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Sample records for human foetal phenotype

  1. Foetal bovine serum-derived exosomes affect yield and phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Francesco; Ionta, Vittoria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Miraldi, Fabio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a powerful tool in cardiac regenerative medicine. Pre-clinical studies suggest that most of the beneficial effects promoted by the injected cells are due to their paracrine activity exerted on endogenous cells and tissue. Exosomes are candidate mediators of this paracrine effects. According to their potential, many researchers have focused on characterizing exosomes derived from specific cell types, but, up until now, only few studies have analyzed the possible in vitro effects of bovine serum-derived exosomes on cell proliferation or differentiation. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyse, from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, the in vitro effects of bovine serum exosomes on human CPCs cultured either as cardiospheres or as monolayers of cardiosphere-forming cells. Results: Effects on proliferation, yield and molecular patterning were detected. We show, for the first time, that exogenous bovine exosomes support the proliferation and migration of human cardiosphere-forming cells, and that their depletion affects cardiospheres formation, in terms of size, yield and extra-cellular matrix production. Conclusion: These results stress the importance of considering differential biological effects of exogenous cell culture supplements on the final phenotype of primary human cell cultures. PMID:27340620

  2. Foetal exposure to food and environmental carcinogens in human beings.

    PubMed

    Myöhänen, Kirsi; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2012-02-01

    Exposure to many different chemicals during pregnancy through maternal circulation is possible. Transplacental transfer of xenobiotics can be demonstrated using human placental perfusion. Also, placental perfusion can give information about the placental kinetics as well as metabolism and accumulation in the placenta because it retains the tissue structure and function. Although human placental perfusion has been used extensively to study the transplacental transfer of drugs, the information on food and environmental carcinogens is much more limited. This review deals with the foetal exposure to food and environmental carcinogens in human beings. In particular, human transplacental transfer of the food carcinogens such as acrylamide, glycidamide and nitrosodimethylamine are in focus. Because these carcinogens are genotoxic, the functional capacity of human placenta to induce DNA adduct formation or metabolize these above mentioned CYP2E1 substrates is of interest in this context.

  3. Transcriptome of human foetal heart compared with cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Cathelijne W; Okawa, Satoshi; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Passier, Robert; Braam, Stefan R; Tertoolen, Leon G; del Sol, Antonio; Davis, Richard P; Mummery, Christine L

    2015-09-15

    Differentiated derivatives of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are often considered immature because they resemble foetal cells more than adult, with hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) being no exception. Many functional features of these cardiomyocytes, such as their cell morphology, electrophysiological characteristics, sarcomere organization and contraction force, are underdeveloped compared with adult cardiomyocytes. However, relatively little is known about how their gene expression profiles compare with the human foetal heart, in part because of the paucity of data on the human foetal heart at different stages of development. Here, we collected samples of matched ventricles and atria from human foetuses during the first and second trimester of development. This presented a rare opportunity to perform gene expression analysis on the individual chambers of the heart at various stages of development, allowing us to identify not only genes involved in the formation of the heart, but also specific genes upregulated in each of the four chambers and at different stages of development. The data showed that hPSC-CMs had a gene expression profile similar to first trimester foetal heart, but after culture in conditions shown previously to induce maturation, they cluster closer to the second trimester foetal heart samples. In summary, we demonstrate how the gene expression profiles of human foetal heart samples can be used for benchmarking hPSC-CMs and also contribute to determining their equivalent stage of development.

  4. Foetal hepatic progenitor cells assume a cholangiocytic cell phenotype during two-dimensional pre-culture

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Kazuya; Chikada, Hiromi; Tsuruya, Kota; Ida, Kinuyo; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Inagaki, Yutaka; Mine, Tesuya; Kamiya, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Liver consists of parenchymal hepatocytes and other cells. Liver progenitor cell (LPC) is the origin of both hepatocytes and cholangiocytic cells. The analyses of mechanism regulating differentiation of LPCs into these functional cells are important for liver regenerative therapy using progenitor cells. LPCs in adult livers were found to form cysts with cholangiocytic characteristics in 3D culture. In contrast, foetal LPCs cannot form these cholangiocytic cysts in the same culture. Thus, the transition of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic progenitor cells might occur during liver development. Primary CD45−Ter119−Dlk1+ LPCs derived from murine foetal livers formed ALBUMIN (ALB)+CYTOKERATIN (CK)19− non-cholangiocytic cysts within 3D culture. In contrast, when foetal LPCs were pre-cultured on gelatine-coated dishes, they formed ALB−CK19+ cholangiocytic cysts. When hepatocyte growth factor or oncostatin M, which are inducers of hepatocytic differentiation, was added to pre-culture, LPCs did not form cholangiocytic cysts. These results suggest that the pre-culture on gelatine-coated dishes changed the characteristics of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic cells. Furthermore, neonatal liver progenitor cells were able to form cholangiocytic cysts in 3D culture without pre-culture. It is therefore possible that the pre-culture of mid-foetal LPCs in vitro functioned as a substitute for the late-foetal maturation step in vivo. PMID:27335264

  5. The human placenta--an alternative for studying foetal exposure.

    PubMed

    Myren, Maja; Mose, Tina; Mathiesen, Line; Knudsen, Lisbeth Ehlert

    2007-10-01

    Pregnant women are daily exposed to a wide selection of foreign substances. Sources are as different as lifestyle factors (smoking, daily care products, alcohol consumption, etc.), maternal medication or occupational/environmental exposures. The placenta provides the link between mother and foetus, and though its main task is to act as a barrier and transport nutrients and oxygen to the foetus, many foreign compounds are transported across the placenta to some degree and may therefore influence the unborn child. Foetal exposures to environmental and medicinal products may have impact on the growth of the foetus (e.g. cigarette smoke) and development of the foetal organs (e.g. methylmercury and thalidomide). The scope of this review is to give insight to the placental anatomy, development and function. Furthermore, the compounds physical properties and the transfer mechanism across the placental barrier are evaluated. In order to determine the actual foetal risk from exposure to a chemical many studies regarding the topic are necessary, including means of transportation, toxicological targets and effects. For this purpose several in vivo and in vitro models including the placental perfusion system are models of choice. PMID:17624715

  6. Human foetal osteoblastic cell response to polymer-demixed nanotopographic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung Yul; Hansen, Joshua C; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Runt, James; Donahue, Henry J

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale cell–substratum interactions are of significant interest in various biomedical applications. We investigated human foetal osteoblastic cell response to randomly distributed nanoisland topography with varying heights (11, 38 and 85 nm) produced by a polystyrene (PS)/polybromostyrene polymer-demixing technique. Cells displayed island-conforming lamellipodia spreading, and filopodia projections appeared to play a role in sensing the nanotopography. Cells cultured on 11 nm high islands displayed significantly enhanced cell spreading and larger cell dimensions than cells on larger nanoislands or flat PS control, on which cells often displayed a stellate shape. Development of signal transmitting structures such as focal adhesive vinculin protein and cytoskeletal actin stress fibres was more pronounced, as was their colocalization, in cells cultured on smaller nanoisland surfaces. Cell adhesion and proliferation were greater with decreasing island height. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, an early stage marker of bone cell differentiation, also exhibited nanotopography dependence, i.e. higher AP activity on 11 nm islands compared with that on larger islands or flat PS. Therefore, randomly distributed island topography with varying nanoscale heights not only affect adhesion-related cell behaviour but also bone cell phenotype. Our results suggest that modulation of nanoscale topography may be exploited to control cell function at cell–biomaterial interfaces. PMID:16849169

  7. Differentiation and migration properties of human foetal umbilical cord perivascular cells: potential for lung repair

    PubMed Central

    Montemurro, Tiziana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Montelatici, Elisa; Weissmann, Gaia; Crisan, Mihaela; Colnaghi, Maria Rosa; Rebulla, Paolo; Mosca, Fabio; Péault, Bruno; Lazzari, Lorenza

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been derived from different cultured human tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, amniotic fluid and umbilical cord blood. Only recently it was suggested that MSC descended from perivascular cells, the latter being defined as CD146+ neuro-glial proteoglycan (NG)2+ platelet-derived growth factor-Rβ+ ALP+ CD34– CD45– von Willebrand factor (vWF)– CD144–. Herein we studied the properties of perivascular cells from a novel source, the foetal human umbilical cord (HUC) collected from pre-term newborns. By immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry we show that pre-term/foetal HUCs contain more perivascular cells than their full-term counterparts (2.5%versus 0.15%). Moreover, foetal HUC perivascular cells (HUCPC) express the embryonic cell markers specific embryonic antigen-4, Runx1 and Oct-4 and can be cultured over the long term. To further confirm the MSC identity of these cultured perivascular cells, we also showed their expression at different passages of antigens that typify MSC. The multilineage differentiative capacity of HUCPC into osteogenic, adipogenic and myogenic cell lineages was demonstrated in culture. In the perspective of a therapeutic application in chronic lung disease of pre-term newborns, we demonstrated the in vitro ability of HUCPC to migrate towards an alveolar type II cell line damaged with bleomycin, an anti-cancer agent with known pulmonary toxicity. The secretory profile exhibited by foetal HUCPC in the migration assay suggested a paracrine effect that could be exploited in various clinical conditions including lung disorders. PMID:20219017

  8. Vascular actions of purines in the foetal circulation of the human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Read, M. A.; Boura, A. L.; Walters, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The vasoactive effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine and other purines in the foetal circulation of the human placenta were examined. Single lobules of the placenta were bilaterally perfused in vitro with Krebs buffer (maternal and foetal sides 5 ml min-1 each, 95% O2:5% CO2, 37 degrees C). Changes in foetal vascular tone were assessed by recording perfusion pressure during constant infusion of each purine. To allow recording of the vasodilator effects, submaximal vasoconstriction was induced by concomitant infusion of prostaglandin F2 alpha (0.7-2.0 mumol l-1). 2. ATP (1.0-100 mumol l-1) usually caused concentration-dependent reductions in perfusion pressure. However, biphasic with initial transient increases, or only increases in pressure were sometimes observed. Falls in pressure caused by ATP were significantly reduced by addition to the perfusate of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) (100 mumol l-1) but not NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NOARG) (100 mumol l-1). They were not influenced by addition of indomethacin (10 mumol l-1) or L-arginine (100 mumol l-1). 3. Adenosine (0.01-1.0 mmol l-1) consistently caused concentration-dependent reductions in perfusion pressure, this effect not being influenced by indomethacin. L-NOARG, but not D-NOARG, reduced the potency of adenosine approximately three fold. L-Arginine, but not D-arginine enhanced its potency by a similar amount. 4. 2-Methylthio-ATP, a selective P2 gamma agonist was approximately 50 times more potent than ATP as a vasodilator agent, always causing decreases in perfusion pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220907

  9. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation.

  10. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation. PMID:26520385

  11. Comparative immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin in human foetal mesonephros and metanephros.

    PubMed

    Magro, G; Perris, R; Romeo, R; Marcello, M; Lopes, M; Vasquez, E; Grasso, S

    2001-04-01

    The human mesonephros is currently regarded as a simplified version of the foetal metanephros, primarily due to the close morphological resemblance between these two structures. The aim of the present study was to define whether human mesonephric and foetal metanephric nephrons share immunophenotypical traits in their corresponding structures (glomeruli, proximal and distal tubules). For this purpose we first investigated immunohistochemically the overall expression and topographical distribution of cytokeratins 7, 8, 18, 19, and 20, vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin in mature mesonephric nephrons and compared the results with those obtained in maturing-stage foetal metanephric nephrons. No expression of cytokeratins 7 and 20 was found. Cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19 and vimentin showed a restricted and basically coincident expression along the different components of both mesonephric and metanephric nephrons. These findings indicate that the intermediate filament protein profile of human mature mesonephric nephrons closely recapitulates that observed in developing metanephros and thereby strengthens the concept that human mesonephros, a transient ontogenic structure, is largely similar to the foetal metanephros. The sole difference between human mesonephros and foetal metanephros was the divergent expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin. This protein exhibited an increasingly accentuated mesangial expression paralleling the morphological maturation of metanephric glomerulus, whereas it was absent from the mesonephric one. This would suggest that the mesangial cells in these two renal structures have a different function during the foetal life.

  12. Morphology of the interstitial cells of Cajal of the human ileum from foetal to neonatal life

    PubMed Central

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Vannucchi, Maria-Giuliana; Alaggio, Rita; Strojna, Aleksandra; Midrio, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The so-called interstitial cells of Cajal myenteric plexus (ICC-MP), interstitial cells of Cajal intramuscular (ICC-IM) and interstitial cells of Cajal deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP) are the three types of ICC endowed within the intestinal muscle coat where they play different roles in gut motility. Studies on ICC ontogenesis showed ICC-MP in the human ileum by 7–9 weeks while information on ICC-IM and ICC-DMP in foetuses and new-borns are not exhaustive. Functional recordings in the fasting state of prematurely born babies aged 28–37 weeks showed immature ileal motility. To gain more information on the time of appearance of the three ICC types in the human ileum and on the steps of the acquisition of mature features, we studied by c-kit immuno-histochemistry foetuses aged 17–27 weeks and newborns aged 36–41 weeks. In parallel, the maturative steps of enteric plexuses and muscle layers were immunohistochemically examined by using anti-neuron specific enolase (NSE), anti-S-100 and anti-α smooth muscle actin (αSMA) antibodies. The appearance and differentiation of all the ICC types were seen to occur in concomitance with those of the related nerve plexuses and muscle layers. ICC-MP appeared first, ICC-IM and ICC-DMP later and their differentiation was incomplete at birth. In conclusion, the ICC-MP, the intestinal pacemaker cells, in spite of absence of food intake, are already present during the foetal life and the ICC-IM appear by pre-term life, thus ensuring neurotransmission. The ICC-DMP and their related nerve plexus and smooth muscle cells, i.e. the intestinal stretch receptor, begin to differentiate at birth. These findings might help in predicting neonatal ileal motor behaviour and in interpreting the role of ICC abnormalities in the pathophysiology of intestinal motile disorders of neonates and young children. PMID:17635640

  13. Inhibition of human lymphocyte transformation by human alpha-foetoprotein (HAFP); comparison of foetal and hepatoma HAFP and kinetic studies in vitro immunosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Yachnin, S; Lester, E

    1976-01-01

    Five pure isolates of human alpha-foetoprotein (HAFP) from adults with tumours of the li er or stomach, as well as HAFP isolated from foetal liver, inhibit in vitro human lymphocyte transformation induced by phytomitogens, anti-human thymocyte serum, and the mixed lymphocyte culture. Foetal HAFP produces 50% inhibition at concentrations of 1-5 mug/ml. The HAFPs isolated from tumour-bearing adults are 1-3 orders of magnitude less potent (50% inhibition achieved at approximately 20, 130, 500, and 2000 mug/ml, respectively). In order to achieve maximum inhibition HAFP must be present at the time of mitogen addition; pre-exposure of lymphocytes to HAFP, followed by washing, does not result in lymphocyte suppression. The inhibiting effect of HAFP cannot be overcome by a ten-fold increase in mitogen concentration implying that HAFP does not act by simple competition with the lymphocyte membrane for the mitogen combining site. HAFP may play an immunoregulatory role during foetal development. PMID:64327

  14. Expression of CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 in Human Foetal Tissues and its Correlation with Nuclear Receptors.

