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Sample records for human fetal heart

  1. Diffusion MRI Tractography of the Developing Human Fetal Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jackowski, Marcel P.; Kostis, William J.; Dai, Guangping; Sanders, Stephen; Sosnovik, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Human myocardium has a complex and anisotropic 3D fiber pattern. It remains unknown, however, when in fetal life this anisotropic pattern develops and whether the human heart is structurally fully mature at birth. We aimed here to use diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) tractography to characterize the evolution of fiber architecture in the developing human fetal heart. Methods Human fetal hearts (n = 5) between 10–19 weeks of gestation were studied. The heart from a 6-day old neonate and an adult human heart served as controls. The degree of myocardial anisotropy was measured by calculating the fractional anisotropy (FA) index. In addition, fiber tracts were created by numerically integrating the primary eigenvector field in the heart into coherent streamlines. Results At 10–14 weeks the fetal hearts were highly isotropic and few tracts could be resolved. Between 14–19 weeks the anisotropy seen in the adult heart began to develop. Coherent fiber tracts were well resolved by 19 weeks. The 19-week myocardium, however, remained weakly anisotropic with a low FA and no discernable sheet structure. Conclusions The human fetal heart remains highly isotropic until 14–19 weeks, at which time cardiomyocytes self-align into coherent tracts. This process lags 2–3 months behind the onset of cardiac contraction, which may be a prerequisite for cardiomyocyte maturation and alignment. No evidence of a connective tissue scaffold guiding this process could be identified by DTI. Maturation of the heart’s sheet structure occurs late in gestation and evolves further after birth. PMID:23991152

  2. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-07-01

    The primitive cardiac tube starts beating 6-8 weeks post fertilization in the developing embryo. In order to describe normal cardiac development during late first and early second trimester in human fetuses this study used microarray and pathways analysis and created a corresponding 'normal' database. Fourteen fetal hearts from human fetuses between 10 and 18 weeks of gestational age (GA) were prospectively collected at the time of elective termination of pregnancy. RNA from recovered tissues was used for transcriptome analysis with Affymetrix 1.0 ST microarray chip. From the amassed data we investigated differences in cardiac development within the 10-18 GA period dividing the sample by GA in three groups: 10-12 (H1), 13-15 (H2) and 16-18 (H3) weeks. A fold change of 2 or above adjusted for a false discovery rate of 5% was used as initial cutoff to determine differential gene expression for individual genes. Test for enrichment to identify functional groups was carried out using the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Array analysis correctly identified the cardiac specific genes, and transcripts reported to be differentially expressed were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Single transcript and Ontology analysis showed first trimester heart expression of myosin-related genes to be up-regulated >5-fold compared with second trimester heart. In contrast the second trimester hearts showed further gestation-related increases in many genes involved in energy production and cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, fetal heart development during the first trimester was dominated by heart-specific genes coding for myocardial development and differentiation. During the second trimester, transcripts related to energy generation and cardiomyocyte communication for contractile coordination/proliferation were more dominant. Transcripts related to fatty acid metabolism can be seen as early as 10 weeks and clearly increase as the heart matures. Retinol

  3. Myocardial bridges of the coronary arteries in the human fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Yusuf Ozgür; Cavdar, Safiye; Yalin, Aymelek; Yener, Nuran; Ozdogmus, Omer

    2010-09-01

    During the last century, many investigators reported on myocardial bridges in the adult human heart. In the present study, 39 human fetal hearts (the mean gestastional age was 30 weeks) were studied for myocardial bridging, and the results were correlated with adult data. Among the 39 (27 male and 12 female) fetal hearts studied, 26 bridges were observed on 18 fetal hearts (46.2%). Ten of the bridges had one myocardial bridge, whereas double myocardial bridges were observed in eight fetal hearts. The most frequent myocardial bridges were observed on the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which had 13 bridges (50%). Eight (30.7%) myocardial bridges were on the diagonal artery, and on the posterior descending artery there were five (19.3%). Myocardial bridges were not observed on the circumflex artery. The data presented in this study may provide potentially useful information for the preoperative evaluation of the newborn and may have a clinical implication for sudden fetal death.

  4. Human fetal cardiac progenitors: The role of stem cells and progenitors in the fetal and adult heart.

    PubMed

    Bulatovic, Ivana; Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Sylvén, Christer; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The human fetal heart is formed early during embryogenesis as a result of cell migrations, differentiation, and formative blood flow. It begins to beat around gestation day 22. Progenitor cells are derived from mesoderm (endocardium and myocardium), proepicardium (epicardium and coronary vessels), and neural crest (heart valves, outflow tract septation, and parasympathetic innervation). A variety of molecular disturbances in the factors regulating the specification and differentiation of these cells can cause congenital heart disease. This review explores the contribution of different cardiac progenitors to the embryonic heart development; the pathways and transcription factors guiding their expansion, migration, and functional differentiation; and the endogenous regenerative capacity of the adult heart including the plasticity of cardiomyocytes. Unfolding these mechanisms will become the basis for understanding the dynamics of specific congenital heart disease as well as a means to develop therapy for fetal as well as postnatal cardiac defects and heart failure.

  5. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-02-26

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development.

  6. The roadmap of WT1 protein expression in the human fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Duim, Sjoerd N; Smits, Anke M; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Goumans, Marie-José

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT1) is essential for cardiac development. Deletion of Wt1 in mice results in disturbed epicardial and myocardial formation and lack of cardiac vasculature, causing embryonic lethality. Little is known about the role of WT1 in the human fetal heart. Therefore, as a first step, we analyzed the expression pattern of WT1 protein during human cardiac development from week 4 till week 20. WT1 expression was apparent in epicardial, endothelial and endocardial cells in a spatiotemporal manner. The expression of WT1 follows a pattern starting at the epicardium and extending towards the lumen of the heart, with differences in timing and expression levels between the atria and ventricles. The expression of WT1 in cardiac arterial endothelial cells reduces in time, whereas WT1 expression in the endothelial cells of cardiac veins and capillaries remains present at all stages studied. This study provides for the first time a detailed description of the expression of WT1 protein during human cardiac development, which indicates an important role for WT1 also in human cardiogenesis.

  7. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Mowrey, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system and method for detecting and processing acoustic fetal heart signals transmitted by different signal transmission modes. One signal transmission mode, the direct contact mode, occurs in a first frequency band when the fetus is in direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. Another signal transmission mode, the fluid propagation mode, occurs in a second frequency band when the fetus is in a recessed position with no direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. The second frequency band is relatively higher than the first frequency band. The fetal heart monitoring system and method detect and process acoustic fetal heart signals that are in the first frequency band and in the second frequency band.

  8. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development.

  9. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development. PMID:25761723

  10. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  11. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor); Wynkoop, Mark W. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. H. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system preferably comprising a backing plate having a generally concave front surface and a generally convex back surface, and at least one sensor element attached to the concave front surface for acquiring acoustic fetal heart signals produced by a fetus within a body. The sensor element has a shape that conforms to the generally concave back surface of the backing plate. In one embodiment, the at least one sensor element comprises an inner sensor, and a plurality of outer sensors surrounding the inner sensor. The fetal heart monitoring system can further comprise a web belt, and a web belt guide movably attached to the web belt. The web belt guide being is to the convex back surface of the backing plate.

  12. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  13. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  14. Human Fetal Behavior: 100 Years of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Low, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews literature on human fetal behavior. Includes descriptions of coupling of body movements and fetal heart rate and behavior maturation from conception to term. Discusses use of stimulus-induced behavior to examine sensory and cognitive development, and spontaneous and stimulus-induced behavior to assess fetal well-being. Notes research focus…

  15. [Hypoxaemia, peripheral chemoreceptors and fetal heart rate].

    PubMed

    Secourgeon, J-F

    2012-02-01

    The perinatal results of the widespread adoption of the continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring during labor remain rather disappointing. This is due in part to a lack of consistent interpretation of the fetal heart tracings. Despite efforts by referral agencies over the past decade the situation has not improved. In defense of practitioners the heterogeneity and complexity of definitions and classifications patterns especially morphological currently proposed should be noted. Whereas with the recent advances in the field of neuroscience, it is now possible to visualize the chain of pathophysiological events that lead from the hypoxemic stimulus of the glomus cell to changes in the morphology of the fetal heart rate tracing. Thus by taking some examples of real situations, we propose a method of analysis that dissects the fetal heart tracing and take into account the functional specifications of the chemoreceptor when exposed to a hypoxic environment. Furthermore we can identify tracings with a "threshold effect" and also "sensitization and desensitization effects" according to the intensity, duration and recurrence of hypoxaemic episodes. This new approach based upon specific research into the mechanism behind the fetal heart rate abnormalities may be useful to complement the morphological study of the fetal heart tracing, to provide a better idea of the fetal status and to better define the indications of fetal blood sampling procedures.

  16. Fetal Heart Rate Response to Maternal Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monga, Manju

    2016-09-01

    Current guidelines regarding recommended exercise in pregnancy appear consistent with reported research regarding fetal heart changes in response to maternal exercise. Fetal heart rate increases during pregnancy, but maternal exercise appears well tolerated if performed in uncomplicated pregnancies and not in the supine position. Maximal levels of exercise that are well tolerated by the fetus have not yet been well defined; however, recent literature suggests that sustained exercise during pregnancy may have beneficial effects on autonomic control of fetal heart rate and variability that may lead to long-term health benefits. PMID:27388963

  17. Intrinsic Myoarchitectural Differences Between the Left and Right Ventricles of Fetal Human Hearts: An Ultrasonic Backscatter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mark R.; Gibson, Allyson A.; Kirschner, Carol A.; Hicks, Deborah; Ludomirsky, Achiau; Singh, Gautam K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Embryologically, cardiac chambers differ in their morphological and contractile properties from the beginning. We hypothesized that a non-invasive ultrasonic backscatter investigation might illustrate the fundamental differences in myocardial morphologic properties of the two ventricles during heart development. Objectives The goals of this investigation were: 1) to explore the feasibility of measuring the magnitude of cyclic variation of ultrasonic backscatter from the left and right ventricular free walls of fetal hearts; 2) to compare measurements of the magnitude of cyclic variation from the left and right sides of the heart; and 3) to determine if the observed results are consistent with predictions relating the overall backscatter level and the magnitude of cyclic variation. Methods Cyclic variation data from the left and right ventricular free walls were generated from analyses of the backscatter from echocardiographic images of 16 structurally normal fetal hearts at mid-gestation. Results The magnitude of cyclic variation was found to be greater for the left ventricular free wall than for the right ventricular free wall (4.5 ± 1.1 dB vs. 2.3 ± 0.9 dB, respectively; mean ± SD; p < 0.0001, paired t-test). Conclusion Measurements of the cyclic variation of backscatter can be obtained from both the left and right sides of fetal hearts demonstrating a significant difference between the measured magnitude of cyclic variation in the left and right ventricular myocardium. This observation is consistent with predictions relating the overall backscatter level and the magnitude of cyclic variation. Results of this study suggest cyclic variation measurements may offer a useful approach for characterizing intrinsic differences in myocardial properties of the two ventricles in assessing fetal heart development. PMID:19131208

  18. Acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    The acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor permits an expectant mother to perform the fetal Non-Stress Test in her home. The potential market would include the one million U.S. pregnancies per year requiring this type of prenatal surveillance. The monitor uses polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) piezoelectric polymer film for the acoustic sensors, which are mounted in a seven-element array on a cummerbund. Evaluation of the sensor ouput signals utilizes a digital signal processor, which performs a linear prediction routine in real time. Clinical tests reveal that the acoustically based monitor provides Non-Stress Test records which are comparable to those obtained with a commercial ultrasonic transducer.

  19. Maternal bisphenol a exposure impacts the fetal heart transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C; Vandevoort, Catherine A; Settles, Matthew L; Robison, Barrie D; Murdoch, Gordon K

    2014-01-01

    Conditions during fetal development influence health and disease in adulthood, especially during critical windows of organogenesis. Fetal exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemical, bisphenol A (BPA) affects the development of multiple organ systems in rodents and monkeys. However, effects of BPA exposure on cardiac development have not been assessed. With evidence that maternal BPA is transplacentally delivered to the developing fetus, it becomes imperative to examine the physiological consequences of gestational exposure during primate development. Herein, we evaluate the effects of daily, oral BPA exposure of pregnant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on the fetal heart transcriptome. Pregnant monkeys were given daily oral doses (400 µg/kg body weight) of BPA during early (50-100 ± 2 days post conception, dpc) or late (100 ± 2 dpc--term), gestation. At the end of treatment, fetal heart tissues were collected and chamber specific transcriptome expression was assessed using genome-wide microarray. Quantitative real-time PCR was conducted on select genes and ventricular tissue glycogen content was quantified. Our results show that BPA exposure alters transcription of genes that are recognized for their role in cardiac pathophysiologies. Importantly, myosin heavy chain, cardiac isoform alpha (Myh6) was down-regulated in the left ventricle, and 'A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 12', long isoform (Adam12-l) was up-regulated in both ventricles, and the right atrium of the heart in BPA exposed fetuses. BPA induced alteration of these genes supports the hypothesis that exposure to BPA during fetal development may impact cardiovascular fitness. Our results intensify concerns about the role of BPA in the genesis of human metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  1. Fetal heart rate changes associated with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fedorkow, D M; Stewart, T J; Parboosingh, J

    1989-07-01

    Decreased fetal heart rate variability was noted 90 seconds after the induction of general anesthesia with sodium thiopentone and fentanyl in a patient undergoing basket extraction of a renal calculus at 30 weeks' gestation. The fetal sleep pattern lasted for 105 minutes after the anesthetic was discontinued, 45 minutes after the mother was fully awake.

  2. Exploring the Relationship between Fetal Heart Rate and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; Hains, Sylvia M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A relationship between fetal heart rate (HR) and cognition is explored within the context of infant, child and adult studies where the association is well established. Lack of direct access to the fetus and maturational changes limit research paradigms and response measures for fetal studies. Nevertheless, neural regulation of HR shows a number of…

  3. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    SciTech Connect

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-25

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced 'modified' Sensitivity (SE deg.) and 'modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV deg.) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  4. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced `modified' Sensitivity (SE°) and `modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV°) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  5. miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a in human fetal hearts correlate to the apoptotic and proliferation markers

    PubMed Central

    Jerše, Maja; Glavač, Damjan; Zidar, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to function in the developing embryo. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the translational regulation of gene expression, which is beside transcriptional regulation crucial for the morphologic development of muscle tissue. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that the expression of miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a correlates with gestational age as well as with an apoptotic and proliferative index in the developing human heart. Our study included normal heart tissue samples obtained at autopsy from 46 fetuses, 12 children, and 15 adults. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured by the immunohistochemical detection of Ki67 and cleaved-CK18. Expression of miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-208a was measured using real-time PCR. We found a similar level of expression of miR-133a/b in fetal and children hearts that was different from the levels in healthy adults. We also found a correlation between a miR-208a expression to the gestational age of fetuses. We observed an inverse correlation between Ki67 expression and gestational age. Expression of Ki67 was positively correlated to the expression of miR-208a and miR-1, but inversely correlated to the expression of miR-133a/b. Expression of cleaved-CK18 was also inversely correlated to the expression of miR-133a/b. Our results showed a general decrease in the expression of miR-1 and an increase of miR-133a/b with increasing gestational age. We also found a general decrease in the expression of miR-208a, mimicking the expression of its host gene. Our results also suggest the involvement of miR-208a and miR-1 in the proliferation as well as anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic roles of miR-133a/b. PMID:25125495

  6. Human fetal growth and organ development: 50 years of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Giorgio; Cetin, Irene

    2006-04-01

    Knowledge about human fetal growth and organ development has greatly developed in the last 50 years. Anatomists and physiologists had already described some crucial aspects, for example, the circulation of blood during intrauterine life through the fetal heart, the liver as well as the placenta. However, only in the last century physiologic studies were performed in animal models. In the human fetus, the introduction of ultrasound and Doppler velocimetry has provided data about the growth and development of the fetus and of the circulation through the different fetal districts. Moreover, in the last 2 decades we have learned about fetal oxygenation and fetal nutrient supply caused by the availability of fetal blood samples obtained under relatively steady state conditions. These studies, together with studies using stable isotope methodologies, have clarified some aspects of the supply of the major nutrients for the fetus such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids. At the same time, the relevance of placental function has been recognized as a major determinant of fetal diseases leading to intrauterine growth restriction. More recently, the availability of new tools such as 3-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, have made possible the evaluation of the growth and development of fetal organs. This knowledge in the healthy fetus will improve the ability of clinicians to recognize abnormal phenotypes of the different fetal organs, thus allowing to stage fetal diseases.

  7. Transfer entropy analysis of maternal and fetal heart rate coupling.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Endo, Miyuki; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence of the short term relationship between maternal and fetal heart rates has been found in previous model-based studies, knowledge about the mechanism and patterns of the coupling during gestation is still limited. In this study, a model-free method based on Transfer Entropy (TE) was applied to quantify the maternal-fetal heart rate couplings in both directions. Furthermore, analysis of the lag at which TE was maximum and its changes throughout gestation, provided more information about the mechanism of coupling and its latency. Experimental results based on fetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) and maternal ECG showed the evidence of coupling for 62 out of 65 healthy mothers and fetuses in each direction, by statistically validating against the surrogate pairs. The fetuses were divided into three gestational age groups: early (16-25 weeks), mid (26-31 weeks) and late (32-41 weeks) gestation. The maximum TE from maternal to fetal heart rate significantly increased from early to mid gestation, while the coupling delay on both directions decreased significantly from mid to late gestation. These changes occur concomitant with the maturation of the fetal sensory and autonomic nervous systems with advancing gestational age. In conclusion, the application of TE with delays revealed detailed information about the changes in fetal-maternal heart rate coupling strength and latency throughout gestation, which could provide novel clinical markers of fetal development and well-being.

  8. Reliability of spectral analysis of fetal heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, G J J; Vullings, R; Bergmans, J W M; Oei, S G

    2014-01-01

    Spectral analysis of fetal heart rate variability could provide information on fetal wellbeing. Unfortunately, fetal heart rate recordings are often contaminated by artifacts. Correction of these artifacts affects the outcome of spectral analysis, but it is currently unclear what level of artifact correction facilitates reliable spectral analysis. In this study, a method is presented that estimates the error in spectral powers due to artifact correction, based on the properties of the Continuous Wavelet Transformation. The results show that it is possible to estimate the error in spectral powers. The information about this error makes it possible for clinicians to assess the reliability of spectral analysis of fetal heart rate recordings that are contaminated by artifacts. PMID:25570577

  9. [An Algorithm for Correcting Fetal Heart Rate Baseline].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Lu, Yaosheng

    2015-10-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline estimation is of significance for the computerized analysis of fetal heart rate and the assessment of fetal state. In our work, a fetal heart rate baseline correction algorithm was presented to make the existing baseline more accurate and fit to the tracings. Firstly, the deviation of the existing FHR baseline was found and corrected. And then a new baseline was obtained finally after treatment with some smoothing methods. To assess the performance of FHR baseline correction algorithm, a new FHR baseline estimation algorithm that combined baseline estimation algorithm and the baseline correction algorithm was compared with two existing FHR baseline estimation algorithms. The results showed that the new FHR baseline estimation algorithm did well in both accuracy and efficiency. And the results also proved the effectiveness of the FHR baseline correction algorithm.

  10. Randomised controlled trial of intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Mahomed, K.; Nyoni, R.; Mulambo, T.; Kasule, J.; Jacobus, E.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare effectiveness of different methods of monitoring intrapartum fetal heart rate. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Referral maternity hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe. SUBJECTS--1255 women who were 37 weeks or more pregnant with singleton cephalic presentation and normal fetal heart rate before entry into study. INTERVENTIONS--Intermittent monitoring of fetal heart rate by electronic monitoring, Doppler ultrasound, use of Pinard stethoscope by a research midwife, or routine use of Pinard stethoscope by attending midwife. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Abnormal fetal heart rate patterns, need for operative delivery for fetal distress, neonatal mortality, Apgar scores, admission to neonatal unit, neonatal seizures, and hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. RESULTS--Abnormalities in fetal heart rate were detected in 54% (172/318) of the electronic monitoring group, 32% (100/312) of the ultrasonography group, 15% (47/310) of the Pinard stethoscope group, and 9% (28/315) of the routine monitoring group. Caesarean sections were performed for 28% (89%), 24% (76), 10% (32), and 15% (46) of the four groups respectively. Neonatal outcome was best in the ultrasonography group: hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurred in two, one, seven, and 10 cases in the four groups respectively; neonatal seizures occurred only in the last two groups (six and nine cases respectively); and deaths occurred in eight, two, five, and nine cases respectively. CONCLUSIONS--Abnormalities in fetal heart rate were more reliably detected by Doppler ultrasonography than with Pinard stethoscope, and its use resulted in good perinatal outcome. The use of relatively cheap ultrasound monitors should be further evaluated and promoted in obstetric units caring for high risk pregnancies in developing countries with scarce resources. PMID:8136665

  11. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  12. Real-time signal processing for fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimy, Muhammad I; Ahmed, Firoz; Mohd Ali, M A; Zahedi, Edmond

    2003-02-01

    An algorithm based on digital filtering, adaptive thresholding, statistical properties in the time domain, and differencing of local maxima and minima has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of the fetal and maternal heart rates from the maternal abdominal electrocardiogram during pregnancy and labor for ambulatory monitoring. A microcontroller-based system has been used to implement the algorithm in real-time. A Doppler ultrasound fetal monitor was used for statistical comparison on five volunteers with low risk pregnancies, between 35 and 40 weeks of gestation. Results showed an average percent root mean square difference of 5.32% and linear correlation coefficient from 0.84 to 0.93. The fetal heart rate curves remained inside a +/- 5-beats-per-minute limit relative to the reference ultrasound method for 84.1% of the time. PMID:12665042

  13. Phase plane based identification of fetal heart rate patterns

    PubMed Central

    Vairavan, Srinivasan; Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D.; Preissl, Hubert; Eswaran, Hari

    2012-01-01

    Using a phase plane analysis (PPA) of the spatial spread of trajectories of the fetal heart rate and its time-derivative we characterize the fetal heart rate patterns (fHRP) as defined by Nijhuis. For this purpose, we collect 22 fetal magnetocardiogram using a 151 SQUID system from 22 low-risk fetuses in gestational ages ranging from 30 to 37 weeks. Each study lasted for 30 minutes. After the attenuation of the maternal cardiac signals, we identify the R waves using an adaptive Hilbert transform approach and calculate the fetal heart rate. On these datasets, we apply the proposed approach and the traditionally used approaches such as standard deviation of the normal to normal intervals (SDNN) and root mean square of the successive difference (RMSSD). Heart rate patterns are scored by an expert using Nijhuis criteria and revealed A, B, and D patterns. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve is used to assess the performance of the metric to differentiate the different patterns. Results showed that only PPA was able to differentiate all pairs of fHRP with high performance. PMID:22254593

  14. Heart disease link to fetal hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Dino A; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Richter, Hans G; Camm, Emily J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Kane, Andrew D; Hansell, Jeremy A; Brain, Kirsty L; Skeffington, Katie L; Itani, Nozomi; Wooding, F B Peter; Cross, Christine M; Allison, Beth J

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the intrauterine environment interacts with our genetic makeup to shape the risk of developing disease in later life. Fetal chronic hypoxia is a common complication of pregnancy. This chapter reviews how fetal chronic hypoxia programmes cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in the offspring in adult life and discusses the mechanisms via which this may occur. Using an integrative approach in large and small animal models at the in vivo, isolated organ, cellular and molecular levels, our programmes of work have raised the hypothesis that oxidative stress in the fetal heart and vasculature underlies the mechanism via which prenatal hypoxia programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in later life. Developmental hypoxia independent of changes in maternal nutrition promotes fetal growth restriction and induces changes in the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine systems of the adult offspring, which are normally associated with disease states during ageing. Treatment with antioxidants of animal pregnancies complicated with reduced oxygen delivery to the fetus prevents the alterations in fetal growth, and the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine dysfunction in the fetal and adult offspring. The work reviewed offers both insight into mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for clinical intervention against the early origin of cardiometabolic disease in pregnancy complicated by fetal chronic hypoxia.

  15. Magnetographic assessment of fetal hiccups and their effect on fetal heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Popescu, E A; Popescu, M; Bennett, T L; Lewine, J D; Drake, W B; Gustafson, K M

    2007-06-01

    Fetal hiccups emerge as early as nine weeks post-conception, being the predominant diaphragmatic movement before 26 weeks of gestation. They are considered as a programmed isometric inspiratory muscle exercise of the fetus in preparation for the post-natal respiratory function, or a manifestation of a reflex circuitry underlying the development of suckling and gasping patterns. The present paper provides the first evidence of non-invasive biomagnetic measurements of the diaphragm spasmodic contractions associated with fetal hiccups. The magnetic field patterns generated by fetal hiccups exhibit well-defined morphological features, consisting of an initial high frequency transient waveform followed by a more prolonged low frequency component. This pattern is consistent across recordings obtained from two fetal subjects, and it is confirmed by signals recorded in a neonatal subject. These results demonstrate that fetal biomagnetometry can provide insights into the electrophysiological mechanisms of diaphragm motor function in the fetus. Additionally, we study the correlation between hiccup events and fetal cardiac rhythm and provide evidence that hiccups may modulate the fetal heart rate during the last trimester of pregnancy.

  16. Fetal echocardiographic screening of diabetic pregnancies for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gladman, G; McCrindle, B W; Boutin, C; Smallhorn, J F

    1997-02-01

    This study sought to assess pregnant diabetic women for the presence of fetal cardiac anomalies and to determine whether better diabetic control was associated with a reduced risk to the fetus. Between 1988 and 1995, pregnant type I and II diabetic women routinely underwent fetal echocardiography. Hemoglobin A1c values were used as an indicator of maternal diabetic control and any relation between congenital heart disease in the fetus and maternal hemoglobin A1c levels was sought. Cardiac defects were identified in 7 of 328 pregnancies assessed, for an incidence of congenital heart disease of 2.1% (95% confidence interval: 0.6-3.6%). A review of the postnatal cardiac database did not reveal any undetected major malformations. The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 7.6% +/- 2.0% obtained at a mean gestational age of 12 +/- 7 weeks. Hemoglobin A1c levels of mothers carrying a fetus with congenital heart disease did not significantly differ from those with a normal fetus: 8.1% +/- 3.4% versus 7.6% +/- 1.9% (p = 0.48). Mothers with an affected fetus demonstrated a wide range of HbA1c levels (4.1 to 13.7%). Thus, the incidence of significant fetal cardiac abnormalities is low and not significantly related to maternal diabetic control. PMID:9259899

  17. Heart rate variability parameters and fetal movement complement fetal behavioral states detection via magnetography to monitor neurovegetative development

    PubMed Central

    Brändle, Johanna; Preissl, Hubert; Draganova, Rossitza; Ortiz, Erick; Kagan, Karl O.; Abele, Harald; Brucker, Sara Y.; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Fetal behavioral states are defined by fetal movement and heart rate variability (HRV). At 32 weeks of gestational age (GA) the distinction of four fetal behavioral states represented by combinations of quiet or active sleep or awakeness is possible. Prior to 32 weeks, only periods of fetal activity and quiesence can be distinguished. The increasing synchronization of fetal movement and HRV reflects the development of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) control. Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) detects fetal heart activity at high temporal resolution, enabling the calculation of HRV parameters. This study combined the criteria of fetal movement with the HRV analysis to complete the criteria for fetal state detection. HRV parameters were calculated including the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal R–R interval (SDNN), the mean square of successive differences of the R–R intervals (RMSSD, SDNN/RMSSD ratio, and permutation entropy (PE) to gain information about the developing influence of the ANS within each fetal state. In this study, 55 magnetocardiograms from healthy fetuses of 24–41 weeks’ GA were recorded for up to 45 min using a fetal biomagnetometer. Fetal states were classified based on HRV and movement detection. HRV parameters were calculated for each state. Before GA 32 weeks, 58.4% quiescence and 41.6% activity cycles were observed. Later, 24% quiet sleep state (1F), 65.4% active sleep state (2F), and 10.6% active awake state (4F) were observed. SDNN increased over gestation. Changes of HRV parameters between the fetal behavioral states, especially between 1F and 4F, were statistically significant. Increasing fetal activity was confirmed by a decrease in PE complexity measures. The fHRV parameters support the differentiation between states and indicate the development of autonomous nervous control of heart rate function. PMID:25904855

  18. Canine fetal heart rate: do accelerations or decelerations predict the parturition day in bitches?

    PubMed

    Gil, E M U; Garcia, D A A; Giannico, A T; Froes, T R

    2014-10-15

    Ultrasonography is a safe and efficient technique for monitoring fetal development and viability. One of the most important and widely used parameters to verify fetal viability is the fetal heart rate (HR). In human medicine, the fetal HR normally oscillates during labor in transient accelerations and decelerations associated with uterine contractions. The present study investigated whether these variations also occur in canine fetuses and its relationship to parturition. A cohort study was conducted in 15 pregnant bitches undergoing two-dimensional high-resolution ultrasonographic examination during the 8th and 9th week of gestation. Fetal HR was assessed in M-mode for 5 minutes in each fetus in all bitches. In addition, the bitches were monitored for clinical signs of imminent parturition. Associations between the HR, antepartum time, and delivery characteristics were evaluated with a Poisson regression model. Fetal HR acceleration and deceleration occurred in canine fetuses and predicted the optimal time of parturition. These findings can help veterinarians and sonographers better understand this phenomenon in canine fetuses.

  19. Prone position craniotomy in pregnancy without fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jean; Alexander, Ashish; Philip, Shoba; Thomas, Anoop

    2016-09-01

    A pregnant patient in second trimester scheduled for posterior fossa craniotomy in prone position is a challenge for the anesthesiologist. Things to consider are physiological changes during pregnancy, non-obstetric surgery in pregnant patients, neuroanesthetic principles, effects of prone positioning, and need for fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring. We have described the anesthetic management of this case and discussed intra-operative FHR monitoring including controversies about its role, indications, and various options available as per fetal gestational age. In our case we attempted intermittent intra-operative FHR monitoring to optimize maternal positioning and fetal oxygenation even though the fetus was pre-viable. However the attempt was abandoned due to practical difficulties with prone positioning. Patient made good neurological recovery following the procedure and delivered a healthy term baby 4 months later. Decisions regarding fetal monitoring should be individualized based on viability of the fetus and feasibility of emergency cesarean delivery. Good communication between a multidisciplinary team involving neurosurgeon, anesthesiologist, obstetrician, and neonatologist is important for a successful outcome for mother and fetus. We conclude that prone position neurosurgery can safely be carried out in a pregnant patient with pre-viable fetus without FHR monitoring. PMID:27555144

  20. Puerperal endometritis and intrauterine fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rehu, M; Haukkamaa, M

    1980-08-01

    The incidence of puerperal endometritis in 5058 patients who were delivered during a one year study period was recorded prospectively. Caesarean section was performed in 774 cases (15.3%) and intrauterine fetal heart rate monitoring was used in 2016 cases (39.9%). After vaginal delivery, the incidence of endometritis was 1.5% in those monitored externally and 2.4% in those monitored internally (P less than 0.05). After Caesarean section, endometritis occurred in 8.0% of those monitored externally and in 16.4% of those monitored internally for varying times (P less than 0.01). The duration of monitoring had no significant effect on these infection rates. The risk of puerperal endometritis after internal fetal monitoring seemed to be the same as after one vaginal examination. PMID:7259077

  1. Design of an FECG scalp electrode fetal heart rate monitor.

    PubMed

    Reguig, F B; Kirk, D L

    1996-03-01

    The design of a fetal heart rate (FHR) monitor using fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) scalp electrodes is described. It is shown that the design approach followed two stages: generation of FHR pulses at R-R intervals and FHR computation. The former uses a simple hardware approach for QRS detection and R-wave enhancement, while the latter requires a software implementation in order to produce FHR traces on a beat to beat basis. The QRS detection is based on bandpass filtering using switched mode capacitor technique; the R-wave enhancement and amplitude information are achieved by differentiation followed by fullwave rectification and peak detection. An adaptive threshold together with a comparator circuit are used to generate FHR pulses at R-R intervals. Beat to beat variations of FHR traces are produced by hardware and software implementation on a Z80 microprocessor board. Results obtained by the FHR monitor are evaluated and contrasted to other commercial FHR monitors. PMID:8673321

  2. Linear and nonlinear measures of fetal heart rate patterns evaluated on very short fetal magnetocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Eder Rezende; Murta, Luiz Otavio; Baffa, Oswaldo; Wakai, Ronald T; Comani, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effectiveness of linear short- and long-term variability time domain parameters, an index of sympatho-vagal balance (SDNN/RMSSD) and entropy in differentiating fetal heart rate patterns (fHRPs) on the fetal heart rate (fHR) series of 5, 3 and 2 min duration reconstructed from 46 fetal magnetocardiograms. Gestational age (GA) varied from 21 to 38 weeks. FHRPs were classified based on the fHR standard deviation. In sleep states, we observed that vagal influence increased with GA, and entropy significantly increased (decreased) with GA (SDNN/RMSSD), demonstrating that a prevalence of vagal activity with autonomous nervous system maturation may be associated with increased sleep state complexity. In active wakefulness, we observed a significant negative (positive) correlation of short-term (long-term) variability parameters with SDNN/RMSSD. ANOVA statistics demonstrated that long-term irregularity and standard deviation of normal-to-normal beat intervals (SDNN) best differentiated among fHRPs. Our results confirm that short- and long-term variability parameters are useful to differentiate between quiet and active states, and that entropy improves the characterization of sleep states. All measures differentiated fHRPs more effectively on very short HR series, as a result of the fMCG high temporal resolution and of the intrinsic timescales of the events that originate the different fHRPs. PMID:22945491

  3. Pulmonary Hypoplasia Associated with Congenital Heart Diseases: A Fetal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruchonnet-Metrailler, Isabelle; Bessieres, Bettina; Bonnet, Damien; Vibhushan, Shamila; Delacourt, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of the fetal pulmonary vasculature may affect lung morphogenesis. Postnatal studies have suggested that pulmonary hypoplasia (PH) may be associated with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Objective To determine the prevalence of PH associated with CHDs, and to evaluate whether CHDs with right outflow obstruction were associated with the highest risk of lung growth impairment. Methods Between January 2006 and December 2010, fetuses with CHD obtained following the termination of pregnancies due to fetal abnormalities were examined in a prospective manner for the detection of heart and lung defects. CHDs were classified into five pathophysiological groups. Lung weight (LW), body weight (BW), and LW/BW ratio were analyzed for each case. The expression of CD31 and VEGF in the lung was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Fetuses with CHDs and right outflow obstruction had significantly lower LW for a given BW, and significantly lower LW/BW ratios for a given gestational age. When defining PH as a fetal LW/BW ratio <0.015 before 28 weeks, and <0.012 after 28 weeks, PH was detected in 15 of the 119 fetuses analyzed (13%). It was significantly associated with CHD with right outflow obstruction, independently of chromosomal abnormalities and associated extracardiac abnormalities (p<0.03). Right outflow obstruction was detected in 60% of the fetuses with CHD and PH, but in only 32% of those with CHD but no PH. In fetuses with right outflow obstruction, no difference was observed between those with PH and those without PH, in terms of the ratio of pulmonary artery diameter to aortic diameter, lung CD31 expression, or lung VEGF expression. Conclusion CHDs with right outflow obstruction are a significant risk factor for prenatally acquired PH. The occurrence of fetal PH is not correlated with abnormalities of the pulmonary vasculature, suggesting the involvement of perfusion-independent mechanisms. PMID:24699523

  4. Categorizing Fetal Heart Rate Variability with and without Visual Aids

    PubMed Central

    Ashdown, Amanda J.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Belfore, Lee A.; Davis, Stephen S.; Abuhamad, Alfred Z.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ability of clinicians to correctly categorize images of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability with and without the use of exemplars. Study Design A sample of 33 labor and delivery clinicians inspected static FHR images and categorized them into one of four categories defined by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) based on the amount of variability within absent, minimal, moderate, or marked ranges. Participants took part in three conditions: two in which they used exemplars representing FHR variability near the center or near the boundaries of each range, and a third control condition with no exemplars. The data gathered from clinicians were compared with those from a previous study using novices. Results Clinicians correctly categorized more images when the FHR variability fell near the center rather than the boundaries of each range, F (1,32) = 71.69, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.69. They also correctly categorized more images when exemplars were available, F (2,64) = 5.44, p = 0.007, partial η2 = 0.15. Compared with the novices, the clinicians were more accurate and quicker in their category judgments, but this difference was limited to the condition without exemplars. Conclusion The results suggest that categorizing FHR variability is more difficult when the examples fall near the boundaries of each NICHD-defined range. Thus, clinicians could benefit from training with visual aids to improve judgments about FHR variability and potentially enhance safety in labor and delivery. PMID:27722031

  5. Human heart by art.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  6. Dual transmission model of the fetal heart tone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    2001-05-01

    Detection of the fetal heart tone by auscultation is sometimes easy, other times very difficult. In the model proposed here, the level of difficulty depends upon the position of the fetus within the maternal abdomen. If the fetus lies in the classical left/right occiput anterior position (head down, back against the maternal abdominal wall), detection by a sensor or stethoscope on the maternal abdominal surface is easy. In this mode, named here the ``direct contact'' mode, the heartbeat pushes the fetus against the detecting sensor. The motion generates pressure by impact and does not involve acoustic propagation at all. If the fetus lies in a persistent occiput posterior position (spine-to-spine, fetus facing forward), detection is difficult. In this, the ``fluid propagation'' mode, sound generated by the fetal heart and propagating across the amniotic fluid produces extremely weak signals at the maternal surface, typically 30 dB lower than those of the direct contact mode. This reduction in tone level can be compensated by judicious selection of detection frequency band and by exploiting the difference between the background noise levels of the two modes. Experimental clinical results, demonstrating the tones associated with the two respective modes, will be presented.

  7. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Kovács, L

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using 3H-prazosin and 3H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogenous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycaemia of newborns after treatment of premature labour with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  8. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  9. Fetal heart screening in low-risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Rustico, M A; Benettoni, A; D'Ottavio, G; Maieron, A; Fischer-Tamaro, I; Conoscenti, G; Meir, Y; Montesano, M; Cattaneo, A; Mandruzzato, G

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether a screening program for fetal cardiac malformations is justified in a low-risk population, and which factors influence its accuracy. The fetal heart was evaluated in 7024 pregnant women at 20-22 weeks, and evaluation was repeated at a more advanced gestational age in 9% of cases. Cardiological follow-up was continued postnatally until 2 years of age. The overall prevalence of cardiac anomaly was 0.93%. The incidences of major and minor defects were 0.44% and 0.48%, respectively. There were 23 true positives (0.33%): in 20 cases, the diagnosis was made in the second trimester, and 13 women (65%) chose termination of pregnancy. Seventeen of the 20 cases identified in the second trimester were serious malformations. There were 42 false negatives (0.60%). Of these, 12 had signs of cardiac dysfunction at birth or within the 1st month of life, and three of them died as a result of their cardiac anomaly. There were eight false positives (0.11%), all of a minor type. Six abnormal karyotypes, out of a total of 21 performed in the true-positive group (28.5%), were found. In addition, five of the 42 newborns in the false-negative group had trisomy 21. The overall sensitivity was 35.4%, and 61.3% for major defects. The accuracy in two distinct periods was estimated because the level of experience of the operators was different: sensitivity was 45.2% in period 1 (1986-88) (77.8% for major defects) and 26.5% in period 2 (1989-92) (52.9% for major defects). We conclude that a fetal heart screening program in the obstetric population is justified. It defines a high-risk group for karyotyping, allows planning of delivery in a tertiary center or the choice of terminating the pregnancy for the parents and appears to have a positive cost-benefit ratio. A crucial factor is the level of training and experience of the operators, who need specific teaching support. PMID:8590200

  10. DNA Methylation Landscapes of Human Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Slieker, Roderick C; Roost, Matthias S; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Suchiman, H Eka D; Tobi, Elmar W; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P; Slagboom, P Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2015-10-01

    Remodelling the methylome is a hallmark of mammalian development and cell differentiation. However, current knowledge of DNA methylation dynamics in human tissue specification and organ development largely stems from the extrapolation of studies in vitro and animal models. Here, we report on the DNA methylation landscape using the 450k array of four human tissues (amnion, muscle, adrenal and pancreas) during the first and second trimester of gestation (9,18 and 22 weeks). We show that a tissue-specific signature, constituted by tissue-specific hypomethylated CpG sites, was already present at 9 weeks of gestation (W9). Furthermore, we report large-scale remodelling of DNA methylation from W9 to W22. Gain of DNA methylation preferentially occurred near genes involved in general developmental processes, whereas loss of DNA methylation mapped to genes with tissue-specific functions. Dynamic DNA methylation was associated with enhancers, but not promoters. Comparison of our data with external fetal adrenal, brain and liver revealed striking similarities in the trajectory of DNA methylation during fetal development. The analysis of gene expression data indicated that dynamic DNA methylation was associated with the progressive repression of developmental programs and the activation of genes involved in tissue-specific processes. The DNA methylation landscape of human fetal development provides insight into regulatory elements that guide tissue specification and lead to organ functionality.

  11. Beat-to-beat heart rate detection in multi-lead abdominal fetal ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Peters, C H L; van Laar, J O E H; Vullings, R; Oei, S G; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    Reliable monitoring of fetal condition often requires more information than is provided by cardiotocography, the standard technique for fetal monitoring. Abdominal recording of the fetal electrocardiogram may offer valuable additional information, but unfortunately is troubled by poor signal-to-noise ratios during certain parts of pregnancy. To increase the usability of abdominal fetal ECG recordings, an algorithm was developed that enhances fetal QRS complexes in these recordings and thereby provides a promising method for detecting the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate in recordings with poor signal-to-noise ratios. The method was evaluated on generated recordings with controlled signal-to-noise ratios and on actual recordings that were performed in clinical practice and were annotated by two independent experts. The evaluation on the generated signals demonstrated excellent results (sensitivity of 0.98 for SNR≥1.5). Only for SNR<2, the inaccuracy of the fetal heart rate detection exceeded 2 ms, which may still suffice for cardiotocography but is unacceptable for analysis of the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the method in actual recordings were reduced to approximately 90% for SNR≤2.4, but were excellent for higher signal-to-noise ratios.

  12. The Ontogenesis of Human Fetal Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.; Shepard, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    The content and concentration of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH) were measured in 117 human fetal pituitary glands from 68 days of gestation to term and in the pituitary glands of 20 children 1 month to 9 yr of age. Physicochemical and immunochemical properties of GH of fetal pituitary glands and GH from adult pituitary glands were indistinguishable by disc gel electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, starch gel electrophoresis, and radioimmunoassay techniques. In the fetal pituitary gland, the GH content rose from mean levels of 0.44±0.2 μg at 10-14 wk of gestation, to 9.21±2.31 μg at 15-19 wk, to 59.38±11.08 μg at 20-24 wk, to 225.93±40.49 μg at 25-29 wk, to 577.67±90 μg at 30-34 wk, and to 675.17±112.33 μg at 35-40 wk. There was a significant positive correlation between growth hormone content of the pituitary and gestational age, crown-rump length, and the weight of the pituitary gland. The content and concentration (micrograms/milligram) of human growth hormone (HGH) in the fetal pituitary showed significant increments (P < 0.001) for each 4 wk period of gestation until 35 wk. Further increases in the HGH content were noted in pituitaries of children aged 1-9 yr (range of 832 to 11.211 μg). Immunoreactive GH was detected in fetal serum at a concentration of 14.5 ng/ml as early as 70 days gestation, the youngest fetus assayed. At 10-14 wk, the mean concentration of serum growth hormone was 65.2±7.6 ng/ml; at 15-19 wk 114.9±12.5 ng/ml; at 20-24 wk 119.3±19.8 ng/ml; at 25-29 wk 72.0±11.5 ng/ml; and 33.5±4.2 ng/ml at term. A significant negative correlation of serum growth hormone with advancing gestational age after 20-24 wk was observed (P < 0.001). In 17 fetuses paired serum and pituitary samples were assayed; no significant correlation between the concentration of serum GH and the pituitary content or concentration of GH was demonstrable. The serum concentration of chorionic somatomammotropin (HCS) in the fetus was unrelated to gestational

  13. The Influence of a Crosshair Visual Aid on Observer Detection of Simulated Fetal Heart Rate Signals.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Rebecca A; Scerbo, Mark W; Anderson-Montoya, Brittany L; Belfore, Lee A; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Davis, Stephen S

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine whether a visual aid overlaid on fetal heart rate (FHR) tracings increases detection of critical signals relative to images with no visual aid. Study Design In an experimental study, 21 undergraduate students viewed 240 images of simulated FHR tracings twice, once with the visual aids and once without aids. Performance was examined for images containing three different types of FHR signals (early deceleration, late deceleration, and acceleration) and four different FHR signal-to-noise ratios corresponding to FHR variability types (absent, minimal, moderate, and marked) identified by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2008). Performance was analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results The presence of the visual aid significantly improved correct detections of signals overall and decreased false alarms for the marked variability condition. Conclusion The results of the study provide evidence that the presence of a visual aid was useful in helping novices identify FHR signals in simulated maternal-fetal heart rate images. Further, the visual aid was most useful for conditions in which the signal is most difficult to detect (when FHR variability is highest).

  14. The Influence of a Crosshair Visual Aid on Observer Detection of Simulated Fetal Heart Rate Signals.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Rebecca A; Scerbo, Mark W; Anderson-Montoya, Brittany L; Belfore, Lee A; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Davis, Stephen S

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine whether a visual aid overlaid on fetal heart rate (FHR) tracings increases detection of critical signals relative to images with no visual aid. Study Design In an experimental study, 21 undergraduate students viewed 240 images of simulated FHR tracings twice, once with the visual aids and once without aids. Performance was examined for images containing three different types of FHR signals (early deceleration, late deceleration, and acceleration) and four different FHR signal-to-noise ratios corresponding to FHR variability types (absent, minimal, moderate, and marked) identified by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2008). Performance was analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results The presence of the visual aid significantly improved correct detections of signals overall and decreased false alarms for the marked variability condition. Conclusion The results of the study provide evidence that the presence of a visual aid was useful in helping novices identify FHR signals in simulated maternal-fetal heart rate images. Further, the visual aid was most useful for conditions in which the signal is most difficult to detect (when FHR variability is highest). PMID:26989564

  15. The relationship of fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks and birthweight at term.

    PubMed

    Panburana, P; Ajjimakorn, S; Jaovisidha, A; Tangkajiwangkoon, P

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks and birthweight at term. At the fetal medicine unit, Ramathibodi Hospital, the screening for Down's syndrome at 10-14 weeks' gestation by ultrasound has been ongoing since January 1997. Transabdominal ultrasound examination is routinely performed for the crown-rump length, nuchal translucency thickness and fetal heart rate. The fetal heart rate is measured over four to six cardiac cycles by using the pulsed Doppler technique. One thousand and fourteen term singleton pregnancies that resulted in phenotypically normal live births were studied. The study was done was carried out at 10-14 weeks of gestation (mean 12.27 weeks) from January 1997 to November 1997. The mean patient age was 26.78 years old. The mean gestational age and birthweight were 38.83 weeks and 3,097.83 grams respectively. The incidence of low birthweight (less than 2,500 grams) was 14.2 per cent. Regression analysis demonstrated no significant relation between fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks and birthweight at term. In conclusion, the result of this study revealed that there was no correlation of the fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks' gestation and birthweight at term.

  16. The effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on fetal rat heart vitamin A: a model for fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeJonge, M H; Zachman, R D

    1995-04-01

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, nutritional alterations caused by ethanol exposure may be an etiologic factor in FAS. The congenital heart defects seen in FAS are similar to those found in vitamin A teratogenesis. Because ethanol ingestion alters vitamin A metabolism, we hypothesized that the cardiac manifestations seen in FAS result from an alteration in vitamin A metabolism or function in the developing fetus. Twenty-day gestation fetal rat hearts from ethanol-exposed and control pregnancies were analyzed for 1) levels of endogenous retinol, retinyl palmitate, and retinoic acid by quantitative HPLC; 2) binding activity levels of both retinol by cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid by cellular retinoic acid binding protein using specific competitive binding assays; and 3) relative abundance of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid receptor alpha, beta, and gamma subtype message as expressed in mRNA. Levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate were significantly higher (p < 0.01) and the level of retinoic acid was significantly lower (p < 0.02) in the ethanol-exposed fetal hearts. Binding activity levels of cellular retinol binding protein and cellular retinoic acid binding protein were not different in the two groups. The message for retinoic acid receptor alpha (3.7 kb) was increased (p < 0.01) and the message for retinoic acid receptor beta was decreased (p < 0.05) in the ethanol-exposed hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7596680

  17. Quantifying the Interactions between Maternal and Fetal Heart Rates by Transfer Entropy.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of the short term relationship between maternal and fetal heart rates has been found in previous studies. However there is still limited knowledge about underlying mechanisms and patterns of the coupling throughout gestation. In this study, Transfer Entropy (TE) was used to quantify directed interactions between maternal and fetal heart rates at various time delays and gestational ages. Experimental results using maternal and fetal electrocardiograms showed significant coupling for 63 out of 65 fetuses, by statistically validating against surrogate pairs. Analysis of TE showed a decrease in transfer of information from fetus to the mother with gestational age, alongside the maturation of the fetus. On the other hand, maternal to fetal TE was significantly greater in mid (26-31 weeks) and late (32-41 weeks) gestation compared to early (16-25 weeks) gestation (Mann Whitney Wilcoxon (MWW) p<0.05). TE further increased from mid to late, for the fetuses with RMSSD of fetal heart rate being larger than 4 msec in the late gestation. This difference was not observed for the fetuses with smaller RMSSD, which could be associated with the quiet sleep state. Delay in the information transfer from mother to fetus significantly decreased (p = 0.03) from mid to late gestation, implying a decrease in fetal response time. These changes occur concomitant with the maturation of the fetal sensory and autonomic nervous systems with advancing gestational age. The effect of maternal respiratory rate derived from maternal ECG was also investigated and no significant relationship was found between breathing rate and TE at any lag. In conclusion, the application of TE with delays revealed detailed information on the fetal-maternal heart rate coupling strength and latency throughout gestation, which could provide novel clinical markers of fetal development and well-being.

  18. The Application of an Anatomical Database for Fetal Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Pei, Qiu-Yan; Li, Yun-Tao; Yang, Zhen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fetal congenital heart anomalies are the most common congenital anomalies in live births. Fetal echocardiography (FECG) is the only prenatal diagnostic approach used to detect fetal congenital heart disease (CHD). FECG is not widely used, and the antenatal diagnosis rate of CHD varies considerably. Thus, mastering the anatomical characteristics of different kinds of CHD is critical for ultrasound physicians to improve FECG technology. The aim of this study is to investigate the applications of a fetal CHD anatomic database in FECG teaching and training program. Methods: We evaluated 60 transverse section databases including 27 types of fetal CHD built in the Prenatal Diagnosis Center in Peking University People's Hospital. Each original database contained 400–700 cross-sectional digital images with a resolution of 3744 pixels × 5616 pixels. We imported the database into Amira 5.3.1 (Australia Visage Imaging Company, Australia) three-dimensional (3D) software. The database functions use a series of 3D software visual operations. The features of the fetal CHD anatomical database were analyzed to determine its applications in FECG continuing education and training. Results: The database was rebuilt using the 3D software. The original and rebuilt databases can be displayed dynamically, continuously, and synchronically and can be rotated at arbitrary angles. The sections from the dynamic displays and rotating angles are consistent with the sections in FECG. The database successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship features of different fetal CHDs. We established a fetal CHD anatomy training database and a standardized training database for FECG. Ultrasound physicians and students can learn the anatomical features of fetal CHD and FECG through either centralized training or distance education. Conclusions: The database of fetal CHD successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship of different kinds of

  19. Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate and Uterine Activity Signals by Using Apple II Plus Microcomputer *

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Sze-ya; Jilek, Jiri; Yeh, Michael M.

    1981-01-01

    Intrapartum electronic fetal monitoring has been used widely for over a decade in obstetric practice. Its main purpose is to provide information about the labor and fetal conditions so that better obstetrical care can be provided. However, there is certain information obtained from monitoring which needs electronic or computer aids to make them useful clinically. This study describes the experience of using the Apple II plus microcomputer in obtaining and analyzing fetal heart rate and uterine activity signals from the intrapartum clinical monitor. This was done by building an analog-to-digital converting board and by using 6502 microprocessor machine language routines. Approximately 60 to 80 minutes of tracings can be processed before 30 kilobytes of memory are filled. The data is then transferred to a 5¼″ diskette for permanent storage and for future data reduction. With this approach, uterine activity units and fetal heart rate variability indices are calculated.

  20. Maternal systemic lupus erythematosus associated with fetal congenital heart block. A case report.

    PubMed

    Moore, P J

    1981-08-15

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is a rare cause of fetal bradycardia and, if misinterpreted as fetal distress, may lead to detrimental obstetric intervention. There is a definite association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as other connective tissue disorders in the mother and CHB in her offspring. A case of CHB in the child of a mother with asymptomatic SLE is reported and a useful diagnostic investigation, the sonar-atropine test, is described.

  1. Investigating the beat by beat phase synchronization between maternal and fetal heart rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Khandoker, Ahsan H; Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Funamoto, Kiyoe; Sugibayashi, Rika; Endo, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    The development of the fetal cardiovascular system plays a crucial role in fetal health. The evolution of the relationship between fetal and maternal cardiac systems during fetal maturation is a characterizing feature for fetal cardiac development. This paper aims to evaluate this relationship by investigating the beat-to-beat synchronization between fetal and maternal heart rates and its variation at different stages of pregnancy. Synchronization epochs and phase locking patterns are analyzed at certain synchronization ratios (SRs) for three gestational age groups (16-26 weeks, 27-33 weeks, 34-40 weeks). Results show that the normalized synchronization epoch is significantly different for three age groups with the p-value of 6.72*10(-6) and 2.89*10(-4) at SR of 1:2 and 4:5 respectively. The variance of phase locking also shows significant difference for three groups with the p-value less than 10(-7) at four SRs. Results also suggest that synchronization may be the force behind the increase in the maternal heart rate to maintain the fetal development and provide supplies for the fetus. Overall, the findings propose new clinical markers for evaluating the antenatal development.

  2. Application of higher-order cepstral techniques in problems of fetal heart signal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry-Rizk, Madiha; Zgallai, Walid; Hardiman, P.; O'Riordan, J.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, cepstral analysis based on second order statistics and homomorphic filtering techniques have been used in the adaptive decomposition of overlapping, or otherwise, and noise contaminated ECG complexes of mothers and fetals obtained by a transabdominal surface electrodes connected to a monitoring instrument, an interface card, and a PC. Differential time delays of fetal heart beats measured from a reference point located on the mother complex after transformation to cepstra domains are first obtained and this is followed by fetal heart rate variability computations. Homomorphic filtering in the complex cepstral domain and the subuent transformation to the time domain results in fetal complex recovery. However, three problems have been identified with second-order based cepstral techniques that needed rectification in this paper. These are (1) errors resulting from the phase unwrapping algorithms and leading to fetal complex perturbation, (2) the unavoidable conversion of noise statistics from Gaussianess to non-Gaussianess due to the highly non-linear nature of homomorphic transform does warrant stringent noise cancellation routines, (3) due to the aforementioned problems in (1) and (2), it is difficult to adaptively optimize windows to include all individual fetal complexes in the time domain based on amplitude thresholding routines in the complex cepstral domain (i.e. the task of `zooming' in on weak fetal complexes requires more processing time). The use of third-order based high resolution differential cepstrum technique results in recovery of the delay of the order of 120 milliseconds.

  3. [Detection of Heart Rate of Fetal ECG Based on STFT and BSS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Cai, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Changes in heart rate of fetal is function regulating performance of the circulatory system and the central nervous system, it is significant to detect heart rate of fetus in perinatal fetal. This paper puts forward the fetal heart rate detection method based on short time Fourier transform and blind source separation. First of all, the mixed ECG signal was preprocessed, and then the wavelet transform technique was used to separate the fetal ECG signal with noise from mixed ECG signal, after that, the short-time Fourier transform and the blind separation were carried on it, and then calculated the correlation coefficient of it, Finally, An independent component that it has strongest correlation with the original signal was selected to make FECG peak detection and calculated the fetal instantaneous heart rate. The experimental results show that the method can improve the detection rate of the FECG peak (R), and it has high accuracy in fixing peak(R) location in the case of low signal-noise ratio. PMID:27197491

  4. The Fetal Heart in Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Van Mieghem, Tim; Lewi, Liesbeth; Gucciardo, Léonardo; DeKoninck, Philip; Van Schoubroeck, Dominique; Devlieger, Roland; Deprest, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a severe complication occurring in 10% of monochorionic twin pregnancies. The disease is usually explained as due to an intrauterine imbalance in intertwin blood exchange, which leads to a volume depleted-donor twin and an overfilled recipient twin. The recipient has signs of cardiac dysfunction, which can be measured using echocardiography or blood and amniotic fluid derived biomarkers. Whereas cardiac dysfunction typically progresses in pregnancies treated with amniodrainage, it usually disappears within a few weeks after fetoscopic laser coagulation of the connecting intertwin anastomoses. Nevertheless, recipients remain at a increased risk of pulmonary stenosis. In this paper, we summarize the cardiac alterations in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, describe the changes seen after fetal therapy, list the newly proposed staging systems based on fetal cardiac function, and make recommendations about the use of fetal echocardiography in the evaluation and followup of pregnancies complicated by twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. PMID:20811613

  5. [Biomechanical characteristics of human fetal membranes. Preterm fetal membranes are stronger than term fetal membranes].

