24350000

  3. Femoral morphology and femoropelvic musculoskeletal anatomy of humans and great apes: a comparative virtopsy study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Nishimura, Takeshi; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2011-09-01

    The proximal femoral morphology of fossil hominins is routinely interpreted in terms of muscular topography and associated locomotor modes. However, the detailed correspondence between hard and soft tissue structures in the proximal femoral region of extant great apes is relatively unknown, because dissection protocols typically do not comprise in-depth osteological descriptions. Here, we use computed tomography and virtopsy (virtual dissection) for non-invasive examination of the femoropelvic musculoskeletal anatomy in Pan troglodytes, P. paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens. Specifically, we analyze the topographic relationship between muscle attachment sites and surface structures of the proximal femoral shaft such as the lateral spiral pilaster. Our results show that the origin of the vastus lateralis muscle is anterior to the insertion of gluteus maximus in all examined great ape specimens and humans. In gorillas and orangutans, the insertion of gluteus maximus is on the inferior (anterolateral) side of the lateral spiral pilaster. In chimpanzees, however, the maximus insertion is on its superior (posteromedial) side, similar to the situation in modern humans. These findings support the hypothesis that chimpanzees and humans exhibit a shared-derived musculoskeletal topography of the proximal femoral region, irrespective of their different locomotor modes, whereas gorillas and orangutans represent the primitive condition. Caution is thus warranted when inferring locomotor behavior from the surface topography of the proximal femur of fossil hominins, as the morphology of this region may contain a strong phyletic signal that tends to blur locomotor adaptation.

  4. Effects of age on the physiological and mechanical characteristics of human femoropopliteal arteries.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Dzenis, Yuris A; Phillips, Nicholas Y; Desyatova, Anastasia S; Kitson, Justin; Bowen, Robert; MacTaggart, Jason N

    2015-01-01

    Surgical and interventional therapies for peripheral artery disease (PAD) are notorious for high rates of failure. Interactions between the artery and repair materials play an important role, but comprehensive data describing the physiological and mechanical characteristics of human femoropopliteal arteries are not available. Fresh femoropopliteal arteries were obtained from 70 human subjects (13-79 years old), and in situ vs. excised arterial lengths were measured. Circumferential and longitudinal opening angles were determined for proximal superficial femoral, proximal popliteal and distal popliteal arteries. Mechanical properties were assessed by multi-ratio planar biaxial extension, and experimental data were used to calculate physiological stresses and stretches, in situ axial force and anisotropy. Verhoeff-Van Gieson-stained axial and transverse arterial sections were used for histological analysis. Most specimens demonstrated nonlinear deformations and were more compliant longitudinally than circumferentially. In situ axial pre-stretch decreased 0.088 per decade of life. In situ axial force and axial stress also decreased with age, but circumferential physiological stress remained constant. Physiological circumferential stretch decreased 55-75% after 45 years of age. Histology demonstrated a thickened external elastic lamina with longitudinally oriented elastin that was denser in smaller, younger arteries. Axial elastin likely regulates axial pre-stretch to help accommodate the complex deformations required of the artery wall during locomotion. Degradation and fragmentation of elastin as a consequence of age, cyclic mechanical stress and atherosclerotic arterial disease may contribute to decreased in situ axial pre-stretch, predisposing to more severe kinking of the artery during limb flexion and loss of energy-efficient arterial function.

  5. Invasive evaluation of plaque morphology of symptomatic superficial femoral artery stenoses using combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Sibin K; Safian, Robert D; Madder, Ryan D; Hanson, Ivan D; Pica, Mark C; Smith, James L; Goldstein, James A; Abbas, Amr E

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the plaque morphology of severe stenoses in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) employing combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS). Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Plaque composition of SFA stenoses has been characterized as primarily fibrous or fibrocalcific by non-invasive and autopsy studies. NIRS has been validated to detect lipid-core plaque (LCP) in the coronary circulation. We imaged severe SFA stenoses with NIRS-IVUS prior to revascularization in 31 patients (46 stenoses) with Rutherford claudication ⩾ class 3. Angiographic parameters included lesion location and stenosis severity. IVUS parameters included plaque burden and presence of calcium. NIRS images were analyzed for LCP and maximum lipid-core burden index in a 4-mm length of artery (maxLCBI4mm). By angiography, 38 (82.6%) lesions were calcified and 9 (19.6%) were chronic total occlusions. Baseline stenosis severity and lesion length were 86.0 ± 11.0% and 36.5 ± 46.5 mm, respectively. NIRS-IVUS identified calcium in 45 (97.8%) lesions and LCP in 17 (37.0%) lesions. MaxLCBI4mm was 433 ± 244. All lesions with LCP also contained calcium; there were no non-calcified lesions with LCP. In conclusion, this is the first study of combined NIRS-IVUS in patients with PAD. NIRS-IVUS demonstrates that nearly all patients with symptomatic severe SFA disease have fibrocalcific plaque, and one-third of such lesions contain LCP. These findings contrast with those in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and may have implications regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in different vascular beds.

  6. CT Angiography Analysis of Axillary Artery Diameter versus Common Femoral Artery Diameter: Implications for Axillary Approach for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Hostile Aortoiliac Segment and Advanced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tayal, Rajiv; Iftikhar, Humayun; LeSar, Benjamin; Patel, Rahul; Tyagi, Naveen; Cohen, Marc; Wasty, Najam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The use of the axillary artery as an access site has lost favor in percutaneous intervention due to the success of these procedures from a radial or brachial alternative. However, these distal access points are unable to safely accommodate anything larger than a 7-French sheath. To date no studies exist describing the size of the axillary artery in relation to the common femoral artery in a patient population. We hypothesized that the axillary artery is of comparable size to the CFA in most patients and less frequently diseased. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 110 CT scans of the thoracic and abdominal aorta done at our institution to rule out aortic dissection in which the right axillary artery, right CFA, left axillary artery, and left CFA were visualized. Images were then reconstructed using commercially available TeraRecon software and comparative measurements made of the axillary and femoral arteries. Results. In 96 patients with complete data, the mean sizes of the right and left axillary artery were slightly smaller than the left and right CFA. A direct comparison of the sizes of the axillary artery and CFA in the same patient yielded a mean difference of 1.69 mm ± 1.74. In all patients combined, the mean difference between the axillary artery and CFA was 1.88 mm on the right and 1.68 mm on the left. In 19 patients (19.8%), the axillary artery was of the same caliber as the associated CFA. In 8 of 96 patients (8.3%), the axillary artery was larger compared to the CFA. Conclusions. Although typically smaller, the axillary artery is often of comparable size to the CFA, significantly less frequently calcified or diseased, and in almost all observed cases large enough to accommodate a sheath with up to 18 French. PMID:27110403

  7. Chondrocyte distribution in the articular cartilage of human femoral condyles.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, R S; Palfrey, A J

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of chondrocytes throughout the total thickness of articular cartilage from the femoral condyles of infants, children and adults has been studied using serial sections cut parallel as well as perpendicular to the articular surface. The thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated in fixed sections. In one of the adult specimens, the thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated firstly by direct measurement of the cut surfaces of a series of blocks cut from both condyles and then from the number of parallel sections of the cartilage prepared from those blocks. Cell density was highest in the superficial zone of all specimens examined, declining to lower values in the deep zone of the cartilage. Within this pattern the infant specimens had the highest values for cell density and the adults the lowest, with values for children in an intermediate range. There was no significant variation in cell density across the condyles of the selected adult specimen. The absolute values for cartilage thickness depended on the method used, but in general total thickness was found to approximately double from late gestation to maturity. In the selected adult specimen, the cartilage was thickest just anterior and posterior to the main weight-bearing area of the condyles. PMID:3198480

  8. JetStream atherectomy for treating iatrogenic occlusion of a stented common femoral artery following deployment of angio-seal closure device.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Nicolas W

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a stented common femoral artery acute occlusion following deployment of an Angio-Seal closure device treated successfully with JetStream atherectomy under distal embolic protection using a NAV6 filter. The JetStream device, with its rotational atherectomy and continuous active aspiration feature, was effective in restoring normal flow to the distal lower extremity and eliminated the subtotal occlusion. Debris was captured in the filter and was retrieved successfully. The NAV6 filter seems uniquely suited for use in conjunction with the JetStream device because its filter is detached from the wire, allowing free wire movement with atherectomy. The JetStream device with NAV6 embolic capture system appears to be an effective method in treating stented common femoral artery occlusion following Angio-Seal deployment. PMID:23995724

  9. [Morphogenesis of the femoral diaphysis in humans: significance of function and evolution].

    PubMed

    Tardieu, C

    1994-01-01

    The obliquity of the femoral diaphysis, measured by the bicondylar angle, permits the adducted position of the knee in humans. The presence of a high femoral bicondylar angle has been a hallmark of hominid bipedality, but its pattern of development has not been documented. We have observed radiographic and skeletal data on the development of this angle. The two samples exhibit a pattern of a bicondylar angle of 0 degrees at birth and then a steady average increase in the angle through infancy and into the juvenile years. These data establish a high degree of potential for plasticity in the development of this angle and the direct association of a bipedal locomotion with the developmental emergence of a human femoral bicondylar angle. We show that the obliquity angle, which occasionally appears in some non-human primates, is not homologous to the human condition. As this angle is an epigenetic functional feature in modern humans, we suggest that it developed following a change in infantile locomotor behaviour of the early australopithecines and was not the result of a genomic change. PMID:7813973

  10. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p<0.001), a 43% greater calcified fibrocartilage tissue area (p<0.001), and a 226% greater uncalcified fibrocartilage depth (p<0.001), with the latter differences being particularly pronounced in the central region. We conclude that the ACL femoral enthesis has more fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure.

  11. Successful Endovascular Repair of an Iatrogenic Perforation of the Superficial Femoral Artery Using Self-Expanding Nitinol Supera Stents in a Patient with Acute Thromboembolic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Tom; Muenz, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of acute thromboembolic limb ischemia includes well-established surgical thrombectomy procedures and, in recent times, also percutaneous rotational thrombectomy using Straub Rotarex® system. This modality not only enables efficient treatment of such thrombotic occlusion but also in rare cases may imply the risk of perforation of the occluded artery. Herein, we report the case of a perforation of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) in an elderly female patient with thromboembolic limb ischemia. The perforation was successfully treated by implantation of self-expanding nitinol Supera stents and without the need for implantation of a stent graft. PMID:27213074

  12. The protective effect of cilostazol on isolated rabbit femoral arteries under conditions of ischemia and reperfusion: the role of the nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana R.G.A.; Celotto, Andréa C; Capellini, Verena K; Evora, Paulo R B; Piccinato, Carlos E; Joviliano, Edwaldo E

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The clinical significance of ischemia/reperfusion of the lower extremities demands further investigation to enable the development of more effective therapeutic alternatives. This study investigated the changes in the vascular reactivity of the rabbit femoral artery and nitric oxide metabolites under partial ischemia/reperfusion conditions following cilostazol administration. METHODS: Ischemia was induced using infrarenal aortic clamping. The animals were randomly divided into seven groups: Control 90 minutes, Ischemia/Reperfusion 90/60 minutes, Control 120 minutes, Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90 minutes, Cilostazol, Cilostazol before Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90 minutes, and Ischemia 120 minutes/Cilostazol/Reperfusion 90 minutes. Dose-response curves for sodium nitroprusside, acetylcholine, and the calcium ionophore A23187 were obtained in isolated femoral arteries. The levels of nitrites and nitrates in the plasma and skeletal muscle were determined using chemiluminescence. RESULTS: Acetylcholine- and A23187-induced relaxation was reduced in the Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90 group, and treatment with cilostazol partially prevented this ischemia/reperfusion-induced endothelium impairment. Only cilostazol treatment increased plasma levels of nitrites and nitrates. An elevation in the levels of nitrites and nitrates was observed in muscle tissues in the Ischemia/Reperfusion 120/90, Cilostazol/Ischemia/Reperfusion, and Ischemia/Cilostazol/Reperfusion groups. CONCLUSION: Hind limb ischemia/reperfusion yielded an impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of the femoral artery. Furthermore, cilostazol administration prior to ischemia exerted a protective effect on endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity under ischemia/reperfusion conditions. PMID:22358243

  13. Chronic vascular response after self-expanding nitinol stent implantation in superficial femoral arteries: a serial intravascular ultrasound analysis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Machiko; Fujii, Kenichi; Fukunaga, Masashi; Kawasaki, Daizo; Miki, Kojiro; Saita, Ten; Horimatsu, Tetsuo; Tamaru, Hiroto; Imanaka, Takahiro; Naito, Yoshiro; Masuyama, Tohru

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical properties of the self-expanding nitinol stents (SENS) and chronic biological stimulation on the wall from the SENS have not been fully investigated. This study evaluated the mechanical vascular response to SENS implantation in superficial femoral artery (SFA) lesions using serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Twenty-five symptomatic patients due to de novo SFA lesions scheduled for SENS placement were prospectively enrolled. Serial IVUS studies were performed immediately after crossing with a guidewire, immediately after the procedure, and at a 8-month follow-up. Serial IVUS volumetric analysis was conducted after stent deployment and at follow-up. Mean stent, lumen and neointimal areas were calculated as the volume divided by the stent length, and the calcium arc was measured. At follow-up, SENS had increased 40.6 % in overall volume. The chronic stent expansion tended to be larger, and the mean neointimal area at the 8-month follow-up was significantly larger in less calcified lesions compared to heavily calcified lesions. As a result, the mean late lumen area loss was significantly larger in lesions with calcium arcs of 0° and in the first and second quadrants than in those with calcium arcs in the third and fourth quadrants (2.8 ± 7.2, 1.3 ± 5.6, 0.6 ± 5.9, 1.2 ± 5.4, -0.8 ± 5.2 mm(2), respectively; p < 0.001). SENSs continued to enlarge with intimal proliferation over 8 months in all lesions. Although arterial calcium affected the degree of chronic stent expansion during the follow-up period, neointimal proliferation was smaller in heavily calcified lesion compared to less calcified lesion following SENS implantation.

  14. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Alter Remodeling of Completely Biological Engineered Grafts Implanted into the Sheep Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Lee A.; Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Lahti, Matthew T.; Johnson, Sandra S.; Chen, Minna H.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Hemocompatibility of tissue-engineered vascular grafts remains a major hurdle to clinical utility for small-diameter grafts. Here we assessed the feasibility of using autologous blood outgrowth endothelial cells to create an endothelium via lumenal seeding on completely biological, decellularized engineered allografts prior to implantation in the sheep femoral artery. The 4-mm-diameter, 2- to 3-cm-long grafts were fabricated from fibrin gel remodeled into an aligned tissue tube in vitro by ovine dermal fibroblasts prior to decellularization. Decellularized grafts pre-seeded with blood outgrowth endothelial cells (n=3) retained unprecedented (>95 %) monolayer coverage 1 h post-implantation and had greater endothelial coverage, smaller wall thickness, and more basement membrane after 9-week implantation, including a final week without anti-coagulation therapy, compared with contralateral non-seeded controls. These results support the use of autologous blood outgrowth endothelial cells as a viable source of endothelial cells for creating an endothelium with biological function on decellularized engineered allografts made from fibroblast-remodeled fibrin. PMID:24429838

  15. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

    PubMed

    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of human arteries. Methodology and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Rosset, E; Brunet, C; Rieu, R; Rolland, P; Pellissier, J F; Magnan, P E; Foulon, P; Drizenko, A; Laude, M; Branchereau, A; Friggi, A

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the biomechanical properties of the arterial wall and to compare arteries with different histologic structures, we designed a device that allows testing of arterial segments under near-physiologic conditions. A hydrodynamic generator simulates systolo-diastolic pressures in an open loop. An intraarterial pressure sensor and a sonomicrometer connected to two piezoelectric crystals placed in diametric opposition on the arterial wall allow computer calculation of compliance, stiffness, midwall radial arterial stress, Young modulus, and incremental modulus for a given arterial segment at a given pressure setting. Seven healthy common carotid artery (CCA) segments and seven healthy (superficial) femoral artery (FA) segments were studied immediately after removal from brain-dead donors between the ages of 18 and 35 years. Histologic examination was performed to determine the density of elastic fibers in the arterial wall. Hysteresis was observed in all segments regardless of pressure settings. Compliance was greater and modulus values and stiffness were lower in CCA than in FA. No evidence of structural change was noted after testing in the circulation loop. These preliminary results open the way to a wide variety of applications for our hydrodynamic circulation loop. Experiments will be undertaken to compare the mechanical properties of arteries before and after cryopreservation.

  17. Diagnosis of abdominal mural aortic thrombus following discovery of common femoral artery and vein thrombosis by point-of-care ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Nadia Maria; Taha, Farook; Vortsman, Eugene; Desai, Poonam; Kindschuh, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Acute limb ischemia (ALI) is a limb-threatening and life-threatening disease process. Mural aortic thrombosis (MAT) is a rare cause of ALI. While there is limited evidence on the use of bedside ultrasound for the detection of ALI or MAT, duplex ultrasound remains the standard in the diagnosis and ultimate medical decision-making in patients with acute and chronic limb ischemia. Point-of-care ultrasound may be used in the evaluation of patients with signs and symptoms of this disease entity. This is a case of a 79-year-old female with a complicated medical history, who presented with a pulseless right leg and abdominal tenderness. The patient quickly decompensated requiring intubation for airway protection. A post-intubation arterial blood gas (ABG) was unsuccessfully attempted in the right femoral artery, prompting an ultrasound-guided ABG. On B-mode ultrasound evaluation, echogenic material was visualized in the right common femoral artery without evidence of Doppler flow signal. Additionally, a partially obstructing echogenic material was also noted at the femoro-saphenous vein junction with only partial compressibility by compression sonography. A computed tomography angiography of the aorta was performed indicating extensive infrarenal aortic thrombosis. The patient expired despite the relatively prompt diagnosis, highlighting the importance of early identification of acute arterial occlusion.

  18. Fluid dynamic study in a femoral artery branch casting of man with upstream main lumen curvature for steady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.; Back, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    An in-vitro, steady flow investigation was conducted in a hollow, transparent vascular replica of the profunda femoris branch of man for a range of physiological flow conditions. The replica casting tested was obtained from a human cadaver and indicated some plague formation along the main lumen and branch. The flow visualization observations and measured pressure distributions indicated the highly three-dimensional flow characteristics with arterial curvature and branching, and the important role of centrifugal effects in fluid transport mechanisms.

  19. Three-dimensional human femoral strain analysis using ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrer, J. R.; Heras-Palou, C.; Slater, T.

    With age, disease or injury the joints in the human body can wear out or bones may even fail catastrophically. In many cases it is possible to replace joints and bones with artificial components (prostheses). However, prosthetic joints can have a very limited life (often less than 10 years) and require replacement or 'revision'. In order to optimise prosthetic life, it is necessary to improve the design of components and implantation techniques, which is clearly also beneficial to both patients and hospitals.

  20. Response of human coronary arteries at different mechanical conditions.

    PubMed

    Atienza, J M

    2010-01-01

    The lack of reliable mechanical data on coronary arteries hampers the application of numerical models to vascular problems, and precludes physicians from knowing in advance the response of coronary arteries to the different interventions. In this work, the mechanical properties of human coronary arteries have been characterized. Whole samples from human right (RC) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arteries aged between 23 and 83 years have been studied by means of in-vitro tensile testing up to failure. Knowledge of the mechanical response of human coronary arteries could be applied to optimize the election of vascular grafts or to prevent arterial damage during angioplasty.

  1. Intraindividual Variability and Association of Human Collateral Supply to Different Arterial Regions.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Michael; Seiler, Christian

    2016-02-15

    The intraindividual variability and association of human collateral functional supply to different arterial regions is unknown. The primary study end point was collateral flow index (CFI) as obtained in the coronary artery (CA), renal artery (RA), left superficial femoral artery (SFA), and left subclavian artery (SCA) of the same individual. CFI is the ratio between simultaneously recorded mean arterial occlusive pressure divided by mean aortic pressure both subtracted by mean central venous pressure. In 100 patients admitted for diagnostic coronary angiography, CFI was assessed in 3 arterial regions (CA, RA, and SFA), 13 patients underwent CFI measurements in all 4 territories. By quantitative coronary angiography, 82 patients had a stenosis <50% in diameter in the CA who underwent CFI measurement. CFI in the CA, RA, left SFA, and left SCA region amounted to 0.110 ± 0.093, 0.119 ± 0.082, 0.512 ± 0.147, and 0.563 ± 0.155, respectively (p <0.0001). There was a direct and linear correlation between CA and SFA CFI: CFI_SFA = 0.47 + 0.47CFI_CA (r(2) = 0.05; p = 0.0259). In patients with CFI values in all 4 arterial regions, an inverse linear relation between left SFA and left SCA CFI was observed: CFI_SCA = 0.91-0.67CFI_SFA (r(2) = 0.36; p = 0.0305). In conclusion, intraindividual, preexistent collateral function is widely varying between different arterial supply areas. On average, collateral flow ranges from approximately 12% in comparison to flow during arterial patency in the coronary and renal circulation to over 50% in the left SFA and left SCA, that is, circle of Willi's territory. CA and SFA CFIs are directly related to each other. PMID:26772443

  2. Transient Monoplegia as a Result of Unilateral Femoral Artery Ischemia Detected by Multimodal Intraoperative Neuromonitoring in Posterior Scoliosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Rafal; Roclawski, Marek; Dziegiel, Krzysztof; Ceynowa, Marcin; Mikulicz, Marcin; Mazurek, Tomasz; Kloc, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This is to report a case of 16-year-old girl with transient right lower limb monoplegia as a result of femoral artery ischemia detected by multimodal intraoperative spinal cord neuromonitoring (MISNM) during posterior correction surgery of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A patient with a marfanoid body habitus and LENKE IA type scoliosis with the right thoracic curve of 48° of Cobb angle was admitted for posterior spinal fusion from Th6 to L2. After selective pedicle screws instrumentation and corrective maneuvers motor evoked potentials (MEP) began to decrease with no concomitant changes in somato-sensory evoked potentials recordings. The instrumentation was released first partially than completely with rod removal but the patient demonstrated constantly increasing serious neurological motor deficit of the whole right lower limb. Every technical cause of the MEP changes was eliminated and during the wake-up test the right foot was found to be pale and cold with no popliteal and dorsalis pedis pulses palpable. The patient was repositioned and the pelvic pad was placed more cranially. Instantly, the pulse and color returned to the patient's foot. Following MEP recordings showed gradual return of motor function up to the baseline at the end of the surgery, whereas somato-sensory evoked potentials were within normal range through the whole procedure. This case emphasizes the importance of the proper pelvic pad positioning during the complex spine surgeries performed in prone position of the patient. A few cases of neurological complications have been described which were the result of vascular occlusion after prolonged pressure in the inguinal area during posterior scoliosis surgery when the patient was in prone position. If incorrectly interpreted, they would have a significant impact on the course of scoliosis surgery. PMID:26871822

  3. Inhibitory effects of total flavones of Hippophae Rhamnoides L on thrombosis in mouse femoral artery and in vitro platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiayi; Kondo, Kazunao; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Meng, Xiansheng; Umemura, Kazuo

    2003-04-01

    Total flavones of Hippophae Rhamnoides L (TFH) are extracted from Sea buckthorn, a Chinese herbal medicine. Sea buckthorn has antioxidant, anti-ulcerogenic and hepato-protective actions, and its berry oil is reported to suppress platelet aggregation. Though it is frequently used for patients with thrombosis, the likely mechanism(s) and effects of TFH on thrombogenesis remain unclear. Thus, we have investigated the effect in-vivo of TFH on thrombogenesis and in vitro on platelet aggregation, comparing them to those of aspirin. We measured thrombotic occlusion time in a mouse femoral artery thrombosis model by the photochemical reaction between intravenously injected rose bengal and green light irradiation. In vitro platelet aggregation in whole blood was measured by single platelet counting. Thrombotic occlusion time was 8.5 +/- 0.6 min in the control group. TFH at a dose of 300 micro g/kg, intravenously administered 15 min before the rose bengal injection, significantly prolonged it to 11.6 +/- 1.0 min (P < 0.05), a similar effect on in-vivo thrombogenesis to that of aspirin. TFH at a concentration of 3.0 micro g/ml significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited in vitro platelet aggregation induced by collagen (2 micro g/ml) in a concentration dependent manner, in contrast TFH did not affect aggregation induced by arachidonic acid (80 micro M) and ADP (0.3 micro M). The results of the present study, in which TFH prevented in-vivo thrombogenesis, probably due to inhibition of platelet aggregation, suggest a possible clinical approach for the prevention of thrombosis. PMID:12628446

  4. [Spinal anesthesia using a low dose of isobaric bupivacaine in a patient with pulmonary artery hypertension and mixed obstructive and restrictive lung disease undergoing repeated femoral fracture surgery].

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Koji; Hakone, Masako; Nakazawa, Harumasa; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Moriyama, Kiyoshi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2014-02-01

    A 75-year-old woman with primary pulmonary hypertension was on medical therapy and ambulatory oxygen inhalation therapy for 7 years. The patient had right femoral fracture and was admitted to our hospital. She had also suffered from asthma for 2 years, and her vital capacity was 1.35 l with forced expiratory volume in 1 second 0.79 l, and with her mean pulmonary artery pressure 60 mmHg. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed under spinal anesthesia using isobaric bupivacaine 6 mg with fentanyl 10 microg, and the patient was discharged on postoperative 31 day with no major complications. One year after the surgery, she had left femoral fracture, and surgery was performed under spinal anesthesia using isobaric bupivacaine 6 mg with fentanyl 10 microg. With its minimal effects on hemodynamics, we speculate that spinal anesthesia using a low dose of isobaric bupivacaine can be a choice for patients with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24601108

  5. Critical appraisal of paclitaxel balloon angioplasty for femoral-popliteal arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Herten, Monika; Torsello, Giovanni B; Schönefeld, Eva; Stahlhoff, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, particularly critical limb ischemia, is an area with urgent need for optimized therapies because, to date, vascular interventions often have limited life spans. In spite of initial encouraging technical success after femoropopliteal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or stenting, postprocedural restenosis remains the major problem. The challenging idea behind the drug-coated balloon (DCB) concept is the biological modification of the injury response after balloon dilatation. Antiproliferative drugs administered via DCBs or drug-eluting stents are able to suppress neointimal hyperplasia, the main cause of restenosis. This article reviews the results of DCB treatments of femoropopliteal and infrapopliteal lesions in comparison to standard angioplasty with uncoated balloons. A systematic literature search was performed in 1) medical journals (ie, MEDLINE), 2) international registers for clinical studies (ie, www.clinicaltrials.gov), and 3) abstracts of scientific sessions. Several controlled randomized trials with follow-up periods of up to 5 years demonstrated the efficacy of paclitaxel -DCB technology. However, calcified lesions seem to affect the efficacy of DCB. Combinations of preconditioning methods with DCBs showed promising results. Although the mechanical abrasion of calcium via atherectomy or laser ablation showed favorable periprocedural results, the long-term impact on restenosis and clinical outcome has to be demonstrated. Major advantages of the DCBs are the rapid delivery of drug at uniform concentrations with a single dose, their efficacy in areas wherein stents have been contraindicated until now (ie, bifurcation, ostial lesions), and in leaving no stent scaffold behind. Reinterventions are easier to perform because DCBs leave no metal behind. Various combinations of DCBs with other treatment modalities may prove to be viable options in future. The follow-up results of clinical studies will evaluate the long-term impact

  6. Computer measurement of arterial disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J.; Selzer, R. H.; Barndt, R.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S.

    1980-01-01

    Image processing technique quantifies human atherosclerosis by computer analysis of arterial angiograms. X-ray film images are scanned and digitized, arterial shadow is tracked, and several quantitative measures of lumen irregularity are computed. In other tests, excellent agreement was found between computer evaluation of femoral angiograms on living subjects and evaluation by teams of trained angiographers.

  7. Distribution of distal femoral osteophytes in a human skeletal population

    PubMed Central

    Shepstone, L.; Rogers, J.; Kirwan, J.; Silverman, B.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine objectively spatial patterns of osteophytes around the distal end of the femur and to identify distinct subgroups.
METHODS—A sample of 107 human femora from a large skeletal population were selected for study. These femora included subjects with evidence of late stage osteoarthritis (that is, with eburnation present) and those with no such evidence. The location of osteophytes was recorded using a video camera and digitised computer images were extracted. Multidimensional scaling was used to identify clusters of femora based upon osteophyte location.
RESULTS—A distinct subgroup of femora was identified with osteophytes present only within the intercondylar notch region. None of these subjects had any evidence of eburnation.
CONCLUSIONS—This finding adds to an earlier study based on radiographs. Osteophytes located within the intercondylar notch of the femur appear to be a distinct subset, which may occur either as an early stage of knee osteoarthritis or for some independent reason.

 PMID:10873960

  8. Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2015-12-16

    The evaluation of viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament is fundamental to understand its physiological function and contribution as stabilizer for the selection of the methods of repair and reconstruction and for the development of scaffolds with adequate mechanical properties. In this work, 12 human specimens were tested to evaluate the time- and history-dependent non linear viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory formulated by Fung et al. (1972) and modified by Abramowitch and Woo (2004). The five constant of the QLV theory, used to describe the instantaneous elastic response and the reduced relaxation function on stress relaxation experiments, were successfully evaluated. It was found that the constant A was 1.21±0.96MPa and the dimensionless constant B was 26.03±4.16. The magnitude of viscous response, the constant C, was 0.11±0.02 and the initial and late relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2 were 6.32±1.76s and 903.47±504.73s respectively. The total stress relaxation was 32.7±4.7%. To validate our results, the obtained constants were used to evaluate peak stresses from a cyclic stress relaxation test on three different specimens. The theoretically predicted values fit the experimental ones demonstrating that the QLV theory could be used to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament.

  9. Alteration of the mu opioid receptor: Ca2+ channel signaling pathway in a subset of rat sensory neurons following chronic femoral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Bassil; Kim, Joyce S; Farrag, Mohamed; Kaufman, Marc P; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2014-12-15

    The exercise pressor reflex, a crucial component of the cardiovascular response under physiological and pathophysiological states, is activated via metabolic and mechanical mediators that originate from contracting muscles and stimulate group III and IV afferents. We reported previously that stimulation of mu opioid receptors (MOR), expressed in both afferents, led to a significant attenuation of the reflex in rats whose femoral arteries had been occluded for 72 h. The present study examined the effect of arterial occlusion on the signaling components involved in the opioid-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating the triceps surae muscles. We focused on neurons that were transfected with cDNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein whose expression is driven by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel 1.8 (Na(V)1.8) promoter region, a channel expressed primarily in nociceptive neurons. With the use of a small interference RNA approach, our results show that the pertussis toxin-sensitive Gα(i3) subunit couples MOR with Ca(2+) channels. We observed a significant leftward shift of the MOR agonist [D-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin concentration-response relationship in neurons isolated from rats with occluded arteries compared with those that were perfused freely. Femoral occlusion did not affect Ca(2+) channel density or the fraction of the main Ca(2+) channel subtype. Furthermore, Western blotting analysis indicated that the leftward shift did not result from either increased Gα(i3) or MOR expression. Finally, all neurons from both groups exhibited an inward current following exposure of the transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist, 8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide. These findings suggest that sensory neurons mediating the exercise pressor reflex express Na(V)1.8 and TRPV1 channels, and femoral occlusion alters the MOR pharmacological profile. PMID:25231620

  10. Dietary supplementation of fermented soybean, natto, suppresses intimal thickening and modulates the lysis of mural thrombi after endothelial injury in rat femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kazunao; Matsumoto, Yuji; Zhao, Bing-Qing; Otsuguro, Kenichi; Maeda, Tetsuya; Tsukamoto, Yoshinori; Urano, Tetsumei; Umemura, Kazuo

    2003-07-25

    We have previously demonstrated that natto-extracts containing nattokinase (NK) inactivates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and then potentiates fibrinolytic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with natto-extracts on neointima formation and on thrombolysis at the site of endothelial injury. Endothelial damage in the rat femoral artery was induced by intravenous injection of rose bengal followed by focal irradiation by transluminal green light. Dietary natto-extracts supplementation containing NK of 50 or 100 CU/body was started 3 weeks before endothelial injury and then continued for another 3 weeks. Intimal thickening in animals given supplementation was significantly (P<0.01) suppressed compared with controls and the intima/media ratio in animals with 50 and 100 CU/body NK and control group was 0.09 +/- 0.03, 0.09 +/- 0.06 and 0.16 +/- 0.12, respectively. Although femoral arteries were reopened both in control animals and those treated with NK within 8 hours after endothelial injury, mural thrombi were histologically observed at the site of endothelial injury. In the control group, the center of vessel lumen was reopened and mural thrombi were attached on the surface of vessel walls. In contrast, in NK-treated groups, thrombi near the vessel wall showed lysis and most of them detached from the surface of vessel walls. In conclusion, dietary natto-extracts supplementation suppressed intimal thickening produced by endothelial injury in rat femoral artery. These effects may partially be attributable to NK, which showed enhanced thrombolysis near the vessel wall.

  11. Thoracic Stent Graft Implantation for Aortic Coarctation with Patent Ductus Arteriosus via Retroperitoneal Iliac Approach in the Presence of Small Sized Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Ozge; Beton, Osman; Goksel, Sabahattin; Kaya, Hakkı; Berkan, Ocal

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stent graft implantation is a favorable method for complex aortic coarctation accompanied by patent ductus arteriosus. Herein, an 18-year-old woman with complex aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus was successfully treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. The reason for retroperitoneal iliac approach was small sized common femoral arteries which were not suitable for stent graft passage. This case is the first aortic coarctation plus patent ductus arteriosus case described in the literature which is treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. PMID:27242935

  12. Nitinol Stent Fatigue in a Peripheral Human Artery Subjected to Pulsatile and Articulation Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Sean Michael

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol self-expanding stents are used to treat peripheral occluded vessels such as the superficial femoral artery or the carotid. The complex vessel articulation requires a stent device that is flexible and kink resistant yet durable. The present study shows how the latest advances in commercially available engineering software tools permit engineering simulations of the many aspects of the Nitinol stent design and analysis. Two stent geometries are evaluated: a helical type stent design, and a more traditional straight strut, with multiple crowns design. The fatigue performance of the two stents is compared. The results show that advanced nonlinear finite element simulations and fatigue predictions of the Nitinol stent are possible today inside realistic simulated human arteries. The finite element analysis software used in this study is SimXpert, Marc, and Mentat (MSC Software, Santa Ana, CA).

  13. Experimental determination of the linear biphasic constitutive coefficients of human fetal proximal femoral chondroepiphysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, T D; Singerman, R J

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cartilaginous regions of the proximal femoral epiphysis are an important factor in load transmission through the hip joint of young children. Cylindrical test specimens excised from the chondroepiphysis of human stillborn femoral heads were subjected to uniaxial loading in peripherally-unconfined compression, using a ramp/plateau input strain history. The corresponding load vs time curves were analyzed in terms of a recent analytical solution for a linear biphasic material (the well-known KLM model), allowing calculation of that model's three fundamental constitutive coefficients (permeability, equilibrium modulus and solid-phase Poisson ratio) for this material. The numerical algorithm developed to evaluate the biphasic solution yielded very precise replication of previously published KLM parametric plots. When fitted to experimental load histories, however, the model provided only a rather loose approximation of specimen behavior, due apparently to a substantial underestimation of the transient response component associated with interstitial fluid transport. Averaged over the series, the best-fit values for permeability (2.51 X 10(-15) m4 Ns-1) and equilibrium modulus (0.699 MPa) were in the range of values accepted for human adult articular cartilage. A consequence of the coarseness of the analytical curve fits was that a solid-phase Poisson ratio of 0.0 was inferred for all specimens. The permeability vs equilibrium modulus exhibited a nearly linear (r = 0.74) inverse relationship similar to that reported for adult articular cartilage.

  14. Comparison of the Efficiencies of Buffers Containing Ankaferd and Chitosan on Hemostasis in an Experimental Rat Model with Femoral Artery Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Abacıoğlu, Serkan; Aydın, Kemal; Büyükcam, Fatih; Kaya, Ural; Işık, Bahattin; Karakılıç, Muhammed Evvah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In the first assessment of trauma patients with major vascular injuries, we need effective and rapid-acting homeostatic materials. In this study we compare the efficiencies of Ankaferd Blood Stopper® and a chitosan linear polymer (Celox®) in an experimental rat model with femoral artery bleeding. Materials and Methods: Thirty male Wistar albino rats weighing 200-250 g were divided into 3 groups: control, Ankaferd, and chitosan. The femoral artery and vein were visualized and bleeding was started by an incision. The bleeding time was recorded and categorized as ‘bleeding stopped at the second minute’, ‘bleeding stopped at the fourth minute’, and ‘unsuccessful’ if bleeding continued after the fourth minute. Results: In the control group, 60% of the bleeding did not stop. In the first 4 min in the Ankaferd group, the bleeding stopped in all rats; only in 1 of the rats in the chitosan group did the bleeding not stop. In stopping the bleeding in the first 4 min, Ankaferd was similar to chitosan but better than the control group; the chitosan group was similar to the control, but the p-value was close to significance. Conclusion: For major arterial bleeding, the main treatment is surgical bleeding control, but outside of the hospital we can use buffers containing Ankaferd and chitosan on the bleeding region. The results of this study should be supported with larger studies. Furthermore, in our study, healthy rats were used. New studies are needed to evaluate the results of hypovolemic and hypotensive cases with major artery bleeding. PMID:25913214

  15. [Femoral bone morphogenesis in human fetuses in the area of environmental fluoride pollution].

    PubMed

    Shalina, T I; Vasil'eva, L S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the peculiarities of femoral bone osteogenesis in human fetuses in the areas with different levels of environmental pollution with fluoride compounds (the city of Irkutsk and the town of Shelekhov). The histological structure of femoral bones was studied in 70 fetuses aged 15-16, 19-20, 22-25 and 27-29 gestational weeks. Morphometric methods were used to evaluate the number of blood vessels per total area of epiphysis, the length of endochondral trabeculae, the thickness of hypertrophic and columnar cartilage zones, diaphysis wall and its trabeculae thickness, the thickness of endochondral trabeculae merging with the diaphysis wall, and of the bone growing on the epiphysis. It was found that in the city of Irkutzk, relatively remote from the pollution source, the processes of osteogenesis and osteoresorption are balanced and are characterized by the prevalence of osteoblastic activity over osteoclastic activity, ensuring the active bone growth. During weeks 15-22, the bones are actively growing in length, while during weeks 22-29 they grow mainly in width. In the town of Shelekhov, located closely to the pollution source, the growth of bones in both length and width, is delayed. The bone growth was active till week 16, however, during weeks 18-29, osteoresorption prevailed over the osteosynthesis, the bone thickness decreased, while the activity of their growth in length remained reduced. PMID:20593589

  16. Crush implantation of a self-expanding interwoven stent over a subintimally recanalized standard stent in a TASC D lesion of the superficial femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Vogel, B; Strothmeyer, A; Cebola, R; Katus, H; Blessing, E

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate feasibility of implantation of a self-expanding interwoven nitinol stent in a claudicant, where recanalization attempt of a heavily calcified, occluded superficial femoral artery (TASC D lesion) was complicated by a previously implanted, fractured standard stent. Wire passage through the occlusion and beyond the fractured stent could only be achieved through the subintimal space. A dedicated reentry device was used to allow distal wire entry into the true lumen at the level of the popliteal artery. Despite crushing of the fractured stent with a series of increasingly sized standard balloons, a significant recoil remainded in the area of the crushed stent. To secure patency of the femoro-popliteal artery we therefore decided to implant the novel self-expanding interwoven nitinol stent (Supera Veritas (TM), IDEV), whose unique feature is an exceptional high radial strength. Patient presented asymptomatic without any impairment of his walking capacity at three month follow up and duplex ultrasound confirmed patency of the stent. Subintimal recanalizations can be complicated by previously implanted stents, in particular in the presence of stent fracture, where intraluminal wire passage often can not be achieved. Considering the high radial strength and fracture resistance, interwoven nitinol stents represent a good treatment option in those challenging cases and they can be used to crush standard nitinol and ballonexpandable stents. PMID:23129042

  17. Anatomical variations of the human suprarenal arteries.

    PubMed

    Manso, J C; DiDio, L J

    2000-09-01

    This is on anatomical study of the suprarenal arteries and their variations in 30 cadavers aimed at providing in a subsequent article the anatomical basis of arterial segments of the gland. The suprarenal glands were supplied by 3 main groups of suprarenal arteries: superior, middle and inferior. Only the superior and the inferior groups were present in all cases, since the middle vessels appeared in only 93.3% +/- 4.6 of the cases. The superior group included on each side 4 arteries in males and 5 in females; the middle group presented only 1 artery on each side in both males and females, and the inferior group exhibited on each side 2 arteries in males and 1 artery in females. The most variable group was the middle one, the aortic origin being the most frequent but with a relatively low incidence (53.3% +/- 9.1 on the right and 46.7% +/- 9.1 on the left). The superior group originated from the posterior branch of the ipsilateral inferior phrenic artery in 83.3% +/- 6.8 on the right and 80% +/- 7.3 on the left. The arteries of the inferior group were branches of the ipsilateral renal artery in 70% +/- 8.4 on the right and 50% +/- 9.1 on the left. The origin of the middle suprarenal arteries from the trunk of the inferior phrenic artery on both sides (26.7% +/- 8.1 on the right and 36.7% +/- 8.8 on the left) should be considered relevant. The anatomical findings warrant a further investigation for the identification, illustration and nomenclature of arterial anatomicosurgical segments.

  18. Successful Antibiotic Treatment of Severe Staphylococcal Infection of a Long Stent Graft in the Superficial Femoral Artery with Graft Preservation in the Long Term

    SciTech Connect

    Treitl, Marcus; Rademacher, Antje; Becker-Lienau, Johanna; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Czihal, Michael

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Bacterial infection of endovascular stent grafts is a serious condition, regularly leading to graft replacement by open bypass surgery.Case ReportWe describe the case of a staphylococcal infection of a 150-mm covered stent graft (Gore Viabahn), placed in the superficial femoral artery. Stent graft infection was successfully treated by oral administration of penicillinase-resistant flucloxacillin and the lipopeptide daptomycin with complete graft preservation, not requiring surgical treatment. During 1-year follow-up, the graft infection did not reappear. However, the patient developed restenosis at the proximal margin of the stent with recurrence of mild claudication, so far treated conservatively. Conclusion: With the increased use of covered stent grafts in the peripheral vasculature, the frequency of graft infection will increase. We demonstrate that with newly developed antibiotics, it is possible to treat this severe complication conservatively, with complete graft preservation and without the need for bypass surgery in selected cases.

  19. N-substituted analogues of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine: chemical stability and prolonged nitric oxide mediated vasodilatation in isolated rat femoral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Megson, I L; Morton, S; Greig, I R; Mazzei, F A; Field, R A; Butler, A R; Caron, G; Gasco, A; Fruttero, R; Webb, D J

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies show that linking acetylated glucosamine to S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) stabilizes the molecule and causes it to elicit unusually prolonged vasodilator effects in endothelium-denuded, isolated rat femoral arteries. Here we studied the propanoyl (SNPP; 3 carbon side-chain), valeryl (SNVP; 5C) and heptanoyl (SNHP; 7C) N-substituted analogues of SNAP (2C), to further investigate other molecular characteristics that might influence chemical stability and duration of vascular action of S-nitrosothiols. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that SNVP was the most stable analogue in solution. Decomposition of all four compounds was accelerated by Cu(II) and cysteine, and neocuproine, a specific Cu(I) chelator, slowed decomposition of SNHP. Generation of NO from the compounds was confirmed by electrochemical detection at 37°C. Bolus injections of SNAP (10 μl; 10−8–10−3 M) into the perfusate of precontracted, isolated rat femoral arteries taken from adult male Wistar rats (400–500 g), caused concentration-dependent, transient vasodilatations irrespective of endothelial integrity. Equivalent vasodilatations induced by SNVP and SNHP were transient in endothelium-intact vessels but failed to recover to pre-injection pressures at moderate and high concentrations (10−6–10−3 M) in those denuded of endothelium. This sustained effect (>1 h) was most prevalent with SNHP and was largely reversed by the NO scavenger, haemoglobin. We suggest that increased lipophilicity of SNAP analogues with longer sidechains facilitates their retention by endothelium-denuded vessels; subsequent slow decomposition within the tissue generates sufficient NO to cause prolonged vasodilatation. This is a potentially useful characteristic for targeting NO delivery to areas of endothelial damage. PMID:10188974

  20. Cutting-Balloon Angioplasty Versus Balloon Angioplasty as Treatment for Short Atherosclerotic Lesions in the Superficial Femoral Artery: Randomized Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech Falkowski, Aleksander; Safranow, Krzysztof Rac, Monika; Zawierucha, Dariusz

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatments of a short-segment atherosclerotic stenosis in the superficial femoral arteries with the cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) versus conventional balloon angioplasty [percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)] in a randomized controlled trial. Material and Methods: The study group comprised 60 patients (33 men, 27 women; average age 64 years) with a short ({<=}5 cm) focal SFA de novo atherosclerotic stenosis associated with a history of intermittent claudication or rest pain. The primary end point of this study was the rate of binary restenosis in the treated segment 12 months after the intervention. All patients were evenly randomized to either the PTA or CBA treatment arms. Follow-up angiograms and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements were performed after 12 months. The evaluation of the restenosis rates and factors influencing its occurrence were calculated by logistic regression analysis. Results: In the intention-to-treat analysis, restenosis rates after 2-month follow-up were 9 of 30 (30 %) in the PTA group and 4 of 30 (13 %) in the CBA group (p = 0.117). In the actual treatment analysis, after exclusion of patients who required nitinol stent placement for a suboptimal result after angioplasty alone (5 patients in the PTA group and none in the CBA group), restenosis rates were 9 of 25 (36 %) and 4 of 30 (13 %), respectively (p = 0.049). In the intention-to-treat analysis there were also significant differences in ABI values between the PTA and CBA groups at 0.77 {+-} 0.11 versus 0.82 {+-} 0.12, respectively (p = 0.039), at 12 months. Conclusion: Based on the presented results of the trial, CBA seems to be a safer and more effective than PTA for treatment of short atherosclerotic lesions in the superior femoral artery.