    PubMed

    Betts, Stina; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Rane, Anders; Ekström, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the nuclear receptors vitamin D receptor (VDR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are involved in the regulation of the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 expression in adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression of CYP3A4 and the foetal CYP3A7 in human foetal tissues and their relation to gene expression and genetic variations in the nuclear receptors VDR, PPARα, PXR and CAR. We determined the relative expression of CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 and these nuclear receptors in foetal livers, intestines and adrenals, using quantitative PCR. In addition, the expression of these enzymes was also analysed in adult liver. There was a high interindividual variability in CYP3A4 and CYP3A7, 49 times and 326 times, respectively. Both CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 had the highest expression in the liver. There were significant correlations (p < 0.001) between the nuclear receptors studied and the expression of CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 in foetal liver, as well as the expression of CYP3A4 in foetal intestine. Polymorphisms in the VDR gene, rs1544410 and rs1523130 (TaqI), in the PXR gene, rs1523130, and in the PPARα gene, rs4253728, were not correlated with CYP3A4 or CYP3A7 expression. However, C-homozygous individuals of the TaqI VDR polymorphism had 60% lower VDR gene expression (p < 0.05), than individuals carrying one or two T alleles. In conclusion, differences in the expression of nuclear receptors might determine the variability in CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 expression observed in foetal liver.

  15. Alpinia katsumadai Extracts Inhibit Adhesion and Invasion of Campylobacter jejuni in Animal and Human Foetal Small Intestine Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Pogačar, Maja Šikić; Klančnik, Anja; Bucar, Franz; Langerholc, Tomaž; Možina, Sonja Smole

    2015-10-01

    Alpinia katsumadai is used in traditional Chinese medicine for abdominal distention, pain, and diarrhoea. Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal illnesses worldwide. Adhesion to gut epithelium is a prerequisite in its pathogenesis. The antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and anti-adhesive activities of a chemically characterised extract (SEE) and its residual material of hydrodistillation (hdSEE-R) from A. katsumadai seeds were evaluated against C. jejuni. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for SEE and hdSEE-R were 0.5 mg/mL and 0.25 mg/mL, respectively, and there was no cytotoxic influence in the anti-adhesion tests, as these were performed at much lower concentrations of these tested plant extracts. Adhesion of C. jejuni to pig (PSI) and human foetal (H4) small-intestine cell lines was significantly decreased at lower concentrations (0.2 to 50 µg/mL). In the same concentration range, the invasiveness of C. jejuni in PSI cells was reduced by 45% to 65% when they were treated with SEE or hdSEE-R. The hdSEE-R represents a bioactive waste with a high phenolic content and an anti-adhesive activity against C. jejuni and thus has the potential for use in pharmaceutical and food products. PMID:26058384

  16. Alpinia katsumadai Extracts Inhibit Adhesion and Invasion of Campylobacter jejuni in Animal and Human Foetal Small Intestine Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Pogačar, Maja Šikić; Klančnik, Anja; Bucar, Franz; Langerholc, Tomaž; Možina, Sonja Smole

    2015-10-01

    Alpinia katsumadai is used in traditional Chinese medicine for abdominal distention, pain, and diarrhoea. Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal illnesses worldwide. Adhesion to gut epithelium is a prerequisite in its pathogenesis. The antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and anti-adhesive activities of a chemically characterised extract (SEE) and its residual material of hydrodistillation (hdSEE-R) from A. katsumadai seeds were evaluated against C. jejuni. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for SEE and hdSEE-R were 0.5 mg/mL and 0.25 mg/mL, respectively, and there was no cytotoxic influence in the anti-adhesion tests, as these were performed at much lower concentrations of these tested plant extracts. Adhesion of C. jejuni to pig (PSI) and human foetal (H4) small-intestine cell lines was significantly decreased at lower concentrations (0.2 to 50 µg/mL). In the same concentration range, the invasiveness of C. jejuni in PSI cells was reduced by 45% to 65% when they were treated with SEE or hdSEE-R. The hdSEE-R represents a bioactive waste with a high phenolic content and an anti-adhesive activity against C. jejuni and thus has the potential for use in pharmaceutical and food products.

  17. Characterisation of the human embryonic and foetal epicardium during heart development.

    PubMed

    Risebro, Catherine A; Vieira, Joaquim Miguel; Klotz, Linda; Riley, Paul R

    2015-11-01

    The epicardium is essential for mammalian heart development. At present, our understanding of the timing and morphogenetic events leading to the formation of the human epicardium has essentially been extrapolated from model organisms. Here, we studied primary tissue samples to characterise human epicardium development. We reveal that the epicardium begins to envelop the myocardial surface at Carnegie stage (CS) 11 and this process is completed by CS15, earlier than previously inferred from avian studies. Contrary to prevailing dogma, the formed human epicardium is not a simple squamous epithelium and we reveal evidence of more complex structure, including novel spatial differences aligned to the developing chambers. Specifically, the ventricular, but not atrial, epicardium exhibited areas of expanded epithelium, preferential cell alignment and spindle-like morphology. Likewise, we reveal distinct properties ex vivo, such that ventricular cells spontaneously differentiate and lose epicardial identity, whereas atrial-derived cells remained 'epithelial-like'. These data provide insight into the developing human epicardium that may contribute to our understanding of congenital heart disease and have implications for the development of strategies for endogenous cell-based cardiac repair.

  18. Characterisation of the human embryonic and foetal epicardium during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Risebro, Catherine A.; Vieira, Joaquim Miguel; Klotz, Linda; Riley, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium is essential for mammalian heart development. At present, our understanding of the timing and morphogenetic events leading to the formation of the human epicardium has essentially been extrapolated from model organisms. Here, we studied primary tissue samples to characterise human epicardium development. We reveal that the epicardium begins to envelop the myocardial surface at Carnegie stage (CS) 11 and this process is completed by CS15, earlier than previously inferred from avian studies. Contrary to prevailing dogma, the formed human epicardium is not a simple squamous epithelium and we reveal evidence of more complex structure, including novel spatial differences aligned to the developing chambers. Specifically, the ventricular, but not atrial, epicardium exhibited areas of expanded epithelium, preferential cell alignment and spindle-like morphology. Likewise, we reveal distinct properties ex vivo, such that ventricular cells spontaneously differentiate and lose epicardial identity, whereas atrial-derived cells remained ‘epithelial-like’. These data provide insight into the developing human epicardium that may contribute to our understanding of congenital heart disease and have implications for the development of strategies for endogenous cell-based cardiac repair. PMID:26395486

  19. Genetics of human sleep behavioral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pei-Ken; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Quality sleep is critical for daily functions of human beings and thus the timing and duration of sleep are tightly controlled. However, rare genetic variants affecting sleep regulatory mechanisms can result in sleep phenotypes of extremely deviated sleep/wake onset time or duration. Using genetic analyses in families with multiple members expressing particular sleep phenotypes, these sleep-associated genetic variants can be identified. Deciphering the nature of these genetic variants using animal models or biochemical methods helps further our understanding of sleep processes. In this chapter, we describe the methods for studying genetics of human sleep behavioral phenotypes.

  20. Evaluation of the Wharton׳s jelly poroelastic parameters through compressive tests on placental and foetal ends of human umbilical cords.

    PubMed

    Gervaso, Francesca; Boschetti, Federica; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    The umbilical cord is a conduit between the developing foetus and the placenta. In physiological conditions it contains two arteries and one vein immersed in a mucoid tissue called Wharton׳s jelly. Although the extreme importance of such a structure is fully recognized, the umbilical cord and its components have been scarcely studied. A deep investigation on the biomechanics of the umbilical cord could help to understand if the pregnancy outcome is influenced by umbilical cord mechanical properties, however, detailed biomechanical data are still lacking. In the present study, the mechanical properties during compression of the human Wharton׳s jelly have been evaluated using a poroelastic approach. Multi-ramp stress-relaxation tests in both confined and unconfined configurations were performed on Wharton׳s jelly samples extracted from foetal and placental sides of twenty human umbilical cords. The Young modulus and Aggregate modulus were calculated at three strain levels and the hydraulic permeability was found by fitting the confined stress-relaxation data to the analytical solution and minimizing the stress least square differences. The Wharton׳s jelly exhibits a highly non linear and viscoelastic behaviour showing a dependence on the applied strain values and a ~90% and ~85% relaxation in unconfined and confined configuration, respectively. Moreover, equilibrium Young and Aggregate moduli resulted significantly higher and the permeability significantly lower at the foetal than the placental site, showing a dependence of the three material parameters on the location (foetal or placental) and, consequently, a non-homogeneity in the Wharton׳s jelly mechanical properties.

  1. [Foetal sampling techniques].

    PubMed

    Levy, R; Arfi, J-S; Daffos, F

    2003-06-01

    This article describes the current techniques of foetal sampling. All of them are actually ultrasound guided, and therefore generally very safe. Nevertheless, an elaborate learning process remains indispensable, in addition to a particular attention to the quality of the physician-patient dialogue. The choice of a technique depends on the indication and on the term of the pregnancy. The most frequently used technique is amniocentesis which presents a low risk of foetal loss, estimated between 0.2 and 0.5 percent. The interest of chorionic villus sampling is the possibility to obtain results at an earlier stage of pregnancy, with a lower risk taking when compared to early amniocentesis. We prefer the transabdominal chorionic villus sampling to the transvaginal. Foetal blood sampling is still required in some cases, but the risk of complications is higher--around 1 percent. PMID:12865196

  2. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  3. Human Phenotypic Diversity: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Balaresque, P; King, T E

    2016-01-01

    As humans migrated across the world, they encountered new environments requiring them to adapt to new challenges that presented themselves. The distribution of human phenotypes observed today is the result of this continuous adaptation, via biological/physiological and cultural means, and also by the modification of cultural practices, which leads to biological changes. In this chapter, we examine a number of adaptive traits and the roles played by their genetic and environmental determinants. We have selected a few traits used for human identification purposes (externally visible characteristics), associated with human metabolism and linked to a shift in subsistence method and food consumption. We discuss the evolutionary processes that have affected the temporal and spatial distribution of these traits, including natural, sexual, and cultural selection. PMID:27282030

  4. Management of foetal asphyxia by intrauterine foetal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhareddy, S.; Kirankumar, H

    2010-01-01

    Management of foetal distress is a subject of gynaecological interest, but an anaesthesiologist should know about resuscitation, because he should be able to treat the patient, whenever he is directly involved in managing the parturient patient during labour analgesia and before an emergency operative delivery. Progressive asphyxia is known as foetal distress; the foetus does not breathe directly from the atmosphere, but depends on maternal circulation for its oxygen requirement. The oxygen delivery to the foetus depends on the placental (maternal side), placental transfer and foetal circulation. Oxygen transport to the foetus is reduced physiologically during uterine contractions in labour. Significant impairment of oxygen transport to the foetus, either temporary or permanent may cause foetal distress, resulting in progressive hypoxia and acidosis. Intrauterine foetal resuscitation comprises of applying measures to a mother in active labour, with the intention of improving oxygen delivery to the distressed foetus to the base line, if the placenta is functioning normally. These measures include left lateral recumbent position, high flow oxygen administration, tocolysis to reduce uterine contractions, rapid intravenous fluid administration, vasopressors for correction of maternal hypotension and amnioinfusion for improving uterine blood flow. Intrauterine Foetal Resuscitation measures are easy to perform and do not require extensive resources, but the results are encouraging in improving the foetal well-being. The anaesthesiologist plays a major role in the application of intrauterine foetal resuscitation measures. PMID:21189876

  5. Anionic polymers and 10 nm Fe₃O₄@UA wound dressings support human foetal stem cells normal development and exhibit great antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica; Andrei, Eugen; Constantinescu, Andrei; Maniu, Horia

    2014-03-25

    The aims of this study were the development, characterization and bioevaluation of a novel biocompatible, resorbable and bio-active wound dressing prototype, based on anionic polymers (sodium alginate--AlgNa, carboximethylcellulose--CMC) and magnetic nanoparticles loaded with usnic acid (Fe₃O₄@UA). The antimicrobial activity was tested against Staphylococcus aureus grown in biofilms. The biocompatibility testing model included an endothelial cell line from human umbilical vein and human foetal progenitor cells derived from the amniotic fluid, that express a wide spectrum of surface molecules involved in different vascular functions and inflammatory response, and may be used as skin regenerative support. The obtained results demonstrated that CMC/Fe₃O₄@UA and AlgNa/Fe₃O₄@UA are exhibiting structural and functional properties that recommend them for further applications in the biomedical field. They could be used alone or coated with different bio-active compounds, such as Fe₃O₄@UA, for the development of novel, multifunctional porous materials used in tissues regeneration, as antimicrobial substances releasing devices, providing also a mechanical support for the eukaryotic cells adhesion, and exhibiting the advantage of low cytotoxicity on human progenitor cells. The great antimicrobial properties exhibited by the newly synthesized nano-bioactive coatings are recommending them as successful candidates for improving the implanted devices surfaces used in regenerative medicine. PMID:23994366

  6. Anionic polymers and 10 nm Fe₃O₄@UA wound dressings support human foetal stem cells normal development and exhibit great antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica; Andrei, Eugen; Constantinescu, Andrei; Maniu, Horia

    2014-03-25

    The aims of this study were the development, characterization and bioevaluation of a novel biocompatible, resorbable and bio-active wound dressing prototype, based on anionic polymers (sodium alginate--AlgNa, carboximethylcellulose--CMC) and magnetic nanoparticles loaded with usnic acid (Fe₃O₄@UA). The antimicrobial activity was tested against Staphylococcus aureus grown in biofilms. The biocompatibility testing model included an endothelial cell line from human umbilical vein and human foetal progenitor cells derived from the amniotic fluid, that express a wide spectrum of surface molecules involved in different vascular functions and inflammatory response, and may be used as skin regenerative support. The obtained results demonstrated that CMC/Fe₃O₄@UA and AlgNa/Fe₃O₄@UA are exhibiting structural and functional properties that recommend them for further applications in the biomedical field. They could be used alone or coated with different bio-active compounds, such as Fe₃O₄@UA, for the development of novel, multifunctional porous materials used in tissues regeneration, as antimicrobial substances releasing devices, providing also a mechanical support for the eukaryotic cells adhesion, and exhibiting the advantage of low cytotoxicity on human progenitor cells. The great antimicrobial properties exhibited by the newly synthesized nano-bioactive coatings are recommending them as successful candidates for improving the implanted devices surfaces used in regenerative medicine.