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, N; Abdelrahim, A; Moore, R M; Uyen, L; Mercer, B M; Mansour, J M; Kumar, D; Sawady, J; Moore, J J

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical characteristics of human fetal membranes (FM) throughout gestation. Biomechanical properties were determined for 115 FM of 23-41 weeks gestation using our previously described methodology. The areas of membrane immediately adjacent to the strongest and weakest tested spots were sampled for histomorphometric analysis. Clinical data on the patients whose FM were examined were also collected. FM less than 28 weeks gestation were associated with higher incidence of abruption and chorioamnionitis. Topographically FM at all gestations had heterogeneous biomechanical characteristics over their surfaces with distinct weak areas. The most premature membranes were the strongest. FM strength represented by rupture force and work to rupture decreased with increasing gestation in both weak and strong regions of FM. This decrease in FM strength was most dramatic at more than 38 weeks gestation. The FM component amnion-chorion sublayers were thinner in the weak areas compared to strong areas. Compared to term FM, preterm FM are stronger but have similar heterogeneous weak and strong areas. Following a gradual increase in FM weakness with increasing gestation, there is a major drop-off at term 38 weeks gestation. The FM weak areas are thinner than the stronger areas. Whether the difference in thickness is enough to account for the strength differences is unknown.

  6. Is there evidence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization?

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Geue, Daniel; Lange, Silke; Cysarz, Dirk; Bettermann, Henrik; Grönemeyer, Dietrich HW

    2003-01-01

    Background The prenatal condition offers a unique possibility of examining physiological interaction between individuals. Goal of this work was to look for evidence of coordination between fetal and maternal cardiac systems. Methods 177 magnetocardiograms were recorded in 62 pregnancies (16th–42nd week of gestation). Fetal and maternal RR interval time series were constructed and the phases, i.e. the timing of the R peaks of one time series in relation to each RR interval of the other were determined. The distributions of these phases were examined and synchrograms were constructed for real and surrogate pairs of fetal and maternal data sets. Synchronization epochs were determined for defined n:m coupling ratios. Results Differences between real and surrogate data could not be found with respect to number of synchronization epochs found (712 vs. 741), gestational age, subject, recording or n:m combination. There was however a preference for the occurrence of synchronization epochs in specific phases in real data not apparent in the surrogate for some n:m combinations. Conclusion The results suggest that occasional coupling between fetal and maternal cardiac systems does occur. PMID:12702214

  7. Development of a piezopolymer pressure sensor for a portable fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Pretlow, R. A.; Stoughton, J. W.; Baker, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    A piezopolymer pressure sensor has been developed for service in a portable fetal heart rate monitor, which will permit an expectant mother to perform the fetal nonstress test, a standard predelivery test, in her home. Several sensors are mounted in an array on a belt worn by the mother. The sensor design conforms to the distinctive features of the fetal heart tone, namely, the acoustic signature, frequency spectrum, signal amplitude, and localization. The components of a sensor serve to fulfill five functions: signal detection, acceleration cancellation, acoustical isolation, electrical shielding, and electrical isolation of the mother. A theoretical analysis of the sensor response yields a numerical value for the sensor sensitivity, which is compared to experiment in an in vitro sensor calibration. Finally, an in vivo test on patients within the last six weeks of term reveals that nonstress test recordings from the acoustic monitor compare well with those obtained from conventional ultrasound.

  8. Fetal Heart Rate Reactivity Differs by Women's Psychiatric Status: An Early Marker for Developmental Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Catherine; Sloan, Richard P.; Myers, Michael M.; Ellman, Lauren; Werner, Elizabeth; Jeon, Jiyeon; Tager, Felice; Fifer, William P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there are differences in fetal heart rate (FHR) reactivity associated with women's psychiatric status. Method: In 57 women in their 36th to 38th week of pregnancy (mean age 27 [+ or -] 6 years), electrocardiogram, blood pressure (BP), respiration (RSP), and FHR were measured during baseline and a psychological…

  9. Fetal Heart Rate and Variability: Stability and Prediction to Developmental Outcomes in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Costigan, Kathleen; Achy-Brou, Aristide

    2007-01-01

    Stability in cardiac indicators before birth and their utility in predicting variation in postnatal development were examined. Fetal heart rate and variability were measured longitudinally from 20 through 38 weeks gestation (n = 137) and again at age 2 (n = 79). Significant within-individual stability during the prenatal period and into childhood…

  10. Fetal autonomic brain age scores, segmented heart rate variability analysis, and traditional short term variability

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Dirk; Kowalski, Eva-Maria; Schmidt, Alexander; Tetschke, Florian; Nowack, Samuel; Rudolph, Anja; Wallwitz, Ulrike; Kynass, Isabelle; Bode, Franziska; Tegtmeyer, Janine; Kumm, Kathrin; Moraru, Liviu; Götz, Theresa; Haueisen, Jens; Witte, Otto W.; Schleußner, Ekkehard; Schneider, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances of fetal autonomic brain development can be evaluated from fetal heart rate patterns (HRP) reflecting the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Although HRP analysis from cardiotocographic (CTG) recordings is established for fetal surveillance, temporal resolution is low. Fetal magnetocardiography (MCG), however, provides stable continuous recordings at a higher temporal resolution combined with a more precise heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. A direct comparison of CTG and MCG based HRV analysis is pending. The aims of the present study are: (i) to compare the fetal maturation age predicting value of the MCG based fetal Autonomic Brain Age Score (fABAS) approach with that of CTG based Dawes-Redman methodology; and (ii) to elaborate fABAS methodology by segmentation according to fetal behavioral states and HRP. We investigated MCG recordings from 418 normal fetuses, aged between 21 and 40 weeks of gestation. In linear regression models we obtained an age predicting value of CTG compatible short term variability (STV) of R2 = 0.200 (coefficient of determination) in contrast to MCG/fABAS related multivariate models with R2 = 0.648 in 30 min recordings, R2 = 0.610 in active sleep segments of 10 min, and R2 = 0.626 in quiet sleep segments of 10 min. Additionally segmented analysis under particular exclusion of accelerations (AC) and decelerations (DC) in quiet sleep resulted in a novel multivariate model with R2 = 0.706. According to our results, fMCG based fABAS may provide a promising tool for the estimation of fetal autonomic brain age. Beside other traditional and novel HRV indices as possible indicators of developmental disturbances, the establishment of a fABAS score normogram may represent a specific reference. The present results are intended to contribute to further exploration and validation using independent data sets and multicenter research structures. PMID:25505399

  11. Fetal growth and coronary heart disease in south India.

    PubMed

    Stein, C E; Fall, C H; Kumaran, K; Osmond, C; Cox, V; Barker, D J

    1996-11-01

    People from India living overseas have high rates of coronary heart disease which are not explained by known coronary risk factors. In India, coronary heart disease is predicted to become the most common cause of death within 15 years. Small size at birth is a newly described risk factor for coronary heart disease. The authors studied 517 men and women born between 1934 and 1954 in a mission hospital in Mysore, South India, and who still lived near the hospital. Researchers related the prevalence of coronary heart disease, defined by standard criteria, to individual birth size. 25 men and 27 women had coronary heart disease. Low birth weight, short birth length, and small head circumference were associated with a raised prevalence of the disease. The associations were stronger and statistically significant among people aged 45 years and over. High rates of disease were also found in those whose mothers had a low body weight during pregnancy. The highest prevalence of coronary heart disease was in people who weighed 2.5 kg or less at birth and whose mothers weighed less than 45 kg during pregnancy. These associations were largely independent of known coronary risk factors.

  12. Monitoring fetal heart rate during pregnancy: contributions from advanced signal processing and wearable technology.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Maria G; Fanelli, Andrea; Magenes, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring procedures are the basis to evaluate the clinical state of patients and to assess changes in their conditions, thus providing necessary interventions in time. Both these two objectives can be achieved by integrating technological development with methodological tools, thus allowing accurate classification and extraction of useful diagnostic information. The paper is focused on monitoring procedures applied to fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) signals, collected during pregnancy, in order to assess fetal well-being. The use of linear time and frequency techniques as well as the computation of non linear indices can contribute to enhancing the diagnostic power and reliability of fetal monitoring. The paper shows how advanced signal processing approaches can contribute to developing new diagnostic and classification indices. Their usefulness is evaluated by comparing two selected populations: normal fetuses and intra uterine growth restricted (IUGR) fetuses. Results show that the computation of different indices on FHRV signals, either linear and nonlinear, gives helpful indications to describe pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and neural system controlling the fetal heart. As a further contribution, the paper briefly describes how the introduction of wearable systems for fetal ECG recording could provide new technological solutions improving the quality and usability of prenatal monitoring.

  13. Monitoring Fetal Heart Rate during Pregnancy: Contributions from Advanced Signal Processing and Wearable Technology

    PubMed Central

    Signorini, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring procedures are the basis to evaluate the clinical state of patients and to assess changes in their conditions, thus providing necessary interventions in time. Both these two objectives can be achieved by integrating technological development with methodological tools, thus allowing accurate classification and extraction of useful diagnostic information. The paper is focused on monitoring procedures applied to fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) signals, collected during pregnancy, in order to assess fetal well-being. The use of linear time and frequency techniques as well as the computation of non linear indices can contribute to enhancing the diagnostic power and reliability of fetal monitoring. The paper shows how advanced signal processing approaches can contribute to developing new diagnostic and classification indices. Their usefulness is evaluated by comparing two selected populations: normal fetuses and intra uterine growth restricted (IUGR) fetuses. Results show that the computation of different indices on FHRV signals, either linear and nonlinear, gives helpful indications to describe pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and neural system controlling the fetal heart. As a further contribution, the paper briefly describes how the introduction of wearable systems for fetal ECG recording could provide new technological solutions improving the quality and usability of prenatal monitoring. PMID:24639886

  14. Reduced systolic pressure load decreases cell-cycle activity in the fetal sheep heart.

    PubMed

    O'Tierney, P F; Anderson, D F; Faber, J J; Louey, S; Thornburg, K L; Giraud, G D

    2010-08-01

    The fetal heart is highly sensitive to changes in mechanical load. We have previously demonstrated that increased cardiac load can stimulate cell cycle activity and maturation of immature cardiomyocytes, but the effects of reduced load are not known. Sixteen fetal sheep were given either continuous intravenous infusion of lactated Ringer solution (LR) or enalaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor beginning at 127 days gestational age. After 8 days, fetal arterial pressure in the enalaprilat-infused fetuses (23.8 +/- 2.8 mmHg) was lower than that of control fetuses (47.5 +/- 4.7 mmHg) (P < 0.0001). Although the body weights of the two groups of fetuses were similar, the heart weight-to-body weight ratios of the enalaprilat-infused fetuses were less than those of the LR-infused fetuses (5.6 +/- 0.5 g/kg vs. 7.0 +/- 0.6 g/kg, P < 0.0001). Dimensions of ventricular myocytes were not different between control and enalaprilat-infused fetuses. However, there was a significant decrease in cell cycle activity in both the right ventricle (P < 0.005) and the left ventricle (P < 0.002) of the enalaprilat-infused fetuses. Thus, we conclude a sustained reduction in systolic pressure load decreases hyperplastic growth in the fetal heart. PMID:20484695

  15. Human fetal gene therapy: moral and ethical questions.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J C; Richter, G

    1996-08-20

    This two-part paper discusses moral and ethical questions raised by future trials of human fetal gene therapy. The first part examines broad moral issues to explore whether fetal gene therapy is a morally praiseworthy goal. Ought it be done at all? These issues include (i) how the concept of fetal gene therapy originally arose as a goal envisioned at the beginning of prenatal diagnosis, (ii) preimplantation genetic diagnosis as a better preconceptual alternative for parents at higher genetic risk, (iii) alternatives to genetic abortions, (iv) the social and economic priority of fetal gene therapy, and (v) whether fetal gene therapy is a "slippery slope" that will end in germ-line gene therapy. This part concludes that far more reasons exist to commend fetal gene therapy than to reject it, given its limits and modest social and economic priority. The second part responds to specific ethical questions that must be raised about any protocol for human gene therapy. These questions and issues are adapted to the prenatal situation: (i) how the previable fetus becomes a "patient," (ii) concern for clinical benefit and minimizing risks to the fetus and pregnant woman, (iii) concern for the voluntary and informed participation of the pregnant woman, the father, and for protection of their privacy, (iv) concern for fair selection of subjects, (v) considerations of harm to germ line cells, and (vi) the role of public oversight of fetal gene therapy. The article concludes by recommending a continuation of the consolidated Recombinant Advisory Committee (RAC) for the near future.

  16. O/sup 6/-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase in human fetal tissues: fetal and maternal factors

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Samuel, M.J.; Dutta-Choudhury, T.A.; Wani, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    O/sup 6/-Methylguanine methyltransferase (O/sup 6/-MT) was measured and compared in extracts of 7 human fetal tissues obtained from 21 different fetal specimens as a function of fetal age and race, and maternal smoking and drug usage. Activity was determined from the proteinase-K solubilized radioactivity transferred from the DNA to the O/sup 6/-MT. S9 homogenates were incubated with a heat depurinated (/sup 3/H)-methylnitrosourea alkylated DNA. Liver exhibited the highest activity followed by kidney, lung, small intestine, large intestine, skin and brain. Each of the tissues exhibited a 3- to 5-fold level of interindividual variation of O/sup 6/-MT. There did not appear to be any significant difference of O/sup 6/-MT in the tissues obtained from mothers who smoked cigarettes during pregnancy. Also, fetal race and age did not appear to account for the level of variation of O/sup 6/-MT. The fetal tissues obtained from an individual using phenobarbital and smoking exhibited 4-fold increases in O/sup 6/-MT activity. The tissues obtained from another individual on kidney dialysis were 2- to 3-fold higher than the normal population. These data suggest that the variation in human O/sup 6/-MT can not be explained by racial or smoking factors, but may be modulated by certain drugs.

  17. Decreased baseline variability on fetal heart rate pattern in a fetus with heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryutaro; Takei, Kohta; Kaneshi, Yosuke; Morikawa, Mamoru; Cho, Kazutoshi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2015-12-01

    In a fetus with suspected heterotaxy syndrome, a decreased/absent baseline variability of fetal heart rate pattern developed at gestational week 36(+5) and continued for 5 days until birth at gestational week 37(+2), while repeat biophysical profile scorings with ultrasound were consistently unremarkable. This neonate weighing 2404 g with Apgar scores of 7 (1-min) and 8 (5-min) and umbilical arterial cord blood pH of 7.28 with base deficit of 3.9 mmol/L, showed a heart rate of 120 b.p.m. for 3 h after birth, but subsequently developed sinus bradycardia (84 b.p.m.) unresponsive to crying. Isoproterenol initiated 9 h after birth was effective in the increase of heart rate to 120 b.p.m. in this neonate. Brain magnetic resonance imaging at 16 days of age was unremarkable. The decreased/absent baseline variability of fetal heart rate pattern was speculated to have been caused by sinus node dysfunction, and not by reduced fetal oxygenation in this case. PMID:26421346

  18. Echocardiographic Assessment of Embryonic and Fetal Mouse Heart Development: A Focus on Haemodynamics and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hahurij, Nathan D.; Calkoen, Emmeline E.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Roest, Arno A. W.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Poelmann, Robert E.; De Ruiter, Marco C.; van Munsteren, Conny J.; Steendijk, Paul; Blom, Nico A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Heart development is a complex process, and abnormal development may result in congenital heart disease (CHD). Currently, studies on animal models mainly focus on cardiac morphology and the availability of hemodynamic data, especially of the right heart half, is limited. Here we aimed to assess the morphological and hemodynamic parameters of normal developing mouse embryos/fetuses by using a high-frequency ultrasound system. Methods. A timed breeding program was initiated with a WT mouse line (Swiss/129Sv background). All recordings were performed transabdominally, in isoflurane sedated pregnant mice, in hearts of sequential developmental stages: 12.5, 14.5, and 17.5 days after conception (n = 105). Results. Along development the heart rate increased significantly from 125 ± 9.5 to 219 ± 8.3 beats per minute. Reliable flow measurements could be performed across the developing mitral and tricuspid valves and outflow tract. M-mode measurements could be obtained of all cardiac compartments. An overall increase of cardiac systolic and diastolic function with embryonic/fetal development was observed. Conclusion. High-frequency echocardiography is a promising and useful imaging modality for structural and hemodynamic analysis of embryonic/fetal mouse hearts. PMID:24707208

  19. Toward the improvement in fetal monitoring during labor with the inclusion of maternal heart rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hernâni; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Manuela; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Bernardes, João

    2016-04-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring is used routinely in labor, but conventional methods have a limited capacity to detect fetal hypoxia/acidosis. An exploratory study was performed on the simultaneous assessment of maternal heart rate (MHR) and FHR variability, to evaluate their evolution during labor and their capacity to detect newborn acidemia. MHR and FHR were simultaneously recorded in 51 singleton term pregnancies during the last two hours of labor and compared with newborn umbilical artery blood (UAB) pH. Linear/nonlinear indices were computed separately for MHR and FHR. Interaction between MHR and FHR was quantified through the same indices on FHR-MHR and through their correlation and cross-entropy. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis included nonparametric confidence intervals and statistical tests, receiver operating characteristic curves and linear discriminant analysis. Progression of labor was associated with a significant increase in most MHR and FHR linear indices, whereas entropy indices decreased. FHR alone and in combination with MHR as FHR-MHR evidenced the highest auROC values for prediction of fetal acidemia, with 0.76 and 0.88 for the UAB pH thresholds 7.20 and 7.15, respectively. The inclusion of MHR on bivariate analysis achieved sensitivity and specificity values of nearly 100 and 89.1%, respectively. These results suggest that simultaneous analysis of MHR and FHR may improve the identification of fetal acidemia compared with FHR alone, namely during the last hour of labor.

  20. Gestational Dietary Protein Is Associated with Sex Specific Decrease in Blood Flow, Fetal Heart Growth and Post-Natal Blood Pressure of Progeny

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Overview The incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes is higher in pregnancies where the fetus is male. Sex specific differences in feto-placental perfusion indices identified by Doppler assessment have recently been associated with placental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction. This study aims to investigate sex specific differences in placental perfusion and to correlate these changes with fetal growth. It represents the largest comprehensive study under field conditions of uterine hemodynamics in a monotocous species, with a similar long gestation period to the human. Primiparous 14mo heifers in Australia (n=360) and UK (n=180) were either individually or group fed, respectively, diets with differing protein content (18, 14, 10 or 7% crude protein (CP)) from 60d prior to 98 days post conception (dpc). Fetuses and placentae were excised at 98dpc (n = 48). Fetal development an median uterine artery blood flow were assessed monthly from 36dpc until term using B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography. MUA blood flow to the male feto-placental unit increased in early pregnancy associated with increased fetal growth. Protein restriction before and shortly after conception (-60d up to 23dpc) increased MUA diameter and indices of velocity during late pregnancy, reduced fetal heart weight in the female fetus and increased heart rate at birth, but decreased systolic blood pressure at six months of age. Conclusion and Significance Sex specific differences both in feto-placental Doppler perfusion indices and response of these indices to dietary perturbations were observed. Further, maternal diet affected development of fetal cardiovascular system associated with altered fetal haemodynamics in utero, with such effects having a sex bias. The results from this study provide further insight into the gender specific circulatory differences present in the fetal period and developing cardiovascular system. PMID:25915506

  1. Detection of fetal heart movement in first trimester of pregnancy using pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H P

    1972-11-25

    A method is reported by which the presence or absence of fetal heart movement may be reliably detected by an abdominal approach from the 48th day of pregnancy onwards (menstrual age). The technique involves the use of commercially available diagnostic sonar apparatus using two display and time position modes in combination.A series of 106 examinations on 56 patients in early pregnancy is presented in which there were no false results.

  2. How to read fetal heart rate tracings in labor: a comparison between ACOG and NICE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Buscicchio, Giorgia; Gentilucci, Lucia; Martorana, Rossana; Martino, Cristina; Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess reproducibility and clinical relevance of current guidelines on fetal heart rate interpretation in labor. Two obstetricians with comparable experience analyzed one hundred fetal heart rate tracings. One doctor made a first analysis using American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) 2009 guideline's criteria; the other used National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2007 guideline's criteria; subsequently they repeated the evaluation crossing the guidelines used. The primary outcome of this experiment was to determine the time spent to evaluate the tracings, secondary outcomes were: the intraobserver concordance (concordance of the evaluation with the two systems for each investigator), the interobserver concordance (concordance between the interpretation given by each investigator) and. the concordance between operators' grading and actual outcome of labor. The interpretation of fetal heart rate tracings was longer using ACOG criteria. The intraobserver agreement was significant. The interobserver agreement was better using NICE guidelines. The same trend showed for the concordance between investigators' grading and actual outcomes There was more discordance in worse outcomes. Both guidelines are interesting and useful, but NICE seems easier to handle than ACOG.

  3. Fetal and neonatal mortality in patients with isolated congenital heart diseases and heart conditions associated with extracardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Marantz, Pablo; Sáenz Tejeira, M Mercedes; Peña, Gabriela; Segovia, Alejandra; Fustiñana, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Congenital malformations are a known cause of intrauterine death; of them, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are accountable for the highest fetal and neonatal mortality rates. They are strongly associated with other extracardiac malformations and an early fetal mortality. Two hundred and twenty fves cases of CHDs are presented. Of them, 155 were isolated CHDs (group A) and 70 were associated with extracardiac malformations, chromosomal disorders, or genetic syndromes (group B). The overall mortality in group B was higher than that observed in group A (p <0.01). Prenatal mortality was similar in both groups: A: 8.4% (13 out of 155); B: 15.7% (11 out of 70). Postnatal mortality was A: 16.8% (26 out of 155) (p <0.01), OR: 0.52 (95% CI: 0.16-1.7); B: 32.9% (23 out of 70) (p <0.01), OR: 0.41 (95% CI: 0.20-0.83). Heart diseases associated with extracardiac abnormalities had a higher mortality rate than isolated congenital heart diseases in the period up to 60 weeks of postmenstrual age (140 days post-term). No differences were observed between both groups of patients in terms of prenatal mortality.

  4. Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): new technology for evaluation of the fetal heart.

    PubMed

    DeVore, G R; Falkensammer, P; Sklansky, M S; Platt, L D

    2003-10-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) is a new approach for clinical assessment of the fetal heart. It offers an easy to use technique to acquire data from the fetal heart and to aid in visualization with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) cine sequences. The acquisition is performed in two steps: first, images are acquired by a single, automatic volume sweep. Second, the system analyzes the image data according to their spatial and temporal domain and processes an online dynamic 3D image sequence that is displayed in a multiplanar reformatted cross-sectional display and/or a surface rendered display. The examiner can navigate within the heart, re-slice, and produce all of the standard image planes necessary for a comprehensive diagnosis. The advantages of STIC for use in evaluation of the fetal heart are as follows: the technique delivers a temporal resolution which corresponds to a B-mode frame rate of approximately 80 frames/s; it provides the examiner with an unlimited number of images for review; it allows for correlation between image planes that are perpendicular to the main image acquisition plane; it may shorten the evaluation time when complex heart defects are suspected; it enables the reconstruction of a 3D rendered image that contains depth and volume which may provide additional information that is not available from the thin multiplanar image slices (e.g. for pulmonary veins, septal thickness); it lends itself to storage and review of volume data by the examiner or by experts at a remote site; it provides the examiner with the ability to review all images in a looped cine sequence. PMID:14528474

  5. Isolation of Leukocytes from the Human Maternal-fetal Interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Plazyo, Olesya; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by the infiltration of leukocytes in the reproductive tissues and at the maternal-fetal interface (decidua basalis and decidua parietalis). This interface is the anatomical site of contact between maternal and fetal tissues; therefore, it is an immunological site of action during pregnancy. Infiltrating leukocytes at the maternal-fetal interface play a central role in implantation, pregnancy maintenance, and timing of delivery. Therefore, phenotypic and functional characterizations of these leukocytes will provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to pregnancy disorders. Several protocols have been described in order to isolate infiltrating leukocytes from the decidua basalis and decidua parietalis; however, the lack of consistency in the reagents, enzymes, and times of incubation makes it difficult to compare these results. Described herein is a novel approach that combines the use of gentle mechanical and enzymatic dissociation techniques to preserve the viability and integrity of extracellular and intracellular markers in leukocytes isolated from the human tissues at the maternal-fetal interface. Aside from immunophenotyping, cell culture, and cell sorting, the future applications of this protocol are numerous and varied. Following this protocol, the isolated leukocytes can be used to determine DNA methylation, expression of target genes, in vitro leukocyte functionality (i.e., phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, T-cell proliferation, and plasticity, etc.), and the production of reactive oxygen species at the maternal-fetal interface. Additionally, using the described protocol, this laboratory has been able to describe new and rare leukocytes at the maternal-fetal interface.

  6. [A new ECG electrode concept for the conduction of fetal heart action potentials without penetration of the skin].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Langner, K; Rothe, J; Saling, E

    1982-10-01

    Internal cardiotocography is an important method for reliable supervision of the fetus during labor. The main task is the prevention of fetal hypoxia. However, there is a considerable disadvantage as the electrodes used penetrate the fetal skin, creating a possible entry point for organisms. The concept we have developed forms a new way of decreasing the risk of infection during labor by conducting the fetal heart rate potentials without penetrating the skin. The electrode is fixed to the skin of the presenting part by tissue adhesive and electrical contact between the fetal skin and the wire of the electrode is established through using electrolyte fluid.

  7. Investigation of the interaction of cardiotoxic anticancer agents using the fetal mouse heart organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Kimler, B.F.; Rethorst, R.D.; Cox, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    The fetal mouse heart organ culture system was utilized in an effort to document and predict the potential cardiotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, Adriamycin (ADR), and Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ); alone and in combination. These antineoplastic agents have been shown to produce clinical cardiomyopathy which is often dose-limiting. Fetal mouse hearts (gestational day 17) were removed and placed in a culture system of 6-well microtiter plates. A single heart was placed in each well on a piece of aluminium mesh, above the culture medium but bathed by capillary action. The plates were then placed in a 100% oxygen environment and incubated at 37/sup 0/C. Treatments performed on day 1 after culture were Cs-137 irradiation (10, 20, or 40 Gy); ADR (10, 30, or 100 micrograms/ml); DHAQ (5, 20, or 50 micrograms/ml); or various combinations of drugs and radiation. Hearts were checked every day for functional activity as evidenced by continuous heart best. Untreated hearts beat rhythmically for up to 9 days (average = 6.8 days); treated hearts stopped beating between 2 and 7 days after treatment. Using this endpoint of functional retention time (FRT), dose response curves were obtained for all individual agents. Combinations of ADR and DHAQ (at concentrations that resulted in FRTs of 3.5 days) produced no greater effect than either agent alone. However, the combination of radiation (FRT = 5.3 days) with ADR, DHAQ or both drugs was more effective than was drug alone. This system may help to predict the cardiotoxic effects that result from the use of these drugs and radiation.

  8. Impact of Heart Disease on Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Koutrolou-Sotiropoulou, Paraskevi; Parikh, Puja B; Miller, Charles; Lima, Fabio V; Butler, Javed; Stergiopoulos, Kathleen

    2015-08-01

    Pregnant women with underlying heart disease (HD) are at increased risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. In this study, we sought to identify the risk and risk factors for adverse maternal and fetal events in pregnant women with underlying HD. Pregnant women referred for echocardiogram with known or suspected HD were categorized into those with (1) cardiomyopathy, (2) other HD (congenital, coronary, arrhythmia, or valvular), and (3) no HD. Primary outcome was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as a composite of death, sustained arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and transient ischemic attack/stroke. Secondary outcome was fetal adverse clinical events (FACE), a composite of infant death, prematurity, underweight status, intracranial hemorrhage, and respiratory distress. Of the 173 pregnancies, 37 (21%) had cardiomyopathy, 65 (38%) had other HD, and 68 (39%) had no HD. MACE was higher in pregnancies with cardiomyopathy (p <0.001) because of higher rates of heart failure and cardiac arrest (up to 6 months postpartum, p <0.001 and 0.023, respectively). FACE rates were higher in cardiomyopathy pregnancies (p <0.001). In multivariate analysis, cardiomyopathy (odds ratio [OR] 11.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.7 to 35.4), hypertension (OR 10.69, 95% CI 3.70 to 30.90), and arrhythmia (OR 7.6, 95% CI 2.1 to 27) were independently associated with higher MACE. Cardiomyopathy (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 7.0) and hypertension (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 9.0) were also independently predictive of higher FACE. In conclusion, pregnant women with cardiomyopathy had higher rates of adverse MACE and FACE rates. Cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and arrhythmia were independently associated with adverse cardiovascular and fetal clinical events, whereas other HD was not.

  9. Fetal, infant, and childhood growth are predictors of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension in adult men and women.

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, C; Barker, D J

    2000-01-01

    Many human fetuses have to adapt to a limited supply of nutrients. In doing so they permanently change their structure and metabolism. These programmed changes may be the origins of a number of diseases in later life, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and noninsulin- dependent diabetes. We review epidemiologic studies in which the incidence of these diseases has been related to the recorded, early growth of individuals, while considering factors in the adult lifestyle, such as obesity and socioeconomic status. We discuss possible mechanisms. For hypertension these mechanisms include placentation, maternal blood pressure, fetal undernutrition; childhood growth, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, renal structure, programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, vascular structure, and sympathetic nervous activity. For noninsulin-dependent diabetes we discuss mechanisms concerning both insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. We include a review of evidence for the programming of serum cholesterol and clotting factor concentrations. We address the timing of critical windows for coronary heart disease, reviewing studies that allow assessment of the relative importance of fetal, infant, and childhood growth. We argue for a research strategy that combines clinical, animal, and epidemiological studies. PMID:10852853

  10. Developmental hematopoiesis in normal human fetal blood.

    PubMed

    Forestier, F; Daffos, F; Catherine, N; Renard, M; Andreux, J P

    1991-06-01

    Using an easy and safe procedure for fetal blood sampling in utero, we studied 3,415 fetuses for prenatal diagnosis. Retrospectively, 2,860 normal blood samples, performed from the 18th week of gestation to the end of pregnancy, were selected. Differentials were evaluated in 732 cases. Burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and erythropoietin (Epo) were measured in 27 and 163 cases, respectively. Total nucleated cell and platelet counts did not change from the 18th to the 30th week of gestation. The lymphocytes represented the main population and the decrease of normoblastic cells made up for the increase in neutrophils. The increase of red blood cells and hemoglobin was substantial during the studied period. At mid trimester threefold more BFU-E were obtained than at birth. Epo levels remained stable throughout the pregnancy and no correlation was found between Epo and gestational age. These normal values of fetal erythropoiesis will improve our knowledge of physiology and provide a better insight into developmental hematopoiesis.

  11. Consuming a Western diet for two weeks suppresses fetal genes in mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Medford, Heidi M.; Cox, Emily J.; Miller, Lindsey E.

    2014-01-01

    Diets high in sugar and saturated fat (Western diet) contribute to obesity and pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. A common physiological response to obesity is hypertension, which induces cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Hypertrophy is regulated at the level of chromatin by repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and pathological hypertrophy is associated with reexpression of a fetal cardiac gene program. Reactivation of fetal genes is commonly observed in hypertension-induced hypertrophy; however, this response is blunted in diabetic hearts, partially due to upregulation of the posttranslational modification O-linked-β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) to proteins by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT). OGT and O-GlcNAc are found in chromatin-modifying complexes, but it is unknown whether they play a role in Western diet-induced hypertrophic remodeling. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between O-GlcNAc, OGT, and the fetal gene-regulating transcription factor complex REST/mammalian switch-independent 3A/histone deacetylase (HDAC). Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a Western (n = 12) or control diet (n = 12) for 2 wk to examine the early hypertrophic response. Western diet-fed mice exhibited fasting hyperglycemia and increased body weight (P < 0.05). As expected for this short duration of feeding, cardiac hypertrophy was not yet evident. We found that REST is O-GlcNAcylated and physically interacts with OGT in mouse hearts. Western blot analysis showed that HDAC protein levels were not different between groups; however, relative to controls, Western diet hearts showed increased REST and decreased ANP and skeletal α-actin. Transcript levels of HDAC2 and cardiac α-actin were decreased in Western diet hearts. These data suggest that REST coordinates regulation of diet-induced hypertrophy at the level of chromatin. PMID:24523346

  12. Ultrasound findings in fetal congenital heart block associated with maternal anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jasmine; Clark, Toshi J; Tan, Justin H; Delaney, Shani; Jolley, Jennifer A

    2015-03-01

    We present the sonographic features of a second-trimester fetus diagnosed with a bradyarrhythmia at 19 weeks' gestation. The mother carried a diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome, including the presence of SSA and SSB antibodies. Ultrasound M-mode and fetal echocardiogram revealed the etiology of the bradycardia to be a complete fetal congenital heart block, likely due to transplacental passage of autoimmune anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies. Consequential to the congenital heart block, the fetus developed hydrops fetalis at 21 weeks' gestational age. We discuss the 2 major etiologies of congenital heart block and the implications in subsequent pregnancies.

  13. Three-dimensional scaffolds of fetal decellularized hearts exhibit enhanced potential to support cardiac cells in comparison to the adult.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Rodrigues, S C; Caldeira, J; Nunes, A M; Sampaio-Pinto, V; Resende, T P; Oliveira, M J; Barbosa, M A; Thorsteinsdóttir, S; Nascimento, D S; Pinto-do-Ó, P

    2016-10-01

    A main challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the limited data on microenvironmental cues that sustain survival, proliferation and functional proficiency of cardiac cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential of fetal (E18) and adult myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM) to support cardiac cells. Acellular three-dimensional (3D) bioscaffolds were obtained by parallel decellularization of fetal- and adult-heart explants thereby ensuring reliable comparison. Acellular scaffolds retained main constituents of the cardiac ECM including distinctive biochemical and structural meshwork features of the native equivalents. In vitro, fetal and adult ECM-matrices supported 3D culture of heart-derived Sca-1(+) progenitors and of neonatal cardiomyocytes, which migrated toward the center of the scaffold and displayed elongated morphology and excellent viability. At the culture end-point, more Sca-1(+) cells and cardiomyocytes were found adhered and inside fetal bioscaffolds, compared to the adult. Higher repopulation yields of Sca-1(+) cells on fetal ECM relied on β1-integrin independent mitogenic signals. Sca-1(+) cells on fetal bioscaffolds showed a gene expression profile that anticipates the synthesis of a permissive microenvironment for cardiomyogenesis. Our findings demonstrate the superior potential of the 3D fetal microenvironment to support and instruct cardiac cells. This knowledge should be integrated in the design of next-generation biomimetic materials for heart repair.

  14. [The abdominal fetal EKG for the analysis of pre- and subpartual heart frequency (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Breuker, K H; Khalili-Brunklaus, D; Bolte, A

    1976-10-15

    The application possibilities of abdominal fetal electrocardiography for pre- and subpartual continuous registration of the fetal heart frequency are examined. For this purpose the technical quality of 403 abdominal FEKG-registrations were checked in the individual stages of pregnancy and during birth. The average time spent looking for the best position with the greatest R-wave amplitude amounting to 2.6 min. The abdominal longitudinal position and the right hand oblique abdominal position proved to be advantageous with longitudinal presentation of the fetus. With fetal oblique to transverse presentation and in the 6th to 7th month of pregnancy the transverse abdominal position was likewise favourable. The technical quality of the supervision varied in the individual months of pregnancy. The best results were achieved in the 6th and 11th month of pregnancy. The worst technical quality was registered in the 8th month. In the 7th and 9th month two thirds of registrations were at least adequate. Sub partu the registrations during the first stage of labour were in two thirds of the cases very good and good, in a quarter satisfactory, in approx. a sixth adequate and fairly bad. In the second stage the registrations were considerably worse, 10.7% were satisfactory, 28.6% adequate and 59.8% deficient. Prepartually the technical quality was dependent on the fetal R-wave amplitude. In the second stage of labour no correlation between fetal R-wave amplitude and technical quality could be ascertained. The rupture of the amnion only influenced the quality of the registrations, if the satisfactory of labour increased. Adiposis and the position of the placenta did not affect the technical quality of the registrations. The lateral positions of the patient led to unusable registrations in 26.2%, in 46.9% the left and in 44.6% the right lateral position could be accepted without loss of quality. The comparison of the subpartual parallel registrations by means of phonocardiography

  15. Correlating multidimensional fetal heart rate variability analysis with acid-base balance at birth.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Martin G; Xu, Yawen; Stampalija, Tamara; Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe; Wang, Xiaogang; Casati, Daniela; Seely, Andrew Je; Alfirevic, Zarko; Gao, Xin; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Fetal monitoring during labour currently fails to accurately detect acidemia. We developed a method to assess the multidimensional properties of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) from trans-abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) during labour. We aimed to assess this novel bioinformatics approach for correlation between fHRV and neonatal pH or base excess (BE) at birth.We enrolled a prospective pilot cohort of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 38-42 weeks' gestation in Milan, Italy, and Liverpool, UK. Fetal monitoring was performed by standard cardiotocography. Simultaneously, with fECG (high sampling frequency) was recorded. To ensure clinician blinding, fECG information was not displayed. Data from the last 60 min preceding onset of second-stage labour were analyzed using clinically validated continuous individualized multiorgan variability analysis (CIMVA) software in 5 min overlapping windows. CIMVA allows simultaneous calculation of 101 fHRV measures across five fHRV signal analysis domains. We validated our mathematical prediction model internally with 80:20 cross-validation split, comparing results to cord pH and BE at birth.The cohort consisted of 60 women with neonatal pH values at birth ranging from 7.44 to 6.99 and BE from -0.3 to -18.7 mmol L(-1). Our model predicted pH from 30 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.90, P < 0.001) and BE from 21 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.77, P < 0.001).Novel bioinformatics approach (CIMVA) applied to fHRV derived from trans-abdominal fECG during labor correlated well with acid-base balance at birth. Further refinement and validation in larger cohorts are needed. These new measurements of fHRV might offer a new opportunity to predict fetal acid-base balance at birth. PMID:25407948

  16. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  17. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  18. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources

    PubMed Central

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. PMID:26395135

  19. Fetal Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... There is actually no direct contact between the circulatory systems of the mother and fetus. The fetus does ... use its own lungs until birth, so its circulatory system is different from that of a newborn baby. ...

  20. The Influence of Bearing-Down Technique on the Fetal Heart Rate during the Second Stage of Labor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlis, Deborah Woolley

    This experimental study contrasted the effects of sustained bearing-down efforts with short bearing-down efforts during the first twelve contractions of the second stage of labor. A single subject design with intrasubject replication was used to compare the incidence, duration, and amplitude of fetal heart rate decelerations, as well as the beat-to-beat variability of those decelerations. Neonatal outcome was evaluated with umbilical arterial cord blood pH values and the one- and five-minute APGAR scores. Thirty -two nulliparous women alternated the use of vigorous, sustained Valsalva-style bearing-down efforts with shorter efforts called minipushes every three contractions during the second stage of labor. Sixteen women began the second stage using the Valsalva-style bearing-down technique; sixteen began the second stage using the minipush. The fetal heart rate was recorded by an internal fetal scalp electrode. Uterine contractility was measured by an internal uterine pressure catheter. A repeated-measures MANOVA showed a significant interaction between the order of implementation of the bearing-down techniques and the amplitude of the fetal heart rate decelerations. A similar comparison of the duration of the decelerations showed no significant differences between the two bearing-down techniques. Likewise, analysis of the incidence of fetal heart rate decelerations and the magnitude of the beat-to-beat variability revealed no significant differences between the two techniques.

  1. Association of GDF1 rs4808863 with fetal congenital heart defects: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Qingqing; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaofei; Ma, Yuqing; Yao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common fetal defects and the most important cause of child mortality and morbidity. Objective To investigate the association between growth/differentiation factor 1 (GDF1) polymorphisms and fetal CHDs, by evaluating the association of GDF1 rs4808863 with fetal CHDs. Design A case–control study. Setting Beijing, China. Participants We selected 124 fetuses with a CHD and a normal karyotype and normal array-based comparative genomic hybridisation analysis and compared them with 124 normal fetuses matched for gestational age and sex. Fetuses with a CHD, from 20 to 32 weeks of gestation were included. Fetuses with any chromosomal abnormalities, and fetuses from multiple pregnancies and those carried by pregnant women with chronic diseases, were excluded from this research. DNA extraction and genotyping were carried out for all cases to investigate the genotype distributions of GDF1 rs4808863. Results A significant difference was noted for the CT phenotype of GDF1 rs4808863 between the controls and the fetuses with CHDs using homozygote and heterozygote comparisons. The minor allele (T allele) of GDF1 rs4808863 was associated with an increased risk of CHD (p<0.05). A statistically significant difference between controls and fetuses with CHDs was noted in a comparison with the mutation genotype CT+TT and wild-type genotype CC (p<0.05) using dominant modal analysis. After stratification analysis, the CT phenotype, the minor allele (T allele) and the mutation genotype CT+TT of the rs4808863 polymorphism were associated with atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD), left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) and left–right laterality defects (p<0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that the GDF1 rs4808863 polymorphism contributes to an increased risk of fetal CHDs, especially the subtypes of AVSD, LVOTO and left–right laterality defects. PMID:26656983

  2. The Fetal Mammalian Heart Generates a Robust Compensatory Response to Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sturzu, Anthony C.; Rajarajan, Kuppusamy; Passer, Derek; Plonowska, Karolina; Riley, Alyssa; Tan, Timothy C.; Sharma, Arun; Xu, Adele F.; Engels, Marc C.; Feistritzer, Rebecca; Li, Guang; Selig, Martin K.; Geissler, Richard; Robertson, Keston D.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Domian, Ibrahim J.; Wu, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart development is tightly regulated by signaling events acting upon a defined number of progenitor and differentiated cardiac cells. While loss-of-function of these signaling pathways leads to congenital malformation, the consequences of cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) or embryonic cardiomyocyte loss are less clear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that embryonic mouse hearts exhibit a robust mechanism for regeneration following extensive cell loss. Methods and Results By combining a conditional cell ablation approach with a novel blastocyst complementation strategy, we generated murine embryos that exhibit a full spectrum of CPC or cardiomyocyte ablation. Remarkably, ablation of up to 60% of CPCs at embryonic day 7.5 was well-tolerated and permitted embryo survival. Ablation of embryonic cardiomyocytes to a similar degree (50-60%) at embryonic day 9.0 could be fully rescued by residual myocytes with no obvious adult cardiac functional deficit. In both ablation models, an increase in cardiomyocyte proliferation rate was detected and accounted for at least some of the rapid recovery of myocardial cellularity and heart size. Conclusions Our study defines the threshold for cell loss in the embryonic mammalian heart and reveals a robust cardiomyocyte compensatory response that sustains normal fetal development. PMID:25995316

  3. Right ventricular nitric oxide signaling in an ovine model of congenital heart disease: a preserved fetal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kameny, Rebecca Johnson; He, Youping; Morris, Catherine; Sun, Christine; Johengen, Michael; Gong, Wenhui; Raff, Gary W; Datar, Sanjeev A; Oishi, Peter E; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    We recently reported superior right ventricle (RV) performance in response to acute afterload challenge in lambs with a model of congenital heart disease with chronic left-to-right cardiac shunts. Compared with control animals, shunt lambs demonstrated increased contractility because of an enhanced Anrep effect (the slow increase in contractility following myocyte stretch). This advantageous physiological response may reflect preservation of a fetal phenotype, since the RV of shunt lambs remains exposed to increased pressure postnatally. Nitric oxide (NO) production by NO synthase (NOS) is activated by myocyte stretch and is a necessary intermediary of the Anrep response. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that NO signaling is increased in the RV of fetal lambs compared with controls and shunt lambs have persistence of this fetal pattern. An 8-mm graft was placed between the pulmonary artery and aorta in fetal lambs (shunt). NOS isoform expression, activity, and association with activating cofactors were determined in fetal tissue obtained during late-gestation and in 4-wk-old juvenile shunt and control lambs. We demonstrated increased RNA and protein expression of NOS isoforms and increased total NOS activity in the RV of both shunt and fetal lambs compared with control. We also found increased NOS activation and association with cofactors in shunt and fetal RV compared with control. These data demonstrate preserved fetal NOS phenotype and NO signaling in shunt RV, which may partially explain the mechanism underlying the adaptive response to increased afterload seen in the RV of shunt lambs.

  4. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  5. Evaluation of fetal echocardiography as a routine antenatal screening tool for detection of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Krishnananda; Shetty, Ranjan; Narayan, Pratap Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background Fetal echocardiography plays a pivotal role in identifying the congenital heart defects (CHDs) in utero. Though foetal echocardiography is mostly reserved for high risk pregnant women, its role as a routine prenatal screening tool still needs to be defined. Performing foetal echocardiography based on only these indications can lead to a significant numbers of CHD cases going undetected who will be deprived of further management leading to increased early neonatal mortalities. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of CHDs by fetal echocardiography in an unselected population of pregnant women in comparison with pregnant women with conventional high risk factors for CHD. Methods This study enrolled consecutive pregnant women who attended antenatal clinic between 2008 and 2012 in a tertiary care hospital. These pregnant women were categorized into two groups: high risk group included pregnant women with traditional risk factors for CHD as laid down by Pediatric Council of the American Society of Echocardiography and low risk group. Detailed fetal 2 D echocardiography was done. Results A total of 1,280 pregnant women were included in study. The 118 women were categorized as the high risk group while remaining 1,162 were included in the low risk group. Twenty six cases of CHDs were detected based on abnormal foetal echocardiography (20.3 per 1,000). Two of the 26 cases of CHD occurred in high risk group whereas the remaining 24 occurred in low risk pregnancy. The difference in the incidence of CHDs between the two groups was not significant statistically (P=0.76). Conclusions Our study shows no difference in incidence of CHDs between pregnancies associated with high risk factors compared to low risk pregnancies. So we advocate foetal echocardiography should be included as a part of routine antenatal screening and all pregnant women irrespective of risk factors for CHDs. PMID:26885491

  6. Human fetal brain imaging by magnetoencephalography: verification of fetal brain signals by comparison with fetal brain models.

    PubMed

    Vrba, J; Robinson, S E; McCubbin, J; Murphy, P; Eswaran, H; Wilson, J D; Preissl, H; Lowery, C L

    2004-03-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalogram (fMEG) is measured in the presence of a large interference from maternal and fetal magnetocardiograms (mMCG and fMCG). This cardiac interference can be successfully removed by orthogonal projection of the corresponding spatial vectors. However, orthogonal projection redistributes the fMEG signal among channels. Such redistribution can be readily accounted for in the forward solution, and the signal topography can also be corrected. To assure that the correction has been done properly, and also to verify that the measured signal originates from within the fetal head, we have modeled the observed fMEG by two extreme models where the fetal head is assumed to be either electrically transparent or isolated from the abdominal tissue. Based on the measured spontaneous, sharp wave, and flash-evoked fMEG signals, we have concluded that the model of the electrically isolated fetal head is more appropriate for fMEG analysis. We show with the help of this model that the redistribution due to projection was properly corrected, and also, that the measured fMEG is consistent with the known position of the fetal head. The modeling provides additional confidence that the measured signals indeed originate from within the fetal head. PMID:15006668

  7. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  8. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  9. Development of the human heart.

    PubMed

    Sylva, Marc; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2014-06-01

    Molecular and genetic studies around the turn of this century have revolutionized the field of cardiac development. We now know that the primary heart tube, as seen in the early embryo contains little more than the precursors for the left ventricle, whereas the precursor cells for the remainder of the cardiac components are continuously added, to both the venous and arterial pole of the heart tube, from a single center of growth outside the heart. While the primary heart tube is growing by addition of cells, it does not show significant cell proliferation, until chamber differentiation and expansion starts locally in the tube, by which the chambers balloon from the primary heart tube. The transcriptional repressors Tbx2 and Tbx3 locally repress the chamber-specific program of gene expression, by which these regions are allowed to differentiate into the distinct components of the conduction system. Molecular genetic lineage analyses have been extremely valuable to assess the distinct developmental origin of the various component parts of the heart, which currently can be unambiguously identified by their unique molecular phenotype. Despite the enormous advances in our knowledge on cardiac development, even the most common congenital cardiac malformations are only poorly understood. The challenge of the newly developed molecular genetic techniques is to unveil the basic gene regulatory networks underlying cardiac morphogenesis.

  10. Center for fetal monkey gene transfer for heart, lung, and blood diseases: an NHLBI resource for the gene therapy community.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2012-11-01

    The goals of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases are to conduct gene transfer studies in monkeys to evaluate safety and efficiency; and to provide NHLBI-supported investigators with expertise, resources, and services to actively pursue gene transfer approaches in monkeys in their research programs. NHLBI-supported projects span investigators throughout the United States and have addressed novel approaches to gene delivery; "proof-of-principle"; assessed whether findings in small-animal models could be demonstrated in a primate species; or were conducted to enable new grant or IND submissions. The Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases successfully aids the gene therapy community in addressing regulatory barriers, and serves as an effective vehicle for advancing the field.

  11. Distribution of elastic system fibres in human fetal liver.

    PubMed Central

    Monte, A; Costa, A; Porto, L C

    1996-01-01

    Elastic system fibres are extracellular matrix components found in different organs for which they provide elasticity and some mechanical resistance. Oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibres, which possess graduated amounts of elastin, are the 3 forms of elastic system fibres that are identifiable by their tinctorial and ultrastructural features. The distribution of these fibres in adult human liver is well-established but little, if anything, is known about them in fetal liver. The distribution of elastic system fibres was therefore investigated in human fetal liver, and the process of elastogenesis characterised. Specimens of liver from 24 human fetuses ranging in age from 13 to 38 wk postfertilisation were studied. The results are presented in relation to gestational age and the size of the portal tracts. Portal tracts exhibited a network of oxytalan fibres at 13 wk; elaunin fibres appeared later after 20 wk postfertilisation. Elastogenesis occurred more rapidly in venous than in arterial walls, and in veins it was more evident in the adventitia. A microfibrillar network of oxytalan fibres was observed around biliary ducts from the outset of their development. Elastogenesis follows the sequence oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibres, but the elastogenetic process only completes its maturation in arterial walls, thus leading to the internal elastic lamina. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8763481

  12. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  13. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  14. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  15. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  16. Reduced Fetal Cerebral Oxygen Consumption is Associated With Smaller Brain Size in Fetuses With Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqun; Macgowan, Christopher K; Sled, John G; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Manlhiot, Cedric; Porayette, Prashob; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Jaeggi, Edgar; McCrindle, Brian W; Kingdom, John; Hickey, Edward; Miller, Steven; Seed, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal hypoxia has been implicated in the abnormal brain development seen in newborns with congenital heart disease (CHD). New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology now offers the potential to investigate the relationship between fetal hemodynamics and brain dysmaturation. Methods and Results We measured fetal brain size, oxygen saturation and blood flow in the major vessels of the fetal circulation in 30 late gestation fetuses with CHD and 30 normal controls using phase contrast MRI and T2 mapping. Fetal hemodynamic parameters were calculated using a combination of MRI flow and oximetry data and fetal hemoglobin concentrations estimated from population averages. In fetuses with CHD, reductions in umbilical vein oxygen content (p<0.001), and failure of the normal streaming of oxygenated blood from the placenta to the ascending aorta were associated with a mean reduction in ascending aortic saturation of 10% (p < 0.001), while cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction were no different from controls. This accounted for the mean 15% reduction in cerebral oxygen delivery (p = 0.08) and 32% reduction cerebral VO2 in CHD fetuses (p < 0.001), which were associated with a 13% reduction in fetal brain volume (p < 0.001). Fetal brain size correlated with ascending aortic oxygen saturation and cerebral VO2 (r = 0.37 p = 0.004). Conclusions This study supports a direct link between reduced cerebral oxygenation and impaired brain growth in fetuses with CHD and raises the possibility that in utero brain development could be improved with maternal oxygen therapy. PMID:25762062

  17. Antepartum fetal heart rate feature extraction and classification using empirical mode decomposition and support vector machine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiotocography (CTG) is the most widely used tool for fetal surveillance. The visual analysis of fetal heart rate (FHR) traces largely depends on the expertise and experience of the clinician involved. Several approaches have been proposed for the effective interpretation of FHR. In this paper, a new approach for FHR feature extraction based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is proposed, which was used along with support vector machine (SVM) for the classification of FHR recordings as 'normal' or 'at risk'. Methods The FHR were recorded from 15 subjects at a sampling rate of 4 Hz and a dataset consisting of 90 randomly selected records of 20 minutes duration was formed from these. All records were labelled as 'normal' or 'at risk' by two experienced obstetricians. A training set was formed by 60 records, the remaining 30 left as the testing set. The standard deviations of the EMD components are input as features to a support vector machine (SVM) to classify FHR samples. Results For the training set, a five-fold cross validation test resulted in an accuracy of 86% whereas the overall geometric mean of sensitivity and specificity was 94.8%. The Kappa value for the training set was .923. Application of the proposed method to the testing set (30 records) resulted in a geometric mean of 81.5%. The Kappa value for the testing set was .684. Conclusions Based on the overall performance of the system it can be stated that the proposed methodology is a promising new approach for the feature extraction and classification of FHR signals. PMID:21244712

  18. Effects of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation during pregnancy on fetal heart rate and variability: A randomized clinical trial☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, K.M.; Carlson, S.E.; Colombo, J.; Yeh, H.-W.; Shaddy, D.J.; Li, S.; Kerling, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    DHA (22:6n-3) supplementation during infancy has been associated with lower heart rate (HR) and improved neurobehavioral outcomes. We hypothesized that maternal DHA supplementation would improve fetal cardiac autonomic control and newborn neurobehavior. Pregnant women were randomized to 600 mg/day of DHA or placebo oil capsules at 14.4 (+/−4) weeks gestation. Fetal HRand HRV were calculated from magnetocardiograms (MCGs) at 24, 32 and 36 weeks gestational age (GA). Newborn neurobehavior was assessed using the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS). Postpartum maternal and infant red blood cell (RBC) DHA was significantly higher in the supplemented group as were metrics of fetal HRV and newborn neurobehavior in the autonomic and motor clusters. Higher HRV is associated with more responsive and flexible autonomic nervous system (ANS). Coupled with findings of improved autonomic and motor behavior, these data suggest that maternal DHA supplementation during pregnancy may impart an adaptive advantage to the fetus. PMID:23433688

  19. Xenotransplantation Models to Study the Effects of Toxicants on Human Fetal Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Heger, Nicholas E.; Sanders, Jennifer A.; Saffarini, Camelia M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; De Paepe, Monique E.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases that manifest throughout the lifetime are influenced by factors affecting fetal development. Fetal exposure to xenobiotics, in particular, may influence the development of adult diseases. Established animal models provide systems for characterizing both developmental biology and developmental toxicology. However, animal model systems do not allow researchers to assess the mechanistic effects of toxicants on developing human tissue. Human fetal tissue xenotransplantation models have recently been implemented to provide human-relevant mechanistic data on the many tissue-level functions that may be affected by fetal exposure to toxicants. This review describes the development of human fetal tissue xenotransplant models for testis, prostate, lung, liver, and adipose tissue, aimed at studying the effects of xenobiotics on tissue development, including implications for testicular dysgenesis, prostate disease, lung disease, and metabolic syndrome. The mechanistic data obtained from these models can complement data from epidemiology, traditional animal models, and in vitro studies to quantify the risks of toxicant exposures during human development. PMID:25477288

  20. Fetal Heart Rate Reactivity Differs by Women’s Psychiatric Status during Psychological Stress, but Not Paced Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Fifer, William P.; Myers, Michael M.; Bagiella, Emilia; Duong, Jimmy K.; Chen, Ivy S.; Leotti, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prenatal exposure to women’s mood dysregulation is associated with variation in neurobehavioral profiles in children. Few studies have assessed these relationships during the prenatal period. Methods In 113 women in the 36th – 38th gestational week (mean age 26.3 ± 5.4 years), electrocardiogram, blood pressure, respiration, salivary cortisol, and fetal heart rate (HR) were measured during baseline, a psychological challenge (Stroop color–word matching task), and a standardized paced breathing protocol. Subjects underwent the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV prior to testing and were grouped as: depressed, co–morbid for depression and anxiety, anxiety disorder only, and control. Results There was a significant main effect of maternal diagnostic group on fetal HR only during the Stroop task: fetuses of women in the co–morbid group had a greater HR increase compared to controls (p < .05). Overall, fetuses showed robust increases in HR during paced breathing (p < .0001), but there was no significant difference by maternal diagnosis. For both tasks, changes in fetal HR were independent of women’s concurrent cardiorespiratory activity. Finally, although cortisol was higher in the co-morbid group (p <.05), independent of diagnosis, there was a trend for maternal baseline cortisol to be positively associated with average fetal HR (p = .08). Conclusions These findings indicate that variation in fetal HR reactivity — an index of emerging regulatory capacities — is likely influenced by multiple acute and chronic factors associated with women’s psychobiology. PMID:21400485

  1. Biomonitoring of human fetal exposure to environmental chemicals in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Gerard M

    2014-01-01

    The first trimester of human fetal life, a period of extremely rapid development of physiological systems, represents the most rapid growth phase in human life. Interference in the establishment of organ systems may result in abnormal development that may be manifest immediately or programmed for later abnormal function. Exposure to environmental chemicals may be affecting development at these early stages, and yet there is limited knowledge of the quantities and identities of the chemicals to which the fetus is exposed during early pregnancy. Clearly, opportunities for assessing fetal chemical exposure directly are extremely limited. Hence, this review describes indirect means of assessing fetal exposure in early pregnancy to chemicals that are considered disrupters of development. Consideration is given to such matrices as maternal hair, fingernails, urine, saliva, sweat, breast milk, amniotic fluid and blood, and fetal matrices such as cord blood, cord tissue, meconium, placenta, and fetal liver. More than 150 articles that presented data from chemical analysis of human maternal and fetal tissues and fluids were reviewed. Priority was given to articles where chemical analysis was conducted in more than one matrix. Where correlations between maternal and fetal matrices were determined, these articles were included and are highlighted, as these may provide the basis for future investigations of early fetal exposure. The determination of fetal chemical exposure, at the time of rapid human growth and development, will greatly assist regulatory agencies in risk assessments and establishment of advisories for risk management concerning environmental chemicals.