  1. Following-up changes in red blood cell deformability and membrane stability in the presence of PTFE graft implanted into the femoral artery in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Kiss, Ferenc; Klarik, Zoltan; Gergely, Eszter; Toth, Eniko; Peto, Katalin; Vanyolos, Erzsebet; Miko, Iren; Nemeth, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    It is known that a moderate mechanical stress can even improve the red blood cells' (RBC) micro-rheological characteristics, however, a more significant stress causes deterioration in the deformability. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of the presence of artificial graft on the RBC deformability and membrane stability in beagles. In the Control group only anesthesia was induced and in the postoperative (p.o.) period blood samplings were carried out. In the Grafted group under general anesthesia, the left femoral artery was isolated, from which a 3.5 cm segment was resected and a PTFE graft (O.D.: 3 mm) of equal in length was implanted into the gap. On the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th and 14th p.o. days blood was collected the cephalic veins and RBC deformability was determined ektacytometry (LoRRca MaxSis Osmoscan). Membrane stability test consisted of two deformability measurements before and after the cells were being exposed to mechanical stress (60 or 100 Pa for 300 seconds). Compared to the Control group and the baseline values the red blood cell deformability showed significant deterioration on the 3rd, 5th and mainly on the 7th postoperative day after the graft implantation. The membrane stability of erythrocyte revealed marked inter-group difference on the 3rd, 5th and 7th day: in the Grafted group the deformability decreased and during the membrane stability test smaller difference was observed between the states before and after shearing. We concluded that the presence of a PTFE graft in the femoral artery may cause changes in RBC deformability in the first p.o. week. RBC membrane stability investigation shows a lower elongation index profile for the grafted group and a narrowed alteration in the deformability curves due to mechanical stress.

  2. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide regulates arterial elasticity in human arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, S; Creager, M A; Fukumoto, M; Hikita, H; Fang, J C; Selwyn, A P; Ganz, P

    2001-11-01

    Arterial elasticity is determined by structural characteristics of the artery wall and by vascular smooth muscle tone. The identity of endogenous vasoactive substances that regulate elasticity has not been defined in humans. We hypothesized that NO, a vasodilator released constitutively by the endothelium, augments arterial elasticity. Seven healthy young men were studied. A 20-MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter was introduced through an arterial sheath to measure brachial artery cross-sectional area, wall thickness, and intra-arterial pressure. After control was established, indices of elasticity (pressure-area relationship, instantaneous compliance, and stress-strain, pressure-incremental elastic modulus (E(inc)), and pressure-pulse wave velocity relationships) were examined over 0 to 100 mm Hg transmural pressure obtained by inflation of an external cuff. Thereafter, the basal production of endothelium-derived NO was inhibited by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (4 and 8 mg/min). Finally, nitroglycerin (2.5 and 12.5 microgram/min), an exogenous donor of NO, was given to relax the vascular smooth muscle. Elasticity was measured under all of these conditions. L-NMMA (8 mg/min) decreased brachial artery area (P=0.016) and compliance (P<0.0001) and increased E(inc) (P<0.01) and pulse wave velocity (P<0.0001). Nitroglycerin (12.5 microgram/min) increased brachial artery area (P<0.001) and compliance (P<0.001) and decreased pulse wave velocity (P=0.02). NO, an endothelium-derived vasodilator, augments arterial elasticity in the human brachial artery. Loss of constitutively released NO associated with cardiovascular risk factors may adversely affect arterial elasticity in humans.

  3. Noninvasive assessment of arterial compliance of human cerebral arteries with short inversion time arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Warnert, Esther A H; Murphy, Kevin; Hall, Judith E; Wise, Richard G

    2015-03-01

    A noninvasive method of assessing cerebral arterial compliance (AC) is introduced in which arterial spin labeling (ASL) is used to measure changes in arterial blood volume (aBV) occurring within the cardiac cycle. Short inversion time pulsed ASL (PASL) was performed in healthy volunteers with inversion times ranging from 250 to 850 ms. A model of the arterial input function was used to obtain the cerebral aBV. Results indicate that aBV depends on the cardiac phase of the arteries in the imaging volume. Cerebral AC, estimated from aBV and brachial blood pressure measured noninvasively in systole and diastole, was assessed in the flow territories of the basal cerebral arteries originating from the circle of Willis: right and left middle cerebral arteries (RMCA and LMCA), right and left posterior cerebral arteries (RPCA and LPCA), and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Group average AC values calculated for the RMCA, LMCA, ACA, RPCA, and LPCA were 0.56%±0.2%, 0.50%±0.3%, 0.4%±0.2%, 1.1%±0.5%, and 1.1%±0.3% per mm Hg, respectively. The current experiment has shown the feasibility of measuring AC of cerebral arteries with short inversion time PASL.

  4. Harmonic Skeleton Guided Evaluation of Stenoses in Human Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen R.; Giddens, Don P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that three-dimensionally visualizes and evaluates stenoses in human coronary arteries by using harmonic skeletons. A harmonic skeleton is the center line of a multi-branched tubular surface extracted based on a harmonic function, which is the solution of the Laplace equation. This skeletonization method guarantees smoothness and connectivity and provides a fast and straightforward way to calculate local cross-sectional areas of the arteries, and thus provides the possibility to localize and evaluate coronary artery stenosis, which is a commonly seen pathology in coronary artery disease. PMID:16685882

  5. Harmonic skeleton guided evaluation of stenoses in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Giddens, Don P

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that three-dimensionally visualizes and evaluates stenoses in human coronary arteries by using harmonic skeletons. A harmonic skeleton is the center line of a multi-branched tubular surface extracted based on a harmonic function, which is the solution of the Laplace equation. This skeletonization method guarantees smoothness and connectivity and provides a fast and straightforward way to calculate local cross-sectional areas of the arteries, and thus provides the possibility to localize and evaluate coronary artery stenosis, which is a commonly seen pathology in coronary artery disease. PMID:16685882

  6. Bone bonding to hydroxyapatite and titanium surfaces on femoral stems retrieved from human subjects at autopsy.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alexandra E; Taak, Punam; Hobbs, Linn W; Coathup, Melanie J; Blunn, Gordon W; Spector, Myron

    2004-09-01

    The success of clinical results obtained with many hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated prosthetic designs has deflected attention from the need to extend the life of the HA coating on the device. In the current study the percentages of HA and titanium surfaces to which bone was bonded, on HA-coated and non-coated titanium femoral stems retrieved from human subjects, were evaluated. Plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA)-coated devices demonstrated wide variability in the percentage of the PSHA coating remaining on the stems. The coating was missing from a substantial portion of a stem after only about 6 months of implantation. The percentage of revealed metal to which bone was bonded was significantly less than the percentage of the HA coating demonstrating such bonding. The revealed metal to which bone was bonded was comparable to the same value for a separate group of non-PSHA-coated titanium stems. If HA-coatings degrade over time precipitous decline in performance may occur even after several functional years. Many ultrastructural features of the bone bonded to the HA coatings on these implants from human subjects were comparable to those found on HA-coated devices implanted in a canine model. PMID:15109844

  7. Is There an Association Between Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsiki, Niki; Kollari, Erietta; Dardas, Sotirios; Dardas, Petros; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Athyros, Vasilios G.; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been shown to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded the gold standard marker of arterial stiffness. In previous studies, cfPWV was associated with the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, with regard to CHD severity as assessed by the Syntax Score, only brachial-ankle PWV was reported to correlate with Syntax Score; no data exist for cfPWV. In this pilot study, we evaluated the possible associations between cfPWV, CHD and Syntax Score in 62 consecutive pa-tients (49 males; mean age: 64±12years) with chest pain undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. cfPWV was signifi-cantly higher in CHD patients than in non-CHD individuals (10 vs. 8.4 m/s; p = 0.003). No significant association was found between cfPWV and CHD severity as assessed by Syntax Score. A cut-off point of 12.3 m/s was considered as diagnostic for abnormally increased cfPWV (specificity: 97%; sensitivity: 12%; positive likelihood ratio: 3.558). Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cfPWV and Syntax Score. PMID:27347222

  8. Effects of arterial blood pressure on rebleeding using Celox and TraumaDEX in a porcine model of lethal femoral injury.

    PubMed

    Burgert, James M; Gegel, Brian T; Austin, Robert; Davila, Alejandro; Deeds, Jacob; Hodges, Lonnie; Hover, Andrew; Lockhart, Cheryl; Roy, John; Simpson, Glenn; Weaver, Stephen; Wolfe, William; Johnson, Don

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to identify the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) at which rebleeding occurs when a clot is formed by a hemostatic agent, Celox or TraumaDEX, compared with a standard dressing. Fifteen pigs (5 each) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups: Celox, TraumaDEX, or standard pressure dressing as a control. In all animals, the femoral artery and vein were transected to simulate traumatic injury. Subjects were allowed to hemorrhage 1 minute before treatment. Direct pressure was held 5 minutes followed by application of elastic dressings for 30 minutes. Dressings were removed after 30 minutes, and the wound was observed for rebleeding. Animals demonstrating hemostasis received phenylephrine infusion to increase SBP in 10-mm Hg increments until SBP reached 210 mm Hg or hemorrhage recurred. There were statistically significant differences between Celox (mean SBP, 166.4 mm Hg; mean MAP, 1376 mm Hg) and the control (mean SBP, 88.25 mm Hg; mean MAP, 59.7 mm Hg), and between TraumaDEX (mean SBP, 152.2 mm Hg; mean MAP, 113.2 mm Hg) and the control (P < .05). However, no statistically significant difference existed between Celox and TraumaDEX. Celox and TraumaDEX effectively prevent rebleeding compared with standard dressing.

  9. Three Point Bending Test of Human Femoral Tissue: An Essay in Ancient and Modern Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Bárcenas, L. A.; Trejo-Camacho, H.; Suárez-Estrella, I.; Heredia, A.; Magaña, C.; Bucio, L.; Orozco, E.

    2003-09-01

    Some procedures for characterising the mechanical properties of femur diaphysis are reviewed here. We have used the three point bending test to measure the relative rupture modulus of ancient healthy human tissues (1250, 800, 614, and 185 years BP) as well as recent bones. The maximum resistance to fracture was measured applying a force (by a wedge) over the femoral inner surface. The maximum rupture strength was about 150 MPa for recent bone and decreased as the antiquity increased. The typical anisotropy that is observed in this kind of tissues is due to the anisotropical orientation of fibres as well as the textured orientation of the apatite crystals over the collagen fibres. Therefore we found that ancient bones show less fracture strength probably due to an abiotic crystal growth phenomenon during the diagenesis process. By LVSEM analysis we have found that in recent samples the fracture surface is irregular due to the crosslinking interactions between the collagen molecules, in comparison with the ancient samples, where a smooth surface is clearly appreciated as the antiquity of the sample increases. The results reported here strongly suggest that these composites should contain a fibrillar phase as a matrix constituted mainly by a natural polymer (i.e. collagen, cellulose, etc.). Moreover, this composite must have a minimum rupture strength of about 150 MPa.

  10. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  11. Chemical composition of human femoral and head cartilage: influence of topographical position and fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Venn, M F

    1979-01-01

    Topographical variations in the composition of cartilage have been described in post-mortem femoral head cartilage. Weight bearing cartilage of the superior region was considerably thicker and had a higher glycosaminoglycan content and lower water and collagen content than cartilage at the periphery and below the fovea. These topographical variations in composition may result both from variations in thickness of the cartilage and from regional areas of degeneration. The composition of cartilage at different depths and with different surface characteristics from different areas of the femoral head was measured. Fibrillated cartilage both from the inferior and superior perifoveal areas had a reduced glycosaminoglycan content and higher water content than intact post-mortem specimens. Cartilage adjacent to fibrillated areas from the superior region did not differ in composition from intact areas of cartilage from the zenith of the femoral head. PMID:434948

  12. A Novel Device for True Lumen Re-Entry After Subintimal Recanalization of Superficial Femoral Arteries: First-in-Man Experience and Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Airoldi, Flavio Faglia, Ezio Losa, Sergio Tavano, Davide; Latib, Azeem; Mantero, Manuela Lanza, Gaetano Clerici, Giacomo

    2011-02-15

    Subintimal angioplasty (SAP) is frequently performed for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) and has been recognized as an effective technique for these patients. Nevertheless, this approach is limited by the lack of controlled re-entry into the true lumen of the target vessel. We describe a novel device for true lumen re-entry after subintimal recanalization of superficial femoral arteries (SFA). We report our experience with six patients treated between April 2009 and January 2010 with a novel system designed to facilitate true lumen re-entry. The device was advanced by ipsilateral antegrade approach through a 6-French sheath. Successful reaccess into the true lumen was obtained in five of six patients without complications. The patient in whom the reaccess to the true lumen was not possible underwent successful bypass surgery. At 30 days follow-up, the SFA was patent in all patients according to echo-Doppler examination. Our preliminary experience indicates that this novel re-entry device increases the success rate of percutaneous revascularization of chronically occluded SFA.

  13. Comparison of Small Intestinal Submucosa-Covered and Noncovered Nitinol Stents with PTFE Endografts in Injured Ovine Femoral Arteries: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Van Alstine, William; Timmermans, Hans A.; Toyota, Naoyuki; Terada, Masaki; Brountzos, Elias; Kaufman, John A.; Keller, Frederick S.; Rosch, Josef

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare performance of small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-covered endografts (SCEs) to polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered endografts (PCEs) and to bare nitinol stents (BSs) in injured sheep femoral artery (FA). Bare Zilver 6 mm x 40 mm nitinol stents (n = 6), Zilver stents covered with SIS (n = 6), and Palmaz stents 6 mm x 37 mm covered with PTFE (n = 6) were implanted in the balloon-injured FAs of nine female sheep. Follow-up arteriograms were obtained before animal sacrifice at 1, 3 and 6 months, with three animals at each time point. The FAs with the implanted device were explanted for histologic studies and morphologic measurements. Stent implantation was technically successful in all sheep. All BS and SCEs were patent at each time point. Five BSs and five SCEs exhibited formation of progressive eccentric intimal hyperplasia (IH) that was more advanced in SCE at 6 months. Cross-sectional area narrowing averaged 60% for BSs and 67% for SCEs. One BS, one SCE and two patent PCEs exhibited mild-to-moderate formation of concentric IH. Four PCS occluded one at 1 month, two at 3 months and one at 6 months. Performance of the devices placed into sheep FAs depended on their relation to the curving peri-articular portion of the FA during extremity flexion. BSs and SCEs placed in this portion exhibited progressive growth of eccentric IH while PCEs placed in this portion occluded.

  14. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  15. Computer densitometry for angiographic assessment of arterial cholesterol content and gross pathology in human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D W; Brooks, S H; Selzer, R H; Barndt, R; Beckenbach, E S; Blankenhorn, D H

    1977-02-01

    Sequential change studies in human atherosclerosis are desirable in disease regression trials but are now limited by dependence on the occurrence of epidemiologic end-points. Prior radiographic studies have pertained to advanced obstructive atherosclerosis. This is a study of measures applied by computer-generated densitometry of angiograms to assess early to advanced nonobstructive atherosclerosis. Measures are based on pathologic and angiographic appearance of all stages of atherosclerosis and include image edge roughness, local width, and local contrast density changes. Femoral angiograms were made in 21 cadavers under simulated clinical conditions, with a pressurized radiopaque casting material. Full-size color photographs were made of 10 cm. segments of opened artery, with matching cast and arterial specimens analyzed for cholesterol content. Four graders, on two occasions, sequenced the photographs in increasing order of disease on the basis of the International Atherosclerosis Grading scheme. The correlation between the two sessions was 0.93. Thirteen computer indices correlated significantly with visual grade and cholesterol and were allowed to compete in a step-wise regression for best indices of prediction. Computer index correlation coefficient for visual grade prediction was 0.86, and for cholesterol content, 0.84. Computer densitometry measurement appears useful in the evaluation of all stages of atherosclerosis as recorded angiographically and obviates the necessity for exacting visual comparisons of large numbers of films.

  16. Importance of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in human arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Urakami-Harasawa, L; Shimokawa, H; Nakashima, M; Egashira, K; Takeshita, A

    1997-01-01

    The endothelium plays an important role in maintaining the vascular homeostasis by releasing vasodilator substances, including prostacyclin (PGI2), nitric oxide (NO), and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Although the former two substances have been investigated extensively, the importance of EDHF still remains unclear, especially in human arteries. Thus we tested our hypothesis that EDHF plays an important role in human arteries, particularly with reference to the effect of vessel size, its vasodilating mechanism, and the influences of risk factors for atherosclerosis. Isometric tension and membrane potentials were recorded in isolated human gastroepiploic arteries and distal microvessels (100-150 microm in diameter). The contribution of PGI2, NO, and EDHF to endothelium-dependent relaxations was analyzed by inhibitory effects of indomethacin, NG-nitro- L-arginine, and KCl, respectively. The nature of and hyperpolarizing mechanism by EDHF were examined by the inhibitory effects of inhibitors of cytochrome P450 pathway and of various K channels. The effects of atherosclerosis risk factors on EDHF-mediated relaxations were also analyzed. The results showed that (a) the contribution of EDHF to endothelium-dependent relaxations is significantly larger in microvessels than in large arteries; (b) the nature of EDHF may not be a product of cytochrome P450 pathway, while EDHF-induced hyperpolarization is partially mediated by calcium-activated K channels; and (c) aging and hypercholesterolemia significantly impair EDHF-mediated relaxations. These results demonstrate that EDHF also plays an important role in human arteries. PMID:9389744

  17. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-04-01

    Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l(−1) at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l(−1), respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min(−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l(−1) (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l(−1). Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  18. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l−1 at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l−1, respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l−1 (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l−1. Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  19. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  20. Mechanical thrombectomy using Rotarex system and stent-in-stent placement for treatment of distal femoral artery occlusion secondary to stent fracture – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dys, Krzysztof; Drelichowska-Durawa, Justyna; Dołega-Kozierowski, Bartosz; Lis, Michał; Sokratous, Kyriakos; Iwanowski, Wojciech; Drelichowski, Stanisław; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Treatment of peripheral arterial diseases may be distinguished into conservative and interventional management; the latter is divided into surgical and endovascular procedures. Management of peripheral artery stenosis and occlusion with vascular stents is associated with the risk of late complications such as restenosis, stent fracture or dislocation. Case Report: A 62-year-old woman with generalized atherosclerosis, particularly extensive in lower limb arteries, was admitted to the Department of Angiology 11 months after having an endovascular procedure performed due to critical ischemia of left lower limb. Because of stent occlusion, a decision to perform angiographic examination of lower limb arteries was made. Examination revealed occlusion of the superficial femoral artery along its entire length, including previously implanted stents. Distal stent was fractured with slight dislocation of the proximal segment. A decision was made to perform mechanical thrombectomy using a Rotarex system followed by a stent-in-stent placement procedure. Follow-up angiography and ultrasound scan performed 24 hours after the procedure revealed a patent vessel with satisfactory blood flow. Discussion: Nowadays, imaging diagnostics of peripheral artery stenosis involves non-invasive examinations such as ultrasound, minimally invasive examinations such as angio-MRI and MDCT, or invasive examinations such as DSA and IVUS. DSA examinations are used to confirm significant stenosis or occlusion of a vessel, particularly when qualifying a patient for endovascular treatment. Due to their anatomic location, the superficial femoral artery and the popliteal artery are subject to various forces e.g. those exerted by the working muscles. Mechanical thrombectomy and atherectomy are efficient methods of arterial recanalization used in the treatment of acute, subacute or even chronic occlusions or stenosis of peripheral vessels. Conclusions: Frequency of angioplasty and

  1. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  2. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  3. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland).

  4. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Wang, Y. S.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, G. L.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.

    2007-07-01

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  5. Transient Monoplegia as a Result of Unilateral Femoral Artery Ischemia Detected by Multimodal Intraoperative Neuromonitoring in Posterior Scoliosis Surgery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafal; Roclawski, Marek; Dziegiel, Krzysztof; Ceynowa, Marcin; Mikulicz, Marcin; Mazurek, Tomasz; Kloc, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    This is to report a case of 16-year-old girl with transient right lower limb monoplegia as a result of femoral artery ischemia detected by multimodal intraoperative spinal cord neuromonitoring (MISNM) during posterior correction surgery of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.A patient with a marfanoid body habitus and LENKE IA type scoliosis with the right thoracic curve of 48° of Cobb angle was admitted for posterior spinal fusion from Th6 to L2. After selective pedicle screws instrumentation and corrective maneuvers motor evoked potentials (MEP) began to decrease with no concomitant changes in somato-sensory evoked potentials recordings.The instrumentation was released first partially than completely with rod removal but the patient demonstrated constantly increasing serious neurological motor deficit of the whole right lower limb. Every technical cause of the MEP changes was eliminated and during the wake-up test the right foot was found to be pale and cold with no popliteal and dorsalis pedis pulses palpable. The patient was repositioned and the pelvic pad was placed more cranially. Instantly, the pulse and color returned to the patient's foot. Following MEP recordings showed gradual return of motor function up to the baseline at the end of the surgery, whereas somato-sensory evoked potentials were within normal range through the whole procedure.This case emphasizes the importance of the proper pelvic pad positioning during the complex spine surgeries performed in prone position of the patient. A few cases of neurological complications have been described which were the result of vascular occlusion after prolonged pressure in the inguinal area during posterior scoliosis surgery when the patient was in prone position. If incorrectly interpreted, they would have a significant impact on the course of scoliosis surgery. PMID:26871822

  6. Antithrombotic activity of NSP-513, a novel selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor, on femoral arterial thrombosis induced by physical stenosis and electrical current: comparison of antithrombotic and hemodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Hirose, H; Mashiko, S; Kimura, T; Ishida, F; Mochizuki, N; Nishibe, T; Nishikibe, M

    2000-04-01

    NSP-513, a novel potent and selective phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE 3) inhibitor, and cilostazol, a previously developed PDE 3 inhibitor, were compared with respect to antiplatelet, antithrombotic, and hemodynamic effects. In the in vitro antiplatelet aggregation studies, NSP-513 and cilostazol inhibited collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation with median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.093 and 3.1 miccroM, respectively, and inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced canine platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 0.15 and 12 microM, respectively. For ADP-induced platelet aggregation, the presence of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1; 3 and 10 nM) further decreased the IC50 values for NSP-513 to 0.11 and 0.032 microM, respectively. In ex vivo antiplatelet aggregation studies, orally administered NSP-513 (0.03-1 mg/kg) and cilostazol (50 mg/kg) inhibited collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation. In an in vivo canine femoral arterial thrombosis model, intraduodenally administered NSP-513 (0.01-0.03 mg/ kg) dose-dependently prevented thrombus formation without any changes in blood pressure, heart rate, or bleeding time. In conscious dogs, NSP-513 at oral doses of > or =0.3 mg/kg produced hemodynamic changes such as decreased blood pressure and increased heart rate and LVdP/dt(max). Thus the minimal hemodynamically effective dose of NSP-513 was 0.3 mg/kg, and the hemodynamic effects of this dose were comparable to those of 50 mg/kg of cilostazol. In conclusion, these data suggest that NSP-513 has in vivo selectivity for antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities over hemodynamic activity, and that the selectivity of NSP-513 is higher than that of cilostazol in dogs.

  7. Drug-Eluting Nitinol Stent Treatment of the Superficial Femoral Artery and Above-the-Knee Popliteal Artery (The Zilver PTX Single-Arm Clinical Study): A Comparison Between Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Primo, Massimiliano Di; Boatta, Emanuele; Johnston, Krystal; Sapoval, Marc

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the 1-year results of drug-eluting nitinol stent placement in the femoropopliteal artery of diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Materials and Methods: All patients enrolled in this prospective, multicenter study underwent paclitaxel-eluting stent placement for de novo or restenotic lesions of the superficial femoral and/or popliteal artery. Baseline and follow-up walking impairment questionnaire (WIQ) scores, Rutherford classifications, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements were obtained. Follow-up was completed at 1, 6, and 12 months. Results: There were 285 diabetic patients and 502 nondiabetic patients treated. There were no significant differences in mean lesion length or lesion calcification between patient groups. Procedural success in both treatment groups was >97 %. There were no significant differences between diabetic and nondiabetic groups in Kaplan-Meier estimates of patency, event-free survival (EFS), or freedom from target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 6 and 12 months. Both groups experienced a significant increase in ABI and WIQ values after treatment, and these improvements were sustained to 12-month follow-up; however, nondiabetic patients had significantly greater 6- and 12-month WIQ scores compared with diabetic patients. Based on covariate analysis, the only factors shown to be significant and to negatively influence patency were longer lesion length (p = 0.009), higher Rutherford classification (p = 0.02), and lack of hypertension (p = 0.02); diabetic status was not found to be a significant factor. Conclusion: Diabetic and nondiabetic patients had similar estimates of primary patency, EFS, and freedom from TLR; however, diabetic patients showed less improvement in WIQ scores compared with nondiabetic patients.

  8. Relationship between mechanical properties and bone mineral density of human femoral bone retrieved from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haba, Yvonne; Lindner, Tobias; Fritsche, Andreas; Schiebenhöfer, Ann-Kristin; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Skripitz, Ralf; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse retrieved human femoral bone samples using three different test methods, to elucidate the relationship between bone mineral density and mechanical properties. Human femoral heads were retrieved from 22 donors undergoing primary total hip replacement due to hip osteoarthritis and stored for a maximum of 24 hours postoperatively at + 6 °C to 8 °C.Analysis revealed an average structural modulus of 232±130 N/mm(2) and ultimate compression strength of 6.1±3.3 N/mm(2) with high standard deviations. Bone mineral densities of 385±133 mg/cm(2) and 353±172 mg/cm(3) were measured using thedual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT), respectively. Ashing resulted in a bone mineral density of 323±97 mg/cm(3). In particular, significant linear correlations were found between DXA and ashing with r = 0.89 (p < 0.01, n = 22) and between structural modulus and ashing with r = 0.76 (p < 0.01, n = 22).Thus, we demonstrated a significant relationship between mechanical properties and bone density. The correlations found can help to determine the mechanical load capacity of individual patients undergoing surgical treatments by means of noninvasive bone density measurements.

  9. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:25342868

  10. Cortical and cancellous bone in the human femoral neck: evaluation of an interactive image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Bell, K L; Garrahan, N; Kneissel, M; Loveridge, N; Grau, E; Stanton, M; Reeve, J

    1996-11-01

    An interactive image analysis package was developed to examine whole cross-sections from the femoral neck. The package quantifies cortical width (Ct.Wi), cortical porosity (Ct.Po), and proportions of cortical, cancellous bone as a percentage of bone plus marrow area. Segmental analysis was used to quantify circumferential variations in bone distribution within the femoral cross-section. To evaluate reproducibility of data four independent operators analyzed previously prepared femoral neck sections from a 2000 BC population. Differences in total and circumferential distributions of cortical and cancellous bone with respect to gender and age of samples were demonstrated. Reproducibility was assessed using coefficients of variation (CV). Analysis of sections using a variable magnification, giving largest possible image size, rather than a set magnification reduced variation between operators for all measurements. Use of a calculated threshold significantly decreased variation between operators for the proportions of cortical and cancellous bone (p < or = 0.026). Dividing the image into 8 rather than 16 segments also improved reproducibility. There was little agreement between operators in the determination of cortical porosity. The mean CV for the other quantitative indices such as cortical width and proportions of cortical and cancellous bone ranged from 4.87% to 13.52%. The genders showed similar patterns in circumferential distribution of bone. Cortical width was significantly greater in the inferior region compared to the other areas, whereas percent cortical bone was lowest at the superior region. The center of mass (COM) for the younger age group was located anteriorly, whereas in the older samples the COM was located posteriorly of the center of area (p = 0.041). Basic data relating to cortical and cancellous bone of acceptable reproducibility in comparison with current standards in iliac histomorphometry can now be provided at modest cost in operator time and

  11. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Tyler, D. J.; Anderson, J. S.; Triolo, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 N m. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 N m in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications.

  12. Mass transport in an anatomically realistic human right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Kaazempur-Mofrad, M R; Ethier, C R

    2001-02-01

    The coronary arteries are a common site of atherosclerotic plaque formation, which has been putatively linked to hemodynamic and mass transport patterns. The purpose of this paper was to study mass transport patterns in a human right coronary artery (RCA) model, focusing on the effects of local geometric features on mass transfer from blood to artery walls. Using a previously developed characteristic/finite element scheme for solving advection-dominated transport problems, mass transfer calculations were performed in a rigid, anatomically realistic model of a human RCA. A qualitative and quantitative examination of the RCA geometry was also carried out. The concentration field within the RCA was seen to closely follow primary and secondary flow features. Local variations in mass transfer patterns due to geometric features were significant and much larger in magnitude than local variations in wall shear stress. We conclude that the complex secondary flows in a realistic arterial model can produce very substantial local variations in blood-wall mass transfer rates, and may be important in atherogenesis. Further, RCA mass transfer patterns are more sensitive to local geometric features than are wall shear stress patterns. PMID:11284666

  13. Grating interferometry-based phase microtomography of atherosclerotic human arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscema, Marzia; Holme, Margaret N.; Deyhle, Hans; Schulz, Georg; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Thalmann, Peter; Hieber, Simone E.; Chicherova, Natalia; Cattin, Philippe C.; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Weitkamp, Timm; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death and morbidity in the world. Understanding disease development in terms of lumen morphology and tissue composition of constricted arteries is essential to improve treatment and patient outcome. X-ray tomography provides non-destructive three-dimensional data with micrometer-resolution. However, a common problem is simultaneous visualization of soft and hard tissue-containing specimens, such as atherosclerotic human coronary arteries. Unlike absorption based techniques, where X-ray absorption strongly depends on atomic number and tissue density, phase contrast methods such as grating interferometry have significant advantages as the phase shift is only a linear function of the atomic number. We demonstrate that grating interferometry-based phase tomography is a powerful method to three-dimensionally visualize a variety of anatomical features in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries, including plaque, muscle, fat, and connective tissue. Three formalin-fixed, human coronary arteries were measured using advanced laboratory μCT. While this technique gives information about plaque morphology, it is impossible to extract the lumen morphology. Therefore, selected regions were measured using grating based phase tomography, sinograms were treated with a wavelet-Fourier filter to remove ring artifacts, and reconstructed data were processed to allow extraction of vessel lumen morphology. Phase tomography data in combination with conventional laboratory μCT data of the same specimen shows potential, through use of a joint histogram, to identify more tissue types than either technique alone. Such phase tomography data was also rigidly registered to subsequently decalcified arteries that were histologically sectioned, although the quality of registration was insufficient for joint histogram analysis.

  14. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  15. Characterization of contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Bodelsson, G; Stjernquist, M

    1995-08-25

    Adrenoceptors mediating contraction in ring segments of human umbilical arteries from normal term pregnancies were investigated in vitro. Contraction was elicited by (order of potency indicated): noradrenaline = the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline > the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and phenylephrine. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and oxymetazoline. Oxymetazoline had an efficacy 5 times higher than that of noradrenaline and the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist methysergide antagonized the contraction elicited by oxymetazoline. It is suggested that the contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery consist of both alpha 1 and alpha 2 subtypes. Furthermore, the contractile effect of oxymetazoline seems to be mediated via both alpha 2-adrenoceptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors.

  16. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, G.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Lluberas, S.; Craiem, D.; Armentano, Rl

    2011-09-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  17. Fracture mechanics of human cortical bone: The relationship of geometry, microstructure and composition with the fracture of the tibia, femoral shaft and the femoral neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeni, Yener Nail

    Bone fracture is a major health problem in old population with its complications leading to mortality and morbidity. Therapies mostly involve preventing bone mass loss. Individuals with high bone mass, however, may still suffer fractures suggesting that additional components such as bone microstructure and composition may be responsible for increased fracture risk in the elderly. The relationship of bone constituents with bone fragility, however, is not well-understood. A better understanding of these relationships will help improving therapies by controlling the relevant biological processes. Bone is a composite material with many constituents such as osteons embedded with vascular channels, collagen fibers, mineral crystals, etc. The nature of interfacing between these constituents makes bone a more complex material. Bone also has a structure that adapts itself, both internally and externally, to better fit its needs. This suggested that, unlike man-made materials, a relationship between material properties and structural properties may exist. Because bone has some similarities with engineering composite materials and also experiences microcracks, a fracture mechanics approach would be more appropriate for investigating its fragility. Choosing mode I and mode II fracture toughness (Gsb{Ic} and Gnsb{IIc}, respectively) as indicators of bone fragility, their relationship with bone microstructure (porosity, osteon morphology, mineral crystal imperfection and microdamage), composition (density, mineral, organic, water and collagen content) and macrostructure (thickness, diameter and moment of inertia of the shaft and angle between the femoral neck and femoral shaft from different views) was investigated. Use of x-ray radiogrammetry for detecting the latter was tested. Differences among the femoral shaft, femoral neck and the tibia were investigated for an age range of 22-94 years. In general, fracture toughness increased with increasing bone quantity. However, the

  18. An anatomical and biometrical study of the femoral trochlear groove in the human fetus

    PubMed Central

    Glard, Yann; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Panuel, Michel; Adalian, Pascal; Tardieu, Christine; Bollini, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    We performed a biometric analysis of the femoral trochlear groove in the fetus and compared our findings with those observed in adults. We studied 44 formalin-preserved fetuses (13–38 weeks) and used digitized images to obtain measurements (α angle of the groove, trochlear slopes θL and θM). A comparison of means between our series and adults was achieved. For each angle of the distal epiphysis (α, θL, θM) there was no significant difference between our fetal series and adults. This is the first biometric study of fetal trochlea. The morphology of the lower femur appears to be the same in the fetus and the adult. PMID:15817109

  19. Large-scale simulation of the human arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, L; Anor, T; Madsen, J R; Yakhot, A; Karniadakis, G E

    2009-02-01

    1. Full-scale simulations of the virtual physiological human (VPH) will require significant advances in modelling, multiscale mathematics, scientific computing and further advances in medical imaging. Herein, we review some of the main issues that need to be resolved in order to make three-dimensional (3D) simulations of blood flow in the human arterial tree feasible in the near future. 2. A straightforward approach is computationally prohibitive even on the emerging petaflop supercomputers, so a three-level hierarchical approach based on vessel size is required, consisting of: (i) a macrovascular network (MaN); (ii) a mesovascular network (MeN); and (iii) a microvascular network (MiN). We present recent simulations of MaN obtained by solving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations on arterial networks with tens of arteries and bifurcations and accounting for the neglected dynamics through proper boundary conditions. 3. A multiscale simulation coupling MaN-MeN-MiN and running on hundreds of thousands of processors on petaflop computers will require no more than a few CPU hours per cardiac cycle within the next 5 years. The rapidly growing capacity of supercomputing centres opens up the possibility of simulation studies of cardiovascular diseases, drug delivery, perfusion in the brain and other pathologies. PMID:18671721

  20. Characterization of optimal resting tension in human pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Azar; Bennett, Robert T; Chaudhry, Mubarak A; Qadri, Syed S; Cowen, Mike; Morice, Alyn H; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the optimum resting tension (ORT) for in vitro human pulmonary artery (PA) ring preparations. METHODS Pulmonary arteries were dissected from disease free sections of the resected lung in the operating theatre and tissue samples were directly sent to the laboratory in Krebs-Henseleit solution (Krebs). The pulmonary arteries were then cut into 2 mm long rings. PA rings were mounted in 25 mL organ baths or 8 mL myograph chambers containing Krebs compound (37 °C, bubbled with 21% O2: 5% CO2) to measure changes in isometric tension. The resting tension was set at 1-gram force (gf) with vessels being left static to equilibrate for duration of one hour. Baseline contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were obtained from a resting tension of 1 gf. Contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were then obtained from stepwise increases in resting tension (1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 gf). RESULTS Twenty PA rings of internal diameter between 2-4 mm were prepared from 4 patients. In human PA rings incrementing the tension during rest stance by 0.6 gf, up to 1.6 gf significantly augmented the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated tension. Further enhancement of active tension by 0.4 gf, up to 2.0 gf mitigate the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated reaction. Both Myograph and the organ bath demonstrated identical conclusions, supporting that the radial optimal resting tension for human PA ring was 1.61 g. CONCLUSION The radial optimal resting tension in our experiment is 1.61 gf (15.78 mN) for human PA rings. PMID:27721938

  1. Intermittent hypoxia and arterial blood pressure control in humans: role of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Boulet, Lindsey M; Tymko, Michael M; Foster, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in association with obstructive sleep apnea and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the putative early adaptations at the level of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex (CBR) that may promote the development of hypertension. Ten healthy male participants (26 ± 1 yr, BMI = 24 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were exposed to 6 h of IH (1-min cycles of normoxia and hypoxia) and SHAM in a single-blinded, counterbalanced crossover study design. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured during each condition and the following night. Vascular strain of the carotid and femoral artery, a measure of localized arterial stiffness, and hemodynamic shear patterns in the brachial and femoral arteries were measured during each condition. Brachial artery reactive hyperemia flow-mediated vasodilation was assessed before and after each condition as a measure of endothelial function. CBR function and its control over leg vascular conductance (LVC) were measured after each condition with a variable-pressure neck chamber. Intermittent hypoxia 1) increased nighttime pulse pressure by 3.2 ± 1.3 mmHg, 2) altered femoral but not brachial artery hemodynamics, 3) did not affect brachial artery endothelial function, 4) reduced vascular strain in the carotid and possibly femoral artery, and 5) shifted CBR mean arterial pressure (MAP) to higher MAP while blunting LVC responses to CBR loading. These results suggest limb-specific vascular impairments, reduced vascular strain, and CBR resetting combined with blunted LVC responses are factors in the early pathogenesis of IH-induced development of hypertension. PMID:27402667

  2. Intermittent hypoxia and arterial blood pressure control in humans: role of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Boulet, Lindsey M; Tymko, Michael M; Foster, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in association with obstructive sleep apnea and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the putative early adaptations at the level of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex (CBR) that may promote the development of hypertension. Ten healthy male participants (26 ± 1 yr, BMI = 24 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were exposed to 6 h of IH (1-min cycles of normoxia and hypoxia) and SHAM in a single-blinded, counterbalanced crossover study design. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured during each condition and the following night. Vascular strain of the carotid and femoral artery, a measure of localized arterial stiffness, and hemodynamic shear patterns in the brachial and femoral arteries were measured during each condition. Brachial artery reactive hyperemia flow-mediated vasodilation was assessed before and after each condition as a measure of endothelial function. CBR function and its control over leg vascular conductance (LVC) were measured after each condition with a variable-pressure neck chamber. Intermittent hypoxia 1) increased nighttime pulse pressure by 3.2 ± 1.3 mmHg, 2) altered femoral but not brachial artery hemodynamics, 3) did not affect brachial artery endothelial function, 4) reduced vascular strain in the carotid and possibly femoral artery, and 5) shifted CBR mean arterial pressure (MAP) to higher MAP while blunting LVC responses to CBR loading. These results suggest limb-specific vascular impairments, reduced vascular strain, and CBR resetting combined with blunted LVC responses are factors in the early pathogenesis of IH-induced development of hypertension.

  3. Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Arterial Stiffness in Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Nichols, Wilmer W.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease, is increased in aging, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) may contribute to oxidative stress and arterial stiffness in healthy older adults. To test the hypothesis that short-term MR blockade may reduce oxidative stress and improve arterial stiffness, we conducted a randomized, double blind, crossover study using the selective MR blocker Eplerenone or placebo in 23 older adults (age, 64±1 years; mean±SE) free from overt cardiovascular and other clinical disease (e.g, diabetes, renal and liver disease). In response to MR blockade, brachial and carotid blood pressure decreased (P≤0.01). However, MR blockade had no effect on oxidative stress (oxidized LDL, 61.2±6.8 vs. 62.4±7.4 U/L, P=0.9; placebo vs. Eplerenone) and arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), 9.17±1.19 vs. 8.92±1.19 m/sec, P=0.5; leg PWV, 13.45±0.45 vs. 12.81±0.47 m/sec, P=0.3; arm PWV, 11.43±0.62 vs. 11.73±0.68 m/sec, P=0.7; carotid artery compliance, 0.150±0.013 vs. 0.149±0.014 mm2/mmHg, P=0.8; distensibility, 23.1±1.8 vs. 23.3±1.7 10−3/kPa, P=0.8; β stiffness index, 3.5±0.3 vs. 3.6±0.3, P=0.6; and augmentation index, 16.0±2.2 vs. 15.6±2.8 %, P=0.8). These results provide the first evidence that MR do not appear to contribute to oxidative stress in human aging and that short-term MR blockade does not result in reduced oxidative stress and improved arterial stiffness. PMID:23707930

  4. Relaxation of human isolated mesenteric arteries by vasopressin and desmopressin.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M C; Vila, J M; Aldasoro, M; Medina, P; Flor, B; Lluch, S

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of vasopressin and deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP, desmopressin) were studied in artery rings (0.8-1 mm in external diameter) obtained from portions of human omentum during the course of abdominal operations (27 patients). 2. In arterial rings under resting tension, vasopressin produced concentration-dependent, endothelium-independent contractions with an EC50 of 0.59 +/- 0.12 nM. The V1 antagonist d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (1 microM) and the mixed V1-V2 antagonist desGly-d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)ValAVP (0.01 microM) displaced the control curve to vasopressin to the right in a parallel manner without differences in the maximal responses. In the presence of indomethacin (1 microM) the contractile response to vasopressin was significantly increased (P < 0.01). 3. In precontracted arterial rings, previously treated with the V1 antagonist, d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (1 microM), vasopressin produced endothelium-dependent relaxation. This relaxation was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) by indomethacin (1 microM) and unaffected by the V1-V2 receptor antagonist desGly-d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)ValAVP (1 microM) or by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 mM). 4. The selective V2 receptor agonist, DDAVP, caused endothelium-independent, concentration-dependent relaxations in precontracted arterial rings that were inhibited by the mixed V1-V2 receptor antagonist, but not by the V1 receptor antagonist or by pretreatment with indomethacin or L-NAME. 5. Results from this study suggest that vasopressin is primarily a constrictor of human mesenteric arteries by V1 receptor stimulation; vasopressin causes dilatation only during V1 receptor blockade. The relaxation appears to be mediated by the release of vasodilator prostaglandins from the endothelial cell layer and is independent of V2 receptor stimulation or release of nitric oxide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834191

  5. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  6. Shared Human-Chimpanzee Pattern of Perinatal Femoral Shaft Morphology and Its Implications for the Evolution of Hominin Locomotor Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Naoki; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Ponce de León, Marcia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acquisition of bipedality is a hallmark of human evolution. How bipedality evolved from great ape-like locomotor behaviors, however, is still highly debated. This is mainly because it is difficult to infer locomotor function, and even more so locomotor kinematics, from fossil hominin long bones. Structure-function relationships are complex, as long bone morphology reflects phyletic history, developmental programs, and loading history during an individual’s lifetime. Here we discriminate between these factors by investigating the morphology of long bones in fetal and neonate great apes and humans, before the onset of locomotion. Methodology/Principal Findings Comparative morphometric analysis of the femoral diaphysis indicates that its morphology reflects phyletic relationships between hominoid taxa to a greater extent than taxon-specific locomotor adaptations. Diaphyseal morphology in humans and chimpanzees exhibits several shared-derived features, despite substantial differences in locomotor adaptations. Orangutan and gorilla morphologies are largely similar, and likely represent the primitive hominoid state. Conclusions/Significance These findings are compatible with two possible evolutionary scenarios. Diaphyseal morphology may reflect retained adaptive traits of ancestral taxa, hence human-chimpanzee shared-derived features may be indicative of the locomotor behavior of our last common ancestor. Alternatively, diaphyseal morphology might reflect evolution by genetic drift (neutral evolution) rather than selection, and might thus be more informative about phyletic relationships between taxa than about locomotor adaptations. Both scenarios are consistent with the hypothesis that knuckle-walking in chimpanzees and gorillas resulted from convergent evolution, and that the evolution of human bipedality is unrelated to extant great ape locomotor specializations. PMID:22848680

  7. Hepatopancreatic arterial ring: bilateral symmetric typology in human celiaco-mesenteric arterial system.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Motohiro; Horiuchi, Kanji; Nishida, Keiichiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Murakami, Takuro; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2002-10-01

    The celiac and mesenteric arterial system including the left gastric, splenic, common hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries shows various types of origins, courses, ramifications and anastomoses. In order to explain the various expressions of this system, we have proposed a typological model, in which celiacomesenteric arteries develop as paired or bilaterally symmetrical primordial vessels originated from the anterior aspect of the aorta, and these vessels anastomose each other with longitudinal and horizontal pathways. Here, we report 3 unusual cases characterized by arterial rings, formed by the left gastric, left accessory hepatic, proper hepatic, anterior pancreaticoduodenal, and dorsal pancreatic arteries. The dorsal pancreatic and anterior pancreaticoduodenal arteries are located to the right and left of the embryonic pancreas developing in the dorsal mesentery, respectively. Such hepatopancreatic arterial rings simultaneously containing right and left elements can only be explained using our typological model, in which the concept of paired arteries or bilateral symmetry is introduced. PMID:12530508

  8. Microcalcifications in Early Intimal Lesions of Atherosclerotic Human Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Roijers, Ruben B.; Debernardi, Nicola; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Schurgers, Leon J.; Mutsaers, Peter H.A.; van der Vusse, Ger J.