  7. Human phenylalanine hydroxylase mutations and hyperphenylalaninemia phenotypes: a metanalysis of genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, E; Treacy, E; Waters, P J; Byck, S; Nowacki, P; Scriver, C R

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed correlations between mutant genotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase locus (gene symbol PAH) and the corresponding hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) phenotypes (notably, phenylketonuria [OMIM 261600]). We used reports, both published and in the PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium Database, on 365 patients harboring 73 different PAH mutations in 161 different genotypes. HPA phenotypes were classified as phenylketonuria (PKU), variant PKU, and non-PKU HPA. By analysis both of homoallelic mutant genotypes and of "functionally hemizygous" heteroallelic genotypes, we characterized the phenotypic effect of 48 of the 73 different, largely missense mutations. Among those with consistent in vivo expression, 24 caused PKU, 3 caused variant PKU, and 10 caused non-PKU HPA. However, 11 mutations were inconsistent in their effect: 9 appeared in two different phenotype classes, and 2 (I65T and Y414C) appeared in all three classes. Seven mutations were inconsistent in phenotypic effect when in vitro (unit-protein) expression was compared with the corresponding in vivo phenotype (an emergent property). We conclude that the majority of PAH mutations confer a consistent phenotype and that this is concordant with their effects, when known, predicted from in vitro expression analysis. However, significant inconsistencies, both between in vitro and in vivo phenotypes and between different individuals with similar PAH genotypes, reveal that the HPA-phenotype is more complex than that predicted by Mendelian inheritance of alleles at the PAH locus. PMID:9399896

  8. Foetal Testosterone, Social Relationships, and Restricted Interests in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sex-differences exist in some areas of human social behaviour. In animals, foetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organising the brain and in later social behaviour. fT has also been implicated in language development, eye-contact, and spatial ability in humans. Methods: Fifty-eight children (35 male and 23 female), whose fT…

  9. Differeniated regions of human placental cell surface associated with exchange of materials between maternal and foetal blood: coated vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ockleford, C D; Whyte, A

    1977-06-01

    Coated vesicles may be an important component of the micropinocytic system of the human placenta. Regions of very dense reaction with glycocalyx stains are restricted to membranes within forming and fully formed coated vesicles. This is interpreted as evidence against permanently grouped specific binding sites having a role in the selective uptake of materials by micropinocytosis, and as support for theories of coated-vesicle formation which take into account the dynamic nature of membrane components. The pyroantimonate precipitation technique which was employed in an attempt to localize cations in placental tissue at term resulted in the deposition of electron-dense material in coated vesicles and basement membrane. Examination of the distribution of coated vesicles in placental tissue explants at 8--12 weeks of gestation revealed a restricted distribution of these organelles. Probably more than 89% of coated vesicles lie within the largest vesicles' diameter from the cell surface. Placental coated vesicles were isolated and examined using negative staining. A polygonally patterened structure was apparent on their surfaces. Analysis of the isolated fraction of coated vesicles using sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows the presence of a major protein of molecular weight 180000. This is the same molecular weight that has been given for clathrin, the major protein of the raised polygonally patterned structure on the cytoplasmic surface of coated vesicles from other sources.

  10. Chemical and X-ray analysis of fluoride, phosphorus, and calcium in human foetal blood and hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Montherrat-Carret, L; Perrat-Mabilon, B; Barbey, E; Bouloc, R; Boivin, G; Michelet, A; Magloire, H

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the beneficial effect of prenatal fluoride supplementation, the presence of fluoride in hard tissues in two populations of human foetuses coming from fluoridated (> or = 0.7 parts/10(6) F in drinking water) and non-fluoridated areas (< or = 0.1 parts/10(6) F in drinking water) were compared by chemical analysis and X-ray microanalysis. The fluoride concentrations measured in maternal and venous cord blood confirmed that placental transfer of fluoride was passive when fluoride intake was low. Total fluoride contents of tooth germs and mandibular bone appeared to increase with fluoride level in drinking water. However, these concentrations were too low to be detected by X-ray microanalysis. Phosphorus and calcium total contents were identical in mandibular and femoral bone of both populations. In incisor germs, phosphorus and calcium concentrations in enamel and dentine close to the amelodentinal junction did not differ significantly between the two populations. It is suggested that the low fluoride concentrations in enamel and dentine formed in utero would not have a significant effect on acid solubility.

  11. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C. M.; Brown, Danielle L.; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A.; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L.; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Vooren, Steven Van; Wapner, Ronald J.; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Wright, Caroline F.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Washingthon, Nicole L.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  12. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Mungall, Christopher J; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C M; Brown, Danielle L; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R; Eppig, Janan T; Jackson, Andrew P; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G; Kelly, Anne M; Ledbetter, David H; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Van Vooren, Steven; Wapner, Ronald J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Wright, Caroline F; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B A; Washingthon, Nicole L; Smith, Cynthia L; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  13. Human brain evolution: From gene discovery to phenotype discovery

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    The rise of comparative genomics and related technologies has added important new dimensions to the study of human evolution. Our knowledge of the genes that underwent expression changes or were targets of positive selection in human evolution is rapidly increasing, as is our knowledge of gene duplications, translocations, and deletions. It is now clear that the genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees are far more extensive than previously thought; their genomes are not 98% or 99% identical. Despite the rapid growth in our understanding of the evolution of the human genome, our understanding of the relationship between genetic changes and phenotypic changes is tenuous. This is true even for the most intensively studied gene, FOXP2, which underwent positive selection in the human terminal lineage and is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of human speech and language. In part, the difficulty of connecting genes to phenotypes reflects our generally poor knowledge of human phenotypic specializations, as well as the difficulty of interpreting the consequences of genetic changes in species that are not amenable to invasive research. On the positive side, investigations of FOXP2, along with genomewide surveys of gene-expression changes and selection-driven sequence changes, offer the opportunity for “phenotype discovery,” providing clues to human phenotypic specializations that were previously unsuspected. What is more, at least some of the specializations that have been proposed are amenable to testing with noninvasive experimental techniques appropriate for the study of humans and apes. PMID:22723367

  14. Olfactory phenotypic expression unveils human aging.

    PubMed

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Cellerino, Alessandro; Origlia, Nicola; Barloscio, Davide; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Di Giulio, Camillo; Domenici, Luciano

    2016-04-12

    The mechanism of the natural aging of olfaction and its declinein the absence of any overt disease conditions remains unclear. Here, we investigated this mechanism through measurement of one of the parameters of olfactory function, the absolute threshold, in a healthy population from childhood to old age. The absolute olfactory threshold data were collected from an Italian observational study with 622 participants aged 5-105 years. A subjective testing procedure of constant stimuli was used, which was also compared to the 'staircase' method, with the calculation of the reliability. The n-butanol stimulus was used as an ascending series of nine molar concentrations that were monitored using an electronic nose. The data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics because of the multimodal distribution. We show that the age-related variations in the absolute olfactory threshold are not continuous; instead, there are multiple olfactory phenotypes. Three distinct age-related phenotypes were defined, termed as 'juvenile', 'mature' and 'elder'. The frequency of these three phenotypes depends on age. Our data suggest that the sense of smell does not decrease linearly with aging. Our findings provide the basis for further understanding of olfactory loss as an anticipatory sign of aging and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27027240

  15. Olfactory phenotypic expression unveils human aging

    PubMed Central

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Cellerino, Alessandro; Origlia, Nicola; Barloscio, Davide; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Giulio, Camillo Di; Domenici, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of the natural aging of olfaction and its declinein the absence of any overt disease conditions remains unclear. Here, we investigated this mechanism through measurement of one of the parameters of olfactory function, the absolute threshold, in a healthy population from childhood to old age. The absolute olfactory threshold data were collected from an Italian observational study with 622 participants aged 5-105 years. A subjective testing procedure of constant stimuli was used, which was also compared to the ‘staircase’ method, with the calculation of the reliability. The n-butanol stimulus was used as an ascending series of nine molar concentrations that were monitored using an electronic nose. The data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics because of the multimodal distribution. We show that the age-related variations in the absolute olfactory threshold are not continuous; instead, there are multiple olfactory phenotypes. Three distinct age-related phenotypes were defined, termed as ‘juvenile’, ‘mature’ and ‘elder’. The frequency of these three phenotypes depends on age. Our data suggest that the sense of smell does not decrease linearly with aging. Our findings provide the basis for further understanding of olfactory loss as an anticipatory sign of aging and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27027240

  16. Mapping Gene Associations in Human Mitochondria using Clinical Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Scharfe, Curt; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Neuenburg, Jutta K.; Allen, Edward A.; Li, Guan-Cheng; Klopstock, Thomas; Cowan, Tina M.; Enns, Gregory M.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects within the

  17. The phenotypic legacy of admixture between modern humans and Neanderthals

    PubMed Central

    Simonti, Corinne N.; Vernot, Benjamin; Bastarache, Lisa; Bottinger, Erwin; Carrell, David S.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Crosslin, David R.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Li, Rongling; Pathak, Jyotishman; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Roden, Dan M.; Verma, Shefali S.; Tromp, Gerard; Prato, Jeffrey D.; Bush, William S.; Akey, Joshua M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Capra, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Many modern human genomes retain DNA inherited from interbreeding with archaic hominins, such as Neanderthals, yet the influence of this admixture on human traits is largely unknown. We analyzed the contribution of common Neanderthal variants to over 1,000 electronic health record (EHR)-derived phenotypes in ~28,000 adults of European ancestry. We discovered and replicated associations of Neanderthal alleles with neurological, psychiatric, immunological, and dermatological phenotypes. Neanderthal alleles together explain a significant fraction of the variation in risk for depression and skin lesions resulting from sun exposure (actinic keratosis), and individual Neanderthal alleles are significantly associated with specific human phenotypes, including hypercoagulation and tobacco use. Our results establish that archaic admixture influences disease risk in modern humans, provide hypotheses about the effects of hundreds of Neanderthal haplotypes and demonstrate the utility of EHR data in evolutionary analyses. PMID:26912863

  18. The phenotypic legacy of admixture between modern humans and Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Simonti, Corinne N; Vernot, Benjamin; Bastarache, Lisa; Bottinger, Erwin; Carrell, David S; Chisholm, Rex L; Crosslin, David R; Hebbring, Scott J; Jarvik, Gail P; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Li, Rongling; Pathak, Jyotishman; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Roden, Dan M; Verma, Shefali S; Tromp, Gerard; Prato, Jeffrey D; Bush, William S; Akey, Joshua M; Denny, Joshua C; Capra, John A

    2016-02-12

    Many modern human genomes retain DNA inherited from interbreeding with archaic hominins, such as Neandertals, yet the influence of this admixture on human traits is largely unknown. We analyzed the contribution of common Neandertal variants to over 1000 electronic health record (EHR)-derived phenotypes in ~28,000 adults of European ancestry. We discovered and replicated associations of Neandertal alleles with neurological, psychiatric, immunological, and dermatological phenotypes. Neandertal alleles together explained a significant fraction of the variation in risk for depression and skin lesions resulting from sun exposure (actinic keratosis), and individual Neandertal alleles were significantly associated with specific human phenotypes, including hypercoagulation and tobacco use. Our results establish that archaic admixture influences disease risk in modern humans, provide hypotheses about the effects of hundreds of Neandertal haplotypes, and demonstrate the utility of EHR data in evolutionary analyses. PMID:26912863

  19. Loss of gene function and evolution of human phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Goh, Chul Jun; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2015-01-01

    Humans have acquired many distinct evolutionary traits after the human-chimpanzee divergence. These phenotypes have resulted from genetic changes that occurred in the human genome and were retained by natural selection. Comparative primate genome analyses reveal that loss-of-function mutations are common in the human genome. Some of these gene inactivation events were revealed to be associated with the emergence of advantageous phenotypes and were therefore positively selected and fixed in modern humans (the “less-ismore” hypothesis). Representative cases of human gene inactivation and their functional implications are presented in this review. Functional studies of additional inactive genes will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying acquisition of various human-specific traits. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 373-379] PMID:25887751

  20. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells. PMID:27082860

  1. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  2. The DDBJ Japanese Genotype-phenotype Archive for genetic and phenotypic human data

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yuichi; Mashima, Jun; Kosuge, Takehide; Katayama, Toshiaki; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Kaminuma, Eli; Ogasawara, Osamu; Okubo, Kousaku; Takagi, Toshihisa; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2015-01-01

    The DNA Data Bank of Japan Center (DDBJ Center; http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) maintains and provides public archival, retrieval and analytical services for biological information. Since October 2013, DDBJ Center has operated the Japanese Genotype-phenotype Archive (JGA) in collaboration with our partner institute, the National Bioscience Database Center (NBDC) of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. DDBJ Center provides the JGA database system which securely stores genotype and phenotype data collected from individuals whose consent agreements authorize data release only for specific research use. NBDC has established guidelines and policies for sharing human-derived data and reviews data submission and usage requests from researchers. In addition to the JGA project, DDBJ Center develops Semantic Web technologies for data integration and sharing in collaboration with the Database Center for Life Science. This paper describes the overview of the JGA project, updates to the DDBJ databases, and services for data retrieval, analysis and integration. PMID:25477381

  3. Do Thyroid Disrupting Chemicals Influence Foetal Development during Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Boas, Malene; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åase Krogh; Main, Katharina; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Maternal euthyroidism during pregnancy is crucial for normal development and, in particular, neurodevelopment of the foetus. Up to 3.5 percent of pregnant women suffer from hypothyroidism. Industrial use of various chemicals—endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)—has been shown to cause almost constant exposure of humans with possible harmful influence on health and hormone regulation. EDCs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis by different mechanisms, and though the effect of each chemical seems scarce, the added effects may cause inappropriate consequences on, for example, foetal neurodevelopment. This paper focuses on thyroid hormone influence on foetal development in relation to the chemicals suspected of thyroid disrupting properties with possible interactions with maternal thyroid homeostasis. Knowledge of the effects is expected to impact the general debate on the use of these chemicals. However, more studies are needed to elucidate the issue, since human studies are scarce. PMID:21918727

  4. Regulatory T cells, maternal-foetal immune tolerance and recurrent miscarriage: new therapeutic challenging opportunities.

    PubMed

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Melnychuk, Taisiia; Gris, Josep Maria

    2015-03-15

    Because maternal alloreactive lymphocytes are not depleted during pregnancy, local and/or systemic mechanisms have to play a key role in altering the maternal immune response. Peripheral T regulatory cells (pTregs) at the maternal-foetal interface are necessary in situ to prevent early abortion, but only those pTregs that have been previously exposed to paternal alloantigens. It has been showed that pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) (Foxp3Tregs) cells with foetal specificity. Interestingly, after delivery, foetal-specific pTregs persist at elevated levels, maintain tolerance to pre-existing foetal antigen, and rapidly re-accumulate during subsequent pregnancy. pTreg up-regulation could be hypothesized as a possible future therapeutic strategy in humans.

  5. Human Cancers Express a Mutator Phenotype: Hypothesis, Origin, and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2016-01-01

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis was postulated more than 40 years ago. It was based on the multiple enzymatic steps required to precisely replicate the 6 billion bases in the human genome each time a normal cell divides. A reduction in this accuracy during tumor progression could be responsible for the striking heterogeneity of malignant cells within a tumor and for the rapidity by which cancers become resistant to therapy. PMID:27197248

  6. Our bodies, our choices: Australian law on foetal personhood.

    PubMed

    Anolak, Helena

    2015-03-01

    The debate revolving around foetal vs maternal rights has been philosophised for years. It has captured attention internationally with the European Court of Human Rights struggling for over five decades to define personhood, and is still yet to reach a definite formulation. A proposed Law Crimes Amendment Bill (Zoe's Law, 2) is currently fuelling public debate about women's reproductive choices in New South Wales, Australia. The proposed legal bill attempts to redefine a 'person' or 'human being' by placing a marker on when 'personhood begins' namely at 20 weeks or weighing a minimum of 400g. Similar laws recognising personhood at foetal viability have come into force in the United States of America that clearly show the broader consequences of this kind of legislation as American women now face county-by-county, state-by-state anti-choice legislative activism. Midwives work closely with women and their families giving them the authority to formulate opinions on issues of maternal-foetal conflict. If a law such as this is allowed to pass a number of legal and ethical issues will arise for Australian midwives that could potentially have far reaching implications for them and for the women and families that they provide women-centred care for. PMID:25458964

  7. Our bodies, our choices: Australian law on foetal personhood.

    PubMed

    Anolak, Helena

    2015-03-01

    The debate revolving around foetal vs maternal rights has been philosophised for years. It has captured attention internationally with the European Court of Human Rights struggling for over five decades to define personhood, and is still yet to reach a definite formulation. A proposed Law Crimes Amendment Bill (Zoe's Law, 2) is currently fuelling public debate about women's reproductive choices in New South Wales, Australia. The proposed legal bill attempts to redefine a 'person' or 'human being' by placing a marker on when 'personhood begins' namely at 20 weeks or weighing a minimum of 400g. Similar laws recognising personhood at foetal viability have come into force in the United States of America that clearly show the broader consequences of this kind of legislation as American women now face county-by-county, state-by-state anti-choice legislative activism. Midwives work closely with women and their families giving them the authority to formulate opinions on issues of maternal-foetal conflict. If a law such as this is allowed to pass a number of legal and ethical issues will arise for Australian midwives that could potentially have far reaching implications for them and for the women and families that they provide women-centred care for.