  2. The effect of warfarin dosage on maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Soma-Pillay, P; Nene, Z; Mathivha, T M; Macdonald, A P

    2011-01-01

    There are several challenges in the management of pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. Pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolism and there is currently no consensus on the safest anticoagulation method during pregnancy. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between the warfarin dose and pregnancy outcome in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves. Warfarin in pregnancy was associated with a low risk of valve thrombosis or maternal death. The risk for fetal abnormalities was not related to the maternal warfarin dosage. However, the risk for stillbirth was significantly increased with increasing doses of warfarin. PMID:27579092

  3. Antithetical regulation of α-myosin heavy chain between fetal and adult heart failure though shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Li, Yifei; Zhou, Kaiyu; Hua, Yimin; Wang, Chuan; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular switches of myosin isoforms are known to occur in various conditions. Here, we demonstrated the result from fetal heart failure and its potential mechanisms. Fetal and adult heart failure rat models were induced by injections of isoproterenol as previously described, and Go6976 was given to heart failing fetuses. Real-time PCR and Western blot were adopted to measure the expressions of α-MHC, β-MHC and YY-1. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analysis whether YY-1 interacts with HDAC5. Besides, histological immunofluorescence assessment was carried out to identify the location of HDAC5. α-MHC was recorded elevated in fetal heart failure which was decreased in adult heart failure. Besides, YY-1 was observed elevated both in fetal and adult failing hearts, but YY-1 could co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC5 only in adult hearts. Nuclear localization of HDAC5 was identified in adult cardiomyocytes, while cytoplasmic localization was identified in fetuses. After Go6976 supplied, HDAC5 shuttled into nucleuses interacted with YY-1. The myosin molecular switches were reversed with worsening cardiac functions and higher mortalities. Regulation of MHC in fetal heart failure was different from adult which provided a better compensation with increased α-MHC. This kind of transition was involved with shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

  4. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure.

  5. Cortisol stimulates proliferation and apoptosis in the late gestation fetal heart: differential effects of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Reini, Seth A.; Richards, Elaine; Wood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously found that modest chronic increases in maternal cortisol result in an enlarged fetal heart. To explore the mechanisms of this effect, we used intrapericardial infusions of a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist (canrenoate) or of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist (mifepristone) in the fetus during maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg·kg−1·day−1). We have shown that the MR antagonist blocked the increase in fetal heart weight and in wall thickness resulting from maternal cortisol infusion. In the current study we extended those studies and found that cortisol increased Ki67 staining in both ventricles, indicating cell proliferation, but also increased active caspase-3 staining in cells of the conduction pathway in the septum and subendocardial layers of the left ventricle, suggesting increased apoptosis in Purkinje fibers. The MR antagonist blocked the increase in cell proliferation, whereas the GR antagonist blocked the increased apoptosis in Purkinje fibers. We also found evidence of activation of caspase-3 in c-kit-positive cells, suggesting apoptosis in stem cell populations in the ventricle. These studies suggest a potentially important role of corticosteroids in the terminal remodeling of the late gestation fetal heart and suggest a mechanism for the cardiac enlargement with excess corticosteroid exposure. PMID:23785077

  6. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  7. Brain macrophages and microglia in human fetal hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, Norbert; Bohl, Jürgen; Neudörfer, Frank; Rezaie, Payam

    2004-08-01

    Whereas several studies have addressed the activation of microglia (the resident mononuclear phagocytes of the brain) and macrophages within the nervous system in experimental animal models of congenital and induced hydrocephalus, little is known of their state of activation or regional distribution in human fetal hydrocephalus. This investigation aimed to address such questions. Ten human fetal cases [20-36 gestational weeks (GW) at postmortem] previously diagnosed with hydrocephalus on ultrasound examination in utero, and 10 non-hydrocephalic controls (22-38 GW at postmortem) were assessed immufcnohistochemically with antibodies directed against MHC class II and CD68 antigens, and lectin histochemistry with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato lectin). Adjacent sections were also immunoreacted with an antiserum to laminin to detect cerebral blood vessels. Eight out of the 10 hydrocephalus cases showed numerous CD68 and tomato lectin-positive macrophages located at focal regions along the ependymal lining of the lateral ventricles (particularly within the occipital horn). However, only five of these cases demonstrated MHC class II positive macrophages associated with the ventricular lining. Microglial reactivity within periventricular regions could also be identified using the lectin in four cases, two of which were also immunoreactive with CD68 (but not with MHC class II). By comparison, in control cases five out of 10 fetal brains (aged between 20 and 24 GW) showed few or no ependymal or supraependymal macrophages. One case at 28 GW, and cases at 32 and 38 GW (two of which were diagnosed with intrauterine hypoxic-ischemia) did, however, show some MHC class II (CD68 negative) cells located at the ependymal surface. Nevertheless, these were not as numerous or intensely immunoreactive as in the hydrocephalus cases. Microglia interspersed throughout the intermediate zone and circumscribing the basal ganglia were within normal confines in all cases examined. Hydrocephalic

  8. A human fetal prostate xenograft model of developmental estrogenization

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease in older men. Rodent models have demonstrated that an early and later-life exposure to estrogen can lead to cancerous lesions, and implicated hormonal dysregulation as an avenue for developing future prostate neoplasia. This study utilizes a human fetal prostate xenograft model to study the role of estrogen in the progression of human disease. Histopathological lesions were assessed in 7, 30, 90, 200, and 400-day human prostate xenografts. Gene expression for cell cycle, tumor suppressors, and apoptosis-related genes (i.e. CDKN1A, CASP9, ESR2, PTEN, and TP53) were performed for 200-day estrogen-treated xenografts. Glandular hyperplasia was observed in xenografts given both an initial and secondary exposure to estradiol in both 200 and 400-day xenografts. Persistent estrogenic effects were verified using immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin 10, p63, and estrogen receptor-α. This model provides data on the histopathological state of the human prostate following estrogenic treatment, which can be utilized in understanding the complicated pathology associated with prostatic disease and early- and later-life estrogenic exposures. PMID:25633637

  9. Aldosterone Inhibits the Fetal Program and Increases Hypertrophy in the Heart of Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azibani, Feriel; Devaux, Yvan; Coutance, Guillaume; Schlossarek, Saskia; Polidano, Evelyne; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Regine; Carrier, Lucie; Solal, Alain Cohen; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Launay, Jean-Marie; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Delcayre, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension (AH) induces cardiac hypertrophy and reactivation of “fetal” gene expression. In rodent heart, alpha-Myosin Heavy Chain (MyHC) and its micro-RNA miR-208a regulate the expression of beta-MyHC and of its intronic miR-208b. However, the role of aldosterone in these processes remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings RT-PCR and western-blot were used to investigate the genes modulated by arterial hypertension and cardiac hyperaldosteronism. We developed a model of double-transgenic mice (AS-Ren) with cardiac hyperaldosteronism (AS mice) and systemic hypertension (Ren). AS-Ren mice had increased (x2) angiotensin II in plasma and increased (x2) aldosterone in heart. Ren and AS-Ren mice had a robust and similar hypertension (+70%) versus their controls. Anatomical data and echocardiography showed a worsening of cardiac hypertrophy (+41%) in AS-Ren mice (P<0.05 vs Ren). The increase of ANP (x 2.5; P<0.01) mRNA observed in Ren mice was blunted in AS-Ren mice. This non-induction of antitrophic natriuretic peptides may be involved in the higher trophic cardiac response in AS-Ren mice, as indicated by the markedly reduced cardiac hypertrophy in ANP-infused AS-Ren mice for one month. Besides, the AH-induced increase of ßMyHC and its intronic miRNA-208b was prevented in AS-Ren. The inhibition of miR 208a (−75%, p<0.001) in AS-Ren mice compared to AS was associated with increased Sox 6 mRNA (x 1.34; p<0.05), an inhibitor of ßMyHC transcription. Eplerenone prevented all aldosterone-dependent effects. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that increased aldosterone in heart inhibits the induction of atrial natriuretic peptide expression, via the mineralocorticoid receptor. This worsens cardiac hypertrophy without changing blood pressure. Moreover, this work reveals an original aldosterone-dependent inhibition of miR-208a in hypertension, resulting in the inhibition of β-myosin heavy chain expression through the induction of

  10. Human fetal membranes at term: Dead tissue or signalers of parturition?

    PubMed

    Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-08-01

    Various endocrine, immune, and mechanical factors produced by feto-maternal compartments at term increase intrauterine inflammatory loads to induce labor. The role of fetal (placental) membranes (amniochorion) as providers of parturition signals has not been well investigated. Fetal membranes line the intrauterine cavity and grow with and protect the fetus. Fetal membranes exist as an entity between the mother and fetus and perform unique functions during pregnancy. Membranes undergo a telomere-dependent p38 MAPK-induced senescence and demonstrate a decline in functional and mechanical abilities at term, showing signs of aging. Fetal membrane senescence is also allied with completion of fetal maturation at term as the fetus readies for delivery, which may also indicate the end of independent life and longevity of fetal membranes as their functional role concludes. Fetal membrane senescence is accelerated at term because of oxidative stress and increased stretching. Senescent fetal membranes cells produce senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP-inflammation) and also release proinflammatory damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), namely HMGB1 and cell-free fetal telomere fragments. In a feedback loop, SASP and DAMPs increase senescence and enhance the inflammatory load to promote labor. Membranes increase the inflammatory load to disrupt homeostatic balance to transition quiescent uterine tissues toward a labor phenotype. Therefore, along with other well-described labor-promoting signals, senescent fetal membranes may also contribute to human term parturition. PMID:27452431

  11. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-03-12

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the "programming" and "reprogramming" of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart.

  12. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Rodin, Sergey; Bulatovic, Ivana; Ibarra, Cristián; Löfling, Marie; Genead, Rami; Wärdell, Eva; Felldin, Ulrika; Granath, Carl; Alici, Evren; Le Blanc, Katarina; Smith, C.I. Edvard; Salašová, Alena; Westgren, Magnus; Sundström, Erik; Uhlén, Per; Arenas, Ernest; Sylvén, Christer; Tryggvason, Karl; Corbascio, Matthias; Simonson, Oscar E.; Österholm, Cecilia; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Summary The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN)-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27052314

  13. Fetal Aortic Valvuloplasty for Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: Postnatal Outcomes of the First 100 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freud, Lindsay R.; McElhinney, Doff B.; Marshall, Audrey C.; Marx, Gerald R.; Friedman, Kevin G.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Emani, Sitaram M.; Lafranchi, Terra; Silva, Virginia; Wilkins-Haug, Louise E.; Benson, Carol B.; Lock, James E.; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) can be performed for severe mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) in an attempt to prevent progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). A subset of patients has achieved a biventricular (BV) circulation after FAV. The postnatal outcomes and survival of the BV patients, compared to those managed as HLHS, have not been reported. Methods and Results We included 100 patients who underwent FAV for severe mid-gestation AS with evolving HLHS from March 2000 to January 2013. Patients were categorized based on postnatal management as BV or HLHS. Clinical records were reviewed. Eighty-eight fetuses were live-born, and 38 had a BV circulation (31 from birth, 7 converted after initial univentricular palliation). Left-sided structures, namely aortic and mitral valve sizes and LV volume, were significantly larger in the BV group at the time of birth (p-values <0.01). After a median follow-up of 5.4 years, freedom from cardiac death among all BV patients was 96±4% at 5 years and 84±12% at 10 years, which was better than HLHS patients (log-rank p=0.04). There was no cardiac mortality in patients with a BV circulation from birth. All but 1 of the BV patients required postnatal intervention; 42% underwent aortic and/or mitral valve replacement. On most recent echocardiogram, the median LV end-diastolic volume z-score was +1.7 (range: -1.3, +8.2), and 80% had normal ejection fraction. Conclusions Short- and intermediate-term survival among patients who underwent FAV and achieved a BV circulation postnatally is encouraging. However, morbidity still exists, and on-going assessment is warranted. PMID:25052401

  14. Generating Purkinje networks in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Sahli Costabal, Francisco; Hurtado, Daniel E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-08-16

    The Purkinje network is an integral part of the excitation system in the human heart. Yet, to date, there is no in vivo imaging technique to accurately reconstruct its geometry and structure. Computational modeling of the Purkinje network is increasingly recognized as an alternative strategy to visualize, simulate, and understand the role of the Purkinje system. However, most computational models either have to be generated manually, or fail to smoothly cover the irregular surfaces inside the left and right ventricles. Here we present a new algorithm to reliably create robust Purkinje networks within the human heart. We made the source code of this algorithm freely available online. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the fractal tree algorithm with our new projection method generates denser and more compact Purkinje networks than previous approaches on irregular surfaces. Under similar conditions, our algorithm generates a network with 1219±61 branches, three times more than a conventional algorithm with 419±107 branches. With a coverage of 11±3mm, the surface density of our new Purkije network is twice as dense as the conventional network with 22±7mm. To demonstrate the importance of a dense Purkinje network in cardiac electrophysiology, we simulated three cases of excitation: with our new Purkinje network, with left-sided Purkinje network, and without Purkinje network. Simulations with our new Purkinje network predicted more realistic activation sequences and activation times than simulations without. Six-lead electrocardiograms of the three case studies agreed with the clinical electrocardiograms under physiological conditions, under pathological conditions of right bundle branch block, and under pathological conditions of trifascicular block. Taken together, our results underpin the importance of the Purkinje network in realistic human heart simulations. Human heart modeling has the potential to support the design of personalized strategies

  15. Generating Purkinje networks in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Sahli Costabal, Francisco; Hurtado, Daniel E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-08-16

    The Purkinje network is an integral part of the excitation system in the human heart. Yet, to date, there is no in vivo imaging technique to accurately reconstruct its geometry and structure. Computational modeling of the Purkinje network is increasingly recognized as an alternative strategy to visualize, simulate, and understand the role of the Purkinje system. However, most computational models either have to be generated manually, or fail to smoothly cover the irregular surfaces inside the left and right ventricles. Here we present a new algorithm to reliably create robust Purkinje networks within the human heart. We made the source code of this algorithm freely available online. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the fractal tree algorithm with our new projection method generates denser and more compact Purkinje networks than previous approaches on irregular surfaces. Under similar conditions, our algorithm generates a network with 1219±61 branches, three times more than a conventional algorithm with 419±107 branches. With a coverage of 11±3mm, the surface density of our new Purkije network is twice as dense as the conventional network with 22±7mm. To demonstrate the importance of a dense Purkinje network in cardiac electrophysiology, we simulated three cases of excitation: with our new Purkinje network, with left-sided Purkinje network, and without Purkinje network. Simulations with our new Purkinje network predicted more realistic activation sequences and activation times than simulations without. Six-lead electrocardiograms of the three case studies agreed with the clinical electrocardiograms under physiological conditions, under pathological conditions of right bundle branch block, and under pathological conditions of trifascicular block. Taken together, our results underpin the importance of the Purkinje network in realistic human heart simulations. Human heart modeling has the potential to support the design of personalized strategies

  16. A longitudinal study of diurnal variation in baseline fetal heart rate in one dichorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Muro, M; Shono, H; Shono, M; Ito, Y; Iwasaka, T

    2001-06-01

    A longitudinal study to analyse the diurnal variations in baseline fetal heart rate (FHR) and sustained fetal tachycardia (SFT) in twin pregnancy was performed on one dichorionic twin. Twenty-four hour FHR recordings on twins were made at 32, 34 and 36 weeks of gestation simultaneously. Significant diurnal variations were found in both twins in all gestational weeks. The diurnal variations in baseline FHR of twins were highly correlated with no phase-lag. No coincidence was recognized in the appearance of SFT between twins. These results suggest the maternal influence equally affects FHR in each fetus of dichorionic twin since 32 weeks of gestation, while the appearance of SFT might be independent from maternal influence.

  17. Rod Photoreceptor Differentiation in Fetal and Infant Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Anita; Bumsted-O'Brien, Keely; Natoli, Riccardo; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Possin, Daniel; Provis, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Human rods and cones are arranged in a precise spatial mosaic that is critical for optimal functioning of the visual system. However, the molecular processes that underpin specification of cell types within the mosaic are poorly understood. The progressive differentiation of human rods was tracked from fetal week (Fwk) 9 to postnatal (P) 8 months using immunocytochemical markers of key molecules that represent rod progression from post-mitotic precursors to outer segment-bearing functional photoreceptors. We find two phases associated with rod differentiation. The early phase begins in rods on the foveal edge at Fwk 10.5 when rods are first identified, and the rod-specific proteins NRL and NR2e3 are detected. By Fwk 11-12, these rods label for interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein, recoverin, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1. The second phase occurs over the next month with the appearance of rod opsin at Fwk 15, closely followed by the outer segment proteins rod GTP-gated sodium channel and peripherin. TULP is expressed relatively late at Fwk 18-20 in rods. Each phase proceeds across the retina in a central-peripheral order, such that rods in far peripheral retina are only entering the early phase at the same time that cells in central retina are entering their late phase. During the second half of gestation rods undergo an intracellular reorganization of these proteins, and cellular and OS elongation which continues into infancy. The progression of rod development shown here provides insight into the possible mechanisms underlying human retinal visual dysfunction when there are mutations affecting key rod-related molecules. PMID:18778702

  18. Length to width ratio of the ductus venosus in simple screening for fetal congenital heart diseases in the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Hsiu; Lee, Shy-Ming; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Tang, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Chen, Ran-Chou

    2016-09-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) is still low even though screening was first introduced over 25 years ago. The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of a second-trimester prenatal ultrasonographic method of screening for CHD.From September 2012 to September 2013, the length and width of the fetal ductus venosus were measured sonographically in 1006 singleton fetuses, and the ratio of length to width was calculated. The accuracy of each fetal measurement and Doppler ultrasonography were determined. The standard fetal echocardiographic evaluations including 2-dimensional gray-scale imaging, color, and Doppler color flow mapping were performed. The transducer was aligned to the long axis of the fetal trunk to view the ductus venosus in its full length, including the inlet (isthmus) and outlet portions of the vessel. The diameters of the vessel inner wall and mid-point of the ductus venosus were measured using calipers. All scans and fetal measurements were conducted by a registered sonographer with more than 20 years of perinatal ultrasound screening experience.Of the 1006 singleton fetuses between 19 and 28 weeks' gestation, 36 had CHD. The ductus venosus length/width ratio (DVR) for the first CHD screening was extremely sensitive at 88.90%, with a specificity of 99.10% for the cardiac abnormalities included in this study. Chromosomal anomalies accompanied CHD in 0.4% (4/1006) of all cases and 11.11% (4/36) of the CHD cases.The DVR differed significantly between fetuses with CHD and normal fetuses during the second trimester. Careful assessment of the ratio should be a part of the sonographic examination of every fetus. In the case of a small DVR, advanced echocardiography and karyotype analysis should be performed. The ratio is a helpful tool for screening CHD abnormalities prenatally in the Chinese population. PMID:27684831

  19. Cryopreservation, Culture, and Transplantation of Human Fetal Mesencephalic Tissue into Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, D. E.; Naftolin, F.; Collier, T. J.; Leranth, C.; Robbins, R. J.; Sladek, C. D.; Roth, R. H.; Sladek, J. R.

    1988-11-01

    Studies in animals suggest that fetal neural grafts might restore lost neurological function in Parkinson's disease. In monkeys, such grafts survive for many months and reverse signs of parkinsonism, without attendant graft rejection. The successful and reliable application of a similar transplantation procedure to human patients, however, will require neural tissue obtained from human fetal cadavers, with demonstrated cellular identity, viability, and biological safety. In this report, human fetal neural tissue was successfully grafted into the brains of monkeys. Neural tissue was collected from human fetal cadavers after 9 to 12 weeks of gestation and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Viability after up to 2 months of storage was demonstrated by cell culture and by transplantation into monkeys. Cryopreservation and storage of human fetal neural tissue would allow formation of a tissue bank. The stored cells could then be specifically tested to assure their cellular identity, viability, and bacteriological and virological safety before clinical use. The capacity to collect and maintain viable human fetal neural tissue would also facilitate research efforts to understand the development and function of the human brain and provide opportunities to study neurological diseases.

  20. KeyGenes, a Tool to Probe Tissue Differentiation Using a Human Fetal Transcriptional Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Roost, Matthias S.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Buermans, Henk P.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Devalla, Harsha D.; Passier, Robert; Mummery, Christine L.; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J.P.; van Zwet, Erik W.; Goeman, Jelle J.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Differentiated derivatives of human pluripotent stem cells in culture are generally phenotypically immature compared to their adult counterparts. Their identity is often difficult to determine with certainty because little is known about their human fetal equivalents in vivo. Cellular identity and signaling pathways directing differentiation are usually determined by extrapolating information from either human adult tissue or model organisms, assuming conservation with humans. To resolve this, we generated a collection of human fetal transcriptional profiles at different developmental stages. Moreover, we developed an algorithm, KeyGenes, which uses this dataset to quantify the extent to which next-generation sequencing or microarray data resemble specific cell or tissue types in the human fetus. Using KeyGenes combined with the human fetal atlas, we identified multiple cell and tissue samples unambiguously on a limited set of features. We thus provide a flexible and expandable platform to monitor and evaluate the efficiency of differentiation in vitro. PMID:26028532

  1. Classical complement activation as a footprint for murine and human antiphospholipid antibody-induced fetal loss.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Danielle; Buurma, Aletta; Goemaere, Natascha N; Girardi, Guillermina; le Cessie, Saskia; Scherjon, Sicco; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; de Heer, Emile; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent miscarriage, fetal growth restriction and intrauterine fetal death are frequently occurring complications of pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Murine models show that complement activation plays a pivotal role in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity, but the exact pathways of complement activation and their potential role in human pregnancy are insufficiently understood. We hypothesized that the classical pathway would play a major role in inducing fetal loss. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in C1q and factor D were injected with antiphospholipid antibodies or normal human IgG. Mouse placentas were subsequently stained with an anti-C4 antibody and anti-normal human IgG to determine the presence of classical complement activation and IgG binding. Findings in mice were validated in 88 human placentae from 83 women (SLE and APS cases versus controls), which were immunohistochemically stained for C4d, C1q, properdin and MBL. Staining patterns were compared to pregnancy outcome. In murine placentae of mice pretreated with antiphospholipid antibodies, increased C4 deposition was observed, which was associated with adverse fetal outcome but not with IgG binding. In humans, diffuse C4d staining at the feto-maternal interface was present almost exclusively in patients with SLE and/or APS (p < 0.001) and was related to intrauterine fetal death (p = 0.03). Our data show that presence of C4d in murine and human placentae is strongly related to adverse fetal outcome in the setting of SLE and APS. The excessive deposition of C4d supports the concept of severe autoantibody-mediated injury at the fetal-maternal interface. We suggest C4d as a potential biomarker of autoantibody-mediated fetal loss in SLE and APS.

  2. Human fetal inner ear involvement in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The mechanisms of pathogenesis of CMV-related SNHL are still unclear. The aim is to study congenital CMV-related damage in the fetal inner ear, in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology behind CMV-SNHL. Results We studied inner ears and brains of 20 human fetuses, all at 21 week gestational age, with a high viral load in the amniotic fluid, with and without ultrasound (US) brain abnormalities. We evaluated histological brain damage, inner ear infection, local inflammatory response and tissue viral load. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CMV was positive in 14/20 brains (70%) and in the inner ears of 9/20 fetuses (45%). In the cases with inner ear infection, the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis was always infected, followed by infection in the Reissner’s membrane. The highest tissue viral load was observed in the inner ear with infected Organ of Corti. Vestibular labyrinth showed CMV infection of sensory cells in the utricle and in the crista ampullaris. US cerebral anomalies were detected in 6 cases, and in all those cases, the inner ear was always involved. In the other 14 cases with normal brain scan, histological brain damage was present in 8 fetuses and 3 of them presented inner ear infection. Conclusions CMV-infection of the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis may alter potassium and ion circulation, dissipating the endocochlear potential with consequent SNHL. Although abnormal cerebral US is highly predictive of brain and inner ear damage, normal US findings cannot exclude them either. PMID:24252374

  3. Comparative production of interferon by human fetal, neonatal, and maternal cells.

    PubMed

    Carter, W A; Hande, K R; Essien, B; Prochownik, E; Kaback, M M

    1971-05-01

    Production of interferon was studied in fibroblasts cultured from human fetal, neonatal, and maternal tissue. Human fetal and maternal cells were paired to diminish genetic variability. Fetal cells displayed an increased response to two inducers of interferon, virus and synthetic double-stranded ribopolynucleotide. Fetal cells released 300-fold more interferon than maternal cells on exposure to poly rI:rC. This enhanced capacity for interferon production was consistent in cultures developed from fetal skin obtained between the 10th and 20th gestational week. The response was relatively stable, persisting in cells cultured for 18 generations (about 14 weeks). On infection with Newcastle disease virus, fetal cells produced, on the average, 4 to 6.5 times more interferon than maternal or neonatal cells. The virus was adsorbed with equal efficiency by each type of cell. Increased production is apparently independent of the rates of overall protein synthesis, since fetal and maternal cells have very similar rates of total protein synthesis. PMID:16558035

  4. Effects of 4 hours magnesium sulfate infusion on fetal heart rate variability and reactivity in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, H; Ikenoue, T; Kamitomo, M; Sakamoto, H

    1998-01-01

    Effects of magnesium sulfate were investigated on fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline, variability, and reactivity in goats. Six chronically catheterized fetuses of Japanese Saanen goat at 125 to 130 days' gestation (term = 147 days) were used. Magnesium sulfate was directly infused to the fetuses. Short-term variability and long-term variability were obtained according to Huey et al. The baseline, reactivity, short-term variability and long-term variability of the FHR were compared between those receiving magnesium sulfate infusions and those receiving vehicle infusions without magnesium sulfate for 4 hr. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test was applied for statistical significance. Four hours magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased fetal plasma concentration of magnesium from 2.4-6.6 mg/dL, without significant changes in fetal respiratory gases and pH values. The baseline FHR was significantly decreased by magnesium infusion compared with that receiving vehicle infusion. The incidence of acceleration, short-term variability, and long-term variability during the fourth hour of magnesium infusion was also significantly decreased compared to a controlled infusion. The time spent by high amplitude phase of short-term variability and that of long-term variability were also significantly reduced. Significant correlation was obtained between the magnesium concentration and incidence of acceleration at fourth hour of magnesium infusion. Four hours infusion of magnesium sulfate significantly decreases baseline FHR, short-term variability, long-term variability, and reactivity in fetal goats at 0.85 gestation.

  5. Expression of ghrelin in human fetal adrenal glands and paraadrenal nerve ganglions.

    PubMed

    Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Kedzia, Andrzej; Chmielnicka-Kopaczyk, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was assessment of location, expression and role of ghrelin in the development and maturation of human fetal adrenal glands and paraadrenal nerve ganglions. Immunohistochemistry was used. The strongest expression of ghrelin was detected in the fetal zone of the adrenal glands, in the neuroepithelial cells of the medullar portion of the adrenals and in few nerve ganglion cells. Ghrelin takes part in molecular processes of proliferation and maturation, and does not influence on steroidogenesis.

  6. Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    van den Driesche, Sander; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A; Johnston, Zoe C; Chetty, Tarini; Smith, Lee B; McKinnell, Chris; Dean, Afshan; Homer, Natalie Z; Jorgensen, Anne; Camacho-Moll, Maria E; Sharpe, Richard M; Mitchell, Rod T

    2015-05-20

    Most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life, although the factors responsible for suppressing fetal testosterone remain largely unknown. Protracted use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons, but effects on fetal testosterone production have not been demonstrated. We used a validated xenograft model to expose human fetal testes to clinically relevant doses and regimens of acetaminophen. Exposure to a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen for 7 days significantly reduced plasma testosterone (45% reduction; P = 0.025) and seminal vesicle weight (a biomarker of androgen exposure; 18% reduction; P = 0.005) in castrate host mice bearing human fetal testis xenografts, whereas acetaminophen exposure for just 1 day did not alter either parameter. Plasma acetaminophen concentrations (at 1 hour after the final dose) in exposed host mice were substantially below those reported in humans after a therapeutic oral dose. Subsequent in utero exposure studies in rats indicated that the acetaminophen-induced reduction in testosterone likely results from reduced expression of key steroidogenic enzymes (Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1). Our results suggest that protracted use of acetaminophen (1 week) may suppress fetal testosterone production, which could have adverse consequences. Further studies are required to establish the dose-response and treatment-duration relationships to delineate the maximum dose and treatment period without this adverse effect.

  7. Sodium MRI in human heart: a review.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    This paper offers a critical review of the properties, methods and potential clinical application of sodium ((23)Na) MRI in human heart. Because the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in heart is about ~40 µmol/g wet weight, and the (23)Na gyromagnetic ratio and sensitivity are respectively about one-quarter and one-11th of that of hydrogen ((1)H), the signal-to-noise ratio of (23)Na MRI in the heart is about one-6000th of that of conventional cardiac (1)H MRI. In addition, as a quadrupolar nucleus, (23)Na exhibits ultra-short and multi-component relaxation behavior (T1 ~ 30 ms; T2 ~ 0.5-4 ms and 12-20 ms), which requires fast, specialized, ultra-short echo-time MRI sequences, especially for quantifying TSC. Cardiac (23)Na MRI studies from 1.5 to 7 T measure a volume-weighted sum of intra- and extra-cellular components present at cytosolic concentrations of 10-15 mM and 135-150 mM in healthy tissue, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 0.1-1 ml in 10 min or so. Currently, intra- and extra-cellular sodium cannot be unambiguously resolved without the use of potentially toxic shift reagents. Nevertheless, increases in TSC attributable to an influx of intra-cellular sodium and/or increased extra-cellular volume have been demonstrated in human myocardial infarction consistent with prior animal studies, and arguably might also be seen in future studies of ischemia and cardiomyopathies--especially those involving defects in sodium transport. While technical implementation remains a hurdle, a central question for clinical use is whether cardiac (23)Na MRI can deliver useful information unobtainable by other more convenient methods, including (1)H MRI.

  8. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor regulates human fetal lung development via CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Wilkinson, William J.; Tseng, Hsiu-Er; Finney, Brenda; Monk, Bethan; Dibble, Holly; Quilliam, Samantha; Warburton, David; Galietta, Luis J.; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Optimal fetal lung growth requires anion-driven fluid secretion into the lumen of the developing organ. The fetus is hypercalcemic compared to the mother and here we show that in the developing human lung this hypercalcaemia acts on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, to promote fluid-driven lung expansion through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. Several chloride channels including TMEM16, bestrophin, CFTR, CLCN2 and CLCA1, are also expressed in the developing human fetal lung at gestational stages when CaSR expression is maximal. Measurements of Cl−-driven fluid secretion in organ explant cultures show that pharmacological CaSR activation by calcimimetics stimulates lung fluid secretion through CFTR, an effect which in humans, but not mice, was also mimicked by fetal hypercalcemic conditions, demonstrating that the physiological relevance of such a mechanism appears to be species-specific. Calcimimetics promote CFTR opening by activating adenylate cyclase and we show that Ca2+-stimulated type I adenylate cyclase is expressed in the developing human lung. Together, these observations suggest that physiological fetal hypercalcemia, acting on the CaSR, promotes human fetal lung development via cAMP-dependent opening of CFTR. Disturbances in this process would be expected to permanently impact lung structure and might predispose to certain postnatal respiratory diseases. PMID:26911344

  9. Human fetal bone cells associated with ceramic reinforced PLA scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Montjovent, Marc-Olivier; Mark, Silke; Mathieu, Laurence; Scaletta, Corinne; Scherberich, Arnaud; Delabarde, Claire; Zambelli, Pierre-Yves; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Applegate, Lee Ann; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2008-03-01

    Fetal bone cells were shown to have an interesting potential for therapeutic use in bone tissue engineering due to their rapid growth rate and their ability to differentiate into mature osteoblasts in vitro. We describe hereafter their capability to promote bone repair in vivo when combined with porous scaffolds based on poly(l-lactic acid) (PLA) obtained by supercritical gas foaming and reinforced with 5 wt.% beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP). Bone regeneration was assessed by radiography and histology after implantation of PLA/TCP scaffolds alone, seeded with primary fetal bone cells, or coated with demineralized bone matrix. Craniotomy critical size defects and drill defects in the femoral condyle in rats were employed. In the cranial defects, polymer degradation and cortical bone regeneration were studied up to 12 months postoperatively. Complete bone ingrowth was observed after implantation of PLA/TCP constructs seeded with human fetal bone cells. Further tests were conducted in the trabecular neighborhood of femoral condyles, where scaffolds seeded with fetal bone cells also promoted bone repair. We present here a promising approach for bone tissue engineering using human primary fetal bone cells in combination with porous PLA/TCP structures. Fetal bone cells could be selected regarding osteogenic and immune-related properties, along with their rapid growth, ease of cell banking and associated safety. PMID:18178142

  10. Ethical issues surrounding the transplantation of human fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Hurd, R E

    1992-12-01

    Organ transplants have been one of the greatest advances in medicine. However, organs from living relatives or cadavers are in short supply, and many people die awaiting a donor organ. Increasing the donor pool by using organs from aborted fetuses has been proposed to increase the supply. In addition, there are benefits of using fetal tissue including its particular usefulness in children, the fact that it is not readily rejected, and its potential for growth. Guidelines for fetal research were issued in 1975, but a research moratorium was imposed in 1988 to allow study of ethical and legal issues. While the federal government delays in lifting the ban, several states have written laws governing experimentation with fetuses. Ethical arguments against using fetal tissue for organ transplant include a concern that this would create a branch of biomedicine which depends on the continuation of induced abortions. This could lead to neglect of research for other therapies. The timing and type of abortion should continue to benefit the mother, rather than the organ recipient. Ethicists debate whether or not use of aborted tissue implies complicity in the abortion process beyond that which exists for all members of a society which permits abortion. They also wonder whether knowing that some good could come of an abortion would influence a woman's decision to have one. Proposals to keep the use of fetal tissue ethical include banning the commercial use of sale of tissues, forbidding designation of the tissue recipient (to prevent harvesting fetal tissue for a relative), separating abortion counseling and management from harvesting of the tissue, and obtaining informed consent (perhaps from a proxy surrogate rather than from the mother) for the use of fetal tissue. When the medical and ethical communities have reached some consensus on these issues, crafted safeguards, and precluded conflicts of interest, then restrictions on government funding should be lifted. Whereas it

  11. Does heart rate variability reflect the systemic inflammatory response in a fetal sheep model of lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis?

    PubMed

    Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe L; Cortes, Marina; Cao, Mingju; Burns, Patrick; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Seely, Andrew J E; Frasch, Martin G

    2015-10-01

    Fetal inflammatory response occurs during chorioamnionitis, a frequent and often subclinical inflammation associated with increased risk for brain injury and life-lasting neurologic deficits. No means of early detection exist. We hypothesized that systemic fetal inflammation without septic shock will be reflected in alterations of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability (fHRV) distinguishing baseline versus inflammatory response states. In chronically instrumented near-term fetal sheep (n = 24), we induced an inflammatory response with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected intravenously (n = 14). Ten additional fetuses served as controls. We measured fetal plasma inflammatory cytokine IL-6 at baseline, 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h. 44 fHRV measures were determined continuously every 5 min using continuous individualized multi-organ variability analysis (CIMVA). CIMVA creates an fHRV measures matrix across five signal-analytical domains, thus describing complementary properties of fHRV. Using principal component analysis (PCA), a widely used technique for dimensionality reduction, we derived and quantitatively compared the CIMVA fHRV PCA signatures of inflammatory response in LPS and control groups. In the LPS group, IL-6 peaked at 3 h. In parallel, PCA-derived fHRV composite measures revealed a significant difference between LPS and control group at different time points. For the LPS group, a sharp increase compared to baseline levels was observed between 3 h and 6 h, and then abating to baseline levels, thus tracking closely the IL-6 inflammatory profile. This pattern was not observed in the control group. We also show that a preselection of fHRV measures prior to the PCA can potentially increase the difference between LPS and control groups, as early as 1 h post LPS injection. We propose a fHRV composite measure that correlates well with levels of inflammation and tracks well its temporal profile. Our results highlight the potential role of HRV to study and monitor

  12. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R.

    1984-03-01

    We have tested human fetal fibroblasts for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus; this was evident by a delay in both the relaxation and the restoration of DNA supercoiling in nucleoids after irradiation. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than those derived at 8 week gestation. However, they exhibited a somewhat lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. The same fetal and non-fetal cells were also tested for induction of the protease plasminogen activator (PA) after u.v. irradiation. Enhancement of PA was higher in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 week than in those derived at 12 week gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. These results are consistent with our previous findings that in human cells u.v. light-induced PA synthesis is correlated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Excision repair and PA inducibility were found to depend on tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. Lung compared to skin fibroblasts exhibited lower repair rates and produced higher levels of PA after irradiation. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s).

  13. Distinct composition of human fetal HDL attenuates its anti-oxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Sreckovic, Ivana; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Obrist, Britta; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Holzer, Michael; Scholler, Monika; Philipose, Sonia; Marsche, Gunther; Lang, Uwe; Desoye, Gernot; Wadsack, Christian

    2013-04-01

    In human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) represents the major cholesterol carrying lipoprotein class in cord blood, while cholesterol is mainly carried by low-density lipoprotein in maternal serum. Additionally, to carrying cholesterol, HDL also associates with a range of proteins as cargo. We tested the hypothesis that fetal HDL carries proteins qualitatively and quantitatively different from maternal HDL. These differences then contribute to distinct HDL functionality in both circulations. Shotgun proteomics and biochemical analyses were used to assess composition/function of fetal and maternal HDL isolated from uncomplicated human pregnancies at term of gestation. The pattern of analyzed proteins that were statistically elevated in fetal HDL (apoE, proteins involved in coagulation, transport processes) suggests a particle characteristic for the light HDL2 sub-fraction. In contrast, proteins that were enriched in maternal HDL (apoL, apoF, PON1, apoD, apoCs) have been described almost exclusively in the dense HDL3 fraction and relevant to its anti-oxidative function and role in innate immunity. Strikingly, PON1 mass and activity were 5-fold lower (p<0.01) in the fetus, which was accompanied by attenuation of anti-oxidant capacity of fetal HDL. Despite almost equal quantity of CETP in maternal and fetal HDL, its enzymatic activity was 55% lower (p<0.001) in the fetal circulation, whereas LCAT activity was not altered. These findings indicate that maternally derived HDL differs from fetal HDL with respect to its proteome, size and function. Absence of apoA-1, apoL and PON1 on fetal HDL is associated with decreased anti-oxidative properties together with deficiency in innate immunity collectively indicating distinct HDLs in fetuses. PMID:23321267

  14. Chronic intermittent materno-fetal hyperoxygenation in late gestation may improve on hypoplastic cardiovascular structures associated with cardiac malformations in human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Hypoplasia of cardiovascular structures is a common finding in fetuses with cardiac malformations. Materno-fetal hyperoxygenation (HO) during late gestation promotes venous return to the fetal heart. This analysis in human fetuses sought to define whether this "loading" effect might improve hypoplastic cardiovascular dimensions. Fifteen late-gestation fetuses presented with varying degrees of hypoplastic cardiovascular structures. In these cases, chronic intermittent materno-fetal HO was administered during periods ranging from 8 to 33 days. Cardiac measurements were taken before and at the end of treatment and translated into Z-scores as well as plotted on normal growth charts. During the treatment period, chronic intermittent materno-fetal HO was associated with improved dimensions of >or=1 hypoplastic cardiovascular structures in most fetuses. However, in some cases, the effect of HO was neutralized or impaired by the presence of ventricular septal defects as well as obstructions to ventricular filling or emptying. Chronic intermittent materno-fetal HO near term may be associated with improvements of hypoplastic cardiovascular dimensions in fetuses with a spectrum of cardiac malformations. This effect may facilitate postnatal treatment and improve prognosis in suitable cases.

  15. Populations of subplate and interstitial neurons in fetal and adult human telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Judaš, Miloš; Sedmak, Goran; Pletikos, Mihovil; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša

    2010-01-01

    In the adult human telencephalon, subcortical (gyral) white matter contains a special population of interstitial neurons considered to be surviving descendants of fetal subplate neurons [Kostovic & Rakic (1980) Cytology and the time of origin of interstitial neurons in the white matter in infant and adult human and monkey telencephalon. J Neurocytol9, 219]. We designate this population of cells as superficial (gyral) interstitial neurons and describe their morphology and distribution in the postnatal and adult human cerebrum. Human fetal subplate neurons cannot be regarded as interstitial, because the subplate zone is an essential part of the fetal cortex, the major site of synaptogenesis and the ‘waiting’ compartment for growing cortical afferents, and contains both projection neurons and interneurons with distinct input–output connectivity. However, although the subplate zone is a transient fetal structure, many subplate neurons survive postnatally as superficial (gyral) interstitial neurons. The fetal white matter is represented by the intermediate zone and well-defined deep periventricular tracts of growing axons, such as the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, internal and external capsule, and the fountainhead of the corona radiata. These tracts gradually occupy the territory of transient fetal subventricular and ventricular zones.The human fetal white matter also contains distinct populations of deep fetal interstitial neurons, which, by virtue of their location, morphology, molecular phenotypes and advanced level of dendritic maturation, remain distinct from subplate neurons and neurons in adjacent structures (e.g. basal ganglia, basal forebrain). We describe the morphological, histochemical (nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase) and immunocytochemical (neuron-specific nuclear protein, microtubule-associated protein-2, calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y) features of both deep fetal interstitial neurons and deep (periventricular

  16. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories. 884.2640 Section 884.2640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically,...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories. 884.2640 Section 884.2640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically,...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories. 884.2640 Section 884.2640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically,...

  19. Fetal hypoplastic left heart syndrome and maternal liver transplantation for Wilson’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation currently represents the only curative treatment for Wilson’s disease. A lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is mandatory. In spite of increased maternal and fetal risks, pregnancies after liver transplantation have been reported with favorable perinatal outcomes. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a spectrum of congenital heart defects that results in the inability to support the systemic circulation. Although its etiology remains elusive, the prognosis of this previously fatal condition has dramatically improved over the last 2 decades mainly due to advances in prenatal diagnosis, surgical technique and perioperative care. Case presentation We present a case of a Caucasian 26-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 1 at 36+0 weeks of gestation who had received a liver transplantation due to Wilson’s disease and subsequently delivered a child with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Conclusions This coincidence of medical conditions has not been described in the literature so far and its implications for mother and child as well as the pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed on the basis of a literature review. PMID:24378118

  20. SIRT1 Disruption in Human Fetal Hepatocytes Leads to Increased Accumulation of Glucose and Lipids.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Takeishi, Kazuki; Nakao, Toshimasa; Wang, Yang; Meng, Fanying; Deng, Chu-Xia; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There are unprecedented epidemics of obesity, such as type II diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) in developed countries. A concerning percentage of American children are being affected by obesity and NAFLD. Studies have suggested that the maternal environment in utero might play a role in the development of these diseases later in life. In this study, we documented that inhibiting SIRT1 signaling in human fetal hepatocytes rapidly led to an increase in intracellular glucose and lipids levels. More importantly, both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis related genes were upregulated upon SIRT1 inhibition. The AKT/FOXO1 pathway, a major negative regulator of gluconeogenesis, was decreased in the human fetal hepatocytes inhibited for SIRT1, consistent with the higher level of gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that SIRT1 is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolisms within human fetal hepatocytes, acting as an adaptive transcriptional response to environmental changes. PMID:26890260

  1. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts. PMID:26676944

  2. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts.

  3. Echocardiographic image of an active human heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Echocardiographic images provide quick, safe images of the heart as it beats. While a state-of-the art echocardiograph unit is part of the Human Research Facility on International Space Station, quick transmission of images and data to Earth is a challenge. NASA is developing techniques to improve the echocardiography available to diagnose sick astronauts as well as study the long-term effects of space travel on their health. Echocardiography uses ultrasound, generated in a sensor head placed against the patient's chest, to produce images of the structure of the heart walls and valves. However, ultrasonic imaging creates an enormous volume of data, up to 220 million bits per second. This can challenge ISS communications as well as Earth-based providers. Compressing data for rapid transmission back to Earth can degrade the quality of the images. Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation are working with NASA to develop compression techniques that meet imaging standards now used on the Internet and by the medical community, and that ensure that physicians receive quality diagnostic images.

  4. Wireless fetal heart rate monitoring in inpatient full-term pregnant women: testing functionality and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Boatin, Adeline A; Wylie, Blair; Goldfarb, Ilona; Azevedo, Robin; Pittel, Elena; Ng, Courtney; Haberer, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5%) successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0) on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96). Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively), useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively), and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively). In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of using this

  5. Wireless Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring in Inpatient Full-Term Pregnant Women: Testing Functionality and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Boatin, Adeline A.; Wylie, Blair; Goldfarb, Ilona; Azevedo, Robin; Pittel, Elena; Ng, Courtney; Haberer, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5%) successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0) on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96). Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively), useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively), and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively). In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of using this

  6. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P

    1997-09-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is a new, alternative method for prenatal surveillance. The fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) registers the magnetic field produced by conduction currents in the fetal heart. Compared to the fetal electrocardiogram, the propagation of magnetic fields is relatively undisturbed by surrounding tissue. The FMCG thus has the advantage of a higher signal-to-noise ratio and can be acquired earlier pregnancy. Also, the high temporal resolution of the signal permits a significantly more precise determination of fetal heart rate parameters than fetal ultrasound. FMCG registration using a biomagnetometer is noninvasive and can be performed as of the second trimeter. It can be used to examine signal morphology, cardiac time intervals, heart rate variability as well as cardiac magnetic fields. To date, arrhythmic activity has been observed in the form of supraventricular and ventricular ectopies as well as atrial flutter, atrio-ventricular block, atrial tachycardia and Torsades de Pointes tachycardia. We also report here on the presence of short episodes of bradycardia in the second trimester of normal pregnancy. Measurement of the magnetic field strength at various locations above the abdomen has allowed the reconstruction of the fetal cardiac magnetic field and the determination of its relation to the position of the fetus. Signal averaging has permitted the precise examination of signal amplitude and cardiac time intervals and has shown that they increase in the course of pregnancy. Heart rate variability could be quantified in the time and frequency domain as well as using parameters of nonlinear dynamics. The results demonstrated an increase of variability and complexity over gestational age. Furthermore spectral analysis of fetal heart arte data could be associated with sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as, with respiration. Although the studies presenting these results have involved only limited numbers of observations, they

  7. Human platelet lysate: Replacing fetal bovine serum as a gold standard for human cell propagation?

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Strunk, Dirk; Koh, Mickey B C; Schallmoser, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The essential physiological role of platelets in wound healing and tissue repair builds the rationale for the use of human platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine. Abundant growth factors and cytokines stored in platelet granules can be naturally released by thrombin activation and clotting or artificially by freeze/thaw-mediated platelet lysis, sonication or chemical treatment. Human platelet lysate prepared by the various release strategies has been established as a suitable alternative to fetal bovine serum as culture medium supplement, enabling efficient propagation of human cells under animal serum-free conditions for a multiplicity of applications in advanced somatic cell therapy and tissue engineering. The rapidly increasing number of studies using platelet derived products for inducing human cell proliferation and differentiation has also uncovered a considerable variability of human platelet lysate preparations which limits comparability of results. The main variations discussed herein encompass aspects of donor selection, preparation of the starting material, the possibility for pooling in plasma or additive solution, the implementation of pathogen inactivation and consideration of ABO blood groups, all of which can influence applicability. This review outlines the current knowledge about human platelet lysate as a powerful additive for human cell propagation and highlights its role as a prevailing supplement for human cell culture capable to replace animal serum in a growing spectrum of applications. PMID:26561934

  8. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered “center-stage” in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as “variable”. This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by “cord-compression” hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called “early” rather than “variable”. Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on

  9. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered "center-stage" in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as "variable". This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by "cord-compression" hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called "early" rather than "variable". Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on time relationship to

  10. Altered decorin and Smad expression in human fetal membranes in PPROM.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Casie E; Roumimper, Hailey; Tucker, Richard; Lechner, Beatrice E

    2014-11-01

    Humans with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a subtype of which is caused by abnormal decorin expression, are at increased risk of preterm birth due to preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (PPROM). In the mouse model, the absence of decorin leads to fetal membrane abnormalities, preterm birth, and dysregulation of decorin's downstream pathway components, including the transcription factor p-Smad-2. However, the role of decorin and p-Smad-2 in idiopathic human PPROM is unknown. Fetal membranes from 20-25 pregnancies per group were obtained as a cross-sectional sample of births at one institution between January 2010 and December 2012. The groups were term, preterm without PPROM, and preterm with PPROM. Immunohistochemical analysis of fetal membranes was performed for decorin and p-Smad-2 using localization and quantification assessment. Decorin expression is developmentally regulated in fetal membranes and is decreased in preterm birth with PPROM compared to preterm birth without PPROM. In preterm with PPROM samples, the presence of infection is associated with significant decorin downregulation compared to preterm with PPROM samples without infection. The preterm with PPROM group exhibited decreased p-Smad-2 staining compared to both the term controls and the preterm-without-PPROM group. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of decorin and its downstream pathway component p-Smad-2 occurs in fetal membranes during the second trimester in pathological pregnancies, thus supporting a role for decorin and p-Smad-2 in the pathophysiology of fetal membranes and adverse pregnancy outcomes. These findings may lead to the discovery of new targets for the diagnosis and treatment of PPROM.

  11. Human cardiac troponin T: Identification of fetal isoforms and assignment of the TNNT2 locus to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, P.J.; Farza, H.; Yacoub, M.H.; Barton, P.J.R. ); MacGeoch, C.; Spurr, N.K. ); Wade, R. ); Gahlmann, R. )

    1994-05-15

    The troponin complex is located on the thin filament of striated muscle and is composed of three component polypeptides: Troponin T, troponin I, and troponin C. Three troponin T genes have been described on the basis of molecular cloning in humans and other vertebrates. These are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and encode the troponin T isoforms expressed in cardiac muscle, slow skeletal muscle, and fast skeletal muscle, respectively. Each of these genes is subject to alternative splicing, resulting in the production of multiple tissue-specific isoforms. The authors have cloned cDNAs encoding human cardiac troponin T from adult heart and have used these to demonstrate that multiple cardiac troponin T mRNAs are present in the human fetal heart, resulting from alternative splicing in the 5[prime] coding region of the gene. Hybridization of the cloned cDNAs to genomic DNA identifies a single-copy gene, and using somatic cell hybrid analysis, the authors have mapped the corresponding gene locus (designated TNNT2) to the long arm of chromosome 1 (1cen-qter). 52 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Ablation of the CLP-1 gene leads to down-regulation of the HAND1 gene and abnormality of the left ventricle of the heart and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Facan; Wagner, Michael; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2004-06-01

    We have recently reported that cardiac lineage protein-1 (CLP-1), a nuclear protein with an acidic region that constitutes a potential protein-protein interaction domain, regulates transcription of the cardiac myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v) gene promoter in a manner consistent with its being a transcriptional co-activator or regulator. To test the postulate that CLP-1 is a regulator of cardiac genes we ablated the CLP-1 gene in mice. Past embryonic day (E)16.5, CLP-1 null alleles did not show Mendelian inheritance suggesting that absence of CLP-1 was lethal in late fetal stages. CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts exhibited a reduced left ventricular chamber with thickened myocardial walls, features suggestive of cardiac hypertrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of E16.5 CLP-1 (-/-) ventricular myocardium showed a marked decline in cell density and altered nuclear and myofibril morphologies similar to that seen in animal models of hypertrophic heart. Analysis of contractile and non-contractile protein genes known to be re-expressed during cardiac hypertrophy showed them to have higher expression levels in CLP-1 (-/-) hearts thereby confirming the hypertrophic phenotype at the molecular level. Analysis of cardiac development genes showed that expression of the HAND1 transcription factor, a gene involved in patterning of the heart tube and down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts, was also significantly reduced in CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts. CLP-1 and HAND1 have similar expression patterns in the developing heart ventricles. These data suggest that CLP-1 and the HAND transcription factors may be part of a genetic program critical to proper heart development, perturbation of which can lead to cardiomyopathy.

  13. Quantitative comparison of stem cell marker-positive cells in fetal and term human amnion.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masanori; Pazin, Benjamin J; Minervini, Crescenzio F; Gerlach, Jörg; Ross, Mark A; Stolz, Donna B; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Miki, Toshio

    2009-07-01

    Scattered in the amniotic epithelium of the human term placenta are pluripotent stem cell marker-positive cells. Unlike other parts of the placenta, amniotic epithelial (AE) cells are derived from pluripotent epiblasts. It is hypothesized that most epiblast-derived fetal AE cells are positive for stem cell markers at the beginning of pregnancy and that the stem cell marker-positive cells scattered through the term amnion are remaining, epiblast-like stem cells. To test this hypothesis, human fetal amnia from early-stage pregnancies were evaluated for expression of the stem cell-specific cell surface markers TRA 1-60 and TRA 1-81 and of the pluripotent stem cell marker genes Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. Whole-mount immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that a greater proportion of AE cells in the 17-19 week human fetal amnion are positive for both TRA 1-60 and TRA 1-81 than in the term amnion. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the fetal AE cells exhibit greater stem cell marker gene expression than those in term placentae. Expression of both Nanog and Sox2 mRNAs were significantly higher in the fetal amnion, while Oct4 mRNA expression was not significantly changed. These differences in abundance of stem cell marker-positive cells and stem cell marker gene expression together indicate that some stem cell marker-positive cells are conserved over the course of pregnancy. The results suggest that stem cell marker-positive AE cells in the term amnion are retained from epiblast-derived fetal AE cells.

  14. Dissecting human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex using single-cell RNAseq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutlein, Barbara

    Cerebral organoids - three-dimensional cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells - have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and novel interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages, and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue in order to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures.

  15. Human cerebral organoids recapitulate gene expression programs of fetal neocortex development

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Badsha, Farhath; Florio, Marta; Kanton, Sabina; Gerber, Tobias; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Lewitus, Eric; Sykes, Alex; Hevers, Wulf; Lancaster, Madeline; Knoblich, Juergen A.; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B.; Treutlein, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral organoids—3D cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells—have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and previously unidentified interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single-cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures. PMID:26644564

  16. Human cerebral organoids recapitulate gene expression programs of fetal neocortex development.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Badsha, Farhath; Florio, Marta; Kanton, Sabina; Gerber, Tobias; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Lewitus, Eric; Sykes, Alex; Hevers, Wulf; Lancaster, Madeline; Knoblich, Juergen A; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B; Treutlein, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Cerebral organoids-3D cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells-have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and previously unidentified interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single-cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures. PMID:26644564

  17. Human cerebral organoids recapitulate gene expression programs of fetal neocortex development

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Badsha, Farhath; Florio, Marta; Kanton, Sabina; Gerber, Tobias; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Lewitus, Eric; Sykes, Alex; Hevers, Wulf; Lancaster, Madeline; Knoblich, Juergen A.; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B.; Treutlein, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral organoids—3D cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells—have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and previously unidentified interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single-cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures. PMID:26644564

  18. A comparative biomechanical analysis of term fetal membranes in human and domestic species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to biomechanically characterize and compare human, porcine, equine, and ovine fetal membranes. Noncontact metrology was used for topographic analyses. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to resolve specific biomechanical values. Puncture force and radial stresses we...