    2011-01-01

    Although calcium (Ca) precipitation may play a pathogenic role in atherosclerosis, information on temporal patterns of microcalcifications in human coronary arteries, their relation to expression of calcification-regulating proteins, and colocalization with iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) is scarce. Human coronary arteries were analyzed post mortem with a proton microprobe for element concentrations and stained (immuno)histochemically for morphological and calcification-regulating proteins. Microcalcifications were occasionally observed in preatheroma type I atherosclerotic intimal lesions. Their abundance increased in type II, III, and IV lesions. Moreover, their appearance preceded increased expression of calcification-regulating proteins, such as osteocalcin and bone morphogenetic protein-2. In contrast, their presence coincided with increased expression of uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein (MGP), whereas the content of carboxylated MGP was increased in type III and IV lesions, indicating delayed posttranslational conversion of biologically inactive into active MGP. Ca/phosphorus ratios of the microcalcifications varied from 1.6 to 3.0, including amorphous Ca phosphates. Approximately 75% of microcalcifications colocalized with the accumulation of Fe and Zn. We conclude that Ca microprecipitation occurs in the early stages of atherosclerosis, inferring a pathogenic role in the sequel of events, resulting in overt atherosclerotic lesions. Microcalcifications may be caused by local events triggering the precipitation of Ca rather than by increased expression of calcification-regulating proteins. The high degree of colocalization with Fe and Zn suggests a mutual relationship between these trace elements and early deposition of Ca salts. PMID:21531376

  9. A prospective randomized longitudinal study involving 6 months of endurance or resistance exercise. Conduit artery adaptation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Angela L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    This randomized trial evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on the function and size of conduit arteries in healthy volunteers. Young (27 ± 5 years) healthy male subjects were randomized to undertake 6 months of either endurance training (ET; n= 10) or resistance training (RT; n= 13). High-resolution ultrasound was used to determine brachial, femoral and carotid artery diameter and wall thickness (IMT) and femoral and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-mediated dilatation. Improvements in peak oxygen uptake occurred with ET (from 3.6 ± 0.7 to 3.8 ± 0.6 l min−1, P= 0.024) but not RT. Upper body muscular strength increased following RT (from 57.8 ± 17.7 to 69.0 ± 19.5 kg, P < 0.001), but not ET. Both groups exhibited increases in lean body mass (ΔET, 1.4 ± 1.8 kg and ΔRT, 2.3 ± 1.3 kg, P < 0.05). Resistance training increased brachial artery resting diameter (from 3.8 ± 0.5 to 4.1 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.2 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-mediated diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.01), as well as brachial FMD (from 5.1 ± 2.2 to 7.0 ± 3.9%, P < 0.05). No improvements in any brachial parameters were observed following ET. Conversely, ET increased femoral artery resting diameter (from 6.2 ± 0.7 to 6.4 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.4 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-induced diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.05), as well as femoral FMD-to-GTN ratio (from 0.6 ± 0.3 to 1.1 ± 0.8, P < 0.05). Resistance training did not induce changes in femoral artery parameters. Carotid artery IMT decreased in response to both forms of training. These findings indicate that 6 months of supervised exercise training induced changes in brachial and femoral artery size and function and decreased carotid artery IMT. These impacts of both RT and ET would be expected to translate to decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:23247114

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Daniel L.; Burnstein, Marcus J.; Errett, Lee; Bonneau, Daniel; Latter, David; Rotstein, Ori D.; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Lidington, Darcy; Voigtlaender-Bolz, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i) express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii) constrict in response to S1P and (iii) lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013). However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study. PMID:26367262

  11. Fetal development of the mesonephric artery in humans with reference to replacement by the adrenal and renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Ryoji; Ishizawa, Akimitsu; Miyake, Hideaki; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-11-01

    According to the classical ladder theory, the mesonephric arteries (MAs) have a segmental arrangement and persist after regression of the mesonephros, with some of these vessels becoming definitive renal arteries. To avoid interruption of blood flow, such a vascular switching would require an intermediate stage in which two or more segmental MAs are connected to a definitive renal artery. To examine developmental changes, especially changes in the segmental distribution of MAs, we studied serial paraffin sections of 26 human embryos (approximately 5-7 weeks). At 5-6 weeks, 1-2 pairs of MAs ran anterolaterally or laterally within each of the lower thoracic vertebral segments, while 2-5 pairs of MAs were present in each of the lumbar vertebral segments, but they were usually asymmetrical. The initial metanephros, extending along the aorta from the first lumbar to first sacral vertebra, had no arterial supply despite the presence of multiple MAs running immediately anterior to it. Depending on increased sizes of the adrenal and metanephros, the MAs were reduced in number and restricted in levels from the twelfth thoracic to the second lumbar vertebra. The elimination of MAs first became evident at a level of the major, inferior parts of the metanephros. Therefore, a hypothetical arterial ladder was lost before development of glomeruli in the metanephros. At 7 weeks, after complete elimination of MAs, a pair of symmetrical renal arteries appeared near the superior end of the metanephros. In conclusion, the MAs appear not to persist to become a definitive renal artery.

  12. [Mechanical properties of the arteries. Effects of cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Rosset, E; Friggi, A; Rieu, R; Rolland, P; Novakovitch, G; Choux, R; Pellissier, J F; Pélissier, R; Branchereau, A

    1996-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of the arterial wall are responsible for the blood pressure wave propagation throughout the arterial system. Arterial diseases may cause disorders in this propagation. We have developed a mock circulation system that allows assessment of viscoelastic properties in fresh or cryopreserved human arteries. It includes the following components:--a hydrodynamic generator that can simulate physiological pressure variations in fresh segments of human arteries;--a lightweight miniature flexible probe that can be placed around the artery to measure changes in the external diameter during systolo-diastolic cycles;--a computer program to analyse pressure and diameter data measured during a cardiac cycle. Using this system, it is possible to evaluate the main viscoelastic properties of the arterial wall (arterial compliance, arterial stiffness, midwall aortic stress, Young elastic modulus, incremental modulus). Human arterial samples were collected during organ harvesting in subjects from 18 to 35 years of age. Correlation between viscoelastic properties, arterial wall status, and histological aspect in nitrogen vapor (-140 degree C) were established. No statistically significant difference was observed in femoral arteries characteristics. Compliance decreased, while stiffness increased with statistically significant difference after cryopreservation in carotid arteries. No histological difference was observed in both arteries before and after cryopreservation.

  13. Femoral neck-shaft angle in humans: variation relating to climate, clothing, lifestyle, sex, age and side.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, Ian; Chandraphak, Supichya; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2013-08-01

    The femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) varies among modern humans but measurement problems and sampling limitations have precluded the identification of factors contributing to its variation at the population level. Potential sources of variation include sex, age, side (left or right), regional differences in body shape due to climatic adaptation, and the effects of habitual activity patterns (e.g. mobile and sedentary lifestyles and foraging, agricultural, and urban economies). In this study we addressed these issues, using consistent methods to assemble a global NSA database comprising over 8000 femora representing 100 human groups. Results from the analyses show an average NSA for modern humans of 127° (markedly lower than the accepted value of 135°); there is no sex difference, no age-related change in adults, but possibly a small lateral difference which could be due to right leg dominance. Climatic trends consistent with principles based on Bergmann's rule are evident at the global and continental levels, with the NSA varying in relation to other body shape indices: median NSA, for instance, is higher in warmer regions, notably in the Pacific (130°), whereas lower values (associated with a more stocky body build) are found in regions where ancestral populations were exposed to colder conditions, in Europe (126°) and the Americas (125°). There is a modest trend towards increasing NSA with the economic transitions from forager to agricultural and urban lifestyles and, to a lesser extent, from a mobile to a sedentary existence. However, the main trend associated with these transitions is a progressive narrowing in the range of variation in the NSA, which may be attributable to thermal insulation provided by improved cultural buffering from climate, particularly clothing.

  14. Femoral neck-shaft angle in humans: variation relating to climate, clothing, lifestyle, sex, age and side

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, Ian; Chandraphak, Supichya; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2013-01-01

    The femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) varies among modern humans but measurement problems and sampling limitations have precluded the identification of factors contributing to its variation at the population level. Potential sources of variation include sex, age, side (left or right), regional differences in body shape due to climatic adaptation, and the effects of habitual activity patterns (e.g. mobile and sedentary lifestyles and foraging, agricultural, and urban economies). In this study we addressed these issues, using consistent methods to assemble a global NSA database comprising over 8000 femora representing 100 human groups. Results from the analyses show an average NSA for modern humans of 127° (markedly lower than the accepted value of 135°); there is no sex difference, no age-related change in adults, but possibly a small lateral difference which could be due to right leg dominance. Climatic trends consistent with principles based on Bergmann's rule are evident at the global and continental levels, with the NSA varying in relation to other body shape indices: median NSA, for instance, is higher in warmer regions, notably in the Pacific (130°), whereas lower values (associated with a more stocky body build) are found in regions where ancestral populations were exposed to colder conditions, in Europe (126°) and the Americas (125°). There is a modest trend towards increasing NSA with the economic transitions from forager to agricultural and urban lifestyles and, to a lesser extent, from a mobile to a sedentary existence. However, the main trend associated with these transitions is a progressive narrowing in the range of variation in the NSA, which may be attributable to thermal insulation provided by improved cultural buffering from climate, particularly clothing. PMID:23781912

  15. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  16. Isolation of human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMC).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maximiano P; Relvas, Ricardo; Chiquita, Samuel; Correia, Ilídio J

    2010-07-03

    The human umbilical cord (UC) is a biological sample that can be easily obtained just after birth. This biological sample is, most of the time, discarded and their collection does not imply any added risk to the newborn or mother s health. Moreover no ethical concerns are raised. The UC is composed by one vein and two arteries from which both endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), two of the main cellular components of blood vessels, can be isolated. In this project the SMCs were obtained after enzymatic treatment of the UC arteries accordingly the experimental procedure previously described by Jaffe et al. After cell isolation they were kept in t-flash with DMEM-F12 supplemented with 5% of fetal bovine serum and were cultured for several passages. Cells maintained their morphological and other phenotypic characteristics in the different generations. The aim of this study was to isolate smooth muscle cells in order to use them as models for future assays with constrictor drugs, isolate and structurally characterize L-type calcium channels, to study cellular and molecular aspects of the vascular function and to use them in tissue engineering.

  17. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  18. Human-derived nanoparticles and vascular response to injury in rabbit carotid arteries: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Maria A K; Lieske, John C; Kumar, Vivek; Farell-Baril, Gerard; Miller, Virginia M

    2008-01-01

    Self-calcifying, self-replicating nanoparticles have been isolated from calcified human tissues. However, it is unclear if these nanoparticles participate in disease processes. Therefore, this study was designed to preliminarily test the hypothesis that human-derived nanoparticles are causal to arterial disease processes. One carotid artery of 3 kg male rabbits was denuded of endothelium; the contralateral artery remained unoperated as a control. Each rabbit was injected intravenously with either saline, calcified, or decalcified nanoparticles cultured from calcified human arteries or kidney stones. After 35 days, both injured and control arteries were removed for histological examination. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with saline showed minimal, eccentric intimal hyperplasia. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with calcified kidney stone- and arterial-derived nanoparticles occluded, sometimes with canalization. The calcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles caused calcifications within the occlusion. Responses to injury in rabbits injected with decalcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles were similar to those observed in saline-injected animals. However, decalcified arterial-derived nanoparticles produced intimal hyperplasia that varied from moderate to occlusion with canalization and calcification. This study offers the first evidence that there may be a causal relationship between human-derived nanoparticles and response to injury including calcification in arteries with damaged endothelium. PMID:18686783

  19. Hemodynamic Instability after Low-Energy Thigh Contusion Caused by Injury to the Femoral Artery: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Roiz, Juan Miguel; Ballesteros-Betancourt, José; García-Tarriño, Raquel; Rodríguez-Roiz, Victor Antonio; Llusa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries have been described in relation to high-energy trauma accidents or in patients undergoing surgery in the femoral area. We describe a healthy patient who sustained a direct, low-energy contusion in the thigh and presented haemodynamic instability. Arteriography was used to locate the point of bleeding, and embolisation and vessel occlusion were carried out to stop the haemorrhage. The genetic study identified the COL3A1 gene mutation; accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (vascular type). PMID:27293936

  20. Hemodynamic Instability after Low-Energy Thigh Contusion Caused by Injury to the Femoral Artery: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Roiz, Juan Miguel; Ballesteros-Betancourt, José; García-Tarriño, Raquel; Rodríguez-Roiz, Victor Antonio; Llusa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries have been described in relation to high-energy trauma accidents or in patients undergoing surgery in the femoral area. We describe a healthy patient who sustained a direct, low-energy contusion in the thigh and presented haemodynamic instability. Arteriography was used to locate the point of bleeding, and embolisation and vessel occlusion were carried out to stop the haemorrhage. The genetic study identified the COL3A1 gene mutation; accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (vascular type). PMID:27293936

  1. Vasorelaxant properties of isolated human radial arteries: comparison with internal mammary arteries.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, C A; O'Dowd, G; McIntosh, L; Berg, G; Butler, J; Pathi, V; Williams, R; Reid, J L; Dominiczak, A F

    2002-02-01

    Radial arteries, used in revascularisation surgery, are prone to spasm. We have examined the ability of nitrovasodilators, calcium channel blockers, and K(ATP) channel openers to cause vasodilation, and to attenuate contractions due to depolarisation and receptor activation in radial and mammary arteries used in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Two to three millimetre rings of artery obtained from patients at surgery were studied in organ baths in vitro. Constriction to KC1 and phenylephrine was examined before and again after treatment of the rings with drug or vehicle. Calcium channel blockers were the only compounds to inhibit contractions to both KC1 and phenylephrine. Sodium nitroprusside attenuated constriction to phenylephrine but not KC1 in both vessels. K(ATP) channel openers similarly attenuated constriction to phenylephrine in radial arteries but were much less effective in mammary arteries. These studies support the continued use of calcium blockers after revascularisation with radial artery but suggest that other classes of drug may be as effective at minimising spasm due to receptor mediated constriction.

  2. The atrioventricular nodal artery in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Krupa, U

    1993-01-01

    Studies were performed on 120 hearts taken from adult cadavers of both sexes. In the study,. prepared and corrosion technique was used. Arteries were filled with vinyl polichloride or Plastogen G through the aorta. The examined vessels were dissected and either partly, or totally etched in the concentrated hydrochloric acid soda lye. The arterial blood supply of the atrioventricular node arose in 108 (90%) of the hearts from the right coronary artery and in 12 (10%) of the hearts from the left coronary artery.

  3. Spatial variation in osteon population density at the human femoral midshaft: histomorphometric adaptations to habitual load environment.

    PubMed

    Gocha, Timothy P; Agnew, Amanda M

    2016-05-01

    Intracortical remodeling, and the osteons it produces, is one aspect of the bone microstructure that is influenced by and, in turn, can influence its mechanical properties. Previous research examining the spatial distribution of intracortical remodeling density across the femoral midshaft has been limited to either considering only small regions of the cortex or, when looking at the entirety of the cortex, considering only a single individual. This study examined the spatial distribution of all remodeling events (intact osteons, fragmentary osteons, and resorptive bays) across the entirety of the femoral midshaft in a sample of 30 modern cadaveric donors. The sample consisted of 15 males and 15 females, aged 21-97 years at time of death. Using geographic information systems software, the femoral cortex was subdivided radially into thirds and circumferentially into octants, and the spatial location of all remodeling events was marked. Density maps and calculation of osteon population density in cortical regions of interest revealed that remodeling density is typically highest in the periosteal third of the bone, particularly in the lateral and anterolateral regions of the cortex. Due to modeling drift, this area of the midshaft femur has some of the youngest primary tissue, which consequently reveals that the lateral and anterolateral regions of the femoral midshaft have higher remodeling rates than elsewhere in the cortex. This is likely the result of tension/shear forces and/or greater strain magnitudes acting upon the anterolateral femur, which results in a greater amount of microdamage in need of repair than is seen in the medial and posterior regions of the femoral midshaft, which are more subject to compressive forces and/or lesser strain magnitudes.

  4. No contractile effect for 5-HT1D and 5-HT1F receptor agonists in human and bovine cerebral arteries: similarity with human coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelet, Isabelle; Case, Bruce; Olivier, André; Hamel, Edith

    2000-01-01

    Using subtype-selective 5-HT1 receptor agonists and/or the 5-HT1 receptor antagonist GR127935, we characterized in vitro the 5-HT receptor that mediates the contraction of human and bovine cerebral arteries. Further, we investigated which sumatriptan-sensitive receptors are present in human coronary artery by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR). Agonists with affinity at the 5-HT1B receptor, such as sumatriptan, alniditan and/or IS-159, elicited dose-dependent contraction in both human and bovine cerebral arteries. They behaved as full agonists at the sumatriptan-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors in both species. In contrast, PNU-109291 and LY344864, selective agonists at 5-HT1D and 5-HT1F receptors, respectively, were devoid of any significant vasocontractile activity in cerebral arteries, or did not affect the sumatriptan-induced vasocontraction. The rank order of agonist potency was similar in both species and could be summarized as 5-HT=alniditan>sumatriptan=IS-159>>>PNU-109291=LY344864. In bovine cerebral arteries, the 5-HT1 receptor antagonist GR127935 dose-dependently inhibited the vasoconstrictions elicited by both 5-HT and sumatriptan, with respective pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.6. RT–PCR studies in human coronary arteries showed a strong signal for the 5-HT1B receptor while message for the 5-HT1F receptor was weak and less frequently detected. Expression of 5-HT1D receptor mRNA was not detected in any sample. The present results demonstrate that the triptan-induced contraction in brain vessels is mediated exclusively by the 5-HT1B receptor, which is also present in a majority of human coronary arteries. These results suggest that selective 5-HT1D and 5-HT1F receptor agonists might represent new antimigraine drugs devoid of cerebro- and cardiovascular effects. PMID:10711348

  5. Bilateral antegrade perfusion of the superficial femoral artery to prevent limb ischaemia during combined use of Impella CP left ventricular assist device and extracorporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Kizner, Lukasz; Flottmann, Christian; Horstkotte, Dieter; Gummert, Jan

    2016-08-01

    The combined use of extracorporeal cardiac life support and the Impella left ventricular assist device is feasible in severe cardiogenic shock. Ischaemic complications due to the arterial cannulation may occur. The following cases show how the use of a perfusion adapter for bilateral antegrade leg perfusion prevents malperfusion of the lower extremities.

  6. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thijssen, Dick H. J.; Cable, N. Timothy; Green, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been consistently reported in asymptomatic subjects and those with cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. In the present review, we summarize evidence pertaining to the impact of exercise and physical activity on arterial wall remodelling of the carotid artery and peripheral arteries in the upper and lower limbs. We consider the potential role of exercise intensity, duration and modality in the context of putative mechanisms involved in wall remodelling, including haemodynamic forces. Finally, we discuss the impact of exercise training in terms of primary prevention of wall thickening in healthy subjects and remodelling of arteries in subjects with existing cardiovascular disease and risk factors. PMID:22150253

  7. Comparison of synchrotron radiation and conventional x-ray microcomputed tomography for assessing trabecular bone microarchitecture of human femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Chappard, Christine; Basillais, Armelle; Benhamou, Laurent; Bonassie, Alexandra; Brunet-Imbault, Barbara; Bonnet, Nicolas; Peyrin, Francoise

    2006-09-15

    Microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) produces three-dimensional (3D) images of trabecular bone. We compared conventional {mu}CT (C{mu}CT) with a polychromatic x-ray cone beam to synchrotron radiation (SR) {mu}CT with a monochromatic parallel beam for assessing trabecular bone microarchitecture of 14 subchondral femoral head specimens from patients with osteoarthritis (n=10) or osteoporosis (n=4). SR{mu}CT images with a voxel size of 10.13 {mu}m were reconstructed from 900 2D radiographic projections (angular step, 0.2 deg. ). C{mu}CT images with a voxel size of 10.77 {mu}m were reconstructed from 205, 413, and 825 projections obtained using angular steps of 0.9 deg., 0.45 deg., and 0.23 deg., respectively. A single threshold was used to binarize the images. We computed bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), bone surface/bone volume (BS/BV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th and Tb.Th*), trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp), degree of anisotropy (DA), and Euler density. With the 0.9 deg. angular step, all C{mu}CT values were significantly different from SR{mu}CT values. With the 0.23 deg. and 0.45 deg. rotation steps, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and BS/BV by C{mu}CT differed significantly from the values by SR{mu}CT. The error due to slice matching (visual site matching {+-}10 slices) was within 1% for most parameters. Compared to SR{mu}CT, BV/TV, Tb.Sp, and Tb.Th by C{mu}CT were underestimated, whereas Tb.N and Tb.Th* were overestimated. A Bland and Altman plot showed no bias for Tb.N or DA. Bias was -0.8{+-}1.0%, +5.0{+-}1.1 {mu}m, -5.9{+-}6.3 {mu}m, and -5.7{+-}29.1 {mu}m for BV/TV, Tb.Th*, Tb.Th, and Tb.Sp, respectively, and the differences did not vary over the range of values. Although systematic differences were noted between SR{mu}CT and C{mu}CT values, correlations between the techniques were high and the differences would probably not change the discrimination between study groups. C{mu}CT provides a reliable 3D assessment of human defatted bone when working at the 0

  8. Trans-femoral thromboaspiration for upper extremity ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gordhan, Ajeet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular trans-femoral access catheter aspiration of thrombus within the proximal subclavian, brachial, radial and ulnar arteries for symptomatic upper extremity ischemic pain has not been previously reported. We describe a case in which a successful clinical outcome was achieved using long length neuro-endovascular aspiration catheters. Presentation of case A 45 year old female presented with diffuse left upper limb pain. Sonography revealed compromised upper extremity blood flow. Thrombus was identified in the proximal left subclavian artery by CT angiography. Surgical retrograde brachial artery access thrombectomy was performed. Occlusion of the left vertebral artery with embolic infarcts of the cerebellar hemispheres was noted post-procedurally. Trans-femoral mechanical aspiration thrombectomy and angioplasty of the subclavian, brachial, ulnar and radial arteries was subsequently performed with successful recanalization. Conclusion Recanalization of vasculature to the upper arm through safer femoral access can be achieved with thrombo-aspiration catheters of sufficient length. PMID:26708945

  9. Arterial and pulmonary arterial hemodynamics and oxygen delivery/extraction in normal humans exposed to hyperbaric air and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K; Howe, Steve; Snow, Gregory L; Deru, Kayla

    2009-07-01

    Divers and hyperbaric chamber attendants breathe hyperbaric air routinely. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)) is used therapeutically frequently. Although much is understood about the hemodynamic physiology and gas exchange effects during hyperbaric air and HBO(2) exposure, arterial and pulmonary arterial (PA) catheter data, including blood gas values during hyperbaric air and HBO(2) exposure of normal humans, have not been reported. We exposed 10 healthy volunteers instrumented with arterial and PA catheters to air at 0.85, 3.0, 2.5, 2.0, 1.3 (decompression stop), 1.12 (decompression stop), and 0.85 atm abs (our altitude) and then at identical pressures breathing O(2) followed by atmospheric pressure air while we measured arterial and PA pressures (PAP), cardiac output (Q), and blood gas measurements from both arterial and PA catheters. Although hemodynamic changes occurred during exposure to both hyperbaric air and HBO(2), we observed a greater magnitude of change under HBO(2) conditions: heart rate changes ranged from -9 to -19% (air to O(2)), respiratory rate from -12 to -17%, Q from -7 to -18%, PAP from -18 to -19%, pulmonary vascular resistance from -38 to -48%, and right-to-left shunt fraction from -87 to -107%. Mixed venous CO(2) fell 8% from baseline during HBO(2) despite mixed venous O(2) tensions of several hundred Torr. The stroke volume, O(2) delivery, and O(2) consumption did not change across exposures. The arterial and mixed venous partial pressures of O(2) and contents were elevated, as predicted. O(2) extraction increased 37% during HBO(2).

  10. Detrimental arterial inflammatory effect of microparticles circulating in preeclamptic women: ex vivo evaluation in human arteries.

    PubMed

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Meziani, Ferhat; Sananès, Nicolas; Boisramé, Thomas; Langer, Bruno; Schneider, Francis; Ragot, Thierry; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Tesse, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Elevated plasmatic levels of lympho-monocyte and platelet microparticles (MPs) have been reported in preeclampsia. Previous studies suggest that MPs could participate in preeclampsia vascular impairment. In this study, we investigated the ex vivo vascular effects of MPs from preeclamptic women on arteries from normotensive pregnant women. Omental arteries were collected from normal pregnant women undergoing cesarean section and incubated during 24 h with MPs from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. Vascular contraction to serotonin and phenylephrine was studied on a wire myograph with or without pharmacological selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and/or cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2). Expression of iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB and production of superoxide anion and 8-isoprostane were also assessed by immunohistological or biochemical staining and/or Western blot or ELISA assay, respectively. Microparticles from preeclamptic women, but not those from normal pregnant women, induced hyporeactivity to vasocontracturant agonists in omental arteries. Selective inhibitor of iNOS partially restored this arterial contraction, suggesting that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in vascular contractility alteration. Conversely, COX-2 induced 8-isoprostane release, a vasoconstricting metabolite modulating the agonist-induced contraction. COX-2 selective inhibitor almost abolished the arterial contraction in the same vessels. Interestingly, the association of iNOS and COX-2 selective inhibitors restored the contraction to control levels. Moreover, iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB expressions are upregulated and superoxide anion levels increased in vessels incubated with MPs from preeclamptic women. In conclusion, circulating MPs from preeclamptic women induce vascular inflammation and enhance oxidative stress. These results suggest a possible role of MPs during preeclampsia-induced arterial dysfunction.

  11. Quantitative comparison of cerebral artery development in human embryos with other eutherians.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2015-09-01

    The embryonic and early fetal human brain is known to undergo extraordinary expansion of its cellular population during embryonic and early fetal life, and is critically dependant on a steady supply of nutrients and oxygen for proper brain development. Quantitative analysis of the internal radius of the aorta and cerebral arteries in a range of eutherian mammals has been used to compare arterial flow to the developing human brain with that to the brains of non-human eutherians. Human embryos showed a much steeper rise of internal radius of the aorta with increasing body size than the embryos of non-human eutherians, but the thickness of the aorta rose at the same pace relative to body size in both humans and non-humans, suggesting that aortic pressure is similar in all eutherian embryos of a similar size. The sums of internal radii of both the internal carotids and vertebral arteries of human embryos raised to the fourth power were much lower at embryonic stages (less than 22 mm body length) than in non-human eutherians, were similar between humans and non-humans at 22-30 mm body length, and exceeded the non-humans at body lengths of more than 30 mm. The relative size of the internal calibre of the cerebral feeder arteries (internal carotid and vertebral) to the aorta did not change between embryonic and fetal sizes in either humans or non-humans. The findings suggest that the developing human brain may actually receive less blood flow at embryonic sizes (less than 22 mm body length) than do other mammalian embryos of a similar body size, but that internal carotid and vertebral flow is higher in human fetuses (body length greater than 30 mm) than in developing non-humans of the same body size. Increased flow to the developing human brain relative to non-humans is achieved by simultaneous increases in both aortic and cerebral feeder artery internal calibre.

  12. The dynamics of pulsatile flow in distensible model arteries.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W; Zimmer, R

    1995-12-01

    Deposits and blockages are often found in the carotid, coronary, renal and femoral arteries. This paper deals with laser-Doppler velocity measurements in models of bifurcations of the human femoral arteries. Several models were prepared for the studies: a simplified 35 degrees glass model, two elastic-silicone-rubber models with a wall thickness of 1 mm and 2 mm, and true-to-scale rigid and elastic models. These measurements give a clearer picture of how hemodynamics influences the formation of atherosclerotic plaques where there is a hardening of the arterial walls and a loss of elasticity. In addition to the effects of elasticity, the influence of the flow's pulsatility were studied. The measurements were done in steady and pulsatile flow. From the velocity measurements the shear stresses were calculated.

  13. Blood flow interpretation in femoral pseudoaneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sang-Ho; Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Ho; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2013-06-01

    A femoral artery pseudoaneurysm is one complication of vascular intervention, and the incidence is increasing. Early management is then needed to avoid potential dangers from it. It differs from a true aneurysm in that it doesn't include any component of the vascular wall, and is not studied as much as a true aneurysm. Here, a model of a femoral pseudoaneurysm was made and a Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) simulation was verified with PIV experiment. Afterwards, a CFD simulation with two different models was performed to look for any findings which may help in developing new treatment methods.

  14. Myocardial bridges of the coronary arteries in the human fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Yusuf Ozgür; Cavdar, Safiye; Yalin, Aymelek; Yener, Nuran; Ozdogmus, Omer

    2010-09-01

    During the last century, many investigators reported on myocardial bridges in the adult human heart. In the present study, 39 human fetal hearts (the mean gestastional age was 30 weeks) were studied for myocardial bridging, and the results were correlated with adult data. Among the 39 (27 male and 12 female) fetal hearts studied, 26 bridges were observed on 18 fetal hearts (46.2%). Ten of the bridges had one myocardial bridge, whereas double myocardial bridges were observed in eight fetal hearts. The most frequent myocardial bridges were observed on the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which had 13 bridges (50%). Eight (30.7%) myocardial bridges were on the diagonal artery, and on the posterior descending artery there were five (19.3%). Myocardial bridges were not observed on the circumflex artery. The data presented in this study may provide potentially useful information for the preoperative evaluation of the newborn and may have a clinical implication for sudden fetal death.

  15. Maternal obesity impairs specific regulatory pathways in human myometrial arteries.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Christina E; Cowley, Elizabeth J; Mills, Tracey A; Sibley, Colin P; Wareing, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Obese women (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2)) are at greater risk than normal weight women of pregnancy complications associated with maternal and infant morbidity, particularly the development of cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders in later life; why this occurs is unknown. Nonpregnant, obese individuals exhibit systemic vascular endothelial dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that obese pregnant women have altered myometrial arterial function compared to pregnant women of normal (18-24 kg/m(2)) and overweight (25-29 kg/m(2)) body mass index. Responses to vasoconstrictors, U46619 (thromboxane mimetic) and arginine vasopressin, and vasodilators, bradykinin and the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, were assessed by wire myography in myometrial arteries from normal weight (n = 18), overweight (n = 18), and obese (n = 20) women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Thromboxane-prostanoid receptor expression was assessed using immunostaining in myometrial arteries of normal weight and obese women. Vasoconstriction and vasodilatation were impaired in myometrial arteries from obese women with otherwise uncomplicated pregnancies. Disparate agonist responses suggest that vascular function in obese women is not globally dysregulated but may be specific to thromboxane and nitric oxide pathways. Because obesity rates are escalating, it is important to identify the mechanisms underlying impaired vascular function and establish why some obese women compensate for vascular dysfunction and some do not. Future studies are needed to determine whether central adiposity results in an altered endocrine milieu that may promote vascular dysfunction by altering the function of perivascular adipose tissue.

  16. Multiscale modeling of the human arterial tree on the TeraGrid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karniadakis, Gerorge

    2009-03-01

    A multiscale model of the human arterial tree will be presented consisting of the macrovascular network (MaN, arteries above 1-2 mm), the mesovascular network (MeN, arterioles above 10 micro-m) and the microvascular network (MiN, capillaries). Coupling conditions between the MaN-MeN-MiN will be discussed and three different methods in modeling each network will be presented. Specific examples will be shown for the intracranial arterial tree for healthy subjects but also for patients with hydrocephalus.

  17. Analysis of blood flow through a model of the human arterial system under periodic body acceleration.

    PubMed

    Sud, V K; Sekhon, G S

    1986-01-01

    The human system may be subjected to a body acceleration deliberated for example by making subjects lie down on vibrating tables or more frequently unintentionally, for example during travel in water and land or in air and space. The present study is concerned with the effects of externally imposed body accelerations on blood flow in a branched system of arteries. A finite-element model of flow in the arterial system subject to periodic body accelerations is presented. Computational results on the flow rates through selected arteries and the corresponding inlet and outlet pressures under different conditions (magnitude, frequency and direction) of applied acceleration are presented.

  18. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  19. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  20. Effects of nicardipine on ventriculo-arterial coupling in humans.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Oshita, S; Kitahata, H; Kimura, H; Kawahito, S; Park, Y C; Sakabe, T

    1998-08-01

    The ratio of effective arterial elastance (Ea) to left ventricular elastance (Ees) is an indicator of the coupling between ventricular properties and arterial load properties. Another criterion for the coupling between an energy source and its load is the principle of economical fuel consumption, or mechanical efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of stroke work (SW) to myocardial oxygen consumption per beat (MVO2). It has been revealed that SW of ventricular contraction is maximized when Ea/Ees = 1, while mechanical efficiency is maximized when Ea/Ees = 0.5. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ventriculo-arterial coupling during hypertension, and the effects of nicardipine on this relationship in surgical patients using Ea/Ees and SW/MVO2 as indicators. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and fentanyl. Radial artery pressure was displayed on a polygraph, and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were determined by use of transoesophageal echocardiography. Ees was calculated as MAP/(ESVI-4), where MAP is mean arterial pressure and ESVI is end-systolic volume index. Ea was calculated as the ratio of MAP to stroke volume index (SVI). Stroke work index (SWI) was calculated as the product of MAP and SVI. MVO2 was assessed by estimating the ventricular pressure-volume area index (PVAI), which is expressed as the sum of SWI and the end-systolic potential energy index. Before (baseline), and 3, 10, 20, and 30 min after i.v. nicardipine (30 micrograms kg-1), Ea/Ees and SWI/PVAI were determined in 14 surgical patients with intraoperative hypertension. Before nicardipine (during hypertension), Ea was almost equal to Ees, whereas Ea/Ees was significantly reduced to about 0.5-0.6 at 3, 10, and 20 min after nicardipine. SWI/PVAI was maximized and significantly greater than the baseline value at 3 min after nicardipine. These results suggest that, during hypertension, ventricular and arterial properties were so

  1. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  2. The physcial properties of human pulmonary arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Banks, J; Booth, F V; MacKay, E H; Rajagopalan, B; Lee, G D

    1978-11-01

    1. We have studied the extensibility of circumferential strips of main pulmonary artery and large pulmonary veins obtained at post mortem from patients of all ages, dying from conditions other than heart and lung disease. 2. The vessel strips were submitted to increasing loads in a tension balance. The pulmonary arteries were found to be readily extensible. This extensibility became less with increasing age. The pulmonary veins were virtually inextensible at all ages. 3. It is postulated that the large extraparenchymal pulmonary veins have a capacitative role in supplying blood from the lungs to the left atrium. This may be accomplished by their collapsible nature, as they have little capability of distension. PMID:720001

  3. Recombinant Human Elastase Alters the Compliance of Atherosclerotic Tibial Arteries After Ex Vivo Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Karen; Moss, Emma; Gottlieb, Daniel P.; Wong, Marco D.; Bland, Kimberly S.; Franano, F. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether vonapanitase (formerly PRT-201), a recombinant human elastase, treatment can fragment the protein elastin in elastic fibers and cause dilation of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries subjected to ex vivo balloon angioplasty. Materials and Methods: Seven patients undergoing lower limb amputation for peripheral artery disease or who died and donated their bodies to science donated 11 tibial arteries (5 anterior, 6 posterior) for this study. All arteries were atherosclerotic by visual inspection. The arteries underwent ex vivo balloon angioplasty and thereafter were cut into rings and studied on wire myographs where the rings were stretched and tension was recorded. After treatment with vonapanitase 2 mg/mL or vehicle control, myography was repeated and the rings were then subject to elastin content measurement using a desmosine radioimmunoassay and elastic fiber visualization by histology. The wire myography data were used to derive compliance, stress-strain, and incremental elastic modulus curves. Results: Vonapanitase treatment reduced elastin (desmosine) content by 60% and decreased elastic fiber histologic staining. Vonapanitase-treated rings experienced less tension at any level of stretch and as a result had shifts in the compliance and stress-strain curves relative to vehicle-treated rings. Vonapanitase treatment did not alter the incremental elastic modulus curve. Conclusions: Vonapanitase treatment of atherosclerotic human peripheral arteries after ex vivo balloon angioplasty fragmented elastin in elastic fibers, decreased tension in the rings at any level of stretch, and altered the compliance and stress-strain curves in a manner predicting arterial dilation in vivo. Based on this result, local treatment of balloon angioplasty sites may increase blood vessel diameter and thereby improve the success of balloon angioplasty in peripheral artery disease. PMID:26745001

  4. Dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Natsuki; Takada, Daisuke; Ohmi, Masato; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2011-03-01

    OCT is highly potential for development of a new field of dynamic skin physiology, as recently reported by the authors. In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by the SS-OCT. Among the vascular system, only the small artery has two physiological functions both for the elastic artery (like main and middle arteries) and for muscle-controlled one (like arterioles). It, therefore, is important for dynamic analysis of blood flow and circulation. In the time-sequential OCT images obtained with 25 frames/s, it is found that the small artery makes a sharp response to sound stress for contraction and expansion while it continues pulsation in synchronization with the heartbeats. This result indicates that the small artery exhibits clearly the two physiological functions for blood flow and circulation. In response to sound stress, blood flow is controlled effectively by thickness change of the tunica media which consists of five to six layers of smooth muscles. It is thus found that the thickness of the tunica media changes remarkably in response to external stress, reflecting activity of the sympathetic nerve. The dynamic OCT of the small artery presented here will allow us not only to understand the mechanism of blood flow control and also to detect abnormal physiological functions in the whole vascular system.

  5. Randomized trial of Legflow® paclitaxel eluting balloon and stenting versus standard percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for the treatment of intermediate and long lesions of the superficial femoral artery (RAPID trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) may occur in 45% of patients at 2 years follow-up. Paclitaxel-coated balloons have been found to reduce neointimal hyperplasia, and thus reduce restenosis. Recently, the Legflow® paclitaxel-coated balloon (Cardionovum Sp.z.o.o., Warsaw, Poland) (LPEB) has been introduced. This balloon is covered with shellac, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved natural resin, to obtain an equally distributed tissue concentration of paclitaxel. The RAPID trial is designed to assess restenosis after PTA using the Legflow balloon combined with nitinol stenting versus uncoated balloons with nitinol stenting in SFA lesions >5 cm. Methods/Design A total of 176 adult patients with Rutherford class 2 to class 6 symptoms due to intermediate (5–15 cm) or long (>15 cm) atherosclerotic lesions in the SFA will be randomly allocated for treatment with LPEB with nitinol stenting or uncoated balloon angioplasty with stenting. Stenting will be performed using the Supera® stent in both groups (IDEV Technologies Inc., Webster, TX). The primary endpoint is the absence of binary restenosis of the treated SFA segment. Secondary outcomes are target lesion revascularization (TLR), clinical and hemodynamic outcome, amputation rate, mortality rate, adverse events, and device-specific adverse events. Follow up consists of four visits in which ankle-brachial indices (ABI), toe pressure measurements, and duplex ultrasound (DUS) will be performed. Furthermore, a peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) will be completed by the patients at each follow-up. In the event that DUS reveals a symptomatic >50% restenosis, or a >75% asymptomatic restenosis, additional digital subtraction angiography will be performed with any necessary re-intervention. Discussion The RAPID trial is a multicenter randomized controlled patient blind trial that will provide evidence concerning whether the use of the

  6. Exosomes from Human Synovial-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shang-Chun; Tao, Shi-Cong; Yin, Wen-Jing; Qi, Xin; Sheng, Jia-Gen; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) represents a debilitating complication following glucocorticoid (GC)-based therapy. Synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) can exert protective effect in the animal model of GC-induced ONFH by inducing cell proliferation and preventing cell apoptosis. Recent studies indicate the transplanted cells exert therapeutic effects primarily via a paracrine mechanism and exosomes are an important paracrine factor that can be directly used as therapeutic agents for tissue engineering. Herein, we provided the first demonstration that the early treatment of exosomes secreted by human synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC-Exos) could prevent GC-induced ONFH in the rat model. Using a series of in vitro functional assays, we found that SMSC-Exos could be internalized into bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and enhance their proliferation and have anti-apoptotic abilities. Finally, SMSC-Exos may be promising for preventing GC-induced ONFH. PMID:27766040

  7. The electron microscope appearance of the subchondral bone plate in the human femoral head in osteoarthritis and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, BAOHUA; MARSHALL, DEBORAH; ROE, MARTIN; ASPDEN, RICHARD M.