  8. Automatic Identification of Subcellular Phenotypes on Human Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Christian; Erfle, Holger; Warnat, Patrick; Daigle, Nathalie; Lörch, Thomas; Ellenberg, Jan; Pepperkok, Rainer; Eils, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Light microscopic analysis of cell morphology provides a high-content readout of cell function and protein localization. Cell arrays and microwell transfection assays on cultured cells have made cell phenotype analysis accessible to high-throughput experiments. Both the localization of each protein in the proteome and the effect of RNAi knock-down of individual genes on cell morphology can be assayed by manual inspection of microscopic images. However, the use of morphological readouts for functional genomics requires fast and automatic identification of complex cellular phenotypes. Here, we present a fully automated platform for high-throughput cell phenotype screening combining human live cell arrays, screening microscopy, and machine-learning-based classification methods. Efficiency of this platform is demonstrated by classification of eleven subcellular patterns marked by GFP-tagged proteins. Our classification method can be adapted to virtually any microscopic assay based on cell morphology, opening a wide range of applications including large-scale RNAi screening in human cells. PMID:15173118

  9. Nitroglycerin prevents coagulopathies and foetal death associated with abnormal maternal inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Othman, Maha; Graham, Charles H

    2012-05-01

    Inflammation-associated foetal loss is often linked to maternal coagulopathies. Here, we characterised the role of maternal inflammation in the development of various systemic maternal coagulopathies and foetal death during mid-to-late gestation in rats. Since nitric oxide (NO) functions as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and anti-oxidant, we also tested whether the NO mimetic nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) prevents inflammation-associated coagulopathies and foetal death. To induce chronic inflammation, pregnant Wistar rats were injected with low-doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10-40 μg/kg) on gestational days (GD) 13.5-16.5. To determine whether the effects of inflammation are mediated by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept was injected on GD 13.5 and 15.5. Controls consisted of rats injected with saline. GTN was administered to LPS-treated rats via daily application of a transdermal patch on GD 12.5-16.5. Using thromboelastography (TEG), various coagulation parameters were assessed on GD 17.5; foetal viability was determined morphologically. Reference coagulation parameters were established based on TEG results obtained from control animals. LPS-treated rats exhibited distinct systemic coagulopathies: hypercoagulability, hypocoagulability, hyperfibrinolysis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) stages I and III. A specific foetal death coagulation phenotype was observed, implicating TEG as a potential tool to identify inflammation-induced haemostatic alterations associated with pregnancy loss. Treatment with etanercept reduced the incidence of coagulopathy by 47%, while continuous delivery of GTN prevented foetal death and the inflammation-induced coagulopathies. These findings provide a rationale for investigating the use of GTN in the prevention of maternal coagulopathies and inflammation-mediated foetal death.

  10. Evolutionary change in physiological phenotypes along the human lineage

    PubMed Central

    Vining, Alexander Q.; Nunn, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Research in evolutionary medicine provides many examples of how evolution has shaped human susceptibility to disease. Traits undergoing rapid evolutionary change may result in associated costs or reduce the energy available to other traits. We hypothesize that humans have experienced more such changes than other primates as a result of major evolutionary change along the human lineage. We investigated 41 physiological traits across 50 primate species to identify traits that have undergone marked evolutionary change along the human lineage. Methodology: We analysed the data using two Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods. One approach models trait covariation in non-human primates and predicts human phenotypes to identify whether humans are evolutionary outliers. The other approach models adaptive shifts under an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of evolution to assess whether inferred shifts are more common on the human branch than on other primate lineages. Results: We identified four traits with strong evidence for an evolutionary increase on the human lineage (amylase, haematocrit, phosphorus and monocytes) and one trait with strong evidence for decrease (neutrophilic bands). Humans exhibited more cases of distinct evolutionary change than other primates. Conclusions and Implications: Human physiology has undergone increased evolutionary change compared to other primates. Long distance running may have contributed to increases in haematocrit and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, while dietary changes are likely related to increases in amylase. In accordance with the pathogen load hypothesis, human monocyte levels were increased, but many other immune-related measures were not. Determining the mechanisms underlying conspicuous evolutionary change in these traits may provide new insights into human disease. PMID:27615376

  11. Human cytotrophoblasts acquire aneuploidies as they differentiateto an invasive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Jung, Christine J.; Gormley, Matthew; Zhou, Yuan; Chu, Lisa W.; Genbacev, Olga; Wright, AlexiA.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2004-12-15

    Through an unusual differentiation process, human trophoblast progenitors (cytotrophoblasts) give rise to tumor-like cells that invade the uterus. By an unknown mechanism, invasive cytotrophoblasts exhibit permanent cell cycle withdrawal. Here we report molecular cytogenetic data showing that {approx} 20 to 60 percent of these interphase cells had acquired aneusomies involving chromosomes X, Y, o r16. The incidence positively correlated with gestational age and differentiation to an invasive phenotype. Scoring 12 chromosomes in flow-sorted cytotrophoblasts showed that more than 95 percent of the cells were hyperdiploid. Thus, aneuploidy appears to be an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of cytotrophoblasts within the uterus.

  12. Human Cancers Express a Mutator Phenotype: Hypothesis, Origin, and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Lawrence A

    2016-04-15

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis was postulated more than 40 years ago. It was based on the multiple enzymatic steps required to precisely replicate the 6 billion bases in the human genome each time a normal cell divides. A reduction in this accuracy during tumor progression could be responsible for the striking heterogeneity of malignant cells within a tumor and for the rapidity by which cancers become resistant to therapy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2057-9. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Loeb et al. Cancer Res. 1974;34:2311-21.

  13. Differentiation of rat brown adipocytes during late foetal development: role of insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, T; Valverde, A M; Alvarez, A; Benito, M; Lorenzo, M

    1995-01-01

    Rat brown adipocytes at day 22 of foetal development showed greater size, higher mitochondria content and larger amounts of lipids, as determined by flow cytometry, than 20-day foetal cells. Simultaneously, an inhibition on the percentage of brown adipocytes into S+G2/M phases of the cell cycle was observed between days 20 and 22 of foetal development. The expression of several adipogenesis-related genes, such as fatty acid synthase, malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and insulin-regulated glucose transporter, increased at the end of foetal life in brown adipose tissue. In addition, the lipogenic enzyme activities and the lipogenic flux increased during late foetal development, resulting in mature brown adipocytes showing a multilocular fat droplet phenotype. Concurrently, brown adipocytes induced the expression of the uncoupling protein (UP) mRNA and UP protein, as visualized by immunofluorescence. The three isoforms of CCAAT enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) were expressed at the mRNA level in brown adipose tissue at day 20. C/EBP alpha decreased and C/EBP beta and delta increased their expression between days 20 and 22 of foetal development, respectively. Brown adipose tissue constitutively expressed insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) mRNAs. Moreover, IGF-IR mRNA content increased between days 20 and 22 in parallel with the occurrence of tissue differentiation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7575409

  14. Foetal presentation of long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Theeuws, Chloe; Nuyens, Dieter; Gewillig, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Long-QT syndrome is a rare, inherited cardiac channelopathy that is characterized by arrhythmia, syncope and sudden cardiac death. Foetal symptoms are very rare and prenatal diagnosis is difficult. We report on a foetal presentation of long-QT syndrome with severe hydrops and a chaotic heart rhythm at 32 weeks of gestation. Postnatal electrocardiography showed runs of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and an extremely prolonged-QT segment (QTc of 640 ms). The initial approach of overdrive pacing, followed by the combined therapy of a beta blocker, a sodium channel blocker (mexiletine) and potassium suppletion proved successful in maintaining a stable sinus rhythm. The girl was doing well at eight months of followup. In this patient a timely diagnosis and effective management after birth have been life-saving.The intrauterine manifestation of foetal atrioventricular dissociation and ventricular arrhythmia should raise suspicion of congenital long-QT syndrome. PMID:23882882

  15. Native human adipose stromal cells: localization, morphology and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, M; Peyrafitte, J-A; D'Angelo, R; Fournier-Wirth, C; Bouloumié, A; Casteilla, L; Sengenès, C; Bourin, P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Beside having roles in energy homeostasis and endocrine modulation, adipose tissue (AT) is now considered a promising source of mesenchymal stromal cells (adipose-derived stromal cells or ASCs) for regenerative medicine. Despite numerous studies on cultured ASCs, native human ASCs are rarely investigated. Indeed, the phenotype of ASCs in their native state, their localization within AT and comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) has been poorly investigated. Design: To address these issues, the stroma vascular fraction (SVF) of human AT was extracted and native cell subtypes were isolated by immunoselection to study their clonogenic potential in culture. Immunohistology on samples of human AT in combination with reconstruction of confocal sections were performed in order to localize ASCs. Results: Compared with BM-MNCs, all native ASCs were found in the CD34+ cell fraction of the AT-SVF. Native ASCs expressed classical mesenchymal markers described for BM-MSCs. Interestingly, CD34 expression decreased during ASC cell culture and was negatively correlated with cell proliferation rate. Immunohistological analysis revealed that native ASCs exhibited specific morphological features with protrusions. They were found scattered in AT stroma and did not express in vivo pericytic markers such as NG2, CD140b or alpha-smooth muscle actin, which appeared during the culture process. Finally, ASCs spontaneous commitment to adipocytic lineage was enhanced in AT from obese humans. Conclusions: The use of complementary methodological approaches to study native human ASCs revealed their immunophenotype, their specific morphology, their location within AT and their stemness. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that human ASCs participate in adipogenesis during AT development. PMID:21266947

  16. The Evolution of Human Genetic and Phenotypic Variation in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the birthplace of modern humans, and is the source of the geographic expansion of ancestral populations into other regions of the world. Indigenous Africans are characterized by high levels of genetic diversity within and between populations. The pattern of genetic variation in these populations has been shaped by demographic events occurring over the last 200,000 years. The dramatic variation in climate, diet, and exposure to infectious disease across the continent has also resulted in novel genetic and phenotypic adaptations in extant Africans. This review summarizes some recent advances in our understanding of the demographic history and selective pressures that have influenced levels and patterns of diversity in African populations. PMID:20178763

  17. Foetal placental blood flow in the lamb

    PubMed Central

    Faber, J. Job; Green, Thomas J.

    1972-01-01

    1. Fifteen sheep foetuses of 1·5-5·2 kg body weight were prepared with indwelling arterial and venous catheters for experimentation one to six days later. 2. Unanaesthetized foetuses were found to have mean arterial and central venous blood pressures of 40 ± 1·5 (S.E. of mean) and 2·0 ± 0·3 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively, compared to intra-uterine pressure. Intra-uterine pressure was 16 ± 0·8 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg with respect to atmospheric pressure at mid-uterine level. 3. Mean placental blood flow of the foetuses was 199 ± 20 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg body wt.). Mean cardiac output in eleven of the foetuses was 658 ± 102 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg). 4. Mean foetal and maternal colloid osmotic pressures were 17·5 ± 0·7 (S.E. of mean) and 20·5 ± 0·6 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively at 38° C. 5. Intravenous infusions into six ewes of 1·8 mole of mannitol and 0·4 mole of NaCl resulted in significant increases in foetal plasma osmolarity, sodium, potassium, and haemoglobin concentrations, without detectable transfer of mannitol to the foetal circulation. 6. In the sheep placenta there is osmotic and hydrostatic equilibration of water. As a consequence, there should be an interaction between foetal placental blood flow and foetal water exchange with the maternal circulation. It was concluded that this interaction tends to stabilize foetal placental blood flow. PMID:5039279

  18. Dissecting phenotypic traits linked to human resilience to Alzheimer's pathology.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Stein, Thor D; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Scotton, Thomas C; Barroeta-Espar, Isabel; Fernandez-Carballo, Leticia; de Munain, Estibaliz Lopez; Perez, Jesus; Marquie, Marta; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Mathew P; Lowe, Val; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Ikonomovic, Milos D; López, Oscar L; Klunk, William; Hyman, Bradley T; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2013-08-01

    Clinico-pathological correlation studies and positron emission tomography amyloid imaging studies have shown that some individuals can tolerate substantial amounts of Alzheimer's pathology in their brains without experiencing dementia. Few details are known about the neuropathological phenotype of these unique cases that might prove relevant to understanding human resilience to Alzheimer's pathology. We conducted detailed quantitative histopathological and biochemical assessments on brains from non-demented individuals before death whose brains were free of substantial Alzheimer's pathology, non-demented individuals before death but whose post-mortem examination demonstrated significant amounts of Alzheimer's changes ('mismatches'), and demented Alzheimer's cases. Quantification of amyloid-β plaque burden, stereologically-based counts of neurofibrillary tangles, neurons and reactive glia, and morphological analyses of axons were performed in the multimodal association cortex lining the superior temporal sulcus. Levels of synaptic integrity markers, and soluble monomeric and multimeric amyloid-β and tau species were measured. Our results indicate that some individuals can accumulate equivalent loads of amyloid-β plaques and tangles to those found in demented Alzheimer's cases without experiencing dementia. Analyses revealed four main phenotypic differences among these two groups: (i) mismatches had striking preservation of neuron numbers, synaptic markers and axonal geometry compared to demented cases; (ii) demented cases had significantly higher burdens of fibrillar thioflavin-S-positive plaques and of oligomeric amyloid-β deposits reactive to conformer-specific antibody NAB61 than mismatches; (iii) strong and selective accumulation of hyperphosphorylated soluble tau multimers into the synaptic compartment was noted in demented cases compared with controls but not in mismatches; and (iv) the robust glial activation accompanying amyloid-β and tau pathologies in

  19. Reconstructing phylogenies and phenotypes: a molecular view of human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Brenda J

    2008-01-01

    This review broadly summarizes how molecular biology has contributed to our understanding of human evolution. Molecular anthropology began in the 1960s with immunological comparisons indicating that African apes and humans were closely related and, indeed, shared a common ancestor as recently as 5 million years ago. Although initially dismissed, this finding has proven robust and numerous lines of molecular evidence now firmly place the human-ape divergence at 4–8 Ma. Resolving the trichotomy among humans, chimpanzees and gorillas took a few more decades. Despite the readily apparent physical similarities shared by African apes to the exclusion of modern humans (body hair, knuckle-walking, thin tooth enamel), the molecular support for a human–chimpanzee clade is now overwhelming. More recently, whole genome sequencing and gene mapping have shifted the focus of molecular anthropology from phylogenetic analyses to phenotypic reconstruction and functional genomics. We are starting to identify the genetic basis of the morphological, physiological and behavioural traits that distinguish modern humans from apes and apes from other primates. Most notably, recent comparative genomic analyses strongly indicate that the marked differences between modern humans and chimpanzees are likely due more to changes in gene regulation than to modifications of the genes themselves, an idea first proposed over 30 years ago. Almost weekly, press releases describe newly identified genes and regulatory elements that seem to have undergone strong positive selection along the human lineage. Loci involved in speech (e.g. FOXP2), brain development (e.g. ASPM), and skull musculature (e.g. MYH16) have been of particular interest, but some surprising candidate loci (e.g. those involved in auditory capabilities) have emerged as well. Exciting new research avenues, such as the Neanderthal Genome Project, promise that molecular analyses will continue to provide novel insights about our evolution

  20. Machine learning for the automatic localisation of foetal body parts in cine-MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Christopher; Nowlan, Niamh C.; Hayat, Tayyib T. A.; Malamateniou, Christina; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Rueckert, Daniel; Kainz, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Being able to automate the location of individual foetal body parts has the potential to dramatically reduce the work required to analyse time resolved foetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cine-MRI) scans, for example, for use in the automatic evaluation of the foetal development. Currently, manual preprocessing of every scan is required to locate body parts before analysis can be performed, leading to a significant time overhead. With the volume of scans becoming available set to increase as cine-MRI scans become more prevalent in clinical practice, this stage of manual preprocessing is a bottleneck, limiting the data available for further analysis. Any tools which can automate this process will therefore save many hours of research time and increase the rate of new discoveries in what is a key area in understanding early human development. Here we present a series of techniques which can be applied to foetal cine-MRI scans in order to first locate and then differentiate between individual body parts. A novel approach to maternal movement suppression and segmentation using Fourier transforms is put forward as a preprocessing step, allowing for easy extraction of short movements of individual foetal body parts via the clustering of optical flow vector fields. These body part movements are compared to a labelled database and probabilistically classified before being spatially and temporally combined to give a final estimate for the location of each body part.