  19. Towards a New Study on Associative Learning in Human Fetuses: Fetal Associative Learning in Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed that fetuses can learn from events in their environment. The most convincing evidence for fetal learning is habituation to vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) in human fetuses and classical conditioning in rat fetuses. However, these two research areas have been independent of each other. There have been few attempts at classical…

  20. Human fetal weight and placental weight growth curves. A mathematical analysis from a population at sea level.

    PubMed

    Bonds, D R; Mwape, B; Kumar, S; Gabbe, S G

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of human fetal and placental growth curves was made on data collected prospectively from a population at sea level. Both the fetal and placental growth curves can best be described by a form of the logistic equation inhibited growth model. The fetal growth rate reaches its maximum approximately 4 weeks after the placental growth rate has reached its maximum. Growth rate constants were calculated for several populations at various altitudes. PMID:6733167

  1. Studies in Fetal Behavior: Revisited, Renewed, and Reimagined

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Voegtline, Kristin M.

    2016-01-01

    Among the earliest volumes of this Monograph series was a report by Lester Sontag and colleagues, of the esteemed Fels Institute, on the heart rate of the human fetus as an expression of the developing nervous system. Here, some 75 years later, we commemorate this work and provide historical and contemporary context on knowledge regarding fetal development, as well as results from our own research. These are based on synchronized monitoring of maternal and fetal parameters assessed between 24 and 36 weeks gestation on 740 maternal-fetal pairs compiled from eight separate longitudinal studies, which commenced in the early 1990s. Data include maternal heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and electrodermal activity and fetal heart rate, motor activity, and their integration. Hierarchical linear modeling of developmental trajectories reveals that the fetus develops in predictable ways consistent with advancing parasympathetic regulation. Findings also include: within-fetus stability (i.e., preservation of rank ordering over time) for heart rate, motor, and coupling measures; a transitional period of decelerating development near 30 weeks gestation; sex differences in fetal heart rate measures but not in most fetal motor activity measures; modest correspondence in fetal neurodevelopment among siblings as compared to unrelated fetuses; and deviations from normative fetal development in fetuses affected by intrauterine growth restriction and other conditions. Maternal parameters also change during this period of gestation and there is evidence that fetal sex and individual variation in fetal neurobehavior influence maternal physiological processes and the local intrauterine context. Results are discussed within the framework of neuromaturation, the emergence of individual differences, and the bidirectional nature of the maternal-fetal relationship. We pose a number of open questions for future research. Although the human fetus remains just out of reach, new

  2. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  3. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  4. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  5. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  6. Critical Scale Invariance in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Sakata, Seiichiro; Hayano, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the robust scale-invariance in the probability density function (PDF) of detrended healthy human heart rate increments, which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state where the mean level of the heart rate is dramatically changing. This scale-independent and fractal structure is markedly different from the scale-dependent PDF evolution observed in a turbulentlike, cascade heart rate model. These results strongly support the view that a healthy human heart rate is controlled to converge continually to a critical state.

  7. Characterization of a primary brown adipocyte culture system derived from human fetal interscapular fat

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Sarah E; Xu, Dan; Ho, Jia-Pei; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Buehrer, Benjamin M; Ludlow, Y John W; Kovalik, Jean-Paul; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Brown fat has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Indeed, the anti-obesity potential of multiple targets to stimulate both brown adipocyte differentiation and recruitment have been verified in rodent models. However, their therapeutic potential in humans is unknown due to the lack of a human primary brown adipocyte cell culture system. Likewise, the lack of a well-characterized human model has limited the discovery of novel targets for the activation of human brown fat. To address this current need, we aimed to identify and describe the first primary brown adipocyte cell culture system from human fetal interscapular brown adipose tissue. Pre-adipocytes isolated from non-viable human fetal interscapular tissue were expanded and cryopreserved. Cells were then thawed and plated alongside adult human subcutaneous and omental pre-adipocytes for subsequent differentiation and phenotypic characterization. Interscapular pre-adipocytes in cell culture differentiated into mature adipocytes that were morphologically indistinguishable from the adult white depots. Throughout differentiation, cultured human fetal interscapular adipocytes demonstrated increased expression of classical brown fat markers compared to subcutaneous and omental cells. Further, functional analysis revealed an elevation in fatty acid oxidation as well as maximal and uncoupled oxygen consumption in interscapular brown adipocytes compared to white control cells. These data collectively identify the brown phenotype of these cells. Thus, our primary cell culture system derived from non-viable human fetal interscapular brown adipose tissue provides a valuable tool for the study of human brown adipocyte biology and for the development of anti-obesity therapeutics. PMID:26451287

  8. Reactivation of Fetal Splicing Programs in Diabetic Hearts Is Mediated by Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sunil K.; Deshmukh, Vaibhav; Liu, Patrick; Nutter, Curtis A.; Espejo, Rosario; Hung, Ming-Lung; Wang, Guey-Shin; Yeo, Gene W.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is one of the complications of diabetes that eventually leads to heart failure and death. Aberrant activation of PKC signaling contributes to diabetic cardiomyopathy by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Previous reports indicate that PKC is implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Therefore, we wanted to test whether PKC activation in diabetic hearts induces alternative splicing abnormalities. Here, using RNA sequencing we identified a set of 22 alternative splicing events that undergo a developmental switch in splicing, and we confirmed that splicing reverts to an embryonic pattern in adult diabetic hearts. This network of genes has important functions in RNA metabolism and in developmental processes such as differentiation. Importantly, PKC isozymes α/β control alternative splicing of these genes via phosphorylation and up-regulation of the RNA-binding proteins CELF1 and Rbfox2. Using a mutant of CELF1, we show that phosphorylation of CELF1 by PKC is necessary for regulation of splicing events altered in diabetes. In summary, our studies indicate that activation of PKCα/β in diabetic hearts contributes to the genome-wide splicing changes through phosphorylation and up-regulation of CELF1/Rbfox2 proteins. These findings provide a basis for PKC-mediated cardiac pathogenesis under diabetic conditions. PMID:24151077

  9. Endocrine regulation of human fetal growth: the role of the mother, placenta, and fetus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Vanessa E; Smith, Roger; Giles, Warwick B; Clifton, Vicki L

    2006-04-01

    The environment in which the fetus develops is critical for its survival and long-term health. The regulation of normal human fetal growth involves many multidirectional interactions between the mother, placenta, and fetus. The mother supplies nutrients and oxygen to the fetus via the placenta. The fetus influences the provision of maternal nutrients via the placental production of hormones that regulate maternal metabolism. The placenta is the site of exchange between mother and fetus and regulates fetal growth via the production and metabolism of growth-regulating hormones such as IGFs and glucocorticoids. Adequate trophoblast invasion in early pregnancy and increased uteroplacental blood flow ensure sufficient growth of the uterus, placenta, and fetus. The placenta may respond to fetal endocrine signals to increase transport of maternal nutrients by growth of the placenta, by activation of transport systems, and by production of placental hormones to influence maternal physiology and even behavior. There are consequences of poor fetal growth both in the short term and long term, in the form of increased mortality and morbidity. Endocrine regulation of fetal growth involves interactions between the mother, placenta, and fetus, and these effects may program long-term physiology.

  10. [Morphogenesis of Human Fetal Thymus during Weeks 22-27 of Development].

    PubMed

    Kulida, L V; Peretyatko, L P; Nazarov, S B

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features of human fetal thymus morphogenesis in early ontogeny in the case of uncomplicated pregnancy have been characterized. A steady increase of thymus dimensions and weight occurred concomitantly to differentiation of morphofunctional zones within the organ. Cell differentiation in the subcapsular and inner cortical zones of the thymus lobes was manifested as changes in parameters of expression of T-lymphocyte antigens CD1, CD2, and CD3 and ultrastructural features of reticuloepithelial cells (REC) type I and II forming a microenvironment for lymphocytes. RECs of the medullar zone formed a glomerular syncytium with desmosomal interepithelial contacts by week 22 of fetal development. Small lymphocytes predominated among thymocytes (66%). Hassall's corpuscles, the structural correlates of morphological and functional maturity, predominated in the fetal thymuses during developmental weeks 25-27.

  11. [Morphogenesis of Human Fetal Thymus during Weeks 22-27 of Development].

    PubMed

    Kulida, L V; Peretyatko, L P; Nazarov, S B

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features of human fetal thymus morphogenesis in early ontogeny in the case of uncomplicated pregnancy have been characterized. A steady increase of thymus dimensions and weight occurred concomitantly to differentiation of morphofunctional zones within the organ. Cell differentiation in the subcapsular and inner cortical zones of the thymus lobes was manifested as changes in parameters of expression of T-lymphocyte antigens CD1, CD2, and CD3 and ultrastructural features of reticuloepithelial cells (REC) type I and II forming a microenvironment for lymphocytes. RECs of the medullar zone formed a glomerular syncytium with desmosomal interepithelial contacts by week 22 of fetal development. Small lymphocytes predominated among thymocytes (66%). Hassall's corpuscles, the structural correlates of morphological and functional maturity, predominated in the fetal thymuses during developmental weeks 25-27. PMID:26480484

  12. Recent advances in the prenatal interrogation of the human fetal genome.

    PubMed

    Hui, Lisa; Bianchi, Diana W

    2013-02-01

    The amount of genetic and genomic information obtainable from the human fetus during pregnancy is accelerating at an unprecedented rate. Two themes have dominated recent technological advances in prenatal diagnosis: interrogation of the fetal genome in increasingly high resolution and the development of non-invasive methods of fetal testing using cell-free DNA in maternal plasma. These two areas of advancement have now converged with several recent reports of non-invasive assessment of the entire fetal genome from maternal blood. However, technological progress is outpacing the ability of the healthcare providers and patients to incorporate these new tests into existing clinical care, and further complicates many of the economic and ethical dilemmas in prenatal diagnosis. This review summarizes recent work in this field and discusses the integration of these new technologies into the clinic and society.

  13. Developmentally regulated IL6-type cytokines signal to germ cells in the human fetal ovary.

    PubMed

    Eddie, Sharon L; Childs, Andrew J; Jabbour, Henry N; Anderson, Richard A

    2012-02-01

    Fetal ovarian development and primordial follicle formation are imperative for adult fertility in the female. Data suggest the interleukin (IL)6-type cytokines, leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), IL6, oncostatin M (OSM) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), are able to regulate the survival, proliferation and differentiation of fetal murine germ cells (GCs) in vivo and in vitro. We postulated that these factors may play a similar role during early human GC development and primordial follicle formation. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the expression and regulation of IL6-type cytokines, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Expression of transcripts encoding OSM increased significantly across the gestational range examined (8-20 weeks), while expression of IL6 increased specifically between the first (8-11 weeks) and early second (12-16 weeks) trimesters, co-incident with the initiation of meiosis. LIF and CNTF expression remained unchanged. Expression of the genes encoding the LIF and IL6 receptors, and their common signalling subunit gp130, was also found to be developmentally regulated, with expression increasing significantly with increasing gestation. LIF receptor and gp130 proteins localized exclusively to GCs, including oocytes in primordial follicles, indicating this cell type to be the sole target of IL6-type cytokine signalling in the human fetal ovary. These data establish that IL6-type cytokines and their receptors are expressed in the human fetal ovary and may directly influence GC development at multiple stages of maturation. PMID:21965347

  14. Transient structures of the human fetal brain: subplate, thalamic reticular complex, ganglionic eminence.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, N; Neudörfer, F; Bohl, J

    2000-07-01

    Morphological features of the subplate, the thalamic reticular complex and the ganglionic eminence, which represent three major transient structures of the human fetal forebrain, are summarized with special reference to their functional roles. The subplate harboring various neuronal types is an outstandingly wide zone subjacent to the cortical plate in the human fetal brain. Within the subplate various cortical afferents establish synaptic contacts for a prolonged period before entering the cortical plate. Therefore, the subplate is regarded as a "waiting compartment" which is required for the formation of mature cortical connections. Next to the thalamic reticular nucleus, within the fibers of internal capsule, the perireticular nucleus is located which has been established as a distinct entity during development. Its various neuronal types express a number of different neuroactive substances. Perinatally, the perireticular nucleus is drastically reduced in size. It is involved in the guidance of corticofugal and thalamocortical fibers. The ganglionic eminence is a conspicuous proliferative area that persists throughout nearly the entire fetal period. In the human fetal brain it extends medially upon the dorsal thalamic nuclei which receive precursor cells from the ganglionic eminence. Postmitotic cells in the marginal zone of the ganglionic eminence serve as an intermediate target for growing axons. On the whole, all three structures establish transient neural circuitries that may be essential for the formation of adult projections. The characteristics of the three transient structures are particularly relevant for developmental neuropathology as these structures may be damaged in disorders that preferentially occur in preterm infants. PMID:10963122

  15. Evolutionary anticipation of the human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, S.; Nayak, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the comparative anatomy of hearts from fish, frog, turtle, snake, crocodile, birds (duck, chicken, quail), mammals (elephant, dolphin, sheep, goat, ox, baboon, wallaby, mouse, rabbit, possum, echidna) and man. The findings were analysed with respect to the mechanism of evolution of the heart. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:11041025

  16. 42 CFR 121.13 - Definition of Human Organ Under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act, as amended.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION... the human (including fetal) kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, bone marrow, cornea, eye, bone,...

  17. Change of Spectral Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate During Clinical Hypnosis: a Prospective Randomised Trial from the 20th Week of Gestation Till Term

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, J.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Schiermeier, S.; Hatzmann, W.; Heinrich, T. M.; Hüsken-Janßen, H.; Herrmann, E.; Louwen, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic nervous system during hypnosis from the 20th week of gestation till term. Are there changes in the power spectrum analysis of fetal heart rate when the mother is having a clinical hypnosis or control period? Study Design: Fourty-nine FHR recordings were analysed. Included recordings were from singletons and abdominal fetal ECG-monitored pregnancies. All women were randomised to receive clinical hypnosis followed by a period with no intervention or vice versa. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon signed ranks and Spearman rho correlation tests. Results: There was a significant difference found between fetal heart rate at baseline (144.3 ± 6.0) and hypnosis (142.1 ± 6.4). A difference was also detected between the standard deviation of the heart rate between baseline (6.7 ± 1.9) and hypnosis (6.8 ± 3.5). LFnu was smaller during baseline (80.2 ± 5.3) than during hypnosis (82.1 ± 5.7), whereas HFnu was significantly larger (19.8 ± 5.3 vs. 17.9 ± 5.7). There was no correlation between the gestation age and the change in LFnu, HFnu or ratio LF/HF due to the hypnosis intervention. Conclusion: The functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic system during hypnosis is reflected by a sympathovagal shift towards increased sympathetic modulation. PMID:25284838

  18. Change of Spectral Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate During Clinical Hypnosis: a Prospective Randomised Trial from the 20th Week of Gestation Till Term.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, J; Hayes-Gill, B R; Schiermeier, S; Hatzmann, W; Heinrich, T M; Hüsken-Janßen, H; Herrmann, E; Louwen, F

    2012-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic nervous system during hypnosis from the 20th week of gestation till term. Are there changes in the power spectrum analysis of fetal heart rate when the mother is having a clinical hypnosis or control period? Study Design: Fourty-nine FHR recordings were analysed. Included recordings were from singletons and abdominal fetal ECG-monitored pregnancies. All women were randomised to receive clinical hypnosis followed by a period with no intervention or vice versa. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon signed ranks and Spearman rho correlation tests. Results: There was a significant difference found between fetal heart rate at baseline (144.3 ± 6.0) and hypnosis (142.1 ± 6.4). A difference was also detected between the standard deviation of the heart rate between baseline (6.7 ± 1.9) and hypnosis (6.8 ± 3.5). LFnu was smaller during baseline (80.2 ± 5.3) than during hypnosis (82.1 ± 5.7), whereas HFnu was significantly larger (19.8 ± 5.3 vs. 17.9 ± 5.7). There was no correlation between the gestation age and the change in LFnu, HFnu or ratio LF/HF due to the hypnosis intervention. Conclusion: The functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic system during hypnosis is reflected by a sympathovagal shift towards increased sympathetic modulation.

  19. Effect of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on human and mouse fetal testis: In vitro and in vivo approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Muczynski, V.; Cravedi, J.P.; Lehraiki, A.; Levacher, C.; Moison, D.; Lecureuil, C.; Messiaen, S.; Perdu, E.; Frydman, R.; Habert, R.; and others

    2012-05-15

    The present study was conducted to determine whether exposure to the mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) represents a genuine threat to male human reproductive function. To this aim, we investigated the effects on human male fetal germ cells of a 10{sup −5} M exposure. This dose is slightly above the mean concentrations found in human fetal cord blood samples by biomonitoring studies. The in vitro experimental approach was further validated for phthalate toxicity assessment by comparing the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure in mouse testes. Human fetal testes were recovered during the first trimester (7–12 weeks) of gestation and cultured in the presence or not of 10{sup −5} M MEHP for three days. Apoptosis was quantified by measuring the percentage of Caspase-3 positive germ cells. The concentration of phthalate reaching the fetal gonads was determined by radioactivity measurements, after incubations with {sup 14}C-MEHP. A 10{sup −5} M exposure significantly increased the rate of apoptosis in human male fetal germ cells. The intratesticular MEHP concentration measured corresponded to the concentration added in vitro to the culture medium. Furthermore, a comparable effect on germ cell apoptosis in mouse fetal testes was induced both in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that this 10{sup −5} M exposure is sufficient to induce changes to the in vivo development of the human fetal male germ cells. -- Highlights: ► 10{sup −5} M of MEHP impairs germ cell development in the human fetal testis. ► Organotypic culture is a suitable approach to investigate phthalate effects in human. ► MEHP is not metabolized in the human fetal testis. ► In mice, MEHP triggers similar effects both in vivo and in vitro.

  20. Comparative studies of different cryopreservation methods for mesenchymal stem cells derived from human fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Plamen; Hristova, Elena; Konakchieva, Rossitza; Michova, Antoaneta; Dimitrov, Josif

    2010-03-29

    Fetal stem cells possess some intriguing characteristics, which delineate them as promising cellular therapeutics. They are less immunogenic, at lower stage of differentiation and have higher potential for repopulation and migration. Furthermore, the fetal stem cells secrete a set of cytokines and growth factors, which stimulate the regeneration of the recipient tissue. The present study indicated that the adhesive fraction of human fetal liver cells possessed the morphological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as potential to differentiate into adipocyte and osteoblast lineages. The immunophenotypic analysis showed that the cells expressed CD13, CD73, CD90 and CD105 (typical for mesenchymal stem cells) and lacked the haematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Addressing the issue of the low-temperature storage of the human fetal liver cells, four different methods for cryopreservation were assessed: conventional slow freezing, program freezing and two vitrification protocols. The obtained results demonstrated that the cells were cryotolerant and maintained their properties and differentiation potential after thawing. Program freezing showed to be the most efficient method for cryopreservation of the investigated cells.

  1. Fetal human keratinocytes produce large amounts of antimicrobial peptides: involvement of histone-methylation processes.

    PubMed

    Gschwandtner, Maria; Zhong, Shaomin; Tschachler, Antonia; Mlitz, Veronika; Karner, Susanne; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Mildner, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), an important part of the innate immune system, are crucial for defense against invading microorganisms. Whereas AMPs have been extensively studied in adult skin, little is known about the impact of AMPs in the developing human skin. We therefore compared the expression and regulation of AMPs in fetal, neonatal, and adult keratinocytes (KCs) in vitro. The constitutive expression of human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2), HBD-3, S100 protein family members, and cathelicidin was significantly higher in KCs from fetal skin than in KCs from postnatal skin. The capacity to further increase AMP production was comparable between prenatal and postnatal KCs. Analysis of skin equivalents (SEs) revealed a strong constitutive expression of S100 proteins in fetal but not in neonatal and adult SEs. The elevated AMP levels correlated with reduced H3K27me3 (tri-methyl-lysine 27 on histone H3) levels and increased expression of the histone demethylase JMJD3. Knockdown of JMJD3 in fetal KCs elevated H3K27me3 levels and significantly downregulated the expression of HBD-3, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9, and cathelicidin. Our data indicate a crucial contribution of histone modifications in the regulation of AMP expression in the skin during ontogeny. The elevated AMP expression in prenatal skin might represent an essential defense strategy of the unborn.

  2. The impact of a human IGF-II analog ([Leu27]IGF-II) on fetal growth in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Charnock, Jayne C.; Dilworth, Mark R.; Aplin, John D.; Sibley, Colin P.; Westwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing placental insulin-like growth factor (IGF) availability appears to be an attractive strategy for improving outcomes in fetal growth restriction (FGR). Our approach was the novel use of [Leu27]IGF-II, a human IGF-II analog that binds the IGF-II clearance receptor IGF-IIR in fetal growth-restricted (FGR) mice. We hypothesized that the impact of [Leu27]IGF-II infusion in C57BL/6J (wild-type) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−; FGR) mice would be to enhance fetal growth and investigated this from mid- to late gestation; 1 mg·kg−1·day−1 [Leu27]IGF-II was delivered via a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump from E12.5 to E18.5. Fetal and placental weights recorded at E18.5 were used to generate frequency distribution curves; fetuses <5th centile were deemed growth restricted. Placentas were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis of the IGF system, and maternal serum was collected for measurement of exogenously administered IGF-II. In WT pregnancies, [Leu27]IGF-II treatment halved the number of FGR fetuses, reduced fetal(P = 0.028) and placental weight variations (P = 0.0032), and increased the numbers of pups close to the mean fetal weight (131 vs. 112 pups within 1 SD). Mixed-model analysis confirmed litter size to be negatively correlated with fetal and placental weight and showed that [Leu27]IGF-II preferentially improved fetal weight in the largest litters, as defined by number. Unidirectional 14CMeAIB transfer per gram placenta (System A amino acid transporter activity) was inversely correlated with fetal weight in [Leu27]IGF-II-treated WT animals (P < 0.01). In eNOS−/− mice, [Leu27]IGF-II reduced the number of FGR fetuses(1 vs. 5 in the untreated group). The observed reduction in FGR pup numbers in both C57 and eNOS−/− litters suggests the use of this analog as a means of standardizing and rescuing fetal growth, preferentially in the smallest offspring. PMID:26530156

  3. Spatial-temporal atlas of human fetal brain development during the early second trimester.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jinfeng; Dinov, Ivo D; Li, Junning; Zhang, Zhonghe; Hobel, Sam; Shi, Yonggang; Lin, Xiangtao; Zamanyan, Alen; Feng, Lei; Teng, Gaojun; Fang, Fang; Tang, Yuchun; Zang, Fengchao; Toga, Arthur W; Liu, Shuwei

    2013-11-15

    During the second trimester, the human fetal brain undergoes numerous changes that lead to substantial variation in the neonatal in terms of its morphology and tissue types. As fetal MRI is more and more widely used for studying the human brain development during this period, a spatiotemporal atlas becomes necessary for characterizing the dynamic structural changes. In this study, 34 postmortem human fetal brains with gestational ages ranging from 15 to 22 weeks were scanned using 7.0 T MR. We used automated morphometrics, tensor-based morphometry and surface modeling techniques to analyze the data. Spatiotemporal atlases of each week and the overall atlas covering the whole period with high resolution and contrast were created. These atlases were used for the analysis of age-specific shape changes during this period, including development of the cerebral wall, lateral ventricles, Sylvian fissure, and growth direction based on local surface measurements. Our findings indicate that growth of the subplate zone is especially striking and is the main cause for the lamination pattern changes. Changes in the cortex around Sylvian fissure demonstrate that cortical growth may be one of the mechanisms for gyration. Surface deformation mapping, revealed by local shape analysis, indicates that there is global anterior-posterior growth pattern, with frontal and temporal lobes developing relatively quickly during this period. Our results are valuable for understanding the normal brain development trajectories and anatomical characteristics. These week-by-week fetal brain atlases can be used as reference in in vivo studies, and may facilitate the quantification of fetal brain development across space and time.

  4. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analysis of the 8-20 week human fetal pancreas.

    PubMed

    Riopel, Matthew; Li, Jinming; Fellows, George F; Goodyer, Cynthia G; Wang, Rennian

    2014-01-01

    Development of the human pancreas is well-known to involve tightly controlled differentiation of pancreatic precursors to mature cells that express endocrine- or exocrine-specific protein products. However, details of human pancreatic development at the ultrastructural level are limited. The present study analyzed 8-20 week fetal age human pancreata using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), TEM immunogold and double or triple immunofluorescence staining. Primary organization of islets and acini occurred during the developmental period examined. Differentiating endocrine and exocrine cells developed from the ductal tubules and subsequently formed isolated small clusters. Extracellular matrix fibers and proteins accumulated around newly differentiated cells during their migration and cluster formation. Glycogen expression was robust in ductal cells of the pancreas from 8-15 weeks of fetal age; however, this became markedly reduced at 20 weeks, with a concomitant increase in acinar cell glycogen content. Insulin secretory granules transformed from being dense and round at 8 weeks to distinct geometric (multilobular, crystalline) structures by 14-20 weeks. Initially many of the differentiating endocrine cells were multihormonal and contained polyhormonal granules; by 20 weeks, monohormonal cells were in the majority. Interestingly, certain secretory granules in the early human fetal pancreatic cells showed positivity for both exocrine (amylase) and endocrine proteins. This combined ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study showed that, during early developmental stages, the human pancreas contains differentiating epithelial cells that associate closely with the extracellular matrix, have dynamic glycogen expression patterns and contain polyhormonal as well as mixed endocrine/exocrine granules.

  5. STUDIES IN FETAL BEHAVIOR: REVISITED, RENEWED, AND REIMAGINED.

    PubMed

    DiPietro, Janet A; Costigan, Kathleen A; Voegtline, Kristin M

    2015-09-01

    Among the earliest volumes of this monograph series was a report by Lester Sontag and colleagues, of the esteemed Fels Institute, on the heart rate of the human fetus as an expression of the developing nervous system. Here, some 75 years later, we commemorate this work and provide historical and contemporary context on knowledge regarding fetal development, as well as results from our own research. These are based on synchronized monitoring of maternal and fetal parameters assessed between 24 and 36 weeks gestation on 740 maternal-fetal pairs compiled from eight separate longitudinal studies, which commenced in the early 1990s. Data include maternal heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and electrodrmal activity and fetal heartrate, motor activity, and their integration. Hierarchical linear modeling of developmental trajectories reveals that the fetus develops in predictable ways consistent with advancing parasympathetic regulation. Findings also include:within-fetus stability (i.e., preservation of rank ordering over time) for heart rate, motor, and coupling measures; a transitional period of decelerating development near 30 weeks gestation; sex differences in fetal heart rate measures but not in most fetal motor activity measures; modest correspondence in fetal neurodevelopment among siblings as compared to unrelated fetuses; and deviations from normative fetal development in fetuses affected by intrauterine growth restriction and other conditions. Maternal parameters also change during this period of gestation and there is evidence that fetal sex and individual variation in fetal neurobehavior influence maternal physio-logical processes and the local intrauterine context. Results are discussed within the framework of neuromaturation, the emergence of individual differences, and the bidirectional nature of the maternal-fetal relationship.We pose a number of open questions for future research. Although the human fetus remains just out of reach, new

  6. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Transient Fetal Compartments during Prenatal Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Vasung, Lana; Lepage, Claude; Radoš, Milan; Pletikos, Mihovil; Goldman, Jennifer S; Richiardi, Jonas; Raguž, Marina; Fischi-Gómez, Elda; Karama, Sherif; Huppi, Petra S; Evans, Alan C; Kostovic, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral wall of the human fetal brain is composed of transient cellular compartments, which show characteristic spatiotemporal relationships with intensity of major neurogenic events (cell proliferation, migration, axonal growth, dendritic differentiation, synaptogenesis, cell death, and myelination). The aim of the present study was to obtain new quantitative data describing volume, surface area, and thickness of transient compartments in the human fetal cerebrum. Forty-four postmortem fetal brains aged 13-40 postconceptional weeks (PCW) were included in this study. High-resolution T1 weighted MR images were acquired on 19 fetal brain hemispheres. MR images were processed using in-house software (MNI-ACE toolbox). Delineation of fetal compartments was performed semi-automatically by co-registration of MRI with histological sections of the same brains, or with the age-matched brains from Zagreb Neuroembryological Collection. Growth trajectories of transient fetal compartments were reconstructed. The composition of telencephalic wall was quantitatively assessed. Between 13 and 25 PCW, when the intensity of neuronal proliferation decreases drastically, the relative volume of proliferative (ventricular and subventricular) compartments showed pronounced decline. In contrast, synapse- and extracellular matrix-rich subplate compartment continued to grow during the first two trimesters, occupying up to 45% of telencephalon and reaching its maximum volume and thickness around 30 PCW. This developmental maximum coincides with a period of intensive growth of long cortico-cortical fibers, which enter and wait in subplate before approaching the cortical plate. Although we did not find significant age related changes in mean thickness of the cortical plate, the volume, gyrification index, and surface area of the cortical plate continued to exponentially grow during the last phases of prenatal development. This cortical expansion coincides developmentally with the

  7. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Transient Fetal Compartments during Prenatal Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Vasung, Lana; Lepage, Claude; Radoš, Milan; Pletikos, Mihovil; Goldman, Jennifer S.; Richiardi, Jonas; Raguž, Marina; Fischi-Gómez, Elda; Karama, Sherif; Huppi, Petra S.; Evans, Alan C.; Kostovic, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral wall of the human fetal brain is composed of transient cellular compartments, which show characteristic spatiotemporal relationships with intensity of major neurogenic events (cell proliferation, migration, axonal growth, dendritic differentiation, synaptogenesis, cell death, and myelination). The aim of the present study was to obtain new quantitative data describing volume, surface area, and thickness of transient compartments in the human fetal cerebrum. Forty-four postmortem fetal brains aged 13–40 postconceptional weeks (PCW) were included in this study. High-resolution T1 weighted MR images were acquired on 19 fetal brain hemispheres. MR images were processed using in-house software (MNI-ACE toolbox). Delineation of fetal compartments was performed semi-automatically by co-registration of MRI with histological sections of the same brains, or with the age-matched brains from Zagreb Neuroembryological Collection. Growth trajectories of transient fetal compartments were reconstructed. The composition of telencephalic wall was quantitatively assessed. Between 13 and 25 PCW, when the intensity of neuronal proliferation decreases drastically, the relative volume of proliferative (ventricular and subventricular) compartments showed pronounced decline. In contrast, synapse- and extracellular matrix-rich subplate compartment continued to grow during the first two trimesters, occupying up to 45% of telencephalon and reaching its maximum volume and thickness around 30 PCW. This developmental maximum coincides with a period of intensive growth of long cortico-cortical fibers, which enter and wait in subplate before approaching the cortical plate. Although we did not find significant age related changes in mean thickness of the cortical plate, the volume, gyrification index, and surface area of the cortical plate continued to exponentially grow during the last phases of prenatal development. This cortical expansion coincides developmentally with the

  8. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Transient Fetal Compartments during Prenatal Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Vasung, Lana; Lepage, Claude; Radoš, Milan; Pletikos, Mihovil; Goldman, Jennifer S; Richiardi, Jonas; Raguž, Marina; Fischi-Gómez, Elda; Karama, Sherif; Huppi, Petra S; Evans, Alan C; Kostovic, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral wall of the human fetal brain is composed of transient cellular compartments, which show characteristic spatiotemporal relationships with intensity of major neurogenic events (cell proliferation, migration, axonal growth, dendritic differentiation, synaptogenesis, cell death, and myelination). The aim of the present study was to obtain new quantitative data describing volume, surface area, and thickness of transient compartments in the human fetal cerebrum. Forty-four postmortem fetal brains aged 13-40 postconceptional weeks (PCW) were included in this study. High-resolution T1 weighted MR images were acquired on 19 fetal brain hemispheres. MR images were processed using in-house software (MNI-ACE toolbox). Delineation of fetal compartments was performed semi-automatically by co-registration of MRI with histological sections of the same brains, or with the age-matched brains from Zagreb Neuroembryological Collection. Growth trajectories of transient fetal compartments were reconstructed. The composition of telencephalic wall was quantitatively assessed. Between 13 and 25 PCW, when the intensity of neuronal proliferation decreases drastically, the relative volume of proliferative (ventricular and subventricular) compartments showed pronounced decline. In contrast, synapse- and extracellular matrix-rich subplate compartment continued to grow during the first two trimesters, occupying up to 45% of telencephalon and reaching its maximum volume and thickness around 30 PCW. This developmental maximum coincides with a period of intensive growth of long cortico-cortical fibers, which enter and wait in subplate before approaching the cortical plate. Although we did not find significant age related changes in mean thickness of the cortical plate, the volume, gyrification index, and surface area of the cortical plate continued to exponentially grow during the last phases of prenatal development. This cortical expansion coincides developmentally with the

  9. Fetal echocardiographic evaluation of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Renner, Michael; Clough, Patricia; Levine, Gregg; Campbell, Michelle; Stone, Rae; Schmitt, Todd; Chang, Ruey-Kang; Shannon-Rodriguez, Jayne

    2010-03-01

    In humans, fetal echocardiography represents the most important tool for the assessment of the cardiovascular well-being of the fetus. However, because of logistic, anatomic, and behavioral challenges, detailed fetal echocardiographic evaluation of marine mammals has not been previously described. Because the application of fetal echocardiography to cetaceans could have both clinical and academic importance, an approach to evaluating the fetal dolphin's cardiovascular status was developed with conventional, fetal echocardiographic techniques developed in humans. Eight singleton fetal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were evaluated, each between 6 and 11 mo gestation; six fetuses underwent two fetal echocardiographic evaluations each, four at 3-mo intervals, and two at 0.5-mo intervals. Evaluations were performed without sedation, using conventional, portable ultrasound systems. Multiple transducers, probes, and maternal dolphin positions were used to optimize image quality. Fetal echocardiography included two-dimensional imaging and color flow mapping of the heart and great arteries, as well as pulsed Doppler evaluation of the umbilical artery and vein. Thorough evaluations of the fetal dolphins' cardiovascular status were performed, with the greatest resolution between 8 and 9 mo gestation. With the use of published human fetal echocardiographic findings for comparison, fetal echocardiography demonstrated normal structure and function of the heart and great arteries, including the pulmonary veins, inferior vena cava, right and left atria, foramen ovale, tricuspid and mitral valves, right and left ventricles, ventricular septum, pulmonary and aortic valves, main pulmonary artery and ascending aorta, and ductus arteriosus. Pulsed Doppler techniques demonstrated normal umbilical arterial and venous waveforms, and color flow mapping demonstrated absence of significant valvar regurgitation. Fetal echocardiography, particularly between 8 and 9 mo gestation, can

  10. 42 CFR 121.13 - Definition of human organ under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND... 1984, as amended, means the human (including fetal) kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, bone...

  11. 42 CFR 121.13 - Definition of human organ under section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND... 1984, as amended, means the human (including fetal) kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, bone...

  12. Distribution and Development of Peripheral Glial Cells in the Human Fetal Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Locher, Heiko; de Groot, John C. M. J.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Huisman, Margriet A.; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2014-01-01

    The adult human cochlea contains various types of peripheral glial cells that envelop or myelinate the three different domains of the spiral ganglion neurons: the central processes in the cochlear nerve, the cell bodies in the spiral ganglia, and the peripheral processes in the osseous spiral lamina. Little is known about the distribution, lineage separation and maturation of these peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea. In the current study, we observed peripheral glial cells expressing SOX10, SOX9 and S100B as early as 9 weeks of gestation (W9) in all three neuronal domains. We propose that these cells are the common precursor to both mature Schwann cells and satellite glial cells. Additionally, the peripheral glial cells located along the peripheral processes expressed NGFR, indicating a phenotype distinct from the peripheral glial cells located along the central processes. From W12, the spiral ganglion was gradually populated by satellite glial cells in a spatiotemporal gradient. In the cochlear nerve, radial sorting was accomplished by W22 and myelination started prior to myelination of the peripheral processes. The developmental dynamics of the peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea is in support of a neural crest origin. Our study provides the first overview of the distribution and maturation of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea from W9 to W22. PMID:24498246

  13. Human cytomegalovirus induces a distinct innate immune response in the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Weisblum, Yiska; Panet, Amos; Zakay-Rones, Zichria; Vitenshtein, Alon; Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Yamin, Rachel; Meir, Karen; Amsalem, Hagai; Imbar, Tal; Mandelboim, Ofer; Yagel, Simcha; Wolf, Dana G

    2015-11-01

    The initial interplay between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and innate tissue response in the human maternal-fetal interface, though crucial for determining the outcome of congenital HCMV infection, has remained unknown. We studied the innate response to HCMV within the milieu of the human decidua, the maternal aspect of the maternal-fetal interface, maintained ex vivo as an integral tissue. HCMV infection triggered a rapid and robust decidual-tissue innate immune response predominated by interferon (IFN)γ and IP-10 induction, dysregulating the decidual cytokine/chemokine environment in a distinctive fashion. The decidual-tissue response was already elicited during viral-tissue contact, and was not affected by neutralizing HCMV antibodies. Of note, IFNγ induction, reflecting immune-cell activation, was distinctive to the maternal decidua, and was not observed in concomitantly-infected placental (fetal) villi. Our studies in a clinically-relevant surrogate human model, provide a novel insight into the first-line decidual tissue response which could affect the outcome of congenital infection.

  14. Phase Transition in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-07-01

    A healthy human heart rate displays complex fluctuations which share characteristics of physical systems in a critical state. We demonstrate that the human heart rate in healthy individuals undergoes a dramatic breakdown of criticality characteristics, reminiscent of continuous second order phase transitions. By studying the germane determinants, we show that the hallmark of criticality—highly correlated fluctuations—is observed only during usual daily activity, and a breakdown of these characteristics occurs in prolonged, strenuous exercise and sleep. This finding is the first reported discovery of the dynamical phase transition phenomenon in a biological control system and will be a key to understanding the heart rate control system in health and disease.

  15. Identification of novel molecular markers through transcriptomic analysis in human fetal and adult corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinyin; Huang, Kevin; Nakatsu, Martin N; Xue, Zhigang; Deng, Sophie X; Fan, Guoping

    2013-04-01

    The corneal endothelium is composed of a monolayer of corneal endothelial cells (CECs), which is essential for maintaining corneal transparency. To better characterize CECs in different developmental stages, we profiled mRNA transcriptomes in human fetal and adult corneal endothelium with the goal to identify novel molecular markers in these cells. By comparing CECs with 12 other tissue types, we identified 245 and 284 signature genes that are highly expressed in fetal and adult CECs, respectively. Functionally, these genes are enriched in pathways characteristic of CECs, including inorganic anion transmembrane transporter, extracellular matrix structural constituent and cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor activity. Importantly, several of these genes are disease target genes in hereditary corneal dystrophies, consistent with their functional significance in CEC physiology. We also identified stage-specific markers associated with CEC development, such as specific members in the transforming growth factor beta and Wnt signaling pathways only expressed in fetal, but not in adult CECs. Lastly, by the immunohistochemistry of ocular tissues, we demonstrated the unique protein localization for Wnt5a, S100A4, S100A6 and IER3, the four novel markers for fetal and adult CECs. The identification of a new panel of stage-specific markers for CECs would be very useful for characterizing CECs derived from stem cells or ex vivo expansion for cell replacement therapy. PMID:23257286

  16. Zonal centrifuge purification of human rabies vaccine obtained on bovine fetal kidney cells. Biological results.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Tsiang, H; Reculard, P; Aguilon, F; Lavergne, M; Adamovicz, P

    1978-01-01

    An inactivated human rabies vaccine prepared on bovine fetal kidney cells is concentrated and purified by zonal centrifugation. The peak of rabies particles is monitored by hemagglutination. Immunogenicity of the purified particles was evaluated by titration of specific antibodies from vaccinated animals. Protective activity of the vaccine was assayed on guinea pigs challenged with street rabies. Biological results were compared with those obtained with other tissue culture vaccines.

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha (PPARa), Beta (PPARI3), and Gamma (PPARy) Expression in Human Fetal Tissues.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis, are targets of pharmaceuticals, and are also activated by environmental contaminants. Almost nothing is known about expression of PPARs during human fetal development. This study uses qPCR...

  18. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors Alpha, Beta, and Gamma mRNA and protein expression in human fetal tissues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis, are targets of pharmaceuticals, and are also activated by environmental contaminants. Almost nothing is known about expression of PPARs during human fetal development. This study examine...

  19. Effect of Caffeine Chronically Consumed During Pregnancy on Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors Signaling in Both Maternal and Fetal Heart from Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Inmaculada; Albasanz, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, even during pregnancy. Its stimulatory effects are mainly due to antagonism of adenosine actions by blocking adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Previous studies have shown that caffeine can cross the placenta and therefore modulate these receptors not only in the fetal brain but also in the heart. Methods: In the present work, the effect of caffeine chronically consumed during pregnancy on A1 and A2A receptors in Wistar rat heart, from both mothers and their fetuses, were studied using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, and adenylyl cyclase activity assays, as well as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: Caffeine did not significantly alter A1R neither at protein nor at gene expression level in both the maternal and fetal heart. On the contrary, A2AR significantly decreased in the maternal heart, although mRNA was not affected. Gi and Gs proteins were also preserved. Finally, A1R-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity did not change in the maternal heart, but A2AR mediated stimulation of this enzymatic activity significantly decreased according to the detected loss of this receptor. Conclusions: Opposite to the downregulation and desensitization of the A1R/AC pathway previously reported in the brain, these results show that this pathway is not affected in rat heart after caffeine exposure during pregnancy. In addition, A2AR is downregulated and desensitized in the maternal heart, suggesting a differential modulation of these receptor-mediated pathways by caffeine. PMID:25538864

  20. Effect of placental factors on growth and function of the human fetal adrenal in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Riopel, L.; Branchaud, C.L.; Goodyer, C.G.; Zweig, M.; Lipowski, L.; Adkar, V.; Lefebvre, Y. )

    1989-11-01

    Conditioned medium from human placental monolayer cultures (PM) had a marked stimulatory effect on proliferation (3H-thymidine uptake) of human fetal zone adrenal cells in primary monolayer culture, even in the absence of serum. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) also significantly stimulated fetal adrenal cell growth. However, the effects of PM differed from those of EGF and FGF in several respects: (1) maximal response to PM was 2-5 times greater; (2) mitogenic effects of EGF and FGF were suppressed by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), whereas that of 50% PM was not; (3) PM inhibited ACTH-stimulated steroidogenesis (dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and cortisol), but EGF and FGF did not. Preliminary characterization studies have indicated that approximately half of the placental growth-promoting activity is heat resistant and sensitive to bacterial proteases, and that 50-60% of the activity is lost after dialysis with membranes having a molecular weight cutoff of 3500. These findings suggest a role for the placenta in the growth and differentiated function of the human fetal adrenal gland.

  1. Expression and localization of VEGF receptors in human fetal skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Marini, M; Sarchielli, E; Toce, M; Acocella, A; Bertolai, R; Ciulli, C; Orlando, C; Sgambati, E; Vannelli, G B

    2012-12-01

    During development the vertebrate skeleton is the product of deriving cells from distinct embryonic lineages. The craniofacial skeleton is formed by migrating cranial neural crest cells, whereas the axial and limb skeletons are derived from mesodermal cells. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors (VEGFs) / receptors (VEGFRs) system plays an important role in angiogenesis, as well as osteogenesis, during bone development, growth, and remodeling, attracting endothelial cells and osteoclasts and stimulating osteoblast differentiation. Recent evidence has shown that during development VEGFR-3 is also expressed in neural and glial precursors of forebrain and cerebellum, as well as in the eye. In this study, we found that VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 are expressed in human bone both in fetal and adult life. The gene expression levels were significantly higher in fetal samples especially in mandibles. In addition, higher levels of VEGFR-3 in orofacial district were confirmed by western blotting analysis. We also observed that in fetal mandibular samples VEGFRs colocalized in several osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteoprogenitor cells. Furthermore, some cells coexpressed VEGFR-3 and ET-1, a marker of neural crest cells. The results demonstrated different expression of VEGFRs in human mandibular and femoral bones which could be correlated to their different structure, function and development during organogenesis. VEGFR-3 might represent a specific signal for ectomesenchymal lineage differentiation during early human development.

  2. Prominent periventricular fiber system related to ganglionic eminence and striatum in the human fetal cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Vasung, L; Jovanov-Milošević, N; Pletikos, M; Mori, S; Judaš, M; Kostović, Ivica

    2011-01-01

    Periventricular pathway (PVP) system of the developing human cerebrum is situated medial to the intermediate zone in the close proximity to proliferative cell compartments. In order to elucidate chemical properties and developing trajectories of the PVP we used DTI in combination with acetylcholinesterase histochemistry, SNAP-25 immunocytochemistry and axonal cytoskeletal markers (SMI312, MAP1b) immunocytochemistry on postmortem paraformaldehyde-fixed brains of 30 human fetuses ranging in age from 10 to 38 postconceptional weeks (PCW), 2 infants (age 1-3 months) and 1 adult brain. The PVP appears in the early fetal period (10-13 PCW) as two defined fibre bundles: the corpus callosum (CC) and the fetal fronto-occipital fascicle (FOF). In the midfetal period (15-18 PCW), all four components of the PVP can be identified: (1) the CC, which at rostral levels forms a voluminous callosal plate; (2) the FOF, with SNAP-25-positive fibers; (3) the fronto-pontine pathway (FPP) which for a short distance runs within the PVP; and (4) the subcallosal fascicle of Muratoff (SFM) which contains cortico-caudate projections. The PVPs are situated medial to the internal capsule at the level of the cortico-striatal junction; they remain prominent during the late fetal and early preterm period (19-28 PCW) and represent a portion of the wider periventricular crossroad of growing associative, callosal and projection pathways. In the perinatal period, the PVPs change their topographical relationships, decrease in size and the FOF looses its SNAP-25-reactivity. In conclusion, the hitherto undescribed PVP of the human fetal cerebrum contains forerunners of adult associative and projection pathways. Its transient chemical properties and relative exuberance suggest that the PVP may exert influence on the development of cortical connectivity (intermediate targeting) and other neurogenetic events such as neuronal proliferation. The PVP's topographical position also indicates that it is a major

  3. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  4. The human placenta is a hematopoietic organ during the embryonic and fetal periods of development

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Alicia; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Muench, Marcus O.; Gormley, Matthew; Scott, Marvin A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Fisher, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the potential role of the human placenta as a hematopoietic organ during embryonic and fetal development. Placental samples contained two cell populations—CD34++CD45low and CD34+CD45low—that were found in chorionic villi and in the chorioamniotic membrane. CD34++CD45low cells express many cell surface antigens found on multipotent primitive hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. CD34++CD45low cells contained colony-forming units culture (CFU-C) with myeloid and erythroid potential in clonogenic in vitro assays, and they generated CD56+ natural killer cells and CD19+CD20+sIgM+ B cells in polyclonal liquid cultures. CD34+CD45low cells mostly comprised erythroid- and myeloid-committed progenitors, while CD34− cells lacked CFU-C. The placenta-derived precursors were fetal in origin, as demonstrated by FISH using repeat-sequence chromosome-specific probes for X and Y. The number of CD34++CD45low cells increased with gestational age, but their density (cells per gram of tissue) peaked at 5–8 wk, decreasing more than sevenfold at the onset of the fetal phase (9 wk of gestation). In addition to multipotent progenitors, the placenta contained myeloid- and erythroid-committed progenitors indicative of active in situ hematopoiesis. These data suggest that the human placenta is an important hematopoietic organ, raising the possibility of banking placental hematopoietic stem cells along with cord blood for transplantation. PMID:19073167

  5. Acellular human heart matrix: A critical step toward whole heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Costanza, Salvatore; Climent, Andreu M; Moscoso, Isabel; Gonzalez-Nicolas, M Angeles; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Hugo; Kren, Stefan M; Garrido, Gregorio; Escalante, Jose L; Bermejo, Javier; Elizaga, Jaime; Menarguez, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Espinosa, M Angeles; Guillem, María S; Willerson, James T; Bernad, Antonio; Matesanz, Rafael; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2015-08-01

    The best definitive treatment option for end-stage heart failure currently is transplantation, which is limited by donor availability and immunorejection. Generating an autologous bioartificial heart could overcome these limitations. Here, we have decellularized a human heart, preserving its 3-dimensional architecture and vascularity, and recellularized the decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM). We decellularized 39 human hearts with sodium-dodecyl-sulfate for 4-8 days. Cell removal and architectural integrity were determined anatomically, functionally, and histologically. To assess cytocompatibility, we cultured human cardiac-progenitor cells (hCPC), bone-marrow mesenchymal cells (hMSCs), human endothelial cells (HUVECs), and H9c1 and HL-1 cardiomyocytes in vitro on dECM ventricles up to 21 days. Cell survival, gene expression, organization and/or electrical coupling were analyzed and compared to conventional 2-dimensional cultures. Decellularization removed cells but preserved the 3-dimensional cardiac macro and microstructure and the native vascular network in a perfusable state. Cell survival was observed on dECM for 21 days. hCPCs and hMSCs expressed cardiocyte genes but did not adopt cardiocyte morphology or organization; HUVECs formed a lining of endocardium and vasculature; differentiated cardiomyocytes organized into nascent muscle bundles and displayed mature calcium dynamics and electrical coupling in recellularized dECM. In summary, decellularization of human hearts provides a biocompatible scaffold that retains 3-dimensional architecture and vascularity and that can be recellularized with parenchymal and vascular cells. dECM promotes cardiocyte gene expression in stem cells and organizes existing cardiomyocytes into nascent muscle showing electrical coupling. These findings represent a first step toward manufacturing human heart grafts or matrix components for treating cardiovascular disease.

  6. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Peng, Hu; Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-10-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  7. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member's physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists' performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists' via speakers. We recorded the audience members' electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience's heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience's sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience's physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience's superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance.

  8. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member’s physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists’ performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists’ via speakers. We recorded the audience members’ electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience’s heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience’s sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience’s physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience’s superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance. PMID:27104377

  9. Human fetal pancreatic islet-like structures as source material to treat type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Kudva, Yogish C

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide. Current therapy continues to be suboptimal. An exciting therapeutic advance in the short term is closed loop technology development and application. However, cell and tissue therapy continues to be an unmet need for the disorder. Human islets isolated from deceased donors will be clinically available to treat type 1 diabetes within the next 1 to 2 years. Other approaches such as xenotransplantation and islet products derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are currently being pursued. The current commentary provides context and discusses future endeavors for transplantation of islet-like structures derived from fetal pancreas. PMID:24377429

  10. A stereological method for estimating the total number of ventricular myocyte nuclei in fetal and postnatal hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, A; Fagan, D G; Mayhew, T M

    1995-01-01

    An experimental protocol is presented for obtaining efficient estimates of the total numbers of myocyte nuclei in the ventricles of human hearts from archival collections. Hearts were collected postmortem from fetuses at 31-42 weeks of gestation and infants at 7 days-9 months postnatal age. Ventricles from normal and abnormal subjects were examined. Numbers of myocyte nuclei per unit volume of myocardium were estimated separately for left and right ventricles using a design-based stereological device, the physical disector (parallel pairs of sections). Absolute numbers were calculated by multiplying nuclear packing densities by myocardial volume. The latter was estimated from ventricular mass and the percentage of ventricle occupied by myocardium. The findings, albeit preliminary, suggest that (1) myocyte number may rise during the last trimester of gestation, (2) postnatal ventricular growth is probably hypertrophic and/or interstitial rather than hyperplastic and (3) whilst absolute numbers are greater in the left ventricle, the pattern of growth is similar in both ventricles. Nuclear numbers found in 2 abnormal hearts (1 from a case of sudden infant death) tended to be lower than normal. PMID:8586563

  11. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice engrafted with human T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow or liver cells and implanted with human fetal thymus: a model for studying human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yurasov, S; Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Raker, C A; Hachamovitch, M; Wong-Staal, F; Goldstein, H

    1997-03-01

    To develop an in vivo model wherein human hematopoiesis occurs, we transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with either human fetal bone marrow (HFBM) or human fetal liver (HFL). After transplantation of SCID mice with cultured HFBM (BM-SCID-hu mice) or HFL cells (Liv-SCID-hu mice), significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow (BM) and population of the peripheral blood with human leukocytes was detected. Human colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage and burst forming unit-erythroid were detected in the BM of the BM-SCID-hu and Liv-SCID-hu mice up to 8 months after transplantation. When the HFBM or HFL cells were transduced with a retroviral vector before transplantation, integrated retroviral sequences were detected in human precursor cells present in the SCID mouse BM and in leukocytes circulating in the peripheral blood (PB) up to 7 months after transplantation. The PB of the BM-SCID-hu mice also became populated with human T cells after implantation with human thymic tissue, which provided a human microenvironment wherein human pre-T cells from the BM could mature. When the HFBM was retrovirally transduced before transplantation, integrated retrovirus was detected in sorted CD4+CD8+ double positive and CD4+ single positive cells from the thymic implant and CD4+ cells from the PB. Taken together, these data indicated that the BM of our BM-SCID-hu and Liv-SCID-hu mice became engrafted with retrovirally transduced human hematopoietic precursors that undergo the normal human hematopoietic program and populate the mouse PB with human cells containing integrated retroviral sequences. In addition to being a model for studying in vivo human hematopoiesis, these mice should also prove to be a useful model for investigating in vivo gene therapy using human stem/precursor cells.

  12. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D.; Taylor, Robert L.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  13. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D; Taylor, Robert L; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  14. Development and Function of the Human Fetal Adrenal Cortex: A Key Component in the Feto-Placental Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Continuous efforts have been devoted to unraveling the biophysiology and development of the human fetal adrenal cortex, which is structurally and functionally unique from other species. It plays a pivotal role, mainly through steroidogenesis, in the regulation of intrauterine homeostasis and in fetal development and maturation. The steroidogenic activity is characterized by early transient cortisol biosynthesis, followed by its suppressed synthesis until late gestation, and extensive production of dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate, precursors of placental estrogen, during most of gestation. The gland rapidly grows through processes including cell proliferation and angiogenesis at the gland periphery, cellular migration, hypertrophy, and apoptosis. Recent studies employing modern technologies such as gene expression profiling and laser capture microdissection have revealed that development and/or function of the fetal adrenal cortex may be regulated by a panoply of molecules, including transcription factors, extracellular matrix components, locally produced growth factors, and placenta-derived CRH, in addition to the primary regulator, fetal pituitary ACTH. The role of the fetal adrenal cortex in human pregnancy and parturition appears highly complex, probably due to redundant and compensatory mechanisms regulating these events. Mounting evidence indicates that actions of hormones operating in the human feto-placental unit are likely mediated by mechanisms including target tissue responsiveness, local metabolism, and bioavailability, rather than changes only in circulating levels. Comprehensive study of such molecular mechanisms and the newly identified factors implicated in adrenal development should help crystallize our understanding of the development and physiology of the human fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:21051591

  15. LIN28B-mediated expression of fetal hemoglobin and production of fetal-like erythrocytes from adult human erythroblasts ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y. Terry; de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Yuan, Joan; Byrnes, Colleen; Noh, Seung-Jae; Meier, Emily R.; Kim, Ki Soon; Rabel, Antoinette; Kaushal, Megha; Muljo, Stefan A.