    1999-01-01

    The subchondral bone plate supports the articular cartilage in diarthrodial joints. It has a significant mechanical function in transmitting loads from the cartilage into the underlying cancellous bone and has been implicated in the destruction of cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) and its sparing in osteoporosis (OP), but little is known of its composition, structure or material properties. This study investigated the microscopic appearance and mineral composition of the subchondral bone plate in femoral heads from patients with OA or OP to determine how these correspond to changes in composition and stiffness found in other studies. Freeze-fractured full-depth samples of the subchondral bone plate from the femoral heads of patients with osteoarthritis, osteoporosis or a matched control group were examined using back scattered and secondary emission scanning electron microscopy. Other samples were embedded and polished and examined using back-scattered electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The appearances of the samples from the normal and osteoporotic patients were very similar, with the subchondral bone plate overlayed by a layer of calcified cartilage. Osteoporotic samples presented a more uniform fracture surface and the relative thicknesses of the layers appeared to be different. In contrast, the OA bone plate appeared to be porous and have a much more textured surface. There were occasional sites of microtrabecular bone formation between the trabeculae of the underlying cancellous bone, which were not seen in the other groups, and more numerous osteoclast resorption pits. The calcified cartilage layer was almost absent and the bone plate was apparently thickened. The appearance of the osteoarthritic subchondral bone plate was, therefore, considerably different from both the normal and the osteoporotic, strongly indicative of abnormal cellular activity. PMID:10473297

  8. Substance P-induced relaxation and hyperpolarization in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, J.; Zygmunt, P. M.; Brandt, L.; Högestätt, E. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular effects of substance P were studied in human isolated pial arteries removed from 14 patients undergoing cerebral cortical resection. 2. Substance P induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of indomethacin. No relaxation was seen in arteries where the endothelium had been removed. 3. N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 0.3 mM) abolished the relaxation in arteries from six patients. The relaxation was only partially inhibited in the remaining eight patients, the reduction of the maximum relaxation being less than 50% in each patient. 4. The L-NOARG-resistant relaxation was abolished when the external K+ concentration was raised above 30 mM. 5. Substance P caused a smooth muscle hyperpolarization (in the presence of L-NOARG and indomethacin), but only when the artery showed an L-NOARG-resistant relaxation. 6. The results indicate that nitric oxide is an important mediator of endothelium-dependent relaxation in human cerebral arteries. Furthermore, another endothelium-dependent pathway, causing hyperpolarization and vasodilatation, was identified in arteries from more than half the population of patients. PMID:7582516

  9. Copper Dependence of Angioproliferation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Shiro; Guignabert, Christophe; Al Hussaini, Aysar A.; Farkas, Daniela; Ruiter, Gerrina; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Fadel, Elie; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Humbert, Marc; Noordegraaf, Anton Vonk; Spiegel, Sarah; Farkas, Laszlo; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2012-01-01

    Obliteration of the vascular lumen by endothelial cell growth is a hallmark of many forms of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copper plays a significant role in the control of endothelial cell proliferation in cancer and wound-healing. We sought to determine whether angioproliferation in rats with experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell proliferation in humans depend on the proangiogenic action of copper. A copper-depleted diet prevented, and copper chelation with tetrathiomolybdate reversed, the development of severe experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension. The copper chelation–induced reopening of obliterated vessels was caused by caspase-independent apoptosis, reduced vessel wall cell proliferation, and a normalization of vessel wall structure. No evidence was found for a role of super oxide–1 inhibition or lysyl–oxidase–1 inhibition in the reversal of angioproliferation. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibited the proliferation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from explanted lungs from control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. These data suggest that the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation by a copper-restricting strategy could be explored as a new therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It remains to be determined, however, whether potential toxicity to the right ventricle is offset by the beneficial pulmonary vascular effects of antiangiogenic treatment in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22162909

  10. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb. PMID:23341246

  11. Effects of Anterior-Posterior Constraint on Injury Patterns in the Human Knee During Tibial-Femoral Joint Loading from Axial Forces through the Tibia.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, V M; Sevensma, E T; Kitagawa, M; Haut, R C

    2001-11-01

    According to the National Accident Sampling System (NASS), 10% of all automobile accident injuries involve the knee. These injuries involve bone fracture and/or "soft tissue" injury. Previous investigators have determined the tibial-femoral (TF) joint failure load for an experimentally constrained human knee at 90 degrees flexion. In these experiments bone fractures have been documented. During TF joint compression, however, anterior motion of the tibia has been noted by others. It was therefore the objectives of this study to document effects of flexion angle and anterior-posterior joint constraint on the nature and severity of knee injury during TF compression loading via axial loads in the tibia. The effect of flexion angle was examined using 10 unconstrained human knees from 5 cadavers aged 73.2+/-9.4 years. The tibial-femoral joint was loaded in compression as a result of axial loading along the tibia using a servo-hydraulic testing machine until gross failure with the knee flexed 60 degrees or 120 degrees . Pressure sensitive film measured the distribution of internal TF joint loads. Both 60 degrees and 120 degrees flexed preparations failed by rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) at 4.6+/-1.2 kN, and the internal joint loads were significantly higher (2.6+/-1.5 kN) on the medial versus the lateral (0.4+/-0.5 kN) aspect of the tibial plateau. The effect of anterior-posterior (AP) constraint of the femur along the longitudinal axis of the femur was investigated in a second series of tests using the same TF joint loading protocol on 6 pairs of human joints (74.3+/-10.5 years) flexed at 90 degrees . The primary mode of failure for the AP constrained joints was fracture of bone via the femoral condyle at a maximum load of 9.2+/-2.6 kN. The mode of failure for unconstrained joints was primarily due to rupture of the ACL at a maximum load of 5.8+/-2.9 kN. Again, the pressure film indicated an unequal internal TF load distribution for the unconstrained

  12. Arterial Shear Stress Reduces Eph-B4 Expression in Adult Human Veins

    PubMed Central

    Model, Lynn S.; Hall, Michael R.; Wong, Daniel J.; Muto, Akihito; Kondo, Yuka; Ziegler, Kenneth R.; Feigel, Amanda; Quint, Clay; Niklason, Laura; Dardik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Vein graft adaptation to the arterial environment is characterized by loss of venous identity, with reduced Ephrin type-B receptor 4 (Eph-B4) expression but without increased Ephrin-B2 expression. We examined changes of vessel identity of human saphenous veins in a flow circuit in which shear stress could be precisely controlled. Medium circulated at arterial or venous magnitudes of laminar shear stress for 24 hours; histologic, protein, and RNA analyses of vein segments were performed. Vein endothelium remained viable and functional, with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-expressing cells on the luminal surface. Venous Eph-B4 expression diminished (p = .002), Ephrin-B2 expression was not induced (p = .268), and expression of osteopontin (p = .002) was increased with exposure to arterial magnitudes of shear stress. Similar changes were not found in veins placed under venous flow or static conditions. These data show that human saphenous veins remain viable during ex vivo application of shear stress in a bioreactor, without loss of the venous endothelium. Arterial magnitudes of shear stress cause loss of venous identity without gain of arterial identity in human veins perfused ex vivo. Shear stress alone, without immunologic or hormonal influence, is capable of inducing changes in vessel identity and, specifically, loss of venous identity. PMID:25191151

  13. Quantitative comparison of cerebral artery development in metatherians and monotremes with non-human eutherians.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the internal diameters of cerebral feeder arteries (internal carotid and vertebral) and the aorta in developing non-human eutherians, metatherians and monotremes has been made, with the aim of determining if there are differences in cerebral arterial flow between the three infraclasses of mammals such as might reflect differences in metabolism of the developing brain. There were no significant differences between eutherians and metatherians in the internal radius of the aorta or the thickness of the aortic wall, but aortic internal radius was significantly smaller in developing monotremes than therians at the < 10 mm body length range. Aortic thickness in the developing monotremes also rose at a slower rate relative to body length than in metatherians or eutherians. The sums of the internal calibres of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries were significantly lower in metatherians as a group and monotremes compared with non-human eutherians at body lengths up to 20 mm and in metatherians at > 20 mm body length. The internal calibre of the internal carotids relative to the sum of all cerebral feeder arteries was also significantly lower in monotremes at < 10 mm body length compared with eutherians. It was noted that dasyurids differed from other metatherians in several measures of cerebral arterial calibre and aortic internal calibre. The findings suggest that: (i) both aortic outflow and cerebral arterial inflow may be lower in developing monotremes than in therians, particularly at small body size (< 20 mm); (ii) cerebral inflow may be lower in some developing metatherians than non-human eutherians; and (iii) dasyurids have unusual features of cerebral arteries possibly related to the extreme immaturity and small size at which they are born. The findings have implications for nutritional sourcing of the developing brain in the three infraclasses of mammals.

  14. Quantitative comparison of cerebral artery development in metatherians and monotremes with non-human eutherians.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the internal diameters of cerebral feeder arteries (internal carotid and vertebral) and the aorta in developing non-human eutherians, metatherians and monotremes has been made, with the aim of determining if there are differences in cerebral arterial flow between the three infraclasses of mammals such as might reflect differences in metabolism of the developing brain. There were no significant differences between eutherians and metatherians in the internal radius of the aorta or the thickness of the aortic wall, but aortic internal radius was significantly smaller in developing monotremes than therians at the < 10 mm body length range. Aortic thickness in the developing monotremes also rose at a slower rate relative to body length than in metatherians or eutherians. The sums of the internal calibres of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries were significantly lower in metatherians as a group and monotremes compared with non-human eutherians at body lengths up to 20 mm and in metatherians at > 20 mm body length. The internal calibre of the internal carotids relative to the sum of all cerebral feeder arteries was also significantly lower in monotremes at < 10 mm body length compared with eutherians. It was noted that dasyurids differed from other metatherians in several measures of cerebral arterial calibre and aortic internal calibre. The findings suggest that: (i) both aortic outflow and cerebral arterial inflow may be lower in developing monotremes than in therians, particularly at small body size (< 20 mm); (ii) cerebral inflow may be lower in some developing metatherians than non-human eutherians; and (iii) dasyurids have unusual features of cerebral arteries possibly related to the extreme immaturity and small size at which they are born. The findings have implications for nutritional sourcing of the developing brain in the three infraclasses of mammals. PMID:26644330

  15. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  16. Diffuse calcification in human coronary arteries. Association of osteopontin with atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, L A; Severson, A; Edwards, W D; Ingram, R T

    1994-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis is frequently associated with calcification of arterial plaque. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the formation of atherosclerotic calcification, we examined human coronary arteries for the presence and extent of mineral. In sections stained specifically for mineral, staining was diffuse and present in all atherosclerotic plaques. Hydroxyapatite was not detected in normal coronary artery sections. Distribution of hydroxyapatite coincided with a similar distribution of calcium detected by a radiodense pattern using contact microradiography of the same sections before cytochemical staining. By energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis, the chemical composition of calcified sites was identical to hydroxyapatite (Ca10[PO4]6[OH]2), the major inorganic component of bone. Osteopontin is a phosphorylated glycoprotein with known involvement in the formation and calcification of bone and is regulated by local cytokines. Human coronary artery segments (14 normal and 34 atherosclerotic) obtained at autopsy were evaluated immunohistochemically using polyclonal antibodies generated against human osteopontin. Immunohistochemistry for osteopontin indicated intense, highly specific staining in the outer margins of all diseased segments at each calcification front; staining was evident throughout the entire plaque. Conversely, arterial segments free of atheroma and calcification and sections treated with nonimmune serum had no evidence of positive staining. Osteopontin, a protein involved in mineralization is specifically associated with calcific coronary atheroma and may play an important role in the onset and progression of this disease in human coronary arteries. The deposition of noncollagenous proteins such as osteopontin may regulate the presence or absence of calcification and ultimately alter vessel compliance. Images PMID:7929835

  17. Insulin enhances the gain of arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin N; Deo, Shekhar H; Chaudhary, Kunal; Thyfault, John P; Fadel, Paul J

    2010-09-15

    Recent animal studies indicate that insulin increases arterial baroreflex control of lumbar sympathetic nerve activity; however, the extent to which these findings can be extrapolated to humans is unknown. To begin to address this, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and arterial blood pressure were measured in 19 healthy subjects (27 ± 1 years) before, and for 120 min following, two common methodologies used to evoke sustained increases in plasma insulin: a mixed meal and a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. Weighted linear regression analysis between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was used to determine the gain (i.e. sensitivity) of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA. Plasma insulin was significantly elevated within 30 min following meal intake (34 ± 6 uIU ml(1); P < 0.05) and remained above baseline for up to 120 min. Similarly, after meal intake, arterial baroreflex-MSNA gain for burst incidence and total MSNA was increased and remained elevated for the duration of the protocol (e.g. burst incidence gain: 3.29 ± 0.54 baseline vs. 5.64 ± 0.67 bursts (100 heart beats)(1) mmHg(1) at 120 min; P < 0.05). During the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, in which insulin was elevated to postprandial concentrations (42 ± 6 μIU ml(1); P < 0.05), while glucose was maintained constant, arterial baroreflex-MSNA gain was similarly enhanced (e.g. burst incidence gain: 2.44 ± 0.29 baseline vs. 4.74 ± 0.71 bursts (100 heart beats)(1) mmHg(1) at 120 min; P < 0.05). Importantly, during time control experiments, with sustained fasting insulin concentrations, the arterial baroreflex-MSNA gain remained unchanged. These findings demonstrate, for the first time in healthy humans, that increases in plasma insulin enhance the gain of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA.

  18. Development of the coronary arteries in staged human embryos (the Paris Embryological Collection revisited).

    PubMed

    Mandarim-de-Lacerda, C A

    1990-03-01

    Twenty seven human embryos from stages 15 to 23 (postsomitic period), belonging to the collection of the "UFR Biomédicale des Saints-Pères, Université René Descartes Paris V", were studied. Details of the aorticopulmonary cleavage were analysed specially aortic valve development and origin of the coronary artery. At stage 18 the aortic valve was clearly distinguished (cup-shaped) presenting semilunar valves and aortic sinus (Valsalvae); at this stage the left coronary artery was detected in 66.7 per cent of the cases as an endothelial epicardial invagination. At stage 19, the left and right coronary arteries were detected simultaneously in 100 per cent of the cases. At stage 20, the coronary arteries showed greater structural complexity with a coat of mesenchymal cells. These results agree with previous data from different embryological collections. These findings suggest that the left coronary artery has a tendency to develop earlier than the right. We found no evidence of the coronary origin from the aortic lumen. This work provides additional information about the embryological development of the heart, obtained from the analyses of a French collection of human embryos.

  19. Effect of microgravity on renal and femoral flows during LBNP & intravenous saline load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Gaffney, F. A.; Beck, L.; Coulon, J.; Porcher, M.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    Renal and femoral hemodynamics were studied in crew members at rest and during lower body negative pressure before and after the D-2 Spacelab mission and with intravenous saline loading. Specific measurements included renal vascular resistance, femoral arterial flow, and vascular resistance, along with other cardiovascular parameters. Cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity is discussed with a focus on changes observed in femoral and renal vascular resistance.

  20. [Reconstruction of the metanephros of a human embryo of 20 millimeters. Study of the origin of the renal artery].

    PubMed

    Salama, J; Folio, P; Chevrel, J P

    1982-09-01

    The authors have reconstructed by the Born's method, the uretero-pyelo-calycial system of a 20 mm human embryo, the aortic axis and the branches given off, at a magnification of 400. This reconstruction shows two antero-lateral branches which are the only mesonephrotic arteries persisting at this stage, and two arteries issued from the aorta at the level of the second lumbar arteries; these are undoubtedly the renal arteries; this is supported by their lateral origin formerly observed on a 17 mm embryo and by their termination at the level of the future renal hilum. This renal artery which is directly metanophrotic, weakens certain classical affirmations considering the renal artery as a mesonephrotic artery, secondarily picked up by the metanephros at the end of its migration.

  1. Characterization of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor which mediates contraction of the human isolated basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Parsons, A A; Whalley, E T

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports part of a study which investigated the identity of the receptor involved in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) mediated contraction of the human basilar artery in vitro. 5-HT and a variety of 5-HT receptor agonists contracted human isolated basilar artery with a rank order of agonist potency: 5-carboxamidotryptamine greater than 5-HT greater than GR43175 much much greater than 2-methyl-5-HT. The maximum response produced by these agonists differed. The contractile responses to both 5-HT and GR43175 were resistant to antagonism by the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin and the 5-HT3 antagonist GR38032, indicating that neither 5-HT nor GR43175 activate 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors in this tissue. In striking contrast, methiothepin (an antagonist at 5-HT1-like receptors) proved a potent antagonist of the contractile actions of both 5-HT and GR43175. Methiothepin did not antagonize the contractile response to the thromboxane-A2 mimetic U-46619. It is concluded that 5-HT and GR43175 contract the human isolated basilar artery by activating 5-HT1-like receptors. It is suggested that the antimigraine action of GR43175 may reflect its ability to constrict certain cranial arteries via 5-HT1-like receptor activation. PMID:2544283

  2. Evaluation of vascular wall elasticity of human digital arteries using alternating current-signal photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Uangpairoj, Pichitra; Shibata, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A simple method of estimating arterial elasticity in the human finger using a volume-oscillometric technique with photoplethysmography was principally studied under the various effects of age, sex, and cold-stress stimulation for testing the capability of using this technique in arterial elasticity analysis. Methods Amplitude variations in the alternating current signal of the photoplethysmograph during a continuous change in transmural pressure were analyzed to obtain the blood pressure and the transmural pressure–relative volume difference relationship of the arteries. We first tested the effect of the occluding cuff size on the arterial elasticity analysis in eight subjects (ages 20–45 years) to obtain a suitable cuff size, resulting in the selection of a middle cuff with a 22 mm diameter. Blood pressure and arterial elasticity were measured in six groups of subjects separated into three age-groups of women and men (ages 20–25, 32–45, and over 50 years) for testing the effect of age and sex. Twelve subjects (ages 20–25 years) also had their blood pressure and arterial elasticity measured in three conditions under the influence of the cold-stress stimulation. Results Age, sex, and cold-stress stimulation had an impact on mean blood pressure (P < 0.0005, 0.025), whereas pulse pressure and heart rate were statistically unchanged by those factors. Furthermore, an advanced age (over 50 years) was found to induce an increase in relative volume difference values (P < 0.025) and upward shifting of the transmural pressure–relative volume difference relationships, whereas sex, level of mean blood pressure, and cold-stress stimulation had no influence on these forms of the index. Conclusion This study showed the usefulness of the relative volume difference as being a mean blood pressure-independent indicator for changes in arterial elasticity. PMID:23766653

  3. Control of shear stress in the epicardial coronary arteries of humans: impairment by atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vita, J A; Treasure, C B; Ganz, P; Cox, D A; Fish, R D; Selwyn, A P

    1989-11-01

    Altered arterial wall shear stress may adversely affect vascular endothelium and contribute to atherogenesis. This study examined the hypothesis that, in humans, dilation of normal coronary arteries with increased flow limits increases in shear stress and that loss of flow-mediated dilation in atherosclerosis results in failure to control shear stress. Coronary blood flow was increased by infusing adenosine (0.022 to 2.2 mg/min) through a 2.5F Doppler flow catheter positioned in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 8 patients with mild atherosclerosis but no flow-limiting stenosis and in 10 patients with entirely smooth coronary arteries. Quantitative angiography and coronary flow velocity were used to estimate shear stress in a proximal segment of the left anterior descending artery exposed to increased flow, but not to adenosine. The peak increase in blood flow was the same in smooth (371 +/- 65%) and irregular (377 +/- 50%) arteries. However, at peak flow, dilation was greater in smooth segments (16.3 +/- 2.7%) than in irregular segments (2.0 +/- 1.5%) (p less than 0.001). In each patient, smooth segments dilated with increasing shear stress (slope 7.4 +/- 0.9%), whereas irregular segments dilated less (slope 0.9 +/- 0.6%) and showed greater increases in shear stress (p less than 0.01). The peak increase in shear stress was less in smooth (189 +/- 23%) than in irregular (365 +/- 52%) segments (p less than 0.01). These results suggest a control mechanism in normal coronary arteries whereby increases in shear stress stimulate vasodilation and thus limit further increases in this force at the endothelial surface.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Model of human cardiovascular system with a loop of autonomic regulation of the mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Karavaev, Anatoly S; Ishbulatov, Yurii M; Ponomarenko, Vladimir I; Prokhorov, Mikhail D; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Bezruchko, Boris P; Kiselev, Anton R

    2016-03-01

    A model of human cardiovascular system is proposed which describes the main heart rhythm, the regulation of heart function and blood vessels by the autonomic nervous system, baroreflex, and the formation of arterial blood pressure. The model takes into account the impact of respiration on these processes. It is shown that taking into account nonlinearity and introducing the autonomous loop of mean arterial blood pressure in the form of self-oscillating time-delay system allow to obtain the model signals whose statistical and spectral characteristics are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those for experimental signals. The proposed model demonstrates the phenomenon of synchronization of mean arterial pressure regulatory system by the signal of respiration with the basic period close to 10 seconds, which is observed in the physiological experiments. PMID:26847603

  5. Regional calcium distribution and ultrasound images of the vessel wall in human carotid arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Uzonyi, I.; Szíki, G. Á.; Magyar, M. T.; Molnár, S.; Ida, Y.; Csiba, L.

    2005-04-01

    Arterial calcification can take place at two sites in the vessel wall: the intima and the media. Intimal calcification occurs exclusively within atherosclerotic plaques, while medial calcification may develop independently. Extensive calcified plaques in the carotid arteries can be easily detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging. The calcium content might correlate with the ultrasound reflectance of the vessel wall, and could be a surrogate marker for arteriosclerosis. In this study, segments of human carotid arteries collected at autopsy were examined by ultrasonography in vitro and calcium distributional maps of sections from the same segments were determined by particle induced X-ray emission. Our aim was to make a first step towards investigating the relationship between the calcium distributional maps and the respective ultrasound images.

  6. An anatomical study and ontogenetic explanation of 23 cases with variations in the main pattern of the human brachio-antebrachial arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Baeza, A; Nebot, J; Ferreira, B; Reina, F; Pérez, J; Sañudo, J R; Roig, M

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three cases with variations in the brachio-antebrachial arterial pattern of the human upper limb are reported. According to the artery which showed a variation, 4 groups were recognised: (1) isolated persistence of the median artery; (2) high origin of the ulnar artery; (3) high origin of the radial artery; and (4) duplication of the brachial artery, either with or without anastomosis at the cubital fossa. In addition, in groups 2, 3 and 4 the median artery may have persisted. Based on these arterial variations an anatomical and embryological correlation was established from a morphogenetic pattern which is proposed as being normal. Thus the terminal branches of the superficial brachial artery take part in the development of the radial, ulnar and median arteries, joining with the trunks of deep origin of these arteries in the primitive axial artery. Regression of the superficial arterial segments located proximal to this anastomosis gives rise to the definitive arterial pattern. Either the total or partial persistence of the superficial arterial segments explains those cases of high origin of either the radial or ulnar arteries as well as the duplications of the brachial artery. We postulate that the persistence of the median artery is independent of the presence or absence of any other variation in the arterial pattern. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7592009

  7. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  17. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  18. A quantitative method for studying human arterial baroreflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Goble, Ross L.

    1991-01-01

    A new system is described that delivers precise, stereotyped pressure changes to the human neck and elicits neurally-mediated heart rate changes. The centerpiece of this system is a Silastic chamber that is strapped to the anterior neck. This chamber is connected to a stepping-motor-controlled bellows assembly. A strain-gauge transducer measures the intensity of pressure changes. The entire system is controlled by microprocessors, and both stimuli and responses are displayed on a digital oscilloscope. The end-product of this system is a reproducible baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relation that can be recorded rapidly and safely in astronauts in space.

  19. Region-based geometric modelling of human airways and arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Songlin; Ye, Yong; Tu, Jiyuan; Subic, Aleksandar

    2010-03-01

    Anatomically precise geometric models of human airways and arterial vessels play a critical role in the analysis of air and blood flows in human bodies. The established geometric modelling methods become invalid when the model consists of bronchioles or small vessels. This paper presents a new method for reconstructing the entire airway tree and carotid vessels from point clouds obtained from CT or MR images. A novel layer-by-layer searching algorithm has been developed to recognize branches of the airway tree and arterial vessels from the point clouds. Instead of applying uniform accuracy to all branches regardless of the number of available points, the surface patches on each branch are constructed adaptively based on the number of available elemental points, which leads to the elimination of distortions occurring at small bronchi and vessels.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  1. Cystic Disease of the Groin Presenting as Compression of a Femoral Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Hwang, Deokbi; Park, Sujin; Jeong, Won-Ju; Seo, An Na; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe our diagnosis and treatment of two patients who presented with femoral vessel compression caused by a cystic lesion in the groin. One case was diagnosed as adventitial cystic disease (ACD) of the common femoral artery resulting in leg claudication and the other was diagnosed as a ganglion cyst (GC) causing femoral vein compression and unilateral leg swelling. The operative findings differed between these two cases with respect to the dissection of the cyst and femoral vessel, but the postoperative histological examination results were similar. The pathogenesis of ACD and GC is not fully understood, and further investigation is needed to delineate the exact pathology of these uncommon conditions.

  2. Wavelet transform analysis to assess oscillations in pial artery pulsation at the human cardiac frequency.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, P J; Gruszecki, M; Wolf, J; Swierblewska, E; Kunicka, K; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, M; Guminski, W; Zabulewicz, J; Frydrychowski, A F; Bieniaszewski, L; Narkiewicz, K

    2015-05-01

    Pial artery adjustments to changes in blood pressure (BP) may last only seconds in humans. Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) in humans, we aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous oscillations in BP and cc-TQ at frequencies between 0.5 Hz and 5 Hz. We hypothesized that analysis of very short data segments would enable the estimation of changes in the cardiac contribution to the BP vs. cc-TQ relationship during very rapid pial artery adjustments to external stimuli. BP and pial artery oscillations during baseline (70s and 10s signals) and the response to maximal breath-hold apnea were studied in eighteen healthy subjects. The cc-TQ was measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate and beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 was measured using a medical gas analyzer. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. The recordings lasting 10s and representing 10 cycles with a frequency of ~1 Hz provided sufficient accuracy with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence values and yielded similar results to those obtained from approximately 70cycles (70s). A slight but significant decrease in wavelet coherence between augmented BP and cc-TQ oscillations was observed by the end of apnea. Wavelet transform analysis can be used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations at cardiac frequency using signals intervals as short as 10s. Apnea slightly decreases the contribution of cardiac activity to BP and cc-TQ oscillations. PMID:25804326

  3. Pregnancy Increases Relaxation in Human Omental Arteries to the CGRP Family of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanlin; Betancourt, Ancizar; Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Lugo, Fernando; Anderson, Matthew L; Espinoza, Jimmy; Fox, Karin; Belfort, Michael; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CALCB) and its family members adrenomedullin (ADM) and intermedin (ADM2) play important roles in maintaining vascular adaptations during pregnancy in animal models. The present study was designed to evaluate the responses of omental arteries to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, and to determine the mechanisms involved. By using resistance omental arteries collected from nonpregnant women (n = 15) during laparotomy and from term pregnant women (n = 15) at cesarean delivery, this study shows that the receptor components--calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2 and 3--are localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in omental arteries, with increased expressions of both mRNA and protein in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. The myography study demonstrated that CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 (0.1-100 nM) dose dependently relax U46619 (1 muM) precontracted omental artery segments, and the maximum possible effects to CALCB and ADM2, but not to ADM, are significantly enhanced in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women. Further, the vasodilatory responses to CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME), adenylyl cyclase (SQ22536), voltage-activated potassium channels (4-aminopyrodin and tetrabutylammonium), Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (charybdotoxin), and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). In conclusion, the CALCB family of peptides, CALCB and ADM2, increase human omental artery relaxation during pregnancy through diverse mechanisms, including NO, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and prostaglandins, and thus could contribute to the vascular adaptations during pregnancy in the human.

  4. Use of fibrin sealant for reinforcing arterial anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Jakob, H; Campbell, C D; Qiu, Z K; Pick, R; Replogle, R L

    1984-01-01

    Despite improvements in needles, sutures, and technique, hemorrhage remains a problem in cardiovascular surgery. In this study conventional vascular suture lines and suture lines reinforced with fibrin sealant are compared for blood loss and burst strength. Bilateral femoral arteries in 20 dogs were divided at 50% of their circumference and repaired with six 6-0 polypropylene sutures. Ten animals were systemically heparinized (3 mg/kg), and 10 were not on anticoagulants. The right femoral artery anastomosis was treated with fibrin sealant in all animals, and the left suture line served as the control. Three minutes after initiation of the sealing procedure, blood flow was reinstituted in both femoral arteries. After 3 minutes a significant difference in blood loss between the conventional suture technique and fibrin-reinforced anastomoses was noted in both heparinized (12.1 +/- 2.79 vs. 0.13 +/- 0.06 ml/min; p less than 0.01) and nonheparinized dogs (8.45 +/- 1.37 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.08 ml/min; p less than 0.001). After 30 minutes volume inflow and pressure catheters were inserted into snared compartments encompassing the femoral artery anastomosis. Continuous pressure recordings during volume loading with normal saline solution demonstrated increased bursting pressures of the fibrin-sealed suture lines in both the heparinized (317.5 +/- 13.18 vs. 135 +/- 23.17 mm Hg; p less than 0.001) and nonheparinized animals (474.5 +/- 26.82 vs. 311 +/- 29.31 mm Hg; p less than 0.001). Histologic examination revealed no fibrosis or foreign body reaction and complete resorption of the fibrin sealant within 3 weeks. Fibrin sealant, a powerful hemostatic agent produced from human donors not suffering from hepatitis, decreases blood loss and strengthens suture lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Contractile effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on the human internal mammary artery.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda; Antunes, Manuel J; Cotrim, Maria Dulce

    2016-08-01

    Since the late 1980s numerous reports have detailed adverse reactions to the use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) associated with cardiovascular collapse and sudden death, following ventricular tachycardia and hypertension. For a better understanding of the effects of MDMA on the cardiovascular system, it is critical to determine their effects at the vasculature level, including the transporter or neurotransmitter systems that are most affected at the whole range of drug doses. With this purpose in mind, the aim of our study was to evaluate the contractile effect of MDMA in the human internal mammary artery, the contribution of SERT for this effect and the responsiveness of this artery to 5-HT in the presence of MDMA. We have also studied the possible involvement of 5-HT2 receptors on the MDMA contractile effect in this human blood vessel using ketanserin. Our results showed that MDMA contracted the studied human's internal mammary artery in a SERT-independent form, through activation of 5-HT2A receptors. Considering the high plasma concentrations achieved in heavy users or in situations of acute exposure to drugs, this effect is probably involved in the cardiovascular risk profile of this psychostimulant, especially in subjects with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. PMID:27079619

  6. A Large-Scale, Energetic Model of Cardiovascular Homeostasis Predicts Dynamics of Arterial Pressure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Roytvarf, Alexander; Shusterman, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The energetic balance of forces in the cardiovascular system is vital to the stability of blood flow to all physiological systems in mammals. Yet, a large-scale, theoretical model, summarizing the energetic balance of major forces in a single, mathematically closed system has not been described. Although a number of computer simulations have been successfully performed with the use of analog models, the analysis of energetic balance of forces in such models is obscured by a big number of interacting elements. Hence, the goal of our study was to develop a theoretical model that represents large-scale, energetic balance in the cardiovascular system, including the energies of arterial pressure wave, blood flow, and the smooth muscle tone of arterial walls. Because the emphasis of our study was on tracking beat-to-beat changes in the balance of forces, we used a simplified representation of the blood pressure wave as a trapezoidal pressure-pulse with a strong-discontinuity leading front. This allowed significant reduction in the number of required parameters. Our approach has been validated using theoretical analysis, and its accuracy has been confirmed experimentally. The model predicted the dynamics of arterial pressure in human subjects undergoing physiological tests and provided insights into the relationships between arterial pressure and pressure wave velocity. PMID:18269976

  7. Geometry-based pressure drop prediction in mildly diseased human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, J T C; Wentzel, J J; van der Steen, A F W; Gijsen, F J H

    2014-06-01

    Pressure drop (△p) estimations in human coronary arteries have several important applications, including determination of appropriate boundary conditions for CFD and estimation of fractional flow reserve (FFR). In this study a △p prediction was made based on geometrical features derived from patient-specific imaging data. Twenty-two mildly diseased human coronary arteries were imaged with computed tomography and intravascular ultrasound. Each artery was modelled in three consecutive steps: from straight to tapered, to stenosed, to curved model. CFD was performed to compute the additional △p in each model under steady flow for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The correlations between the added geometrical complexity and additional △p were used to compute a predicted △p. This predicted △p based on geometry was compared to CFD results. The mean △p calculated with CFD was 855±666Pa. Tapering and curvature added significantly to the total △p, accounting for 31.4±19.0% and 18.0±10.9% respectively at Re=250. Using tapering angle, maximum area stenosis and angularity of the centerline, we were able to generate a good estimate for the predicted △p with a low mean but high standard deviation: average error of 41.1±287.8Pa at Re=250. Furthermore, the predicted △p was used to accurately estimate FFR (r=0.93). The effect of the geometric features was determined and the pressure drop in mildly diseased human coronary arteries was predicted quickly based solely on geometry. This pressure drop estimation could serve as a boundary condition in CFD to model the impact of distal epicardial vessels. PMID:24746019

  8. Biaxial mechanical properties of the human thoracic and abdominal aorta, common carotid, subclavian, renal and common iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Pemberton, Mark A; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Phillips, Nick Y; Herber, Kyle; Woodford, Thomas; Bowen, Robert E; Lomneth, Carol S; MacTaggart, Jason N

    2014-11-01

    The biomechanics of large- and medium-sized arteries influence the pathophysiology of arterial disease and the response to therapeutic interventions. However, a comprehensive comparative analysis of human arterial biaxial mechanical properties has not yet been reported. Planar biaxial extension was used to establish the passive mechanical properties of human thoracic (TA, [Formula: see text]) and abdominal (AA, [Formula: see text]) aorta, common carotid (CCA, [Formula: see text]), subclavian (SA, [Formula: see text]), renal (RA, [Formula: see text]) and common iliac (CIA, [Formula: see text]) arteries from 11 deceased subjects ([Formula: see text] years old). Histological evaluation determined the structure of each specimen. Experimental data were used to determine constitutive parameters for a structurally motivated nonlinear anisotropic constitutive model. All arteries demonstrated appreciable anisotropy and large nonlinear deformations. Most CCA, SA, TA, AA and CIA specimens were stiffer longitudinally, while most RAs were stiffer circumferentially. A switch in anisotropy was occasionally demonstrated for all arteries. The CCA was the most compliant, least anisotropic and least frequently diseased of all arteries, while the CIA and AA were the stiffest and the most diseased. The severity of atherosclerosis correlated with age, but was not affected by laterality. Elastin fibers in the aorta, SA and CCA were uniformly and mostly circumferentially distributed throughout the media, while in the RA and CIA, elastin was primarily axially aligned and concentrated in the external elastic lamina. Constitutive modeling provided good fits to the experimental data for most arteries. Biomechanical and architectural features of major arteries differ depending on location and functional environment. A better understanding of localized arterial mechanical properties may support the development of site-specific treatment modalities for arterial disease.

  9. Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Douglas; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Sun, Xiaofeng; Broekman, M Johan; Nguyen, Annie; Drosopoulos, Joan H F; Marcus, Aaron J; Robson, Simon C; Chen, Ridong; Abendschein, Dana

    2014-08-01

    In patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy to restore blood flow through blocked arteries, simultaneous inhibition of platelet P2Y12 receptors with the current standard of care neither completely prevents recurrent thrombosis nor provides satisfactory protection against reperfusion injury. Additionally, these antiplatelet drugs increase the risk of bleeding. To devise a different strategy, we engineered and optimized the apyrase activity of human nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-3 (CD39L3) to enhance scavenging of extracellular adenosine diphosphate, a predominant ligand of P2Y12 receptors. The resulting recombinant protein, APT102, exhibited greater than four times higher adenosine diphosphatase activity and a 50 times longer plasma half-life than did native apyrase. Treatment with APT102 before coronary fibrinolysis with intravenous recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator in conscious dogs completely prevented thrombotic reocclusion and significantly decreased infarction size by 81% without increasing bleeding time. In contrast, clopidogrel did not prevent coronary reocclusion and increased bleeding time. In a murine model of myocardial reperfusion injury caused by transient coronary artery occlusion, APT102 also decreased infarct size by 51%, whereas clopidogrel was not effective. These preclinical data suggest that APT102 should be tested for its ability to safely and effectively maximize the benefits of myocardial reperfusion therapy in patients with arterial thrombosis.

  10. Suture-mediated closure of antegrade femoral arteriotomy following infrainguinal intervention.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Sandeep; Kunjummen, Binu; Guerrero, Mayra; Manda, Ravi; Razminia, Mansoor; Ahmed, Aziz

    2002-12-01

    Antegrade femoral arterial access has been less commonly adopted for infrainguinal intervention due to increased risk of retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to noncompressibility of arteriotomy site. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of suture-mediated closure of antegrade femoral arteriotomy using the Closer device. Twelve consecutive patients undergoing infrainguinal intervention (females, 5; mean body weight, 69 +/- 16 kg; limb threatening ischemia, 50%) underwent repair of the antegrade femoral arteriotomy immediately postprocedure using the Closer. Indications for antegrade access were excessive iliac tortuosity (6/12), long femoral artery occlusion (5/12), and bilateral aortoiliac bifurcation stents (1/12). The acute procedural success (immediate hemostasis without need for manual compression) was 100%. The mean time to ambulation was 3.9 +/- 1.5 hr and the procedure-related length of stay was 18 +/- 5.5 hr. In conclusion, repair of antegrade arterial puncture is safe and effective following infrainguinal intervention. PMID:12455086

  11. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Methods and results Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. PMID:26092099

  12. Effect of branchings on blood flow in the system of human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Wiwatanapataphee, Benchawan; Wu, Yong Hong; Siriapisith, Thanongchai; Nuntadilok, Buraskorn

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the behavior of the pulsatile blood flow in the system of human coronary arteries. Blood is modeled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid. The transient phenomena of blood flow through the coronary system are simulated by solving the three dimensional unsteady state Navier-Stokes equations and continuity equation. Distributions of velocity, pressure and wall shear stresses are determined in the system under pulsatile conditions on the boundaries. Effect of branching vessel on the flow problem is investigated. The numerical results show that blood pressure in the system with branching vessels of coronary arteries is lower than the one in the system with no branch. The magnitude of wall shear stresses rises at the bifurcation. PMID:22229404

  13. Augmented contraction of the human isolated coronary artery by sumatriptan: a possible role for endogenous thromboxane.

    PubMed Central

    Maassen VanDenBrink, A.; Bax, W. A.; Ferrari, M. D.; Zijlstra, F. J.; Bos, E.; Saxena, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. The antimigraine drug, sumatriptan, contracts the human coronary artery and, in some patients, elicits chest symptoms (e.g. pressure and pain), particularly after subcutaneous administration. We studied the effects of the thromboxane A2 (TxA2) analogue, U46619 and endothelin-1 on contractile responses to sumatriptan in the human isolated coronary artery as well as the role of endogenously produced TxA2 and endothelin-1 in contractions evoked by sumatriptan. 2. In the presence of U46619 (1 and 3 nM), mean concentration-response curves to sumatriptan in the human coronary artery were shifted vertically due to the initial contraction by U46619, but when this initial contraction was subtracted from the response to sumatriptan, no significant augmentation was observed. However, analysis of the degree of augmentation in individual arterial segments revealed that the augmentation was variable and related inversely to the Emax of sumatriptan in the absence of U46619 (r = 0.78 and 0.81 for 1 and 3 nM, respectively; P < 0.05). 3. Treatment with the TxA2 receptor antagonist, SQ30741 (100 nM), or incubation of vessel segments with aspirin (10 microM), significantly reduced responses to sumatriptan; in aspirin-treated vessel segments, SQ30741 failed to decrease further the contractions to sumatriptan. The decrease in Emax of sumatriptan by both SQ30741 and aspirin correlated significantly with the Emax of sumatriptan without SQ30741 (r = 0.74; P < 0.01) or aspirin (r = 0.94; P < 0.01). In aspirin-treated vessel segments, responses to sumatriptan were significantly augmented in the presence of U46619 (3 nM; P < 0.05). 4. The specificity of SQ30741 was demonstrated by its ability to antagonize coronary artery contractions to U46619 (pA2: 7.54 +/- 0.30), but not endothelin-1. Similarly, incubation with aspirin (10 microM) did not affect contractile responses to endothelin-1, but significantly reduced TxA2 production in coronary artery segments as judged by a decrease in

  14. Suxiao Jiuxin Pill Induces Potent Relaxation and Inhibition on Contraction in Human Artery and the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Qin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wang, Jun; Tong, Yong-Ling; Xiong, Song-Jin; Liu, Li-Hua; Wang, Lei; He, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Suxiao Jiuxin Pill, a compound Chinese traditional medicine with main components of tetramethylpyrazine and borneol, is widely used for antiangina treatment in China but its pharmacological effect on human blood vessels is unknown. We investigated the effect and possible mechanism of SJP in the human internal mammary artery (IMA, n = 78) taken from patients undergoing coronary surgery. SJP caused full relaxation in KCl- (99.4 ± 10.5%, n = 6) and U46619- (99.9 ± 5.6%, n = 6) contracted IMA. Pretreatment of IMA with plasma concentrations of SJP (1 mg/mL), calculated from the plasma concentration of its major component borneol, significantly depressed the maximal contraction to KCl (from 35.8 ± 6.0 mN to 12.6 ± 5.6 mN, P = 0.03) and U46619 (from 19.4 ± 2.9 mN to 5.7 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.007) while SJP at 10 mg/mL abolished the subsequent contraction. Endothelium denudation and inhibition of eNOS significantly altered the SJP-induced relaxation without changes of eNOS expression. We conclude that SJP has a potent inhibitory effect on the vasoconstriction mediated by a variety of vasoconstrictors in human arteries. The vasorelaxation involves both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Thus, the effect of SJP on human arteries demonstrated in this study may prove to be particularly important in vasorelaxing therapy in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24808920

  15. Angioseal use after antegrade femoral arteriotomy in patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization for critical limb ischemia: a case series.

    PubMed

    Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe G L; Fusaro, Massimiliano; Tashani, Abdulkafi; Mollichelli, Nadia; Medda, Massimo; De Giacobbi, Graziella; Inglese, Luigi

    2007-06-12

    Antegrade femoral artery access is commonly used for percutaneous transluminal revascularization of ipsilateral lower limbs in patients with critical limb ischemia. While hemostasis at the end of the procedure can be achieved by manual compression, this may lead to an increase in local vascular complications. Femoral artery closure devices, such as the Angioseal collagen plug and anchor device, have been approved and shown of benefit after retrograde femoral artery catheterization. To date, there are however no data on the use of such arteriotomy closure device after antegrade femoral access. We hereby report a case series of five patients in whom Angioseal was successfully used after antegrade femoral puncture and below-the-knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. In all cases the device enabled immediate and complete hemostasis without major complications, despite the intense antithrombotic regimen, including heparin, aspirin, and clopidogrel in all patients, as well as glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (in two patients) and fibrinolytic therapy (in one). PMID:17052791

  16. Coexistence of rare arteries in the human celiaco-mesenteric system.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Mabuchi, M; Giuvarasteanu, I; Kikuta, A; Ohtsuka, A

    1998-10-01

    Some rare anomalies of the celiaco-mesenteric system were observed postmortem in a Japanese adult male: a) The left gastric, common hepatic, splenic and superior mesenteric arteries arose independently from the abdominal aorta. b) The anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery of the superior mesenteric artery issued a hepatic artery which ascended along the anterior surface of the pancreas and gave off the right gastroepiploic, right gastric and cystic arteries. c) The common hepatic artery gave off an anastomosing branch to the superior mesenteric artery. d) The left gastric artery gave off the left accessory hepatic artery. e) The splenic artery issued the accessory middle colic artery. f) The left inferior phrenic artery gave off the esophageal branch. These anomalies are discussed in light of a typological system which we proposed in a previous paper for the celiaco-mesenteric system. PMID:9810433

  17. Triptan-induced contractile (5-HT1B receptor) responses in human cerebral and coronary arteries: relationship to clinical effect.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Lars; Uddman, Erik; Wackenfors, Angelica; Davenport, Anthony; Longmore, Jenny; Malmsjö, Malin

    2005-09-01

    Triptans are agonists at 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D (where 5-HT is 5-hydroxytryptamine; serotonin) receptors and cause vasoconstriction of isolated blood vessels. The aim of the present study was to determine vasoconstrictor potency (EC50) of triptans in human coronary and cerebral arteries and to examine whether there was any relationship with the maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax; nM) of the drugs achieved following oral administration of clinically relevant doses to man using values reported in the literature. We also examined the expression of 5-HT1B receptors in atherosclerotic and normal coronary arteries. The vasocontractile responses to sumatriptan, rizatriptan or eletriptan were characterized by in vitro pharmacology. The ratio of Cmax/EC50 was calculated. 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors were visualized by immunohistochemical techniques in coronary arteries. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan and eletriptan were powerful vasoconstrictors in cerebral artery. The rank order of agonist potency was eletriptan=rizatriptan=sumatriptan. In the coronary artery, the triptans were weaker vasoconstrictors. The rank order of potency was similar. In cerebral artery the ratio of Cmax/EC50 was not significantly different from unity, indicating a relationship between these two parameters. In general for the coronary artery, the ratios were significantly less than unity, indicating no direct relationship. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of 5-HT1B receptors in the medial layer, but did not reveal any obvious difference in 5-HT1B receptor expression between normal and atherosclerotic coronary arteries. The results support the notion that triptans are selective vasoconstrictors of cerebral arteries over coronary arteries and that there is a relationship between vasoconstrictor potency in cerebral arteries and clinically relevant plasma levels. PMID:15853772

  18. [Biomechanical study of the vasomotor system of the arterial smooth muscle after long-term cryopreservation of a human arterial graft at two different temperatures -80 and -150C].