  1. Plasma catecholamines in foetal and adult sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C T; Robinson, R O

    1975-01-01

    1. Foetal and maternal plasma catecholamine concentrations were measured during and after hypoxia (mean maternal Pa,02 44mmHg) in chronically catheterized sheep, 118-141 days pregnant. 2. In most foetuses the initial plasma catecholamines were smaller than 0.07 ng/ml. During hypoxia plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline always rose; there was a rise in arterial pressure and a fall in heart rate. 3. The initial catecholamine concentration in the ewes was smaller than 0.05-2.3 ng/ml. During hypoxia there was no consistent change; the maternal plasma concentrations were less than the foetal. 4. Infusion of adrenaline at 0.3 mug kg(-1) min(-1) to the ewe resulted in plasma catecholamine concentrations higher than those observed during hypoxia. There was a rise in heart rate but no consistent change in arterial pressure. 5. Infusion of adrenaline 0.4 mug kg(-1) min(-1) into the foetal jugular vein caused a rise in plasma concentration similar to that seen during hypoxia. There was a rise in heart rate but no significant change in arterial pressure. 6. The half-life of adrenaline and of noradrenaline in the maternal and foetal circulation was 0.25-1 min. There was no evidence of transfer of labelled catecholamine across the placenta. PMID:1151803

  2. Phenotypical characterization of regulatory T cells in humans and rodents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Perea, A L; Arcia, E D; Rueda, C M; Velilla, P A

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) constitute a fascinating subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells due to their ability to limit the immune response against self and non-self antigens. Murine models and antibodies directed against surface and intracellular molecules have allowed elucidation of the mechanisms that govern their development and function. However, these markers used to their classification lack of specificity, as they can be expressed by activated T cells. Similarly, there are slight differences between animal models, in steady state and pathological conditions, anatomical localization and strategy of analysis by flow cytometry. Here, we revised the most common markers utilized for Treg typification by flow cytometry such as CD25, forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) and CD127, along with our data obtained in different body compartments of humans, mice and rats. Furthermore, we revised and determined the expression of other molecules important for the phenotypical characterization of Treg cells. We draw attention to the drawbacks of those markers used in chronic states of inflammation. However, until a specific marker for the identification of Tregs is discovered, the best combination of markers will depend upon the tissue or the degree of inflammation from which Tregs derive. PMID:27124481

  3. Generating Phenotypical Erroneous Human Behavior to Evaluate Human-automation Interaction Using Model Checking

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2012-01-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in unanticipated ways. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. Model-driven design and analysis techniques provide engineers with formal methods tools and techniques capable of evaluating how human behavior can contribute to system failures. This paper presents a novel method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both normative and erroneous human behavior from normative task models. The generated erroneous behavior is capable of replicating Hollnagel’s zero-order phenotypes of erroneous action for omissions, jumps, repetitions, and intrusions. Multiple phenotypical acts can occur in sequence, thus allowing for the generation of higher order phenotypes. The task behavior model pattern capable of generating erroneous behavior can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human-automation interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. We present benchmarks related to the size of the statespace and verification time of models to show how the erroneous human behavior generation process scales. We demonstrate the method with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. A potential problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. A design intervention is presented which prevents this problem from occurring. We discuss how our method could be used to evaluate larger applications and recommend future paths of development. PMID:23105914

  4. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  5. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  6. Foetal response to maternal coffee intake: role of habitual versus non-habitual caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Mulder, E J H; Tegaldo, L; Bruschettini, P; Visser, G H A

    2010-11-01

    Little is known about the effect on the human foetus of long-term and acute exposure to caffeine. We studied the organisation of foetal sleep-wake states in 13 healthy near-term foetuses over a wide range of maternal plasma caffeine concentrations (0-13 μg/mL) reflecting normal lifestyle conditions (day 0) and again following intake of two cups of regular coffee (~300 mg of caffeine) intermitted by 50 h of abstinence (day 2; acute effects). On either day, 2 h simultaneous recordings were made of foetal heart rate, general-, eye-, and breathing-movements. The recordings were analysed for the presence of each of four foetal behavioural states: quiet- and active-sleep, quiet- and active-wakefulness. There was a linear relationship between maternal caffeine content and the incidence of foetal general movements during active sleep on day 0 (R = 0.74; P < 0.02). After coffee loading on day 2, foetuses of non- or low-caffeine consumers showed increases in active wakefulness (P < 0.001), general movements (P < 0.05) and heart rate variation (P < 0.01) but lower basal heart rate (P < 0.01) compared with their day 0 values. The changes in foetal heart rate (variation) and behaviour occurred between 90 and 180 min post-consumption. In contrast, foetuses of habitual caffeine consumers remained unaffected suggestive of foetal tolerance to caffeine. The results indicate differential performance between foetuses regularly exposed to caffeine and those caffeine-naive, both under normal maternal lifestyle conditions and in response to maternal coffee ingestion.

  7. Divergent cellular phenotypes of human and mouse cells lacking the Werner syndrome RecQ helicase

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Kiranjit K.; Sidorova, Julia M.; Albertson, Tina M.; Anderson, Judith B.; Ladiges, Warren C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Preston, Bradley D.; Monnat, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a human autosomal recessive genetic instability and cancer predisposition syndrome with features of premature aging. Several genetically determined mouse models of WS have been generated, however none develops features of premature aging or an elevated risk of neoplasia unless additional genetic perturbations are introduced. In order to determine whether differences in cellular phenotype could explain the discrepant phenotypes of Wrn−/− mice and WRN-deficient humans, we compared the cellular phenotype of newly derived Wrn−/− mouse primary fibroblasts with previous analyses of primary and transformed fibroblasts from WS patients and with newly derived, WRN-depleted human primary fibroblasts. These analyses confirmed previously reported cellular phenotypes of WRN-mutant and WRN-deficient human fibroblasts, and demonstrated that the human WRN-deficient cellular phenotype can be detected in cells grown in 5% or in 20% oxygen. In contrast, we did not identify prominent cellular phenotypes present in WRN-deficient human cells in Wrn−/− mouse fibroblasts. Our results indicate that human and mouse fibroblasts have different functional requirements for WRN protein, and that the absence of a strong cellular phenotype may in part explain the failure of Wrn−/− mice to develop an organismal phenotype resembling Werner syndrome. PMID:19896421

  8. Multiparameter Phenotyping of Human PBMCs Using Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Michael D.; Newell, Evan W.; Maecker, Holden T.

    2016-01-01

    The standard for single-cell analysis of phenotype and function in recent decades has been fluorescence flow cytometry. Mass cytometry is a newer technology that uses heavy metal ions, rather than fluorochromes, as labels for probes such as antibodies. The binding of these ion-labeled probes to cells is quantitated by mass spectrometry. This greatly increases the number of phenotypic and functional markers that can be probed simultaneously. Here, we review topics that must be considered when adapting existing flow cytometry panels to mass cytometry analysis. We present a protocol and representative panels for surface phenotyping and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays. PMID:26420710

  9. Humoral immune responses in foetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, K J; Morris, B

    1978-01-01

    A total of fifty-two foetal sheep between 49 and 126 days gestation were injected with polymeric and monomeric flagellin, dinitrophenylated monomeric flagellin, chicken red blood cells, ovalbumin, ferritin, chicken gamma-globulin and the somatic antigens of Salmonella typhimurium in a variety of combinations. Immune responses were followed in these animals by taking serial blood samples from them through indwelling vascular cannulae and measuring the circulating titres of antibody. Of the antigens tested, ferritin induced immune responses in the youngest foetuses. A short time later in gestation, the majority of foetuses responded to chicken red blood cells, polymeric flagellin, monomeric flagellin and dinitrophenylated monomeric flagellin. Only older foetuses responded regularly to chicken gamma-globulin and ovalbumin. However, antibodies to all these antigens were first detected over the relatively short period of development between 64 and 82 days gestation and this made it difficult to define any precise order in the development of immune responsiveness. Of the antigens tested only the somatic antigens of S. typhimurium failed to induce a primary antibody response during foetal life. The character and magnitude of the antibody responses in foetuses changed throughout in utero development. Both the total amount of antibody produced and the duration of the response increased with foetal age. Foetuses younger than 87 days gestation did not synthesize 2-mercaptoethanol resistant antibodies or IgG1 immunoglobulin to any of the antigens tested, whereas most foetuses older than this regularly did so. PMID:711249

  10. Third Trimester foetal complications in pregnancy with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Vidushi; Agarwal, Nutan

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy starts affecting the foetus even in the pre-conception period. The complications encountered in third trimester are foetal macrosomia and intrauterine foetal demise; birth of a macrosomic baby further leads to shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, brachial plexus injury. Additionally, pregnancies with overt/pregestational diabetes may be complicated with foetal growth restriction, congenital abnormalities diagnosed in third trimester and foetal hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Even minor degrees of hyperglycaemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Optimizing maternal glycaemic control and foetal surveillance is crucial for optimizing the perinatal outcome and minimizing aforesaid complications. The management of macrosomia is controversial regarding timing and mode of delivery, but most authorities agree for primary caesarean if estimated foetal weight at the end of pregnancy is 4500 gram or more. PMID:27640989

  11. Man is not a big rat: concerns with traditional human risk assessment of phthalates based on their anti-androgenic effects observed in the rat foetus.

    PubMed

    Habert, René; Livera, Gabriel; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates provide one of the most documented example evidencing how much we must be cautious when using the traditional paradigm based on extrapolation of experimental data from rodent studies for human health risk assessment of endocrine disruptors (EDs). Since foetal testis is known as one of the most sensitive targets of EDs, phthalate risk assessment is routinely based on the capacity of such compounds to decrease testosterone production by the testis or to impair masculinization in the rat during foetal life. In this paper, the well-established inhibiting effects of phthalates of the foetal Leydig cells function in the rat are briefly reviewed. Then, data obtained in humans and other species are carefully analysed. Already in January 2009, using the organotypic culture system named Fetal Testis Assay (FeTA) that we developed, we reported that phthalates might not affect testosterone production in human foetal testes. Several recent experimental studies using xenografts confirm the absence of detectable anti-androgenic effect of phthalates in the human foetal testes. Epidemiological studies led to contradictory results. Altogether, these findings suggest that phthalates effects on foetal Leydig cells are largely species-specific. Consequently, the phthalate threshold doses that disturb foetal steroidogenesis in rat testes and that are presently used to define the acceptable daily intake levels for human health protection must be questioned. This does not mean that phthalates are safe because these compounds have many deleterious effects upon germ cell development that may be common to the different studied species including human. More generally, the identification of common molecular, cellular or/and phenotypic targets in rat and human testes should precede the choice of the toxicological endpoint in rat to accurately assess the safety threshold of any ED in humans.

  12. Prediction of gene–phenotype associations in humans, mice, and plants using phenologs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phenotypes and diseases may be related to seemingly dissimilar phenotypes in other species by means of the orthology of underlying genes. Such “orthologous phenotypes,” or “phenologs,” are examples of deep homology, and may be used to predict additional candidate disease genes. Results In this work, we develop an unsupervised algorithm for ranking phenolog-based candidate disease genes through the integration of predictions from the k nearest neighbor phenologs, comparing classifiers and weighting functions by cross-validation. We also improve upon the original method by extending the theory to paralogous phenotypes. Our algorithm makes use of additional phenotype data — from chicken, zebrafish, and E. coli, as well as new datasets for C. elegans — establishing that several types of annotations may be treated as phenotypes. We demonstrate the use of our algorithm to predict novel candidate genes for human atrial fibrillation (such as HRH2, ATP4A, ATP4B, and HOPX) and epilepsy (e.g., PAX6 and NKX2-1). We suggest gene candidates for pharmacologically-induced seizures in mouse, solely based on orthologous phenotypes from E. coli. We also explore the prediction of plant gene–phenotype associations, as for the Arabidopsis response to vernalization phenotype. Conclusions We are able to rank gene predictions for a significant portion of the diseases in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database. Additionally, our method suggests candidate genes for mammalian seizures based only on bacterial phenotypes and gene orthology. We demonstrate that phenotype information may come from diverse sources, including drug sensitivities, gene ontology biological processes, and in situ hybridization annotations. Finally, we offer testable candidates for a variety of human diseases, plant traits, and other classes of phenotypes across a wide array of species. PMID:23800157

  13. Genotype-phenotype associations and human eye color.

    PubMed

    White, Désirée; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Although eye color is usually modeled as a simple, Mendelian trait, further research and observation has indicated that eye color does not follow the classical paths of inheritance. Eye color phenotypes demonstrate both epistasis and incomplete dominance. Although there are about 16 different genes responsible for eye color, it is mostly attributed to two adjacent genes on chromosome 15, hect domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 2 (HERC2) and ocular albinism (that is, oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2)). An intron in HERC2 contains the promoter region for OCA2, affecting its expression. Therefore, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in either of these two genes have a large role in the eye color of an individual. Furthermore, with all genetic expression, aberration also occurs. Some individuals may express two phenotypes--one in each eye--or a complete lack of pigmentation, ocular albinism. In addition, the evolutionary and population roles of the different expressions are significant.

  14. Human genotype-phenotype databases: aims, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Anthony J; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-12-01

    Genotype-phenotype databases provide information about genetic variation, its consequences and its mechanisms of action for research and health care purposes. Existing databases vary greatly in type, areas of focus and modes of operation. Despite ever larger and more intricate datasets--made possible by advances in DNA sequencing, omics methods and phenotyping technologies--steady progress is being made towards integrating these databases rather than using them as separate entities. The consequential shift in focus from single-gene variants towards large gene panels, exomes, whole genomes and myriad observable characteristics creates new challenges and opportunities in database design, interpretation of variant pathogenicity and modes of data representation and use. PMID:26553330

  15. Genotype-phenotype associations and human eye color.

    PubMed

    White, Désirée; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Although eye color is usually modeled as a simple, Mendelian trait, further research and observation has indicated that eye color does not follow the classical paths of inheritance. Eye color phenotypes demonstrate both epistasis and incomplete dominance. Although there are about 16 different genes responsible for eye color, it is mostly attributed to two adjacent genes on chromosome 15, hect domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 2 (HERC2) and ocular albinism (that is, oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2)). An intron in HERC2 contains the promoter region for OCA2, affecting its expression. Therefore, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in either of these two genes have a large role in the eye color of an individual. Furthermore, with all genetic expression, aberration also occurs. Some individuals may express two phenotypes--one in each eye--or a complete lack of pigmentation, ocular albinism. In addition, the evolutionary and population roles of the different expressions are significant. PMID:20944644

  16. Foetal immune programming: hormones, cytokines, microbes and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter; Nanan, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental cues play important roles in shaping the immune system. The first environment that the developing foetal immune system encounters is the uterus. Although physically the mother and the foetus are separated by the placental membranes, various factors such as hormones and cytokines may provide "environmental cues" to the foetal immune system. Additionally, increasing evidence suggests that prenatal maternal environmental factors, particularly microbial exposure, might significantly influence the foetal immune system, affecting long-term outcomes, a concept termed foetal immune programming. Here we discuss the potential mediators of foetal immune programming, focusing on the role of pregnancy-related hormones, cytokines and regulatory T cells, which play a critical role in immune tolerance.