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) holds therapeutic potential for sickle cell disease and β-thalassemias. In human erythroid cells and hematopoietic organs, LIN28B and its targeted let-7 microRNA family, demonstrate regulated expression during the fetal-to-adult developmental transition. To explore the effects of LIN28B in human erythroid cell development, lentiviral transduction was used to knockdown LIN28B expression in erythroblasts cultured from human umbilical cord CD34+ cells. The subsequent reduction in LIN28B expression caused increased expression of let-7 and significantly reduced HbF expression. Conversely, LIN28B overexpression in cultured adult erythroblasts reduced the expression of let-7 and significantly increased HbF expression. Cellular maturation was maintained including enucleation. LIN28B expression in adult erythroblasts increased the expression of γ-globin, and the HbF content of the cells rose to levels >30% of their hemoglobin. Expression of carbonic anhydrase I, glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 2, and miR-96 (three additional genes marking the transition from fetal-to-adult erythropoiesis) were reduced by LIN28B expression. The transcription factor BCL11A, a well-characterized repressor of γ-globin expression, was significantly down-regulated. Independent of LIN28B, experimental suppression of let-7 also reduced BCL11A expression and significantly increased HbF expression. LIN28B expression regulates HbF levels and causes adult human erythroblasts to differentiate with a more fetal-like phenotype. PMID:23798711

  16. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood. PMID:25204635

  17. Preferential utilization of conserved immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments during human fetal life.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H W; Wang, J Y

    1990-01-01

    The ability to respond to specific antigens develops in a programmed fashion. Although the antibody repertoire in adults is presumably generated by stochastic combinatorial joining of rearranged heavy variable, diversity, and joining (VH-DH-JH) and light (VL-JL) chains, experimental evidence in the mouse has shown nonrandom utilization of variable gene segments during ontogeny and in response to specific antigens. In this study, we have performed sequence analysis of 104-day human fetal liver-derived, randomly isolated constant region C+ mu transcripts and demonstrate a consistent preference during fetal life for a small subset of three highly conserved VH3 family gene segments. In addition, the data show that this preferential gene segment utilization extends to the DHQ52 and the JH3 and JH4 loci. Sequence analysis of two "sterile" DH-JH transcripts suggests that transcriptional activation of the JH-proximal DHQ52 element may precede initiation of DH-JH rearrangement and influence fetal DH utilization. Sequence comparisons reveal striking nucleotide polymorphism in allelic gene segments which is poorly reflected in the peptide sequence, implying considerable evolutionary selection pressure. Although vertebrate species utilize a variety of strategies to generate their antibody repertoire, preferential utilization of VH3 elements is consistently found during early development. These data support the hypothesis that VH3 gene segments play an essential role in the development of the immune response. Images PMID:2117273

  18. Temporal Patterns in Sheep Fetal Heart Rate Variability Correlate to Systemic Cytokine Inflammatory Response: A Methodological Exploration of Monitoring Potential Using Complex Signals Bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Herry, Christophe L; Cortes, Marina; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Durosier, Lucien D; Cao, Mingju; Burns, Patrick; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Seely, Andrew J E; Frasch, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    Fetal inflammation is associated with increased risk for postnatal organ injuries. No means of early detection exist. We hypothesized that systemic fetal inflammation leads to distinct alterations of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV). We tested this hypothesis deploying a novel series of approaches from complex signals bioinformatics. In chronically instrumented near-term fetal sheep, we induced an inflammatory response with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected intravenously (n = 10) observing it over 54 hours; seven additional fetuses served as controls. Fifty-one fHRV measures were determined continuously every 5 minutes using Continuous Individualized Multi-organ Variability Analysis (CIMVA). CIMVA creates an fHRV measures matrix across five signal-analytical domains, thus describing complementary properties of fHRV. We implemented, validated and tested methodology to obtain a subset of CIMVA fHRV measures that matched best the temporal profile of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In the LPS group, IL-6 peaked at 3 hours. For the LPS, but not control group, a sharp increase in standardized difference in variability with respect to baseline levels was observed between 3 h and 6 h abating to baseline levels, thus tracking closely the IL-6 inflammatory profile. We derived fHRV inflammatory index (FII) consisting of 15 fHRV measures reflecting the fetal inflammatory response with prediction accuracy of 90%. Hierarchical clustering validated the selection of 14 out of 15 fHRV measures comprising FII. We developed methodology to identify a distinctive subset of fHRV measures that tracks inflammation over time. The broader potential of this bioinformatics approach is discussed to detect physiological responses encoded in HRV measures. PMID:27100089

  19. Temporal Patterns in Sheep Fetal Heart Rate Variability Correlate to Systemic Cytokine Inflammatory Response: A Methodological Exploration of Monitoring Potential Using Complex Signals Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hau-Tieng; Durosier, Lucien D.; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Seely, Andrew J. E.; Frasch, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal inflammation is associated with increased risk for postnatal organ injuries. No means of early detection exist. We hypothesized that systemic fetal inflammation leads to distinct alterations of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV). We tested this hypothesis deploying a novel series of approaches from complex signals bioinformatics. In chronically instrumented near-term fetal sheep, we induced an inflammatory response with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected intravenously (n = 10) observing it over 54 hours; seven additional fetuses served as controls. Fifty-one fHRV measures were determined continuously every 5 minutes using Continuous Individualized Multi-organ Variability Analysis (CIMVA). CIMVA creates an fHRV measures matrix across five signal-analytical domains, thus describing complementary properties of fHRV. We implemented, validated and tested methodology to obtain a subset of CIMVA fHRV measures that matched best the temporal profile of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In the LPS group, IL-6 peaked at 3 hours. For the LPS, but not control group, a sharp increase in standardized difference in variability with respect to baseline levels was observed between 3 h and 6 h abating to baseline levels, thus tracking closely the IL-6 inflammatory profile. We derived fHRV inflammatory index (FII) consisting of 15 fHRV measures reflecting the fetal inflammatory response with prediction accuracy of 90%. Hierarchical clustering validated the selection of 14 out of 15 fHRV measures comprising FII. We developed methodology to identify a distinctive subset of fHRV measures that tracks inflammation over time. The broader potential of this bioinformatics approach is discussed to detect physiological responses encoded in HRV measures. PMID:27100089

  20. Fractal Analysis and Hurst Parameter for Intrapartum Fetal Heart Rate Variability Analysis: A Versatile Alternative to Frequency Bands and LF/HF Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Doret, Muriel; Spilka, Jiří; Chudáček, Václav; Gonçalves, Paulo; Abry, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background The fetal heart rate (FHR) is commonly monitored during labor to detect early fetal acidosis. FHR variability is traditionally investigated using Fourier transform, often with adult predefined frequency band powers and the corresponding LF/HF ratio. However, fetal conditions differ from adults and modify spectrum repartition along frequencies. Aims This study questions the arbitrariness definition and relevance of the frequency band splitting procedure, and thus of the calculation of the underlying LF/HF ratio, as efficient tools for characterizing intrapartum FHR variability. Study Design The last 30 minutes before delivery of the intrapartum FHR were analyzed. Subjects Case-control study. A total of 45 singletons divided into two groups based on umbilical cord arterial pH: the Index group with pH ≤ 7.05 (n = 15) and Control group with pH > 7.05 (n = 30). Outcome Measures Frequency band-based LF/HF ratio and Hurst parameter. Results This study shows that the intrapartum FHR is characterized by fractal temporal dynamics and promotes the Hurst parameter as a potential marker of fetal acidosis. This parameter preserves the intuition of a power frequency balance, while avoiding the frequency band splitting procedure and thus the arbitrary choice of a frequency separating bands. The study also shows that extending the frequency range covered by the adult-based bands to higher and lower frequencies permits the Hurst parameter to achieve better performance for identifying fetal acidosis. Conclusions The Hurst parameter provides a robust and versatile tool for quantifying FHR variability, yields better acidosis detection performance compared to the LF/HF ratio, and avoids arbitrariness in spectral band splitting and definitions. PMID:26322889

  1. Human embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages in contrast to their adult counterparts.

    PubMed

    Ramkisoensing, Arti A; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Askar, Saïd F A; Passier, Robert; Swildens, Jim; Goumans, Marie José; Schutte, Cindy I; de Vries, Antoine A F; Scherjon, Sicco; Mummery, Christine L; Schalij, Martin J; Atsma, Douwe E

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show unexplained differences in differentiation potential. In this study, differentiation of human (h) MSCs derived from embryonic, fetal and adult sources toward cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was investigated. Labeled hMSCs derived from embryonic stem cells (hESC-MSCs), fetal umbilical cord, bone marrow, amniotic membrane and adult bone marrow and adipose tissue were co-cultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (nrCMCs) or cardiac fibroblasts (nrCFBs) for 10 days, and also cultured under angiogenic conditions. Cardiomyogenesis was assessed by human-specific immunocytological analysis, whole-cell current-clamp recordings, human-specific qRT-PCR and optical mapping. After co-culture with nrCMCs, significantly more hESC-MSCs than fetal hMSCs stained positive for α-actinin, whereas adult hMSCs stained negative. Furthermore, functional cardiomyogenic differentiation, based on action potential recordings, was shown to occur, but not in adult hMSCs. Of all sources, hESC-MSCs expressed most cardiac-specific genes. hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs contained significantly higher basal levels of connexin43 than adult hMSCs and co-culture with nrCMCs increased expression. After co-culture with nrCFBs, hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs did not express α-actinin and connexin43 expression was decreased. Conduction velocity (CV) in co-cultures of nrCMCs and hESC-MSCs was significantly higher than in co-cultures with fetal or adult hMSCs. In angiogenesis bioassays, only hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs were able to form capillary-like structures, which stained for smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers.Human embryonic and fetal MSCs differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages, in contrast to adult MSCs. Cardiomyogenesis is determined by stimuli from the cellular microenvironment, where connexin43 may play an important role.

  2. Structural development of human brain white matter from mid-fetal to perinatal stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Austin; Yu, Qiaowen; Mishra, Virendra; Chalak, Lina; Jeon, Tina; Sivarajan, Muraleedharan; Jackson, Greg; Rollins, Nancy; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The structures of developing human brain white matter (WM) tracts can be effectively quantified by DTI-derived metrics, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD, AD and RD). However, dynamics of WM microstructure during very early developmental period from mid-fetal to perinatal stage is unknown. It is difficult to accurately measure microstructural properties of these WM tracts due to severe contamination from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this study, high resolution DTI of fetal brains at mid-fetal stage (20 weeks of gestation or 20wg), 19 brains in the middle of 3rd trimester (35wg) and 17 brains around term (40wg) were acquired. We established first population-averaged DTI templates at these three time points and extracted WM skeleton. 16 major WM tracts in limbic, projection, commissural and association tract groups were traced with DTI tractography in native space. The WM skeleton in the template space was inversely transformed back to the native space for measuring core WM microstructures of each individual tract. Continuous microstructural enhancement and volumetric increase of WM tracts were found from 20wg to 40wg. The microstructural enhancement from FA measurement is decelerated in late 3rd trimester compared to mid-fetal to middle 3rd trimester, while volumetric increase of prefrontal WM tracts is accelerated. The microstructural enhancement from 35wg to 40wg is heterogeneous among different tract groups with microstructures of association tracts undergoing most dramatic change. Besides decreases of RD indicating active myelination, the decrease of AD for most WM tracts during late 3rd trimester suggests axonal packing process.

  3. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Thomas G; Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-03-01

    The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study.

  4. Overview of fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shardha; Strasburger, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Though fetal arrhythmias account for a small proportion of referrals to a fetal cardiologist, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review outlines the current literature with regard to the diagnosis and, in brief, some management strategies in fetal arrhythmias. Recent findings Advances in echocardiography have resulted in significant improvements in our ability to elucidate the mechanism of arrhythmia at the bedside. At the same time, fetal magnetocardiography is broadening our understanding of mechanisms of arrhythmia especially as it pertains to ventricular arrhythmias and congenital heart block. It provides a unique window to study electrical properties of the fetal heart, unlike what has been available to date. Recent reports of bedside use of fetal ECG make it a promising new technology. The underlying mechanisms resulting in immune-mediated complete heart block in a small subset of ‘at-risk’ fetuses is under investigation. Summary There have been great strides in noninvasive diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. However, we still need to improve our knowledge of the electromechanical properties of the fetal heart as well as the mechanisms of arrhythmia to further improve outcomes. Multiinstitutional collaborative studies are needed to help answer some of the questions regarding patient, drug selection and management algorithms. PMID:18781114

  5. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the ontogeny of fetal autonomic, motoric, state, and interactive functioning in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through term. Found that male fetuses were more active than female fetuses, and that greater maternal stress appraisal was associated with reduced fetal heart rate variability. Found that an apparent period of…

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and its SpaC pilus adhesin modulate inflammatory responsiveness and TLR-related gene expression in the fetal human gut

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Kriston; Collado, Maria Carmen; Rautava, Jaana; Lu, Lei; Satokari, Reetta; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; de Vos, Willem M.; Palva, Airi; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo; Walker, W. Allan; Rautava, Samuli

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial contact in utero modulates fetal and neonatal immune responses. Maternal probiotic supplementation reduces the risk of immune-mediated disease in the infant. We investigated the immunomodulatory properties of live Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and its SpaC pilus adhesin in human fetal intestinal models. Methods TNF-α mRNA expression was measured by qPCR in a human fetal intestinal organ culture model exposed to live L. rhamnosus GG and proinflammatory stimuli. Binding of recombinant SpaC pilus protein to intestinal epithelial cells was assessed in human fetal intestinal organ culture and the human fetal intestinal epithelial cell line H4 by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, respectively. TLR-related gene expression in fetal ileal organ culture after exposure to recombinant SpaC was assessed by qPCR. Results Live L. rhamnosus GG significantly attenuates pathogen-induced TNF-α mRNA expression in the human fetal gut. Recombinant SpaC protein was found to adhere to the fetal gut and to modulate varying levels of TLR-related gene expression. Conclusion The human fetal gut is responsive to luminal microbes. L. rhamnosus GG significantly attenuates fetal intestinal inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria. The L. rhamnosus GG pilus adhesin SpaC binds to immature human intestinal epithelial cells and directly modulates intestinal epithelial cell innate immune gene expression. PMID:25580735

  7. High-resolution imaging diagnosis of human fetal membrane by three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Avila, Cecilia; Kaplan, Cynthia; Pan, Yingtian

    2011-11-01

    Microscopic chorionic pseudocyst (MCP) arising in the chorion leave of the human fetal membrane (FM) is a clinical precursor for preeclampsia which may progress to fatal medical conditions (e.g., abortion) if left untreated. To examine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) for noninvasive delineation of the morphology of human fetal membranes and early clinical detection of MCP, 60 human FM specimens were acquired from 10 different subjects undergoing term cesarean delivery for an ex vivo feasibility study. Our results showed that OCT was able to identify the four-layer architectures of human FMs consisting of high-scattering decidua vera (DV, average thickness dDV ~ 92+/-38 μm), low-scattering chorion and trophoblast (CT, dCT ~ 150+/-67 μm), high-scattering subepithelial amnion (A, dA ~ 95+/-36 μm), and low-scattering epithelium (E, dE ~ 29+/-8 μm). Importantly, 3D OCT was able to instantaneously detect MCPs (low scattering due to edema, fluid buildup, vasodilatation) and track (staging) their thicknesses dMCP ranging from 24 to 615 μm. It was also shown that high-frequency ultrasound was able to compliment OCT for detecting more advanced thicker MCPs (e.g., dMCP>615 μm) because of its increased imaging depth.

  8. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L.; Vickers, Alison E.M.

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  9. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  10. Developmental Exposure to Estrogen Alters Differentiation and Epigenetic Programming in a Human Fetal Prostate Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Camelia M.; McDonnell-Clark, Elizabeth V.; Amin, Ali; Huse, Susan M.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM) isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure. PMID:25799167

  11. Unconjugated bilirubin effect on 3H-ouabain binding to human fetal red cells.

    PubMed

    Corchs, J L; Corchs, M J; Serrani, R E

    1994-03-01

    Human fetal red cells show heterogeneity of 3H-ouabain binding sites. These cells were chosen as a model to look into unconjugated bilirubin effects on the primary active Na(+)-K+ transport mechanism. Evidences are presented suggesting that unconjugated bilirubin affects 3H-ouabain binding but not through a direct effect. This is supported by the fact that the "low affinity" subgroup sites of the last mentioned ligand persists after unconjugated bilirubin treatment of cells, whereas the "high-affinity" subgroup disappears.

  12. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach.

  13. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  14. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Browne, Vaughn A; Julian, Colleen G; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100-4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success.

  15. Placental CLIC3 is increased in fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia affected human pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Murthi, P; Stevenson, J L; Money, T T; Borg, A J; Brennecke, S P; Gude, N M

    2012-09-01

    Chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) proteins constitute a subgroup of the glutathione-S-transferase (GSTs) superfamily. In humans, the CLIC family of proteins consists of six members, designated CLIC 1-6, which have a conserved C-terminal 240 residue module and one major transmembrane domain. CLIC proteins regulate fundamental cellular processes including regulation of chloride ion concentration, stabilization of cell membrane potential, trans-epithelial transport, regulation of cell volume and stimulation of apoptotic processes in response to cellular stress. Previously, we described the expression profile of a member of the CLIC family of proteins, CLIC3, in human placentae and fetal membranes. In the current study, we determined CLIC3 expression in placentae from pregnancies complicated with either fetal growth restriction (FGR, n=19), pre-eclampsia (PE, n=16) or both FGR and PE combined (n=12) compared to gestation-matched controls (n=13) using real-time PCR and a CLIC3 specific immunoassay. Significantly increased CLIC3 mRNA and protein were detected in placental extracts from pregnancies with FGR, PE and PE with FGR compared to controls. Our results suggest that increased expression of CLIC3 may play a role in abnormal placental function associated with the human pregnancy disorders FGR and PE. PMID:22795578

  16. Direct observation of homoclinic orbits in human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2003-05-01

    Homoclinic trajectories of the interbeat intervals between contractions of ventricles of the human heart are identified. The interbeat intervals are extracted from 24-h Holter ECG recordings. Three such recordings are discussed in detail. Mappings of the measured consecutive interbeat intervals are constructed. In the second and in some cases in the fourth iterate of the map of interbeat intervals homoclinic trajectories associated with a hyperbolic saddle are found. The homoclinic trajectories are often persistent for many interbeat intervals, sometimes spanning many thousands of heartbeats. Several features typical for homoclinic trajectories found in other systems were identified, including a signature of the gluing bifurcation. The homoclinic trajectories are present both in recordings of heart rate variability obtained from patients with an increased number of arrhythmias and in cases in which the sinus rhythm is dominant. The results presented are a strong indication of the importance of deterministic nonlinear instabilities in human heart rate variability.

  17. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell

    PubMed Central

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the “programming” and “reprogramming” of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart. PMID:25712211

  18. Somatostatin in the human heart and comparison with guinea pig and rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Day, S M; Gu, J; Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1985-01-01

    Somatostatin has been shown to have negative inotropic and chronotopic effects and to restore sinus rhythm in some cases of cardiac arrhythmia. Using acid extracts, regions of human heart were examined by radioimmunoassay to determine their somatostatin content. Mean (SD) concentrations of 4.1 (0.8) pmol/g and 2.9 (0.8) pmol/g were found in atrioventricular node and right atria respectively and were significantly higher than in other heart regions. Using fresh heart tissue from guinea pigs, somatostatin was localised to cardiac nerves by immunocytochemistry. Nerves containing somatostatin were most abundant in the atria, where the concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay were 7.6 (1.0) and 2.6 (0.4) pmol/g for right and left atria respectively. Somatostatin contained in cardiac nerves may have a physiological role in the cardiac conduction system. Images PMID:2857086

  19. Oxygen consumption of human heart cells in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kaori; Kagawa, Yuki; Maeyama, Erina; Ota, Hiroki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-09-26

    Tissue engineering in cardiovascular regenerative therapy requires the development of an efficient oxygen supply system for cell cultures. However, there are few studies which have examined human cardiomyocytes in terms of oxygen consumption and metabolism in culture. We developed an oxygen measurement system equipped with an oxygen microelectrode sensor and estimated the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) by using the oxygen concentration profiles in culture medium. The heart is largely made up of cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, and cardiac endothelial cells. Therefore, we measured the oxygen consumption of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), cardiac fibroblasts, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cell and aortic smooth muscle cells. Then we made correlations with their metabolisms. In hiPSC-CMs, the value of the OCR was 0.71±0.38pmol/h/cell, whereas the glucose consumption rate and lactate production rate were 0.77±0.32pmol/h/cell and 1.61±0.70pmol/h/cell, respectively. These values differed significantly from those of the other cells in human heart. The metabolism of the cells that constitute human heart showed the molar ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption (L/G ratio) that ranged between 1.97 and 2.2. Although the energy metabolism in adult heart in vivo is reported to be aerobic, our data demonstrated a dominance of anaerobic glycolysis in an in vitro environment. With our measuring system, we clearly showed the differences in the metabolism of cells between in vivo and in vitro monolayer culture. Our results regarding cell OCRs and metabolism may be useful for future tissue engineering of human heart.

  20. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel; Azorin, Inmaculada; Sirera, Rafael; Martinez-Dolz, Luis; Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R.; Salvador, Antonio; Portoles, Manuel

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  1. /sup 3/H-cyclosporine internalization and secretion by human fetal pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Formby, B.; Walker, L.; Peterson, C.M.

    1988-10-01

    Human fetal pancreatic islets were isolated from 16- to 20-week-old fetuses by a collagenase technique and cultured 48 hr in RPMI 1640 containing 10% human adult serum and unlabeled 0 to 5 micrograms cyclosporine A (CsA)/ml. Insulin secretory capacity of human fetal islets was expressed as a fractional stimulatory ratio FSR = F2/F1 of the fractional secretion rates during two successive 1 hr static incubations first with 2 mM glucose (F1) to stabilize secretion followed by maximal stimulus, i.e., 25 mM glucose plus 10 mM L-leucine and 10 mM L-arginine (F2). Unlabeled CsA at the above concentrations had no significant effects on the insulin secretory capacity expressed by FSR-values. Studies of net uptake of 3H-CsA by islets cultured for varying periods up to 40 hr and expressed as picomole 3H-CsA per picomole islet insulin content demonstrated that uptake rate was slow and did not reach isotopic equilibrium over the 40 hr of culture. When isolated fetal islets were cultured for 48 hr in the presence of 3H-CsA and varying concentrations of unlabeled CsA it was found during two successive 1 hr static incubations that fetal islets secrete insulin concomitantly with 3H-CsA following maximal stimulus for secretion. An optimal secretory molar ratio of 3H-CsA to insulin of 4.0 +/- 1.3 (n = 7) was found after islets were cultured 48 hr in the presence of a saturating 2.128 micrograms 3H-CsA per milliliter culture medium. In three successive 30-min static incubations of 3H-CsA loaded islets, first with low glucose, followed by high glucose plus L-arginine and L-leucine, and finally with high glucose plus L-arginine and L-leucine and 10 mM theophylline, the proportional fractional secretion rates of insulin and 3H-CsA were of the same magnitude.

  2. Ex utero: live human fetal research and the films of Davenport Hooker.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Emily K

    2014-01-01

    Between 1932 and 1963 University of Pittsburgh anatomist Davenport Hooker, Ph.D., performed and filmed noninvasive studies of reflexive movement on more than 150 surgically aborted human fetuses. The resulting imagery and information would contribute substantially to new visual and biomedical conceptions of fetuses as baby-like, autonomous human entities that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s. Hooker's methods, though broadly conforming to contemporary research practices and views of fetuses, would not have been feasible later. But while Hooker and the 1930s medical and general public viewed live fetuses as acceptable materials for nontherapeutic research, they also shared a regard for fetuses as developing humans with some degree of social value. Hooker's research and the various reactions to his work demonstrate the varied and changing perspectives on fetuses and fetal experimentation, and the influence those views can have on biomedical research. PMID:24769805

  3. Foodborne outbreak of human brucellosis caused by ingested raw materials of fetal calf on Jeju Island.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Rae; Heo, Sang Taek; Lee, Keun Hwa; Kim, Young Ree; Yoo, Seung Jin

    2015-02-01

    Since the first reported case of human brucellosis in 2002 in South Korea, its incidence has been increasing nationally. However, bovine brucellosis has not been present from 2005 to date on Jeju Island. Despite Jeju Island being considered a clean area for bovine brucellosis, we experienced an outbreak of human brucellosis between 2012 and 2013. Herein, we report cases with human brucellosis after ingestion of raw materials of fetal calf at a restaurant. Patients were identified by isolation of the Brucella abortus in their blood and joint tissue. Because all patients developed zoonosis by a faulty folk remedy, we emphasize the importance of educational programs to increase the awareness of zoonosis, and the need for active surveillance and detection of illegal distribution channels of the infected animal. After the outbreak, we took control of the involved restaurant and its illegal distribution channel, and there have been no further outbreaks.

  4. Mechanisms for the adverse effects of late gestational increases in maternal cortisol on the heart revealed by transcriptomic analyses of the fetal septum

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Charles E.; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown in sheep that 10 days of modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol resulting from maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg/kg/day) caused fetal heart enlargement and Purkinje cell apoptosis. In subsequent studies we extended the cortisol infusion to term, finding a dramatic incidence of stillbirth in the pregnancies with chronically increased cortisol. To investigate effects of maternal cortisol on the heart, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the septa using ovine microarrays and Webgestalt and Cytoscape programs for pathway inference. Analyses of the transcriptomic effects of maternal cortisol infusion for 10 days (130 day cortisol vs 130 day control), or ∼25 days (140 day cortisol vs 140 day control) and of normal maturation (140 day control vs 130 day control) were performed. Gene ontology terms related to immune function and cytokine actions were significantly overrepresented as genes altered by both cortisol and maturation in the septa. After 10 days of cortisol, growth factor and muscle cell apoptosis pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with our previous histologic findings. In the term fetuses (∼25 days of cortisol) nutrient pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with altered metabolism and reduced mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial number by mitochondrial DNA expression confirmed a significant decrease in mitochondria. The metabolic pathways modeled as altered by cortisol treatment to term were different from those modeled during maturation of the heart to term, and thus changes in gene expression in these metabolic pathways may be indicative of the fetal heart pathophysiologies seen in pregnancies complicated by stillbirth, including gestational diabetes, Cushing's disease and chronic stress. PMID:24867915

  5. Mechanisms for the adverse effects of late gestational increases in maternal cortisol on the heart revealed by transcriptomic analyses of the fetal septum.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elaine M; Wood, Charles E; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2014-08-01

    We have previously shown in sheep that 10 days of modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol resulting from maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg/kg/day) caused fetal heart enlargement and Purkinje cell apoptosis. In subsequent studies we extended the cortisol infusion to term, finding a dramatic incidence of stillbirth in the pregnancies with chronically increased cortisol. To investigate effects of maternal cortisol on the heart, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the septa using ovine microarrays and Webgestalt and Cytoscape programs for pathway inference. Analyses of the transcriptomic effects of maternal cortisol infusion for 10 days (130 day cortisol vs 130 day control), or ∼25 days (140 day cortisol vs 140 day control) and of normal maturation (140 day control vs 130 day control) were performed. Gene ontology terms related to immune function and cytokine actions were significantly overrepresented as genes altered by both cortisol and maturation in the septa. After 10 days of cortisol, growth factor and muscle cell apoptosis pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with our previous histologic findings. In the term fetuses (∼25 days of cortisol) nutrient pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with altered metabolism and reduced mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial number by mitochondrial DNA expression confirmed a significant decrease in mitochondria. The metabolic pathways modeled as altered by cortisol treatment to term were different from those modeled during maturation of the heart to term, and thus changes in gene expression in these metabolic pathways may be indicative of the fetal heart pathophysiologies seen in pregnancies complicated by stillbirth, including gestational diabetes, Cushing's disease and chronic stress.

  6. Hear the beat: decellularized mouse heart regenerated with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Lu, Tung-Ying; Yang, Lei

    2014-02-01

    Heart tissue engineering holds a great potential for human heart disease therapy. Regeneration of whole biofunctional human heart is the ultimate goal of tissue engineering. Recent advances take the first step towards whole heart regeneration. However, a substantial amount of challenges have to be overcome.

  7. Trends in cardiovascular engineering: organizing the human heart.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, Nathaniel L; Murry, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The regulation of heart growth through the interaction of cell types, matrix molecules, and mechanical cues is poorly understood, yet is necessary for the heart to reach its proper size and function. Using mechanical load and vascular cell co-culture in combination with a tissue engineering approach, we have recently been able to generate organized human myocardium in vitro and to modulate cardiomyocyte alignment, proliferation, and hypertrophy within the engineered tissue construct; further, we measured contractile function and the force-length dependence of the engineered tissue as a whole. The goal of these studies has been to characterize in vitro models of human cardiac development and to work towards human therapeutics using organized, vascularized, contractile human cardiac tissue. This review will touch on the current state of knowledge in this field, give an overview of the results of our own recent findings, and present areas of active investigation and new directions for future research.

  8. Human germ cell differentiation from fetal- and adult-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Panula, Sarita; Medrano, Jose V.; Kee, Kehkooi; Bergström, Rosita; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Byers, Blake; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Wu, Joseph C.; Simon, Carlos; Hovatta, Outi; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, our understanding of molecular genetic aspects of human germ cell development has been limited, at least in part due to inaccessibility of early stages of human development to experimentation. However, the derivation of pluripotent stem cells may provide the necessary human genetic system to study germ cell development. In this study, we compared the potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), derived from adult and fetal somatic cells to form primordial and meiotic germ cells, relative to human embryonic stem cells. We found that ∼5% of human iPSCs differentiated to primordial germ cells (PGCs) following induction with bone morphogenetic proteins. Furthermore, we observed that PGCs expressed green fluorescent protein from a germ cell-specific reporter and were enriched for the expression of endogenous germ cell-specific proteins and mRNAs. In response to the overexpression of intrinsic regulators, we also observed that iPSCs formed meiotic cells with extensive synaptonemal complexes and post-meiotic haploid cells with a similar pattern of ACROSIN staining as observed in human spermatids. These results indicate that human iPSCs derived from reprogramming of adult somatic cells can form germline cells. This system may provide a useful model for molecular genetic studies of human germline formation and pathology and a novel platform for clinical studies and potential therapeutical applications. PMID:21131292

  9. Isolation and characterization of full-length cDNA clones coding for cholinesterase from fetal human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Prody, C.A.; Zevin-Sonkin, D.; Gnatt, A.; Goldberg, O.; Soreq, H.

    1987-06-01

    To study the primary structure and regulation of human cholinesterases, oligodeoxynucleotide probes were prepared according to a consensus peptide sequence present in the active site of both human serum pseudocholinesterase and Torpedo electric organ true acetylcholinesterase. Using these probes, the authors isolated several cDNA clones from lambdagt10 libraries of fetal brain and liver origins. These include 2.4-kilobase cDNA clones that code for a polypeptide containing a putative signal peptide and the N-terminal, active site, and C-terminal peptides of human BtChoEase, suggesting that they code either for BtChoEase itself or for a very similar but distinct fetal form of cholinesterase. In RNA blots of poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from the cholinesterase-producing fetal brain and liver, these cDNAs hybridized with a single 2.5-kilobase band. Blot hybridization to human genomic DNA revealed that these fetal BtChoEase cDNA clones hybridize with DNA fragments of the total length of 17.5 kilobases, and signal intensities indicated that these sequences are not present in many copies. Both the cDNA-encoded protein and its nucleotide sequence display striking homology to parallel sequences published for Torpedo AcChoEase. These finding demonstrate extensive homologies between the fetal BtChoEase encoded by these clones and other cholinesterases of various forms and species.

  10. Fetal Microchimerism in Cancer Protection and Promotion: Current Understanding in Dogs and the Implications for Human Health.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Jeffrey N

    2015-05-01

    Fetal microchimerism is the co-existence of small numbers of cells from genetically distinct individuals living within a mother's body following pregnancy. During pregnancy, bi-directional exchange of cells occurs resulting in maternal microchimerism and even sibling microchimerism in offspring. The presence of fetal microchimerism has been identified with lower frequency in patients with cancers such as breast and lymphoma and with higher frequency in patients with colon cancer and autoimmune diseases. Microchimeric cells have been identified in healing and healed tissues as well as normal and tumor tissues. This has led to the hypothesis that fetal microchimerism may play a protective role in some cancers and may provoke other cancers or autoimmune disease. The long periods of risk for these diseases make it a challenge to prospectively study this phenomenon in human populations. Dogs get similar cancers as humans, share our homes and environmental exposures, and live compressed life-spans, allowing easier prospective study of disease development. This review describes the current state of understanding of fetal microchimerism in humans and dogs and highlights the similarities of the common cancers mammary carcinoma, lymphoma, and colon cancer between the two species. Study of fetal microchimerism in dogs might hold the key to characterization of the type and function of microchimeric cells and their role in health and disease. Such an understanding could then be applied to preventing and treating disease in humans. PMID:25693490

  11. n-Order and maximum fuzzy similarity entropy for discrimination of signals of different complexity: Application to fetal heart rate signals.

    PubMed

    Zaylaa, Amira; Oudjemia, Souad; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new concepts for discrimination of signals of different complexity. The first focused initially on solving the problem of setting entropy descriptors by varying the pattern size instead of the tolerance. This led to the search for the optimal pattern size that maximized the similarity entropy. The second paradigm was based on the n-order similarity entropy that encompasses the 1-order similarity entropy. To improve the statistical stability, n-order fuzzy similarity entropy was proposed. Fractional Brownian motion was simulated to validate the different methods proposed, and fetal heart rate signals were used to discriminate normal from abnormal fetuses. In all cases, it was found that it was possible to discriminate time series of different complexity such as fractional Brownian motion and fetal heart rate signals. The best levels of performance in terms of sensitivity (90%) and specificity (90%) were obtained with the n-order fuzzy similarity entropy. However, it was shown that the optimal pattern size and the maximum similarity measurement were related to intrinsic features of the time series.

  12. Recognizing different tissues in human fetal femur cartilage by label-free Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstar, Aliz; Leijten, Jeroen; van Leuveren, Stefan; Hilderink, Janneke; Otto, Cees; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Karperien, Marcel; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2012-11-01

    Traditionally, the composition of bone and cartilage is determined by standard histological methods. We used Raman microscopy, which provides a molecular "fingerprint" of the investigated sample, to detect differences between the zones in human fetal femur cartilage without the need for additional staining or labeling. Raman area scans were made from the (pre)articular cartilage, resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones of growth plate and endochondral bone within human fetal femora. Multivariate data analysis was performed on Raman spectral datasets to construct cluster images with corresponding cluster averages. Cluster analysis resulted in detection of individual chondrocyte spectra that could be separated from cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) spectra and was verified by comparing cluster images with intensity-based Raman images for the deoxyribonucleic acid/ribonucleic acid (DNA/RNA) band. Specific dendrograms were created using Ward's clustering method, and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed with the separated and averaged Raman spectra of cells and ECM of all measured zones. Overall (dis)similarities between measured zones were effectively visualized on the dendrograms and main spectral differences were revealed by PCA allowing for label-free detection of individual cartilaginous zones and for label-free evaluation of proper cartilaginous matrix formation for future tissue engineering and clinical purposes.

  13. Microstructure and micromechanical properties of the mid-diaphyses of human fetal femurs.

    PubMed

    Su, X W; Feng, Q L; Cui, F Z; Zhu, X D

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure, composition and the micromechanical properties across the thickness of femoral mid-diaphyses from 14 to 26 week human fetuses have been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine structural changes with maturation. The fetal bones consist of layers of woven bone. From young to old fetuses and from outer to inner bone layers, the collagen fibrils become more cross-linked, densely packed and change from disordered to an ordered arrangement. The collagen fibril bundles are also more preferentially oriented and change from a chiefly circumferential to longitudinal direction. The sizes of the apatite crystals also increase with age. The Ca/P ratio remains constant around 1.55 for all the bone layers except the outmost layer which is lower than 1.2. An nano-indenter was used to evaluate the microhardness and elastic modulus of each bone layer. The increase of microhardness and elastic modulus correlates with the maturation of bone. The mechanical properties of the mid-diaphyses of human fetal femurs are anisotropic, which is due to the preferential orientation of collagen fibrils.

  14. Expression Profile of Sonic Hedgehog Pathway Members in the Developing Human Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Julia; Zinke, Jenny; Bunz, Benedikt; Meyermann, Richard; Harter, Patrick N.; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway plays a central role in the developing mammalian CNS. In our study, we aimed to investigate the spatiotemporal SHH pathway expression pattern in human fetal brains. We analyzed 22 normal fetal brains for Shh, Patched, Smoothened, and Gli1-3 expression by immunohistochemistry. In the telencephalon, strongest expression of Shh, Smoothened, and Gli2 was found in the cortical plate (CP) and ventricular zone. Patched was strongly upregulated in the ventricular zone and Gli1 in the CP. In the cerebellum, SHH pathway members were strongly expressed in the external granular layer (EGL). SHH pathway members significantly decreased over time in the ventricular and subventricular zone and in the cerebellar EGL, while increasing levels were found in more superficial telencephalic layers. Our findings show that SHH pathway members are strongly expressed in areas important for proliferation and differentiation and indicate a temporal expression gradient in telencephalic and cerebellar layers probably due to decreased proliferation of progenitor cells and increased differentiation. Our data about the spatiotemporal expression of SHH pathway members in the developing human brain serves as a base for the understanding of both normal and pathological CNS development. PMID:26266257

  15. Characterization and Pharmacologic Targeting of EZH2, a Fetal Retinal Protein and Epigenetic Regulator, in Human Retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mehnaz; Walters, Laura L.; Li, Qiang; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Miller, Jason M.L.; Zhang, Qitao; Sciallis, Andrew P.; Liu, Yu; Dlouhy, Brian J.; Fort, Patrice E.; Archer, Steven M.; Demirci, Hakan; Dou, Yali; Rao, Rajesh C.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular cancer in children, a nd the third most common cancer overall in infants. No molecular-targeted therapy for this lethal tumor exists. Since the tumor suppressor RB1, whose genetic inactivation underlies RB, is upstream of the epigenetic regulator EZH2, a pharmacologic target for many solid tumors, we reasoned that EZH2 might regulate human RB tumorigenesis. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses were performed using an EZH2 antibody in sections from 43 samples of primary, formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded human RB tissue, cryopreserved mouse retina; and in whole cell lysates from human RB cell lines (Y79 and WERI-Rb1), primary human fetal RPE and fetal and adult retina, mouse retina and embryonic stem (ES) cells. While enriched during fetal human retinal development, EZH2 protein was not present in the normal postnatal retina. However, EZH2 was detected in all 43 analyzed human RB specimens, indicating that EZH2 is a fetal protein expressed in postnatal human RB. EZH2 expression marked single RB cell invasion into the optic nerve, a site of invasion whose involvement may influence the decision for systemic chemotherapy. To assess the role of EZH2 in RB cell survival, human RB and primary RPE cells were treated with two EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), GSK126 and SAH-EZH2 (SAH). EZH2i inhibitors impaired intracellular ATP production, an indicator of cell viability, in a time and dose-dependent manner, but did not affect primary human fetal RPE. Thus, aberrant expression of a histone methyltransferase protein is a feature of human RB. This is the first time this mechanism has been implicated for an eye, adnexal, or orbital tumor. The specificity of EZH2i toward human RB cells, but not RPE, warrants further in vivo testing in animal models of RB, especially those EZH2i currently in clinical trials for solid tumors and lymphoma. PMID:26280220

  16. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing.

  17. Dysregulated flow-mediated vasodilatation in the human placenta in fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Bischof, Helen; Lang, Ingrid; Desoye, Gernot; Greenwood, Sue L; Johnstone, Edward D; Wareing, Mark; Sibley, Colin P; Brownbill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Increased vascular resistance and reduced fetoplacental blood flow are putative aetiologies in the pathogenesis of fetal growth restriction (FGR); however, the regulating sites and mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesised that placental vessels dictate fetoplacental resistance and in FGR exhibit endothelial dysfunction and reduced flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMVD). Resistance was measured in normal pregnancies (n = 10) and FGR (n = 10) both in vivo by umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry and ex vivo by dual placental perfusion. Ex vivo FMVD is the reduction in fetal-side inflow hydrostatic pressure (FIHP) following increased flow rate. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between vascular resistance measured in vivo and ex vivo in normal pregnancy, but not in FGR. In perfused FGR placentas, vascular resistance was significantly elevated compared to normal placentas (58 ± 7.7 mmHg and 36.8 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; 8 ml min−1; means ± SEM; P < 0.0001) and FMVD was severely reduced (3.9 ± 1.3% and 9.1 ± 1.2%, respectively). In normal pregnancies only, the highest level of ex vivo FMVD was associated with the lowest in vivo resistance. Inhibition of NO synthesis during perfusion (100 μm l-NNA) moderately elevated FIHP in the normal group, but substantially in the FGR group. Human placenta artery endothelial cells from FGR groups exhibited increased shear stress-induced NO generation, iNOS expression and eNOS expression compared with normal groups. In conclusion, fetoplacental resistance is determined by placental vessels, and is increased in FGR. The latter also exhibit reduced FMVD, but with a partial compensatory increased NO generation capacity. The data support our hypothesis, which highlights the importance of FMVD regulation in normal and dysfunctional placentation. Key points A correlation was found between in vivo umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry and resistance to fetal-side flow in the human ex vivo dually

  18. Characterization of mesenchymal cells beneath cornification of the fetal epithelium and epidermis at the face: an immunohistochemical study using human fetal specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Jin, Zhe Wu; Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Fetal development of the face involves a specific type of cornification in which keratinocytes provide a mass or plug to fill a cavity. The epithelial-mesenchymal interaction was likely to be different from that in the usual skin. We examined expression of intermediate filaments and other mesenchymal markers beneath cornification in the fetal face. Using sections from 5 mid-term human fetuses at 14–16 weeks, immunohistochemistry was conducted for cytokeratins (CK), vimentin, nestin, glial fibrilary acidic protein, desmin, CD34, CD68 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Fetal zygomatic skin was composed of a thin stratum corneum and a stratum basale (CK5/6+, CK14+, and CK19+) and, as the intermediate layer, 2–3 layered large keratinocytes with nucleus. The basal layer was lined by mono-layered mesenchymal cells (CD34+ and nestin+). Some of basal cells were PCNA-positive. In the keratinocyte plug at the external ear and nose, most cell nuclei expressed PCNA, CK5/6, CK14, and CK19. Vimentin-positive mesenchymal cells migrated into the plug. The PCNA-positive nucleus as well as mesenchymal cell migration was not seen in the lip margin in spite of the thick keratinocyte layer. The lingual epithelium were characterized by the CK7-positive stratum corneum as well as the thick mesenchymal papilla. CD68-positive macrophages were absent in the epidermis/epithelium. Being different from usual cornification of the skin, loss of a mesenchymal monolayer as well as superficial migration of mesenchymal cells might connect with a specific differentiation of keratinocyte to provide a plug at the fetal nose and ear. PMID:27051567

  19. Fetal and infant growth patterns of the mandibular symphysis in modern humans and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Coquerelle, Michael; Bookstein, Fred L; Braga, José; Halazonetis, Demetrios J; Weber, Gerhard W

    2010-11-01

    Comparison of the early development of the mandibular symphysis between primates and modern humans is of particular interest in human palaeontology. Using geometric morphometric methods, we explored and compared the ontogenetic shape changes of 14 chimpanzee mandibles (Pan troglodytes) against 66 human CT-scanned mandibles over the age range from fetal life to the complete emergence of the deciduous dentition in a visualization incorporating the deciduous tooth arrangement. The results reveal that the symphysis is anteriorly inclined in the youngest chimpanzee fetuses but develops an increasingly vertical orientation up until birth. At the same time, the anterior teeth reorient before a vertical emergence, and a symphyseal tuber appears on the labial side. When the deciduous canine emerges, the symphysis inclines anteriorly again, exhibiting the adult characteristic slope. These two phases are characterized by a repositioning of the simian shelf. Unlike chimpanzees, the human symphysis remains vertical throughout fetal development. However, the combination of morphological changes observed in chimpanzee fetuses is similar to that of modern humans after birth, as the mental region projects forward. By elongating the alveolar process, the inclination of the chimpanzee symphysis could be a key event for emergence of the deciduous canine, as space is lacking at the alveolar ridge in a vertical symphysis once the deciduous incisors and molars have emerged. The repositioning of the simian shelf suggests that the suprahyoid muscles have a significant influence on the anterior growth of the symphysis. The anteroposterior positioning of the basal symphysis in both species may be related to hyoid bone position during ontogeny.

  20. Fetal and infant growth patterns of the mandibular symphysis in modern humans and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Coquerelle, Michael; Bookstein, Fred L; Braga, José; Halazonetis, Demetrios J; Weber, Gerhard W

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the early development of the mandibular symphysis between primates and modern humans is of particular interest in human palaeontology. Using geometric morphometric methods, we explored and compared the ontogenetic shape changes of 14 chimpanzee mandibles (Pan troglodytes) against 66 human CT-scanned mandibles over the age range from fetal life to the complete emergence of the deciduous dentition in a visualization incorporating the deciduous tooth arrangement. The results reveal that the symphysis is anteriorly inclined in the youngest chimpanzee fetuses but develops an increasingly vertical orientation up until birth. At the same time, the anterior teeth reorient before a vertical emergence, and a symphyseal tuber appears on the labial side. When the deciduous canine emerges, the symphysis inclines anteriorly again, exhibiting the adult characteristic slope. These two phases are characterized by a repositioning of the simian shelf. Unlike chimpanzees, the human symphysis remains vertical throughout fetal development. However, the combination of morphological changes observed in chimpanzee fetuses is similar to that of modern humans after birth, as the mental region projects forward. By elongating the alveolar process, the inclination of the chimpanzee symphysis could be a key event for emergence of the deciduous canine, as space is lacking at the alveolar ridge in a vertical symphysis once the deciduous incisors and molars have emerged. The repositioning of the simian shelf suggests that the suprahyoid muscles have a significant influence on the anterior growth of the symphysis. The anteroposterior positioning of the basal symphysis in both species may be related to hyoid bone position during ontogeny. PMID:20807267

  1. Human anogenital distance: an update on fetal smoke-exposure and integration of the perinatal literature on sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Paul A.; Filis, Panagiotis; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; le Bizec, Bruno; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Morvan, Marie-Line; Drake, Amanda J.; Soffientini, Ugo; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do sex and maternal smoking effects on human fetal anogenital distance (AGD) persist in a larger study and how do these data integrate with the wider literature on perinatal human AGD, especially with respect to sex differences? SUMMARY ANSWER Second trimester sex differences in AGD are broadly consistent with neonatal and infant measures of AGD and maternal cigarette smoking is associated with a temporary increase in male AGD in the absence of changes in circulating testosterone. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY AGD is a biomarker of fetal androgen exposure, a reduced AGD in males being associated with cryptorchidism, hypospadias and reduced penile length. Normative fetal AGD data remain partial and windows of sensitivity of human fetal AGD to disruption are not known. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The effects of fetal sex and maternal cigarette smoking on the second trimester (11–21 weeks of gestation) human fetal AGD were studied, along with measurement of testosterone and testicular transcripts associated with apoptosis and proliferation. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING METHODS AGD, measured from the centre of the anus to the posterior/caudal root of penis/clitoris (AGDapp) was determined in 56 female and 70 male morphologically normal fetuses. These data were integrated with current literature on perinatal AGD in humans. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE At 11–13 weeks of gestation male fetal AGDapp was 61% (P< 0.001) longer than in females, increasing to 70% at 17–21 weeks. This sexual dimorphism was independent of growth characteristics (fetal weight, length, gonad weight). We confirmed that at 14–16 weeks of gestation male fetal AGDapp was increased 28% (P < 0.05) by in utero cigarette smoke exposure. Testosterone levels were not affected by smoking. To develop normative data, our findings have been integrated with available data from in vivo ultrasound scans and neonatal studies. Inter-study variations in male/female AGD differences lead to

  2. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light. [Development associated changes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1984-03-01

    Human fetal fibroblasts have been tested for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than at 8 weeks. However, they exhibited a lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. Enhancement of protease plasminogen activator (PA) was higher after u.v. irradiation in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 weeks than at 12 weeks gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. Excision repair and PA inducibility depended on the tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s).

  3. Novel Observations From Next-Generation RNA Sequencing of Highly Purified Human Adult and Fetal Islet Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, David M; Nowosielska, Anetta; Afik, Shaked; Pechhold, Susanne; Cura, Anthony J; Kennedy, Norman J; Kim, Soyoung; Kucukural, Alper; Davis, Roger J; Kent, Sally C; Greiner, Dale L; Garber, Manuel G; Harlan, David M; diIorio, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Understanding distinct gene expression patterns of normal adult and developing fetal human pancreatic α- and β-cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapies, islet regeneration strategies, and therapies designed to increase β-cell function in patients with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Toward that end, we have developed methods to highly purify α-, β-, and δ-cells from human fetal and adult pancreata by intracellular staining for the cell-specific hormone content, sorting the subpopulations by flow cytometry, and, using next-generation RNA sequencing, we report the detailed transcriptomes of fetal and adult α- and β-cells. We observed that human islet composition was not influenced by age, sex, or BMI, and transcripts for inflammatory gene products were noted in fetal β-cells. In addition, within highly purified adult glucagon-expressing α-cells, we observed surprisingly high insulin mRNA expression, but not insulin protein expression. This transcriptome analysis from highly purified islet α- and β-cell subsets from fetal and adult pancreata offers clear implications for strategies that seek to increase insulin expression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25931473

  4. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart.

  5. Alternative splicing of the FMR1 gene in human fetal brain neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Huang; Yan Shen; Xue-bin Qin; Guan-Yun Wu

    1996-08-09

    The alternative splicing expression of the FMR1 gene was reported in several human and mouse tissues. Five regions of FMR1 gene can be alternatively spliced, but the combination of them has not been investigated fully. We reported here the analysis of alternative splicing pattern of the FMR1 gene in cultured fetal human neurons, using a RT-PCR and cloning strategy. Eleven splicing types were cloned and different isoforms were not equally represented. The dominant isoform represents nearly 40%, and the other isoforms were relatively rare. One isoform has a different carboxyl-terminus. Most of the alternative spliced regions appear hydrophilic; thus, they may locate on the surface of the FMR1 protein. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Influence of heart failure on nucleocytoplasmic transport in human cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Raquel; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Salvador, Antonio; Azorín, Inmaculada; Portolés, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Aims The role of the cell nucleus in the development of heart failure (HF) is unknown, so the objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of HF on nucleocytoplasmic transport and density of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Methods and results A total of 51 human heart samples from ischaemic (ICM, n = 30) and dilated (DCM, n = 16) patients undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (CNT, n = 5) were analysed by western blotting. Subcellular distribution of proteins and NPC were analysed by fluorescence and electron microscopy, respectively. When we compared nucleocytoplasmic machinery protein levels according to aetiology of HF, ICM showed higher levels of importins [(IMP-β3) (150%, P < 0.0001), IMP-α2 (69%, P = 0.001)] and exportins [EXP-1 (178%, P < 0.0001), EXP-4 (81%, P = 0.006)] than those of the CNT group. Furthermore, DCM also showed significant differences for IMP-β3 (192%, P < 0.0001), IMP-α2 (52%, P = 0.025), and EXP-1 (228%, P < 0.0001). RanGTPase-activating proteins (RanGAP1 and RaGAP1u) were increased in ICM (76%, P = 0.005; 51%, P = 0.012) and DCM (41%, P = 0.042; 50%, P = 0.029). Furthermore, subcellular distribution of nucleocytoplasmic machinery was not altered in pathological hearts. Finally, nucleoporin (Nup) p62 was increased in ICM (80%) and DCM (109%) (P < 0.001 and P = 0.024). Nuclear pore density was comparable in pathological and CNT hearts, and ICM showed a low diameter (P = 0.005) and different structural configuration of NPC. Conclusion This study shows the effect of HF on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking machinery, evidenced by higher levels of importins, exportins, Ran regulators and Nup p62 in ischaemic and dilated human hearts than those in the controls, with NPCs acquiring a different configuration and morphology in ICM. PMID:19819881

  7. Nonlinear control of heart rate variability in human infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, G; Allan, W; Sobel, D; Allan, K D

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation greater than or equal to 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation > or = to 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A.L., Rigney, D.R. & West, B.J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states. PMID:8637921

  8. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation <= 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  9. Differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells into Schwann-like cells: fetal bovine serum or human serum?

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Elham; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Azandeh, Seyyed Saeed; Bijannejad, Dariush; Bahreini, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Access to autologous Schwann cells is limited due to lack of donor site and its difficult isolation and culture. Therefore, one of the possible ways to obtain to Schwann cells is to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into glial pathway using various materials and protocols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of fetal bovine serum and human serum on Schwann cell differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells to choose the best serum for use in future research. For this purpose, after isolation of human adipose-derived stem cells, it was characterized and differentiated into Schwann cell lineage using two protocols which one of them contained fetal bovine serum and the other human serum. At the end, morphological evaluation declared an increased detachment of cells in response to human serum. On the other side, immunocytochemistry showed that there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing glial fibrillary acidic proteins and S100 in fetal bovine serum-treated group when compared to human serum-treated one (P<0.05). It was concluded that fetal bovine serum was more effective than allogeneic human serum in Schwann cell differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells. PMID:26417476

  10. [Fetal responses to different methods of electrocution of pregnant sows].

    PubMed

    Peisker, Nina; Preissel, Anne-Kathrin; Ritzmann, Mathias; Schuster, Tibor; Thomes, Rainer; Henke, Julia

    2008-01-01

    The fetal stress responses in sows euthanized by electrical current during their second and last trimester of pregnancy (G1 and G2) were evaluated. Three methods of euthanasia of pregnant sows generally applicable to cases of epizootic or emergency slaughter were investigated: 1. conventional application of electrical current to the head and heart (HH); 2. application of electrical current to the head, heart and the uterus (HHU); 3. application of electrical current to the head, heart and from the upper body to the vagina (HHV). Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section at intervals of 3 to 4 minutes and remained attached to the sow by the umbilical cord. Fetal vitality, reflexes, heart rate, blood pressure, rectal body temperature, intracardial arteriovenous pCO2, pH and lactic acid were monitored for a period of 30 minutes. No method was found to kill the fetal pigs immediately. In fetuses at G1 there were no significant differences between the HH and HHU and HHV methods. Fetuses at G2 showed a significantly faster decrease in heart rate and blood pressure as well as a shorter period of time for the absence of fetal body movements and reflexes for the HHT method, compared to the other methods. Since it is not yet known to what extent the fetal pig experiences pain and suffering, the prolonged process of dying for the in utero fetus due to hypoxia which includes struggling and gasps is inconsistent with criteria for humane euthanasia and animal welfare. PMID:18822602

  11. Cryopreserved Human Amniotic Membrane and A Bioinspired Underwater Adhesive To Seal And Promote Healing Of Iatrogenic Fetal Membrane Defect Sites

    PubMed Central

    Papanna, Ramesha; Mann, Lovepreet K; Tseng, Scheffer C.G.; Stewart, Russell J; Kaur, Sarbjit S; Swindle, M Michael; Kyriakides, Themis R; Tatevian, Nina; Moise, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the ability of cryopreserved human amniotic membrane (hAM) scaffold sealed with an underwater adhesive, bio-inspired by marine sandcastle worms to promote healing of iatrogenic fetal membrane defects in a pregnant swine model. Methods Twelve Yucatan miniature pigs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia at 70 days gestation (term = 114 days). The gestational sacs were assigned to uninstrumented (n=24) and instrumented with 12 Fr trocar, which was further randomized into four different arms-no hAM patch, (n=22), hAM patch secured with suture (n=16), hAM patch with no suture (n=14), and hAM patch secured with adhesive (n=9). The animals were euthanized 20 days after the procedure. Gross and histological examination of the entry site was performed for fetal membrane healing. Results There were no differences in fetal survival, amniotic fluid levels, or dye-leakage from the amniotic cavity between the groups. The fetal membranes spontaneously healed in instrumented sacs without hAM patches. In sacs with hAM patches secured with sutures, the patch was incorporated into the swine fetal membranes. In sacs with hAM patches without sutures, 100% of the patches were displaced from the defect site, whereas in sacs with hAM patches secured with adhesive 55% of the patches remained in place and showed complete healing (p=0.04). Discussion In contrast to humans, swine fetal membranes heal spontaneously after an iatrogenic injury and thus not an adequate model. hAM patches became incorporated into the defect site by cellular ingrowth from the fetal membranes. The bioinspired adhesive adhered the hAM patches within the defect site. PMID:26059341

  12. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  13. Virtual histology of the human heart using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Moazami, Nader; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for the visualization of micron-scale structures within nontransparent biological tissues. For the first time, we demonstrate the use of OCT in identifying components of the cardiac conduction system and other structures in the explanted human heart. Reconstructions of cardiac structures up to 2 mm below the tissue surface were achieved and validated with Masson Trichrome histology in atrial, ventricular, sinoatrial nodal, and atrioventricular nodal preparations. The high spatial resolution of OCT provides visualization of cardiac fibers within the myocardium, as well as elements of the cardiac conduction system; however, a limiting factor remains its depth penetration, demonstrated to be ~2 mm in cardiac tissues. Despite its currently limited imaging depth, the use of OCT to identify the structural determinants of both normal and abnormal function in the intact human heart is critical in its development as a potential aid to intracardiac arrhythmia diagnosis and therapy.

  14. gamma. sub 2 -MSH immunoreactivity in the human heart

    SciTech Connect

    Ekman, R.; Bjartell, A.; Lisander, J.; Edvinsson, L. )

    1989-01-01

    In patients undergoing aorto-coronary by-pass surgery, we found a 26% arterial-venous difference of immunoreactive {gamma}{sub 2}-melanocytostimulating hormone (MSH), a proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derived peptide known to possess profound hemodynamic effects. These results prompted an investigation of the presence of {gamma}{sub 2}-MSH in the human heart. Using a two-step extraction procedure, regions of human hearts were examined by sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays to determine their {gamma}{sub 2}-MSH content. Mean ({plus minus} SEM) concentrations of 0.14 {plus minus} 0.023 pmol/g and 0.12 {plus minus} 0.017 were found in right atrium and right ventricle, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography indicated that 80-90 % of the total immunoreactivity eluted in a single sharp peak in a position identical to that of synthetic {gamma}{sub 2}-MSH.