    PubMed

    Cardon, A; Aillet, S; Desjardins, J F; Hocdet, V; Tardivel, R; Le Du, J; Langlais, F; Kerdiles, Y; Saiag, B

    1999-05-01

    We conducted two parallel studies on cryopreserved arterial homografts: a biomechanical study based on traction tests and a functional study coupled with a histology examination. Twenty-four arterial segments from 6 donors (2 iliac and 2 superficial femoral segments per donor) were cryopreserved at -150 degrees C and -80 degrees C. Cryopreservation lasted at least 6 months. Lengthening at rupture, the Young elasticity module, and rupture stress were calculated from the traction test. Results were significantly different depending on the preservation temperature. The functional properties of the cryopreserved arterial grafts were evaluated by studying the vasomotricity capacity of the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and the endothelium. The expected results (direct contracture of VSM induced by PHE and endothelial dependent relaxation of VSM induced by ACH) were measured on fresh arteries. Cryopreserved arteries showed no response to physiological doses of PHE and ACH, whatever the preservation temperature. In one-third of the cases, a lower amplitude vasoconstriction was obtained using nonphysiological doses of PHE; there was no relaxation with ACH.

  19. Ex Vivo and in Silico Study of Human Common Carotid Arteries Pressure Response in Physiological and Inverted State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piechna, A.; Cieślicki, K.; Lombarski, L.; Ciszek, B.

    2015-02-01

    Arterial walls are a multilayer structures with nonlinear material characteristics. Furthermore, residual stresses exist in unloaded state (zero-pressure condition) and they affect arterial behavior. To investigate these phenomena a number of theoretical and numerical studies were performed, however no experimental validation was proposed and realized yet. We cannot get rid of residual stresses without damaging the arterial segment. In this paper we propose a novel experiment to validate a numerical model of artery with residual stresses. The inspiration for our study originates from experiments made by Dobrin on dogs' arteries (1999). We applied the idea of turning the artery inside out. After such an operation the sequence of layer is reversed and the residual stresses are re-ordered. We performed several pressure-inflation tests on human Common Carotid Arteries (CCA) in normal and inverted configurations. The nonlinear responses of arterial behavior were obtained and compared to the numerical model. Computer simulations were carried out using the commercial software which applied the finite element method (FEM). Then, these results were discussed.

  20. Age-related telomere uncapping is associated with cellular senescence and inflammation independent of telomere shortening in human arteries.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard G; Ives, Stephen J; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Cawthon, Richard M; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Noyes, R Dirk; Richardson, Russell S; Donato, Anthony J

    2013-07-15

    Arterial telomere dysfunction may contribute to chronic arterial inflammation by inducing cellular senescence and subsequent senescence-associated inflammation. Although telomere shortening has been associated with arterial aging in humans, age-related telomere uncapping has not been described in non-cultured human tissues and may have substantial prognostic value. In skeletal muscle feed arteries from 104 younger, middle-aged, and older adults, we assessed the potential role of age-related telomere uncapping in arterial inflammation. Telomere uncapping, measured by p-histone γ-H2A.X (ser139) localized to telomeres (chromatin immunoprecipitation; ChIP), and telomeric repeat binding factor 2 bound to telomeres (ChIP) was greater in arteries from older adults compared with those from younger adults. There was greater tumor suppressor protein p53 (P53)/cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (P21)-induced senescence, measured by P53 bound to P21 gene promoter (ChIP), and greater expression of P21, interleukin 8, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 mRNA (RT-PCR) in arteries from older adults compared with younger adults. Telomere uncapping was a highly influential covariate for the age-group difference in P53/P21-induced senescence. Despite progressive age-related telomere shortening in human arteries, mean telomere length was not associated with telomere uncapping or P53/P21-induced senescence. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that advancing age is associated with greater telomere uncapping in arteries, which is linked to P53/P21-induced senescence independent of telomere shortening.

  1. [Prediction of human orthostatic tolerance by changes in arterial and venous hemodynamics in the microgravity environment].

    PubMed

    Kotovskaia, A R; Fomin, G A

    2013-01-01

    The authors intentionally present exclusively the results of their recent studies of arterial and venous hemodynamics as predictors of human orthostatic tolerance (OT) during space flight and on return to Earth. There is a sufficient demonstration of the in-flight OT predictability by arterial hemodynamic reactions to LBNP and venous hemodynamic changes in response to the lower extremities occlusion. Three levels of cerebral blood flow deficits in the course of the lower body negative pressure test (LBNP) performed in microgravity were first defined. The authors offer quantitative arguments for the dependence of cerebral flow deficit on the degree of LBNP tolerance degradation. Patterns of arterial hemodynamics during LBNP were used successfully to diagnose the actual orthostatic tolerance and also to follow its trend as flight extended, which attests to the predictability of OT change in an individual cosmonaut on space flight. Occlusion plethysmography of legs revealed three levels of response of the most informative venous parameters (capacity, distensibility and rate of filling) correlating with severity of OT degradation. PMID:25509869

  2. Measurement of T1 of human arterial and venous blood at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Rane, S.; Gore, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for measuring cerebral perfusion require accurate longitudinal relaxation (T1) of blood, a MRI parameter that is field dependent. T1 of arterial and venous human blood was measured at 7T using three different sources – pathology laboratory, blood bank and in vivo. The T1 of venous blood was measured from sealed samples from a pathology lab and in vivo. Samples from a blood bank were oxygenated and mixed to obtain different physiological concentrations of hematocrit and oxygenation. T1 relaxation times were estimated using a three-point fit to a simple inversion recovery equation. At 37° C, the T1 of blood at arterial pO2was 2.29 ± 0.1 s and 2.07 ± 0.12 at venous pO2. The in vivo T1 of venous blood, in three subjects, was slightly longer at 2.45 ± 0.11s. T1 of arterial and venous blood at 7T was measured and found to be significantly different. The T1 values were longer in vivo than in vitro. While the exact cause for the discrepancy is unknown, the additives in the blood samples, degradation during experiment, oxygenation differences, and the non-stagnant nature of blood in vivo could be potential contributors to the lower values of T1 in the venous samples. PMID:23102945

  3. Life-threatening Rupture of a Femoral Pseudoaneurysm after Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Malakos, Ioannis; Kampanarou, Stamatina; Doulas, Nikolaos; Voudris, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    A pseudoaneurysm refers to a defect in the arterial wall, allowing communication of arterial blood with the adjacent extra-luminal space. Pseudoaneurysms result from traumatic arterial injury. With the increasing utilization of percutaneous arterial interventions, iatrogenic arterial injury has become the predominant cause of pseudoaneurysm formation. Rupture of the pseudoaneurysm comprises a vascular emergency. Clinical suspicion and imaging techniques are the cornerstones of timely diagnosis and appropriate management of the condition. Herein, we report the case of a 69 year-old woman who suffered a life-threatening profunda femoral artery pseudoaneurysm rupture after a routine cardiac catheterization, that was treated surgically. PMID:27733869

  4. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is activated during advanced arterial aging in humans.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Alexandre; Atassi, Fabrice; Gaaya, Amira; Leprince, Pascal; Le Feuvre, Claude; Soubrier, Florent; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Nadaud, Sophie

    2011-04-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The Wnt signaling pathway was shown to be induced during aging in muscle and in the skin, but the regulation and role of Wnt signaling in the aged vessel have not yet been addressed. While screening for age-related changes in gene expression in the intima/media of human mammary arteries, we observed that the expression of frizzled 4 (Fzd4), a Wnt receptor, and of several targets of the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway [Wnt-inducible secreted protein 1 (WISP1), versican, osteopontin (SPP1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2), and p21] were modified with age, suggesting an activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In contrast, we did not observe any regulation of forkhead transcription factor (FoxO) target genes. Beta-catenin-activating phosphorylation at position Ser675 was increased in aging mammary arteries, confirming the activation of this pathway. We confirmed in vitro that Wnt3a or Wnt1 treatment of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser675 and WISP1, SPP1, and IGFBP-2 expression. In vitro, Wnt treatment induced proliferation and cyclin D1 expression in VSMC from young (6 weeks old) rats but not in cells from older rats (8 months old), even though low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and β-catenin phosphorylation, and β-catenin nuclear translocation demonstrated β-catenin activation in both cell types. Beta-catenin silencing demonstrated that Wnt induction of cyclin D1 expression is β-catenin dependent. Altogether, our data show that the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF pathway is activated in aging human mammary artery cells, but fails to induce the proliferation of aging vascular cells. PMID:21108734

  5. Targeting arterial wall sulfated glycosaminoglycans in rabbit atherosclerosis with a mouse/human chimeric antibody.

    PubMed

    Soto, Yosdel; Mesa, Niurka; Alfonso, Yumisley; Pérez, Arlenis; Batlle, Fernando; Griñán, Tania; Pino, Adonis; Viera, Justo; Frómeta, Milagros; Brito, Victor; Olivera, Armando; Zayas, Francisco; Vázquez, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis is favored by increasing amounts of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the artery wall. We previously reported the reactivity of chP3R99 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with sulfated glycosaminoglycans and its association with the anti-atherogenic properties displayed. Now, we evaluated the accumulation of this mAb in atherosclerotic lesions and its potential use as a probe for specific in vivo detection of the disease. Atherosclerosis was induced in NZW rabbits (n = 14) by the administration of Lipofundin 20% using PBS-receiving animals as control (n = 8). Accumulation of chP3R99 mAb in atherosclerotic lesions was assessed either by immunofluorescence detection of human IgG in fresh-frozen sections of aorta, or by immunoscintigraphy followed by biodistribution of the radiotracer upon administration of (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb. Immunofluorescence studies revealed the presence of chP3R99 mAb in atherosclerotic lesions 24 h after intravenous administration, whereas planar images showed an evident accumulation of (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb in atherosclerotic rabbit carotids. Accordingly, (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb uptake by lesioned aortic arch and thoracic segment was increased 5.6-fold over controls and it was 3.9-folds higher in carotids, in agreement with immunoscintigrams. Moreover, the deposition of (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb in the artery wall was associated both with the presence and size of the lesions in the different portions of evaluated arteries and was greater than in non-targeted organs. In conclusion, chP3R99 mAb preferentially accumulates in arterial atherosclerotic lesions supporting the potential use of this anti-glycosaminoglycans antibody for diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  6. Adult heartworms in arteries and veins of a dog.

    PubMed

    Slonka, G F; Castleman, W; Krum, S

    1977-04-01

    A 5-year-old terrier-type dog with a 3-week history of progressive lameness, swelling, and pain in the left hindlimb suddenly became paralyzed in the right hindlimb. Because of a poor prognosis, the dog was euthanatized. Necropsy revealed mature heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis) in the femoral arteries as well as in the right side of the heart and pulmonary arteries. Extensive ischemic necrosis in the muscles of the hindlimbs was attributed to occlusion of the femoral arteries by heartworms.

  7. Total femoral replacement.

    PubMed

    Nerubay, J; Katznelson, A; Tichler, T; Rubinstein, Z; Morag, B; Bubis, J J

    1988-04-01

    Between 1973 and 1983, 19 patients with sarcoma of the femur were treated by adjuvant chemotherapy, excision of the entire femur, and replacement by a total femoral prosthesis. Five patients had excellent and nine had good functional results. Twelve patients died an average of 23 months after the procedure and seven are at present disease free. This limb-saving procedure permits rapid rehabilitation, prevents severe psychological problems, and improves the quality of life.

  8. Limb suction evoked during arterial occlusion causes systemic sympathetic activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl; Herr, Michael D.; Drew, Rachel C.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Venous saline infusions in an arterially occluded forearm evokes reflex increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that the application of suction to the human limbs would activate this venous distension reflex and raise sympathetic outflow. We placed airtight pressure tanks and applied 100 mmHg negative pressure to an arterially occluded limb (occlusion and suction, O&S) to induce tissue deformation without fluid translocation. BP, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were assessed in 19 healthy subjects during 2 min of arm or leg O&S. Occlusion without suction served as a control. During a separate visit, saline (5% forearm volume) was infused into veins of the arterially occluded arm (n = 13). The O&S increased limb circumference, MSNA burst rate (arm: Δ6.7 ± 0.7; leg: Δ6.8 ± 0.7 bursts/min), and total activity (arm: Δ199 ± 14; leg: Δ172 ± 22 units/min) and BP (arm: Δ4.3 ± 0.3; leg: Δ9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg) from the baseline. The MSNA and BP responses during arm O&S correlated with those during leg O&S. Occlusion alone had no effect on MSNA and BP. MSNA (r = 0.607) responses during arm O&S correlated with those evoked by the saline infusion into the arm. These correlations suggest that sympathetic activation during limb O&S is likely, at least partially, to be evoked via the venous distension reflex. These data suggest that suction of an occluded limb evokes sympathetic activation and that the limb venous distension reflex exists in arms and legs of normal humans. PMID:26136530

  9. Limb suction evoked during arterial occlusion causes systemic sympathetic activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl; Herr, Michael D; Drew, Rachel C; Muller, Matthew D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-09-01

    Venous saline infusions in an arterially occluded forearm evokes reflex increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that the application of suction to the human limbs would activate this venous distension reflex and raise sympathetic outflow. We placed airtight pressure tanks and applied 100 mmHg negative pressure to an arterially occluded limb (occlusion and suction, O&S) to induce tissue deformation without fluid translocation. BP, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were assessed in 19 healthy subjects during 2 min of arm or leg O&S. Occlusion without suction served as a control. During a separate visit, saline (5% forearm volume) was infused into veins of the arterially occluded arm (n = 13). The O&S increased limb circumference, MSNA burst rate (arm: Δ6.7 ± 0.7; leg: Δ6.8 ± 0.7 bursts/min), and total activity (arm: Δ199 ± 14; leg: Δ172 ± 22 units/min) and BP (arm: Δ4.3 ± 0.3; leg: Δ9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg) from the baseline. The MSNA and BP responses during arm O&S correlated with those during leg O&S. Occlusion alone had no effect on MSNA and BP. MSNA (r = 0.607) responses during arm O&S correlated with those evoked by the saline infusion into the arm. These correlations suggest that sympathetic activation during limb O&S is likely, at least partially, to be evoked via the venous distension reflex. These data suggest that suction of an occluded limb evokes sympathetic activation and that the limb venous distension reflex exists in arms and legs of normal humans. PMID:26136530

  10. Limb suction evoked during arterial occlusion causes systemic sympathetic activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl; Herr, Michael D; Drew, Rachel C; Muller, Matthew D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-09-01

    Venous saline infusions in an arterially occluded forearm evokes reflex increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that the application of suction to the human limbs would activate this venous distension reflex and raise sympathetic outflow. We placed airtight pressure tanks and applied 100 mmHg negative pressure to an arterially occluded limb (occlusion and suction, O&S) to induce tissue deformation without fluid translocation. BP, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were assessed in 19 healthy subjects during 2 min of arm or leg O&S. Occlusion without suction served as a control. During a separate visit, saline (5% forearm volume) was infused into veins of the arterially occluded arm (n = 13). The O&S increased limb circumference, MSNA burst rate (arm: Δ6.7 ± 0.7; leg: Δ6.8 ± 0.7 bursts/min), and total activity (arm: Δ199 ± 14; leg: Δ172 ± 22 units/min) and BP (arm: Δ4.3 ± 0.3; leg: Δ9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg) from the baseline. The MSNA and BP responses during arm O&S correlated with those during leg O&S. Occlusion alone had no effect on MSNA and BP. MSNA (r = 0.607) responses during arm O&S correlated with those evoked by the saline infusion into the arm. These correlations suggest that sympathetic activation during limb O&S is likely, at least partially, to be evoked via the venous distension reflex. These data suggest that suction of an occluded limb evokes sympathetic activation and that the limb venous distension reflex exists in arms and legs of normal humans.

  11. Effect of oxytocin as a partial agonist at vasoconstrictor vasopressin receptors on the human isolated uterine artery.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, A; Jovanović, S; Tulić, I; Grbović, L

    1997-08-01

    1. The effect of oxytocin on endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded segments of the human uterine artery rings was investigated. 2. In both types of preparation oxytocin induced contraction of human uterine artery with similar potency and efficacy (pEC50 values: 6.95 +/- 0.05 vs 7.06 +/- 0.01; maximal response values: 61 +/- 4.1% vs 63 +/- 5.1% for arteries with and without endothelium, respectively). 3. In contrast, human uterine arteries, both intact and denuded of endothelium, did not respond to the addition of the selective oxytocin receptor agonist, [Thr4, Gly7]oxytocin (10 nM(-1) microM). 4. The vasopressin receptor antagonists, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)]AVP (10-100nM) and [d(CH2)5,D-Ile2,Ile4]AVP (300 nM-3 microM) produced parallel rightward shifts of the curves for oxytocin. The Schild plots constrained to a slope of unity gave the following -log K(B) values: [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)] AVP vs [d(CH2)5,D-Ile2,Ile4] AVP 9.24 vs 6.91 and 9.26 vs 6.84 for human uterine artery with intact and those denuded of endothelium, respectively. In contrast, in both types of preparations the oxytocin receptor antagonist, [d(CH2)5Tyr(OMe), 2Orn8]vasotocin (1 microM), did not significantly affect oxytocin-induced contractions. 5. The calculated pK(A) values for oxytocin itself also did not differ between preparations: 6.56 and 6.43 for human uterine artery with and without endothelium, respectively. In both types of preparations, the receptor reserve (K(A)/EC50) was close to unity (intact vs denuded: 3.9 vs 3.0). 6. It is concluded that, in human uterine artery, oxytocin induces contractions that are not modulated by the endothelium. It is likely that oxytocin acts as a partial agonist on human uterine artery, regardless of the endothelial condition. On the basis of differential antagonists affinity and affinity of oxytocin itself, it is probable that receptors involved in oxytocin-induced contraction in human uterine arteries belong to the V(1A) vasopressin receptors.

  12. Nicotine induced changes in gene expression by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Day, I; Ye, S

    2001-02-01

    The primary role of cigarette smoking in the development of coronary heart disease is to cause damage to the vascular endothelium, leading to endothelial cell dysfunction and initiating the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. We studied the response of human coronary artery endothelial cells to nicotine exposure by examining the expression of a panel of genes encoding molecules that have been shown to be involved in atherogenesis. Treatment of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells with nicotine for 24 h at concentrations (10(-5) and 10(-7) M) similar to those in the blood of smokers resulted in increased mRNA levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, angiotensin-I converting enzyme, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, von Willebrand factor, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. No change was detected in the expression levels of the genes encoding basic fibroblast growth factor, endothelin-1, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 under these conditions. These data indicate that nicotine alters the expression of a number of endothelial genes whose products play major roles in regulating the vascular tone and thrombogenicity, making a contribution to the understanding of the effects of cigarette smoking on the development of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:11166759

  13. Reasonable classical concepts in human lower limb anatomy from the viewpoint of the primitive persistent sciatic artery and twisting human lower limb.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of this review is (1) to introduce the two previous studies we published human lower limb anatomy based on the conventional macroscopic anatomical [corrected] criteria with hazardous recognition of this description, (2) to activate the discussion whether the limb homology exists, and (3) to contribute to future study filling the gap between the gross anatomy and embryology. One of the topics we discussed was the human persistent sciatic artery. To date, numerous human cases of persistent sciatic artery have been reported in which the anomalous artery was present in the posterior compartment of the thigh alongside the sciatic nerve. As one of the important criteria for assessing the human primitive sciatic artery, its ventral arterial position with respect to the sciatic nerve is reasonable based on the initial positional relationship between ventral arterial and dorsal nervous systems and comparative anatomical findings. We also discuss ways of considering the topography of muscles of the lower limb and their innervations compared to those of the upper limb. We propose a schema of the complex anatomical characteristics of the lower limb based on the vertebrate body plan. According to this reasonable schema, the twisted anatomy of the lower limb can be understood more easily. These two main ideas discussed in this paper will be useful for further understanding of the anatomy of the lower limb and as a first step for future. We hope that the future study in lower limb will be further developed by both viewpoints of the classical gross anatomy and recent embryology.

  14. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  15. Arterial levels of oxygen stimulate intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins via a ROS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Joddar, Binata; Firstenberg, Michael S; Reen, Rashmeet K; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Khan, Mahmood; Childers, Rachel C; Zweier, Jay L; Gooch, Keith J

    2015-01-01

    Saphenous veins used as arterial grafts are exposed to arterial levels of oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which are much greater than what they experience in their native environment. The object of this study is to determine the impact of exposing human saphenous veins to arterial pO2. Saphenous veins and left internal mammary arteries from consenting patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were cultured ex vivo for 2 weeks in the presence of arterial or venous pO2 using an established organ culture model. Saphenous veins cultured with arterial pO2 developed intimal hyperplasia as evidenced by 2.8-fold greater intimal area and 5.8-fold increase in cell proliferation compared to those freshly isolated. Saphenous veins cultured at venous pO2 or internal mammary arteries cultured at arterial pO2 did not develop intimal hyperplasia. Intimal hyperplasia was accompanied by two markers of elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS): increased dihydroethidium associated fluorescence (4-fold, p<0.05) and increased levels of the lipid peroxidation product, 4-hydroxynonenal (10-fold, p<0.05). A functional role of the increased ROS saphenous veins exposed to arterial pO2 is suggested by the observation that chronic exposure to tiron, a ROS scavenger, during the two-week culture period, blocked intimal hyperplasia. Electron paramagnetic resonance based oximetry revealed that the pO2 in the wall of the vessel tracked that of the atmosphere with a ~30 mmHg offset, thus the cells in the vessel wall were directly exposed to variations in pO2. Monolayer cultures of smooth muscle cells isolated from saphenous veins exhibited increased proliferation when exposed to arterial pO2 relative to those cultured at venous pO2. This increased proliferation was blocked by tiron. Taken together, these data suggest that exposure of human SV to arterial pO2 stimulates IH via a ROS-dependent pathway.

  16. Diversity of potassium channels in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells: a review of their roles in human umbilical artery contraction.

    PubMed

    Martín, Pedro; Rebolledo, Alejandro; Palomo, Ana Rocio Roldán; Moncada, Melisa; Piccinini, Luciano; Milesi, Verónica

    2014-04-01

    Through their control of cell membrane potential, potassium (K(+)) channels are among the best known regulators of vascular tone. This article discusses the expression and function of K(+) channels in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). We review the bibliographic reports and also present single-channel data recorded in freshly isolated cells. Electrophysiological properties of big conductance, voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channel and voltage-dependent K(+) channels are clearly established in this vessel, where they are involved in contractile state regulation. Their role in the maintenance of membrane potential is an important control mechanism in the determination of the vessel diameter. Additionally, small conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels, 2-pore domains K(+) channels and inward rectifier K(+) channels also appear to be present in HUASMCs, while intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels could not be identified. In both cases, additional investigation is necessary to reach conclusive evidence of their expression and/or functional role in HUASMCs. Finally, we discuss the role of K(+) channels in pregnancy-related pathologies like gestational diabetes and preeclampsia.

  17. Computer-aided CT coronary artery stenosis detection: comparison with human reading and quantitative coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rief, Matthias; Kranz, Anisha; Hartmann, Lisa; Roehle, Robert; Laule, Michael; Dewey, Marc

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate computer-aided stenosis detection for computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA) in comparison with human reading and conventional coronary angiography (CCA) as the reference standard. 50 patients underwent CTA and CCA and out of these 44 were evaluable for computer-aided stenosis detection. The diagnostic performance of the software and of human reading were compared and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) served as the reference standard for the detection of significant stenosis (>50 %). Overall, three readers with high (reader 1), intermediate (reader 2) and low (reader 3) experience in cardiac CT imaging performed the manual CTA evaluation on a commercially available workstation, whereas the automated software processed the datasets without any human interaction. The prevalence of coronary artery disease was 41 % (18/44) and QCA indicated significant stenosis (>50 %) in 33 coronary vessels. The automated software accurately diagnosed 18 individuals with significant coronary artery disease (CAD), and correctly ruled out CAD in 10 patients. In summary the sensitivity of computer-aided detection was 100 %/94 % (per-patient/per-vessel) and the specificity was 38 %/70 %, the positive predictive value (PPV) was 53 %/42 % and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 100 %/98 %. In comparison, reader 1-3 showed per-patient sensitivities of 100/94/89 %, specificities of 73/69/50 %, PPVs of 72/68/55 % and NPVs of 100/95/87 %. Computer-aided detection yields a high NPV that is comparable to more experienced human readers. However, PPV is rather low and in the range of an unexperienced reader.

  18. Distinct endothelial phenotypes evoked by arterial waveforms derived from atherosclerosis-susceptible and -resistant regions of human vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guohao; Kaazempur-Mofrad, Mohammad R.; Natarajan, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuzhi; Vaughn, Saran; Blackman, Brett R.; Kamm, Roger D.; García-Cardeña, Guillermo; Gimbrone, Michael A., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    Atherosclerotic lesion localization to regions of disturbed flow within certain arterial geometries, in humans and experimental animals, suggests an important role for local hemodynamic forces in atherogenesis. To explore how endothelial cells (EC) acquire functional/dysfunctional phenotypes in response to vascular region-specific flow patterns, we have used an in vitro dynamic flow system to accurately reproduce arterial shear stress waveforms on cultured human EC and have examined the effects on EC gene expression by using a high-throughput transcriptional profiling approach. The flow patterns in the carotid artery bifurcations of several normal human subjects were characterized by using 3D flow analysis based on actual vascular geometries and blood flow profiles. Two prototypic arterial waveforms, "athero-prone" and "athero-protective," were defined as representative of the wall shear stresses in two distinct regions of the carotid artery (carotid sinus and distal internal carotid artery) that are typically "susceptible" or "resistant," respectively, to atherosclerotic lesion development. These two waveforms were applied to cultured EC, and cDNA microarrays were used to analyze the differential patterns of EC gene expression. In addition, the differential effects of athero-prone vs. athero-protective waveforms were further characterized on several parameters of EC structure and function, including actin cytoskeletal organization, expression and localization of junctional proteins, activation of the NF-B transcriptional pathway, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. These global gene expression patterns and functional data reveal a distinct phenotypic modulation in response to the wall shear stresses present in atherosclerosis-susceptible vs. atherosclerosis-resistant human arterial geometries.

  19. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  20. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to isolated common femoral vessel injury: an unusual etiology.

    PubMed

    Davaine, Jean-Michel; Lintz, François; Cappelli, Marc; Chaillou, Philippe; Gouin, François; Patra, Philippe; Gouëffic, Yann

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to common femoral vessel injury. The lesion was associated with common femoral artery dissection and common femoral vein rupture. Emergency surgical treatment consisted of resection-anastomosis of the arterial dissection, vein ligature, and fasciotomies. The patient is symptom-free after 15 months of follow-up. Isolated vascular injury is an unusual cause of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh. This case serves to increase awareness that isolated vascular injury, without femoral fracture or multiple injury, can result in thigh compartment syndrome. Early recognition and treatment of vascular involvement contributes to better functional outcome of this rare condition, but treatment modalities remain subject to discussion.

  1. Opposing effects of shear-mediated dilation and myogenic constriction on artery diameter in response to handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Dawson, Ellen A; Marusic, Petra; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2015-10-15

    While the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30 min of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of changes in shear stress or sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation, on conduit artery diameter. Ten healthy male subjects undertook three sessions of 30 min unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% of maximal voluntary contractile (MVC) strength. Brachial artery shear rate and blood flow profiles were measured simultaneously during exercise in the active and contralateral resting arms. Bilateral brachial artery diameter was simultaneously assessed before and immediately postexercise. In a second experiment, six subjects repeated the 15% MVC condition while continuous vascular measurements were collected during muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessment using peroneal microneurography. We found that unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% MVC strength induced stepwise elevations in blood pressure (P < 0.01, Δmean arterial pressure: 7.06 ± 2.44, 8.50 ± 2.80, and 18.35 ± 3.52 mmHg, P < 0.01). Whereas stepwise increases were evident in shear rate in the exercising arm (P < 0.001), no changes were apparent in the nonexercising limb (P = 0.42). Brachial artery diameter increased in the exercising arm (P = 0.02), but significantly decreased in the nonexercising arm (P = 0.03). At 15% MVC, changes in diameter were significantly different between arms (interaction effect: P = 0.01), whereas this level of exertion produced no significant changes in MSNA. We conclude that acute increases in transmural pressure, independent of shear rate and changes in SNS activation, reduce arterial caliber in normotensive humans in vivo. These changes in diameter were mitigated by exercise-induced elevations in shear rate in the active limb.

  2. Opposing effects of shear-mediated dilation and myogenic constriction on artery diameter in response to handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Dawson, Ellen A; Marusic, Petra; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2015-10-15

    While the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30 min of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of changes in shear stress or sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation, on conduit artery diameter. Ten healthy male subjects undertook three sessions of 30 min unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% of maximal voluntary contractile (MVC) strength. Brachial artery shear rate and blood flow profiles were measured simultaneously during exercise in the active and contralateral resting arms. Bilateral brachial artery diameter was simultaneously assessed before and immediately postexercise. In a second experiment, six subjects repeated the 15% MVC condition while continuous vascular measurements were collected during muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessment using peroneal microneurography. We found that unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% MVC strength induced stepwise elevations in blood pressure (P < 0.01, Δmean arterial pressure: 7.06 ± 2.44, 8.50 ± 2.80, and 18.35 ± 3.52 mmHg, P < 0.01). Whereas stepwise increases were evident in shear rate in the exercising arm (P < 0.001), no changes were apparent in the nonexercising limb (P = 0.42). Brachial artery diameter increased in the exercising arm (P = 0.02), but significantly decreased in the nonexercising arm (P = 0.03). At 15% MVC, changes in diameter were significantly different between arms (interaction effect: P = 0.01), whereas this level of exertion produced no significant changes in MSNA. We conclude that acute increases in transmural pressure, independent of shear rate and changes in SNS activation, reduce arterial caliber in normotensive humans in vivo. These changes in diameter were mitigated by exercise-induced elevations in shear rate in the active limb. PMID:26294751

  3. In situ longitudinal pre-stretch in the human femoropopliteal artery

    PubMed Central

    Kamenskiy, Alexey; Seas, Andreas; Bowen, Grant; Deegan, Paul; Desyatova, Anastasia; Bohlim, Nick; Poulson, William; MacTaggart, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In situ longitudinal (axial) pre-stretch (LPS) plays a fundamental role in the mechanics of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA). It conserves energy during pulsation and prevents buckling of the artery during limb movement. We investigated how LPS is affected by demographics and risk factors, and how these patient characteristics associate with the structural and physiologic features of the FPA. LPS was measured in n = 148 fresh human FPAs (14–80 years old). Mechanical properties were characterized with biaxial extension and histopathological characteristics were quantified with Verhoeff–Van Gieson Staining. Constitutive modeling was used to calculate physiological stresses and stretches which were then analyzed in the context of demographics, risk factors and structural characteristics. Age had the strongest negative effect (r = −0.812, p < 0.01) on LPS and could alone explain 66% of LPS variability. Male gender, higher body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia and tobacco use had negative effects on LPS, but only the effect of tobacco was not associated with aging. FPAs with less pre-stretch had thicker medial layers, but thinner intramural elastic fibers with less dense and more fragmented external elastic laminae. Elastin degradation was associated with decreased physiological tethering force and longitudinal stress, while circumferential stress remained constant. FPA wall pathology was negatively associated with LPS (r = −0.553, p < 0.01), but the effect was due primarily to aging. LPS in the FPA may serve as an energy reserve for adaptive remodeling. Reduction of LPS due to degradation and fragmentation of intramural longitudinal elastin during aging can be accelerated in tobacco users. PMID:26766633

  4. Effects of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin on Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Sierra, Cristina; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Davidman, Michael; Bercovitch, David; Nessim, Sharon J.; Frisch, Gershon; Paradis, Pierre; Lipman, Mark L.; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised concern about the safety of erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents because of evidence of increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on endothelial function of gluteal subcutaneous resistance arteries isolated from 17 stage 4 patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate 21.9±7.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2) aged 63±13 years. Methods and Results Arteries were mounted on a pressurized myograph. EPO impaired endothelium‐dependent relaxation in a concentration‐dependent manner. The maximal response to acetylcholine with EPO at 1, 10, and 20 IU/mL was reduced by 12%, 34%, and 43%, respectively, compared with the absence of EPO (P<0.001). EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction was significantly associated with carotid stiffness and history of cardiovascular events. EPO had no effect on norepinephrine‐induced vasoconstriction or sodium nitroprusside–induced relaxation. ABT‐627, an endothelin type A receptor antagonist, and tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, partially reversed the altered endothelial function in the presence of EPO (P<0.01). Increased expression of endothelin‐1 was found in the vessel wall after incubation with EPO. Conclusions EPO alters endothelial function of resistance arteries in CKD patients via a mechanism involving in part oxidative stress and signaling through an endothelin type A receptor. EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction could contribute to deleterious effects of EPO described in large interventional trials. PMID:23584809

  5. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  6. Serum can overcome contact inhibition in confluent human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Solodushko, Victor; Khader, Heba A; Fouty, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) in an intact vessel are continually exposed to serum, but unless injured, do not proliferate, constrained by confluence. In contrast, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) attain, and maintain, confluence in the presence of minimal serum, protected from serum's stimulatory effects except when the endothelial barrier becomes more permeable. We hypothesized therefore, that confluent PASMC may be less constrained by contact inhibition in the presence of serum than PAEC and tested this idea by exposing confluent non-transformed human PAEC and PASMC to media containing increasing concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and determining cell growth over 7 days. PAEC that had attained confluence in low serum did not proliferate even when exposed to 5% serum, the highest concentration tested. In contrast, PASMC that attained confluence in low serum did proliferate once serum levels were increased, an effect that was dose dependent. Consistent with this observation, PASMC had more BrdU incorporation and a greater percentage of cells in S phase in 5% compared to 0.2% FBS, whereas no such difference was seen in PAEC. These results suggest that confluent human PAEC are resistant to the stimulatory effects of serum, whereas confluent PASMC can proliferate when serum levels are increased, an effect mediated in part by differences in phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation. This observation may be relevant to understanding the PASMC hyperplasia observed in humans and animals with pulmonary hypertension in which changes in endothelial permeability due to hypoxia or injury expose the underlying smooth muscle to serum.

  7. Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity under orthostatic stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained against the orthostatic stress caused by gravity's effect on the fluid distribution within the body are important issues in physiology, especially in humans who usually adopt an upright posture. Peripheral vasoconstriction and increased heart rate (HR) are major cardiovascular adjustments to orthostatic stress and comprise part of the reflex response elicited via the carotid sinus and aortic baroreceptors (arterial baroreflex: ABR) and cardiopulmonary stretch receptors (cardiopulmonary baroreflex). In a series of studies, we have been characterizing the ABR-mediated regulation of cardiovascular hemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) while applying orthostatic stress in humans. We have found that under orthostatic stress, dynamic carotid baroreflex responses are modulated as exemplified by the increases in the MSNA, blood pressure, and HR responses elicited by carotid baroreflex unloading and the shorter period of MSNA suppression, comparable reduction and faster recovery of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and greater HR response to carotid baroreflex stimulation. Our results also show that ABR-mediated beat-to-beat control over burst incidence, burst strength and total MSNA is progressively modulated as orthostatic stress is increased until induction of syncope, and that the sensitivity of ABR control over the aforementioned MSNA variables is substantially reduced during the development of syncope. We suggest that in humans, the modulation of ABR function under orthostatic stress may be one of the mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained and orthostatic hypotension limited, and impairment of ABR control over sympathetic vasomotor activity leads to the severe hypotension associated with orthostatic syncope.

  8. [Peripheral artery disease and acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. When presented in the context of an acute coronary syndrome a differential diagnosis with aorta dissection should be made, because peripheral arterial disease may be asymptomatic despite the absence or asymmetry of femoral pulses.

  9. [First pass effect by infusing 99mTc-human serum albumin into the hepatic artery].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Kimura, K; Koyanagi, Y; Aoki, T; Kusama, M; Takagi, S; Kakuta, T; Yoshimatsu, A; Ishikawa, M; Yasuda, D

    1988-08-01

    The fundamental principles of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy are thought to be increased local drug concentration and the "first-pass" effect. The concentration in the rest of the body can only be decreased if there is local elimination of the infused drug before reaching the systemic circulation. This is referred to as the "first-pass" effect. In the evaluation of "first-pass" effect, the uptake of liver after infusing 99mTc-human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) in the hepatic artery by injecting the subcutaneously implanted silicon reservoir was compared with that obtained after intravenous administration of 99mTc-HSA. In order to remove the factor of portal infusion, each count of liver up take had been continued for only 24 seconds after starting the liver uptake. The results are as follows: for 24 cases excepting 6 cases with catheter obstruction, the mean i.a./i.v. ratio was 7.92 +/- 3.34 (range 3.25 to 17.25). Although the elimination rate of drugs in the liver varies with each drug, the infusion of intraarterial chemotherapy should be about 8 times more concentrative than intravenous administration on the "first-pass" effect.

  10. Characterization of human arterial tissue affected by atherosclerosis using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baria, Enrico; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rotellini, Matteo; Nesi, Gabriella; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread cardiovascular disease caused by the deposition of lipids (such as cholesterol and triglycerides) on the inner arterial wall. The rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, resulting in a thrombus, is one of the leading causes of death in the Western World. Preventive assessment of plaque vulnerability is therefore extremely important and can be performed by studying collagen organization and lipid composition in atherosclerotic arterial tissues. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Instead, a label-free and non-invasive alternative is provided by nonlinear microscopy. In this study, we combined SHG and FLIM microscopy in order to characterize collagen organization and lipids in human carotid ex vivo tissues affected by atherosclerosis. SHG and TPF images, acquired from different regions within atherosclerotic plaques, were processed through image pattern analysis methods (FFT, GLCM). The resulting information on collagen and cholesterol distribution and anisotropy, combined with collagen and lipids fluorescence lifetime measured from FLIM images, allowed characterization of carotid samples and discrimination of different tissue regions. The presented method can be applied for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. Moreover, it lays the foundation for a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to be used in clinical setting.

  11. Biodegradable Polymers Influence the Effect of Atorvastatin on Human Coronary Artery Cells.

    PubMed

    Strohbach, Anne; Begunk, Robert; Petersen, Svea; Felix, Stephan B; Sternberg, Katrin; Busch, Raila

    2016-01-22

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) have reduced in-stent-restenosis drastically. Yet, the stent surface material directly interacts with cascades of biological processes leading to an activation of cellular defense mechanisms. To prevent adverse clinical implications, to date almost every patient with a coronary artery disease is treated with statins. Besides their clinical benefit, statins exert a number of pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells (ECs). Since maintenance of EC function and reduction of uncontrolled smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation represents a challenge for new generation DES, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR) on human coronary artery cells grown on biodegradable polymers. Our results show a cell type-dependent effect of ATOR on ECs and SMCs. We observed polymer-dependent changes in IC50 values and an altered ATOR-uptake leading to an attenuation of statin-mediated effects on SMC growth. We conclude that the selected biodegradable polymers negatively influence the anti-proliferative effect of ATOR on SMCs. Hence, the process of developing new polymers for DES coating should involve the characterization of material-related changes in mechanisms of drug actions.

  12. Biodegradable Polymers Influence the Effect of Atorvastatin on Human Coronary Artery Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strohbach, Anne; Begunk, Robert; Petersen, Svea; Felix, Stephan B.; Sternberg, Katrin; Busch, Raila

    2016-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) have reduced in-stent-restenosis drastically. Yet, the stent surface material directly interacts with cascades of biological processes leading to an activation of cellular defense mechanisms. To prevent adverse clinical implications, to date almost every patient with a coronary artery disease is treated with statins. Besides their clinical benefit, statins exert a number of pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells (ECs). Since maintenance of EC function and reduction of uncontrolled smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation represents a challenge for new generation DES, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR) on human coronary artery cells grown on biodegradable polymers. Our results show a cell type-dependent effect of ATOR on ECs and SMCs. We observed polymer-dependent changes in IC50 values and an altered ATOR-uptake leading to an attenuation of statin-mediated effects on SMC growth. We conclude that the selected biodegradable polymers negatively influence the anti-proliferative effect of ATOR on SMCs. Hence, the process of developing new polymers for DES coating should involve the characterization of material-related changes in mechanisms of drug actions. PMID:26805825

  13. [Femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Gierer, P; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of femoral neck fractures increases exponentially with rising age. Young patients are rarely affected but when they are it is mostly due to high energy accidents, whereas older patients suffer from femoral neck fractures by low energy trauma due to osteoporotic changes of the bone mineral density. Treatment options have not essentially changed over the last few years. Non-operative treatment may be a choice in non-dislocated and impacted fractures. Due to the high risk of secondary fracture displacement prophylactic screw osteosynthesis is recommended even in Garden type I fractures. Osteosynthetic fracture stabilization with cannulated screws or angle stable sliding screws, is usually applied in non-displaced fractures and fractures in younger patients. Older patients need rapid mobilization after surgery; therefore, total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty are commonly used with a low incidence of secondary complications. In addition to sufficient operative treatment a guideline conform osteoprosis therapy should be initiated for the prophylaxis of further fractures and patients should undertake a suitable rehabilitation.

  14. Characterization of endothelium-derived relaxing factors released by bradykinin in human resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, P; Martínez, M C; Schneider, F; Stoclet, J C; Andriantsitohaina, R

    1997-01-01

    Relaxing factors released by the endothelium and their relative contribution to the endothelium-dependent relaxation produced by bradykinin (BK) in comparison with different vasodilator agents were investigated in human omental resistance arteries. BK produced an endothelium-dependent relaxation of arteries pre-contracted with the thromboxane A2 agonist, U46619. The B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe 140 (0.1, 1 and 10 μM), produced a parallel shift to the right of the concentration-response curve to BK with a pA2 of 7.75. Neither the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10 μM) alone, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 300 μM) alone, the nitric oxide scavenger, oxyhaemoglobin (Hb, 10 μM) alone, nor the combination of L-NAME plus Hb affected the concentration-response curve to BK. Conversely, the combination of indomethacin with either L-NAME or Hb attenuated but did not abolish the BK-induced relaxation. By contrast, the relaxations produced by the Ca2+ ionophore, calcimycin (A23187), and by the inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, thapsigargin (THAPS), were abolished in the presence of indomethacin plus L-NAME. Also, the presence of indomethacin plus L-NAME produced contraction of arteries with functional endothelium. The indomethacin plus L-NAME resistant component of BK relaxation was abolished in physiological solution (PSS) containing 40 mM KCl and vice versa. However, in the presence of KCl 40 mM, indomethacin plus L-NAME did not affect the nitric oxide donor, S-N-acetylpenicillamine-induced relaxation. The indomethacin plus L-NAME resistant component of the relaxation to BK was significantly attenuated by the K+ channel blocker tetrabutylammonium (TBA, 1 mM). However, it was not affected by other K+ channel blockers such as apamin (10 μM), 4-aminopyridine (100 μM), glibenclamide (10 μM), tetraethylammonium (10 mM) and charybdotoxin (50 nM). In the presence of indomethacin

  15. Tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow in a modeled human carotid artery bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Atkinson, C.; Jeremy, M. C.; Soria, J.

    2011-04-01

    Hemodynamic forces within the human carotid artery are well known to play a key role in the initiation and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The degree and extent of the disease largely depends on the prevailing three-dimensional flow structure and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution. This work presents tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) measurements of the flow structure and WSS in a physiologically accurate model of the human carotid artery bifurcation. The vascular geometry is reconstructed from patient-specific data and reproduced in a transparent flow phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of Tomo-PIV in a complex three-dimensional geometry. Tomographic reconstruction is performed with the multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation and simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction (SMART) technique. The implemented methodology is validated by comparing the results with Stereo-PIV measurements in the same facility. Using a steady flow assumption, the measurement error and RMS uncertainty are directly inferred from the measured velocity field. It is shown that the measurement uncertainty increases for increasing light sheet thickness and increasing velocity gradients, which are largest near the vessel walls. For a typical volume depth of 6 mm (or 256 pixel), the analysis indicates that the velocity derived from 3D cross-correlation can be measured within ±2% of the maximum velocity (or ±0.2 pixel) near the center of the vessel and within ±5% (±0.6 pixel) near the vessel wall. The technique is then applied to acquire 3D-3C velocity field data at multiple axial locations within the carotid artery model, which are combined to yield the flow field and WSS in a volume of approximately 26 mm × 27 mm × 60 mm. Shear stress is computed from the velocity gradient tensor and a method for inferring the WSS distribution on the vessel wall is presented. The results indicate the presence of a complex and three-dimensional flow structure, with

  16. Arterial stiffness is regulated by nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor during changes in blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Bellien, Jeremy; Favre, Julie; Iacob, Michele; Gao, Ji; Thuillez, Christian; Richard, Vincent; Joannidès, Robinson

    2010-03-01

    Cytochrome-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids may be important endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, opening calcium-activated potassium channels, but their involvement in the regulation of arterial stiffness during changes in blood flow in humans is unknown. In healthy volunteers, we measured arterial pressure, radial artery diameter, wall thickness, and flow (NIUS02) during hand skin heating in the presence of saline or inhibitors of NO synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine), calcium-activated potassium channels (tetraethylammonium), and cytochrome epoxygenases (fluconazole). Arterial compliance and elastic modulus were calculated and fitted as functions of midwall stress to suppress the confounding influence of geometric changes. Under saline infusion, heating induced an upward shift of the compliance-midwall stress curve and a downward shift of the modulus-midwall stress curve demonstrating a decrease in arterial tone and stiffness when blood flow increases. These shifts were reduced by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine and abolished by the combinations of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine+tetraethylammonium and N(G)-monomethyl arginine+fluconazole. In parallel, in isolated mice coronary arteries, fluconazole and tetraethylammonium reduced the relaxations to acetylcholine. However, fluconazole did not affect the relaxations to the openers of calcium-activated potassium channels of small- and intermediate-conductance NS309 and of large-conductance NS1619 excluding a direct effect on these channels. Moreover, tetraethylammonium reduced the relaxations to NS1619 but not to NS309, suggesting that the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor involved mainly acts on large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. These results show in humans that, during flow variations, arterial stiffness is regulated by the endothelium through the release of both NO and cytochrome-related endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor.