  17. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings. PMID:26051359

  18. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  19. Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Human Holoprosencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Mercier, Sandra; Vélez, Jorge I.; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E.; Wyllie, Adrian; Zhou, Nan; Dubourg, Christèle; David, Veronique; Odent, Sylvie; Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first gene causing holoprosencephaly (HPE), over 500 patients with mutations in genes associated with non-chromosomal, non-syndromic HPE have been described, with detailed descriptions available in over 300. Comprehensive clinical analysis of these individuals allows examination for the presence of genotype-phenotype correlations. These correlations allow a degree of differentiation between patients with mutations in different HPE-associated genes and for the application of functional studies to determine intragenic correlations. These early correlations are an important advance in the understanding of the clinical aspects of this disease, and in general argue for continued analysis of the genetic and clinical findings of large cohorts of patients with rare diseases in order to better inform both basic biological insight and care and counseling for affected patients and families. PMID:20104608

  20. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn S.; Fields, Natasha R.; Chaudoin, Tammy R; Epstein, Adrian A.; Makarov, Edward; Akhter, Sidra P.; Gorantla, Santhi; Bonasera, Stephen J.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization. PMID:26353862

  1. From phenotype to gene: detecting disease-specific gene functional modules via a text-based human disease phenotype network construction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Chao; Li, Xia; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Wei; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yu-Qing

    2010-08-20

    Currently, some efforts have been devoted to the text analysis of disease phenotype data, and their results indicated that similar disease phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. These related genes work together, as a functional module, to perform a desired cellular function. We constructed a text-based human disease phenotype network and detected 82 disease-specific gene functional modules, each corresponding to a different phenotype cluster, by means of graph-based clustering and mapping from disease phenotype to gene. Since genes in such gene functional modules are functionally related and cause clinically similar diseases, they may share common genetic origin of their associated disease phenotypes. We believe the investigation may facilitate the ultimate understanding of the common pathophysiologic basis of associated diseases.

  2. Potassium Channels and Human Epileptic Phenotypes: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Chiara; Combi, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K+ channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K+ channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K+ channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals. This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K+ channels in monogenic forms. PMID:27064559

  3. Epigenetic alterations differ in phenotypically distinct human neuroblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epigenetic aberrations and a CpG island methylator phenotype have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in children with neuroblastoma (NB). Seven cancer related genes (THBS-1, CASP8, HIN-1, TIG-1, BLU, SPARC, and HIC-1) that have been shown to have epigenetic changes in adult cancers and play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis, tumor growth, and apoptosis were analyzed to investigate the role epigenetic alterations play in determining NB phenotype. Methods Two NB cell lines (tumorigenic LA1-55n and non-tumorigenic LA1-5s) that differ in their ability to form colonies in soft agar and tumors in nude mice were used. Quantitative RNA expression analyses were performed on seven genes in LA1-5s, LA1-55n and 5-Aza-dC treated LA1-55n NB cell lines. The methylation status around THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1 and CASP8 promoters was examined using methylation specific PCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to examine histone modifications along the THBS-1 promoter. Luciferase assay was used to determine THBS-1 promoter activity. Cell proliferation assay was used to examine the effect of 5-Aza-dC on NB cell growth. The soft agar assay was used to determine the tumorigenicity. Results Promoter methylation values for THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1, and CASP8 were higher in LA1-55n cells compared to LA1-5s cells. Consistent with the promoter methylation status, lower levels of gene expression were detected in the LA1-55n cells. Histone marks associated with repressive chromatin states (H3K9Me3, H3K27Me3, and H3K4Me3) were identified in the THBS-1 promoter region in the LA1-55n cells, but not the LA1-5s cells. In contrast, the three histone codes associated with an active chromatin state (acetyl H3, acetyl H4, and H3K4Me3) were present in the THBS-1 promoter region in LA1-5s cells, but not the LA1-55n cells, suggesting that an accessible chromatin structure is important for THBS-1 expression. We also show that 5-Aza-dC treatment of LA1-55n cells

  4. Genetic modeling of ovarian phenotypes in mice for the study of human polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Li, Xin; Shao, Ruijin

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) presents with a range of clinical complications including hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries, chronic oligo/anovulation, infertility, and metabolic alterations related to insulin resistance. Because the mechanism by which this disorder develops is poorly understood, information from experimental models of human disease phenotypes may help to define the mechanisms for the initiation and development of PCOS-related pathological events. The establishment of animal models compatible with human PCOS is challenging, and applying the lessons learned from these models to human PCOS is often complicated. In this mini-review we provide examples of currently available genetic mouse models, their ovarian phenotypes, and their possible relationship to different aspects of human PCOS. Because of the practical and ethical limitations of studying PCOS-related events in humans, our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of human PCOS may be enhanced through further study of these transgenic and knockout mouse models. PMID:23390562

  5. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pphenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD.

  6. Comparative Analyses of QTLs Influencing Obesity and Metabolic Phenotypes in Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Mette J.; Cirera, Susanna; Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Bruun, Camilla S.; Mark, Thomas; Jørgensen, Claus B.; Grarup, Niels; Appel, Emil V. R.; Galjatovic, Ehm A. A.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Guerin, Maryse; Huby, Thierry; Lesnik, Philipppe; Meuwissen, Theo H. E.; Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Fredholm, Merete

    2015-01-01

    The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35) from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days), including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days) via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine 60k SNP Beadchip and a combined linkage disequilibrium-linkage analysis was used to identify genome-wide significant associations for collected phenotypes. We identified 229 QTLs which associated with adiposity- and metabolic phenotypes at genome-wide significant levels. Subsequently comparative analyses were performed to identify the extent of overlap between previously identified QTLs in both humans and pigs. The combined analysis of a large number of obesity phenotypes has provided insight in the genetic architecture of the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits indicating that QTLs underlying similar phenotypes are clustered in the genome. Our analyses have further confirmed that genetic heterogeneity is an inherent characteristic of obesity traits most likely caused by segregation or fixation of different variants of the individual components belonging to cellular pathways in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel insight that

  7. DMP1 C-Terminal Mutant Mice Recapture the Human ARHR Tooth Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Baichun; Cao, Zhengguo; Lu, Yongbo; Janik, Carol; Lauziere, Stephanie; Xie, Yixia; Poliard, Anne; Qin, Chunlin; Ward, Leanne M; Feng, Jian Q

    2010-01-01

    DMP1 mutations in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) patients and mice lacking Dmp1 display an overlapping pathophysiology, such as hypophosphatemia. However, subtle differences exist between the mouse model and human ARHR patients. These differences could be due to a species specificity of human versus mouse, or it may be that the mutant DMP1 in humans maintains partial function of DMP1. In this study we report a deformed tooth phenotype in a human DMP1 deletion mutation case. Unexpectedly, the deletion of nucleotides 1484 to 1490 (c.1484_1490delCTATCAC, delMut, resulting in replacement of the last 18 residues with 33 random amino acids) showed a severe dentin and enamel defect similar to a dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) III–like phenotype. To address the molecular mechanism behind this phenotype, we generated delMut transgenic mice with the endogenous Dmp1 gene removed. These mutant mice did not recapture the abnormal phenotype observed in the human patient but displayed a mild rachitic tooth phenotype in comparison with that in the Dmp1-null mice, suggesting that the DI III–like phenotype may be due to an as-yet-undetermined acquired gene modifier. The mechanism studies showed that the mutant fragment maintains partial function of DMP1 such as stimulating MAP kinase signaling in vitro. Last, the in vitro and in vivo data support a role of odontoblasts in the control of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) regulation during early postnatal development, although this regulation on Pi homeostasis is likely limited. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20499360

  8. From genotype to human β cell phenotype and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Piero; Syed, Farooq; Suleiman, Mara; Bugliani, Marco; Marselli, Lorella

    2012-01-01

    Polygenic type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multi-factorial disease due to the interplay between genes and the environment. Over the years, several genes/loci have been associated with this type of diabetes, with the majority of them being related to β cell dysfunction. In this review, the available information on how polymorphisms in T2DM-associated genes/loci do directly affect the properties of human islet cells are presented and discussed, including some clinical implications and the role of epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:23073174

  9. Phenotype-independent effects of retroviral transduction in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Egbuniwe, Obi; Grant, Andrew D; Renton, Tara; Di Silvio, Lucy

    2013-07-01

    An immortalized human dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) line of an odontoblastic phenotype is established to circumvent the normal programmed senescence and to maintain the cell line's usefulness as a tool for further study of cellular activity. DPSCs are isolated from human dental pulp tissues and transfected using hTERT. The influence of this process on the DPSC phenotype and the mRNA expression of oncogenes involved in cellular senescence is investigated. The results reveal an absence of altered DPSC morphology and phenotype following the exogenous introduction of the hTERT gene, which is coupled with a significant reduction in p16 mRNA expression. This provides insight into how to circumvent in vitro dental pulp stem cell death following the exogenous introduction of hTERT.

  10. Phenotype expression of human bone cells cultured on implant substrates.

    PubMed

    Locci, P; Becchetti, E; Pugliese, M; Rossi, L; Belcastro, S; Calvitti, M; Pietrarelli, G; Staffolani, N

    1997-09-01

    Bone cells derived from the human jaw were cultured on titanium, titanium coated with hydroxyapatite (THA) or with plasma spray (TPS) to study the behaviour of the cells anchored to implant substrates. Bone cells were cultured in MEM with the addition of [3H]-thymidine to evaluate cellular proliferation, and [3H]-glucosamine to evaluate GAG synthesis and accumulation in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Moreover, to study the degradation of GAG bone cells were cultured in the presence of NH4Cl, an amine known to inhibit lysosomal activity. Our results show that TPS is the substrate that favours both cellular proliferation and the accumulation of GAG in the ECM. PMID:9377794

  11. Thromboxane synthase regulates the migratory phenotype of human glioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giese, A.; Hagel, C.; Kim, E. L.; Zapf, S.; Djawaheri, J.; Berens, M. E.; Westphal, M.

    1999-01-01

    The capacity of glial tumor cells to migrate and diffusely infiltrate normal brain compromises surgical eradication of the disease. Identification of genes associated with invasion may offer novel strategies for anti-invasive therapies. The gene for TXsyn, an enzyme of the arachidonic acid pathway, has been identified by differential mRNA display as being overexpressed in a glioma cell line selected for migration. In this study TXsyn mRNA expression was found in a large panel of glioma cell lines but not in a strain of human astrocytes. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated TXsyn in the parenchyma of glial tumors and in reactive astrocytes, whereas it could not be detected in quiescent astrocytes and oligodendroglia of normal brain. Glioma cell lines showed a wide range of thromboxane B2 formation, the relative expression of which correlated with migration rates of these cells. Migration was effectively blocked by specific inhibitors of TXsyn, such as furegrelate and dazmegrel. Other TXsyn inhibitors and cyclooxygenase inhibitors were less effective. Treatment with specific inhibitors also resulted in a decrease of intercellular adhesion in glioma cells. These data indicate that TXsyn plays a crucial role in the signal transduction of migration in glial tumors and may offer a novel strategy for anti-invasive therapies. PMID:11550298

  12. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  13. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of the human haptoglobin phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nina S.; Vardi, Moshe; Blum, Shany; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Afinbinder, Yefim; Cleary, Patricia A.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Bharaj, Bhupinder; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Rewers, Marian J.; Lache, Orit; Levy, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Haptoglobin (Hp) is an abundant serum protein which binds extracorpuscular hemoglobin (Hb). Two alleles exist in humans for the Hp gene, denoted 1 and 2. Diabetic individuals with the Hp 2-2 genotype are at increased risk of developing vascular complications including heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Recent evidence shows that treatment with vitamin E can reduce the risk of diabetic vascular complications by as much as 50% in Hp 2-2 individuals. We sought to develop a rapid and accurate test for Hp phenotype (which is 100% concordant with the three major Hp genotypes) to facilitate widespread diagnostic testing as well as prospective clinical trials. Methods A monoclonal antibody raised against human Hp was shown to distinguish between the three Hp phenotypes in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hp phenotypes obtained in over 8000 patient samples using this ELISA method were compared with those obtained by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or the TaqMan PCR method. Results Our analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA test for Hp 2-2 phenotype is 99.0% and 98.1%, respectively. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value for Hp 2-2 phenotype is 97.5% and 99.3%, respectively. Similar results were obtained for Hp 2-1 and Hp 1-1 phenotypes. In addition, the ELISA was determined to be more sensitive and specific than the TaqMan method. Conclusions The Hp ELISA represents a user-friendly, rapid and highly accurate diagnostic tool for determining Hp phenotypes. This test will greatly facilitate the typing of thousands of samples in ongoing clinical studies. PMID:23492570

  14. The development of a phantom to determine foetal organ doses from 131I in the foetal thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hare, N.; Murphy, D.; Malone, J. F.

    2000-09-01

    Iodine can accumulate in the foetal thyroid from the twelfth week of gestation onwards. If the iodine taken up by the foetal thyroid is in the form of 131I then the thyroid and its proximal tissues and organs will be irradiated. Several mathematical models exist in the literature on foetal/maternal iodine kinetics. However, very few studies have been performed where the foetal thyroid had been physically modelled thus allowing the determination of foetal organ dosimetry from 131I in the foetal thyroid. Here, the development of such a physical model or phantom is described and dosimetry results obtained from the phantom are discussed. The phantom is of Perspex construction, the dimensions of which are sufficient to incorporate models of the foetus at 16, 24 and 36 weeks' gestational age. The dosimetry of two organs is presented, that of the brain and the thymus. The results show that the measured absorbed dose is comparable with that calculated using modified MIRD dosimetry and traditional methods. The results also show that the dose to the thymus is greater than that of the brain by a factor of almost 30 for 16 weeks' gestational age.