  15. Inhibition of Histone H3K9 Acetylation by Anacardic Acid Can Correct the Over-Expression of Gata4 in the Hearts of Fetal Mice Exposed to Alcohol during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chang; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Hui-Chao; Huang, Xu-Pei; Zhao, Wei-An; Zheng, Min; Liu, Ling-Juan; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular malformations can be caused by abnormalities in Gata4 expression during fetal development. In a previous study, we demonstrated that ethanol exposure could lead to histone hyperacetylation and Gata4 over-expression in fetal mouse hearts. However, the potential mechanisms of histone hyperacetylation and Gata4 over-expression induced by ethanol remain unclear. Methods and Results Pregnant mice were gavaged with ethanol or saline. Fetal mouse hearts were collected for analysis. The results of ethanol fed groups showed that global HAT activity was unusually high in the hearts of fetal mice while global HDAC activity remained unchanged. Binding of P300, CBP, PCAF, SRC1, but not GCN5, were increased on the Gata4 promoter relative to the saline treated group. Increased acetylation of H3K9 and increased mRNA expression of Gata4, α-MHC, cTnT were observed in these hearts. Treatment with the pan-histone acetylase inhibitor, anacardic acid, reduced the binding of P300, PCAF to the Gata4 promoter and reversed H3K9 hyperacetylation in the presence of ethanol. Interestingly, anacardic acid attenuated over-expression of Gata4, α-MHC and cTnT in fetal mouse hearts exposed to ethanol. Conclusions Our results suggest that P300 and PCAF may be critical regulatory factors that mediate Gata4 over-expression induced by ethanol exposure. Alternatively, P300, PCAF and Gata4 may coordinate over-expression of cardiac downstream genes in mouse hearts exposed to ethanol. Anacardic acid may thus protect against ethanol-induced Gata4, α-MHC, cTnT over-expression by inhibiting the binding of P300 and PCAF to the promoter region of these genes. PMID:25101666

  16. Fetal electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Puente, Ernestina; Lizana, Pablo R.; Mendoza, Diego

    2002-11-01

    The high intra-uterine death rate is due to failure in appropriately diagnosing some problems in the cardiobreathing system of the fetus during pregnancy. The electrocardiograph is one apparatus which might detect problems at an early stage. With electrodes located near the womb and uterus, in a way similar to the normal technique, the detection of so-called biopotential differences, caused by concentrations of ions, can be achieved. The fetal electrocardiograph is based on an ultrasound technique aimed at detecting intrauterine problems in pregnant women, because it is a noninvasive technique due to the very low level of ultrasound power used. With this system, the following tests can be done: Heart movements from the ninth week onwards; Rapid and safe diagnosis of intrauterine fetal death; Location and size of the placenta. The construction of the fetal electrocardiograph requires instrument level components directly mounted on the printed circuit board, in order to avoid stray capacitance in the cabling which prevents the detection of the E.C.G. activity. The low cost of the system makes it affordable to low budget institutions; in contrast, available commercial systems are priced in U.S. Dollars. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  17. Engraftment and long-term expression of human fetal hemopoietic stem cells in sheep following transplantation in utero.

    PubMed Central

    Zanjani, E D; Pallavicini, M G; Ascensao, J L; Flake, A W; Langlois, R G; Reitsma, M; MacKintosh, F R; Stutes, D; Harrison, M R; Tavassoli, M

    1992-01-01

    Hemopoietic stem cells from human fetal liver were transplanted in utero into preimmune fetal sheep (48-54 days of gestation). The fate of donor cells was followed using karyotype analysis, by immunofluorescence labeling with anti-CD antibodies, and by fluorescent in situ hybridization using human-specific DNA probes. Engraftment occurred in 13 of 33 recipients. Of five live born sheep that exhibited chimerism, all expressed human cells in the marrow, whereas three expressed them in blood as well. Engraftment was multilineage (erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid) and human hemopoietic progenitors (multipotent colony-forming units, colony-forming units-granulocyte, macrophage, and erythroid burst-forming units) capable of forming colonies in vitro were detected in all five lambs for greater than 2 yr. These progenitors responded to human-specific growth factors both in vitro and in vivo. Thus the administration of recombinant human IL-3 and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor to chimeric sheep resulted in a 2.1-3.4-fold increase in the relative expression of donor (human) cells. These results demonstrate that the permissive environment of the preimmune fetal sheep provides suitable conditions for the engraftment and long-term multilineage expression of human hemopoietic stem cells in a large animal model. In this model, donor human cells appear to retain certain phenotypic and functional characteristics that can be used to manipulate the size of donor cell pool. PMID:1348253

  18. Aqueous synthesis of gold nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity in human dermal fibroblasts-fetal.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yinghua; Lü, Xiaoying

    2009-04-01

    The unique physicochemical properties of nanoparticles make them promising substrates for application in the medical area. As there are no safety regulations yet, concerns about future health problems are rising. This study was conducted to prepare approximately 20 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by a chemical reduction method and evaluate their cytotoxicity by MTT assay using human dermal fibroblasts-fetal (HDF-f). 10-50 nm GNPs could be obtained in redistilled water by varying the amount of sodium citrate. MTT results showed that approximately 20 nm GNPs did not cause cell death at a maximum concentration of 300 microM but affected the morphology of HDF-f when their concentration increased. PMID:19258699

  19. Effect of phorbol and glucose on insulin secretion from the human fetal pancreas.

    PubMed

    Tuch, B E; Williams, P F; Handelsman, D; Dunlop, M; Grigoriou, S; Turtle, J R

    1987-04-01

    It has been reported previously that 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate is capable of stimulating the release of insulin from adult and neonatal pancreatic tissue. The data from this study show that this agent at a concentration of 1.3 uM, in the presence of 2.8 mM glucose, was unable to cause significant secretion of insulin from cultured human fetal pancreatic explants. By contrast 20 mM glucose was able to cause a small but significant immediate increase in secretion of insulin, but was unable to maintain this response beyond ten minutes. When the two agents were combined, a synergistic effect was seen throughout the entire 50 minute period of stimulation. The reason for this synergism is unclear since, whilst both secretagogues were able to cause a rise in the levels of diacylglycerol, together no extra effect was observed.

  20. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Julia E; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L; Vickers, Alison E M

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices.

  1. Development and characterization of a conditionally immortalized human fetal osteoblastic cell line.

    PubMed

    Harris, S A; Enger, R J; Riggs, B L; Spelsberg, T C

    1995-02-01

    We report the establishment of a human fetal osteoblast cell line derived from biopsies obtained from a spontaneous miscarriage. Primary cultures isolated from fetal tissue were transfected with a gene coding for a temperature-sensitive mutant (tsA58) of SV40 large T antigen along with a gene coding for neomycin (G418) resistance. Individual neomycin resistant colonies were screened for alkaline phosphatase (AP)-specific staining. The clone with the highest AP level, hFOB 1.19, was examined further for other osteoblast phenotypic markers. Incubation of hFOB cells at the permissive temperature (33.5 degrees C) resulted in rapid cell division, whereas little or no cell division occurred at the restrictive temperature (39.5 degrees C). Both AP activity and osteocalcin (OC) secretion increased in a dose-dependent manner following dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) treatment when cultured at either temperature. However, AP and 1,25-D3-induced OC levels were elevated in confluent hFOB cells cultured at 39.5 degrees C compared with 33.5 degrees C. Treatment of hFOB cells with 1-34 parathyroid hormone (PTH) resulted in an increase in cAMP levels. Upon reaching confluence, hFOB cultures went through programmed differentiation and formed mineralized nodules as observed by von Kossa staining. Further, immunostaining of postconfluent, differentiated hFOB cells showed that high levels of osteopontin, osteonectin, bone sialoprotein, and type I collagen were expressed. Therefore, the clonal cell line hFOB 1.19 provides a homogeneous, rapidly proliferating model system to study certain stages of human osteoblast differentiation.

  2. Telomere attrition and Chk2 activation in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hidemasa; Wang, Sam C.; Prahash, Arun; Sano, Motoaki; Moravec, Christine S.; Taffet, George E.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Youker, Keith A.; Entman, Mark L.; Schneider, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The “postmitotic” phenotype in adult cardiac muscle exhibits similarities to replicative senescence more generally and constitutes a barrier to effective restorative growth in heart disease. Telomere dysfunction is implicated in senescence and apoptotic signaling but its potential role in heart disorders is unknown. Here, we report that cardiac apoptosis in human heart failure is associated specifically with defective expression of the telomere repeat- binding factor TRF2, telomere shortening, and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, Chk2. In cultured cardiomyocytes, interference with either TRF2 function or expression triggered telomere erosion and apoptosis, indicating that cell death can occur via this pathway even in postmitotic, noncycling cells; conversely, exogenous TRF2 conferred protection from oxidative stress. In vivo, mechanical stress was sufficient to down-regulate TRF2, shorten telomeres, and activate Chk2 in mouse myocardium, and transgenic expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase conferred protection from all three responses. Together, these data suggest that apoptosis in chronic heart failure is mediated in part by telomere dysfunction and suggest an essential role for TRF2 even in postmitotic cells. PMID:12702777

  3. Metric optimized gating for fetal cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Jansz, Michael S; Seed, Mike; van Amerom, Joshua F P; Wong, Derek; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2010-11-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can be used to complement echocardiography for the evaluation of the fetal heart. Cardiac imaging typically requires gating with peripheral hardware; however, a gating signal is not readily available in utero. No successful application of existing technologies to human fetal phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging has been reported to date in the literature. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal heart that does not require measurement of a gating signal. Metric optimized gating involves acquiring data without gating and retrospectively determining the proper reconstruction by optimizing an image metric. The effects of incorrect gating on phase contrast images were investigated, and the time-entropy of the series of images was found to provide a good measure of the level of corruption. The technique was validated with a pulsatile flow phantom, experiments with adult volunteers, and in vivo application in the fetal population. Images and flow curves from these measurements are presented. Additionally, numerical simulations were used to investigate the degree to which heart rate variability affects the reconstruction process. Metric optimized gating enables imaging with conventional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging sequences in the absence of a gating signal, permitting flow measurements in the great vessels in utero.

  4. Galectin-1 confers immune privilege to human trophoblast: implications in recurrent fetal loss.

    PubMed

    Ramhorst, Rosanna E; Giribaldi, Laura; Fraccaroli, Laura; Toscano, Marta A; Stupirski, Juan C; Romero, Marta D; Durand, Edith S; Rubinstein, Natalia; Blaschitz, Astrid; Sedlmayr, Peter; Genti-Raimondi, Susana; Fainboim, Leonardo; Rabinovich, Gabriel A

    2012-10-01

    Mechanisms accounting for the protection of the fetal semi-allograft from maternal immune cells remain incompletely understood. In previous studies, we showed that galectin-1 (Gal1), an immunoregulatory glycan-binding protein, hierarchically triggers a cascade of tolerogenic events at the mouse fetomaternal interface. Here, we show that Gal1 confers immune privilege to human trophoblast cells through the modulation of a number of regulatory mechanisms. Gal1 was mainly expressed in invasive extravillous trophoblast cells of human first trimester and term placenta in direct contact with maternal tissue. Expression of Gal1 by the human trophoblast cell line JEG-3 was primarily controlled by progesterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines and impaired T-cell responses by limiting T cell viability, suppressing the secretion of Th1-type cytokines and favoring the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells. Targeted inhibition of Gal1 expression through antibody (Ab)-mediated blockade, addition of the specific disaccharide lactose or retroviral-mediated siRNA strategies prevented these immunoregulatory effects. Consistent with a homeostatic role of endogenous Gal1, patients with recurrent pregnancy loss showed considerably lower levels of circulating Gal1 and had higher frequency of anti-Gal1 auto-Abs in their sera compared with fertile women. Thus, endogenous Gal1 confers immune privilege to human trophoblast cells by triggering a broad tolerogenic program with potential implications in threatened pregnancies. PMID:22752006

  5. IgE is expressed on, but not produced by, fetal cells in the human placenta irrespective of maternal atopy

    PubMed Central

    EKSTRÖM, E SVERREMARK; NILSSON, C; HOLMLUND, U; PLOEG, I VAN DER; SANDSTEDT, B; LILJA, G; SCHEYNIUS, A

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic diseases in children has increased during the last decades. Atopic symptoms usually appear early in life. This implies an early priming for atopic disease, possibly even at the fetal level. We therefore compared the presence and production of IgE in the local in utero environment during pregnancy in atopic and non-atopic women. Eighty-six women were included in the study. Fifty women were demonstrated to be atopics, based on clinical symptoms of atopic disease together with a positive Phadiatop and/or skin prick test. Placentas from these term pregnancies were obtained. Slices covering the full thickness of the placenta were cut clockwise around the umbilical cord and were analysed with immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, numerous IgE+ cells, located primarily in the fetal villous stroma, were detected in a majority of the investigated placentas irrespective of the atopy of the mother or maternal or fetal total serum IgE levels. The placental IgE could not be demonstrated to be bound to IgE receptors, but was shown to be bound to fetal macrophages, possibly via FcγRI. No evidence was found for local fetal IgE production, although cells producing epsilon transcripts were occasionally detected in the decidua. We describe here the novel finding of numerous IgE+ cells in the human placenta, suggesting an hitherto unknown role for IgE in a successful pregnancy outcome, irrespective of whether or not the mother is atopic. PMID:11876750

  6. Fetal cardiac arrhythmia detection and in utero therapy

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    The human fetal heart develops arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in response to ischemia, inflammation, electrolyte disturbances, altered load states, structural defects, inherited genetic conditions, and many other causes. Yet sinus rhythm is present without altered rate or rhythm in some of the most serious electrophysiological diseases, which makes detection of diseases of the fetal conduction system challenging in the absence of magnetocardiographic or electrocardiographic recording techniques. Life-threatening changes in QRS or QT intervals can be completely unrecognized if heart rate is the only feature to be altered. For many fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography alone can assess important clinical parameters for diagnosis. Appropriate treatment of the fetus requires awareness of arrhythmia characteristics, mechanisms, and potential associations. Criteria to define fetal bradycardia specific to gestational age are now available and may allow detection of ion channelopathies, which are associated with fetal and neonatal bradycardia. Ectopic beats, once thought to be entirely benign, are now recognized to have important pathologic associations. Fetal tachyarrhythmias can now be defined precisely for mechanism-specific therapy and for subsequent monitoring of response. This article reviews the current and future diagnostic techniques and pharmacologic treatments for fetal arrhythmia. PMID:20418904

  7. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reendothelialize Porcine Heart Valve Scaffolds: Novel Perspectives in Heart Valve Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lanuti, Paola; Serafini, Francesco; Pierdomenico, Laura; Simeone, Pasquale; Bologna, Giuseppina; Ercolino, Eva; Di Silvestre, Sara; Guarnieri, Simone; Canosa, Carlo; Impicciatore, Gianna Gabriella; Chiarini, Stella; Magnacca, Francesco; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Pandolfi, Assunta; Marchisio, Marco; Di Giammarco, Gabriele; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve diseases are usually treated by surgical intervention addressed for the replacement of the damaged valve with a biosynthetic or mechanical prosthesis. Although this approach guarantees a good quality of life for patients, it is not free from drawbacks (structural deterioration, nonstructural dysfunction, and reintervention). To overcome these limitations, the heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) is developing new strategies to synthesize novel types of valve substitutes, by identifying efficient sources of both ideal scaffolds and cells. In particular, a natural matrix, able to interact with cellular components, appears to be a suitable solution. On the other hand, the well-known Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) plasticity, regenerative abilities, and their immunomodulatory capacities make them highly promising for HVTE applications. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to use porcine valve matrix to regenerate in vitro the valve endothelium by WJ-MSCs differentiated along the endothelial lineage, paralleled with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), used as positive control. Here, we were able to successfully decellularize porcine heart valves, which were then recellularized with both differentiated-WJ-MSCs and HUVECs. Data demonstrated that both cell types were able to reconstitute a cellular monolayer. Cells were able to positively interact with the natural matrix and demonstrated the surface expression of typical endothelial markers. Altogether, these data suggest that the interaction between a biological scaffold and WJ-MSCs allows the regeneration of a morphologically well-structured endothelium, opening new perspectives in the field of HVTE.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Fetal Heart Attenuate Myocardial Injury after Infarction: An In Vivo Serial Pinhole Gated SPECT-CT Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Jadhav, Sachin; Pal, Lily; Prakash, Prem; Dikshit, Madhu; Nityanand, Soniya

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a potential stem cell type for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). Recently, we isolated and characterized mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat fetal heart (fC-MSC), which exhibited potential to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of intravenously injected fC-MSC in a rat model of MI using multi-pinhole gated SPECT-CT system. fC-MSC were isolated from the hearts of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat fetuses at gestation day 16 and expanded ex vivo. One week after induction of MI, 2×106 fC-MSC labeled with PKH26 dye (n = 6) or saline alone (n = 6) were injected through the tail vein of the rats. Initial in vivo tracking of 99mTc-labeled fC-MSC revealed a focal uptake of cells in the anterior mid-ventricular region of the heart. At 4 weeks of fC-MSC administration, the cells labeled with PKH26 were located in abundance in infarct/peri-infarct region and the fC-MSC treated hearts showed a significant increase in left ventricular ejection fraction and a significant decrease in the end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and left ventricular myo-mass in comparison to the saline treated group. In addition, fC-MSC treated hearts had a significantly better myocardial perfusion and attenuation in the infarct size, in comparison to the saline treated hearts. The engrafted PKH26-fC-MSC expressed cardiac troponin T, endothelial CD31 and smooth muscle sm-MHC, suggesting their differentiation into all major cells of cardiovascular lineage. The fC-MSC treated hearts demonstrated an up-regulation of cardio-protective growth factors, anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic molecules, highlighting that the observed left ventricular functional recovery may be due to secretion of paracrine factors by fC-MSC. Taken together, our results suggest that fC-MSC therapy may be a new therapeutic strategy for MI and multi

  9. Indices and detectors for fetal MCG actography.

    PubMed

    Lutter, William J; Wakai, Ronald T

    2011-06-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this study, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  10. Indices and Detectors for Fetal MCG Actography

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this work, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  11. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Validation of In utero Tractography of Human Fetal Commissural and Internal Capsule Fibers with Histological Structure Tensor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Christian; Jakab, András; Brugger, Peter C.; Ricken, Gerda; Gruber, Gerlinde M.; Bettelheim, Dieter; Scharrer, Anke; Langs, Georg; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography offer the unique possibility to visualize the developing white matter macroanatomy of the human fetal brain in vivo and in utero and are currently under investigation for their potential use in the diagnosis of developmental pathologies of the human central nervous system. However, in order to establish in utero DTI as a clinical imaging tool, an independent comparison between macroscopic imaging and microscopic histology data in the same subject is needed. The present study aimed to cross-validate normal as well as abnormal in utero tractography results of commissural and internal capsule fibers in human fetal brains using postmortem histological structure tensor (ST) analysis. In utero tractography findings from two structurally unremarkable and five abnormal fetal brains were compared to the results of postmortem ST analysis applied to digitalized whole hemisphere sections of the same subjects. An approach to perform ST-based deterministic tractography in histological sections was implemented to overcome limitations in correlating in utero tractography to postmortem histology data. ST analysis and histology-based tractography of fetal brain sections enabled the direct assessment of the anisotropic organization and main fiber orientation of fetal telencephalic layers on a micro- and macroscopic scale, and validated in utero tractography results of corpus callosum and internal capsule fiber tracts. Cross-validation of abnormal in utero tractography results could be achieved in four subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and in two cases with malformations of internal capsule fibers. In addition, potential limitations of current DTI-based in utero tractography could be demonstrated in several brain regions. Combining the three-dimensional nature of DTI-based in utero tractography with the microscopic resolution provided by histological ST analysis may ultimately facilitate a more complete morphologic

  13. Validation of In utero Tractography of Human Fetal Commissural and Internal Capsule Fibers with Histological Structure Tensor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitter, Christian; Jakab, András; Brugger, Peter C; Ricken, Gerda; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Bettelheim, Dieter; Scharrer, Anke; Langs, Georg; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography offer the unique possibility to visualize the developing white matter macroanatomy of the human fetal brain in vivo and in utero and are currently under investigation for their potential use in the diagnosis of developmental pathologies of the human central nervous system. However, in order to establish in utero DTI as a clinical imaging tool, an independent comparison between macroscopic imaging and microscopic histology data in the same subject is needed. The present study aimed to cross-validate normal as well as abnormal in utero tractography results of commissural and internal capsule fibers in human fetal brains using postmortem histological structure tensor (ST) analysis. In utero tractography findings from two structurally unremarkable and five abnormal fetal brains were compared to the results of postmortem ST analysis applied to digitalized whole hemisphere sections of the same subjects. An approach to perform ST-based deterministic tractography in histological sections was implemented to overcome limitations in correlating in utero tractography to postmortem histology data. ST analysis and histology-based tractography of fetal brain sections enabled the direct assessment of the anisotropic organization and main fiber orientation of fetal telencephalic layers on a micro- and macroscopic scale, and validated in utero tractography results of corpus callosum and internal capsule fiber tracts. Cross-validation of abnormal in utero tractography results could be achieved in four subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and in two cases with malformations of internal capsule fibers. In addition, potential limitations of current DTI-based in utero tractography could be demonstrated in several brain regions. Combining the three-dimensional nature of DTI-based in utero tractography with the microscopic resolution provided by histological ST analysis may ultimately facilitate a more complete morphologic

  14. Relative concentration of astatine-211 and iodine-125 by human fetal thyroid and carcinoma of the thyroid in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Cobb, L M; Harrison, A; Dudley, N E; Carr, T E; Humphreys, J A

    1988-11-01

    The concentrations of 211At and 125I were measured in various tissues in nude mice bearing xenografts of human thyroid tissue (fetal and malignant). The relative concentration of the two halogens was obtained at 4 and 24 h after injection. Samples were taken of the host blood, muscle and thyroid gland and the grafted tissues. The mouse thyroid concentrated 125I more efficiently than 211At but the human grafts concentrated both halogens about equally.

  15. Developmental regulation of DUOX1 expression and function in human fetal lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Gonzales, Linda K; Kolla, Venkatadri; Schwarzer, Christian; Miot, Françoise; Illek, Beate; Ballard, Philip L

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the expression and cellular functions of the epithelial NADPH oxidase DUOX1 during alveolar type II cell development. When human fetal lung cells (gestational age 11-22 wk) were cultured to confluency on permeable filters, exposure of cells to a hormone mixture (dexamethasone, 8-Br-cAMP, and IBMX, together referred to as DCI) resulted in differentiation of cells into a mature type II phenotype as assessed by expression of lamellar bodies, surfactant proteins, and transepithelial electrical parameters. After 6 days in culture in presence of DCI, transepithelial resistance (2,616 +/- 529 Omega.cm(2)) and potential (-8.5 +/- 0.6 mV) indicated epithelial polarization. At the same time, treatment with DCI significantly increased the mRNA expression of DUOX1 ( approximately 21-fold), its maturation factor DUOXA1 ( approximately 12-fold), as well as DUOX protein ( approximately 12-fold), which was localized near the apical cell pole in confluent cultures. For comparison, in fetal lung specimens, DUOX protein was not detectable at up to 27 wk of gestational age but was strongly upregulated after 32 wk. Function of DUOX1 was assessed by measuring H(2)O(2) and acid production. Rates of H(2)O(2) production were increased by DCI treatment and blocked by small interfering RNA directed against DUOX1 or by diphenylene iodonium. DCI-treated cultures also showed increased intracellular acid production and acid release into the mucosal medium, and acid production was largely blocked by knockdown of DUOX1 mRNA. These data establish the regulated expression of DUOX1 during alveolar maturation, and indicate DUOX1 in alveolar H(2)O(2) and acid secretion by differentiated type II cells.

  16. Fetal cardiac interventions: an update of therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article aims to present updated therapeutic options for fetal congenital heart diseases. Methods Data source for the present study was based on comprehensive literature retrieval on fetal cardiac interventions in terms of indications, technical approaches and clinical outcomes. Results About 5% of fetal congenital heart diseases are critical and timely intrauterine intervention may alleviate heart function. Candidates for fetal cardiac interventions are limited. These candidates may include critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The advocated option are prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of atrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Conclusion Fetal cardiac interventions are feasible at midgestation with gradually improved technical success and fetal/postnatal survival due mainly to a well-trained multidisciplinary team, sophisticated equipment and better postnatal care. PMID:25372914

  17. Arrhythmogenic remodelling of activation and repolarization in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Holzem, Katherine M; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-11-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of disability and death worldwide, and approximately half of heart failure-related deaths are sudden and presumably due to ventricular arrhythmias. Patients with heart failure have been shown to be at 6- to 9-fold increased risk of sudden cardiac death compared to the general population. (AHA. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2003 Update. Heart and Stroke Facts. Dallas, TX: American Heart Association; 2002) Thus, electrophysiological remodelling associated with heart failure is a leading cause of disease mortality and has been a major investigational focus examined using many animal models of heart failure. While these studies have provided an important foundation for understanding the arrhythmogenic pathophysiology of heart failure, the need for corroborating studies conducted on human heart tissue has been increasingly recognized. Many human heart studies of conduction and repolarization remodelling have now been published and shed some light on important, potentially arrhythmogenic, changes in human heart failure. These studies are being conducted at multiple experimental scales from isolated cells to whole-tissue preparations and have provided insight into regulatory mechanisms such as decreased protein expression, alternative mRNA splicing of ion channel genes, and defective cellular trafficking. Further investigations of heart failure in the human myocardium will be essential for determining possible therapeutic targets to prevent arrhythmia in heart failure and for facilitating the translation of basic research findings to the clinical realm.

  18. Arrhythmogenic remodelling of activation and repolarization in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Holzem, Katherine M; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-11-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of disability and death worldwide, and approximately half of heart failure-related deaths are sudden and presumably due to ventricular arrhythmias. Patients with heart failure have been shown to be at 6- to 9-fold increased risk of sudden cardiac death compared to the general population. (AHA. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2003 Update. Heart and Stroke Facts. Dallas, TX: American Heart Association; 2002) Thus, electrophysiological remodelling associated with heart failure is a leading cause of disease mortality and has been a major investigational focus examined using many animal models of heart failure. While these studies have provided an important foundation for understanding the arrhythmogenic pathophysiology of heart failure, the need for corroborating studies conducted on human heart tissue has been increasingly recognized. Many human heart studies of conduction and repolarization remodelling have now been published and shed some light on important, potentially arrhythmogenic, changes in human heart failure. These studies are being conducted at multiple experimental scales from isolated cells to whole-tissue preparations and have provided insight into regulatory mechanisms such as decreased protein expression, alternative mRNA splicing of ion channel genes, and defective cellular trafficking. Further investigations of heart failure in the human myocardium will be essential for determining possible therapeutic targets to prevent arrhythmia in heart failure and for facilitating the translation of basic research findings to the clinical realm. PMID:23104915

  19. A connection between extracellular matrix and hormonal signals during the development of the human fetal adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Chamoux, E; Otis, M; Gallo-Payet, N

    2005-10-01

    The human adrenal cortex, involved in adaptive responses to stress, body homeostasis and secondary sexual characters, emerges from a tightly regulated development of a zone-specific secretion pattern during fetal life. Its development during fetal life is critical for the well being of pregnancy, the initiation of delivery, and even for an adequate adaptation to extra-uterine life. As early as from the sixth week of pregnancy, the fetal adrenal gland is characterized by a highly proliferative zone at the periphery, a concentric migration accompanied by cell differentiation (cortisol secretion) and apoptosis in the central androgen-secreting fetal zone. After birth, a strong reorganization occurs in the adrenal gland so that it better fulfills the newborn's needs, with aldosterone production in the external zona glomerulosa, cortisol secretion in the zona fasciculata and androgens in the central zona reticularis. In addition to the major hormonal stimuli provided by angiotensin II and adrenocorticotropin, we have tested for some years the hypotheses that such plasticity may be under the control of the extracellular matrix. A growing number of data have been harvested during the last years, in particular about extracellular matrix expression and its putative role in the development of the human adrenal cortex. Laminin, collagen and fibronectin have been shown to play important roles not only in the plasticity of the adrenal cortex, but also in cell responsiveness to hormones, thus clarifying some of the unexplained observations that used to feed controversies. PMID:16172742

  20. Characterization and pharmacologic targeting of EZH2, a fetal retinal protein and epigenetic regulator, in human retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mehnaz; Walters, Laura L; Li, Qiang; Thomas, Dafydd G; Miller, Jason M L; Zhang, Qitao; Sciallis, Andrew P; Liu, Yu; Dlouhy, Brian J; Fort, Patrice E; Archer, Steven M; Demirci, Hakan; Dou, Yali; Rao, Rajesh C

    2015-11-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary intraocular cancer in children, and the third most common cancer overall in infants. No molecular-targeted therapy for this lethal tumor exists. Since the tumor suppressor RB1, whose genetic inactivation underlies RB, is upstream of the epigenetic regulator EZH2, a pharmacologic target for many solid tumors, we reasoned that EZH2 might regulate human RB tumorigenesis. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses were performed using an EZH2 antibody in sections from 43 samples of primary, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human RB tissue, cryopreserved mouse retina, and in whole cell lysates from human RB cell lines (Y79 and WERI-Rb1), primary human fetal retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and fetal and adult retina, mouse retina and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Although enriched during fetal human retinal development, EZH2 protein was not present in the normal postnatal retina. However, EZH2 was detected in all 43 analyzed human RB specimens, indicating that EZH2 is a fetal protein expressed in postnatal human RB. EZH2 expression marked single RB cell invasion into the optic nerve, a site of invasion whose involvement may influence the decision for systemic chemotherapy. To assess the role of EZH2 in RB cell survival, human RB and primary RPE cells were treated with two EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), GSK126 and SAH-EZH2 (SAH). EZH2i impaired intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, an indicator of cell viability, in a time and dose-dependent manner, but did not affect primary human fetal RPE. Thus, aberrant expression of a histone methyltransferase protein is a feature of human RB. This is the first time this mechanism has been implicated for an eye, adnexal, or orbital tumor. The specificity of EZH2i toward human RB cells, but not RPE, warrants further in vivo testing in animal models of RB, especially those EZH2i currently in clinical trials for solid tumors and lymphoma. PMID:26280220

  1. Development of the human fetal hippocampal formation during early second trimester

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xinting; Shi, Yonggang; Li, Junning; Zhang, Zhonghe; Lin, Xiangtao; Zhan, Jinfeng; Ge, Haitao; Xu, Junhai; Yu, Qiaowen; Leng, Yuan; Teng, Gaojun; Feng, Lei; Meng, Haiwei; Tang, Yuchun; Zang, Fengchao; Toga, Arthur W.; Liu, Shuwei

    2015-01-01

    Development of the fetal hippocampal formation has been difficult to fully describe because of rapid changes in its shape during the fetal period. The aims of this study were to: (1) segment the fetal hippocampal formation using 7.0 T MR images from 41 specimens with gestational ages ranging from 14 to 22 weeks and (2) reveal the developmental course of the fetal hippocampal formation using volume and shape analyses. Differences in hemispheric volume were observed, with the right hippocampi being larger than the left. Absolute volume changes showed a linear increase, while relative volume changes demonstrated an inverted-U shape trend during this period. Together these exhibited a variable developmental rate among different regions of the fetal brain. Different sub-regional growth of the fetal hippocampal formation was specifically observed using shape analysis. The fetal hippocampal formation possessed a prominent medial–lateral bidirectional shape growth pattern during its rotation process. Our results provide additional insight into 3D hippocampal morphology in the assessment of fetal brain development and can be used as a reference for future hippocampal studies. PMID:26123377

  2. Temporal and spatial distribution of mast cells and steroidogenic enzymes in the human fetal adrenal.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Alexandre; Louiset, Estelle; Duparc, Céline; Laquerrière, Annie; Patrier, Sophie; Renouf, Sylvie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Mukai, Kuniaki; Lefebvre, Hervé; Castanet, Mireille

    2016-10-15

    Mast cells are present in the human adult adrenal with a potential role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion in both normal cortex and adrenocortical adenomas. We have investigated the human developing adrenal gland for the presence of mast cells in parallel with steroidogenic enzymes profile and serotonin signaling pathway. RT-QPCR and immunohistochemical studies were performed on adrenals at 16-41 weeks of gestation (WG). Tryptase-immunopositive mast cells were found from 18 WG in the adrenal subcapsular layer, close to 3βHSD- and CYP11B2-immunoreactive cells, firstly detected at 18 and 24 WG, respectively. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor type 4 expression increased at 30 WG before the CYP11B2 expression surge. In addition, HDL and LDL cholesterol receptors were expressed in the subcapsular zone from 24 WG. Altogether, our findings suggest the implication of mast cells and serotonin in the establishment of the mineralocorticoid synthesizing pathway during fetal adrenal development. PMID:27302892

  3. Fate and Development of Human Vomeronasal Organ – A Microscopic Fetal Study

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, T.K. Aleyemma; Devi, M. Nirmala; Hebzibah, T. Deborah Joy; Jamuna, M.; Sundaram, K. Kalyana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The existence of Vomeronasal organ in human is a controversial subject. Presence of Vomeronasal organ and its structure was not reported in standard text books. The presence of Vomeronasal organ in fetal life is doubtful. Hence identification of the organ by histological examination was planned. Materials and Methods A study was conducted on resected specimens of nasal septum obtained from 45 spontaneously aborted fetuses from Obstetrics and Gynaecology department, PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, after ethical clearance. Results The histological structure of Vomeronasal organ was observed from 11 weeks old fetus. The epithelial lining of the organ, presence of cilia, presence of lamina propria, acini and the blood vessel and the types of cells were observed. The organ was lined by pseudostratified columnar epithelium. The organ showed Lamina propria with serous acini from 18 weeks fetus. Vomeronasal duct opening into the nasal cavity and three types of cells were observed in 28 weeks fetus. Conclusion Knowledge about the persistence of Vomeronasal organ in fetuses and its structure need to be known. The organ may be found as a putative pit posterior to anterior nasal spine. The organ may be damaged in nasal septal surgeries and nasal endoscopic procedures. The organ may not be seen on gross examination in all human fetuses and cadavers. PMID:27134849

  4. Derivation and characterization of goat fetal fibroblast cells induced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying; Zhao, Xiaoe; Jia, Hongxiang; Ma, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Fetal fibroblast cells (FFCs) are often used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) because they are easy to culture and suitable for genetic manipulation. However, through genetic modification process, which required FFCs to be cultured in vitro for several passages, cells tended to age very rapidly and became inappropriate for SCNT. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) possessed the activity of human telomerase and maintains telomere in dividing cells; therefore, hTERT can be transfected into somatic cells to extend their lifespan. In this study, we transfected a Xinong Saanen Dairy Goat FFC line with hTERT. Then, we tested several characteristics of transfected cells, including growth curve, expression and activity of hTERT, tumorigenicity, and expression of oct4 and nanog. The result showed that hTERT could significantly extend the lifespan of transfected cells in vitro. hTERT mRNA was expressed in hTERT-transfected cells. Moreover, hTERT-transfected cells presented enhanced telomerase activity and longer telomere than untransfected cells at the same passage. On the other hand, hTERT-transfected cells can maintain normal karyotype even after several times of subculture in vitro. After inoculation of hTERT-transfected cells in nude mouse, none of them developed tumors on the vaccination site. Interestingly, transfection of hTERT can improve expression of nanog and oct4 in Xinong Saanen Dairy Goat FFCs, especially in low generation after transfection, but with increasing subculture, this effect gradually weakened.

  5. THERP and HEART integrated methodology for human error assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglia, Francesco; Giardina, Mariarosa; Tomarchio, Elio

    2015-11-01

    THERP and HEART integrated methodology is proposed to investigate accident scenarios that involve operator errors during high-dose-rate (HDR) treatments. The new approach has been modified on the basis of fuzzy set concept with the aim of prioritizing an exhaustive list of erroneous tasks that can lead to patient radiological overexposures. The results allow for the identification of human errors that are necessary to achieve a better understanding of health hazards in the radiotherapy treatment process, so that it can be properly monitored and appropriately managed.

  6. Snake heart: a case of atavism in a human being.

    PubMed

    Walia, Ishmeet; Arora, Harvinder S; Barker, Esmond A; Delgado, Reynolds M; Frazier, O H

    2010-01-01

    Atavism is the rare reappearance, in a modern organism, of a trait from a distant evolutionary ancestor. We describe an apparent case of atavism involving a 59-year-old man with chest pain whose coronary circulation and myocardial architecture resembled those of the reptilian heart. The chest pain was attributed to a coronary steal phenomenon. The patient was discharged from the hospital on a heightened regimen of β-blockers, and his symptoms improved significantly. To our knowledge, this is only the 2nd reported clinical case of a human coronary circulation similar to that of reptiles.

  7. Dynamic holographic imaging of the beating human heart

    PubMed

    Hunziker; Smith; Scherrer-Crosbie; Liel-Cohen; Levine; Nesbitt; Benton; Picard

    1999-02-01

    Background--Currently, the reporting and archiving of echocardiographic data suffer from the difficulty of representing heart motion on printable 2-dimensional (2D) media. Methods and Results--We studied the capability of holography to integrate motion into 2D echocardiographic prints. Images of normal human hearts and of a variety of mitral valve function abnormalities (mitral valve prolapse, systolic anterior motion of the mitral leaflets, and obstruction of the mitral valve by a myxoma) were acquired digitally on standard echocardiographic machines. Images were processed into a data format suitable for holographic printing. Angularly multiplexed holograms were then printed on a prototype holographic "laser" printer, with integration of time in vertical parallax, so that heart motion became visible when the hologram was tilted up and down. The resulting holograms displayed the anatomy with the same resolution as the original acquisition and allowed detailed study of valve motion with side-by-side comparison of normal and abnormal findings. Comparison of standard echocardiographic measurements in original echo frames and corresponding hologram views showed an excellent correlation of both methods (P<0.0001, r2=0.979, mean bias=2.76 mm). In this feasibility study, both 2D and 3D holographic images were produced. The equipment needed to view these holograms consists of only a simple point-light source. Conclusions--Holographic representation of myocardial and valve motion from echocardiographic data is feasible and allows the printing on a 2D medium of the complete heart cycle. Combined with the recent development of online holographic printing, this novel technique has the potential to improve reporting, visualization, and archiving of echocardiographic imaging.

  8. Extracellular vesicle–depleted fetal bovine and human sera have reduced capacity to support cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Zhang, Shi; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is the most widely used serum supplement for mammalian cell culture. It supports cell growth by providing nutrients, growth signals, and protection from stress. Attempts to develop serum-free media that support cell expansion to the same extent as serum-supplemented media have not yet succeeded, suggesting that FBS contains one or more as-yet-undefined growth factors. One potential vehicle for the delivery of growth factors from serum to cultured cells is extracellular vesicles (EVs). Methods EV-depleted FBS and human serum were generated by 120,000g centrifugation, and its cell growth–supporting activity was measured. Isolated EVs from FBS were quantified and characterized by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and protein assay. EV internalization into cells was quantified using fluorescent plate reader analysis and microscopy. Results Most cell types cultured with EV-depleted FBS showed a reduced growth rate but not an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent etoposide and the endoplasmic reticulum stress–inducing chemical tunicamycin. Supplying cells with isolated FBS-derived EVs enhanced their growth. FBS-derived EVs were internalized by mouse and human cells wherein 65±26% of them interacted with the lysosomes. EV-depleted human serum also exhibited reduced cell growth–promoting activity. Conclusions EVs play a role in the cell growth and survival-promoting effects of FBS and human serum. Thus, it is important to take the effect of EV depletion under consideration when planning EV extraction experiments and while attempting to develop serum-free media that support rapid cell expansion. In addition, these findings suggest roles for circulating EVs in supporting cell growth and survival in vivo. PMID:25819213

  9. Generation of human cortical neurons from a new immortal fetal neural stem cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Cacci, E.; Villa, A.; Parmar, M.; Cavallaro, M.; Mandahl, N.; Lindvall, O.; Martinez-Serrano, A.; Kokaia, Z. . E-mail: Zaal.Kokaia@med.lu.se

    2007-02-01

    Isolation and expansion of neural stem cells (NSCs) of human origin are crucial for successful development of cell therapy approaches in neurodegenerative diseases. Different epigenetic and genetic immortalization strategies have been established for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new, clonal NSC (hc-NSC) line, derived from human fetal cortical tissue, based on v-myc immortalization. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that these cells retain the characteristics of NSCs after more than 50 passages. Under proliferation conditions, when supplemented with epidermal and basic fibroblast growth factors, the hc-NSCs expressed neural stem/progenitor cell markers like nestin, vimentin and Sox2. When growth factors were withdrawn, proliferation and expression of v-myc and telomerase were dramatically reduced, and the hc-NSCs differentiated into glia and neurons (mostly glutamatergic and GABAergic, as well as tyrosine hydroxylase-positive, presumably dopaminergic neurons). RT-PCR analysis showed that the hc-NSCs retained expression of Pax6, Emx2 and Neurogenin2, which are genes associated with regionalization and cell commitment in cortical precursors during brain development. Our data indicate that this hc-NSC line could be useful for exploring the potential of human NSCs to replace dead or damaged cortical cells in animal models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Taking advantage of its clonality and homogeneity, this cell line will also be a valuable experimental tool to study the regulatory role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in human NSC biology.

  10. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Regenerate Non-Human Primate Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Chong, James J.H.; Yang, Xiulan; Don, Creighton W.; Minami, Elina; Liu, Yen-Wen; Weyers, Jill J; Mahoney, William M.; Van Biber, Benjamin; Cook, Savannah M.; Palpant, Nathan J; Gantz, Jay; Fugate, James A.; Muskheli, Veronica; Gough, G. Michael; Vogel, Keith W.; Astley, Cliff A.; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E.; Baldessari, Audrey; Pabon, Lil; Reinecke, Hans; Gill, Edward A.; Nelson, Veronica; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Laflamme, Michael A.; Murry, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells provide a potential solution to current epidemic rates of heart failure 1 by providing human cardiomyocytes to support heart regeneration 2. Studies of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in small animal models have shown favorable effects of this treatment 3–7. It remains unknown, however, whether clinical scale hESC-CMs transplantation is feasible, safe or can provide large-scale myocardial regeneration. Here we show that hESC-CMs can be produced at a clinical scale (>1 billion cells/batch) and cryopreserved with good viability. Using a non-human primate (NHP) model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, we show that that cryopreservation and intra-myocardial delivery of 1 billion hESC-CMs generates significant remuscularization of the infarcted heart. The hESC-CMs showed progressive but incomplete maturation over a three-month period. Grafts were perfused by host vasculature, and electromechanical junctions between graft and host myocytes were present within 2 weeks of engraftment. Importantly, grafts showed regular calcium transients that were synchronized to the host electrocardiogram, indicating electromechanical coupling. In contrast to small animal models 7, non-fatal ventricular arrhythmias were observed in hESC-CM engrafted primates. Thus, hESC-CMs can remuscularize substantial amounts of the infarcted monkey heart. Comparable remuscularization of a human heart should be possible, but potential arrhythmic complications need to be overcome. PMID:24776797

  11. Survival and functional restoration of human fetal ventral mesencephalon following transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rath, Anika; Klein, Alexander; Papazoglou, Anna; Pruszak, Jan; Garcia, Joanna; Krause, Martin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Dunnett, Stephen B; Nikkhah, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy by intracerebral transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons has become a promising therapeutic option for patients suffering from Parkinson's disease during the last decades. However, limited availability of human fetal tissue as well as ethical issues, lack of alternative nonfetal donor cells, and the absence of standardized transplantation protocols have prevented neurorestorative therapies from becoming a routine procedure in patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Improvement of graft survival, surgery techniques, and identification of the optimal target area are imperative for further optimization of this novel treatment. In the present study, human primary fetal ventral mesencephalon-derived tissue from 7- to 9-week-old human fetuses was transplanted into 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Graft survival, fiber outgrowth, and drug-induced rotational behavior up to 14 weeks posttransplantation were compared between different intrastriatal transplantation techniques (full single cell suspension vs. partial tissue pieces suspension injected by glass capillary or metal cannula) and the intranigral glass capillary injection of a full (single cell) suspension. The results demonstrate a higher survival rate of dopamine neurons, a greater reduction in amphetamine-induced rotations (overcompensation), and more extensive fiber outgrowth for the intrastriatally transplanted partial (tissue pieces) suspension compared to all other groups. Apomorphine-induced rotational bias was significantly reduced in all groups including the intranigral group. The data confirm that human ventral mesencephalon-derived cells serve as a viable cell source, survive in a xenografting paradigm, and functionally integrate into the host tissue. In contrast to rat donor cells, keeping the original (fetal) neuronal network by preparing only a partial suspension containing tissue pieces seems to be beneficial for human cells, although a

  12. Antenatal architecture and activity of the human heart

    PubMed Central

    Pervolaraki, Eleftheria; Anderson, Richard A.; Benson, Alan P.; Hayes-Gill, Barrie; Holden, Arun V.; Moore, Benjamin J. R.; Paley, Martyn N.; Zhang, Henggui

    2013-01-01

    We construct the components for a family of computational models of the electrophysiology of the human foetal heart from 60 days gestational age (DGA) to full term. This requires both cell excitation models that reconstruct the myocyte action potentials, and datasets of cardiac geometry and architecture. Fast low-angle shot and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) of foetal hearts provides cardiac geometry with voxel resolution of approximately 100 µm. DT-MRI measures the relative diffusion of protons and provides a measure of the average intravoxel myocyte orientation, and the orientation of any higher order orthotropic organization of the tissue. Such orthotropic organization in the adult mammalian heart has been identified with myocardial sheets and cleavage planes between them. During gestation, the architecture of the human ventricular wall changes from being irregular and isotropic at 100 DGA to an anisotropic and orthotropic architecture by 140 DGA, when it has the smooth, approximately 120° transmural change in myocyte orientation that is characteristic of the adult mammalian ventricle. The DT obtained from DT-MRI provides the conductivity tensor that determines the spread of potential within computational models of cardiac tissue electrophysiology. The foetal electrocardiogram (fECG) can be recorded from approximately 60 DGA, and RR, PR and QT intervals between the P, R, Q and T waves of the fECG can be extracted by averaging from approximately 90 DGA. The RR intervals provide a measure of the pacemaker rate, the QT intervals an index of ventricular action potential duration, and its rate-dependence, and so these intervals constrain and inform models of cell electrophysiology. The parameters of models of adult human sinostrial node and ventricular cells that are based on adult cell electrophysiology and tissue molecular mapping have been modified to construct preliminary models of foetal cell electrophysiology, which reproduce these

  13. Myocardial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells: Rapid production of human heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Garreta, Elena; de Oñate, Lorena; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Oria, Roger; Tarantino, Carolina; Climent, Andreu M; Marco, Andrés; Samitier, Mireia; Martínez, Elena; Valls-Margarit, Maria; Matesanz, Rafael; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Montserrat, Nuria

    2016-08-01

    Genome editing on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) together with the development of protocols for organ decellularization opens the door to the generation of autologous bioartificial hearts. Here we sought to generate for the first time a fluorescent reporter human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line by means of Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to efficiently produce cardiomyocyte-like cells (CLCs) from hPSCs and repopulate decellularized human heart ventricles for heart engineering. In our hands, targeting myosin heavy chain locus (MYH6) with mCherry fluorescent reporter by TALEN technology in hESCs did not alter major pluripotent-related features, and allowed for the definition of a robust protocol for CLCs production also from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in 14 days. hPSCs-derived CLCs (hPSCs-CLCs) were next used to recellularize acellular cardiac scaffolds. Electrophysiological responses encountered when hPSCs-CLCs were cultured on ventricular decellularized extracellular matrix (vdECM) correlated with significant increases in the levels of expression of different ion channels determinant for calcium homeostasis and heart contractile function. Overall, the approach described here allows for the rapid generation of human cardiac grafts from hPSCs, in a total of 24 days, providing a suitable platform for cardiac engineering and disease modeling in the human setting.

  14. Intramyocardial transplantation and tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in a novel intra-uterine pre-immune fetal sheep myocardial infarction model: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Maximilian Y; Weber, Benedikt; Wolint, Petra; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Zeisberger, Steffen M; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sebastien; Scherman, Jacques; Brokopp, Chad E; Schwartländer, Ruth; Vogel, Viola; Vogt, Peter; Grünenfelder, Jürg; Alkadhi, Hatem; Falk, Volkmar; Boss, Andreas; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2013-01-01

    -Cytometry detected the cells within spleen, lungs, kidneys, thymus, bone-marrow and intra-peritoneal lavage, but not within the heart. For the first time we demonstrate the feasibility of intra-uterine, intra-myocardial stem-cell transplantation into the pre-immune fetal-sheep after MI. Utilizing cell-tracking strategies comprising advanced imaging-technologies and in-vitro tracking-tools, this novel model may serve as a unique platform to assess human cell-fate after intra-myocardial transplantation without the necessity of immunosuppressive-therapy.

  15. Fetal calf serum heat inactivation and lipopolysaccharide contamination influence the human T lymphoblast proteome and phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effects of fetal calf serum (FCS) heat inactivation and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination on cell physiology have been studied, but their effect on the proteome of cultured cells has yet to be described. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of heat inactivation of FCS and LPS contamination on the human T lymphoblast proteome. Human T lymphoblastic leukaemia (CCRF-CEM) cells were grown in FCS, either non-heated, or heat inactivated, having low (< 1 EU/mL) or regular (< 30 EU/mL) LPS concentrations. Protein lysates were resolved by 2-DE followed by phospho-specific and silver nitrate staining. Differentially regulated spots were identified by nano LC ESI Q-TOF MS/MS analysis. Results A total of four proteins (EIF3M, PRS7, PSB4, and SNAPA) were up-regulated when CCRF-CEM cells were grown in media supplemented with heat inactivated FCS (HE) as compared to cells grown in media with non-heated FCS (NHE). Six proteins (TCPD, ACTA, NACA, TCTP, ACTB, and ICLN) displayed a differential phosphorylation pattern between the NHE and HE groups. Compared to the low concentration LPS group, regular levels of LPS resulted in the up-regulation of three proteins (SYBF, QCR1, and SUCB1). Conclusion The present study provides new information regarding the effect of FCS heat inactivation and change in FCS-LPS concentration on cellular protein expression, and post-translational modification in human T lymphoblasts. Both heat inactivation and LPS contamination of FCS were shown to modulate the expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in basic cellular functions, such as protein synthesis, cytoskeleton stability, oxidative stress regulation and apoptosis. Hence, the study emphasizes the need to consider both heat inactivation and LPS contamination of FCS as factors that can influence the T lymphoblast proteome. PMID:22085958

  16. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  17. Development and morphogenesis of human wrist joint during embryonic and early fetal period.

    PubMed

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Ortiz, Raúl; Caba, Octavio; Alvarez, Pablo; Prados, José C; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Aránega, Antonia; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio; Mérida-Velasco, Juan A

    2012-06-01

    The development of the human wrist joint has been studied widely, with the main focus on carpal chondrogenesis, ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage. However, there are some discrepancies concerning the origin and morphogenetic time-table of these structures, including nerves, muscles and vascular elements. For this study we used serial sections of 57 human embryonic (n = 30) and fetal (n = 27) specimens from O'Rahilly stages 17-23 and 9-14 weeks, respectively. The following phases in carpal morphogenesis have been established: undifferentiated mesenchyme (stage 17), condensated mesenchyme (stages 18 and 19), pre-chondrogenic (stages 19 and 20) and chondrogenic (stages 21 and over). Carpal chondrification and osteogenic processes are similar, starting with capitate and hamate (stage 19) and ending with pisiform (stage 22). In week 14, a vascular bud penetrates into the lunate cartilaginous mold, early sign of the osteogenic process that will be completed after birth. In stage 18, median, ulnar and radial nerves and thenar eminence appear in the hand plate. In stage 21, there are indications of the interosseous muscles, and in stage 22 flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus and lumbrical muscles, transverse carpal ligament and collateral ligaments emerge. In stage 23, the articular disc, radiocarpal and ulnocarpal ligaments and deep palmar arterial arch become visible. Radiate carpal and interosseous ligaments appear in week 9, and in week 10, dorsal radiocarpal ligament and articular capsule are evident. Finally, synovial membrane is observed in week 13. We have performed a complete analysis of the morphogenesis of the structures of the human wrist joint. Our results present new data on nervous and arterial elements and provide the basis for further investigations on anatomical pathology, comparative morphology and evolutionary anthropology.

  18. Reactivating Fetal Hemoglobin Expression in Human Adult Erythroblasts Through BCL11A Knockdown Using Targeted Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Bjurström, Carmen F; Mojadidi, Michelle; Phillips, John; Kuo, Caroline; Lai, Stephen; Lill, Georgia R; Cooper, Aaron; Kaufman, Michael; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    We examined the efficiency, specificity, and mutational signatures of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems designed to target the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor BCL11A, in human K562 cells and human CD34+ progenitor cells. ZFNs and TALENs were delivered as in vitro transcribed mRNA through electroporation; CRISPR/Cas9 was codelivered by Cas9 mRNA with plasmid-encoded guideRNA (gRNA) (pU6.g1) or in vitro transcribed gRNA (gR.1). Analyses of efficacy revealed that for these specific reagents and the delivery methods used, the ZFNs gave rise to more allelic disruption in the targeted locus compared to the TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9, which was associated with increased levels of fetal hemoglobin in erythroid cells produced in vitro from nuclease-treated CD34+ cells. Genome-wide analysis to evaluate the specificity of the nucleases revealed high specificity of this specific ZFN to the target site, while specific TALENs and CRISPRs evaluated showed off-target cleavage activity. ZFN gene-edited CD34+ cells had the capacity to engraft in NOD-PrkdcSCID-IL2Rγnull mice, while retaining multi-lineage potential, in contrast to TALEN gene-edited CD34+ cells. CRISPR engraftment levels mirrored the increased relative plasmid-mediated toxicity of pU6.g1/Cas9 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), highlighting the value for the further improvements of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery in primary human HSPCs.

  19. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days-1 year), children (6-17 years) and adults (34-60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm(2) ) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52-62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22-28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6-7%, fibroblasts 3-10%, macrophages 1-8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults).

  20. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on human fetal scleral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huang; Wang, Jie; Cui, Jiefeng; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on human fetal scleral fibroblasts (HFSFs). HFSFs were subjected to 50 Hz artificial ELF-EMFs generated by Helmholtz coils with 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mT field intensities for 6 to 48 h. The viability and factors involved in scleral structuring of HFSFs were determined. The growth rate of HFSFs significantly decreased after only 24 h of exposure to ELF-EMFs (0.2 mT). The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of collagen type I (COL1A1) decreased and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) increased significantly. There was a decrease in tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 mRNA levels between treated and control cells only at the 1.0 mT intensity level. Transforming growth factor beta-2 mRNA increased in exposed cells, and, simultaneously, fibroblast growth factor-2 mRNA levels decreased. The protein expressions of COL1A1 and MMP-2 were also significantly altered subsequent to exposure (p < 0.05). This study shows that ELF-EMFs had biological effects on HFSFs and could cause abnormality in scleral collagen.

  1. Human fetal colon cells and colon cancer cells respond differently to butyrate and PUFAs.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jirina; Vaculová, Alena; Koubková, Zuzana; Hýzd'alová, Martina; Kozubík, Alois

    2009-05-01

    We verified the hypothesis suggesting modulation of the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBt) by omega-3 or omega-6 PUFAs. Comparing the response of human colon epithelial cell lines of fetal (FHC) and adenocarcinoma (HT-29, HCT-116) origin, we detected significant differences in proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic response to the treatment of NaBt, arachidonic or docosahexaenoic acids and their combination. While in FHC and HT-29 cells NaBt induced G0/G1 arrest, differentiation and low level of apoptosis, in HCT-116 cells G2/M arrest, no differentiation and high degree of apoptosis were detected. Moreover, in FHC cells significant potentiation of apoptosis accompanied by increased arrest in the cell cycle, cell detachment and decrease in differentiation were detected after combined treatment with NaBt and both PUFAs. Changes in cytokinetics induced by fatty acids were accompanied by membrane lipid unpacking, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Detection of caspase-3 activation and dynamic modulation of Mcl-1 protein expression imply their possible role in both cell differentiation and apoptotic response. Our results support the concept of modulation of NaBt effects by PUFAs, especially of omega-3 type, in colonic cells in vitro with diverse impact in cell lines derived from normal or neoplastic epithelium.

  2. Induction of human fetal hemoglobin via the NRF2 antioxidant response signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macari, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy have the potential to cure β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease, they are not currently available to most people with these diseases. In the near term, pharmacologic induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) may offer the best possibility for safe, effective, and widely available therapy. In an effort to define new pathways for targeted drug development for HbF induction, we evaluated the nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (NRF2) antioxidant response element signaling pathway. We found that 3 well-known activators of this pathway increased γ-globin mRNA at nontoxic doses in K562 cells. Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), the most active of these compounds, increased cellular levels and nuclear translocation of NRF2 and binding of NRF2 to the γ-globin promoter. siRNA knockdown of NRF2 inhibited γ-globin induction by tBHQ. When tested in human primary erythroid cells, tBHQ induced NRF2 binding to the γ-globin promoter, increased γ-globin mRNA and HbF, and suppressed β-globin mRNA and HbA, resulting in a > 3-fold increase in the percentage of HbF. These results suggest that drugs that activate the NRF2/antioxidant response element signaling pathway have the potential to induce therapeutic levels of HbF in people with β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:21464371

  3. Induction of human fetal hemoglobin via the NRF2 antioxidant response signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Macari, Elizabeth R; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2011-06-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy have the potential to cure β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease, they are not currently available to most people with these diseases. In the near term, pharmacologic induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) may offer the best possibility for safe, effective, and widely available therapy. In an effort to define new pathways for targeted drug development for HbF induction, we evaluated the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) antioxidant response element signaling pathway. We found that 3 well-known activators of this pathway increased γ-globin mRNA at nontoxic doses in K562 cells. Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), the most active of these compounds, increased cellular levels and nuclear translocation of NRF2 and binding of NRF2 to the γ-globin promoter. siRNA knockdown of NRF2 inhibited γ-globin induction by tBHQ. When tested in human primary erythroid cells, tBHQ induced NRF2 binding to the γ-globin promoter, increased γ-globin mRNA and HbF, and suppressed β-globin mRNA and HbA, resulting in a > 3-fold increase in the percentage of HbF. These results suggest that drugs that activate the NRF2/antioxidant response element signaling pathway have the potential to induce therapeutic levels of HbF in people with β-hemoglobinopathies.