  17. In utero arsenic exposure and epigenome-wide associations in placenta, umbilical artery, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Andres; Houseman, E Andres; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mostofa, Golam; Wright, Robert O; Christiani, David C; Kile, Molly L

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic early in life has been associated with increased risk of several chronic diseases and is believed to alter epigenetic programming in utero. In the present study, we evaluate the epigenome-wide association of arsenic exposure in utero and DNA methylation in placenta (n = 37), umbilical artery (n = 45) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) (n = 52) in a birth cohort using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Unadjusted and cell mixture adjusted associations for each tissue were examined along with enrichment analyses relative to CpG island location and omnibus permutation tests of association among biological pathways. One CpG in artery (cg26587014) and 4 CpGs in placenta (cg12825509; cg20554753; cg23439277; cg21055948) reached a Bonferroni adjusted level of significance. Several CpGs were differentially methylated in artery and placenta when controlling the false discovery rate (q-value<0.05), but none in HUVEC. Enrichment of hypomethylated CpG islands was observed for artery while hypermethylation of open sea regions were present in placenta relative to prenatal arsenic exposure. The melanogenesis pathway was differentially methylated in artery (Max F P < 0.001), placenta (Max F P < 0.001), and HUVEC (Max F P = 0.02). Similarly, the insulin-signaling pathway was differentially methylated in artery (Max F P = 0.02), placenta (Max F P = 0.02), and HUVEC (Max F P = 0.02). Our results show that prenatal arsenic exposure can alter DNA methylation in artery and placenta but not in HUVEC. Further studies are needed to determine if these alterations in DNA methylation mediate the effect of prenatal arsenic exposure and health outcomes later in life.

  18. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism caused by an intravascular synovial sarcoma of the common femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Schoneveld, J M; Debing, E; Verfaillie, G; Geers, C; Van den Brande, P

    2012-11-01

    Malignant tumors arising in deep veins of the lower extremities are very uncommon. To our best knowledge, this is the seventh case of a primary venous intravascular synovial sarcoma (SS) reported in literature. A 32-year-old woman was admitted with a second episode of deep venous thrombosis of the right lower limb and pulmonary embolism. Physical and radiological examinations showed besides the thrombosis a tumor arising from the right common femoral vein involving the bifurcation of the common femoral artery. At surgery, en block resection of the tumor including the deep femoral vein and arterial bifurcation was done with an arterial reconstruction using a synthetic graft. Histopathological examination revealed an intravascular SS of the common femoral vein. The mainstay of curative therapy is complete surgical resection of all tumor manifestations with negative histological margins.

  19. Femoral approach to lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mulpuru, Siva K; Hayes, David L; Osborn, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Laser and radiofrequency energy-assisted lead extraction has greatly facilitated this complex procedure. Although success rates are high, in some instances alternate methods of extraction are required. In this review, we discuss techniques for femoral extraction of implanted leads and retained fragments. The major tools available, including commonly used snares and delivery tools, are discussed. We briefly describe combined internal jugular and femoral venous extraction approaches, as well as complimentary utilization of more than one technique via the femoral vein. Animated and procedural sequences are included to help the reader visualize the key components of these techniques. PMID:25311643

  20. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  1. Determinants of ventilation and pulmonary artery pressure during early acclimatization to hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Fatemian, Marzieh; Herigstad, Mari; Croft, Quentin P P; Formenti, Federico; Cardenas, Rosa; Wheeler, Carly; Smith, Thomas G; Friedmannova, Maria; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and pulmonary arterial pressure both rise progressively during the first few hours of human acclimatization to hypoxia. These responses are highly variable between individuals, but the origin of this variability is unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether the variabilities between different measures of response to sustained hypoxia were related, which would suggest a common source of variability. Eighty volunteers individually underwent an 8-h isocapnic exposure to hypoxia (end-tidal P(O2)=55 Torr) in a purpose-built chamber. Measurements of ventilation and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) assessed by Doppler echocardiography were made during the exposure. Before and after the exposure, measurements were made of the ventilatory sensitivities to acute isocapnic hypoxia (G(pO2)) and hyperoxic hypercapnia, the latter divided into peripheral (G(pCO2)) and central (G(cCO2)) components. Substantial acclimatization was observed in both ventilation and PASP, the latter being 40% greater in women than men. No correlation was found between the magnitudes of pulmonary ventilatory and pulmonary vascular responses. For G(pO2), G(pCO2) and G(cC O2), but not the sensitivity of PASP to acute hypoxia, the magnitude of the increase during acclimatization was proportional to the pre-acclimatization value. Additionally, the change in G(pO2) during acclimatization to hypoxia correlated well with most other measures of ventilatory acclimatization. Of the initial measurements prior to sustained hypoxia, only G(pCO2) predicted the subsequent rise in ventilation and change in G(pO2) during acclimatization. We conclude that the magnitudes of the ventilatory and pulmonary vascular responses to sustained hypoxia are predominantly determined by different factors and that the initial G(pCO2) is a modest predictor of ventilatory acclimatization.

  2. Changes in tooth position in humans in relation to arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ioi, H; Nakata, S; Nakasima, A; Counts, A L; Nanda, R S

    2002-03-01

    The three-dimensional physiological tooth movement synchronized with the heartbeat is called periodontal pulsation. This study utilized a computer-assisted amorphous sensor to evaluate the relation between tooth position and arterial blood pressure, and also between the amplitude of periodontal pulsation and arterial blood pressure. The measuring device consisted of a small magnet attached to the tooth and an amorphous sensor that was used to detect displacement of the tooth without actually contacting it. The sample consisted of the upper left central incisors of six healthy Japanese volunteers. The three measuring points for each tooth were on the labial surface. The cold-pressor test was used as an autonomic nerve stimulus that induces an increase in blood pressure and heart rate. Periodontal pulsation, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and heart rate were recorded simultaneously during a 1 min pre-test relaxation, a 2 min cold-pressor test and a 1 min recovery. The results showed significant correlations between tooth position and mean blood pressure in five of the six volunteers and between tooth position and pulse pressure in four. Moreover, it was confirmed that tooth position shifted in the labial direction in conjunction with an increase of the mean blood pressure induced by cold stimulation. Significant correlations were found between the amplitude of periodontal pulsation and pulse pressure in four of the volunteers. These findings suggest that in humans tooth position might be affected by the force of blood pressure transmitted through periodontal vessels and that the amplitude of periodontal pulsation tends to reflect changes of pulse pressure rather than changes in mean blood pressure.

  3. Development of the arterial pattern in the upper limb of staged human embryos: normal development and anatomic variations

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-NIEDENFÜHR, M.; BURTON, G. J.; DEU, J.; SAÑUDO, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 112 human embryos (224 upper limbs) between stages 12 and 23 of development were examined. It was observed that formation of the arterial system in the upper limb takes place as a dual process. An initial capillary plexus appears from the dorsal aorta during stage 12 and develops at the same rate as the limb. At stage 13, the capillary plexus begins a maturation process involving the enlargement and differentiation of selected parts. This remodelling process starts in the aorta and continues in a proximal to distal sequence. By stage 15 the differentiation has reached the subclavian and axillary arteries, by stage 17 it has reached the brachial artery as far as the elbow, by stage 18 it has reached the forearm arteries except for the distal part of the radial, and finally by stage 21 the whole arterial pattern is present in its definitive morphology. This differentiation process parallels the development of the skeletal system chronologically. A number of arterial variations were observed, and classified as follows: superficial brachial (7.7%), accessory brachial (0.6%), brachioradial (14%), superficial brachioulnar (4.7%), superficial brachioulnoradial (0.7%), palmar pattern of the median (18.7%) and superficial brachiomedian (0.7%) arteries. They were observed in embryos belonging to stages 17–23 and were not related to a specific stage of development. Statistical comparison with the rates of variations reported in adults did not show significant differences. It is suggested that the variations arise through the persistence, enlargement and differentiation of parts of the initial network which would normally remain as capillaries or even regress. PMID:11693301

  4. Sirtuin 3 deficiency is associated with inhibited mitochondrial function and pulmonary arterial hypertension in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Roxane; Dromparis, Peter; Sutendra, Gopinath; Gurtu, Vikram; Zervopoulos, Sotirios; Bowers, Lyndsay; Haromy, Alois; Webster, Linda; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sebastien; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of mitochondrial function promoting proliferation and apoptosis suppression has been described in the pulmonary arteries and extrapulmonary tissues in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the cause of this metabolic remodeling is unknown. Mice lacking sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial deacetylase, have increased acetylation and inhibition of many mitochondrial enzymes and complexes, suppressing mitochondrial function. Sirt3KO mice develop spontaneous PAH, exhibiting previously described molecular features of PAH pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In human PAH PASMC and rats with PAH, SIRT3 is downregulated, and its normalization with adenovirus gene therapy reverses the disease phenotype. A loss-of-function SIRT3 polymorphism, linked to metabolic syndrome, is associated with PAH in an unbiased cohort of 162 patients and controls. If confirmed in large patient cohorts, these findings may facilitate biomarker and therapeutic discovery programs in PAH.

  5. Phenylephrine-induced elevations in arterial blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans, blood pressure was elevated via steady-state infusion of three doses of phenylephrine HCl in 10 healthy subjects in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature by 0.5 degrees C, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, and cardiac output and decreased total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR; all P < 0.005) but did not change mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; P > 0.05). At the highest dose of phenylephrine, the increase in MAP and TPR from predrug baselines was significantly attenuated during the heat stress [DeltaMAP 8.4 +/- 1.2 mmHg; DeltaTPR 0.96 +/- 0.85 peripheral resistance units (PRU)] compared with normothermia (DeltaMAP 15.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg, DeltaTPR 7.13 +/- 1.18 PRU; all P < 0.001). The sensitivity of baroreflex control of MSNA and heart rate, expressed as the slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure, as well as the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure, respectively, was similar between thermal conditions (each P > 0.05). These data suggest that phenylephrine-induced elevations in MAP are attenuated in heat-stressed humans without affecting baroreflex control of MSNA or heart rate.

  6. Vasoactive actions of local anaesthetics on human isolated umbilical veins and arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Monuszko, E.; Halevy, S.; Freese, K.; Liu-Barnett, M.; Altura, B.

    1989-01-01

    1. An in vitro study, using helical preparations of human umbilical arteries and veins obtained from healthy women at term pregnancy, was designed to determine: (a) whether three local anaesthetics commonly utilized in obstetric anaesthesia (bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and lignocaine) can induce contraction or relaxation of resting umbilical vessels; (b) whether these agents can induce contraction or relaxation of umbilical vessels which have been previously induced to contract by a known activator, potassium chloride (KCl); and (c) the relative potency of these agents as compared to KCl. 2. The results indicate that: (a) these local anaesthetics are vasoactive on human umbilical vascular smooth muscle; (b) bupivacaine induces contraction in over 90% of the resting vessels examined, while 2-chloroprocaine consistently causes relaxation and lignocaine causes a small degree of contraction in 40% of vessels examined; (c) bupivacaine causes further contraction (or potentiation) of KCl-contracted muscle in 50% of the vessels studied, while 2-chloroprocaine and lignocaine both induce relaxation of these contracted vessels. PMID:2758218

  7. Arterial specification of endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells in a biomimetic flow bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Le, Andrew V; Mendez, Julio J; Qyang, Yibing; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) exist in different microenvironments in vivo, including under different levels of shear stress in arteries versus veins. Standard stem cell differentiation protocols to derive ECs and EC-subtypes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generally use growth factors or other soluble factors in an effort to specify cell fate. In this study, a biomimetic flow bioreactor was used to subject hiPSC-derived ECs (hiPSC-ECs) to shear stress to determine the impacts on phenotype and upregulation of markers associated with an anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, arterial-like phenotype. The in vitro bioreactor system was able to efficiently mature hiPSC-ECs into arterial-like cells in 24 h, as demonstrated by qRT-PCR for arterial markers EphrinB2, CXCR4, Conexin40 and Notch1, as well protein-level expression of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD). Furthermore, the exogenous addition of soluble factors was not able to fully recapitulate this phenotype that was imparted by shear stress exposure. The induction of these phenotypic changes was biomechanically mediated in the shear stress bioreactor. This biomimetic flow bioreactor is an effective means for the differentiation of hiPSC-ECs toward an arterial-like phenotype, and is amenable to scale-up for culturing large quantities of cells for tissue engineering applications.

  8. Arterial specification of endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells in a biomimetic flow bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Le, Andrew V.; Mendez, Julio J.; Qyang, Yibing; Niklason, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) exist in different microenvironments in vivo, including under different levels of shear stress in arteries versus veins. Standard stem cell differentiation protocols to derive ECs and EC-subtypes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generally use growth factors or other soluble factors in an effort to specify cell fate. In this study, a biomimetic flow bioreactor was used to subject hiPSC-derived ECs (hiPSC-ECs) to shear stress to determine the impacts on phenotype and upregulation of markers associated with an anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, arterial-like phenotype. The in vitro bioreactor system was able to efficiently mature hiPSC-ECs into arterial-like cells in 24 hours, as demonstrated by qRT-PCR for arterial markers EphrinB2, CXCR4, Conexin40 and Notch1, as well protein-level expression of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD). Furthermore, the exogenous addition of soluble factors was not able to fully recapitulate this phenotype that was imparted by shear stress exposure. The induction of these phenotypic changes was biomechanically mediated in the shear stress bioreactor. This biomimetic flow bioreactor is an effective means for the differentiation of hiPSC-ECs toward an arterial-like phenotype, and is amenable to scale-up for culturing large quantities of cells for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25890758

  9. Factors influencing the diameter of human anterior and posterior intercostal arteries.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, David R; Khuder, Sadik A; Lane, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    At present, there have not been any detailed studies examining the size relationships of the intercostal arteries. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the vessel lumenal diameter of ipsilateral, paired anterior and posterior IC arteries, as well as with the length of the IC space supplied by each artery. Samples were collected from the second-sixth anterior and posterior IC arteries near their site of origin, and the lengths of the corresponding IC spaces were measured in 42 cadavers. Lumenal diameters of both the anterior and posterior IC arteries at consecutive IC space closely followed second degree polynomial regression models (R(2) = 0.9655, and R(2) = 0.9741, respectively), and reached maximum size at the fifth IC space, which was found to be the longest of the IC spaces. No direct relationship was observed between diameters of the paired anterior and posterior IC arteries, although there was a trend for the larger anterior IC arteries to be paired with the larger posterior IC arteries. The calculated rate of blood flow at each IC artery was approximately two-fold greater in males than in females. These results suggest that the length of the IC space, and hence the extent of the thoracic wall supplied, is a major factor in determining the diameter of both anterior and posterior IC arteries. Since COPD is such a prevalent disease, this study also examined its influence on the IC arteries, and found that the posterior IC arteries are significantly larger among afflicted subjects.

  10. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Eduardo; Mauricio, María Dolores; Granado, Miriam; García-Villar, Oscar; Aldasoro, Martín; Vila, José María; Hidalgo, Manuel; Ferrero, Jorge Luis; Fernández, Nuria; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors. PMID:24324963

  11. Arterial blood pressure wave forms in radial and posterior tibial arteries in critically ill newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; Hack, W W; Ree, E F; Lafeber, H N; Westerhof, N

    1993-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document arterial blood pressure wave forms at two sites along the arterial tree of the neonate: in the radial and posterior tibial arteries. Using a high-fidelity catheter tip-transducer system, peripheral arterial blood pressure wave forms in 26 critically newborn infants were studied. In 14 infants the radial artery and in 12 infants the posterior tibial artery was cannulated. Radial artery blood pressure waves resembled those of proximal aortic rather than those of the radial artery in adults. Quantitative analysis of the waves was performed to reassure this finding. Blood pressure waves obtained from posterior tibial artery resembled those of femoral artery rather than those of posterior tibial artery waves in adults. We conclude that radial and posterior tibial artery wave forms in neonates appear to have a central appearance. This phenomenon might be explained by the close proximity of the radial and posterior tibial artery to the central aorta and femoral artery respectively, due to the small and short limbs of the neonate. The finding allows an "easy central pressure look" at both ends of the neonatal aorta.

  12. Potent contractile actions of prostanoid EP3-receptor agonists on human isolated pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y M; Jones, R L; Chan, K M; Stock, A I; Ho, J K

    1994-10-01

    1. In 13 of 15 experiments, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and sulprostone (a prostanoid EP1/EP3-receptor agonist) contracted isolated rings of human pulmonary artery at low concentrations (> or = 5 and > or = 0.5 nM respectively). Tissue was obtained from patients undergoing surgery mainly for carcinoma of the lung. Characterization of the receptors involved was complicated by loss of sensitivity to the contractile PGE action over the experimental period. In contrast, contractile responses to KCl, phenylephrine and the specific thromboxane (TP-) receptor agonist, U-46619, did not decrease with time. 2. The relative contractile potencies for seven PGE analogues, measured during the first few hours after setting up the preparations, were as follows: sulprostone > misoprostol = gemeprost > or = PGE2 > or = GR 63799X > 17-phenyl-omega-trinor PGE2 > or = 11-deoxy PGE1. This ranking indicates that an EP3-receptor is involved. 3. The contractile action of sulprostone was not blocked by the TP-receptor antagonists, EP 169 and GR 32191, and the EP1-receptor antagonist, AH 6809. 4. In two experiments, PGE2 (50 nM) reduced basal tone and sulprostone was a weak contractile agent. Phenylephrine-induced tone was also inhibited by PGE2 (EC50 = 5-20 nM), 11-deoxy PGE1 and butaprost (a selective EP2-receptor agonist); the latter prostanoids were about 2 and 4 times less potent than PGE2 respectively. Interactions with phenylephrine were different in experiments where PGE2 alone was contractile: PGE2 induced contraction superimposed on the phenylephrine response and 11-deoxy PGE1 induced either further contraction or had no effect. Butaprost produced relaxation at high concentrations;this may not be an EP2 action since preparations were highly sensitive to relaxant actions of prostacyclin (IP-) receptor agonists (cicaprost and TEI-9063).5 The study has shown that in the majority of experiments on the human isolated pulmonary artery,the contractile EP3 system outweighed the relaxant EP2

  13. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure in awake humans

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Judith M; Aziz, Tipu; Schlugman, David; Paterson, David J

    2002-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus, basal ganglia or pedunculopontine nucleus in decorticate animals results in locomotion and a cardiorespiratory response resembling that seen during exercise. This has led to the hypothesis that parallel activation of cardiorespiratory and locomotor systems from the midbrain could form part of the ‘central command’ mechanism of exercise. However, the degree to which subcortical structures play a role in cardiovascular activation in awake humans has not been established. We studied the effects on heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of electrically stimulating the thalamus and basal ganglia in awake humans undergoing neurosurgery for movement disorders (n = 13 Parkinson's disease, n = 1 myoclonic dystonia, n = 1 spasmodic torticollis). HR and MAP increased during high frequency (> 90 Hz) electrical stimulation of the thalamus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 4 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.05, n = 9), subthalamic nucleus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 5 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.006, n = 8) or substantia nigra (HR 6 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.001, MAP 5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005, n = 8). This was accompanied by the facilitation of movement, but without the movement itself. Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus did not increase cardiovascular variables but did facilitate movement. Low frequency (< 20 Hz) stimulation of any site did not affect cardiovascular variables or movement. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain in awake humans can cause a modest increase in cardiovascular variables that is not dependent on movement feedback from exercising muscles. The relationship between this type of response and that occurring during actual exercise is unclear, but it indicates that subcortical command could be involved in ‘parallel activation’ of the locomotor and cardiovascular systems and thus contribute to the neurocircuitry of ‘central command’. PMID:11882692

  14. Induction of stearoyl-CoA desaturase protects human arterial endothelial cells against lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peter, Andreas; Weigert, Cora; Staiger, Harald; Rittig, Kilian; Cegan, Alexander; Lutz, Philipp; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin

    2008-08-01

    Endothelial lipotoxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple stages of cardiovascular disease from early endothelial dysfunction to manifest atherosclerosis and its complications. Saturated free fatty acids are the major inducers of endothelial cell apoptosis and inflammatory cytokines. In humans, the enzyme human stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (hSCD-1) is the limiting step of the desaturation of saturated to monounsaturated fatty acids. Since we could demonstrate the expression of SCD-1 in primary human arterial endothelial cells (HAECs), we aimed to prove a beneficial role of upregulated hSCD-1 expression. In contrast to other cells that are less susceptible to lipotoxicity, hSCD-1 was not upregulated in HAECs upon palmitate treatment. Following that, we could show that upregulation of hSCD-1 using the LXR activator TO-901317 in HAECs protects the cells against palmitate-induced lipotoxicity, cell apoptosis, and expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Increased hSCD-1 activity was determined as increased C16:1/16:0 ratio and enhanced triglyceride storage in palmitate treated cells. The beneficial effect was clearly attributed to enhanced hSCD-1 activity. Overexpression of hSCD-1 blocked palmitate-induced cytotoxicity, and knockdown of hSCD-1 using siRNA abolished the protective effect of TO-901317 in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, inhibition of hSCD-1 with 10/12 CLA blocked the effect of TO-901317 on palmitate-induced lipotoxicity, cell apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokine induction in HAECs. We conclude that upregulation of hSCD-1 leads to a desaturation of saturated fatty acids and facilitates their esterification and storage, thereby preventing downstream effects of lipotoxicity in HAECs. These findings add a novel aspect to the atheroprotective actions of LXR activators in cardiovascular disease.

  15. Misdiagnosis of pathological femoral fracture in a patient with intramuscular hemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAOLONG; NIE, TAO; ZHANG, BIN; DAI, MIN; LIU, HUCHENG; ZOU, FAN

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is a common disease; however, intramuscular hemangioma (IH) presenting with a pathological fracture is extremely rare. The present study reports a case of a 46-year-old male patient that suffered from IH of the right thigh, presenting with a pathological femoral fracture. The patient was initially diagnosed with a traumatic femoral fracture, and routine open reduction and internal fixation were performed at a local hospital. However, 20 days subsequent to surgery, gradual swelling and soreness around the incision were observed. The incision eventually ruptured during squatting for bowel movement, which led to extensive blood loss. Based on computed tomography (CT) and deep femoral artery arteriography, IH presenting with a pathological femoral fracture was diagnosed. The patient underwent artery embolization, from which he recovered well. At the 6-month follow-up, the femoral fracture was revealed to have healed, and a CT scan demonstrated no evidence of recurrence; however, continuous observation using CT is required in order to determine the long-term outcome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a misdiagnosed pathological femoral fracture in a patient with IH reported in the English literature. PMID:27347124

  16. The effect of urapidil, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, on the vascular tone of the porcine coronary and pulmonary arteries, the rat aorta and the human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Claire; Auger, Cyril; Diemunsch, Pierre; Schini-Kerth, Valérie

    2016-05-15

    Urapidil (Eupressyl(®)) an antihypertensive drug acting as an α1 antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, may be of special interest in the treatment of hypertension associated with preeclamptic toxaemia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction. However, the effect of urapidil on vascular tone has been poorly investigated. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using pulmonary and coronary arteries from 36 pigs, aortae from 22 rats and 9 human pulmonary artery samples suspended in organ chambers. Concentration-relaxation curves either to urapidil, 5-HT, or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were constructed after pre-contraction of rings. Pig pulmonary and coronary artery rings were contracted with U46619, a thromboxane mimetic, rat aortic rings with either endothelin-1 or phenylephrine, and human pulmonary artery rings with U46619 or phenylephrine. Urapidil markedly inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium with a more pronounced effect observed in rings without endothelium. Both 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT failed to induce relaxation in rat aortic rings with an intact endothelium. 5-HT, but not urapidil and 8-OH-DPAT, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary and pulmonary artery rings with an intact endothelium (P<0.05). 5-HT and phenylephrine but not urapidil caused concentration-dependent contractions in human pulmonary artery rings. The present findings, while confirming that urapidil is a potent inhibitor of α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction, do not support the role of 5-HT1A receptor activation in the control of the vascular tone of the different types of arteries tested in response to urapidil. In addition, they indicate that urapidil seems to preferentially target arteries with endothelial dysfunction.

  17. Regional variation in arterial stiffening and dysfunction in Western diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Bender, Shawn B; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A; Garro, Mona; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C; Sowers, James R; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A

    2015-08-15

    Increased central vascular stiffening, assessed in vivo by determination of pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular event risk. Recent evidence demonstrates that accelerated aortic stiffening occurs in obesity; however, little is known regarding stiffening of other disease-relevant arteries or whether regional variation in arterial stiffening occurs in this setting. We addressed this gap in knowledge by assessing femoral PWV in vivo in conjunction with ex vivo analyses of femoral and coronary structure and function in a mouse model of Western diet (WD; high-fat/high-sugar)-induced obesity and insulin resistance. WD feeding resulted in increased femoral PWV in vivo. Ex vivo analysis of femoral arteries revealed a leftward shift in the strain-stress relationship, increased modulus of elasticity, and decreased compliance indicative of increased stiffness following WD feeding. Confocal and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy revealed increased femoral stiffness involving decreased elastin/collagen ratio in conjunction with increased femoral transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) content in WD-fed mice. Further analysis of the femoral internal elastic lamina (IEL) revealed a significant reduction in the number and size of fenestrae with WD feeding. Coronary artery stiffness and structure was unchanged by WD feeding. Functionally, femoral, but not coronary, arteries exhibited endothelial dysfunction, whereas coronary arteries exhibited increased vasoconstrictor responsiveness not present in femoral arteries. Taken together, our data highlight important regional variations in the development of arterial stiffness and dysfunction associated with WD feeding. Furthermore, our results suggest TGF-β signaling and IEL fenestrae remodeling as potential contributors to femoral artery stiffening in obesity.

  18. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  19. Human brain: reliability and reproducibility of pulsed arterial spin-labeling perfusion MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Geon-Ho; Song, Enmin; Zhu, Xiao-Ping; Matson, Gerald B; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2005-03-01

    The Committee of Human Research of the University of California San Francisco approved this study, and all volunteers provided written informed consent. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the global and regional reliability and reproducibility of noninvasive brain perfusion measurements obtained with different pulsed arterial spin-labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and to determine the extent to which within-subject variability and random noise limit reliability and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined twice within 2 hours. The pulsed ASL methods compared in this study differ mainly with regard to magnetization transfer and eddy current effects. There were two main results: (a) Pulsed ASL MR imaging consistently had high measurement reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.75) and reproducibility (coefficients of variation less than 8.5%), and (b) random noise rather than within-subject variability limited reliability and reproducibility. It was concluded that low signal-to-noise ratios substantially limit the reliability and reproducibility of perfusion measurements.

  20. Graphics processing unit accelerated one-dimensional blood flow computation in the human arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2013-12-01

    One-dimensional blood flow models have been used extensively for computing pressure and flow waveforms in the human arterial circulation. We propose an improved numerical implementation based on a graphics processing unit (GPU) for the acceleration of the execution time of one-dimensional model. A novel parallel hybrid CPU-GPU algorithm with compact copy operations (PHCGCC) and a parallel GPU only (PGO) algorithm are developed, which are compared against previously introduced PHCG versions, a single-threaded CPU only algorithm and a multi-threaded CPU only algorithm. Different second-order numerical schemes (Lax-Wendroff and Taylor series) are evaluated for the numerical solution of one-dimensional model, and the computational setups include physiologically motivated non-periodic (Windkessel) and periodic boundary conditions (BC) (structured tree) and elastic and viscoelastic wall laws. Both the PHCGCC and the PGO implementations improved the execution time significantly. The speed-up values over the single-threaded CPU only implementation range from 5.26 to 8.10 × , whereas the speed-up values over the multi-threaded CPU only implementation range from 1.84 to 4.02 × . The PHCGCC algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with non-periodic BC and for viscoelastic wall laws, whereas the PGO algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with periodic BC.

  1. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Lee, Kang-Yun; Pan, Chih-Hong; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lin, Lian-Yu; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2016-07-01

    Inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) metal fumes is known to cause metal fume fever and to have systemic effects; however, the effects of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) on the cardiovascular system remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular toxicity of ZnONPs. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were exposed to ZnONPs of different sizes to investigate the cell viability, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), interleukin (IL)-6, nitric oxide (NO), and regulation of cardiovascular disease-related genes. Exposure of HCAECs to ZnONPs resulted in decreased cell viability and increased levels of 8-OHdG, IL-6, and NO. Downregulation of cardiovascular-associated genes was observed in response to ZnONPs in HCAECs determined by qPCR, suggesting that the calcium signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and renin-angiotensin system are important affected pathways in response to ZnONPs. Furthermore, we observed a significant response of AGTR1 to ZnONP exposure in HCAECs. Our results suggest that ZnONPs cause toxicity to HCAECs, which could be associated with cardiovascular dysfunction.

  2. Biological Atomic Force Microscopy for Imaging Gold-Labeled Liposomes on Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zaske, Ana-María; Danila, Delia; Queen, Michael C.; Golunski, Eva; Conyers, Jodie L.

    2013-01-01

    Although atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used extensively to characterize cell membrane structure and cellular processes such as endocytosis and exocytosis, the corrugated surface of the cell membrane hinders the visualization of extracellular entities, such as liposomes, that may interact with the cell. To overcome this barrier, we used 90 nm nanogold particles to label FITC liposomes and monitor their endocytosis on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro. We were able to study the internalization process of gold-coupled liposomes on endothelial cells, by using AFM. We found that the gold-liposomes attached to the HCAEC cell membrane during the first 15–30 min of incubation, liposome cell internalization occurred from 30 to 60 min, and most of the gold-labeled liposomes had invaginated after 2 hr of incubation. Liposomal uptake took place most commonly at the periphery of the nuclear zone. Dynasore monohydrate, an inhibitor of endocytosis, obstructed the internalization of the gold-liposomes. This study showed the versatility of the AFM technique, combined with fluorescent microscopy, for investigating liposome uptake by endothelial cells. The 90 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles proved to be a noninvasive contrast agent that efficiently improves AFM imaging during the investigation of biological nanoprocesses. PMID:26555999

  3. Diversity of Potassium Channels in Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Pedro; Rebolledo, Alejandro; Palomo, Ana Rocio Roldán; Moncada, Melisa; Piccinini, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Through their control of cell membrane potential, potassium (K+) channels are among the best known regulators of vascular tone. This article discusses the expression and function of K+ channels in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). We review the bibliographic reports and also present single-channel data recorded in freshly isolated cells. Electrophysiological properties of big conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel and voltage-dependent K+ channels are clearly established in this vessel, where they are involved in contractile state regulation. Their role in the maintenance of membrane potential is an important control mechanism in the determination of the vessel diameter. Additionally, small conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, 2-pore domains K+ channels and inward rectifier K+ channels also appear to be present in HUASMCs, while intermediate conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels could not be identified. In both cases, additional investigation is necessary to reach conclusive evidence of their expression and/or functional role in HUASMCs. Finally, we discuss the role of K+ channels in pregnancy-related pathologies like gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. PMID:24084522

  4. Graphics processing unit accelerated one-dimensional blood flow computation in the human arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2013-12-01

    One-dimensional blood flow models have been used extensively for computing pressure and flow waveforms in the human arterial circulation. We propose an improved numerical implementation based on a graphics processing unit (GPU) for the acceleration of the execution time of one-dimensional model. A novel parallel hybrid CPU-GPU algorithm with compact copy operations (PHCGCC) and a parallel GPU only (PGO) algorithm are developed, which are compared against previously introduced PHCG versions, a single-threaded CPU only algorithm and a multi-threaded CPU only algorithm. Different second-order numerical schemes (Lax-Wendroff and Taylor series) are evaluated for the numerical solution of one-dimensional model, and the computational setups include physiologically motivated non-periodic (Windkessel) and periodic boundary conditions (BC) (structured tree) and elastic and viscoelastic wall laws. Both the PHCGCC and the PGO implementations improved the execution time significantly. The speed-up values over the single-threaded CPU only implementation range from 5.26 to 8.10 × , whereas the speed-up values over the multi-threaded CPU only implementation range from 1.84 to 4.02 × . The PHCGCC algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with non-periodic BC and for viscoelastic wall laws, whereas the PGO algorithm performs best for an elastic wall law with periodic BC. PMID:24009129

  5. Beta dose calculation in human arteries for various brachytherapy seed types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Woo

    This dissertation explores beta dose profile of microspheres packed in arteries, various source geometries of 142Pr that can be used for therapeutic purpose, and dose backscatter factors for selected beta sources. A novel treatment method by injecting microspheres into feeding arteries of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is under pre-clinical investigation. To optimize radiation dose to the clinically important area, i.e. arterial wall, preliminary dosimetric studies were needed. Monte Carlo calculations were performed for several geometries simulating arteries filled with microspheres packed by random packing methods. Arterial radii used in the simulation varied from 50 mum to 3 mm; microsphere radii varied from 10 mum to 0.7 mm. Dose varied significantly as a function of microsphere size, for constant arterial sizes. For the same sizes of arteries, significant dose increase was observed because of inter-artery exposure for large arteries (>0.1 cm rad.) filled with large microspheres (>0.03 cm rad.). Dose increase between small arteries (<0.03 cm rad.) was less significant. The dose profiles of prototype 142Pr beta brachytherapy sources were calculated using MCNP 4C Monte Carlo code as well as dose point kernel (DPK) for selected cases. Dose profiles were similar to beta sources currently used indicating that 142Pr can substitute for current sources for certain cases and the DPK was closely matched with MCNP result. Backscattering of electrons is a prominent secondary effect in beta dosimetry. The backscattering is closely correlated with factors such as geometry of source and scattering material, and composition of scattering material. The backscattering factors were calculated for selected beta sources that are currently used as well as potentially useful sources for therapeutic purpose. The factors were calculated as a function of distance from the interface between water and scatterers. These factors were fit by a simple function for future incorporation into

  6. Cystic Disease of the Groin Presenting as Compression of a Femoral Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Hwang, Deokbi; Park, Sujin; Jeong, Won-Ju; Seo, An Na; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe our diagnosis and treatment of two patients who presented with femoral vessel compression caused by a cystic lesion in the groin. One case was diagnosed as adventitial cystic disease (ACD) of the common femoral artery resulting in leg claudication and the other was diagnosed as a ganglion cyst (GC) causing femoral vein compression and unilateral leg swelling. The operative findings differed between these two cases with respect to the dissection of the cyst and femoral vessel, but the postoperative histological examination results were similar. The pathogenesis of ACD and GC is not fully understood, and further investigation is needed to delineate the exact pathology of these uncommon conditions. PMID:27699160

  7. Klotho modulates FGF23-mediated NO synthesis and oxidative stress in human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Beatrice; Haller, Jacqueline; Haffner, Dieter; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a state of Klotho deficiency and excess of the phosphaturic hormone fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Both dysregulations were shown to be associated with endothelial dysfunction in humans, but direct vascular effects of FGF23 remain largely elusive. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the effects of FGF23 (10 ng/mL) in relation to its co-receptor Klotho on nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and detoxification in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Membrane-bound Klotho is expressed in HCAEC, and FGF23 increases the expression of the Klotho shedding protease ADAM17, and consequently the secretion of soluble Klotho. FGF23 activates FGF receptor 1 and stimulates NO release via Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Both FGF receptor (FGFR)-dependent ROS formation via activation of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) as well as ROS degradation via superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase (CAT) is stimulated by FGF23. Pre-incubation with a Klotho inhibitor blunts the FGF23-stimulated Akt-eNOS activation and NO synthesis, and decreases ROS degradation by blocking SOD2 and CAT enzymes, whereas FGF23-stimulated ROS synthesis via Nox2 is unaffected, resulting in low NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress. Our data indicate that in the presence of Klotho, FGF23 induces NO release in HCAEC and its stimulating effects on ROS production are counterbalanced by increased ROS degradation. In states of Klotho deficiency, e.g., CKD, FGF23-mediated NO synthesis is blunted and ROS formation overrules ROS degradation. Thus, FGF23 excess may primarily promote oxidative stress and thus endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27448998

  8. Arterial compliance measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to study the elasticity of the arterial wall using a non-invasive laser Doppler measurement system. The elasticity of the arterial wall is described by its compliance factor, which can be determined when both blood pressure and the radial velocity of the arterial wall are known. To measure radical velocity we used a self- mixing interferometer. The compliance factors were measured from six healthy volunteers, whose ages were varied from 21 to 32. Although a single volunteer's compliance factor is presented as an example, this paper treated the volunteers as a group. First, the elastic modulus, which is inversely proportional to the compliance factor, was determined. Then, an exponential curve was fitted into the measured data and a characteristic equation for the elastic modulus of the arterial wall was determined. The elastic modulus was calculated at different pressures and the results were compared to the static incremental modulus of a dog's femoral artery. The results indicate that there is a correlation between human elastic and canine static incremental modulus for blood pressures varying from 60 to 110 mmHg.

  9. Plaque components affect wall stress in stented human carotid artery: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhen-Min; Liu, Xiao; Du, Cheng-Fei; Sun, An-Qiang; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Zhan-Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Carotid artery stenting presents challenges of in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis, which are caused primarily by alterations in the mechanical environment of the artery after stent implantation. The present study constructed patient-specific carotid arterial bifurcation models with lipid pools and calcified components based on magnetic resonance imaging. We numerically analyzed the effects of multicomponent plaques on the distributions of von Mises stresses (VMSs) in the patient-specific models after stenting. The results showed that when a stent was deployed, the large soft lipid pool in atherosclerotic plaques cushioned the host artery and reduced the stress within the arterial wall; however, this resulted in a sharp increase of VMS in the fibrous cap. When compared with the lipid pool, the presence of the calcified components led to slightly increased stresses on the luminal surface. However, when a calcification was located close to the luminal surface of the host artery and the stenosis, the local VMS was elevated. Overall, compared with calcified components, large lipid pools severely damaged the host artery after stenting. Furthermore, damage due to the calcified component may depend on location.

  10. Algorithm for quantifying advanced carotid artery atherosclerosis in humans using MRI and active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Gareth; Vick, G. W., III; Bordelon, Cassius; Insull, William; Morrisett, Joel

    2002-05-01

    A new algorithm for measuring carotid artery volumes and estimating atherosclerotic plaque volumes from MRI images has been developed and validated using pressure-perfusion-fixed cadaveric carotid arteries. Our method uses an active contour algorithm with the generalized gradient vector field force as the external force to localize the boundaries of the artery on each MRI cross-section. Plaque volume is estimated by an automated algorithm based on estimating the normal wall thickness for each branch of the carotid. Triplicate volume measurements were performed by a single observer on thirty-eight pairs of cadaveric carotid arteries. The coefficient of variance (COV) was used to quantify measurement reproducibility. Aggregate volumes were computed for nine contiguous slices bounding the carotid bifurcation. The median (mean +/- SD) COV for the 76 aggregate arterial volumes was 0.93% (1.47% +/- 1.52%) for the lumen volume, 0.95% (1.06% +/- 0.67%) for the total artery volume, and 4.69% (5.39% +/- 3.97%) for the plaque volume. These results indicate that our algorithm provides repeatable measures of arterial volumes and a repeatable estimate of plaque volume of cadaveric carotid specimens through analysis of MRI images. The algorithm also significantly decreases the amount of time necessary to generate these measurements.

  11. The specific role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Herrera, Frankyn; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2013-02-01

    It is mostly agreed that arterial adaptations occur, among others, in response to changes in mechanical stimuli. Models like bed rest, spinal cord injury, or limb suspension have been applied to study vascular adaptations to unloading in humans. However, these models cannot distinguish the role of muscle contractions and the role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptation. The HEPHAISTOS orthosis allows normal ambulation, while it significantly reduces force generation in the lower leg muscles. Eleven subjects wore HEPHAISTOS unilaterally for 56 days and were followed up for another 4 wk. Arterial diameters, intima media thickness (IMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and resting blood flow (BF(rest)) were measured using high-frequency ultrasonography. Arterial adaptations were investigated in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), the brachial artery (BA), and the carotid artery (CA). Mean SFA resting diameter was decreased from 6.57 mm (SD = 0.74 mm) at baseline to 5.77 mm (SD = 0.87 mm) at the end of the intervention (P < 0.001), whereas SFA wall-to-lumen ratio, SFA BF(rest), and SFA FMD remained unaffected throughout the study. The application of HEPHAISTOS had no effect on structure and function of the systemic control sites, the BA, and the CA. Our findings highlight the importance of muscular contractions for arterial diameter adaptations. Moreover, we propose that FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio are unaffected by ambulating with the HEPHAISTOS orthosis, which is suggestive of habitual acceleration profiles in the lower leg constituting an important stimulus for the maintenance of FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio.

  12. Pulsatile blood velocity in human arteries displayed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, D.A.; Crooks, L.; Hoenninger, J. III.; Arakawa, M.; Watts, J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors describe a new method for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of flowing protons which can illustrate relative blood velocity in the arteries supplying the brain. The magnetic gradient pulse sequence was synchronized to the cardiac cycle at 100-msec. increments to check pulsatile blood flow perpendicular to the image plane. The magnitude of the signal increased with the velocity of blood in major arteries flowing in the direction of the spatially offset refocusing plane. The blood velocity in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries varied as a function of the phase of the cardiac cycle, and the velocity profiles across the vascular lumina were compatible with laminar flow.

  13. Changes in distribution of hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II in human hepatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Y.; Imaoka, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Nakano, S.; Ishikawa, O.; Ohigashi, H.; Taniguchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Iwanaga, T.; Terasawa, T.

    1985-01-15

    Changes in the distribution of the hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II (AT-II) were studied in human hepatic cancers using extremely short-lived radioisotope (RI) (krypton 81 m (/sup 81m/Kr); half-life, 13 seconds). After the start of continuous infusion of AT-II, the radioactivity of the tumor showed about a two-fold increase, whereas that of the nontumor region decreased to about one half as much as the level before the infusion. Consequently, the mean ratio of the arterial blood flow in the tumor region to that in the nontumor region (T/N ratio) increased to 3.30 (P less than 0.001). The T/N ratio showed a peak before the peripheral blood pressure reached the maximum, and thereafter tended to decrease. Intra-arterial infusion of AT-II raised the T/N ratio more obviously than did intravenous infusion of the drug, with less rise in the peripheral blood pressure. It is believed that intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with local use of AT-II enables better accessibility of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors.

  14. A Perfusion-based Human Cadaveric Model for Management of Carotid Artery Injury during Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin; Kale, Aydemir; Marquez, Yvette; Winer, Jesse; Lee, Brian; Harris, Brianna; Minnetti, Michael; Carey, Joseph; Giannotta, Steven; Zada, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    Objective To create and develop a reproducible and realistic training environment to prepare residents and trainees for arterial catastrophes during endoscopic endonasal surgery. Design An artificial blood substitute was perfused at systolic blood pressures in eight fresh human cadavers to mimic intraoperative scenarios. Setting The USC Keck School of Medicine Fresh Tissue Dissection Laboratory was used as the training site. Participants Trainees were USC neurosurgery residents and junior faculty. Main Outcome A 5-point questionnaire was used to assess pre- and posttraining confidence scores. Results High-pressure extravasation at normal arterial blood pressure mimicked real intraoperative internal carotid artery (ICA) injury. Residents developed psychomotor skills required to achieve hemostasis using suction, cottonoids, and muscle grafts. Questionnaire responses from all trainees reported a realistic experience enhanced by the addition of the perfusion model. Conclusions The addition of an arterial perfusion system to fresh tissue cadavers is among the most realistic training models available. This enables the simulation of rare intraoperative scenarios such as ICA injury. Strategies for rapid hemostasis and implementation of techniques including endoscope manipulation, suction, and packing can all be rehearsed via this novel paradigm. PMID:25301092

  15. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  16. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications.