  15. The functional foetal brain: A systematic preview of methodological factors in reporting foetal visual and auditory capacity.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kirsty; Reissland, Nadja; Reid, Vincent M

    2015-06-01

    Due to technological advancements in functional brain imaging, foetal brain responses to visual and auditory stimuli is a growing area of research despite being relatively small with much variation between research laboratories. A number of inconsistencies between studies are, nonetheless, present in the literature. This article aims to explore the potential contribution of methodological factors to variation in reports of foetal neural responses to external stimuli. Some of the variation in reports can be explained by methodological differences in aspects of study design, such as brightness and wavelength of light source. In contrast to visual foetal processing, auditory foetal processing has been more frequently investigated and findings are more consistent between different studies. This is an early preview of an emerging field with many articles reporting small sample sizes with techniques that are yet to be replicated. We suggest areas for improvement for the field as a whole, such as the standardisation of stimulus delivery and a more detailed reporting of methods and results. This will improve our understanding of foetal functional response to light and sound. We suggest that enhanced technology will allow for a more reliable description of the developmental trajectory of foetal processing of light stimuli. PMID:25967364

  16. Human regulatory B cells combine phenotypic and genetic hallmarks with a distinct differentiation fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenyu; Cerny, Daniela; Chua, Edmond; Duan, Kaibo; Yi, June Tai Jing; Shadan, Nurhidaya Binte; Lum, Josephine; Maho-Vaillant, Maud; Zolezzi, Francesca; Wong, Siew Cheng; Larbi, Anis; Fink, Katja; Musette, Philippe; Poidinger, Michael; Calbo, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory B cells (B-reg) produce IL-10 and suppress inflammation in both mice and humans, but limited data on the phenotype and function of these cells have precluded detailed assessment of their contribution to host immunity. In this article, we report that human B-reg cannot be defined based on a phenotype composed of conventional B cell markers, and that IL-10 production can be elicited in both the CD27(+) memory population and naive B cell subset after only a brief stimulation in vitro. We therefore sought to obtain a better definition of IL-10-producing human B-regs using a multiparameter analysis of B cell phenotype, function, and gene expression profile. Exposure to CpG and anti-Ig are the most potent stimuli for IL-10 secretion in human B cells, but microarray analysis revealed that human B cells cotreated with these reagents resulted in only ∼0.7% of genes being differentially expressed between IL-10(+) and IL-10(-) cells. Instead, connectivity map analysis revealed that IL-10-secreting B cells are those undergoing specific differentiation toward a germinal center fate, and we identified a CD11c(+) B cell subset that was not capable of producing IL-10 even under optimal conditions. Our findings will assist in the identification of a broader range of human pro-B-reg populations that may represent novel targets for immunotherapy. PMID:25080484

  17. Evaluation of the foetal time to death in mice after application of direct and indirect euthanasia methods.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mediavilla, C; Cámara, J A; Salazar, S; Segui, B; Sanguino, D; Mulero, F; de la Cueva, E; Blanco, I

    2016-04-01

    Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes requires that the killing of mammal foetuses during the last third of their gestational period should be accomplished through effective and humane methods. The fact that murine foetuses are resistant to hypoxia-mediated euthanasia renders the current euthanasia methods ineffective or humane for the foetuses when these methods are applied to pregnant female mice. We have assessed the time to death of foetuses after performing either indirect (dam euthanasia) or direct (via intraplacental injection--a new approach to euthanasia) euthanasia methods in order to determine a euthanasia method that is appropriate, ethical and efficient for the killing of mouse foetuses. The respective times to death of foetuses after performing the three most commonly used euthanasia methods (namely cervical dislocation, CO2inhalation and intraperitoneal sodium pentobarbital administration) were recorded. Absence of foetal heartbeat was monitored via ultrasound. We consider that the most effective and humane method of foetal euthanasia was the one able to achieve foetal death within the shortest possible period of time. Among the indirect euthanasia methods assessed, the administration of a sodium pentobarbital overdose to pregnant female mice was found to be the fastest for foetuses, with an average post-treatment foetal death of approximately 29.8 min. As for the direct euthanasia method assessed, foetal time to death after intraplacental injection of sodium pentobarbital was approximately 14 min. Significant differences among the different mouse strains employed were found. Based on the results obtained in our study, we consider that the administration of a sodium pentobarbital overdose by intraplacental injection to be an effective euthanasia method for murine foetuses.

  18. Human tracheobronchial basal cells. Normal versus remodeling/repairing phenotypes in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; Jian, Abhilasha; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W; Helm, Karen M; Seibold, Max A; Groshong, Steven D; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2013-12-01

    Human tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) basal cells (BCs) function as progenitors in normal tissue. However, mechanistic studies are typically performed in vitro and frequently use BCs recovered from patients who die of nonrespiratory disease. It is not known whether the cadaveric epithelium (1) is undergoing homeostatic remodeling and/or repair, or (2) yields BC clones that represent homeostatic processes identified in tissue. We sought to compare the phenotype of TBE-BCs with that of BCs cultured under optimal clone-forming conditions. TBE pathology was evaluated using quantitative histomorphometry. The cultured BC phenotype was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Clone organization and cell phenotype were determined by immunostaining. The cadaveric TBE is 20% normal. In these regions, BCs are keratin (K)-5(+) and tetraspanin CD151(+), and demonstrate a low mitotic index. In contrast, 80% of the cadaveric TBE exhibits homeostatic remodeling/repair processes. In these regions, BCs are K5(+)/K14(+), and a subset expresses tissue factor (TF). Passage 1 TBE cells are BCs that are K5(+)/TF(+), and half coexpress CD151. Optimal clone formation conditions use an irradiated NIH3T3 fibroblast feeder layer (American Type Culture Collection, Frederick, MD) and serum-supplemented Epicult-B medium (Stemcell Technologies, La Jolla, CA). The TF(+)/CD151(-) BC subpopulation is the most clonogenic BC subtype, and is enriched with K14(+) cells. TF(+)/CD151(-) BCs generate clones containing BCs that are K5(+)/Trp63(+), but K14(-)/CD151(-). TF(+) cells are limited to the clone edge. In conclusion, clonogenic human TBE BCs (1) exhibit a molecular phenotype that is a composite of the normal and remodeling/reparative BC phenotypes observed in tissue, and (2) generate organoid clones that contain phenotypically distinct BC subpopulations.

  19. The effect of maternal Inflammation on foetal programming of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Ingvorsen, C; Brix, S; Ozanne, S E; Hellgren, L I

    2015-08-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy increases the child's risk of developing obesity and obesity-related diseases later in life. Key components in foetal programming of metabolic risk remain to be identified; however, chronic low-grade inflammation associated with obesity might be responsible for metabolic imprinting in the offspring. We have therefore surveyed the literature to evaluate the role of maternal obesity-induced inflammation in foetal programming of obesity and related diseases. The literature on this topic is limited, so this review also includes animal models where maternal inflammation is mimicked by single injections with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). An LPS challenge results in an immunological response that resembles the obesity-induced immune profile, although LPS injections provoke a stronger response than the subclinical obesity-associated response. Maternal LPS or cytokine exposures result in increased adiposity and impaired metabolic homeostasis in the offspring, similar to the phenotype observed after exposure to maternal obesity. The cytokine levels might be specifically important for the metabolic imprinting, as cytokines are both transferable from maternal to foetal circulation and have the capability to modulate placental nutrient transfer. However, the immune response associated with obesity is moderate and therefore potentially weakened by the pregnancy-driven immune modulation, dominated by anti-inflammatory Treg and Th2 cells. We know from other low-grade inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, that pregnancy can improve disease state. If pregnancy is also capable of suppressing the obesity-associated inflammation, the immunological markers might be less likely to affect metabolic programming in the developing foetus than otherwise implied.

  20. Automatic concept recognition using the Human Phenotype Ontology reference and test suite corpora

    PubMed Central

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra; Collier, Nigel; Oellrich, Anika; Smedley, Damian; Couto, Francisco M; Baynam, Gareth; Zankl, Andreas; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Concept recognition tools rely on the availability of textual corpora to assess their performance and enable the identification of areas for improvement. Typically, corpora are developed for specific purposes, such as gene name recognition. Gene and protein name identification are longstanding goals of biomedical text mining, and therefore a number of different corpora exist. However, phenotypes only recently became an entity of interest for specialized concept recognition systems, and hardly any annotated text is available for performance testing and training. Here, we present a unique corpus, capturing text spans from 228 abstracts manually annotated with Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) concepts and harmonized by three curators, which can be used as a reference standard for free text annotation of human phenotypes. Furthermore, we developed a test suite for standardized concept recognition error analysis, incorporating 32 different types of test cases corresponding to 2164 HPO concepts. Finally, three established phenotype concept recognizers (NCBO Annotator, OBO Annotator and Bio-LarK CR) were comprehensively evaluated, and results are reported against both the text corpus and the test suites. The gold standard and test suites corpora are available from http://bio-lark.org/hpo_res.html. Database URL: http://bio-lark.org/hpo_res.html PMID:25725061

  1. Metagenomic Predictions: From Microbiome to Complex Health and Environmental Phenotypes in Humans and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Elizabeth M.; Moate, Peter J.; Marett, Leah C.; Cocks, Ben G.; Hayes, Ben J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammals have a large cohort of endo- and ecto- symbiotic microorganisms (the microbiome) that potentially influence host phenotypes. There have been numerous exploratory studies of these symbiotic organisms in humans and other animals, often with the aim of relating the microbiome to a complex phenotype such as body mass index (BMI) or disease state. Here, we describe an efficient methodology for predicting complex traits from quantitative microbiome profiles. The method was demonstrated by predicting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) status and BMI from human microbiome data, and enteric greenhouse gas production from dairy cattle rumen microbiome profiles. The method uses unassembled massively parallel sequencing (MPS) data to form metagenomic relationship matrices (analogous to genomic relationship matrices used in genomic predictions) to predict IBD, BMI and methane production phenotypes with useful accuracies (r = 0.423, 0.422 and 0.466 respectively). Our results show that microbiome profiles derived from MPS can be used to predict complex phenotypes of the host. Although the number of biological replicates used here limits the accuracy that can be achieved, preliminary results suggest this approach may surpass current prediction accuracies that are based on the host genome. This is especially likely for traits that are largely influenced by the gut microbiota, for example digestive tract disorders or metabolic functions such as enteric methane production in cattle. PMID:24023808

  2. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  3. Metagenomic predictions: from microbiome to complex health and environmental phenotypes in humans and cattle.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elizabeth M; Moate, Peter J; Marett, Leah C; Cocks, Ben G; Hayes, Ben J

    2013-01-01

    Mammals have a large cohort of endo- and ecto- symbiotic microorganisms (the microbiome) that potentially influence host phenotypes. There have been numerous exploratory studies of these symbiotic organisms in humans and other animals, often with the aim of relating the microbiome to a complex phenotype such as body mass index (BMI) or disease state. Here, we describe an efficient methodology for predicting complex traits from quantitative microbiome profiles. The method was demonstrated by predicting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) status and BMI from human microbiome data, and enteric greenhouse gas production from dairy cattle rumen microbiome profiles. The method uses unassembled massively parallel sequencing (MPS) data to form metagenomic relationship matrices (analogous to genomic relationship matrices used in genomic predictions) to predict IBD, BMI and methane production phenotypes with useful accuracies (r = 0.423, 0.422 and 0.466 respectively). Our results show that microbiome profiles derived from MPS can be used to predict complex phenotypes of the host. Although the number of biological replicates used here limits the accuracy that can be achieved, preliminary results suggest this approach may surpass current prediction accuracies that are based on the host genome. This is especially likely for traits that are largely influenced by the gut microbiota, for example digestive tract disorders or metabolic functions such as enteric methane production in cattle. PMID:24023808

  4. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease.

    PubMed

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L; Mungall, Christopher J; Lewis, Suzanna E; Haendel, Melissa A; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-07-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  5. Phenotypic, Morphological and Adhesive Differences of Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Cultured on Murine versus Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Doreen; Friedrichs, Jens; Ritter, Steffi; Käubler, Theresa; Werner, Carsten; Bornhäuser, Martin; Corbeil, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Xenogenic transplantation models have been developed to study human hematopoiesis in immunocompromised murine recipients. They still have limitations and therefore it is important to delineate all players within the bone marrow that could account for species-specific differences. Here, we evaluated the proliferative capacity, morphological and physical characteristics of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) after co-culture on murine or human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). After seven days, human CD34+CD133– HSPCs expanded to similar extents on both feeder layers while cellular subsets comprising primitive CD34+CD133+ and CD133+CD34– phenotypes are reduced fivefold on murine MSCs. The number of migrating HSPCs was also reduced on murine cells suggesting that MSC adhesion influences cellular polarization of HSPC. We used atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify their adhesive interactions. We found threefold higher detachment forces of human HSPCs from murine MSCs compared to human ones. This difference is related to the N-cadherin expression level on murine MSCs since its knockdown abolished their differential adhesion properties with human HSPCs. Our observations highlight phenotypic, morphological and adhesive differences of human HSPCs when cultured on murine or human MSCs, which raise some caution in data interpretation when xenogenic transplantation models are used. PMID:26498381

  6. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  7. A PC-aided optical foetal heart rate detection system.

    PubMed

    Oweis, Rami J; As'ad, Hala; Aldarawsheh, Amany; Al-Khdeirat, Rawan; Lwissy, Kaldoun

    2014-01-01

    Safe monitoring of foetal heart rate is a valuable tool for the healthy evolution and wellbeing of both foetus and mother. This paper presents a non-invasive optical technique that allows for foetal heart rate detection using a photovoltaic infrared (IR) detector placed on the mother's abdomen. The system presented here consists of a photoplethysmography (PPG) circuit, abdomen circuit and a personal computer equipped with MATLAB. A near IR beam having a wavelength of 880 nm is transmitted through the mother's abdomen and foetal tissue. The received abdominal signal that conveys information pertaining to the mother and foetal heart rate is sensed by a low noise photodetector. The PC receives the signal through the National Instrumentation Data Acquisition Card (NIDAQ). After synchronous detection of the abdominal and finger PPG signals, the designed MATLAB-based software saves, analyses and extracts information related to the foetal heart rate. Extraction is carried out using recursive least squares adaptive filtration. Measurements on eight pregnant women with gestational periods ranging from 35-39 weeks were performed using the proposed system and CTG. Results show a correlation coefficient of 0.978 and a correlation confidence interval between 88-99.6%. The t test results in a p value of 0.034, which is less than 0.05. Low power, low cost, high signal-to-noise ratio, reduction of ambient light effect and ease of use are the main characteristics of the proposed system. PMID:24195701

  8. New genes contribute to genetic and phenotypic novelties in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong E.; Long, Manyuan

    2014-01-01

    New genes in human genomes have been found relevant in evolution and biology of humans. It was conservatively estimated that the human genome encodes more than 300 human-specific genes and 1,000 primate-specific genes. These new arrivals appear to be implicated in brain function and male reproduction. Surprisingly, increasing evidence indicates that they may also bring negative pleiotropic effects, while assuming various possible biological functions as sources of phenotypic novelties, suggesting a non-progressive route for functional evolution. Similar to these fixed new genes, polymorphic new genes were found to contribute to functional evolution within species, e.g. with respect to digestion or disease resistance, revealing that new genes can acquire new or diverged functions in its initial stage as prototypic genes. These progresses have provided new opportunity to explore the genetic basis of human biology and human evolutionary history in a new dimension. PMID:25218862

  9. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Li, Xiaojie; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Mauceri, Joseph; Burm, Hayley B.; Toner, Michael; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Jim Xu, Qiwu; Ding, Fengfei; Wang, Fushun; Kang, Ning; Kang, Jian; Curtin, Paul C.; Brunner, Daniela; Windrem, Martha S.; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Nedergaard, Maiken; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder. PMID:27273432

  10. Epigenetic reprogramming in embryonic and foetal development upon somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner; Tian, X Cindy; King, W Allan; Lee, Rita S F

    2008-02-01

    The birth of 'Dolly', the first mammal cloned from an adult donor cell, has sparked a flurry of research activities to improve cloning technology and to understand the underlying mechanism of epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus. Especially in ruminants, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is frequently associated with pathological changes in the foetal and placental phenotype and has significant consequences for development both before and after birth. The most critical factor is epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus from its differentiated status into the totipotent state of the early embryo. This involves an erasure of the gene expression program of the respective donor cell and the establishment of the well-orchestrated sequence of expression of an estimated number of 10 000-12 000 genes regulating embryonic and foetal development. The following article reviews the present knowledge on the epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus, with emphasis on DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and telomere length restoration in bovine development. Additionally, we briefly discuss other approaches towards epigenetic nuclear reprogramming, including the fusion of somatic and embryonic stem cells and the overexpression of genes crucial in the formation and maintenance of the pluripotent status. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realising the great potential of SCNT for basic biological research and for various agricultural and biomedical applications.