  4. BD PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel as a culture system for human fetal Schwann cells in spinal cord regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Fateme; Bahktiari, Mehrdad; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Nobakht, Maliheh; Soleimani, Masoud; Hasanzadeh, Gholamreza; Fallah, Ali; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Hejazian, Leila Beigom; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Maleki, Fatemeh

    2012-12-01

    BD PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel, a three-dimensional cell culture model of nanofiber scaffold derived from the self-assembling peptide RADA16, has been applied to regenerative tissue repair in order to develop novel nanomedicine systems. In this study with PuraMatrix, self-assembling nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) and Schwann cells (SCs) were isolated from human fetal sciatic nerves, cultured within SAPNS, and then transplanted into the spinal cord after injury (SCI) in rats. First, the peptide nanofiber scaffold was evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. With phase-contrast microscopy, the appearance of representative human fetal SCs encapsulated in PuraMatrix on days 3, 5, and 7 in 12-well plates was revealed. The Schwann cells in PuraMatrix were cultured for 2 days, and the SCs had active proliferative potential. Spinal cord injury was induced by placing a 35-g weight on the dura of T9-T10 segments for 15 min, followed by in vivo treatment with SAPNS and human fetal SCs (100,000 cells/10 μl/injection) grafted into spinal cord 7 days after SCI. After treatment, the recovery of motor function was assessed periodically using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scoring system. Eight weeks after grafting, animals were perfusion fixed, and the survival of implanted cells was analyzed with antibody recognizing SCs. Immunohistochemical analysis of grafted lumber segments at 8 weeks after grafting revealed reduced asterogliosis and considerably increased infiltration of endogenous S100(+) cells into the injury site, suggesting that PuraMatrix may play an important role in the repair observed after SAPNS and human fetal SC transplantation.

  5. FKLF, a Novel Krüppel-Like Factor That Activates Human Embryonic and Fetal β-Like Globin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Haruhiko; Li, Xi Susan; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a novel Krüppel-type zinc finger protein, FKLF, was cloned from fetal globin-expressing human fetal erythroid cells. The deduced polypeptide sequence composed of 512 amino acids revealed that, like Sp1 and EKLF, FKLF has three contiguous zinc fingers at the near carboxyl-terminal end. A long amino-terminal domain is characterized by the presence of two acidic and two proline-rich regions. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays using various cell lines demonstrated that the FKLF mRNA is expressed predominantly in erythroid cells. FKLF message is detectable by RT-PCR in fetal liver but not in adult bone marrow cells. As predicted from its structural features, FKLF is a transcriptional activator. In luciferase assays FKLF activated the γ- and ɛ-globin gene promoters, and, to a much lower degree, the β-globin promoter. Studies of HS2-γ gene reporter constructs carrying CACCC box deletions revealed that the CACCC box sequence of the γ gene promoter mediates the activation of the γ gene by FKLF. Other erythroid promoters (GATA-1, glycophorin B, ferrochelatase, porphobilinogen deaminase, and 5-aminolevulinate synthase) containing CACCC elements or GC-rich potential Sp1-binding sites were activated minimally, if at all, by FKLF, indicating that FKLF is not a general activator of genes carrying the CACCC motifs. Transfection of K562 cells with FKLF cDNA enhanced the expression of the endogenous ɛ- and γ-globin genes, suggesting an in vivo role of FKLF in fetal and embryonic globin gene expression. Our results indicate that the protein potentially encoded by the FKLF cDNA acts as a transcriptional activator of embryonic and fetal β-like globin genes. PMID:10207080

  6. Fetal Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  7. Hierarchical Structure of Heart Rate Variability in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Z.; Ching, E. S. C.; Lin, D. C.

    2004-03-01

    We show a hierarchical structure (HS) of the She-Leveque form in the beat-to-beat RR intervals of heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. This structure, first found as an empirical law in turbulent fluid flows, implies further details in the HRV multifractal scaling. We tested HS using daytime RRi data from healthy subjects and heart diseased patients with congestive heart failure and found a universal law C(b) where b characterizes the multifractality of HRV and C is related to a co-dimension parameter of the most violent events in the fluctuation. The potential of diagnosis is discussed based on the characteristics of this finding. To model the HRV phenomenology, we propose a local-feedback-global-cascade (LFGC) model based on the She-Waymire (SW) cascade solution to the HS in fluid turbulence. This model extends from the previous work in that it integrates additive law multiplicatively into the cascade structure. It is an attempt to relate to the cardiovascular physiology which consists of numerous feedback controls that function primarily on the principle of additive law. In particular, the model is based on the same philosophy as the SW cascade that its multifractal dynamics consists of a singular and a modulating component. In the LFGC model, we introduce local feedback to model the dynamics of the modulating effect. The novelty of our model is to incorporate the cascade structure in the scheduling for the feedback control. This model also represents an alternative solution to the HS. We will present the simulation results by the LFGC model and discuss its implication in physiology terms.

  8. Derivation and characterization of goat fetal fibroblast cells induced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying; Zhao, Xiaoe; Jia, Hongxiang; Ma, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Fetal fibroblast cells (FFCs) are often used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) because they are easy to culture and suitable for genetic manipulation. However, through genetic modification process, which required FFCs to be cultured in vitro for several passages, cells tended to age very rapidly and became inappropriate for SCNT. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) possessed the activity of human telomerase and maintains telomere in dividing cells; therefore, hTERT can be transfected into somatic cells to extend their lifespan. In this study, we transfected a Xinong Saanen Dairy Goat FFC line with hTERT. Then, we tested several characteristics of transfected cells, including growth curve, expression and activity of hTERT, tumorigenicity, and expression of oct4 and nanog. The result showed that hTERT could significantly extend the lifespan of transfected cells in vitro. hTERT mRNA was expressed in hTERT-transfected cells. Moreover, hTERT-transfected cells presented enhanced telomerase activity and longer telomere than untransfected cells at the same passage. On the other hand, hTERT-transfected cells can maintain normal karyotype even after several times of subculture in vitro. After inoculation of hTERT-transfected cells in nude mouse, none of them developed tumors on the vaccination site. Interestingly, transfection of hTERT can improve expression of nanog and oct4 in Xinong Saanen Dairy Goat FFCs, especially in low generation after transfection, but with increasing subculture, this effect gradually weakened. PMID:23271363

  9. Asymmetry of Radial and Symmetry of Tangential Neuronal Migration Pathways in Developing Human Fetal Brains

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yuta; Song, Jae W.; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    The radial and tangential neural migration pathways are two major neuronal migration streams in humans that are critical during corticogenesis. Corticogenesis is a complex process of neuronal proliferation that is followed by neuronal migration and the formation of axonal connections. Existing histological assessments of these two neuronal migration pathways have limitations inherent to microscopic studies and are confined to small anatomic regions of interest (ROIs). Thus, little evidence is available about their three-dimensional (3-D) fiber pathways and development throughout the entire brain. In this study, we imaged and analyzed radial and tangential migration pathways in the whole human brain using high-angular resolution diffusion MR imaging (HARDI) tractography. We imaged ten fixed, postmortem fetal (17 gestational weeks (GW), 18 GW, 19 GW, three 20 GW, three 21 GW and 22 GW) and eight in vivo newborn (two 30 GW, 34 GW, 35 GW and four 40 GW) brains with no neurological/pathological conditions. We statistically compared the volume of the left and right radial and tangential migration pathways, and the volume of the radial migration pathways of the anterior and posterior regions of the brain. In specimens 22 GW or younger, the volume of radial migration pathways of the left hemisphere was significantly larger than that of the right hemisphere. The volume of posterior radial migration pathways was also larger when compared to the anterior pathways in specimens 22 GW or younger. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the radial migration pathways of brains older than 22 GW. Moreover, our study did not identify any significant differences in volumetric laterality in the tangential migration pathways. These results suggest that these two neuronal migration pathways develop and regress differently, and radial neuronal migration varies regionally based on hemispheric and anterior-posterior laterality, potentially explaining regional differences in

  10. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  11. Statistical Properties of the Interbeat Interval Cascade in Human Hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Fatemeh; Peinke, J.; Reza Rahimi Tabar, M.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    Statistical properties of interbeat intervals cascade in human hearts are evaluated by considering the joint probability distribution P (Δx2, τ2 Δx1, τ1) for two interbeat increments Δx1 and Δx2 of different time scales τ1 and τ2. We present evidence that the conditional probability distribution P (Δx2, τ2 | Δx1, τ1) may be described by a Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. The corresponding Kramers-Moyal (KM) coefficients are evaluated. The analysis indicates that while the first and second KM coefficients take on well-defined and significant values, the higher-order coefficients in the KM expansion are small. As a result, the joint probability distributions of the increments in the interbeat intervals are described by a Fokker-Planck equation, with the first two KM coefficients acting as the drift and diffusion coefficients. The method provides a novel technique for distinguishing two classes of subjects, namely, healthy ones and those with congestive heart failure, in terms of the drift and diffusion coefficients which behave differently for two classes of the subjects.

  12. The use of small interfering RNAs to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mirmalek-Sani, S.-H.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Oreffo, R.O.C. . E-mail: roco@soton.ac.uk

    2006-06-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in functional genomics and offers innovative approaches in the development of novel therapeutics. Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a unique cell source for tissue engineering/regeneration strategies. The current study examined the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) to suppress adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells. Adipogenesis was investigated using cellular and biochemical analysis. Transient transfection with PPAR{gamma}-siRNA using a liposomal-based strategy resulted in a significant inhibition of adipogenesis in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells, compared to controls (cell, liposomal and negative siRNA). The inhibitory effect of PPAR{gamma}-siRNA was supported by testing human PPAR{gamma} mRNA and adipogenic associated genes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 as well as examination of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP{sub 3}) expression, an adipocyte-specific marker. The current studies indicate that PPAR{gamma}-siRNA is a useful tool to study adipogenesis in human cells, with potential applications both therapeutic and in the elucidation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in the modulation of cell differentiation in human mesenchymal cells.

  13. Altered gene expression in human adipose stem cells cultured with fetal bovine serum compared to human supplements.

    PubMed

    Bieback, Karen; Ha, Viet Anh-Thu; Hecker, Andrea; Grassl, Melanie; Kinzebach, Sven; Solz, Hermann; Sticht, Carsten; Klüter, Harald; Bugert, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for innovative cell therapeutic applications. For clinical scale manufacturing regulatory agencies recommend to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS) commonly used in MSC expansion media as soon as equivalent alternative supplements are available. We already demonstrated that pooled blood group AB human serum (HS) and thrombin-activated platelet releasate plasma (tPRP) support the expansion of multipotent adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs). Slight differences in size, growth pattern and adhesion prompted us to investigate the level of equivalence by compiling the transcriptional profiles of ASCs cultivated in these supplements. A whole genome gene expression analysis was performed and data verified by polymerase chain reaction and protein analyses. Microarray-based screening of 34,039 genes revealed 102 genes differentially expressed in ASCs cultured with FBS compared to HS or tPRP supplements. A significantly higher expression in FBS cultures was found for 90 genes (fold change ≥2). Only 12 of the 102 genes showed a lower expression in FBS compared to HS or tPRP cultures (fold change ≤0.5). Differences between cells cultivated in HS and tPRP were hardly evident. Supporting previous observations of reduced adhesion of cells cultivated in the human alternatives we detected a number of adhesion and extracellular matrix-associated molecules expressed at lower levels in ASCs cultivated with human supplements. Confirmative assays analyzing transcript or protein expression with selected genes supported these results. Likewise a number of mesodermal differentiation-associated genes were higher expressed in cells grown in FBS. Quantifying adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation lacked to demonstrate a clear correlation to the supplement due to donor-specific variances. Our results emphasize the necessity of comparability studies as they indicate that FBS induces a culture adaptation exceeding that of ex vivo

  14. Effects of gene regulatory reprogramming on gene expression in human and mouse developing hearts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Lineage-specific regulatory elements underlie adaptation of species and play a role in disease susceptibility. We compared functionally conserved and lineage-specific enhancers by cross-mapping 5042 human and 6564 mouse heart enhancers. Of these, 79 per cent are lineage-specific, lacking a functional orthologue. Heart enhancers tend to cluster and, commonly, there are multiple heart enhancers in a heart locus providing a regulatory stability to the locus. We observed little cross-clustering, however, between lineage-specific and functionally conserved heart enhancers suggesting regulatory function acquisition and development in loci previously lacking heart activity. We also identified 862 human-specific heart enhancers: 417 featuring sequence conservation with mouse (class II) and 445 with neither sequence nor function conservation (class III). Ninety-eight per cent of class III enhancers were deleted from the mouse genome, and we estimated a similar-sized enhancer gain in the human lineage. Human-specific enhancers display no detectable decrease in the negative selection pressure and are strongly associated with genes partaking in the heart regulatory programmes. The loss of a heart enhancer could be compensated by activity of a redundant heart enhancer; however, we observed redundancy in only 15 per cent of class II and III enhancer loci indicating a large-scale reprogramming of the heart regulatory programme in mammals.

  15. Activation of the Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Pathway in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Andrea; Tóth, Attila; Bagi, Zsolt; Papp, Zoltán; Édes, István; Vaszily, Miklós; Galajda, Zoltán; Papp, Julius Gy.; Varró, András; Szüts, Viktória; Lacza, Zsombor; Gerö, Domokos; Szabó, Csaba

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic myocardial dysfunction and heart failure. The goal of the present study was to investigate PARP activation in human heart failure, and to correlate PARP activation with various indices of apoptosis and oxidative and nitrosative stress in healthy (donor) and failing (NYHA class III–IV) human heart tissue samples. Higher levels of oxidized protein end-products were found in failing hearts compared with donor heart samples. On the other hand, no differences in tyrosine nitration (a marker of peroxynitrite generation) were detected. Activation of PARP was demonstrated in the failing hearts by an increased abundance of poly-ADP ribosylated proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PARP activation was localized to the nucleus of the cardiomyocytes from the failing hearts. The expression of full-length PARP-1 was not significantly different in donor and failing hearts. The expression of caspase-9, in contrast, was significantly higher in the failing than in the donor hearts. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. We found no significant translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) into the nucleus. Overall, the current data provide evidence of oxidative stress and PARP activation in human heart failure. Interventional studies with antioxidants or PARP inhibitors are required to define the specific roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:17088946

  16. Holmes heart--a simple antenatal diagnosis of a complex cardiac anomaly? Fetal echocardiographic findings and review.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Jan; Axt-Fliedner, Roland; Gembruch, Ulrich; Hartge, David R

    2013-01-01

    Double inlet left ventricle as a rare cardiac malformation comprises a broad spectrum of anatomic variants making its correct antenatal diagnosis challenging. We report on echocardiographic findings of three fetuses found to have a less frequent morphologic subgroup of double inlet left ventricle, namely Holmes heart, characterized by a single (left) ventricle connected to both atrioventricular orifices and normally related arteries. We addressed the pre- and perinatal management as well as additional abnormalities and discussed our experiences together with what is known from current literature.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing hormone directly stimulates cortisol and the cortisol biosynthetic pathway in human fetal adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Sirianni, Rosa; Rehman, Khurram S; Carr, Bruce R; Parker, C Richard; Rainey, William E

    2005-01-01

    Near term the human fetal adrenals (HFAs) initiate production of cortisol, which promotes organ maturation and acts to increase placental CRH biosynthesis. The objective of the present study was to determine whether CRH directly stimulates both cortisol production and expression of the steroidogenic enzymes in HFA-definitive zone cells. CRH stimulated the production of cortisol in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with an effective concentration of as low as 0.01 nm. In real-time RT-PCR experiments, CRH treatment increased the mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and each of the enzymes needed to produce cortisol. CRH induced 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (HSD3B2) by 34-fold, 21-hydroxylase (CYP21) by 55-fold, and 11beta-hydroxylase by 41-fold. Induction of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cholesterol side chain cleavage (CYP11A), and 17alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17) mRNA by CRH was 6-, 4-, and 6-fold, respectively. We also demonstrated that submaximal concentrations of CRH (30 pm) and ACTH (30 pm) that are seen in fetal circulation were additive on cortisol biosynthesis and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II mRNA induction. We suggest that CRH may play an important role in the late gestational rise in cortisol secretion from the HFAs, which may serve to augment placental CRH production and therefore participate in the endocrine cascade that is involved in fetal organ maturation and potentially in the timing of human parturition.

  18. Acquisition of innate-like microbial reactivity in mucosal tissues during human fetal MAIT-cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeansyah, Edwin; Loh, Liyen; Nixon, Douglas F.; Sandberg, Johan K.

    2014-01-01

    Innate-like, evolutionarily conserved MR1-restricted mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent a large antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. Here, we investigate the development of these cells in second trimester human fetal tissues. MAIT cells are rare and immature in the fetal thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. In contrast, mature IL-18Rα+ CD8αα MAIT cells are enriched in the fetal small intestine, liver and lung. Independently of localization, MAIT cells express CD127 and Ki67 in vivo and readily proliferate in response to Escherichia coli in vitro. Maturation is accompanied by the gradual post-thymic acquisition of the PLZF transcription factor and the ability to produce IFNγ and IL-22 in response to bacteria in mucosa. Thus, MAIT cells acquire innate-like antimicrobial responsiveness in mucosa before exposure to environmental microbes and the commensal microflora. Establishment of this arm of immunity before birth may help protect the newborn from a range of pathogenic microbes.

  19. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  20. 15- and 16-hydroxylations of androgens and estrogens in the human fetal liver: a critical step in estetrol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cantineau, R; Kremers, P; De Graeve, J; Gielen, J E; Lambotte, R

    1985-02-01

    To elucidate the main metabolic pathways which lead to the foeto-placental biosynthesis of estetrol (I), we investigated the 15 alpha- and 16 alpha-hydroxylations of potential precursors of this estrogen in the human fetal liver. We determined the 15 alpha- and 16 alpha-hydroxylation capacity of the fetal liver for each precursor by GC-MS. The results suggest that estetrol is derived only from estradiol sulfate (II) and DHEA sulfate (III). 15 alpha-Hydroxy-androstenedione (IV) can no longer be regarded as a good precursor of estetrol. The phenolic pathway appears to be a more likely route than the neutral pathway, even when derived from DHEA sulfate. PMID:3157024

  1. Maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Tang, Alvin; Levy, Denis; Grossfeld, Paul; Kashani, Iraj; Shaughnessy, Robin; Rothman, Abraham

    2002-02-01

    The maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography may be deleterious in the face of newly diagnosed congenital heart disease. This questionnaire-based study prospectively examined the psychological impact of both normal and abnormal fetal echocardiography. Normal fetal echocardiography decreased maternal anxiety, increased happiness, and increased the closeness women felt toward their unborn children. In contrast, when fetal echocardiography detected congenital heart disease, maternal anxiety typically increased, and mothers commonly felt less happy about being pregnant. However, among women who had recently delivered infants with congenital heart disease, those who had had fetal echocardiography during the pregnancy felt less responsible for their infants' defects and tended to have improved their relationships with the infants' fathers after the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Further study of the psychological and medical impact of fetal echocardiography will be necessary to define and optimize the clinical value of this powerful diagnostic tool.

  2. Fetal in vivo continuous cardiovascular function during chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Allison, B J; Brain, K L; Niu, Y; Kane, A D; Herrera, E A; Thakor, A S; Botting, K J; Cross, C M; Itani, N; Skeffington, K L; Beck, C; Giussani, D A

    2016-03-01

    Although the fetal cardiovascular defence to acute hypoxia and the physiology underlying it have been established for decades, how the fetal cardiovascular system responds to chronic hypoxia has been comparatively understudied. We designed and created isobaric hypoxic chambers able to maintain pregnant sheep for prolonged periods of gestation under controlled significant (10% O2) hypoxia, yielding fetal mean P(aO2) levels (11.5 ± 0.6 mmHg) similar to those measured in human fetuses of hypoxic pregnancy. We also created a wireless data acquisition system able to record fetal blood flow signals in addition to fetal blood pressure and heart rate from free moving ewes as the hypoxic pregnancy is developing. We determined in vivo longitudinal changes in fetal cardiovascular function including parallel measurement of fetal carotid and femoral blood flow and oxygen and glucose delivery during the last third of gestation. The ratio of oxygen (from 2.7 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.8; P < 0.05) and of glucose (from 2.3 ± 0.1 to 3.3 ± 0.6; P < 0.05) delivery to the fetal carotid, relative to the fetal femoral circulation, increased during and shortly after the period of chronic hypoxia. In contrast, oxygen and glucose delivery remained unchanged from baseline in normoxic fetuses. Fetal plasma urate concentration increased significantly during chronic hypoxia but not during normoxia (Δ: 4.8 ± 1.6 vs. 0.5 ± 1.4 μmol l(-1), P<0.05). The data support the hypotheses tested and show persisting redistribution of substrate delivery away from peripheral and towards essential circulations in the chronically hypoxic fetus, associated with increases in xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26926316

  3. Psychological and psychophysiological considerations regarding the maternal-fetal relationship

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.

    2009-01-01

    The earliest relationship does not begin with birth. Pregnant women construct mental representations of the fetus, and feelings of affiliation or “maternal-fetal attachment” generally increase over the course of gestation. While there is a fairly substantial literature on the development and moderation of psychological features of the maternal-fetal relationship, including the role of ultrasound imaging, relatively little is known about the manner in which maternal psychological functioning influences the fetus. Dispositional levels of maternal stress and anxiety are modestly associated with aspects of fetal heart rate and motor activity. Both induced maternal arousal and relaxation generate fairly immediate alterations to fetal neurobehaviors; the most consistently observed fetal response to changes in maternal psychological state involves suppression of motor activity. These effects may be mediated, in part, by an orienting response of the fetus to changes in the intrauterine environment. Conversely, there is evidence that fetal behaviors elicit maternal physiological responses. Integration of this finding into a more dynamic model of the maternal-fetal dyad, and implications for the postnatal relationship are discussed. Research on the period before birth affords tremendous opportunity for developmental scientists to advance understanding of the origins of human attachment. PMID:20228872

  4. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20th week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30th week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  5. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-10-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20(th) week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30(th) week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  6. TRP Channels Localize to Subdomains of the Apical Plasma Membrane in Human Fetal Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peter Y.; Gan, Geliang; Peng, Shaomin; Wang, Shao-Bin; Chen, Bo; Adelman, Ron A.; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Calcium regulates many functions of the RPE. Its concentration in the subretinal space and RPE cytoplasm is closely regulated. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a superfamily of ion channels that are moderately calcium-selective. This study investigates the subcellular localization and potential functions of TRP channels in a first-passage culture model of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Methods. The RPE isolated from 15- to 16-week gestation fetuses were maintained in serum-free media. Cultures were treated with barium chloride (BaCl2) in the absence and presence of TRP channel inhibitors and monitored by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The expression of TRP channels was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Results. Barium chloride substantially decreased TER and disrupted cell–cell contacts when added to the apical surface of RPE, but not when added to the basolateral surface. The effect could be partially blocked by the general TRP inhibitor, lanthanum chloride (LaCl3, ~75%), or an inhibitor of calpain (~25%). Family member-specific inhibitors, ML204 (TRPC4) and HC-067047 (TRPV4), had no effect on basal channel activity. Expression of TRPC4, TRPM1, TRPM3, TRPM7, and TRPV4 was detected by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The TRPM3 localized to the base of the primary cilium, and TRPC4 and TRPM3 localized to apical tight junctions. The TRPV4 localized to apical microvilli in a small subset of cells. Conclusions. The TRP channels localized to subdomains of the apical membrane, and BaCl2 was only able to dissociate tight junctions when presented to the apical membrane. The data suggest a potential role for TRP channels as sensors of [Ca2+] in the subretinal space. PMID:25736794

  7. Parent bisphenol A accumulation in the human maternal-fetal-placental unit.

    PubMed Central

    Schönfelder, Gilbert; Wittfoht, Werner; Hopp, Hartmut; Talsness, Chris E; Paul, Martin; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2002-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is employed in the manufacture of a wide range of consumer products. The suggestion that BPA, at amounts to which we are exposed, alters the reproductive organs of developing rodents has caused concern. At present, no information exists concerning the exposure of human pregnant women and their fetuses to BPA. We therefore investigated blood samples from mothers (n = 37) between weeks 32 and 41 of gestation. Afer the births, we also analyzed placental tissue and umbilical cord blood from the same subjects. We developed a novel chemical derivatization-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method to analyze parent BPA at concentrations < 1 micro g/mL in plasma and tissues. Concentrations of BPA ranged from 0.3 to 18.9 ng/mL (median = 3.1 ng/mL) in maternal plasma, from 0.2 to 9.2 ng/mL (median = 2.3 ng/mL) in fetal plasma, and from 1.0 to 104.9 ng/g (median = 12.7 ng/g) in placental tissue. BPA blood concentrations were higher in male than in female fetuses. Here we demonstrate parent BPA in pregnant women and their fetuses. Exposure levels of parent BPA were found within a range typical of those used in recent animal studies and were shown to be toxic to reproductive organs of male and female offspring. We suggest that the range of BPA concentrations we measured may be related to sex differences in metabolization of parent BPA or variable maternal use of consumer products leaching BPA. PMID:12417499

  8. Fetal development of the elastic-fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Kawase, Tetsuaki

    2013-10-01

    In the human middle ear, the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint and the insertions of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles contain abundant elastic fibers; i.e., the elastic-fiber-mediated entheses. Hyaluronan also coexists with the elastic fibers. In the present study using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated the distribution of elastin not only in the incudostapedial joint but also in the other two joints of the middle ear in adults and fetuses. In adults, the expression of elastin did not extend out of the annular ligament composed of mature elastic fibers but clearly overlapped with it. Electron microscopic observations of the annular ligament demonstrated a few microfibrils along the elastic fibers. Thus, in contrast to the vocal cord, the middle ear entheses seemed not to contain elaunin and oxytalan fibers. In mid-term fetuses (at approximately 15-16 weeks of gestation) before opening of the external acoustic meatus, the incudostapedial joint showed abundant elastic fibers, but the incudomalleolar and stapediovestibular joints did not. At this stage, hyaluronan was not colocalized, but distributed diffusely in loose mesenchymal tissues surrounding the ear ossicles. Therefore, fetal development of elastin and elastic fibers in the middle ear entheses is unlikely to require acoustic oscillation. In late-stage fetuses (25-30 weeks), whose ear ossicles were almost the same size as those in adults, we observed bundling and branching of elastic fibers. However, hyaluronan expression was not as strong as in adults. Colocalization between elastic fibers and hyaluronan appeared to be a result of postnatal maturation of the entheses.

  9. Transient HEXA expression in a transformed human fetal Tay-Sachs disease neuroglial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, M.J.; Hechtman, P.; Kaplan, F.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of GM{sub 2} ganglioside in the neurons of the central cortex. The recessively inherited disorder results from deficiency of hexosaminidase A (Hex A), a heterodimer of an {alpha} and {beta} subunit encoded by the HEXA and HEXB genes. Expression of HEXA mutations in COS cells has several disadvantages including high endogenous hexosaminidase activity. We report a new transient expression system with very low endogenous Hex A activity. An SV40-transformed fetal TSD neuroglial cell line was assessed for transient expression of the HEXA gene. pCMV{alpha}, a vector incorporating the cytomegalovirus promoter with the human {alpha}-subunit cDNA insert, proved to be the most efficient expression vector. Transfection of 4x10{sup 6} cells with 5-20 {mu}g of plasmid resulted in 100 to 500-fold Hex A activity (4MUGS hydrolysis) relative to mock-transfected cells. Use of pCMV{beta}-Gal as a control for transfection efficiency indicated that 10-20% of cells were transfected. Hex A specific activity increased for at least 72 h post-transfection. This new transient expression system should greatly improve the characterization of mutations in which low levels of HEXA expression result in milder clinical phenotypes and permit studies on enzymatic properties of mutant forms of Hex A. Since the cells used are of CNS origin and synthesize gangliosides, it should also be possible to study, in culture, the metabolic phenotype associated with TSD.

  10. Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on the growth and antioxidant defenses of of human cell cultures established from fetal and postnatal skin.

    PubMed

    Balin, Arthur K; Pratt, Loretta; Allen, R G

    2002-02-01

    Oxygen toxicity is believed to arise from changes in the rates at which cells generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sensitivity to hyperoxia has been postulated to depend on levels of antioxidant defense. Human cells obtained from fetal tissues have lower antioxidant defenses than those obtained from adult tissue. The present study was performed to determine whether the differences in fetal and adult antioxidant defense levels modulated their responses to changes in the ambient oxygen concentration. Our results demonstrate that oxygen modulates the proliferation of human fetal and adult skin fibroblasts in a similar fashion. In general, skin fibroblasts grew better at approximately 31 mm Hg, regardless of donor age. Manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were lower in fetal cells than in adult fibroblasts. Copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were similar in fetal and postnatal tissues and were unaltered appreciably by hyperoxic exposure. Glutathione concentration increased at higher oxygen tensions; however, the increase was much greater in fetal cells than in cultures derived from adult skin. These observations demonstrate that the capacity of fetal and adult cells to cope with oxidative stress, while similar, result from distinct mechanisms. PMID:11827751

  11. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit http://www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days–1 year), children (6–17 years) and adults (34–60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm2) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52–62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22–28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6–7%, fibroblasts 3–10%, macrophages 1–8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults). PMID:25545142

  12. De novo expression of fetal ED-A(+) fibronectin and B (+) tenascin-C splicing variants in human cardiac allografts: potential impact for targeted therapy of rejection.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Matusiak-Brückner, Monika; Richter, Petra; Grün, Katja; Ziffels, Barbara; Neri, Dario; Maschek, Hansjörg; Schulz, Uwe; Pfeil, Alexander; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R; Gummert, Jan; Berndt, Alexander; Renner, André

    2014-10-01

    Management of acute and especially chronic rejection after human cardiac transplantation is still challenging. Chronic rejection, represented by allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) is known to cause severe long-term complications. Rejection associated tissue-remodelling entails the reoccurrence of fetal variants of Fibronectin (Fn) and Tenascin-C (Tn-C), which are virtually absent in adult human organs. In a rat model, an extensive re-expression could be demonstrated for ED-A(+) Fn with spatial association to CAV and CIF. Thus, it is of great interest to investigate the cardiac tissue expression and distribution in human samples. From 48 heart transplanted patients, 64 tissue specimens derived from right ventricular biopsies were available. Histopathological analysis was performed according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for the detection of acute rejection. By immunohistochemistry, protein expression of ED-A(+) Fn, B(+) Tn-C, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and CD45 was assessed and analysed semiquantitatively. Co-localisation studies were performed by means of immunofluorescence double labelling. Histopathological analysis of the 64 samples revealed different ISHLT grades (0R in 36 cases, 1R in 20 cases and 2R in 8 cases). There was a distinct and quantitatively relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C in most samples. Semi-quantitative evaluation did not show any correlation to the acute rejection grade for all markers. Interestingly, significant correlations to the extent of inflammation could be shown for ED-A(+) Fn (r = 0.442, p = 0.000) and B(+) Tn-C (r = 0.408, p = 0.001) as well as between both proteins (r = 0.663, p = 0.000). A spatial association of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C to CAV and CIF could be demonstrated. A relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C following human heart transplantation could be demonstrated with spatial association to

  13. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  14. Characterization of human fetal cord blood steroid profiles in relation to fetal sex and mode of delivery using temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography and principal component analysis (PCA).

    PubMed

    Clifton, Vicki L; Bisits, Andrew; Zarzycki, Paweł K

    2007-08-15

    In the present work, human male and female fetal cord blood samples were purified, selectively extracted and separated to examine a fraction of steroids ranging from polar estetrol to relatively non-polar progesterone using solid phase extraction based on C-18 tubes and beta-cyclodextrin driven temperature dependent inclusion chromatography. Resulting UV diode array chromatographic patterns revealed the presence of 27 peaks. Chromatographic patterns of UV detected steroids were analyzed using principal components analysis which revealed differences between male/female and labour/not-in-labour clusters. Quantitative analysis of nine identified steroids including: estetrol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, cortisol, cortisone, progesterone, 20 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone were not significantly different between males and females. Significant differences between male and female fetuses were related to as yet unidentified compounds. Four peaks were significantly different with labour which corresponded with cortisol, cortisone and two unidentified compounds. This protocol may distinguish significant differences between clinical groups that are not readily identifiable using univariate measurements of single steroids or different low molecular mass biomarkers. Moreover, we have provided new evidence that despite the absence of testosterone there are number of steroids and low molecular mass compounds that differ between male and female fetuses. PMID:17625993

  15. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-08-16

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue.

  16. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Images PMID:7914701

  17. The role and interaction of imprinted genes in human fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gudrun E.; Ishida, Miho; Demetriou, Charalambos; Al-Olabi, Lara; Leon, Lydia J.; Thomas, Anna C.; Abu-Amero, Sayeda; Frost, Jennifer M.; Stafford, Jaime L.; Chaoqun, Yao; Duncan, Andrew J.; Baigel, Rachel; Brimioulle, Marina; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Apostolidou, Sophia; Aggarwal, Reena; Whittaker, John C.; Syngelaki, Argyro; Nicolaides, Kypros H.; Regan, Lesley; Monk, David; Stanier, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the genetic input for fetal growth will help to understand common, serious complications of pregnancy such as fetal growth restriction. Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic process that silences one parental allele, resulting in monoallelic expression. Imprinted genes are important in mammalian fetal growth and development. Evidence has emerged showing that genes that are paternally expressed promote fetal growth, whereas maternally expressed genes suppress growth. We have assessed whether the expression levels of key imprinted genes correlate with fetal growth parameters during pregnancy, either early in gestation, using chorionic villus samples (CVS), or in term placenta. We have found that the expression of paternally expressing insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), its receptor IGF2R, and the IGF2/IGF1R ratio in CVS tissues significantly correlate with crown–rump length and birthweight, whereas term placenta expression shows no correlation. For the maternally expressing pleckstrin homology-like domain family A, member 2 (PHLDA2), there is no correlation early in pregnancy in CVS but a highly significant negative relationship in term placenta. Analysis of the control of imprinted expression of PHLDA2 gave rise to a maternally and compounded grand-maternally controlled genetic effect with a birthweight increase of 93/155 g, respectively, when one copy of the PHLDA2 promoter variant is inherited. Expression of the growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (GRB10) in term placenta is significantly negatively correlated with head circumference. Analysis of the paternally expressing delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1) shows that the paternal transmission of type 1 diabetes protective G allele of rs941576 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in significantly reduced birth weight (−132 g). In conclusion, we have found that the expression of key imprinted genes show a strong correlation with fetal growth and that for both genetic and genomics data analyses

  18. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  19. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future.

  20. A fast method to measure the 3D surface of the human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; Su, Xianyu; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing; Zhang, Qican

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) automatic measurement of an object is widely used in many fields. In Biology and Medicine society, it can be applicable for surgery, orthopedics, viscera disease analysis and diagnosis etc. Here a new fast method to measure the 3D surface of human heart is proposed which can provide doctors a lot of information, such as the size of heart profile, the sizes of the left or right heart ventricle, and the curvature center and radius of heart ventricle, to fully analyze and diagnose pathobiology of human heart. The new fast method is optically and noncontacted and based upon the Phase Measurement Profilometry (PMP), which has higher measuring precision. A human heart specimen experiment has verified our method.

  1. Human Fetal Exposure to Triclosan and Triclocarban in an Urban Population from Brooklyn, New York

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are antimicrobial agents formulated in a wide variety of consumer products (including soaps, toothpaste, medical devices, plastics, and fabrics) that are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In late 2014, the FDA will consider regulating the use of both chemicals, which are under scrutiny regarding lack of effectiveness, potential for endocrine disruption, and potential contribution to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Here, we report on body burdens of TCS and TCC resulting from real-world exposures during pregnancy. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the concentrations of TCS, TCC, and its human metabolites (2′-hydroxy-TCC and 3′-hydroxy-TCC) as well as the manufacturing byproduct (3′-chloro-TCC) as total concentrations (Σ−) after conjugate hydrolysis in maternal urine and cord blood plasma from a cohort of 181 expecting mother/infant pairs in an urban multiethnic population from Brooklyn, NY recruited in 2007–09. TCS was detected in 100% of urine and 51% of cord blood samples after conjugate hydrolysis. The interquartile range (IQR) of detected TCS concentrations in urine was highly similar to the IQR reported previously for the age-matched population of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2004, but typically higher than the IQR reported previously for the general population (detection frequency = 74.6%). Urinary levels of TCC are reported here for the first time from real-world exposures during pregnancy, showing a median concentration of 0.21 μg/L. Urinary concentrations of TCC correlated well with its phase-I metabolite ∑-2′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.49) and the manufacturing byproduct ∑-3′-chloro-TCC C (r = 0.79), and ∑-2′-hydroxy-TCC correlated strongly with ∑-3′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.99). This human biomonitoring study presents the first body burden data for TCC

  2. Human fetal exposure to triclosan and triclocarban in an urban population from Brooklyn, New York.

    PubMed

    Pycke, Benny F G; Geer, Laura A; Dalloul, Mudar; Abulafia, Ovadia; Jenck, Alizee M; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are antimicrobial agents formulated in a wide variety of consumer products (including soaps, toothpaste, medical devices, plastics, and fabrics) that are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In late 2014, the FDA will consider regulating the use of both chemicals, which are under scrutiny regarding lack of effectiveness, potential for endocrine disruption, and potential contribution to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Here, we report on body burdens of TCS and TCC resulting from real-world exposures during pregnancy. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the concentrations of TCS, TCC, and its human metabolites (2'-hydroxy-TCC and 3'-hydroxy-TCC) as well as the manufacturing byproduct (3'-chloro-TCC) as total concentrations (Σ-) after conjugate hydrolysis in maternal urine and cord blood plasma from a cohort of 181 expecting mother/infant pairs in an urban multiethnic population from Brooklyn, NY recruited in 2007-09. TCS was detected in 100% of urine and 51% of cord blood samples after conjugate hydrolysis. The interquartile range (IQR) of detected TCS concentrations in urine was highly similar to the IQR reported previously for the age-matched population of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2004, but typically higher than the IQR reported previously for the general population (detection frequency = 74.6%). Urinary levels of TCC are reported here for the first time from real-world exposures during pregnancy, showing a median concentration of 0.21 μg/L. Urinary concentrations of TCC correlated well with its phase-I metabolite ∑-2'-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.49) and the manufacturing byproduct ∑-3'-chloro-TCC C (r = 0.79), and ∑-2'-hydroxy-TCC correlated strongly with ∑-3'-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.99). This human biomonitoring study presents the first body burden data for TCC from exposures

  3. A recombinant human hemoglobin with anti-sickling properties greater than fetal hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Dana N; Ryan, Thomas M; Reilly, Michael P; McCune, Steven L; Asakura, Toshio; Townes, Tim M

    2004-06-25

    A new recombinant, human anti-sickling beta-globin polypeptide designated beta(AS3) (betaGly(16) --> Asp/betaGlu(22) --> Ala/betaThr(87) --> Gln) was designed to increase affinity for alpha-globin. The amino acid substitutions at beta22 and beta87 are located at axial and lateral contacts of the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymers and strongly inhibit deoxy-HbS polymerization. The beta16 substitution confers the recombinant beta-globin subunit (beta(AS3)) with a competitive advantage over beta(S) for interaction with the alpha-globin polypeptide. Transgenic mouse lines that synthesize high levels of HbAS3 (alpha(2)beta(AS3)(2)) were established, and recombinant HbAS3 was purified from hemolysates and then characterized. HbAS3 binds oxygen cooperatively and has an oxygen affinity that is comparable with fetal hemoglobin. Delay time experiments demonstrate that HbAS3 is a potent inhibitor of HbS polymerization. Subunit competition studies confirm that beta(AS3) has a distinct advantage over beta(S) for dimerization with alpha-globin. When equal amounts of beta(S)- and beta(AS3)-globin monomers compete for limiting alpha-globin chains up to 82% of the tetramers formed is HbAS3. Knock-out transgenic mice that express exclusively human HbAS3 were produced. When these mice were bred with knock-out transgenic sickle mice the beta(AS3) polypeptides corrected all hematological parameters and organ pathology associated with the disease. Expression of beta(AS3)-globin should effectively lower the concentration of HbS in erythrocytes of patients with sickle cell disease, especially in the 30% percent of these individuals who coinherit alpha-thalassemia. Therefore, constructs expressing the beta(AS3)-globin gene may be suitable for future clinical trials for sickle cell disease. PMID:15084588

  4. Morphological Study of Chordae Tendinae in Human Cadaveric Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gunnal, S. A.; Wabale, R. N.; Farooqui, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The chordae tendinae (CT) are strong, fibrous connections between the valve leaflets and the papillary muscles. Dysfunction of the papillary muscles and chordae is frequent. Mitral valve replacement with preservation of CT and papillary muscles may preserve postoperative left ventricular function better than conventional mitral valve replacement in patients with chronic mitral regurgitation. Methods: The study was carried out on 116 human cadaveric hearts. The heart was opened through the atrioventricular valve to view the constituents of the complex. Origin, attachments, insertions, distribution, branching pattern and gross structure of CT were observed and studied in detail. Results: In the present study more than 21 terminologies of CT were defined by classifying it into six different types. Classification is done according to the origin, attachments, insertion, distribution, branching pattern and gross structure. Terminologies defined are as follows. Apical pillar chordae, Basal pillar chordae, True chordae, False chordae, Interpillar chordae, Pillar wall chordae, Cusp chordae, Cleft chordae, Commissural chordae, First order chordae, Second order chordae, Free zone chordae, Marginal chordae, Rough zone chordae, Straight chordae, Branched-fan shaped chordae, Spiral chordae, Irregular-web chordae, Tendinous chordae, Muscular chordae, Membranous chordae. Basal pillar chordae are found in 9.48%. Mean number of chordae taking origin from apical half of a single papillary muscle or single head of papillary muscle was 9.09 with the range of 3-18. Mean number of the marginal chordae attached to a single cusp was 22.63 ranging from 11 to 35. Strut chordae showed interesting insertion with broad aponeurosis in 38.79% and large muscular flaps in 13.79%. Chordae muscularis were found in 14% and membranous chordae were found in 6%. Conclusions: This knowledge may prove useful for cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. PMID:25838872

  5. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the human fetal small bowel as shown by c-kit immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wester, T; Eriksson, L; Olsson, Y; Olsen, L

    1999-01-01

    Background—Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, which is required for their development and spontaneous pacemaker activity in the bowel. From murine models it has been proposed that ICCs do not develop until after birth, but more recent findings indicate that c-kit is expressed early in the embryonic period. The temporal development of ICCs in the human gut remains unknown. 
Aim—To investigate ICCs in the human fetal small bowel using c-kit immunohistochemistry. 
Subjects—Small bowel specimens were obtained at post mortem examination of 16 fetuses and nine neonates, eight of whom were premature, born at gestational ages of 13 to 41 weeks, without gastrointestinal disorders. 
Methods—Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on material fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. The specimens were exposed to antibodies raised against c-kit (an ICC marker) and neurone specific enolase (a general neuronal marker). The ABC complex method was used to visualise binding of antibodies to the corresponding antigens. 
Results—c-kit immunoreactive cells were visualised from 13 weeks of gestation. The immunoreactivity was mainly localised in association with the myenteric plexus. From about 17-18 weeks of gestation, the ICCs formed a layer along the myenteric plexus, whereas this layer appeared to be disrupted at 13-16 weeks of gestation. 
Conclusions—ICCs are c-kit immunoreactive at least from a gestational age of 13 weeks in the human fetal small intestine. From 17-18 weeks of gestation until birth, they form a continuous layer around the myenteric ganglia. 

 Keywords: interstitial cells of Cajal; c-kit; myenteric plexus; human; fetal; development PMID:9862827

  6. CRISPLD2 (LGL1) inhibits proinflammatory mediators in human fetal, adult, and COPD lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Kho, Alvin T; Wu, Qing; Halayko, Andrew J; Limbert Rempel, Karen; Chase, Robert P; Sweezey, Neil B; Weiss, Scott T; Kaplan, Feige

    2016-09-01

    Chronic lung disease of prematurity/bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity in developed countries. Inflammation is a prominent finding. Currently available interventions have associated toxicities and limited efficacy. While BPD often resolves in childhood, survivors of preterm birth are at risk for acquired respiratory disease in early life and are more likely to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adulthood. We previously cloned Crispld2 (Lgl1), a glucocorticoid-regulated mesenchymal secretory protein that modulates lung branching and alveogenesis through mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. Absence of Crispld2 is embryonic lethal. Heterozygous Crispld2+/- mice display features of BPD, including distal airspace enlargement, disruption of elastin, and neonatal lung inflammation. CRISPLD2 also plays a role in human fetal lung fibroblast cell expansion, migration, and mesenchymal-epithelial signaling. This study assessed the effects of endogenous and exogenous CRISPLD2 on expression of proinflammatory mediators in human fetal and adult (normal and COPD) lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells. CRISPLD2 expression was upregulated in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human fetal lung fibroblast line (MRC5). LPS-induced upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and CCL2 was exacerbated in MRC5-CRISPLD2(knockdown) cells. siRNA suppression of endogenous CRISPLD2 in adult lung fibroblasts (HLFs) led to augmented expression of IL-8, IL-6, CCL2. LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory mediators by human lung epithelial HAEo- cells was attenuated by purified secretory CRISPLD2. RNA sequencing results from HLF-CRISPLD2(knockdown) suggest roles for CRISPLD2 in extracellular matrix and in inflammation. Our data suggest that suppression of CRISPLD2 increases the risk of lung inflammation in early life and adulthood. PMID:27597766

  7. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development. PMID:27752099

  8. Numerical investigation of the haemodynamics in the human fetal umbilical vein/ductus venosus based on the experimental data

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Taraneh; Hassani, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Abortion of the fetus due to a disease, in an early stage of pregnancy, has been dramatically increased in the last decades. There is a still lack of knowledge on the various types of diseases which lead fetus to a vulnerable circumstance. The transport of oxygenated blood from the placenta to the human fetus has been an important clinical feature in Doppler velocimetry studies, especially the ductus venosus (DV). The DV connects intra-abdominal portion of the umbilical vein and the inferior vena cava (IVC) at the inlet of the right atrium and is, therefore, important when examining the fetus state of health. An abnormal flow in the DV can indicate a fetal disease such as, chromosomal abnormalities, cardiac defect, hypoxaemia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The blood flow in the fetal circulation has not been investigated much in detail. The blood flow in the fetal circulation provides necessary information for physician to make a suitable decision on abortion or alternative medical practice before or even after birth. The present study performed a comparative study to quantify the blood velocity in DV by a combination approach based on 3D computational simulation and Doppler measurement. The results showed that the velocity value in DV is significant and can be considered as an indicator of any kind of disease in fetal. The nodal displacement of the model was also analysed. It shows that DV tolerates a higher level of displacement compared with the other regions of the model, whereas the nodal pressure shows different results as the lowest values are located in DV. PMID:27512094

  9. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  10. Ex Vivo Expansion and Differentiation of Human and Mouse Fetal Pancreatic Progenitors Are Modulated by Epidermal Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Paola; Nobecourt, Estelle; Oshima, Masaya; Albagli-Curiel, Olivier; Laurysens, Veerle; Stangé, Geert; Sojoodi, Mozhdeh; Heremans, Yves; Heimberg, Harry; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2015-08-01

    A comparative analysis of mouse and human pancreatic development may reveal common mechanisms that control key steps as organ morphogenesis and cell proliferation and differentiation. More specifically, understanding beta cell development remains an issue, despite recent progress related to their generation from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we use an integrated approach, including prospective isolation, organ culture, and characterization of intermediate stages, and report that cells from human and mouse fetal pancreas can be expanded in the long term and give rise to hollow duct-like structures in 3D cultures. The expanded cells express a combination of markers (E-cadherin, PDX1, NKX6-1, SOX9, and HNF1β) that reveals pancreatic progenitor identity. Proliferation of embryonic progenitors was stimulated by the Wnt agonist R-spondin1 (RSPO1), FGF10, and EGF. This combination of growth factors allowed maintaining human fetal pancreatic progenitors in culture for many passages, a finding not reported previously. Importantly, in the absence of EGF, proliferation was reduced, while endocrine differentiation was significantly enhanced. We conclude that modulation of EGF signaling affects in vitro expansion and differentiation of progenitors from embryonic pancreas of both mice and man.

  11. Cytoarchitecture of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence and Rostral Extension of the Lateral Ventricle in the Human Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Cázares, Hugo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Zamora-Berridi, Grettel; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Quinoñes-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The fetal development of the anterior subventricular zone (SVZ) involves the transformation of radial glia into neural stem cells, in addition to the migration of neuroblasts from the SVZ towards different regions in the brain. In adult rodents this migration from the anterior SVZ is restricted to the olfactory bulb following a rostral migratory stream (RMS) formed by chains of migratory neuroblasts. Similar to rodents, an RMS has been suggested in the adult human brain, where the SVZ remains as an active proliferative region. Nevertheless, a human fetal RMS has not been described and the presence of migratory neuroblasts in the adult remains controversial. Here we describe the cytoarchitecture of the human SVZ at the lateral ganglionic eminence late in the second trimester of development (23–24 weeks postconception). Cell organization in this region is heterogeneous along the ventricular wall, with GFAP-positive cells aligned to the ventricle. These cells coexpress markers for radial glia like GFAPδ, nestin, and vimentin. We also show the presence of abundant migratory neuroblasts in the anterior horn SVZ forming structures here denominated cell throngs. Interestingly, a ventral extension of the lateral ventricle suggests the presence of a putative RMS. Nevertheless, in the olfactory bulb neuroblast throngs or chain-like structures were not observed. The lack of these structures closer to the olfactory bulb could indicate a destination for the migratory neuroblasts outside the olfactory bulb in the human brain. PMID:21344407

  12. Comparative Analysis of KnockOut™ Serum with Fetal Bovine Serum for the In Vitro Long-Term Culture of Human Limbal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The limbal epithelial cells can be maintained on 3T3 feeder layer with fetal bovine serum supplemented culture medium, and these cells have been used to successfully treat limbal stem cell deficiency. However, fetal bovine serum contains unknown components and displays quantitative and qualitative lot-to-lot variations. To improve the culture condition, the defined KnockOut serum replacement was investigated to replace fetal bovine serum for culturing human limbal epithelial cell. Human primary limbal epithelial cells were cultured in KnockOut serum and fetal bovine serum supplemented medium, respectively. The cell growth rate, gene expression, and maintenance of limbal epithelial stem cells were studied and compared between these two groups. Human primary limbal epithelial cells were isolated and successfully serially cultivated in this novel KnockOut serum supplemented medium; the cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were similar to those of cells grown in fetal bovine serum supplemented medium. These data suggests that this KnockOut serum supplemented medium is an efficient replacement to traditional fetal bovine serum supplemented medium for limbal epithelial cell culture, and this medium has great potential for long term maintenance of limbal epithelial cells, limbal epithelial stem cells transplantation, and tissue regeneration. PMID:27446607

  13. Temporal patterns of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts in human fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tornatore, C; Meyers, K; Atwood, W; Conant, K; Major, E

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the developing central nervous system results in a dementing process in children, termed HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Infection of astroglial elements of the pediatric nervous system has been demonstrated and suggests that direct infection of some astrocytes may contribute to the neurologic deficit. In this model, HIV-1 establishes a persistent state of infection in astrocytes, which can be reactivated by the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta). To better understand the natural history of viral persistence in astroglial cells, we characterized infection at the transcriptional level. The most abundant viral transcript during the establishment of persistence was the subgenomic multiply spliced 2-kb message, similar to mononuclear cell models of HIV-1 latency. Following reactivation with TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta the multiply spliced 2-kb message remained the most abundant viral transcript, in contrast to infected mononuclear cells in which reactivation leads to the reemergence of the 9- and 4-kb transcripts. Further characterization of the persistent 2-kb transcript by PCR amplification of in vitro-synthesized viral cDNA showed that, in the absence of cytokine stimulation, the most abundant multiply spliced transcripts were the Nef- and Rev-specific messages. However, following cytokine stimulation, double- and triple-spliced Tat-, Rev-, and Nef-specific messages could be identified. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that, during viral persistence, astrocytes expressed Nef protein but few or no viral structural proteins. These results demonstrate that viral persistence in astrocytes at the transcriptional level is fundamentally different from that seen in mononuclear cells and could account for the virtual absence of astroglial expression of viral structural antigens in vivo. Images PMID:8254781

  14. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  15. Allometric studies on growth and development of the human placenta: growth of tissue compartments and diffusive conductances in relation to placental volume and fetal mass.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Terry M

    2006-06-01

    Correlations between placental size and fetal mass during gestation fail to account for changes in composition that accompany placental growth and maturation. This study uses stereological data on the sizes of different tissue compartments in human placentas from 10 weeks of gestation to term and relates them to placental volume and to fetal mass by means of allometric analysis. In addition, tissue dimensions are used to calculate a physiological transport measure (diffusive conductance) for the villous membrane. Histological sections randomly sampled from placentas and analysed stereologically provided estimates of structural quantities (volumes, exchange surface areas, lengths, numbers of nuclei, diffusion distances). These data were combined with a physicochemical quantity (Krogh's diffusion coefficient) in order to estimate oxygen diffusive conductances for the villous membrane and its two components (trophoblast and stroma). Allometric relationships between these quantities and placental volume or fetal mass were obtained by linear regression analyses after log-transformation. Placental tissues had different growth trajectories: most grew more rapidly than placental volume and all grew more slowly than fetal mass. Diffusion distances were inversely related to placental and fetal size. Differential growth impacted on diffusive conductances, which, again, did not improve commensurately with placental volume but did match exactly growth of the fetus. Findings show that successful integration between supply and demand can be achieved by differential tissue growth. Allometric analysis of results from recent studies on the murine placenta suggest further that diffusive conductances may also be matched to fetal mass during gestation and to fetal mass at term across species.

  16. Sex Moderates Associations between Prenatal Glucocorticoid Exposure and Human Fetal Neurological Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Laura M.; Sandman, Curt A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal cortisol levels (at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks' gestation) and fetal movement response to vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS; at 25, 31 and 37 weeks) were assessed in 190 mother-fetus pairs. Fetuses showed a response to the VAS at 25 weeks and there was evidence of increasing maturation in the response at 31 and 37 weeks. Early elevations in…

  17. Reconstruction of a geometrically correct diffusion tensor image of a moving human fetal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. J.; Koob, Meriam; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Robinson, Ashley J.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Miller, Steven P.; Studholme, Colin

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies reported the development of methods for rigid registration of 2D fetal brain imaging data to correct for unconstrained fetal and maternal motion, and allow the formation of a true 3D image of conventional fetal brain anatomy from conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging provides additional valuable insight into the developing brain anatomy, however the correction of motion artifacts in clinical fetal diffusion imaging is still a challenging problem. This is due to the challenging problem of matching lower signal-to-noise ratio diffusion weighted EPI slice data to recover between-slice motion, compounded by the presence of possible geometric distortions in the EPI data. In addition, the problem of estimating a diffusion model (such as a tensor) on a regular grid that takes into account the inconsistent spatial and orientation sampling of the diffusion measurements needs to be solved in a robust way. Previous methods have used slice to volume registration within the diffusion dataset. In this work, we describe an alternative approach that makes use of an alignment of diffusion weighted EPI slices to a conventional structural MRI scan which provides a geometrically correct reference image. After spatial realignment of each diffusion slice, a tensor field representing the diffusion profile is estimated by weighted least squared fitting. By qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the results, we confirm the proposed algorithm successfully corrects the motion and reconstructs the diffusion tensor field.