  17. Fundamental relations between short-term RR interval and arterial pressure oscillations in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the principal explanations for respiratory sinus arrhythmia is that it reflects arterial baroreflex buffering of respiration-induced arterial pressure fluctuations. If this explanation is correct, then elimination of RR interval fluctuations should increase respiratory arterial pressure fluctuations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured RR interval and arterial pressure fluctuations during normal sinus rhythm and fixed-rate atrial pacing at 17.2+/-1.8 (SEM) beats per minute greater than the sinus rate in 16 healthy men and 4 healthy women, 20 to 34 years of age. Measurements were made during controlled-frequency breathing (15 breaths per minute or 0.25 Hz) with subjects in the supine and 40 degree head-up tilt positions. We characterized RR interval and arterial pressure variabilities in low-frequency (0.05 to 0.15 Hz) and respiratory-frequency (0.20 to 0.30 Hz) ranges with fast Fourier transform power spectra and used cross-spectral analysis to determine the phase relation between the two signals. As expected, cardiac pacing eliminated beat-to-beat RR interval variability. Against expectations, however, cardiac pacing in the supine position significantly reduced arterial pressure oscillations in the respiratory frequency (systolic, 6.8+/-1.8 to 2.9 +/-0.6 mm Hg2/Hz, P=.017). In contrast, cardiac pacing in the 40 degree tilt position increased arterial pressure variability (systolic, 8.0+/-1.8 to 10.8 +/-2.6, P=.027). Cross-spectral analysis showed that 40 degree tilt shifted the phase relation between systolic pressure and RR interval at the respiratory frequency from positive to negative (9 +/-7 degrees versus -17+/-11 degrees, P=.04); that is, in the supine position, RR interval changes appeared to lead arterial pressure changes, and in the upright position, RR interval changes appeared to follow arterial pressure changes. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that respiratory sinus arrhythmia can actually contribute to respiratory arterial

  18. Morphometric and hemodynamic analysis of atherosclerotic progression in human carotid artery bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Yin, Xiaoping; Xu, Yingjin; Jia, Xinwei; Li, Jianhui; Niu, Pei; Shen, Wenzeng; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Although atherosclerosis has been widely investigated at carotid artery bifurcation, there is a lack of morphometric and hemodynamic data at different stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesion difference in patients with carotid artery disease compared with healthy control subjects. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of carotid artery bifurcation was reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of Chinese control subjects (n = 30) and patients with carotid artery disease (n = 30). We defined two novel vector angles (i.e., angles 1 and 2) that were tangential to the reconstructed contour of the 3D vessel. The best-fit diameter was computed along the internal carotid artery (ICA) center line. Hemodynamic analysis was performed at various bifurcations. Patients with stenotic vessels have larger angles 1 and 2 (151 ± 11° and 42 ± 20°) and smaller diameters of the external carotid artery (ECA) (4.6 ± 0.85 mm) compared with control subjects (144 ± 13° and 36 ± 16°, 5.2 ± 0.57 mm) although there is no significant difference in the common carotid artery (CCA) (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, P = 0.18). In particular, all patients with carotid artery disease have a stenosis at the proximal ICA (including both sinus and carina regions), while 20% of patients have stenosis at the middle ICA and 20% have stenosis expansion to the entire cervical ICA. Morphometric and hemodynamic analyses suggest that atherosclerotic plaques initiate at both sinus and carina regions of ICA and progress downstream.

  19. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw,pot) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) ∼94%, 656 ± 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2 ∼82%, 278 ± 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2 ∼67%; 125 ± 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 ± 61%). The magnitude of ΔQtw,pot at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (−35% to −36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 ± 6 s). Although Qtw,pot was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (−23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central component of fatigue, probably involving brain

  20. Mechanism of vasodilation induced by alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide in rabbit and guinea-pig renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Ishimatsu, T; Kuriyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Effects of alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha-HANP) on electrical and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries and of the guinea-pig mesenteric artery were investigated. alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) modified neither the membrane potential nor resistance of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries. In the guinea-pig mesenteric and renal arteries, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the amplitude and facilitation (mesenteric artery) or depression (renal artery) of excitatory junction potentials nor on action potentials. In the guinea-pig renal artery, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the depolarization induced by noradrenaline (NA) (up to 10 microM) but markedly inhibited NA-induced contraction. alpha-HANP (10 nM) slightly inhibited the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, alpha-HANP (10 nM) inhibited the NA-induced contraction and to a lesser extent the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, the effects of alpha-HANP on the release of Ca from the cellular storage by two applications of NA, and its re-storage, were investigated in Ca-free solution containing 2 mM-EGTA. When 5 nM-alpha-HANP was applied before and during the first application of 0.5 microM-NA, the contraction was markedly inhibited but the contraction to a second application of 10 microM-NA was potentiated. If the first dose of NA was 10 microM the effect was very small. Under the same experimental procedures, nitroglycerine (10 microM) showed almost the same effects as alpha-HANP on the NA-induced contractions. When both the first (3 mM) and second (10 mM) contractions were evoked by caffeine in Ca-free solution, alpha-HANP (5 nM) and nitroglycerine (10 microM) inhibited both contractions to the same extent. In the rabbit renal artery, applications of alpha-HANP or nitroglycerine increased the amount of guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) in a dose-dependent manner. However, a

  1. Optimization of a Cemented Femoral Prosthesis Considering Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Corso, Leandro Luis; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Schnaid, Fernando; Zanrosso, Crisley Dossin; Marczak, Rogério José

    2016-01-01

    The study presents a numerical methodology for minimizing the bone loss in human femur submitted to total hip replacement (THR) procedure with focus on cemented femoral stem. Three-dimensional computational models were used to describe the femoral bone behavior. An optimization procedure using the genetic algorithm (GA) method was applied in order to minimize the bone loss, considering the geometry and the material of the prosthesis as well as the design of the stem. Internal and external bone remodeling were analyzed numerically. The numerical method proposed here showed that the bone mass loss could be reduced by 24%, changing the design parameters. PMID:26540616

  2. Localization of relaxin receptors in arteries and veins, and region-specific increases in compliance and bradykinin-mediated relaxation after in vivo serelaxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Jelinic, Maria; Leo, Chen-Huei; Post Uiterweer, Emiel D; Sandow, Shaun L; Gooi, Jonathan H; Wlodek, Mary E; Conrad, Kirk P; Parkington, Helena; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin is a potent vasodilator of small resistance arteries and modifies arterial compliance in some systemic vascular beds, yet receptors for relaxin, such as RXFP1, have only been localized to vascular smooth muscle. This study first aimed to localize RXFP1 in rat arteries and veins from different organ beds and determine whether receptors are present in endothelial cells. We then tested the hypothesis that region-specific vascular effects of relaxin may be influenced by the cellular localization of RXFP1 within different blood vessels. The aorta, vena cava, mesenteric artery, and vein had significantly higher (P<0.05) RXFP1 immunostaining in endothelial cells compared with vascular smooth muscle, whereas the femoral artery and vein and small pulmonary arteries had higher (P<0.01) RXFP1 immunostaining in the vascular smooth muscle. Male rats were treated subcutaneously with recombinant human relaxin-2 (serelaxin; 4 μg/h) for 5 d; vasodilation and compliance in mesenteric and femoral arteries and veins were compared with placebo controls. Serelaxin significantly (P=0.04) reduced wall stiffness and increased volume compliance in mesenteric arteries but not in the other vessels examined. This was associated with changes in geometrical properties, and not compositional changes in the extracellular matrix. Serelaxin treatment had no effect on acetylcholine-mediated relaxation but significantly (P<0.001) enhanced bradykinin (BK)-mediated relaxation in mesenteric arteries, involving enhanced nitric oxide but not endothelium-derived hyperpolarization or vasodilatory prostanoids. In conclusion, there is differential distribution of RXFP1 on endothelial and smooth muscle across the vasculature. In rats, mesenteric arteries exhibit the greatest functional response to chronic serelaxin treatment.

  3. Human Tissue Kallikrein Activity in Angiographically Documented Chronic Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Estêvão Lanna; Magalhães, Carolina Antunes; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; Mandil, Ari; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Araújo, Rosanã Aparecida; Figueiredo, Amintas Fabiano de Souza; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Background Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) is a key enzyme in the kallikrein–kinin system (KKS). hK1-specific amidase activity is reduced in urine samples from hypertensive and heart failure (HF) patients. The pathophysiologic role of hK1 in coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. Objective To evaluate hK1-specific amidase activity in the urine of CAD patients Methods Sixty-five individuals (18–75 years) who underwent cardiac catheterism (CATH) were included. Random midstream urine samples were collected immediately before CATH. Patients were classified in two groups according to the presence of coronary lesions: CAD (43 patients) and non-CAD (22 patients). hK1 amidase activity was estimated using the chromogenic substrate D-Val-Leu-Arg-Nan. Creatinine was determined using Jaffé’s method. Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity was expressed as µM/(min · mg creatinine) to correct for differences in urine flow rates. Results Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity levels were similar between CAD [0.146 µM/(min ·mg creatinine)] and non-CAD [0.189 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] patients (p = 0.803) and remained similar to values previously reported for hypertensive patients [0.210 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] and HF patients [0.104 µM/(min . mg creatinine)]. CAD severity and hypertension were not observed to significantly affect urinary hK1-specific amidase activity. Conclusion CAD patients had low levels of urinary hK1-specific amidase activity, suggesting that renal KKS activity may be reduced in patients with this disease. PMID:26351984

  4. Pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, T.L. Jr.; Keats, T.E.; Goldner, R.; Stelling, C.B.; Logan, M.

    1981-11-01

    We have seen two cases of traumatic subcapital fractures of the femoral neck which resembled pathologic fractures on plain radiography. We have named this entity pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck and offer suggestions for why it occurs.

  5. Absence of arterial baroreflex modulation of skin sympathetic activity and sweat rate during whole-body heating in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Prior findings suggest that baroreflexes are capable of modulating skin blood flow, but the effects of baroreceptor loading/unloading on sweating are less clear. Therefore, this project tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically induced alterations in arterial blood pressure in heated humans would lead to baroreflex-mediated changes in both skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and sweat rate. 2. In seven subjects mean arterial blood pressure was lowered (approximately 8 mmHg) and then raised (approximately 13 mmHg) by bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Moreover, in a separate protocol, arterial blood pressure was reduced via steady-state administration of sodium nitroprusside. In both normothermia and heat-stress conditions the following responses were monitored: sublingual and mean skin temperatures, heart rate, beat-by-beat blood pressure, skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry), local sweat rate and SSNA (microneurography from peroneal nerve). 3. Whole-body heating increased skin and sublingual temperatures, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, sweat rate and SSNA, but did not change arterial blood pressure. Heart rate was significantly elevated (from 74 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus sodium nitroprusside-induced reductions in blood pressure, and significantly reduced (from 92 +/- 4 to 68 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure, thereby demonstrating normal baroreflex function in these subjects. 4. Neither SSNA nor sweat rate was altered by rapid (bolus infusion) or sustained (steady-state infusion) changes in blood pressure regardless of the thermal condition. 5. These data suggest that SSNA and sweat rate are not modulated by arterial baroreflexes in normothermic or moderately heated individuals.

  6. Integration of multi-modality imaging for accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoglou, George D.; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.; Sianos, George; Tsikaderis, Dimitrios; Matakos, Antonis; Koutkias, Vassilios; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Maglaveras, Nicos; Parcharidis, George E.; Louridas, George E.

    2006-12-01

    In conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of human coronary arteries, IVUS images are arranged linearly generating a straight vessel volume. However, with this approach real vessel curvature is neglected. To overcome this limitation an imaging method was developed based on integration of IVUS and biplane coronary angiography (BCA). In 17 coronary arteries from nine patients, IVUS and BCA were performed. From each angiographic projection, a single end-diastolic frame was selected and in each frame the IVUS catheter was interactively detected for the extraction of 3D catheter path. Ultrasound data was obtained with a sheath-based catheter and recorded on S-VHS videotape. S-VHS data was digitized and lumen and media-adventitia contours were semi-automatically detected in end-diastolic IVUS images. Each pair of contours was aligned perpendicularly to the catheter path and rotated in space by implementing an algorithm based on Frenet-Serret rules. Lumen and media-adventitia contours were interpolated through generation of intermediate contours creating a real 3D lumen and vessel volume, respectively. The absolute orientation of the reconstructed lumen was determined by back-projecting it onto both angiographic planes and comparing the projected lumen with the actual angiographic lumen. In conclusion, our method is capable of performing rapid and accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo. This technique can be utilized for reliable plaque morphometric, geometrical and hemodynamic analyses.

  7. Nuclear IL-33 regulates soluble ST2 receptor and IL-6 expression in primary human arterial endothelial cells and is decreased in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Perros, Frédéric; Caramori, Gaetano; Meng, Chao; Dormuller, Peter; Chou, Pai-Chien; Church, Colin; Papi, Alberto; Casolari, Paolo; Welsh, David; Peacock, Andrew; Humbert, Marc; Adcock, Ian M; Wort, Stephen J

    2014-08-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is an incurable condition leading to right ventricular failure and death and inflammation is postulated to be associated with vascular remodelling. Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the "alarmin" family can either act on the membrane ST2 receptor or as a nuclear repressor, to regulate inflammation. We show, using immunohistochemistry, that IL-33 expression is nuclear in the vessels of healthy subjects whereas nuclear IL-33 is markedly diminished in the vessels of IPAH patients. This correlates with reduced IL-33 mRNA expression in their lung. In contrast, serum levels of IL-33 are unchanged in IPAH. However, the expression of the soluble form of ST2, sST2, is enhanced in the serum of IPAH patients. Knock-down of IL-33 in human endothelial cells (ECs) using siRNA is associated with selective modulation of inflammatory genes involved in vascular remodelling including IL-6. Additionally, IL-33 knock-down significantly increased sST2 release from ECs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that IL-33 bound multiple putative homeodomain protein binding motifs in the proximal and distal promoters of ST2 genes. IL-33 formed a complex with the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1, a transcriptional repressor. In conclusion, IL-33 regulates the expression of IL-6 and sST2, an endogenous IL-33 inhibitor, in primary human ECs and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PAH through recruitment of transcriptional repressor proteins. PMID:25003325

  8. Carotid chemoreceptor modulation of blood flow during exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Stickland, Michael K; Fuhr, Desi P; Haykowsky, Mark J; Jones, Kelvin E; Paterson, D Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; McMurtry, M Sean

    2011-12-15

    Carotid chemoreceptor (CC) inhibition reduces sympathetic nervous outflow in exercising dogs and humans. We sought to determine if CC suppression increases muscle blood flow in humans during exercise and hypoxia. Healthy subjects (N = 13) were evaluated at rest and during constant-work leg extension exercise while exposed to either normoxia or hypoxia (inspired O(2) tension, F(IO(2)), ≈ 0.12, target arterial O(2) saturation = 85%). Subjects breathed hyperoxic gas (F(IO(2)) ≈ 1.0) and/or received intravenous dopamine to inhibit the CC while femoral arterial blood flow data were obtained continuously with pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Exercise increased heart rate, mean arterial pressure, femoral blood flow and conductance compared to rest. Transient hyperoxia had no significant effect on blood flow at rest, but increased femoral blood flow and conductance transiently during exercise without changing blood pressure. Similarly, dopamine had no effect on steady-state blood flow at rest, but increased femoral blood flow and conductance during exercise. The transient vasodilatory response observed by CC inhibition with hyperoxia during exercise could be blocked with simultaneous CC inhibition with dopamine. Despite evidence of dopamine reducing ventilation during hypoxia, no effect on femoral blood flow, conductance or mean arterial pressure was observed either at rest or during exercise with CC inhibition with dopamine while breathing hypoxia. These findings indicate that the carotid chemoreceptor contributes to skeletal muscle blood flow regulation during normoxic exercise in healthy humans, but that the influence of the CC on blood flow regulation in hypoxia is limited.

  9. Carotid chemoreceptor modulation of blood flow during exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Stickland, Michael K; Fuhr, Desi P; Haykowsky, Mark J; Jones, Kelvin E; Paterson, D Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; McMurtry, M Sean

    2011-12-15

    Carotid chemoreceptor (CC) inhibition reduces sympathetic nervous outflow in exercising dogs and humans. We sought to determine if CC suppression increases muscle blood flow in humans during exercise and hypoxia. Healthy subjects (N = 13) were evaluated at rest and during constant-work leg extension exercise while exposed to either normoxia or hypoxia (inspired O(2) tension, F(IO(2)), ≈ 0.12, target arterial O(2) saturation = 85%). Subjects breathed hyperoxic gas (F(IO(2)) ≈ 1.0) and/or received intravenous dopamine to inhibit the CC while femoral arterial blood flow data were obtained continuously with pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Exercise increased heart rate, mean arterial pressure, femoral blood flow and conductance compared to rest. Transient hyperoxia had no significant effect on blood flow at rest, but increased femoral blood flow and conductance transiently during exercise without changing blood pressure. Similarly, dopamine had no effect on steady-state blood flow at rest, but increased femoral blood flow and conductance during exercise. The transient vasodilatory response observed by CC inhibition with hyperoxia during exercise could be blocked with simultaneous CC inhibition with dopamine. Despite evidence of dopamine reducing ventilation during hypoxia, no effect on femoral blood flow, conductance or mean arterial pressure was observed either at rest or during exercise with CC inhibition with dopamine while breathing hypoxia. These findings indicate that the carotid chemoreceptor contributes to skeletal muscle blood flow regulation during normoxic exercise in healthy humans, but that the influence of the CC on blood flow regulation in hypoxia is limited. PMID:22025661

  10. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P; Symons, John D; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-01-15

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOS(s1177)/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  11. Plaque and arterial vulnerability investigation in a three-layer atherosclerotic human coronary artery using computational fluid-structure interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the common form of cardiovascular diseases and known to be the main reason of deaths in the world. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) simulations can be employed to assess the interactions of artery/plaque and blood to provide a more precise anticipation for rupture of arterial tissue layers and plaque tissues inside an atherosclerotic artery. To date, the arterial tissue in computational FSI simulations has been considered as a one-layer structure. However, a single layer assumption might have deeply bounded the results and, consequently, more computational simulation is needed by considering the arterial tissue as a three-layer structure. In this study, a three-dimensional computational FSI model of an atherosclerotic artery with a three-layer structure and different plaque types was established to perform a more accurate arterial wall/plaque tissue vulnerability assessment. The hyperelastic material coefficients of arterial layers were calculated and implemented in the computational model. The fully coupled fluid and structure models were solved using the explicit dynamics finite element code LS-DYNA. The results revealed the significant role of plaque types in the normal and shear stresses induced within the arterial tissue layers. The highest von Mises and shear stresses were observed on the stiffest calcified plaque with 3.59 and 3.27 MPa, while the lowest von Mises and shear stresses were seen on the hypocellular plaque with 1.15 and 0.63 MPa, respectively. Regardless of plaque types, the media and adventitia layers were played protective roles by displaying less stress on their wall, whilst the intima layer was at a high risk of rupture. The findings of this study have implications not only for determining the most vulnerable arterial layer/plaque tissue inside an atherosclerotic coronary artery but also for balloon-angioplasty, stenting, and bypass surgeries.

  12. Arterial Stiffness Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Catherine; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality in various clinical conditions. The aim of this review is to focus on the arterial stiffness gradient, to discuss the integrated role of medium-sized muscular conduit arteries in the regulation of pulsatile pressure and organ perfusion and to provide a rationale for integrating their mechanical properties into risk prediction. Summary The physiological arterial stiffness gradient results from a higher degree of vascular stiffness as the distance from the heart increases, creating multiple reflective sites and attenuating the pulsatile nature of the forward pressure wave along the arterial tree down to the microcirculation. The stiffness gradient hypothesis simultaneously explains its physiological beneficial effects from both cardiac and peripheral microcirculatory points of view. The loss or reversal of stiffness gradient leads to the transmission of a highly pulsatile pressure wave into the microcirculation. This suggests that a higher degree of stiffness of medium-sized conduit arteries may play a role in protecting the microcirculation from a highly pulsatile forward pressure wave. Using the ratio of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) to carotid-radial PWV, referred to as PWV ratio, a recent study in a dialysis cohort has shown that the PWV ratio is a better predictor of mortality than the classical carotid-femoral PWV. Key Messages Theoretically, the use of the PWV ratio seems more logical for risk determination than aortic stiffness as it provides a better estimation of the loss of stiffness gradient, which is the unifying hypothesis that explains the impact of aortic stiffness both on the myocardium and on peripheral organs. PMID:27195235

  13. Heat and α1-adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Kwon, Sun Hyung; Shiu, Yan-Ting; Ruan, Ting; Noyes, R. Dirk; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Symons, J. David; Richardson, Russell S.

    2012-01-01

    Increased local temperature exerts a sympatholytic effect on human skeletal muscle feed arteries. We hypothesized that this attenuated α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness may be due to a temperature-induced increase in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, thereby reducing the impact of the α1-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine (PE). Thirteen human skeletal muscle feed arteries were harvested, and wire myography was used to generate PE concentration-response curves at 37°C and 39°C, with and without the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). A subset of arteries (n = 4) were exposed to 37°C or 39°C, and the protein content of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and α1-adrenergic receptors was determined by Western blot analysis. Additionally, cultured bovine endothelial cells were exposed to static or shear stress conditions at 37°C and 39°C and assayed for eNOS activation (phosphorylation at Ser1177), eNOS expression, and NO metabolites [nitrate + nitrite (NOx)]. Maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (PEmax) was lower at 39°C than at 37°C [39 ± 10 vs. 84 ± 30% maximal response to 100 mM KCl (KClmax)]. NO blockade restored vasocontraction at 39°C to that achieved at 37°C (80 ± 26% KClmax). Western blot analysis of the feed arteries revealed that heating increased eNOS protein, but not α1-adrenergic receptors. Heating of bovine endothelial cells resulted in greater shear stress-induced eNOS activation and NOx production. Together, these data reveal for the first time that, in human skeletal muscle feed arteries, NO blockade can restore the heat-attenuated α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasocontraction and implicate endothelium-derived NO bioavailability as a major contributor to heat-induced sympatholysis. Consequently, these findings highlight the important role of vasodilators in modulating the vascular response to vasoconstrictors. PMID:23042905

  14. Numerical analysis of the effect of turbulence transition on the hemodynamic parameters in human coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gawandalkar, Udhav Ulhas; Kini, Girish; Buradi, Abdulrajak; Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Nicolaides, Andrew; Laird, John R.; Saba, Luca; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Local hemodynamics plays an important role in atherogenesis and the progression of coronary atherosclerosis disease (CAD). The primary biological effect due to blood turbulence is the change in wall shear stress (WSS) on the endothelial cell membrane, while the local oscillatory nature of the blood flow affects the physiological changes in the coronary artery. In coronary arteries, the blood flow Reynolds number ranges from few tens to several hundreds and hence it is generally assumed to be laminar while calculating the WSS calculations. However, the pulsatile blood flow through coronary arteries under stenotic condition could result in transition from laminar to turbulent flow condition. Methods In the present work, the onset of turbulent transition during pulsatile flow through coronary arteries for varying degree of stenosis (i.e., 0%, 30%, 50% and 70%) is quantitatively analyzed by calculating the turbulent parameters distal to the stenosis. Also, the effect of turbulence transition on hemodynamic parameters such as WSS and oscillatory shear index (OSI) for varying degree of stenosis is quantified. The validated transitional shear stress transport (SST) k-ω model used in the present investigation is the best suited Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model to capture the turbulent transition. The arterial wall is assumed to be rigid and the dynamic curvature effect due to myocardial contraction on the blood flow has been neglected. Results Our observations shows that for stenosis 50% and above, the WSSavg, WSSmax and OSI calculated using turbulence model deviates from laminar by more than 10% and the flow disturbances seems to significantly increase only after 70% stenosis. Our model shows reliability and completely validated. Conclusions Blood flow through stenosed coronary arteries seems to be turbulent in nature for area stenosis above 70% and the transition to turbulent flow begins from 50% stenosis. PMID:27280084

  15. Physiological antagonism of endothelin-1 in human conductance and resistance coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Katherine E; Davenport, Anthony P

    2001-01-01

    The ability of four endogenous vasodilators, nitric oxide (NO; 0.01 – 30 μM), atrial (ANP), brain (BNP) and C-type (CNP) natriuretic peptide (0.1 – 300 nM), to reverse endothelin-1 (ET-1; 10 nM) constrictions in human resistance and conductance coronary arteries (CA) in vitro was investigated.ET-1 (0.1 – 300 nM) constricted resistance CA more potently than conductance CA (P<0.05; EC50 values 2.98 nM (95% CI: 1.49 – 5.95 nM and 8.58 (4.72 – 15.6 nM) respectively)).The NO-donor diethylamine NONOate fully reversed the ET-1 constriction in conductance CA (EMAX 127±9.16%), however only partial reversal was observed in resistance CA (EMAX 78.8±8.13; P<0.05). The soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (100 μM) reduced the maximum response to diethylamine NONOate to 76.9±14.4% in conductance CA (P<0.05), but had no effect on resistance CA (EMAX 77.2±18.4%).There was no difference between responses to ANP in conductance and resistance CA (EC50 values 4.25 nM (0.84 – 21.4 nM) and 18.4 nM (2.92 – 116 nM), EMAX 53.1±14.7% and 48.6±11.8% respectively).BNP was a more potent vasodilator of conductance than resistance CA. In conductance CA the mean EC50 value was 2.4 nM (0.74 – 7.75 nM), EMAX 54.5±14.9%. Concentration-response curves to BNP were incomplete in resistance CA.Concentration-response curves to CNP were incomplete in both conductance and resistance CA.The greater potency of ET-1 in resistance vessels may exacerbate the effects of increased circulating levels of the peptide in disease. Only NO could fully reverse ET-1 mediated constrictions in conductance CA, and none of the dilators tested could completely counteract constrictions in resistance CA. PMID:11399674

  16. Iptakalim influences the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinglin; Yan, Xiaopei; Kong, Hui; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), and examine the potential value of IPT to hypoxic pulmonary hyper-tension (HPH) at a cellular level. HPASMCs were divided into the control, ET-1, ET-1+IPT and ET-1+IPT+glibenclamide (GLI) groups. GLI was administered 30 min prior to ET-1 and IPT. The 4 groups were incubated with corresponding reagents for 24 h. Cell viability was evaluated using a CCK-8 assay, cell proliferation by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, and cell apoptosis via the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, i.e., Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) using western blotting. We incubated HPASMCs with varying concentrations of ET-1 for 24, 48 and 72 h, and found that cell survival rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) rather than in a time-dependent manner (P>0.05). After co-incubation of HPASMCs with varying concentrations of IPT and ET-1 for 24 h, the cell survival rate was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival rate in the IPT+ET-1 group was significantly lower than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1 group were higher than those in the control group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than the control group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT group were lower than those in the ET-1 group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was higher than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT+GLI group were higher than those in the ET-1+IPT group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than that in the ET-1+IPT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, IPT inhibited ET-1‑induced HPASMC proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Thus, it may

  17. The effect of pH and ion channel modulators on human placental arteries.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tayyba Y; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Khan, Raheela N

    2014-01-01

    Chorionic plate arteries (CPA) are located at the maternofetal interface where they are able to respond to local metabolic changes. Unlike many other types of vasculature, the placenta lacks nervous control and requires autoregulation for controlling blood flow. The placental circulation, which is of low-resistance, may become hypoxic easily leading to fetal acidosis and fetal distress however the role of the ion channels in these circumstances is not well-understood. Active potassium channel conductances that are subject to local physicochemical modulation may serve as pathways through which such signals are transduced. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulation of CPA by pH and the channels implicated in these responses using wire myography. CPA were isolated from healthy placentae and pre-contracted with U46619 before testing the effects of extracellular pH using 1 M lactic acid over the pH range 7.4-6.4 in the presence of a variety of ion channel modulators. A change from pH 7.4 to 7.2 produced a 29±3% (n = 9) relaxation of CPA which increased to 61±4% at the lowest pH of 6.4. In vessels isolated from placentae of women with pre-eclampsia (n = 6), pH responses were attenuated. L-methionine increased the relaxation to 67±7% (n = 6; p<0.001) at pH 6.4. Similarly the TASK 1/3 blocker zinc chloride (1 mM) gave a maximum relaxation of 72±5% (n = 8; p<0.01) which compared with the relaxation produced by the TREK-1 opener riluzole (75±5%; n = 6). Several other modulators induced no significant changes in vascular responses. Our study confirmed expression of several ion channel subtypes in CPA with our results indicating that extracellular pH within the physiological range has an important role in controlling vasodilatation in the human term placenta. PMID:25490401

  18. Bilateral carotid artery injury response in side impact using a vessel model integrated with a human body model.

    PubMed

    Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Yu, Mao M; Martin, R Shayn; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2009-10-01

    In a far-side crash configuration, the occupant can experience severe excursion from the seat space. Given this challenge, there are research efforts focused on alternate restraints, such as four-point belts. A potential implication of this geometry would be interaction of the belt with the occupant's neck. This study examines the response of the carotid arteries using a Finite Element Model (FEM) in a far-side crash configuration with a reversed three-point restraint. A FEM of the carotid artery and neck fascia was developed and integrated with the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 1.44. This model was subjected to four test conditions simulating far-side crashes. Load conditions included a low velocity impact of approximately 4 m/s and a higher velocity impact of approximately 10 m/s. For each velocity, the model was restrained with a belt placed low on the neck and a belt placed higher on the neck. Strain data in each element of the carotid arteries was analyzed. The overall response of the vessel was examined to determine locations of high strain values. Low belt placement resulted in more head excursion, stretching the carotid on the non-struck side. High belt placement resulted in compression of the artery on the struck side due to direct loading of the vessel from the belt. Strain values in the carotid artery elements increased with increasing speed of impact. The lower and higher speed tests with a low belt configuration resulted in a maximum principal strains, at maximal belt engagement, of 0.223 and 0.459, respectively. Corresponding values for the high belt configuration were 0.222 and 0.563. In both belt configurations, the non-struck side vessel stretched more than the struck side vessel; however, the non-struck side vessel experienced higher compressive forces. Strain values measured during the simulations can be compared to a value of 0.31 to intimal failure in previous experimental tests. These results quantitatively illustrate the two

  19. Bilateral Carotid Artery Injury Response in Side Impact Using a Vessel Model Integrated with a Human Body Model

    PubMed Central

    Danelson, Kerry A.; Gayzik, F. Scott; Yu, Mao M.; Martin, R. Shayn; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    In a far-side crash configuration, the occupant can experience severe excursion from the seat space. Given this challenge, there are research efforts focused on alternate restraints, such as four-point belts. A potential implication of this geometry would be interaction of the belt with the occupant’s neck. This study examines the response of the carotid arteries using a Finite Element Model (FEM) in a far-side crash configuration with a reversed three-point restraint. A FEM of the carotid artery and neck fascia was developed and integrated with the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 1.44. This model was subjected to four test conditions simulating far-side crashes. Load conditions included a low velocity impact of approximately 4 m/s and a higher velocity impact of approximately 10 m/s. For each velocity, the model was restrained with a belt placed low on the neck and a belt placed higher on the neck. Strain data in each element of the carotid arteries was analyzed. The overall response of the vessel was examined to determine locations of high strain values. Low belt placement resulted in more head excursion, stretching the carotid on the non-struck side. High belt placement resulted in compression of the artery on the struck side due to direct loading of the vessel from the belt. Strain values in the carotid artery elements increased with increasing speed of impact. The lower and higher speed tests with a low belt configuration resulted in a maximum principal strains, at maximal belt engagement, of 0.223 and 0.459, respectively. Corresponding values for the high belt configuration were 0.222 and 0.563. In both belt configurations, the non-struck side vessel stretched more than the struck side vessel; however, the non-struck side vessel experienced higher compressive forces. Strain values measured during the simulations can be compared to a value of 0.31 to intimal failure in previous experimental tests. These results quantitatively illustrate the two

  20. Percutaneous Endoluminal Stent-Graft Repair of an Old Traumatic Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, Renan; Elliott, Bruce M.

    1996-03-15

    A stent-graft was custom made to close a high-flow traumatic arteriovenous fistula of the left superficial femoral artery, present for 30 years, in a 60-year-old man with congestive heart failure and ischemic ulceration in the left foot. A balloon expandable Palmaz stent (P394; 2.5 mm x 3.9 cm) was covered with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft and was inserted percutaneously through an 11 Fr vascular sheath. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound at 6 months demonstrated occlusion of the arteriovenous fistula, patency of the artery, and luminal integrity of the artery and vein.

  1. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  2. Experimental evidence of the compressibility of arteries.

    PubMed

    Yosibash, Zohar; Manor, Itay; Gilad, Ilan; Willentz, Udi

    2014-11-01

    A definitive answer to the question whether artery walls are incompressible is to our opinion not yet categorically provided. Experimental-based evidence on the level of compressibility in artery walls is not easily achieved because of the difficulties associated with the measurement of very small differences in volumes under physiological pressure in these biological tissues. Past experiments aimed at addressing the question considered different species, different arteries, the experimental devices were not accurate enough and a statistical analysis of the results was missing. A precise experimental device together with a thorough testing protocol, a careful selection of arteries and a statistical analysis is presented for a definitive evaluation of the artery wall compressibility. We provide experimental evidence that in saphenous and femoral porcine arteries under physiological pressure range a relative compressibility of 2-6% is observed. The pre-assumption of incompressibility in many phenomenological constitutive models of artery walls should probably be re-evaluated.

  3. Growth dynamics of the renal and suprarenal arteries in human foetuses.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Bartłomiej; Kuczera, Małgorzata; Gielecki, Jerzy S

    2003-11-01

    The kidneys and suprarenal cortex are of common embryonic origin. The suprarenal gland and kidney have a common pathway in angiogenesis. Each of the organs is of key importance for intrauterine and individual development, yet they vary greatly in growth dynamics throughout pregnancy. The authors compared the arterial supply of these organs quantitatively in respect to foetal age and sex.

  4. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture: histopathological investigation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Kido, Hidehiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-08-01

    Late segmental collapse after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture is the phenomenon observed in post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ON), which has generally been reported to occur over a year or more after internal fixation. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIF) has also been recognized to cause femoral head collapse, however, only two cases of SIF after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture have been reported. We report a case with femoral head collapse observed 5 months after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture, which was histopathologically diagnosed as SIF. Clinically, differentiating SIF from ON is important because some cases of SIF have been reported to heal without surgical treatments. The timing of femoral head collapse after femoral neck fracture may be different between SIF and post-traumatic ON.

  5. Nuclear IL-33 regulates soluble ST2 receptor and IL-6 expression in primary human arterial endothelial cells and is decreased in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Dongmin; Perros, Frédéric; Caramori, Gaetano; Meng, Chao; Dormuller, Peter; Chou, Pai-Chien; Church, Colin; Papi, Alberto; Casolari, Paolo; Welsh, David; Peacock, Andrew; Humbert, Marc; Adcock, Ian M.; Wort, Stephen J.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear IL-33 expression is reduced in vascular endothelial cells from PAH patients. • Knockdown of IL-33 leads to increased IL-6 and sST2 mRNA expression. • IL-33 binds homeobox motifs in target gene promoters and recruits repressor proteins. - Abstract: Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is an incurable condition leading to right ventricular failure and death and inflammation is postulated to be associated with vascular remodelling. Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the “alarmin” family can either act on the membrane ST2 receptor or as a nuclear repressor, to regulate inflammation. We show, using immunohistochemistry, that IL-33 expression is nuclear in the vessels of healthy subjects whereas nuclear IL-33 is markedly diminished in the vessels of IPAH patients. This correlates with reduced IL-33 mRNA expression in their lung. In contrast, serum levels of IL-33 are unchanged in IPAH. However, the expression of the soluble form of ST2, sST2, is enhanced in the serum of IPAH patients. Knock-down of IL-33 in human endothelial cells (ECs) using siRNA is associated with selective modulation of inflammatory genes involved in vascular remodelling including IL-6. Additionally, IL-33 knock-down significantly increased sST2 release from ECs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that IL-33 bound multiple putative homeodomain protein binding motifs in the proximal and distal promoters of ST2 genes. IL-33 formed a complex with the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1, a transcriptional repressor. In conclusion, IL-33 regulates the expression of IL-6 and sST2, an endogenous IL-33 inhibitor, in primary human ECs and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PAH through recruitment of transcriptional repressor proteins.

  6. Mechanical properties of femoral diaphysis and femoral neck of female rats chronically exposed to various levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, M M; Majewska, K; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, J

    2005-04-01

    The effect of chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) on the mechanical properties of femoral diaphysis and femoral neck was investigated on a rat model of human exposure. Three-week-old female Wistar rats were exposed to Cd in drinking water at concentrations of 1, 5, 50, or 100 mg/L for 12 months. Biomechanical properties of the femoral diaphysis were evaluated in a three-point bending test and those of the femoral neck in a bending test with vertical loading of the head. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at the whole femur, and BMD at the diaphysis and proximal femur (head and neck region) of the Cd-treated rats decreased in a dose-dependent manner, except for the diaphyseal BMD at a Cd concentration of 1 mg/L. Exposure to Cd concentrations of 1 and 5 mg/L had only little effect on the diaphyseal mechanical properties (decreased yield load with unchanged bending strength, stiffness, yield stress, ultimate stress, and Young modulus), whereas the bending strength and stiffness of the neck decreased and the yield load clearly tended to decline or declined. The effect of Cd at the two locations was more marked in the 50 and 100 mg/L groups, and changes in the bone geometry were observed in these animals. The results clearly revealed that chronic, even low-level, exposure to Cd results in demineralization and weakening of the femur. The femoral neck seems to be more vulnerable than the diaphysis to failure from Cd. We conclude that environmental exposure to Cd may be an important risk factor for femoral neck fracture.

  7. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    PubMed

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries.

  8. Activation of endothelial and epithelial KCa2.3 calcium-activated potassium channels by NS309 relaxes human small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles

    PubMed Central

    Kroigaard, Christel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Gorm; Laursen, Britt E; Pilegaard, Hans; Köhler, Ralf; Simonsen, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Small (KCa2) and intermediate (KCa3.1) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) may contribute to both epithelium- and endothelium-dependent relaxations, but this has not been established in human pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. Therefore, we investigated the expression of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels, and hypothesized that activation of these channels would produce relaxation of human bronchioles and pulmonary arteries. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Channel expression and functional studies were conducted in human isolated small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. KCa2 and KCa3.1 currents were examined in human small airways epithelial (HSAEpi) cells by whole-cell patch clamp techniques. RESULTS While KCa2.3 expression was similar, KCa3.1 protein was more highly expressed in pulmonary arteries than bronchioles. Immunoreactive KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 proteins were found in both endothelium and epithelium. KCa currents were present in HSAEpi cells and sensitive to the KCa2.3 blocker UCL1684 and the KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34. In pulmonary arteries contracted by U46619 and in bronchioles contracted by histamine, the KCa2.3/ KCa3.1 activator, NS309, induced concentration-dependent relaxations. NS309 was equally potent in relaxing pulmonary arteries, but less potent in bronchioles, than salbutamol. NS309 relaxations were blocked by the KCa2 channel blocker apamin, while the KCa3.1 channel blocker, charybdotoxin failed to reduce relaxation to NS309 (0.01–1 µM). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels are expressed in the endothelium of human pulmonary arteries and epithelium of bronchioles. KCa2.3 channels contributed to endo- and epithelium-dependent relaxations suggesting that these channels are potential targets for treatment of pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:22506557

  9. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  10. Comparative genome-wide transcriptional analysis of human left and right internal mammary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giovanni; Quackenbush, John; Strobeck, John; Hu, Lan; Johnson, Christopher K.; Mak, Andrew; Shaw, Richard E.; Sayles, Kathleen; Brizzio, Mariano E.; Zapolanski, Alex; Grau, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    In coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), the combined use of left and right internal mammary arteries (LIMA and RIMA) — collectively known as bilateral IMAs (BIMAs) provides a survival advantage over the use of LIMA alone. However, gene expression in RIMA has never been compared to that in LIMA. Here we report a genome-wide transcriptional analysis of BIMA to investigate the expression profiles of these conduits in patients undergoing CABG. As expected, in comparing the BIMAs to the aorta, we found differences in pathways and processes associated with atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cell signaling — pathways which provide biological support for the observation that BIMA grafts deliver long-term benefits to the patients and protect against continued atherosclerosis. These data support the widespread use of BIMAs as the preferred conduits in CABG. PMID:24858532

  11. An investigation of the origin, location and variations of the renal arteries in human fetuses and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Ciçekcibaşi, Aynur Emine; Ziylan, Taner; Salbacak, Ahmet; Seker, Muzaffer; Büyükmumcu, Mustafa; Tuncer, Işik

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the origin, localizations and anatomic variations of the renal artery (RA) in human fetuses with the aim of determining the distribution of these variations according to lateralization and gender. In total, 90 fetuses of spontaneous abortion (45 males, 45 females) with no congenital malformations were included to the study. The abdominal aorta and its branches were dissected after latex solution colored with red ink had been injected into the vessels from the thoracic aorta. In all, 180 RA dissections were performed bilaterally in 90 cases and the anatomic variations were photographed. Right and left RAs were found to originate from the following levels according to the columna vertebralis, respectively: 3.8% and 1.9% lower T12, 67.3% and 25.0% upper L1, 9.6% and 28.8% mid L1, 15.3% and 40.3 lower L1, 3.8% and 3.8% upper 1/3 part of L2 vertebra. The right RA originated from the lateral part and anterolateral wall of the abdominal aorta in 73.0% and 26.9% of cases while the lateral and anterolateral wall origin percentages of left RA were 90.3% and 9.6%, respectively. The origin site of the right RA from the abdominal aorta was superior to, at the same level with, and inferior to that of the left RA in 53.8%, 34.6% and 11.5% of the cases, respectively. There were no variations in 75% of the cases whereas the remaining 25% had several variation patterns. The presented morphological results are as follows: A single hilar artery in 75% of the cases, double hilar arteries in 11.1%, an inferior polar artery in 10.5%, and a superior polar artery in 3.3% of specimens studied. Anatomical variations were observed more frequently among male fetuses and on the right side. Knowledge of RA variations is important for surgeons in performing many procedures and may help to avoid clinical complications, especially, during radiological examination and/or surgical approaches in the abdominal region.