  18. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C.; Nettleship, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  19. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose

  20. Estradiol influences the mechanical properties of human fetal osteoblasts through cytoskeletal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, Padmalosini; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were quantified using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol causes significant decrease in the stiffness of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased stiffness was caused by decreased density of f-actin network. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stiffness changes were not associated with mineralized matrix of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol increases inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts. -- Abstract: Estrogen is known to have a direct effect on bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. The cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts and osteoblasts-like cells have been extensively studied. However, the effect of estrogen on the mechanical property of osteoblasts has not been studied yet. It is important since mechanical property of the mechanosensory osteoblasts could be pivotal to its functionality in bone remodeling. This is the first study aimed to assess the direct effect of estradiol on the apparent elastic modulus (E{sup Asterisk-Operator }) and corresponding cytoskeletal changes of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). The cells were cultured in either medium alone or medium supplemented with {beta}-estradiol and then subjected to Atomic Force Microscopy indentation (AFM) to determine E{sup Asterisk-Operator }. The underlying changes in cytoskeleton were studied by staining the cells with TRITC-Phalloidin. Following estradiol treatment, the cells were also tested for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. With estradiol treatment, E{sup Asterisk-Operator} of osteoblasts significantly decreased by 43-46%. The confocal images showed that the changes in f-actin network observed in estradiol treated cells can give rise to the changes in the stiffness of the cells. Estradiol also increases the inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. Estradiol induced stiffness

  1. Microcarrier Culture for Efficient Expansion and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Fetal Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Tony Kwang-Poh; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Reuveny, Shaul; Choolani, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Stirred microcarrier (MC) culture has been suggested as the method of choice for supplying large volumes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we show that in addition to the improvement in cell expansion capacity, MSCs propagated and harvested from MC culture also demonstrate higher osteogenic potency when differentiated in vivo or in vitro in three-dimensional (3D) scaffold cultures as compared with traditional monolayer (MNL) cultures. Cytodex 3 microcarrier-expanded human fetal MSC (hfMSC) cultures (MC-hfMSCs) achieved 12- to 16-fold expansion efficiency (6×105–8×105 cells/mL) compared to 4- to 6-fold (1.2×105–1.8×105 cells/mL) achieved by traditional MNL-expanded hfMSC culture (MNL-hfMSCs; p<0.05). Both MC-hfMSCs and MNL-hfMSCs maintained similar colony-forming capacity, doubling times, and immunophenotype postexpansion. However, when differentiated under in vitro two-dimensional (2D) osteogenic conditions, MC-hfMSCs exhibited a 45-fold reduction in alkaline phosphatase level and a 37.5% decrease in calcium deposition compared with MNL-hfMSCs (p<0.05). Surprisingly, when MC-hfMSCs and MNL-hfMSCs were seeded on 3D macroporous scaffold culture or subcutaneously implanted into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, MC-hfMSCs deposited 63.5% (p<0.05) more calcium and formed 47.2% (p<0.05) more bone volume, respectively. These results suggest that the mode of hfMSC growth in the expansion phase affects the osteogenic potential of hfMSCs differently in various differentiation platforms. In conclusion, MC cultures are advantageous over MNL cultures in bone tissue engineering because MC-hfMSCs have improved cell expansion capacity and exhibit higher osteogenic potential than MNL-hfMSCs when seeded in vitro into 3D scaffolds or implanted in vivo. PMID:23593561

  2. Development of peptide-containing nerves in the human fetal prostate gland.

    PubMed Central

    Jen, P Y; Dixon, J S

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the developing peptidergic innervation of the human fetal prostate gland in a series of specimens ranging in gestational age from 13 to 30 wk. The overall innervation of each specimen was visualised using protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), a general nerve marker. The onset and development of specific neuropeptide-containing subpopulations were investigated using antisera to neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), bombesin (BOM), somatostatin (SOM), leu-enkephalin (l-ENK) and met-enkephalin (m-ENK). In addition the occurrence and distribution of presumptive noradrenergic nerves was studied using antisera to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). At 13 wk numerous branching PGP-immunoreactive (-IR) nerves were observed in the capsule of the developing prostate gland and surrounding the preprostatic urethra but the remainder of the gland was devoid of nerves. The majority of nerves in the capsule contained D beta H and TH and were presumed to be noradrenergic in type while other nerves (in decreasing numbers) contained NPY, l-ENK, SP and CGRP. Nerves associated with the preprostatic urethra did not contain any of the neuropeptides under investigation. At 17 wk the density of nerves in the capsule had increased and occasional m-ENK-, VIP- and BOM-IR nerve fibres were also observed. In addition PGP, D beta H-, TH-, NPY- and l-ENK-IR nerves occurred in association with smooth muscle bundles which at 17 wk were present in the outer part of the gland. Occasional PGP-IR nerves were also present at the base of the epithelium forming some of the prostatic glands. At 23 wk some of the subepithelial nerves showed immunoreactivity for NPY, VIP or l-ENK. At 26 wk smooth muscle bundles occurred throughout the gland and were richly innervated by PGP, D beta H and TH-IR nerves while a less dense plexus was formed by NPY- and l

  3. Impedance experimentation for an electrode interface in human fetal tissue: Novel pathological régime of anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovadia, Marc; Fayn, Evgueni; Zavitz, Daniel H.

    2006-06-01

    Impedance spectroscopic experimentation at the superfused electrode|living tissue interface for human fetal skin was performed in three-electrode potentiostatic configuration for noble metal electrodes, with spectral analysis of the current. The impedance plane locus observed, reflects a diffusional element frequently in series with a distributed element of Havriliak-Negami type. In a minority of experiments no impedance could be defined, due to the presence of an additional peak in every cycle in the shoulder of the current waveform. This nonlinearity has never been reported before for a system of the present type, and may represent a novel pathological régime of anomalous diffusion.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Two Auditory Methods by Mother and Fetus on the Results of Non-Stress Test (Baseline Fetal Heart Rate and Number of Accelerations) in Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkholgh, Roghaie; Keshavarz, Tahereh; Moshfeghy, Zeinab; Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two auditory methods by mother and fetus on the results of NST in 2011-2012. Materials and methods: In this single-blind clinical trial, 213 pregnant women with gestational age of 37-41 weeks who had no pregnancy complications were randomly divided into 3 groups (auditory intervention for mother, auditory intervention for fetus, and control) each containing 71 subjects. In the intervention groups, music was played through the second 10 minutes of NST. The three groups were compared regarding baseline fetal heart rate and number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes of NST. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and paired T-test. Results: The results showed no significant difference among the three groups regarding baseline fetal heart rate in the first (p = 0.945) and second (p = 0.763) 10 minutes. However, a significant difference was found among the three groups concerning the number of accelerations in the second 10 minutes. Also, a significant difference was observed in the number of accelerations in the auditory intervention for mother (p = 0.013) and auditory intervention for fetus groups (p < 0.001). The difference between the number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes was also statistically significant (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Music intervention was effective in the number of accelerations which is the indicator of fetal health. Yet, further studies are required to be conducted on the issue. PMID:27385971

  5. Characteristic parameters of electromagnetic signals from a human heart system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Yuan; Pei, Liu-Qing; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Su-Ming; Gao, Hong-Lei; Dai, Yuan-Dong

    2011-04-01

    The electromagnetic field of a human heart system is a bioelectromagnetic field. Electrocardiography (ECG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) are both carriers of electromagnetic information about the cardiac system, and they are nonstationary signals. In this study, ECG and MCG data from healthy subjects are acquired; the MCG data are captured using a high-Tc radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUIDs) and the QRS complexes in these data are analysed by the evolutionary spectrum analysis method. The results show that the quality factor Q and the central frequency fz of the QRS complex evolutionary spectrum are the characteristic parameters (CHPs) of ECG and MCG in the time—frequency domain. The confidence intervals of the mean values of the CHPs are estimated by the Student t distribution method in mathematical statistics. We believe that there are threshold ranges of the mean values of Q and fz for healthy subjects. We have postulated the following criterion: if the mean values of CHPs are in the proper ranges, the cardiac system is in a normal condition and it possesses the capability of homeostasis. In contrast, if the mean values of the CHPs do not lie in the proper ranges, the homeostasis of the cardiac system is lacking and some cardiac disease may follow. The results and procedure of MCG CHPs in the study afford a technological route for the application of HTc rf SQUIDs in cardiology.

  6. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically, in graphic form, and noninvasively, to ascertain fetal condition during labor. This generic type of...

  7. Fetal endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition. PMID:23961471

  8. Time-lapse imaging of human heart motion with switched array UWB radar.

    PubMed

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Paichard, Yoann; Aardal, Øyvind; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-10-01

    Radar systems for detection of human heartbeats have mostly been single-channel systems with limited spatial resolution. In this paper, a radar system for ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging of the human heart is presented. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue the antenna is placed very close to the body. The antenna is an array with eight elements, and an antenna switch system connects the radar to the individual elements in sequence to form an image. Successive images are used to build up time-lapse movies of the beating heart. Measurements on a human test subject are presented and the heart motion is estimated at different locations inside the body. The movies show rhythmic motion consistent with the beating heart, and the location and shape of the reflections correspond well with the expected response form the heart wall. The spatial dependent heart motion is compared to ECG recordings, and it is confirmed that heartbeat modulations are seen in the radar data. This work shows that radar imaging of the human heart may provide valuable information on the mechanical movement of the heart.

  9. Long chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids attenuate the IL-1β-induced pro-inflammatory response in human fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Brenna, JT; Wang, Dong Hao; Zhu, Weishu; Meng, Di; Ganguli, Kriston; Kothapalli, Kumar SD; Requena, Pilar; Innis, Sheila; Walker, WA

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that excessive inflammation of the immature intestine may predispose premature infants to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in human fetal and adult intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in primary culture. Methods Human fetal IEC in culture were derived from a healthy fetal small intestine (H4) or resected small intestine of a neonate with NEC (NEC-IEC). Intestinal cell lines Caco2 and NCM460 in culture were used as models for mature IEC. IEC in culture were pre-treated with 100µM palmitic acid (PAL), DHA, EPA, ARA or ARA+DHA for 48 hrs and then stimulated with pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Results DHA significantly attenuated IL-1β induced pro-inflammatory IL-8 and IL-6 protein and mRNA in fetal H4, NEC-IEC and mature Caco2, NCM460 IEC, compared to control and PAL treatment. DHA down regulated IL-1R1 (IL-1β receptor) and NFk β1 mRNA expression in fetal and adult IEC. ARA had potent anti-inflammatory effects with lower IL-8 and IL-6 (protein and mRNA) in fetal H4 but not in NEC-IEC or adult IEC. Conclusion The present study provides evidence that DHA and ARA may have important anti-inflammatory functions for prevention of NEC in premature infants. PMID:26270575

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  11. Resonance of about-weekly human heart rate rhythm with solar activity change.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, G; Halberg, F; Wendt, H W; Bingham, C; Sothern, R B; Haus, E; Kleitman, E; Kleitman, N; Revilla, M A; Revilla, M; Breus, T K; Pimenov, K; Grigoriev, A E; Mitish, M D; Yatsyk, G V; Syutkina, E V

    1996-12-01

    In several human adults, certain solar activity rhythms may influence an about 7-day rhythm in heart rate. When no about-weekly feature was found in the rate of change in sunspot area, a measure of solar activity, the double amplitude of a circadian heart rate rhythm, approximated by the fit of a 7-day cosine curve, was lower, as was heart rate corresponds to about-weekly features in solar activity and/or relates to a sunspot cycle.

  12. Cyclooxygenase products sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors in humans with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Chiu, Josephine; Hamilton, Michele A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Maclellan, W Robb; Hage, Antoine; Moriguchi, Jaime; Patel, Jignesh

    2008-04-01

    Prior work in animals and humans suggests that muscle mechanoreceptor control of sympathetic activation [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] during exercise in heart failure (HF) patients is heightened compared with that of healthy humans and that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by metabolic by-products. We sought to determine whether cyclooxygenase products and/or endogenous adenosine, two metabolites of ischemic exercise, sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors during rhythmic handgrip (RHG) exercise in HF patients. Indomethacin, which inhibits the production of prostaglandins, and saline control were infused in 12 HF patients. In a different protocol, aminophylline, which inhibits adenosine receptors, and saline control were infused in 12 different HF patients. MSNA was recorded (microneurography). During exercise following saline, MSNA increased in the first minute of exercise, consistent with baseline heightened mechanoreceptor sensitivity. MSNA continued to increase during 3 min of RHG, indicative that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by ischemia metabolites. Indomethacin, but not aminophylline, markedly attenuated the increase in MSNA during the entire 3 min of low-level rhythmic exercise, consistent with the sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors by cyclooxygenase products. Interestingly, even the early increase in MSNA was abolished by indomethacin infusion, indicative of the very early generation of cyclooxygenase products after the onset of exercise in HF patients. In conclusion, muscle mechanoreceptors mediate the increase in MSNA during low-level RHG exercise in HF. Cyclooxygenase products, but not endogenous adenosine, play a central role in muscle mechanoreceptor sensitization. Finally, muscle mechanoreceptors in patients with HF have heightened basal sensitivity to mechanical stimuli, which also appears to be mediated by the early generation of cyclooxygenase products, resulting in exaggerated early increases in MSNA.

  13. Human heart conjugate cooling simulation: unsteady thermo-fluid-stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Abas; Dulikravich, George S; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Stowe, David F; Jahania, M Salik

    2014-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to demonstrate computationally that realistic human hearts can be cooled much faster by performing conjugate heat transfer consisting of pumping a cold liquid through the cardiac chambers and major veins while keeping the heart submerged in cold gelatin filling a cooling container. The human heart geometry used for simulations was obtained from three-dimensional, high resolution CT-angio scans. Two fluid flow domains for the right (pulmonic) and left (systemic) heart circulations, and two solid domains for the heart tissue and gelatin solution were defined for multi-domain numerical simulation. Detailed unsteady temperature fields within the heart tissue were calculated during the conjugate cooling process. A linear thermoelasticity analysis was performed to assess the stresses applied on the heart due to the coolant fluid shear and normal forces and to examine the thermal stress caused by temperature variation inside the heart. It was demonstrated that a conjugate cooling effort with coolant temperature at +4°C is capable of reducing the average heart temperature from +37°C to +8°C in 25 minutes for cases in which the coolant was steadily pumped only through major heart inlet veins and cavities.

  14. Human heart conjugate cooling simulation: Unsteady thermo-fluid-stress analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Abas; Dulikravich, George S.; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Stowe, David F.; Jahania, M. Salik

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to demonstrate computationally that realistic human hearts can be cooled much faster by performing conjugate heat transfer consisting of pumping a cold liquid through the cardiac chambers and major veins while keeping the heart submerged in cold gelatin filling a cooling container. The human heart geometry used for simulations was obtained from three-dimensional, high resolution MRI scans. Two fluid flow domains for the right (pulmonic) and left (systemic) heart circulations, and two solid domains for the heart tissue and gelatin solution were defined for multi-domain numerical simulation. Detailed unsteady temperature fields within the heart tissue were calculated during the conjugate cooling process. A linear thermoelasticity analysis was performed to assess the stresses applied on the heart due to the coolant fluid shear and normal forces and to examine the thermal stress caused by temperature variation inside the heart. It was demonstrated that a conjugate cooling effort with coolant temperature at +4°C is capable of reducing the average heart temperature from +37°C to +8°C in 25 minutes for cases in which the coolant was steadily pumped only through major heart inlet veins and cavities. PMID:25045006

  15. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of human basophilic cells derived from dispersed fetal liver with murine T cell factors

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.C.; Caulfield, J.P.; Hein, A.; Osathanondh, R.; Nabel, G.; Schlossman, S.F.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.

    1986-03-15

    Metachromatically granulated cells were generated from human fetal liver stem cells cultured in heterologous mouse conditioned medium rich in interleukin 3. After 2 to 3 wk of culture with biweekly changes of medium and selection of nonadherent cells, all cells present in five cultures had cytoplasmic granules. Ultrastructurally, many granules contained fibrillar material or electron-dense cores with fibrils and vesicular fragments. In addition, the granules of many cells were filled with electron-dense material, which in some cases had a fine structure consisting of concentric whorls or a reticular pattern. Analysis of high-affinity IgE receptors on the cultured cells by flow cytometry demonstrated a unimodel fluorescence pattern, suggesting that most cells were in the basophil or mast cell lineage. The cells contained 52 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of histamine and incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate at an average rate of 31,300 cpm/10/sup 6/ cells/4 hr into 175,000 m.w. chondroitin sulfate A proteoglycans. Upon activation with 1 ..mu..M calcium ionophore A23187, the cultured cells released 53% of their cell-associated histamine and metabolized arachidonic acid to 15.0 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of immunoreactive leukotriene C/sub 4/ equivalents, 0.5 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of leukotriene B/sub 4/, and 3.1 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ (means, n = 3). Thus, stem cells present in human fetal liver give rise, as do stem cells in mouse fetal liver, to metachromatically granulated cells when cultured in the presence of mouse interleukin 3.

  16. Ljungan virus: a commentary on its association with fetal and infant morbidity and mortality in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Krous, Henry F; Langlois, Neil E

    2010-11-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data support the notion that Ljungan virus (LV), endemic in some rodent populations in Sweden, Denmark, and the United States, can cause morbidity and mortality in animals and humans. LV infection can cause type I diabetes mellitus, myocarditis, and encephalitis in bank voles and experimental mice, and lemmings. Mouse dams infected with LV experience high rates of stillbirth that may persist across generations, and their fetuses may develop cranial, brain, and limb malformations. In humans, epidemiologic and serologic data suggest that LV infection correlates with intrauterine fetal death, malformations, placental inflammation, myocarditis, encephalitis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The proposed role of LV infection in SIDS is unconvincing. Further research is necessary to clarify the role of LV infection in animal and human disease. PMID:20890937

  17. Transmural distribution and connectivity of coronary collaterals within the human heart.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Monique G J T B; Oost, Elco; Spaan, Jos A E; van Horssen, Pepijn; van der Wal, Allard C; vanBavel, Ed; Siebes, Maria; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of collateral vessels in human hearts, a detailed analysis of their distribution within the coronary vasculature based on three-dimensional vascular reconstructions is lacking. This study aimed to classify the transmural distribution and connectivity of coronary collaterals in human hearts. One normotrophic human heart and one hypertrophied human heart with fibrosis in the inferior wall from a previous infarction were obtained. After filling the coronary arteries with fluorescent replica material, hearts were frozen and alternately cut and block-face imaged using an imaging cryomicrotome. Transmural distribution, connectivity, and diameter of collaterals were determined. Numerous collateral vessels were found (normotrophic heart: 12.3 collaterals/cm(3); hypertrophied heart: 3.7 collaterals/cm(3)), with 97% and 92%, respectively, of the collaterals located within the perfusion territories (intracoronary collaterals). In the normotrophic heart, intracoronary collaterals {median diameter [interquartile range (IQR)]: 91.4 [73.0-115.7] μm} were most prevalent (74%) within the left anterior descending (LAD) territory. Intercoronary collaterals [median diameter (IQR): 94.3 (79.9-107.4) μm] were almost exclusively (99%) found between the LAD and the left circumflex artery (LCX). In the hypertrophied heart, intracoronary collaterals [median diameter (IQR): 101.1 (84.8-126.0) μm] were located within both the LAD (48%) and LCX (46%) territory. Intercoronary collaterals [median diameter (IQR): 97.8 (89.3-111.2) μm] were most prevalent between the LAD-LCX (68%) and LAD-right coronary artery (28%). This study shows that human hearts have abundant coronary collaterals within all flow territories and layers of the heart. The majority of these collaterals are small intracoronary collaterals, which would have remained undetected by clinical imaging techniques.

  18. Resilience of the human fetal lung following stillbirth: potential relevance for pulmonary regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Monique E; Chu, Sharon; Heger, Nicholas; Hall, Susan; Mao, Quanfu

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in pulmonary regenerative medicine have increased the demand for alveolar epithelial progenitor cells. Fetal lung tissues from spontaneous pregnancy losses may represent a neglected, yet ethically and societally acceptable source of alveolar epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the regenerative capacity of fetal lungs obtained from second trimester stillbirths. Lung tissues were harvested from 11 stillborn fetuses (13 to 22 weeks' gestation) at postdelivery intervals ranging from 10 to 41 hours and grafted to the renal subcapsular space of immune-suppressed rats to provide optimal growth conditions. Histology, epithelial and alveolar type II cell proliferation, and surfactant protein-C mRNA expression were studied in preimplantation lung tissues and in xenografts at posttransplantation week 2. All xenografts displayed advanced architectural maturation compared with their respective preimplantation tissues, regardless of gestational age and postdelivery interval. The proliferative activity of the grafts was significantly higher than that of the preimplantation tissues (mean Ki-67 labeling index 26.7%±7.7% versus 14.7%±10.5%; P<.01). The proliferative activity of grafts obtained after a long (>36 hours) postdelivery interval was significantly higher than that of the corresponding preimplantation tissue, and equivalent to that of grafts obtained after a short postdelivery interval (<14 hours). The regenerative capacity of fetal lung tissue was greater at younger (13 to 17 weeks) than at older (19 to 22 weeks) gestational ages. The presence of inflammation/chorioamnionitis did not appear to affect graft regeneration. All grafts studied displayed robust surfactant protein-C mRNA expression. In conclusion, fetal lung tissues from second trimester stillbirths can regain their inherent high regenerative potential following short-term culture, even if harvested more than 36 hours after delivery.

  19. Assessment of placental transfer and the effect on embryo-fetal development of a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting lymphotoxin-alpha in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Schuetz, Chris; Arima, Akihiro; Chihaya, Yutaka; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Habermann, Gunnar; Xiao, Jim; Woods, Cynthia; Grogan, Jane; Gelzleichter, Thomas; Cain, Gary

    2016-08-01

    An enhanced embryo-fetal development study was conducted in cynomolgus monkeys using pateclizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting lymphotoxin-alpha. Pateclizumab administration between gestation days (GD) 20 and 132 did not induce maternal or developmental toxicities. The ratio of fetal-to-maternal serum concentration of pateclizumab was 0.73% on GD 50 and 61% by GD 139. Decreased fetal inguinal lymph node-to-body weight ratio was present in the high-dose group without microscopic abnormalities, a change attributable to inhibition of lymphocyte recruitment, which is a pharmacologic effect of pateclizumab during late lymph node development. The effect was observed in inguinal but not submandibular or mesenteric lymph nodes; this was attributed to differential susceptibility related to sequential lymph node development. Placental transfer of therapeutic IgG1 antibodies; thus, begins during the first trimester in non-human primates. Depending on the potency and dose levels administered, antibody levels in the fetus may be pharmacologically or toxicologically relevant.

  20. Assessment of placental transfer and the effect on embryo-fetal development of a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting lymphotoxin-alpha in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Schuetz, Chris; Arima, Akihiro; Chihaya, Yutaka; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Habermann, Gunnar; Xiao, Jim; Woods, Cynthia; Grogan, Jane; Gelzleichter, Thomas; Cain, Gary

    2016-08-01

    An enhanced embryo-fetal development study was conducted in cynomolgus monkeys using pateclizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting lymphotoxin-alpha. Pateclizumab administration between gestation days (GD) 20 and 132 did not induce maternal or developmental toxicities. The ratio of fetal-to-maternal serum concentration of pateclizumab was 0.73% on GD 50 and 61% by GD 139. Decreased fetal inguinal lymph node-to-body weight ratio was present in the high-dose group without microscopic abnormalities, a change attributable to inhibition of lymphocyte recruitment, which is a pharmacologic effect of pateclizumab during late lymph node development. The effect was observed in inguinal but not submandibular or mesenteric lymph nodes; this was attributed to differential susceptibility related to sequential lymph node development. Placental transfer of therapeutic IgG1 antibodies; thus, begins during the first trimester in non-human primates. Depending on the potency and dose levels administered, antibody levels in the fetus may be pharmacologically or toxicologically relevant. PMID:27211603

  1. Baby on board: olfactory cues indicate pregnancy and fetal sex in a non-human primate

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Drea, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory cues play an integral, albeit underappreciated, role in mediating vertebrate social and reproductive behaviour. These cues fluctuate with the signaller's hormonal condition, coincident with and informative about relevant aspects of its reproductive state, such as pubertal onset, change in season and, in females, timing of ovulation. Although pregnancy dramatically alters a female's endocrine profiles, which can be further influenced by fetal sex, the relationship between gestation and olfactory cues is poorly understood. We therefore examined the effects of pregnancy and fetal sex on volatile genital secretions in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), a strepsirrhine primate possessing complex olfactory mechanisms of reproductive signalling. While pregnant, dams altered and dampened their expression of volatile chemicals, with compound richness being particularly reduced in dams bearing sons. These changes were comparable in magnitude with other, published chemical differences among lemurs that are salient to conspecifics. Such olfactory ‘signatures’ of pregnancy may help guide social interactions, potentially promoting mother–infant recognition, reducing intragroup conflict or counteracting behavioural mechanisms of paternity confusion; cues that also advertise fetal sex may additionally facilitate differential sex allocation. PMID:25716086

  2. Baby on board: olfactory cues indicate pregnancy and fetal sex in a non-human primate.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Drea, Christine M

    2015-02-01

    Olfactory cues play an integral, albeit underappreciated, role in mediating vertebrate social and reproductive behaviour. These cues fluctuate with the signaller's hormonal condition, coincident with and informative about relevant aspects of its reproductive state, such as pubertal onset, change in season and, in females, timing of ovulation. Although pregnancy dramatically alters a female's endocrine profiles, which can be further influenced by fetal sex, the relationship between gestation and olfactory cues is poorly understood. We therefore examined the effects of pregnancy and fetal sex on volatile genital secretions in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), a strepsirrhine primate possessing complex olfactory mechanisms of reproductive signalling. While pregnant, dams altered and dampened their expression of volatile chemicals, with compound richness being particularly reduced in dams bearing sons. These changes were comparable in magnitude with other, published chemical differences among lemurs that are salient to conspecifics. Such olfactory 'signatures' of pregnancy may help guide social interactions, potentially promoting mother-infant recognition, reducing intragroup conflict or counteracting behavioural mechanisms of paternity confusion; cues that also advertise fetal sex may additionally facilitate differential sex allocation. PMID:25716086

  3. Upstream promoter mutation associated with a modest elevation of fetal hemoglobin expression in human adults.

    PubMed

    Gilman, J G; Mishima, N; Wen, X J; Kutlar, F; Huisman, T H

    1988-07-01

    In hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin, Hb F (alpha 2 gamma 2) is elevated after birth. Screening of sickle cell patients has revealed a family with elevated Hb F and high A gamma values. The propositus was a sickle cell patient with approximately 25% Hb F and 68.4% A gamma. He was heterozygous for the Benin (#19) and Mor beta S haplotypes. Five AS relatives with the Mor haplotype had 2.5% +/- 0.9% fetal hemoglobin and 92.8% +/- 2.8% A gamma, whereas two with the Benin haplotype had normal fetal hemoglobin (0.5%). The Mor haplotype is thus associated with the elevated Hb F in this family. The 13-kilobase (kb) Bg/II fragment containing the G gamma and A gamma genes of the Mor haplotype was cloned, and the G gamma and A gamma promoters sequenced from -383 to beyond the Cap sites. The Mor G gamma gene was normal, but the A gamma gene had a unique C----T mutation at -202. A different mutation at -202 of G gamma (C----G) was previously detected by other researchers in association with considerably higher Hb F in AS cases (15% to 25%). These data suggest either that -202 mutations affect the G gamma and A gamma promoters differently or that different nucleotide substitutions at -202 have divergent effects. Alternatively, additional unknown mutations could cause the differences in gene expression.

  4. Development of external surfaces of human cerebellar lobes in the fetal period.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska-Kotas, Marta; Kędzia, Alicja; Dudek, Krzysztof

    2014-10-01

    In the fetal period, development of cerebellar lobes may proceed dissimilarly due to possible differentiated origins of the cells and diversified times of their migration to certain cerebellum regions. This can cause various growth trajectories for the external surfaces of cerebellar lobes. The goal of the study was to describe the development of the external surface of cerebellum lobes and fissures delineating them in the fetal period. The material consisted of 101 fetuses (48 males and 53 females)-crown rump length 89-229 mm corresponding to 15-28 weeks of fetal life. The methods were based on anthropometric measurements and preparation techniques combined with elicited image computer analysis. At the largest values of the cerebellum posterior lobe surface, the most dynamic growth rate was observed in the case of the anterior lobe. Among the cerebellar lobes, proportional change was observed as well as a gradual increase in anterior lobe surface area and a simultaneous decrease in the surface area of the flocculonodular lobe part of the cerebellum total external surface. This paper presents the different growth trajectories of cerebellar lobes and demonstrates the importance of the primary fissure as a delineating mark for two regions with different dynamics of development.

  5. Maternal hyperglycemia leads to fetal cardiac hyperplasia and dysfunction in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Lara; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Laine, V Jukka; Koskinen, Anna; Soukka, Hanna; Kytö, Ville; Määttä, Jorma; Haapsamo, Mervi; Ekholm, Eeva; Räsänen, Juha

    2013-09-01

    Accelerated fetal myocardial growth with altered cardiac function is a well-documented complication of human diabetic pregnancy, but its pathophysiology is still largely unknown. Our aim was to explore the mechanisms of fetal cardiac remodeling and cardiovascular hemodynamics in a rat model of maternal pregestational streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. The hyperglycemic group comprised 107 fetuses (10 dams) and the control group 219 fetuses (20 dams). Fetal cardiac function was assessed serially by Doppler ultrasonography. Fetal cardiac to thoracic area ratio, newborn heart weight, myocardial cell proliferative and apoptotic activities, and cardiac gene expression patterns were determined. Maternal hyperglycemia was associated with increased cardiac size, proliferative, apoptotic and mitotic activities, upregulation of genes encoding A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, myosin heavy chain types 2 and 3, uncoupling proteins 2 and 3, and the angiogenetic tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 12A. The genes encoding Kv channel-interacting protein 2, a regulator of electrical cardiac phenotype, and the insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 were downregulated. The heart rate was lower in fetuses of hyperglycemic dams. At 13-14 gestational days, 98% of fetuses of hyperglycemic dams had holosystolic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and decreased outflow mean velocity, indicating diminished cardiac output. Maternal hyperglycemia may lead to accelerated fetal myocardial growth by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia. In fetuses of hyperglycemic dams, expression of key genes that control and regulate cardiomyocyte electrophysiological properties, contractility, and metabolism are altered and may lead to major functional and clinical implications on the fetal heart. PMID:23839525

  6. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75(NTR) in Developing Human Fetal Teeth.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75(NTR) and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75(NTR) expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75(NTR) in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues. PMID:27536251

  7. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75(NTR) in Developing Human Fetal Teeth.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75(NTR) and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75(NTR) expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75(NTR) in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75(NTR), and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues.

  8. The fine structure of the human fetal urinary bladder. Development and maturation. A light, transmission and scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J; Antonakopoulos, G N

    1989-01-01

    The urinary bladders of 27 human fetuses, aged 7 weeks to full term, were studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy to establish the sequence of events in the development and maturation of the organ during fetal life. In the early specimens, 7-12 weeks old, the urinary bladder was lined by a bilayered, cuboidal and glycogen-rich epithelium. During the 13-17th weeks the epithelium thickened, a third layer developed and by light microscopy it now resembled urothelium. By 21 weeks this had evolved into a 3-4 layer thick epithelium with typical ultrastructural urothelial characteristics. Smooth muscle cells emerged from the condensed mesenchyme of the bladder wall by the 12th week of gestation, initially in the cephalic part of the organ but spreading within a week into the caudal end. Our findings indicate that the human fetal bladder undergoes a series of vital developmental changes during 13-21 weeks of gestation finally acquiring the typical urothelial lining and a well-developed muscular coat. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 PMID:2621133

  9. Temporal and spatial expression of major myelin proteins in the human fetal spinal cord during the second trimester

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenheim, K.M.; Bodhireddy, S.R.; Rashbaum, W.K.; Lyman, W.D.

    1996-06-01

    Immunohistochemical identification of myelin basic protein (MBP) is a sensitive method for assessing myelination in the human fetal central nervous system (CNS). However, the temporospatial relationship of expression of two other major myelin proteins, proteolipid protein (PLP) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) to that of MBP during fetal development has not been assessed in human tissues. Vibratome sections of cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral levels from 37 normal spinal cords of {le} 10 to 24 gestational week (GW) fetuses were analyzed using immunohistochemical methods. Using light microscopy, MBP was the first oligodendrocyte marker detected, present by 10 GW at more rostral levels. PLP and MAG were detected rostrally between 12 to 14 GW. All myelin proteins were expressed in anterior to posterior and rostral to caudal gradients. By the late second trimester, expression of MBP, PLP and MAG was noted in all locations in the spinal white matter except for the corticospinal tract. Expression of MAG was particularly marked in the posterior root entry zone and propriospinal tracts. The results suggest that PLP and MAG are expressed later than MBP but follow similar spatial gradients. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Western Zika Virus in Human Fetal Neural Progenitors Persists Long Term with Partial Cytopathic and Limited Immunogenic Effects.

    PubMed

    Hanners, Natasha W; Eitson, Jennifer L; Usui, Noriyoshi; Richardson, R Blake; Wexler, Eric M; Konopka, Genevieve; Schoggins, John W

    2016-06-14

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Western hemisphere is associated with severe pathology in newborns, including microcephaly and brain damage. The mechanisms underlying these outcomes are under intense investigation. Here, we show that a 2015 ZIKV isolate replicates in multiple cell types, including primary human fetal neural progenitors (hNPs). In immortalized cells, ZIKV is cytopathic and grossly rearranges endoplasmic reticulum membranes similar to other flaviviruses. In hNPs, ZIKV infection has a partial cytopathic phase characterized by cell rounding, pyknosis, and activation of caspase 3. Despite notable cell death, ZIKV did not activate a cytokine response in hNPs. This lack of cell intrinsic immunity to ZIKV is consistent with our observation that virus replication persists in hNPs for at least 28 days. These findings, supported by published fetal neuropathology, establish a proof-of-concept that neural progenitors in the developing human fetus can be direct targets of detrimental ZIKV-induced pathology.

  11. Antioxidants and fetal protection against ethanol teratogenicity. I. Review of the experimental data and implications to humans.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kerem, Raanan; Koren, Gideon

    2003-01-01

    Ethanol is the most common human teratogen, and heavy drinking during pregnancy can result in serious adverse outcomes to the fetus. The cellular mechanisms by which ethanol induces damage in utero are not well understood, while induction of oxidative stress is believed to be one putative mechanism. Our objective is to review the data of antioxidant effects in experimental models of fetal alcohol syndrome. Prior to the description of the available experimental data, we will briefly review the mechanisms leading to ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Ethanol-induced oxidative damage to the fetus could be attenuated by a variety of antioxidants as was documented in whole animal and tissue culture studies. Experiments, retrieved from the literature search, are described and criticized. Although experimental data are still limited, the application of a treatment strategy that includes antioxidants is justified since antioxidant treatment in human pregnancy for pre-eclampsia was demonstrated to be safe and effective. The available experimental evidence and the safety of vitamins C and E in pregnancy suggest that experimental use of antioxidants in alcohol-consuming mothers should be seriously considered to reduce fetal alcohol damage.

  12. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75NTR in Developing Human Fetal Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Pagella, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is important for the development and the differentiation of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. NGF binds to specific low- and high-affinity cell surface receptors, respectively, p75NTR and TrkA. In the present study, we examined by immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of the NGF, p75NTR, and TrkA proteins during human fetal tooth development, in order to better understand the mode of NGF signaling action in dental tissues. The results obtained show that these molecules are expressed in a wide range of dental cells of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin during early stages of odontogenesis, as well as in nerve fibers that surround the developing tooth germs. At more advanced developmental stages, NGF and TrkA are localized in differentiated cells with secretory capacities such as preameloblasts/ameloblasts secreting enamel matrix and odontoblasts secreting dentine matrix. In contrast, p75NTR expression is absent from these secretory cells and restricted in proliferating cells of the dental epithelium. The temporospatial distribution of NGF and p75NTR in fetal human teeth is similar, but not identical, with that observed previously in the developing rodent teeth, thus indicating that the genetic information is well-conserved during evolution. The expression patterns of NGF, p75NTR, and TrkA during odontogenesis suggest regulatory roles for NGF signaling in proliferation and differentiation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, as well as in attraction and sprouting of nerve fibers within dental tissues. PMID:27536251

  13. The atrioventricular nodal artery in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Krupa, U

    1993-01-01

    Studies were performed on 120 hearts taken from adult cadavers of both sexes. In the study,. prepared and corrosion technique was used. Arteries were filled with vinyl polichloride or Plastogen G through the aorta. The examined vessels were dissected and either partly, or totally etched in the concentrated hydrochloric acid soda lye. The arterial blood supply of the atrioventricular node arose in 108 (90%) of the hearts from the right coronary artery and in 12 (10%) of the hearts from the left coronary artery.

  14. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  15. Development of the stria vascularis and potassium regulation in the human fetal cochlea: Insights into hereditary sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Locher, Heiko; de Groot, John C M J; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Huisman, Margriet A; Frijns, Johan H M; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2015-11-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is one of the most common congenital disorders in humans, afflicting one in every thousand newborns. The majority is of heritable origin and can be divided in syndromic and nonsyndromic forms. Knowledge of the expression profile of affected genes in the human fetal cochlea is limited, and as many of the gene mutations causing SNHL likely affect the stria vascularis or cochlear potassium homeostasis (both essential to hearing), a better insight into the embryological development of this organ is needed to understand SNHL etiologies. We present an investigation on the development of the stria vascularis in the human fetal cochlea between 9 and 18 weeks of gestation (W9-W18) and show the cochlear expression dynamics of key potassium-regulating proteins. At W12, MITF+/SOX10+/KIT+ neural-crest-derived melanocytes migrated into the cochlea and penetrated the basement membrane of the lateral wall epithelium, developing into the intermediate cells of the stria vascularis. These melanocytes tightly integrated with Na+/K+-ATPase-positive marginal cells, which started to express KCNQ1 in their apical membrane at W16. At W18, KCNJ10 and gap junction proteins GJB2/CX26 and GJB6/CX30 were expressed in the cells in the outer sulcus, but not in the spiral ligament. Finally, we investigated GJA1/CX43 and GJE1/CX23 expression, and suggest that GJE1 presents a potential new SNHL associated locus. Our study helps to better understand human cochlear development, provides more insight into multiple forms of hereditary SNHL, and suggests that human hearing does not commence before the third trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25663387

  16. Development of the stria vascularis and potassium regulation in the human fetal cochlea: Insights into hereditary sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John C.M.J.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Huisman, Margriet A.; Frijns, Johan H.M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is one of the most common congenital disorders in humans, afflicting one in every thousand newborns. The majority is of heritable origin and can be divided in syndromic and nonsyndromic forms. Knowledge of the expression profile of affected genes in the human fetal cochlea is limited, and as many of the gene mutations causing SNHL likely affect the stria vascularis or cochlear potassium homeostasis (both essential to hearing), a better insight into the embryological development of this organ is needed to understand SNHL etiologies. We present an investigation on the development of the stria vascularis in the human fetal cochlea between 9 and 18 weeks of gestation (W9–W18) and show the cochlear expression dynamics of key potassium‐regulating proteins. At W12, MITF+/SOX10+/KIT+ neural‐crest‐derived melanocytes migrated into the cochlea and penetrated the basement membrane of the lateral wall epithelium, developing into the intermediate cells of the stria vascularis. These melanocytes tightly integrated with Na+/K+‐ATPase‐positive marginal cells, which started to express KCNQ1 in their apical membrane at W16. At W18, KCNJ10 and gap junction proteins GJB2/CX26 and GJB6/CX30 were expressed in the cells in the outer sulcus, but not in the spiral ligament. Finally, we investigated GJA1/CX43 and GJE1/CX23 expression, and suggest that GJE1 presents a potential new SNHL associated locus. Our study helps to better understand human cochlear development, provides more insight into multiple forms of hereditary SNHL, and suggests that human hearing does not commence before the third trimester of pregnancy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1219–1240, 2015 PMID:25663387

  17. Omeprazole does not Potentiate Acute Oxygen Toxicity in Fetal Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Exposed to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the pathogenesis of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is a developmental lung disease of premature infants that is characterized by an interruption of lung alveolar and pulmonary vascular development. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. Earlier we observed that OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury in adult mice and oxygen toxicity in adult human lung cells. However, our later studies in newborn mice demonstrated that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced developmental lung injury. Whether OM exerts a similar toxicity in primary human fetal lung cells is unknown. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation in the human fetal lung derived primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). OM activated AhR as evident by a dose-dependent increase in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 mRNA levels in OM-treated cells. Furthermore, OM at a concentration of 100 μM (OM 100) increased NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression. Surprisingly, hyperoxia decreased rather than increase the NQO1 protein levels in OM 100-treated cells. Exposure to hyperoxia increased cytotoxicity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Interestingly, OM 100-treated cells exposed to air had increased H2O2 levels. However, hyperoxia did not further augment H2O2 levels in OM 100-treated cells. Additionally, hyperoxia-mediated oxygen toxicity was similar in both vehicle- and OM-treated cells. These findings contradict our hypothesis and support the hypothesis that OM does not potentiate acute hyperoxic injury in HPMEC in vitro. PMID:26779382

  18. Inhibition of Acute in vivo Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection by Human Interleukin 10 Treatment of SCID Mice Implanted with Human Fetal Thymus and Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, Tobias R.; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Katopodis, Nikos F.; Hachamovitch, Moshe; Rubinstein, Arye; Kim, Ana; Goldstein, Harris

    1996-04-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo models for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-159, a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-159 was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive in vivo to treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon γ expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the in vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers.

  19. Inhibition of acute in vivo human immunodeficiency virus infection by human interleukin 10 treatment of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Pettoello-Mantovani, M; Katopodis, N F; Hachamovitch, M; Rubinstein, A; Kim, A; Goldstein, H

    1996-01-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo mode for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-1(59), a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-1(59) was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive to in vivo treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon gamma expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610180

  20. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Donna K.; Struble, Craig A.; Tuffnell, Maureen E.; Stamm, Karl D.; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E.; Goetsch, Mary A.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Bick, David P.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N.; Tweddell, James S.; Mitchell, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency “spectra” to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (≥200 kb) and losses (≥100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ≤ 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ≤ 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  1. Decreased IL7Rα and TdT expression underlie the skewed immunoglobulin repertoire of human B-cell precursors from fetal origin

    PubMed Central

    Rother, Magdalena B.; Jensen, Kristin; van der Burg, Mirjam; van de Bovenkamp, Fleur S.; Kroek, Roel; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Cupedo, Tom; Olstad, Ole K.; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; van Zelm, Menno C.

    2016-01-01

    Newborns are unable to mount antibody responses towards certain antigens. This has been related to the restricted repertoire of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes of their B cells. The mechanisms underlying the restricted fetal Ig gene repertoire are currently unresolved. We here addressed this with detailed molecular and cellular analysis of human precursor-B cells from fetal liver, fetal bone marrow (BM), and pediatric BM. In the absence of selection processes, fetal B-cell progenitors more frequently used proximal V, D and J genes in complete IGH gene rearrangements, despite normal Ig locus contraction. Fewer N-nucleotides were added in IGH gene rearrangements in the context of low TdT and XRCC4 expression. Moreover, fetal progenitor-B cells expressed lower levels of IL7Rα than their pediatric counterparts. Analysis of progenitor-B cells from IL7Rα-deficient patients revealed that TdT expression and N-nucleotides additions in Dh-Jh junctions were dependent on functional IL7Rα. Thus, IL7Rα affects TdT expression, and decreased expression of this receptor underlies at least in part the skewed Ig repertoire formation in fetal B-cell precursors. These new insights provide a better understanding of the formation of adaptive immunity in the developing fetus. PMID:27658954

  2. The human subject: an integrative animal model for 21(st) century heart failure research.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Pippin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a leading cause of death and it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality affecting tens of millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of extensive research conducted at enormous expense, only a handful of interventions have significantly impacted survival in heart failure. Even the most widely prescribed treatments act primarily to slow disease progression, do not provide sustained survival advantage, and have adverse side effects. Since mortality remains about 50% within five years of diagnosis, the need to increase our understanding of heart failure disease mechanisms and development of preventive and reparative therapies remains critical. Currently, the vast majority of basic science heart failure research is conducted using animal models ranging from fruit flies to primates; however, insights gleaned from decades of animal-based research efforts have not been proportional to research success in terms of deciphering human heart failure and developing effective therapeutics for human patients. Here we discuss the reasons for this translational discrepancy which can be equally attributed to the use of erroneous animal models and the lack of widespread use of human-based research methodologies and address why and how we must position our own species at center stage as the quintessential animal model for 21(st) century heart failure research. If the ultimate goal of the scientific community is to tackle the epidemic status of heart failure, the best way to achieve that goal is through prioritizing human-based, human-relevant research.

  3. Transcriptome of human foetal heart compared with cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Cathelijne W; Okawa, Satoshi; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Passier, Robert; Braam, Stefan R; Tertoolen, Leon G; del Sol, Antonio; Davis, Richard P; Mummery, Christine L

    2015-09-15

    Differentiated derivatives of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are often considered immature because they resemble foetal cells more than adult, with hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) being no exception. Many functional features of these cardiomyocytes, such as their cell morphology, electrophysiological characteristics, sarcomere organization and contraction force, are underdeveloped compared with adult cardiomyocytes. However, relatively little is known about how their gene expression profiles compare with the human foetal heart, in part because of the paucity of data on the human foetal heart at different stages of development. Here, we collected samples of matched ventricles and atria from human foetuses during the first and second trimester of development. This presented a rare opportunity to perform gene expression analysis on the individual chambers of the heart at various stages of development, allowing us to identify not only genes involved in the formation of the heart, but also specific genes upregulated in each of the four chambers and at different stages of development. The data showed that hPSC-CMs had a gene expression profile similar to first trimester foetal heart, but after culture in conditions shown previously to induce maturation, they cluster closer to the second trimester foetal heart samples. In summary, we demonstrate how the gene expression profiles of human foetal heart samples can be used for benchmarking hPSC-CMs and also contribute to determining their equivalent stage of development.

  4. The human subject: an integrative animal model for 21st century heart failure research

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Pippin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a leading cause of death and it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality affecting tens of millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of extensive research conducted at enormous expense, only a handful of interventions have significantly impacted survival in heart failure. Even the most widely prescribed treatments act primarily to slow disease progression, do not provide sustained survival advantage, and have adverse side effects. Since mortality remains about 50% within five years of diagnosis, the need to increase our understanding of heart failure disease mechanisms and development of preventive and reparative therapies remains critical. Currently, the vast majority of basic science heart failure research is conducted using animal models ranging from fruit flies to primates; however, insights gleaned from decades of animal-based research efforts have not been proportional to research success in terms of deciphering human heart failure and developing effective therapeutics for human patients. Here we discuss the reasons for this translational discrepancy which can be equally attributed to the use of erroneous animal models and the lack of widespread use of human-based research methodologies and address why and how we must position our own species at center stage as the quintessential animal model for 21st century heart failure research. If the ultimate goal of the scientific community is to tackle the epidemic status of heart failure, the best way to achieve that goal is through prioritizing human-based, human-relevant research. PMID:26550463

  5. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoffen, E.; Van Wichen, D.; Stuij, I.; De Jonge, N.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.; Van Den Tweel, J.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.; De Weger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952534

  6. Mutator/Hypermutable Fetal/Juvenile Metakaryotic Stem Cells and Human Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Lohith G.; Herrero-Jimenez, Pablo; Kamath, Tushar; Sanghvi, Jayodita; Gutierrez, Efren; Hensle, David; Kogel, John; Kusko, Rebecca; Rexer, Karl; Kurzweil, Ray; Refinetti, Paulo; Morgenthaler, Stephan; Koledova, Vera V.; Gostjeva, Elena V.; Thilly, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Adult age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates increase exponentially from maturity, reach a maximum, then decline in extreme old age. Armitage and Doll (1) postulated that the exponential increase resulted from “n” mutations occurring throughout adult life in normal “cells at risk” that initiated the growth of a preneoplastic colony in which subsequent “m” mutations promoted one of the preneoplastic “cells at risk” to form a lethal neoplasia. We have reported cytologic evidence that these “cells at risk” are fetal/juvenile organogenic, then preneoplastic metakaryotic stem cells. Metakaryotic cells display stem-like behaviors of both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear divisions and peculiarities such as bell shaped nuclei and amitotic nuclear fission that distinguish them from embryonic, eukaryotic stem cells. Analyses of mutant colony sizes and numbers in adult lung epithelia supported the inferences that the metakaryotic organogenic stem cells are constitutively mutator/hypermutable and that their contributions to cancer initiation are limited to the fetal/juvenile period. We have amended the two-stage model of Armitage and Doll and incorporated these several inferences in a computer program CancerFit v.5.0. We compared the expectations of the amended model to adult (15–104 years) age-specific colon cancer rates for European-American males born 1890–99 and observed remarkable concordance. When estimates of normal colonic fetal/juvenile APC and OAT gene mutation rates (∼2–5 × 10−5 per stem cell doubling) and preneoplastic colonic gene loss rates (∼8 × 10−3) were applied, the model was in accordance only for the values of n = 2 and m = 4 or 5. PMID:24195059

  7. Mutator/Hypermutable fetal/juvenile metakaryotic stem cells and human colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kini, Lohith G; Herrero-Jimenez, Pablo; Kamath, Tushar; Sanghvi, Jayodita; Gutierrez, Efren; Hensle, David; Kogel, John; Kusko, Rebecca; Rexer, Karl; Kurzweil, Ray; Refinetti, Paulo; Morgenthaler, Stephan; Koledova, Vera V; Gostjeva, Elena V; Thilly, William G

    2013-10-29

    Adult age-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates increase exponentially from maturity, reach a maximum, then decline in extreme old age. Armitage and Doll (1) postulated that the exponential increase resulted from "n" mutations occurring throughout adult life in normal "cells at risk" that initiated the growth of a preneoplastic colony in which subsequent "m" mutations promoted one of the preneoplastic "cells at risk" to form a lethal neoplasia. We have reported cytologic evidence that these "cells at risk" are fetal/juvenile organogenic, then preneoplastic metakaryotic stem cells. Metakaryotic cells display stem-like behaviors of both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear divisions and peculiarities such as bell shaped nuclei and amitotic nuclear fission that distinguish them from embryonic, eukaryotic stem cells. Analyses of mutant colony sizes and numbers in adult lung epithelia supported the inferences that the metakaryotic organogenic stem cells are constitutively mutator/hypermutable and that their contributions to cancer initiation are limited to the fetal/juvenile period. We have amended the two-stage model of Armitage and Doll and incorporated these several inferences in a computer program CancerFit v.5.0. We compared the expectations of the amended model to adult (15-104 years) age-specific colon cancer rates for European-American males born 1890-99 and observed remarkable concordance. When estimates of normal colonic fetal/juvenile APC and OAT gene mutation rates (∼2-5 × 10(-5) per stem cell doubling) and preneoplastic colonic gene loss rates (∼8 × 10(-3)) were applied, the model was in accordance only for the values of n = 2 and m = 4 or 5.

  8. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  9. Visualization of Fiber Structurein the Left and Right Ventricleof a Human Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-07-12

    The human heart is composed of a helical network of musclefibers. Anisotropic least squares filtering followed by fiber trackingtechniques were applied to Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging(DTMRI) data of the excised human heart. The fiber configuration wasvisualized by using thin tubes to increase 3-dimensional visualperception of the complex structure. All visualizations were performedusing the high-quality ray-tracing software POV-Ray. The fibers are shownwithin the left and right ventricles. Both ventricles exhibit similarfiber architecture and some bundles of fibers are shown linking right andleft ventricles on the posterior region of the heart.

  10. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  11. Simultaneous quantification of nicotine, opioids, cocaine, and metabolites in human fetal postmortem brain by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2011-01-01

    A validated method for simultaneous LCMSMS quantification of nicotine, cocaine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), codeine, and metabolites in 100 mg fetal human brain was developed and validated. After homogenization and solid-phase extraction, analytes were resolved on a Hydro-RP analytical column with gradient elution. Empirically determined linearity was from 5–5,000 pg/mg for cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE), 25–5,000 pg/mg for cotinine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME) and 6AM, 50–5000 pg/mg for trans-3-hydroxycotinine (OH-cotinine) and codeine, and 250–5,000 pg/mg for nicotine. Potential endogenous and exogenous interferences were resolved. Intra- and inter-assay analytical recoveries were ≥92%, intra- and inter-day and total assay imprecision were ≤14% RSD and extraction efficiencies were ≥67.2% with ≤83% matrix effect. Method applicability was demonstrated with a postmortem fetal brain containing 40 pg/mg cotinine, 65 pg/mg OH-cotinine, 13 pg/mg cocaine, 34 pg/mg EME, and 525 pg/mg BE. This validated method is useful for determination of nicotine, opioid, and cocaine biomarkers in brain. PMID:19229524

  12. Zika virus damages the human placental barrier and presents marked fetal neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Lucia de; Zanluca, Camila; Azevedo, Marina Luize Viola; Luz, Kleber Giovanni; Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte Dos

    2016-05-01

    An unusually high incidence of microcephaly in newborns has recently been observed in Brazil. There is a temporal association between the increase in cases of microcephaly and the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. Viral RNA has been detected in amniotic fluid samples, placental tissues and newborn and fetal brain tissues. However, much remains to be determined concerning the association between ZIKV infection and fetal malformations. In this study, we provide evidence of the transplacental transmission of ZIKV through the detection of viral proteins and viral RNA in placental tissue samples from expectant mothers infected at different stages of gestation. We observed chronic placentitis (TORCH type) with viral protein detection by immunohistochemistry in Hofbauer cells and some histiocytes in the intervillous spaces. We also demonstrated the neurotropism of the virus via the detection of viral proteins in glial cells and in some endothelial cells and the observation of scattered foci of microcalcifications in the brain tissues. Lesions were mainly located in the white matter. ZIKV RNA was also detected in these tissues by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We believe that these findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission, interactions between the virus and host cells and viral tropism. PMID:27143490

  13. Zika virus damages the human placental barrier and presents marked fetal neurotropism

    PubMed Central

    de Noronha, Lucia; Zanluca, Camila; Azevedo, Marina Luize Viola; Luz, Kleber Giovanni; dos Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte

    2016-01-01

    An unusually high incidence of microcephaly in newborns has recently been observed in Brazil. There is a temporal association between the increase in cases of microcephaly and the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. Viral RNA has been detected in amniotic fluid samples, placental tissues and newborn and fetal brain tissues. However, much remains to be determined concerning the association between ZIKV infection and fetal malformations. In this study, we provide evidence of the transplacental transmission of ZIKV through the detection of viral proteins and viral RNA in placental tissue samples from expectant mothers infected at different stages of gestation. We observed chronic placentitis (TORCH type) with viral protein detection by immunohistochemistry in Hofbauer cells and some histiocytes in the intervillous spaces. We also demonstrated the neurotropism of the virus via the detection of viral proteins in glial cells and in some endothelial cells and the observation of scattered foci of microcalcifications in the brain tissues. Lesions were mainly located in the white matter. ZIKV RNA was also detected in these tissues by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We believe that these findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission, interactions between the virus and host cells and viral tropism. PMID:27143490

  14. Zika virus damages the human placental barrier and presents marked fetal neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Lucia de; Zanluca, Camila; Azevedo, Marina Luize Viola; Luz, Kleber Giovanni; Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte Dos

    2016-05-01

    An unusually high incidence of microcephaly in newborns has recently been observed in Brazil. There is a temporal association between the increase in cases of microcephaly and the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. Viral RNA has been detected in amniotic fluid samples, placental tissues and newborn and fetal brain tissues. However, much remains to be determined concerning the association between ZIKV infection and fetal malformations. In this study, we provide evidence of the transplacental transmission of ZIKV through the detection of viral proteins and viral RNA in placental tissue samples from expectant mothers infected at different stages of gestation. We observed chronic placentitis (TORCH type) with viral protein detection by immunohistochemistry in Hofbauer cells and some histiocytes in the intervillous spaces. We also demonstrated the neurotropism of the virus via the detection of viral proteins in glial cells and in some endothelial cells and the observation of scattered foci of microcalcifications in the brain tissues. Lesions were mainly located in the white matter. ZIKV RNA was also detected in these tissues by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We believe that these findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission, interactions between the virus and host cells and viral tropism.

  15. Application of Laser Doppler Vibrometery for human heart auscultation.

    PubMed

    Koegelenberg, S; Scheffer, C; Blanckenberg, M M; Doubell, A F

    2014-01-01

    In this study the potential of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) was tested as a non-contact sensor for the classification of heart sounds. Of the twenty participants recorded using the LDV, five presented with Aortic Stenosis (AS), three were healthy and twelve presented with other pathologies. The recorded heart sounds were denoised and segmented using a combination of the Electrocardiogram (ECG) data and the complexity of the signal. Frequency domain features were extracted from the segmented heart sound cycles and used to train a K-nearest neighbor classifier. Due to the small number of participants, the classifier could not be trained to differentiate between normal and abnormal participants, but could successfully distinguish between participants who presented with AS and those who did not. A sensitivity of 80 % and a specificity of 100 % were achieved a test dataset.

  16. Comparative RNA-sequencing analysis of myocardial and circulating small RNAs in human heart failure and their utility as biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Akat, Kemal Marc; Moore-McGriff, D'Vesharronne; Morozov, Pavel; Brown, Miguel; Gogakos, Tasos; Correa Da Rosa, Joel; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Sauer, Markus; Ji, Ruiping; Ramarathnam, Aarthi; Totary-Jain, Hana; Williams, Zev; Tuschl, Thomas; Schulze, P Christian

    2014-07-29

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity and mortality and its incidence is increasing worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential markers and targets for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, respectively. We determined myocardial and circulating miRNA abundance and its changes in patients with stable and end-stage HF before and at different time points after mechanical unloading by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by small RNA sequencing. miRNA changes in failing heart tissues partially resembled that of fetal myocardium. Consistent with prototypical miRNA-target-mRNA interactions, target mRNA levels were negatively correlated with changes in abundance for highly expressed miRNAs in HF and fetal hearts. The cir