  12. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P < 0.001). Training-induced increase in FMD% was predicted by lower body weight (β = -0.212), lower baseline FMD% (β = -0.469), lower training frequency (β = -0.256), and longer training duration (β = 0.367) (combined: P < 0.001, r = 0.63). With the exception of a modest correlation with total cholesterol (r = -0.243, P < 0.01), changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  13. Three-dimensional modeling and numerical analysis of fractional flow reserve in human coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Neng; Lv, Hui-Jie; Xiang, Ya-Fei; Fan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) computed from CT (FFRCT) is a novel method for determining the physiologic significance of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have been conducted, but its diagnostic performance varied among different trials. Aim To determine the cut-off value of FFRCT and its correlation with the gold standard used to diagnose CAD in clinical practice. Material and methods Forty patients with single vessel disease were included in our study. Computed tomography scan and coronary angiography with FFR were conducted for these patients. Three-dimensional geometric reconstruction and numerical analysis based on the computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) of coronary arteries were applied to obtain the values of FFRCT. The correlation between FFRCT and the gold standard used in clinical practice was tested. Results For FFRCT, the best cut-off value was 0.76, with the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of 84.6%, 92.9%, 88% and 73.3%, respectively. The area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve was 0.945 (p < 0.0001). There was a good correlation of FFRCT values with FFR values (r = 0.94, p < 0.0001), with a slight overestimation of FFRCT as compared with measured FFR (mean difference 0.01 ±0.11, p < 0.05). For inter-observer agreement, the mean κ value was 0.69 (0.61 to 0.78) and for intra-observer agreement the mean κ value was 0.61 (0.50 to 0.72). Conclusions FFRCT derived from CT of the coronary artery is a reliable non-invasive way providing reliable functional information of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:26966446

  14. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 modulates prostaglandin E2 release from human arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Golej, Deidre L.; Askari, Bardia; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) catalyze the thioesterification of long-chain FAs into their acyl-CoA derivatives. Purified ACSL4 is an arachidonic acid (20:4)-preferring ACSL isoform, and ACSL4 is therefore a probable regulator of lipid mediator production in intact cells. Eicosanoids play important roles in vascular homeostasis and disease, yet the role of ACSL4 in vascular cells is largely unknown. In the present study, the ACSL4 splice variant expressed in human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was identified as variant 1. To investigate the function of ACSL4 in SMCs, ACSL4 variant 1 was overexpressed, knocked-down by small interfering RNA, or its enzymatic activity acutely inhibited in these cells. Overexpression of ACSL4 resulted in a markedly increased synthesis of arachidonoyl-CoA, increased 20:4 incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and triacylglycerol, and reduced cellular levels of unesterified 20:4. Accordingly, secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was blunted in ACSL4-overexpressing SMCs compared with controls. Conversely, acute pharmacological inhibition of ACSL4 activity resulted in increased release of PGE2. However, long-term downregulation of ACSL4 resulted in markedly reduced PGE2 secretion. Thus, ACSL4 modulates PGE2 release from human SMCs. ACSL4 may regulate a number of processes dependent on the release of arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators in the arterial wall. PMID:21242590

  15. Radial Versus Femoral Access for Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Helen; Sastry, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility and safety of transradial coronary intervention was demonstrated soon after the description of the transfemoral approach, despite which the use of the femoral artery still dominates in acute coronary syndrome intervention. The advantages of using the radial artery are virtual elimination of access site complications and an important reduction in bleeding, both of which are of utmost importance to the patient with myocardial infarction. Randomised controlled trials have now documented what seems inherent; that transradial intervention should bring with it an advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality in this cohort. The potential disadvantages in terms of speed of procedure and radiation exposure are negated by operator experience. Registries have illustrated that conversion on a large scale from the femoral to the transradial approach is safe and saves lives, most convincingly so in acute coronary syndrome intervention. This review discusses the potential benefits and risks of the alternative access sites in acute patients and explores how these are borne out in the published data.

  16. Contributions of tidal lung inflation to human R-R interval and arterial pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Koh, J; Brown, T E; Beightol, L A; Eckberg, D L

    1998-01-19

    We studied the effects of mechanical lung inflation on respiratory frequency R-R interval and arterial pressure fluctuations in nine healthy young adults undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. We conducted this research to define the contribution of pulmonary and thoracic stretch receptor input to respiratory sinus arrhythmia. We compared fast Fourier transform spectral power during three modes of ventilation: (1) spontaneous, frequency-controlled (0.25 Hz) breathing, (2) intermittent positive pressure ventilation (0.25 Hz, with a tidal volume of 8 ml/kg) and (3) high frequency jet ventilation (5.0 Hz, 2.5 kg/cm2), after sedation and vecuronium paralysis. Mean R-R intervals, arterial pressures and arterial blood gas levels were comparable during all three breathing conditions. Respiratory frequency systolic pressure spectral power was comparable during spontaneous breathing and conventional mechanical ventilation, but was significantly reduced during high frequency jet ventilation (P < 0.05). Respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power (used as an index of respiratory sinus arrhythmia) declined dramatically with sedation and muscle paralysis (P < 0.05), but was greater during conventional mechanical, than high frequency jet ventilation (P < 0.05). These results suggest that although phasic inputs from pulmonary and thoracic stretch receptors make a statistically significant contribution to respiratory sinus arrhythmia, that contribution is small.

  17. Contributions of tidal lung inflation to human R-R interval and arterial pressure fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of mechanical lung inflation on respiratory frequency R-R interval and arterial pressure fluctuations in nine healthy young adults undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. We conducted this research to define the contribution of pulmonary and thoracic stretch receptor input to respiratory sinus arrhythmia. We compared fast Fourier transform spectral power during three modes of ventilation: (1) spontaneous, frequency-controlled (0.25 Hz) breathing, (2) intermittent positive pressure ventilation (0.25 Hz, with a tidal volume of 8 ml/kg) and (3) high frequency jet ventilation (5.0 Hz, 2.5 kg/cm2), after sedation and vecuronium paralysis. Mean R-R intervals, arterial pressures and arterial blood gas levels were comparable during all three breathing conditions. Respiratory frequency systolic pressure spectral power was comparable during spontaneous breathing and conventional mechanical ventilation, but was significantly reduced during high frequency jet ventilation (P < 0.05). Respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power (used as an index of respiratory sinus arrhythmia) declined dramatically with sedation and muscle paralysis (P < 0.05), but was greater during conventional mechanical, than high frequency jet ventilation (P < 0.05). These results suggest that although phasic inputs from pulmonary and thoracic stretch receptors make a statistically significant contribution to respiratory sinus arrhythmia, that contribution is small.

  18. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia: opposite effects on systolic and mean arterial pressure in supine humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elstad, M.; Toska, K.; Chon, K. H.; Raeder, E. A.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    1. Are arterial blood pressure fluctuations buffered or reinforced by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)? There is still considerable debate about this simple question. Different results have been obtained, triggering a discussion as to whether or not the baroreflexes are responsible for RSA. We suspected that the measurements of different aspects of arterial pressure (mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic pressure (SP)) can explain the conflicting results. 2. Simultaneous recordings of beat-to-beat MAP, SP, left cardiac stroke volume (SV, pulsed ultrasound Doppler), heart rate (HR) and respiration (RE) were obtained in 10 healthy young adults during spontaneous respiration. In order to eliminate HR variations at respiratory frequency we used propranolol and atropine administration in the supine and tilted positions. Respiration-synchronous variation in the recorded variables was quantified by spectral analysis of the recordings of each of these variables, and the phase relations between them were determined by cross-spectral analysis. 3. MAP fluctuations increased after removing heart rate variations in both supine and tilted position, whereas SP fluctuations decreased in the supine position and increased in the head-up tilted position. 4. RSA buffers respiration-synchronous fluctuations in MAP in both positions. However, fluctuations in SP were reinforced by RSA in the supine and buffered in the tilted position.

  19. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  20. A new method using medical ultrasound for measuring femoral anteversion (torsion): technique and reliability. An intra-observer and inter-observer study on dried bones from human adults.

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, S S; O'Neil, T; Burwell, R G; Moulton, A

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an ultrasound method on dried femora to decide if it is sufficiently reliable to consider its application to living subjects in health and disease. It reports the application of a standard static image B-mode ultrasound scanner to measure femoral anteversion (strictly torsion) on dried bones. The method involves creating images of bony surface contours at both the upper and the lower ends of the femur placed in a water bath. The calculation of femoral torsion involves measuring the angular difference between a head-neck line at the upper end and a transcondylar line at the lower end of the femur. This approach, using the surface contour of the bone at the upper end of the femur, is similar to that used by Lange & Pitzen (1921) and differs from conventional ways of measuring anteversion in dried bones using a central femoral head-neck axis. It is shown that in ultrasound scanning of the upper end of the dried femur to measure femoral anteversion, the head-neck line must be at, or rostral to, the base of greater trochanter. The intra- and inter-observer reliability was assessed in 10 femora, each scanned ten times by two observers. It is shown that femoral torsion can be measured by the ultrasound method to an accuracy of +/- 2 degrees (95% confidence limits) without a significant difference between the observers. The ultrasound method is compared with a new mechanical method for creating surface contours at both ends of the femur and found not to be statistically different in 37 femora. Two real-time ultrasound methods reported by other workers for measuring femoral anteversion in dried bones are reviewed. It is suggested that in applying ultrasound to measure femoral anteversion in living subjects, the B-mode static image scanner is superior to the use of real-time scanners. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3332271

  1. Role of the vestibular system in the arterial pressure response to parabolic-flight-induced gravitational changes in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Chihiro; Abe, Chikara; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Morita, Hironobu

    2011-05-16

    Arterial pressure (AP) is known to fluctuate during parabolic-flight-induced gravitational changes in human subjects, increasing during hypergravity and decreasing during microgravity. In this study, we examined whether the vestibular system participates in the AP response to the gravitational changes induced by parabolic flight in human subjects. Eight subjects performed parabolic flights in a supine position as their AP was measured. Their vestibular inputs during the gravitational changes were reversibly masked by artificial electrical stimulation (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS). The AP responses during the parabolas were then compared between the GVS-off and GVS-on conditions. AP increased during hypergravity and decreased during microgravity. The AP responses at the onset of hypergravity and microgravity were abolished by GVS. These results indicate that the vestibular system elicits pressor and depressor responses during parabolic-flight-induced hypergravity and microgravity, respectively.

  2. Differential effects of relaxin deficiency on vascular aging in arteries of male mice.

    PubMed

    Jelinic, Maria; Tare, Marianne; Conrad, Kirk P; Parry, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Exogenous treatment with the naturally occurring peptide relaxin increases arterial compliance and reduces vascular stiffness. In contrast, relaxin deficiency reduces the passive compliance of small renal arteries through geometric and compositional vascular remodeling. The role of endogenous relaxin on passive mechanical wall properties in other vascular beds is unknown. Importantly, no studies have investigated the effects of aging in arteries of relaxin-deficient mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mesenteric and femoral arteries stiffen with aging, and this is exacerbated with relaxin deficiency. Male wild-type (Rln (+/+)) and relaxin knockout (Rln (-/-)) mice were aged to 3, 6, 12, 18, and 23 months. Passive mechanical wall properties were assessed by pressure myography. In both genotypes, there was a significant increase in circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries with aging, whereas in the femoral artery, aging reduced volume compliance. This was associated with a reduced ability of the artery to lengthen with aging. The predominant phenotype observed in Rln (-/-) mice was reduced volume compliance in young mice in both mesenteric and femoral arteries. In summary, aging induces circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries and axial stiffening in femoral arteries. Passive mechanical wall properties of Rln (-/-) mouse arteries predominantly differ at younger ages compared with Rln (+/+) mice, suggesting that a lack of endogenous relaxin only has a minor effect on vascular aging.

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Lower Limb Penetrating Arterial Traumas

    SciTech Connect

    Mavili, Ertugrul Donmez, Halil; Ozcan, Nevzat; Akcali, Yigit

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous arterial embolization in patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma were treated with percutaneous arterial embolization between 2002 and 2007. All injuries were secondary to penetrating stab wounds. Active bleeding (eight patients), recurrent bleeding episodes (one patient), persistent pain and mass (one patient), leg edema, claudication, swelling (one patient), local hyperemia, and pain (one patient) were the presenting symptoms. Microcatheter systems were used for catheterization. We used n-butyl cyanoacrylate mixture as the embolizing agent in all patients. Results: On angiograms the inferior gluteal artery (one patient), internal pudendal artery (one patient), perforating branch of the profundal femoral artery (six patients), superficial femoral artery (one patient), peroneal artery (two patients), and anterior tibial artery (one patient) were found to be injured. In all patients, the source of arterial bleeding could be reached, and a safe embolization was achieved. Nontarget embolization due to backflow of n-butyl cyanoacrylate mixture was detected in two patients and inguinal hematoma at the puncture site occurred in one patient. Conclusions: We conclude that embolization-particularly n-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization-is technically feasible in patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma.

  4. In vivo measurement of volumetric strain in the human brain induced by arterial pulsation and harmonic waves.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Klatt, Dieter; Freimann, Florian; Scheel, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-09-01

    Motion-sensitive phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance elastography are applied for the measurement of volumetric strain and tissue compressibility in human brain. Volumetric strain calculated by the divergence operator using a biphasic effective-medium model is related to dilatation and compression of fluid spaces during harmonic stimulation of the head or during intracranial passage of the arterial pulse wave. In six volunteers, phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging showed that the central cerebrum expands at arterial pulse wave to strain values of (2.8 ± 1.9)·10(-4). The evolution of volumetric strain agrees well with the magnitude of the harmonic divergence measured in eight volunteers by magnetic resonance elastography using external activation of 25 Hz vibration frequency. Intracranial volumetric strain was proven sensitive to venous pressure altered by abdominal muscle contraction. In eight volunteers, an increase in volumetric strain due to abdominal muscle contraction of approximately 45% was observed (P = 0.0001). The corresponding compression modulus in the range of 9.5-13.5 kPa demonstrated that the compressibility of brain tissue at 25 Hz stimulation is much higher than that of water. This pilot study provides the background for compression-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging with or without external head stimulation. Volumetric strain may be sensitive to fluid flow abnormalities or pressure imbalances between vasculature and parenchyma as seen in hydrocephalus.

  5. Binding of human coronary artery endothelial cells to plasma-treated titanium dioxide nanotubes of different diameters.

    PubMed

    Flašker, Ajda; Kulkarni, Mukta; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Junkar, Ita; Čučnik, Saša; Žigon, Polona; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Iglič, Aleš; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna

    2016-05-01

    Nanoscale topography in improving vascular response in vitro was established previously on various titanium surfaces. In the present study different surface nanotopographies that is different diameters of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanotubes (NTs) were fabricated by electrochemical anodization and conditioned with highly reactive gaseous oxygen plasma. The morphology of different diameter NTs was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while changes in chemical composition on the surface before and after plasma treatment were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Performance of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) on those conditioned surfaces was studied in regard to cell proliferation, released IL-6 protein and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM). We show that HCAEC function is dependent on the diameter of the TiO2 NTs, functioning far less optimally when bound to 100 nm TiO2 NTs as compared to Ti foil, 15 nm NTs or 50 nm NTs. There were improved, morphological cell shape changes, observed with IFM, between HCAEC growing on oxygen-rich plasma-treated versus nontreated 100 nm NTs. These endothelialized conditioned Ti nanosurfaces could elucidate optimization conditions necessary for vascular implants in coronary arteries.

  6. Predictive haemodynamics in a one-dimensional human carotid artery bifurcation. Part II: Application to graft design.

    PubMed

    Kolachalama, Vijaya B; Bressloff, Neil W; Nair, Prasanth B; Shearman, Clifford P

    2008-03-01

    A Bayesian surrogate modeling technique is proposed that may be able to predict an optimal bypass graft configuration for patients suffering with stenosis in the internal carotid artery (ICA). At the outset, this statistical technique is considered as a means for identifying key geometric parameters influencing haemodynamics in the human carotid bifurcation. This methodology uses a design of experiments (DoE) technique to generate candidate geometries for flow analysis. A pulsatile one dimensional Navier-Stokes solver incorporating fluid-wall interactions for a Newtonian fluid which predicts pressure and flow in the carotid bifurcation (comprising a stenosed segment in the internal carotid artery) is used for the numerical simulations. Two metrics, pressure variation factor (PVF) and maximum pressure (p(*)(m)) are employed to directly compare the global and local effects, respectively, of variations in the geometry. The values of PVF and p(*)(m) are then used to construct two Bayesian surrogate models. These models are statistically analyzed to visualize how each geometric parameter influences PVF and p(*)(m). Percentage of stenosis is found to influence these pressure based metrics more than any other geometric parameter. Later, we identify bypass grafts with optimal geometric and material properties which have low values of PVF on five test cases with 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, and 90% stenosis in the ICA, respectively.5%, 80%, 85%, and 90% stenosis in the ICA, respectively. PMID:18334411

  7. Effect of Australian Propolis from Stingless Bees (Tetragonula carbonaria) on Pre-Contracted Human and Porcine Isolated Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, Flavia C.; Brooks, Peter R.; Wallace, Helen M.; Nsengiyumva, Vianne; Narokai, Lorraine; Russell, Fraser D.

    2013-01-01

    Bee propolis is a mixture of plant resins and bee secretions. While bioactivity of honeybee propolis has been reported previously, information is limited on propolis from Australian stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria). The aim of this study was to investigate possible vasomodulatory effects of propolis in KCl-precontracted porcine coronary arteries using an ex vivo tissue bath assay. Polar extracts of propolis produced a dose-dependent relaxant response (EC50=44.7±7.0 μg/ml), which was unaffected by endothelial denudation, suggesting a direct effect on smooth muscle. Propolis markedly attenuated a contractile response to Ca2+ in vessels that were depolarised with 60 mM KCl, in Ca2+-free Krebs solution. Propolis (160 µg/ml) reduced vascular tone in KCl pre-contracted vessels to near-baseline levels over 90 min, and this effect was partially reversible with 6h washout. Some loss in membrane integrity, but no loss in mitochondrial function was detected after 90 min exposure of human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells to 160 µg/ml propolis. We conclude that Australian stingless bee (T. carbonaria) propolis relaxes porcine coronary artery in an endothelial-independent manner that involves inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. This effect is partially and slowly reversible upon washout. Further studies are required to determine the therapeutic potential of Australian stingless bee propolis for conditions in which vascular supply is compromised. PMID:24260567

  8. Effect of Australian propolis from stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria) on pre-contracted human and porcine isolated arteries.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Flavia C; Brooks, Peter R; Wallace, Helen M; Nsengiyumva, Vianne; Narokai, Lorraine; Russell, Fraser D

    2013-01-01

    Bee propolis is a mixture of plant resins and bee secretions. While bioactivity of honeybee propolis has been reported previously, information is limited on propolis from Australian stingless bees (Tetragonula carbonaria). The aim of this study was to investigate possible vasomodulatory effects of propolis in KCl-precontracted porcine coronary arteries using an ex vivo tissue bath assay. Polar extracts of propolis produced a dose-dependent relaxant response (EC50=44.7±7.0 μg/ml), which was unaffected by endothelial denudation, suggesting a direct effect on smooth muscle. Propolis markedly attenuated a contractile response to Ca(2+) in vessels that were depolarised with 60 mM KCl, in Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. Propolis (160 µg/ml) reduced vascular tone in KCl pre-contracted vessels to near-baseline levels over 90 min, and this effect was partially reversible with 6 h washout. Some loss in membrane integrity, but no loss in mitochondrial function was detected after 90 min exposure of human cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells to 160 µg/ml propolis. We conclude that Australian stingless bee (T. carbonaria) propolis relaxes porcine coronary artery in an endothelial-independent manner that involves inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. This effect is partially and slowly reversible upon washout. Further studies are required to determine the therapeutic potential of Australian stingless bee propolis for conditions in which vascular supply is compromised.

  9. Fiberoptic observation of thrombosis and thrombolysis in isolated human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Masuo, M; Tomaru, T; Kato, A; Sugimoto, T

    1986-10-01

    Coronary arteries isolated from cadavers autopsied within 7 hours after death were perfused with canine arterial blood, and the processes of thrombus formation at the segments stenosed with atheroma and the thrombolytic effects of urokinase were investigated by angioscopy. Ten minutes of blood perfusion caused thin mural thrombi localized at the stenotic or nonstenotic segments. During 30 minutes of blood perfusion, the thin mural thrombi of the outlet or inlet of the segment grew into a doughnut-shaped thrombus. Also, the thin mural thrombi in the stenotic segment grew into a streamer-like thrombus and drifted downstream. These thrombi grew in size with increasing perfusion time and finally obstructed the stenotic segment. Globular thrombi close to the outlet also were formed in a few preparations. Unlike the thrombi at the stenotic segment, the mural thrombi in the nonstenotic segments did not grow into massive thrombi. The thrombi were reduced in size within 10 minutes of perfusion with 320 U/ml or more of urokinase. During thrombolysis, sandstorm-like dispersion of the blood cells occurred, small fragments detached from the mother thrombus and flew downstream, or the fibrin core of the thrombus was exposed. The results indicate the usefulness of angioscopy for the dynamic and serial investigation of thrombosis and thrombolysis. PMID:3766368

  10. [Solar phase effect on elasticity of the brachial artery and blood flow in humans].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, V N; Komliagina, T G; Rechkina, S Iu; Krivoshchekov, S G

    2010-01-01

    Single and double examinations of normal males and females in the course of 11-year solar cycle with the use of oscillovasometry and occlusive plethysmography established a direct correlation between the effective diastolic radius of the brachial artery and solar activity characteristics on the day of examination, i.e. number of solar spots and intensity of radiation with the 10.7 cm wavelength. Other blood flow parameters demonstrated opposite correlations with the factors in males and females. As solar activity increased, females displayed linear decrements of arterial elasticity and regional peripheral resistance and growth of the volumetric blood flow velocity equally at rest and at the peak of post-occlusion reactive hyperemia. In males, the correlations had the reversed sign. Besides, males were noted to reduce venous reserve and venous outflow from antebrachial muscles proportionally to the increase of Wolf number. It is inferred that elevated solar activity may be responsible for impairment of the feeling of well-being of people with reduced cardiovascular reserve, particularly in space tight or at high altitudes in the absence of or under weak protection of the geomagnetic field and ozone layer.

  11. Endovascular Management of an Infected Superficial Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Damodharan, Karthik Beckett, David

    2013-10-15

    This article describes an endovascular technique of treating an infected pseudoaneurysm by direct thrombin injection via a catheter placed inside the aneurysm sac while maintaining temporary balloon occlusion of the neck of the false aneurysm.

  12. Effect of posture on arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. H.; Rittenhouse, D.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of blood-volume redistribution induced by postural changes on baroreflex activity are investigated. The central blood volume and baroreceptor functions of ten males between 23-51 years old were examined while they were in the head-up tilt (HUT), head-down tilt (HDT), and supine positions. It is observed that during HDT at 15 deg the pulse interval over the first five cardiac cycles following neck suction onset is 51 + or - 18 ms longer, at 30 deg it is 61 + or - 20 ms longer, and at 45 deg it is 74 + or - 35 ms longer than at supine; during HUT at 15 deg the pulse interval is 25 + or - 9 ms shorter than when supine, but for the 30 and 45 deg there is no significant difference in pulse interval detected. The data reveal that posture does modify arterial baroreflex control of heart rate.

  13. Pulmonary vascular disease in mice xenografted with human BM progenitors from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Lichtin, Alan; Graham, Brian; George, Deepa; Aldred, Micheala; Hazen, Stanley L.; Loyd, James; Tuder, Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic myeloid progenitors released into the circulation are able to promote vascular remodeling through endothelium activation and injury. Endothelial injury is central to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a proliferative vasculopathy of the pulmonary circulation, but the origin of vascular injury is unknown. In the present study, mice transplanted with BM-derived CD133+ progenitor cells from patients with PAH, but not from healthy controls, exhibited morbidity and/or death due to features of PAH: in situ thrombi and endothelial injury, angioproliferative remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Myeloid progenitors from patients with heritable and/or idiopathic PAH all produced disease in xenografted mice. Analyses of hematopoietic transcription factors and colony formation revealed underlying abnormalities of progenitors that skewed differentiation toward the myeloid-erythroid lineage. The results of the present study suggest a causal role for hematopoietic stem cell abnormalities in vascular injury, right ventricular hypertrophy, and morbidity associated with PAH. PMID:22745307

  14. Dissociation between renin and arterial pressure responses to beta-adrenergic blockade in human essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bravo, E L; Tarazi, R C; Dustan, H P; Lewis, J W

    1975-06-01

    Studies were carried out in 69 patients with essential hypertension to examine the relationship between changes in plasma renin activity (PRA) and arterial pressure (BP) in response to a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, propranolol. PRA had no consistent relationship with BP during treatment, either in patients receiving propranolol alone (r = 0.12) or in those receiving a combination of diuretics and propranolol (r = 0.18). Furthermore, long-term beta-adrenergic blockade failed to inhibit increases of PRA induced by diuretics or rapid sodium depletion. These results indicate that (1) beta-adrenergic blockade can reduce BP by mechanisms other than PRA suppression; and (2) the beta-adrenergic nervous system is important, but not essential, for renin release. PMID:236841

  15. Arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in exercise-trained versus untrained men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Yoshida, Shou; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2015-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia increases arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are lower in exercise-trained humans than in untrained humans. However, the effect of exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young adults remains unknown. The present study investigates the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young males. Ten exercise-trained males (age, 20.8 ± 0.2 years; ETR) and 9 healthy untrained males (age, 22.2 ± 0.7 years; UTR) participated in this study. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle blood pressure (BP), heart rate (oscillometric device and electrocardiography), and blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) were measured at 30 min before (baseline) and 30, 60, and 120 min after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Leg PWV at 30 min after glucose ingestion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the UTR group than in the ETR group. Ankle systolic BP at 30 min after glucose ingestion was also significantly higher in the UTR group than in the ETR group (P < 0.05). Blood glucose increased from baseline at 30 min (P < 0.01) and 60 min (P < 0.05) after glucose ingestion in both groups. Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, and brachial systolic BP did not change from baseline after glucose ingestion in both groups. The present findings indicate that leg PWV and ankle systolic BP after glucose ingestion were significantly lower in the ETR group than in the UTR group. PMID:26444929

  16. Arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in exercise-trained versus untrained men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Yoshida, Shou; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2015-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia increases arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are lower in exercise-trained humans than in untrained humans. However, the effect of exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young adults remains unknown. The present study investigates the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young males. Ten exercise-trained males (age, 20.8 ± 0.2 years; ETR) and 9 healthy untrained males (age, 22.2 ± 0.7 years; UTR) participated in this study. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle blood pressure (BP), heart rate (oscillometric device and electrocardiography), and blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) were measured at 30 min before (baseline) and 30, 60, and 120 min after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Leg PWV at 30 min after glucose ingestion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the UTR group than in the ETR group. Ankle systolic BP at 30 min after glucose ingestion was also significantly higher in the UTR group than in the ETR group (P < 0.05). Blood glucose increased from baseline at 30 min (P < 0.01) and 60 min (P < 0.05) after glucose ingestion in both groups. Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, and brachial systolic BP did not change from baseline after glucose ingestion in both groups. The present findings indicate that leg PWV and ankle systolic BP after glucose ingestion were significantly lower in the ETR group than in the UTR group.

  17. Non-invasive, energy-based assessment of patient-specific material properties of arterial tissue.

    PubMed

    Smoljkić, M; Vander Sloten, J; Segers, P; Famaey, N

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties of human biological tissue vary greatly. The determination of arterial material properties should be based on experimental data, i.e. diameter, length, intramural pressure, axial force and stress-free geometry. Currently, clinical data provide only non-invasively measured pressure-diameter data for superficial arteries (e.g. common carotid and femoral artery). The lack of information forces us to take into account certain assumptions regarding the in situ configuration to estimate material properties in vivo. This paper proposes a new, non-invasive, energy-based approach for arterial material property estimation. This approach is compared with an approach proposed in the literature. For this purpose, a simplified finite element model of an artery was used as a mock experimental situation. This method enables exact knowledge of the actual material properties, thereby allowing a quantitative evaluation of material property estimation approaches. The results show that imposing conditions on strain energy can provide a good estimation of the material properties from the non-invasively measured pressure and diameter data.

  18. The femoral sulcus in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lingaraj, Krishna; Bartlett, John

    2009-05-01

    The position of the femoral sulcus relative to the midline of the distal femoral resection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied to determine if centralized placement of the femoral component on the distal femur was justified in terms of aligning the prosthetic sulcus with the native femoral sulcus. The location of the femoral sulcus was studied in 112 consecutive patients undergoing TKA. The mean sulcus position was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline of the distal femoral resection (SD 1.4, 95% CI, 0.5-1.0 mm). However, the variation in sulcus positions ranged from 4 mm medial to 4 mm lateral to the midline. The mean sulcus position in valgus knees was 1.0 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.8), and that in varus knees was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.2) (P = 0.501). It appears prudent to centre the femoral component on the native sulcus rather than the midline of the distal femoral resection, so as to ensure accurate alignment of the prosthetic sulcus with the native sulcus and to encourage normal patella tracking.

  19. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  20. The Therapeutic Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Primed with Sphingosine-1 Phosphate on Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunsook; Kim, Kang-Hyun; Lim, Jisun; Kim, You-Sun; Heo, Jinbeom; Choi, Jongjin; Jeong, Jaeho; Kim, YongHwan; Kim, Seong Who; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Choo, Myung-Soo; Son, Jaekyoung; Kim, Su Jung; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Oh, Wonil; Choi, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell (SC) therapy has become a potential treatment modality for pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), but the efficacy of human SC and priming effects have not yet been established. The mobilization and homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are modulated by priming factors that include a bioactive lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which stimulates CXCR4 receptor kinase signaling. Here, we show that priming human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with S1P enhances their therapeutic efficacy in PAH. Human MSCs, similar to HSCs, showed stronger chemoattraction to S1P in transwell assays. Concomitantly, MSCs treated with 0.2 μM S1P showed increased phosphorylation of both MAPKp42/44 and AKT protein compared with nonprimed MSCs. Furthermore, S1P-primed MSCs potentiated colony forming unit-fibroblast, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic activities of MSCs in culture. In a PAH animal model induced by subcutaneously injected monocrotaline, administration of human cord blood-derived MSCs (hCB-MSCs) or S1P-primed cells significantly attenuated the elevated right ventricular systolic pressure. Notably, S1P-primed CB-MSCs, but not unprimed hCB-MSCs, also elicited a significant reduction in the right ventricular weight ratio and pulmonary vascular wall thickness. S1P-primed MSCs enhanced the expression of several genes responsible for stem cell trafficking and angiogenesis, increasing the density of blood vessels in the damaged lungs. Thus, this study demonstrates that human MSCs have potential utility for the treatment of PAH, and that S1P priming increases the effects of SC therapy by enhancing cardiac and vascular remodeling. By optimizing this protocol in future studies, SC therapy might form a basis for clinical trials to treat human PAH. PMID:25761906

  1. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25125498

  2. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lanter, Bernard B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  3. Propionibacterium acnes Recovered from Atherosclerotic Human Carotid Arteries Undergoes Biofilm Dispersion and Releases Lipolytic and Proteolytic Enzymes in Response to Norepinephrine Challenge In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lanter, Bernard B; Davies, David G

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, human atherosclerotic carotid arteries were examined following endarterectomy for the presence of the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes and its potential association with biofilm structures within the arterial wall. The P. acnes 16S rRNA gene was detectable in 4 of 15 carotid artery samples, and viable P. acnes was one among 10 different bacterial species recoverable in culture. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of 5 additional atherosclerotic carotid arteries demonstrated biofilm bacteria within all samples, with P. acnes detectable in 4 samples. We also demonstrated that laboratory-grown cultures of P. acnes biofilms were susceptible to induction of a biofilm dispersion response when challenged with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine in the presence of iron-bound transferrin or with free iron. The production and release of lipolytic and proteolytic extracellular enzymes by P. acnes were shown to increase in iron-induced dispersed biofilms, and these dispersion-induced P. acnes VP1 biofilms showed increased expression of mRNAs for the triacylglycerol lipases PPA2105 and PPA1796 and the hyaluronate lyase PPA380 compared to that in untreated biofilms. These results demonstrate that P. acnes can infect the carotid arteries of humans with atherosclerosis as a component of multispecies biofilms and that dispersion is inducible for this organism, at least in vitro, with physiologically relevant levels of norepinephrine resulting in the production and release of degradative enzymes. PMID:26216428

  4. Deposition of amyloid β in the walls of human leptomeningeal arteries in relation to perivascular drainage pathways in cerebral amyloid angiopathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Keable, Abby; Fenna, Kate; Yuen, Ho Ming; Johnston, David A.; Smyth, Neil R.; Smith, Colin; Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Samarasekera, Neshika; Nicoll, James A.R.; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Weller, Roy O.; Carare, Roxana O.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the walls of cerebral arteries as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) suggests an age-related failure of perivascular drainage of soluble Aβ from the brain. As CAA is associated with Alzheimer's disease and with intracerebral haemorrhage, the present study determines the unique sequence of changes that occur as Aβ accumulates in artery walls. Paraffin sections of post-mortem human occipital cortex were immunostained for collagen IV, fibronectin, nidogen 2, Aβ and smooth muscle actin and the immunostaining was analysed using Image J and confocal microscopy. Results showed that nidogen 2 (entactin) increases with age and decreases in CAA. Confocal microscopy revealed stages in the progression of CAA: Aβ initially deposits in basement membranes in the tunica media, replaces first the smooth muscle cells and then the connective tissue elements to leave artery walls completely or focally replaced by Aβ. The pattern of development of CAA in the human brain suggests expansion of Aβ from the basement membranes to progressively replace all tissue elements in the artery wall. Establishing this full picture of the development of CAA is pivotal in understanding the clinical presentation of CAA and for developing therapies to prevent accumulation of Aβ in artery walls. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26327684

  5. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  6. Involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels in both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type relaxation in human penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Király, István; Pataricza, János; Bajory, Zoltán; Simonsen, Ulf; Varro, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pajor, Lászlo; Kun, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels (BKC a ), located on the vascular smooth muscle, play an important role in regulation of vascular tone. In penile corpus cavernosum tissue, opening of BKC a channels leads to relaxation of corporal smooth muscle, which is essential during erection; however, there is little information on the role of BKC a channels located in penile vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of BKC a channels in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of human intracavernous penile arteries. In human intracavernous arteries obtained in connection with transsexual operations, change in isometric force was recorded in microvascular myographs, and endothelium-dependent [nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type] and endothelium-independent (NO-donor) relaxations were measured in contracted arteries. In penile small arteries contracted with phenylephrine, acetylcholine evoked NO- and EDH-type relaxations, which were sensitive to iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of BKC a channels. Iberiotoxin also inhibited relaxations induced by a NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside. NS11021, a selective opener of BKC a channels, evoked pronounced relaxations that were inhibited in the presence of IbTX. NS13558, a BKC a -inactive analogue of NS11021, failed to relax human penile small arteries. Our results show that BKC a channels are involved in both NO- and EDH-type relaxation of intracavernous penile arteries obtained from healthy men. The effect of a selective opener of BKC a channels also suggests that direct activation of the channel may be an advantageous approach for treatment of impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation often associated with erectile dysfunction.

  7. Regional arterial stress-strain distributions referenced to the zero-stress state in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Day, Judd; Yuan, Zhuang Feng; Gregersen, Hans

    2002-02-01

    Morphometric and stress-strain properties were studied in isolated segments of the thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta, left common carotid artery, left femoral artery, and the left pulmonary artery in 16 male Wistar rats. The mechanical test was performed as a distension experiment where the proximal end of the arterial segment was connected via a tube to the container used for applying pressures to the segment and the distal end was left free. Outer wall dimensions were obtained from digitized images of the arterial segments at different pressures as well as at no-load and zero-stress states. The results showed that the morphometric data, such as inner and outer circumference, wall and lumen area, wall thickness, wall thickness-to-inner radius ratio, and normalized outer diameter, as a function of the applied pressures, differed between the five arteries (P < 0.01). The opening angle was largest in the pulmonary artery and smallest in thoracic aorta (P < 0.01). The absolute value of both the inner and outer residual strain and the residual strain gradient were largest in the femoral artery and smallest in the thoracic aorta (P < 0.01). In the circumferential and longitudinal direction, the arterial wall was stiffest in the femoral artery and in the thoracic aorta, respectively, and most compliant in the pulmonary artery. These results show that the morphometric and biomechanical properties referenced to the zero-stress state differed between the five arterial segments. PMID:11788411

  8. Automatic detection of aorto-femoral vessel trajectory from whole-body computed tomography angiography data sets.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Budde, Ricardo P J; Tu, Shengxian; de Graaf, Michiel A; Xu, Liang; Xu, Bo; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H C

    2016-08-01

    Extraction of the aorto-femoral vessel trajectory is important to utilize computed tomography angiography (CTA) in an integrated workflow of the image-guided work-up prior to trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The aim of this study was to develop a new, fully-automated technique for the extraction of the entire arterial access route from the femoral artery to the aortic root. An automatic vessel tracking algorithm was first used to find the centerline that connected the femoral accessing points and the aortic root. Subsequently, a deformable 3D-model fitting method was used to delineate the lumen boundary of the vascular trajectory in the whole-body CTA dataset. A validation was carried out by comparing the automatically obtained results with semi-automatically obtained results from two experienced observers. The whole framework was validated on whole body CTA datasets of 36 patients. The average Dice similarity indexes between the segmentations of the automatic method and observer 1 for the left ilio-femoral artery, the right ilio-femoral artery and the aorta were 0.977 ± 0.030, 0.980 ± 0.019, 0.982 ± 0.016; the average Dice similarity indexes between the segmentations of the automatic method and observer 2 were 0.950 ± 0.040, 0.954 ± 0.031 and 0.965 ± 0.019, respectively. The inter-observer variability resulted in a Dice similarity index of 0.954 ± 0.038, 0.952 ± 0.031 and 0.969 ± 0.018 for the left ilio-femoral artery, the right ilio-femoral artery and the aorta. The average minimal luminal diameters (MLDs) of the ilio-femoral artery were 6.03 ± 1.48, 5.70 ± 1.43 and 5.52 ± 1.32 mm for the automatic method, observer 1 and observer 2 respectively. The MLDs of the aorta were 13.43 ± 2.54, 12.40 ± 2.93 and 12.08 ± 2.40 mm for the automatic method, observer 1 and observer 2 respectively. The automatic measurement overestimated the MLD slightly in the ilio-femoral artery at the

  9. Automatic detection of aorto-femoral vessel trajectory from whole-body computed tomography angiography data sets.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Budde, Ricardo P J; Tu, Shengxian; de Graaf, Michiel A; Xu, Liang; Xu, Bo; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H C

    2016-08-01

    Extraction of the aorto-femoral vessel trajectory is important to utilize computed tomography angiography (CTA) in an integrated workflow of the image-guided work-up prior to trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The aim of this study was to develop a new, fully-automated technique for the extraction of the entire arterial access route from the femoral artery to the aortic root. An automatic vessel tracking algorithm was first used to find the centerline that connected the femoral accessing points and the aortic root. Subsequently, a deformable 3D-model fitting method was used to delineate the lumen boundary of the vascular trajectory in the whole-body CTA dataset. A validation was carried out by comparing the automatically obtained results with semi-automatically obtained results from two experienced observers. The whole framework was validated on whole body CTA datasets of 36 patients. The average Dice similarity indexes between the segmentations of the automatic method and observer 1 for the left ilio-femoral artery, the right ilio-femoral artery and the aorta were 0.977 ± 0.030, 0.980 ± 0.019, 0.982 ± 0.016; the average Dice similarity indexes between the segmentations of the automatic method and observer 2 were 0.950 ± 0.040, 0.954 ± 0.031 and 0.965 ± 0.019, respectively. The inter-observer variability resulted in a Dice similarity index of 0.954 ± 0.038, 0.952 ± 0.031 and 0.969 ± 0.018 for the left ilio-femoral artery, the right ilio-femoral artery and the aorta. The average minimal luminal diameters (MLDs) of the ilio-femoral artery were 6.03 ± 1.48, 5.70 ± 1.43 and 5.52 ± 1.32 mm for the automatic method, observer 1 and observer 2 respectively. The MLDs of the aorta were 13.43 ± 2.54, 12.40 ± 2.93 and 12.08 ± 2.40 mm for the automatic method, observer 1 and observer 2 respectively. The automatic measurement overestimated the MLD slightly in the ilio-femoral artery at the

  10. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure on human arterial pressure during the solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.; Levi, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We performed a study of the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure (AtmP) and the horizontal geomagnetic field component (H). We worked with a sample of 304 healthy normotense volunteers, 152 men and 152 women, with ages between 18 and 84 years in Mexico City during the period 2008-2014, corresponding to the minimum, ascending and maximum phases of the solar cycle 24. The data was divided by gender, age and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: Correlations, bivariate and superposed epochs (within a window of three days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the SBP and DBP and the natural variables (AtmP and H). The correlation analysis indicated correlation between the SBP and DBP and AtmP and H, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analysis showed that the largest correlations are between the SBP and DBP and the AtmP. The superposed epoch analysis found that the largest number of significant SBP and DBP changes occurred for women. Finally, the blood pressure changes are larger during the solar minimum and ascending solar cycle phases than during the solar maximum; the storms of the minimum were more intense than those of the maximum and this could be the reason of behavior of the blood pressure changes along the solar cycle.

  11. New Biochemical Insights into the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bujak, Renata; Mateo, Jesús; Blanco, Isabel; Izquierdo-García, José Luis; Dudzik, Danuta; Markuszewski, Michał J; Peinado, Victor Ivo; Laclaustra, Martín; Barberá, Joan Albert; Barbas, Coral; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is difficult due to the lack of specific clinical symptoms and biomarkers, especially at early stages. We compared plasma metabolic fingerprints of PAH patients (n = 20) with matched healthy volunteers (n = 20) using, for the first time, untargeted multiplatform metabolomics approach consisting of high-performance liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistical analyses were performed to select metabolites that contribute most to groups' classification (21 from liquid in both ionization modes and 9 from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). We found metabolites related to energy imbalance, such as glycolysis-derived metabolites, as well as metabolites involved in fatty acid, lipid and amino acid metabolism. We observed statistically significant changes in threitol and aminomalonic acid in PAH patients, which could provide new biochemical insights into the pathogenesis of the disease. The results were externally validated on independent case and control cohorts, confirming up to 16 metabolites as statistically significant in the validation study. Multiplatform metabolomics, followed by multivariate chemometric data analysis has a huge potential for explaining pathogenesis of PAH and for searching potential and new more specific and less invasive markers of the disease. PMID:27486806

  12. New Biochemical Insights into the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bujak, Renata; Mateo, Jesús; Blanco, Isabel; Izquierdo-García, José Luis; Dudzik, Danuta; Markuszewski, Michał J; Peinado, Victor Ivo; Laclaustra, Martín; Barberá, Joan Albert; Barbas, Coral; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is difficult due to the lack of specific clinical symptoms and biomarkers, especially at early stages. We compared plasma metabolic fingerprints of PAH patients (n = 20) with matched healthy volunteers (n = 20) using, for the first time, untargeted multiplatform metabolomics approach consisting of high-performance liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistical analyses were performed to select metabolites that contribute most to groups' classification (21 from liquid in both ionization modes and 9 from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). We found metabolites related to energy imbalance, such as glycolysis-derived metabolites, as well as metabolites involved in fatty acid, lipid and amino acid metabolism. We observed statistically significant changes in threitol and aminomalonic acid in PAH patients, which could provide new biochemical insights into the pathogenesis of the disease. The results were externally validated on independent case and control cohorts, confirming up to 16 metabolites as statistically significant in the validation study. Multiplatform metabolomics, followed by multivariate chemometric data analysis has a huge potential for explaining pathogenesis of PAH and for searching potential and new more specific and less invasive markers of the disease.

  13. Numerical study of wall shear stress-based descriptors in the human left coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S I S; Campos, J B L M

    2016-10-01

    The present work is about the application of wall shear stress descriptors - time averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillating shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT) - to the study of blood flow in the left coronary artery (LCA). These descriptors aid the prediction of disturbed flow conditions in the vessels and play a significant role in the detection of potential zones of atherosclerosis development. Hemodynamic descriptors data were obtained, numerically, through ANSYS® software, for the LCA of a patient-specific geometry and for a 3D idealized model. Comparing both cases, the results are coherent, in terms of location and magnitude. Low TAWSS, high OSI and high RRT values are observed in the bifurcation - potential zone of atherosclerosis appearance. The dissimilarities observed in the TAWSS values, considering blood as a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid, releases the importance of the correct blood rheologic caracterization. Moreover, for a higher Reynolds number, the TAWSS values decrease in the bifurcation and along the LAD branch, increasing the probability of plaques deposition. Furthermore, for a stenotic LCA model, very low TAWSS and high RRT values in front and behind the stenosis are observed, indicating the probable extension, in the flow direction, of the lesion. PMID:26883291

  14. Numerical study of wall shear stress-based descriptors in the human left coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S I S; Campos, J B L M

    2016-10-01

    The present work is about the application of wall shear stress descriptors - time averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillating shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT) - to the study of blood flow in the left coronary artery (LCA). These descriptors aid the prediction of disturbed flow conditions in the vessels and play a significant role in the detection of potential zones of atherosclerosis development. Hemodynamic descriptors data were obtained, numerically, through ANSYS® software, for the LCA of a patient-specific geometry and for a 3D idealized model. Comparing both cases, the results are coherent, in terms of location and magnitude. Low TAWSS, high OSI and high RRT values are observed in the bifurcation - potential zone of atherosclerosis appearance. The dissimilarities observed in the TAWSS values, considering blood as a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid, releases the importance of the correct blood rheologic caracterization. Moreover, for a higher Reynolds number, the TAWSS values decrease in the bifurcation and along the LAD branch, increasing the probability of plaques deposition. Furthermore, for a stenotic LCA model, very low TAWSS and high RRT values in front and behind the stenosis are observed, indicating the probable extension, in the flow direction, of the lesion.

  15. Platelet deposition at angioplasty sites and its relation to restenosis in human iliac and femoropopliteal arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Ahmadi, R.; Dudczak, R.; Leitha, T.; Koppensteiner, R.; Jung, M.; Stuempflen, A.

    19