  11. Human Endometrial Side Population Cells Exhibit Genotypic, Phenotypic and Functional Features of Somatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cervelló, Irene; Gil-Sanchis, Claudia; Mas, Aymara; Delgado-Rosas, Francisco; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Galán, Amparo; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastian; Navarro, Ismael; Ferro, Jaime; Horcajadas, José Antonio; Esteban, Francisco José; O'Connor, José Enrique; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC) population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP) cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC. PMID:20585575

  12. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease. PMID:20092628

  13. Nanopatterned Human iPSC-based Model of a Dystrophin-Null Cardiomyopathic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Guan, Xuan; Smith, Alec S.T.; Lucero, Rachel; Czerniecki, Stefan; Childers, Martin K.; Mack, David L.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) offer unprecedented opportunities to study inherited heart conditions in vitro, but are phenotypically immature, limiting their ability to effectively model adult-onset diseases. Cardiomyopathy is becoming the leading cause of death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but the pathogenesis of this disease phenotype is not fully understood. Therefore, we aimed to test whether biomimetic nanotopography could further stratify the disease phenotype of DMD hiPSC-CMs to create more translationally relevant cardiomyocytes for disease modeling applications. We found that anisotropic nanotopography was necessary to distinguish structural differences between normal and DMD hiPSC-CMs, as these differences were masked on conventional flat substrates. DMD hiPSC-CMs exhibited a diminished structural and functional response to the underlying nanotopography compared to normal cardiomyocytes at both the macroscopic and subcellular levels. This blunted response may be due to a lower level of actin cytoskeleton turnover as measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Taken together these data suggest that DMD hiPSC-CMs are less adaptable to changes in their extracellular environment, and highlight the utility of nanotopographic substrates for effectively stratifying normal and structural cardiac disease phenotypes in vitro. PMID:26366230

  14. Tissue Metabonomic Phenotyping for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Xu, Tangpeng; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Limin; Xu, Shan; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and prognosis based on the conventional histological grading method for CRC remains poor. To better the situation, we analyzed the metabonomic signatures of 50 human CRC tissues and their adjacent non-involved tissues (ANIT) using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) 1H NMR spectroscopy together with the fatty acid compositions of these tissues using GC-FID/MS. We showed that tissue metabolic phenotypes not only discriminated CRC tissues from ANIT, but also distinguished low-grade tumor tissues (stages I-II) from the high-grade ones (stages III-IV) with high sensitivity and specificity in both cases. Metabonomic phenotypes of CRC tissues differed significantly from that of ANIT in energy metabolism, membrane biosynthesis and degradations, osmotic regulations together with the metabolism of proteins and nucleotides. Amongst all CRC tissues, the stage I tumors exhibited largest differentiations from ANIT. The combination of the differentiating metabolites showed outstanding collective power for differentiating cancer from ANIT and for distinguishing CRC tissues at different stages. These findings revealed details in the typical metabonomic phenotypes associated with CRC tissues nondestructively and demonstrated tissue metabonomic phenotyping as an important molecular pathology tool for diagnosis and prognosis of cancerous solid tumors. PMID:26876567

  15. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pphenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD. PMID:26958284

  16. Gax regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Hu, Zhenlei; Zhai, Xinming; Wang, Yongyi; Liu, Jidong; Wang, Weijun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and restenosis after angioplasty. Transcription factors have emerged as critical regulators for VSMCs function, and recently we verified inhibiting transcription factor Gax was important for controlling VSMCs proliferation and migration. This study aimed to determine its role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. Western blot revealed that overexpression of Gax increased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes such as calponin and SM-MHC 11. Then, Gax overexpression potently suppressed proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without platelet-derived growth factor-induced-BB (PDGF-BB) stimuli whereas Gax silencing inhibited these processes. Furthermore, cDNA array analysis indicated that Rap1A gene was the downstream target of Gax in human VSMCs. And overexpression of Gax significantly inhibited expression of Rap1A in VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Moreover, overexpression of Rap1A decreased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes and increased proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Finally, Gax overexpression significantly inhibited the neointimal formation in carotid artery injury of mouse models, specifically through maintaining VSMCs contractile phenotype by decreasing Rap1A expression. In conclusion, these results indicated that Gax was a regulator of human VSMCs phenotypic modulation by targeting Rap1A gene, which suggested that targeting Gax or its downstream targets in human VSMCs may provide an attractive approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27508012

  17. Urban particle-induced apoptosis and phenotype shifts in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Holian, A; Hamilton, R F; Morandi, M T; Brown, S D; Li, L

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report a small but positive association between short-term increases in airborne particulate matter and small increases in morbidity and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular disease in urban areas. However, the lack of a mechanistic explanation to link particle exposure and human health effects makes it difficult to validate the human health effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that urban particles could cause apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages(AM) and a shift of their phenotypes to a higher immune active state, which would provide a mechanism to explain an inflammatory response. Freshly isolated human AM were incubated for 24 hr with urban particles (#1648 and #1649), Mount Saint Helen's ash (MSH), and residual oil fly ash (ROFA).Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis was demonstrated by morphology, cell death ELISA, and DNA ladder formation. Additionally, AM were characterized according to RFD1(+) (immune stimulatory macrophages) and RFD1(+)7(+) (suppressor macrophages) phenotypes by flow cytometry. ROFA particles caused AM necrosis at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, urban particles had no effect except at 200 microg/ml, and MSH had no effect at 200 microg/ml. ROFA (25 microg/ml) and particles #1648 or #1649 (100 microg/ml) caused apoptosis of AM by all three criteria, but 200 microg/ml MSH had no effect. Finally, 25 microg/ml ROFA and 100 microg/ml particles #1648 or #1649 up regulated the expression of the RFD1(+) AM phenotype, while only ROFA decreased the RFD1(+)7(+) phenotype. Consequently, ROFA and urban particles can induce apoptosis of human AM and increase the ratio of AM phenotypes toward a higher immune active state (i.e., increased RFD1(+):RFD1(+)7(+) ratio). Ifurban particles cause similar changes in vivo, this could result in lung inflammation and possible increased pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID

  18. Human Peripheral Clocks: Applications for Studying Circadian Phenotypes in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Camille; Brown, Steven A.; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Most light-sensitive organisms on earth have acquired an internal system of circadian clocks allowing the anticipation of light or darkness. In humans, the circadian system governs nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. Circadian phenotypes, including chronotype, vary dramatically among individuals and over individual lifespan. Recent studies have revealed that the characteristics of human skin fibroblast clocks correlate with donor chronotype. Given the complexity of circadian phenotype assessment in humans, the opportunity to study oscillator properties by using cultured primary cells has the potential to uncover molecular details difficult to assess directly in humans. Since altered properties of the circadian oscillator have been associated with many diseases including metabolic disorders and cancer, clock characteristics assessed in additional primary cell types using similar technologies might represent an important tool for exploring the connection between chronotype and disease, and for diagnostic purposes. Here, we review implications of this approach for gathering insights into human circadian rhythms and their function in health and disease. PMID:26029154

  19. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells acquire neural phenotype under the appropriate niche conditions.

    PubMed

    Martini, Maristela Maria; Jeremias, Talita da Silva; Kohler, Maria Cecília; Marostica, Lucas Lourenço; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells with clinical interest. It has been reported that MSCs can be isolated from the human term placenta. We investigated the ability of human placenta-derived MSCs to differentiate into a neural phenotype in coculture assays with astrocytes obtained from neonatal rats. Placenta-derived MSCs were cocultured on a confluent monolayer of astrocytes obtained from the rat cerebellum to evaluate the differences in morphology. The extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by astrocytes as well as the growth factors produced by the astrocyte-conditioned medium were evaluated. The expression of the neural markers glial fibrillate acid protein (GFAP) and Nestin was studied in MSCs by immunocytochemistry. MSCs were able to respond to the astrocyte niche in coculture assays. They expressed the neural markers GFAP, Nestin, or β-Tubulin III, followed by an outgrowth of cell processes. The ECM from astrocytes was not effective in inducing the neural phenotype in MSCs, although the expression of β-Tubulin III was observed. When MSCs were cocultured with cerebellar astrocytes from newborn rats, a neural phenotype was achieved. This was determined by immunocytochemistry to GFAP, Nestin, or β-Tubulin III and by morphological changes. It was achieved without the addition of exogenous differentiation factors. This demonstrates that placenta-derived MSCs may be able to differentiate into neural cell types when in direct contact with a neural environment.

  20. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from humans and animals differ in major phenotypical traits and virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Uber, Ana Paula; Trabulsi, Luiz R; Irino, Kinue; Beutin, Lothar; Ghilardi, Angela C R; Gomes, Tânia A T; Liberatore, Ana Maria A; de Castro, Antônio F P; Elias, Waldir P

    2006-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is characterized by the expression of the aggregative adherence pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we determined the phenotypic and genotypic relationships among 86 EAEC strains of human and animal (calves, piglets and horses) feces. Serotypes and the presence of EAEC virulence markers were determined, and these results were associated with ribotyping. Strains harboring aggR (typical EAEC) of human origin were found carrying several of the searched markers, while atypical EAEC harbored none or a few markers. The strains of animal origin were classified as atypical EAEC (strains lacking aggR) and harbored only irp2 or shf. Strains from humans and animals belonged to several different serotypes, although none of them prevailed. Sixteen ribotypes were determined, and there was no association with virulence genes profiles or serotypes. Relationship was not found among the strains of this study, and the assessed animals may not represent a reservoir of human pathogenic typical EAEC.

  1. Le syndrome d’alcoolisme foetal

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    L’alcool est un tératogène physique et comportemental. Le syndrome d’alcoolisme foetal (SAF) est un trouble courant mais encore sous-diagnostiqué découlant de la consommation d’alcool par la mère pendant la grossesse. Bien qu’il puisse être prévenu, le SAF est également invalidant. Même si le SAF est présent dans tous les groupes socioéconomiques du Canada, sa prévalence est élevée dans certaines communautés inuites et des Premières nations du Canada. Le présent énoncé porte sur la prévention, le diagnostic, le dépistage précoce et la prise en charge du SAF par les professionnels de la santé. La prévention du SAF doit s’effectuer à deux échelons. La prévention primaire consiste à éliminer le SAF par une formation en classe ou dans la collectivité et à inciter les femmes à éviter de consommer de l’alcool avant la conception et pendant la grossesse. La prévention secondaire consiste à repérer les femmes qui boivent pendant leur grossesse et à réduire leur consommation. Le présent énoncé décrit plusieurs stratégies de dépistage, dont la stratégie T-ACE (tolérance-agacement, réduction, éveil). Les dispensateurs de soins devraient recommander l’abstinence dès la première visite prénatale. Un envoi rapide en consultation en vue de traiter l’alcoolisme est recommandé pour les femmes enceintes incapables d’arrêter de boire. Le présent énoncé décrit le diagnostic de SAF, de SAF partiel ou atypique, d’anomalies congénitales et de troubles neurodéveloppementaux reliés à l’alcool. En cas d’exposition à l’alcool in utero, un diagnostic de SAF devrait être envisagé en présence d’un retard de croissance courant ou antérieur, de certaines anomalies faciales touchant la lèvre supérieure et les yeux et d’anomalies neurodéveloppementales. Ces caractéristiques sont mieux quantifiées au moyen d’une méthode diagnostique à quatre chiffres. Des stratégies de dépistage précoce des

  2. Le syndrome d’alcoolisme foetal

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    L’alcool est un tératogène physique et comportemental. Le syndrome d’alcoolisme foetal (SAF) est un trouble courant mais encore sous-diagnostiqué découlant de la consommation d’alcool par la mère pendant la grossesse. Bien qu’il puisse être prévenu, le SAF est également invalidant. Même si le SAF est présent dans tous les groupes socioéconomiques du Canada, sa prévalence est élevée dans certaines communautés inuites et des Premières nations du Canada. Le présent énoncé porte sur la prévention, le diagnostic, le dépistage précoce et la prise en charge du SAF par les professionnels de la santé. La prévention du SAF doit s’effectuer à deux échelons. La prévention primaire consiste à éliminer le SAF par une formation en classe ou dans la collectivité et à inciter les femmes à éviter de consommer de l’alcool avant la conception et pendant la grossesse. La prévention secondaire consiste à repérer les femmes qui boivent pendant leur grossesse et à réduire leur consommation. Le présent énoncé décrit plusieurs stratégies de dépistage, dont la stratégie T-ACE (tolérance-agacement, réduction, éveil). Les dispensateurs de soins devraient recommander l’abstinence dès la première visite prénatale. Un envoi rapide en consultation en vue de traiter l’alcoolisme est recommandé pour les femmes enceintes incapables d’arrêter de boire. Le présent énoncé décrit le diagnostic de SAF, de SAF partiel ou atypique, d’anomalies congénitales et de troubles neurodéveloppementaux reliés à l’alcool. En cas d’exposition à l’alcool in utero, un diagnostic de SAF devrait être envisagé en présence d’un retard de croissance courant ou antérieur, de certaines anomalies faciales touchant la lèvre supérieure et les yeux et d’anomalies neurodéveloppementales. Ces caractéristiques sont mieux quantifiées au moyen d’une méthode diagnostique à quatre chiffres. Des stratégies de dépistage précoce des

  3. Gravitaional/Mechanical Factors Affect Gene Expression Profile and Phenotypic Specification of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Romano, Giovanni; Cialdai, Francesca; Fusi, Fanco; Marziliano, Nicola; Benvenuti, Susana; Cellai, Ilaria; Egli, Marcel; Cogoli, Augusto

    2008-06-01

    Stem cell implantation is a promising approach for tissue repair. Unfortunately this possibility is strictly limited because these cells early withdraw from the cell cycler and seem to form passive, rather than active grafts. Therefore, the development of strategies capable of increasing the yield of phenotypic specification would be a primary aim in biomedical research. It is known that both biochemical and physical factors are needed for tissue homeostasis and their combination in a dose- and time-dependent manner is probably the key to in vitro and in vivo tissue regeneration. In this study, the effects of gravitational factors on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation were investigated and compared with the ones caused by mechanical stress. The results showed that gene expression profile and phenotypic specification change according with the gravitational/ mechanical stress to which the hMSCs were exposed. Loading by hyperfuge and photomechanical stress by pulsed Nd:YAG laser induced osteoblastogenesis and chondrogenesis while microgravity favoured adipogenesis.

  4. Human memory T cells with a naive phenotype accumulate with aging and respond to persistent viruses.

    PubMed

    Pulko, Vesna; Davies, John S; Martinez, Carmine; Lanteri, Marion C; Busch, Michael P; Diamond, Michael S; Knox, Kenneth; Bush, Erin C; Sims, Peter A; Sinari, Shripad; Billheimer, Dean; Haddad, Elias K; Murray, Kristy O; Wertheimer, Anne M; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2016-08-01

    The number of naive T cells decreases and susceptibility to new microbial infections increases with age. Here we describe a previously unknown subset of phenotypically naive human CD8(+) T cells that rapidly secreted multiple cytokines in response to persistent viral antigens but differed transcriptionally from memory and effector T cells. The frequency of these CD8(+) T cells, called 'memory T cells with a naive phenotype' (TMNP cells), increased with age and after severe acute infection and inversely correlated with the residual capacity of the immune system to respond to new infections with age. CD8(+) TMNP cells represent a potential new target for the immunotherapy of persistent infections and should be accounted for and subtracted from the naive pool if truly naive T cells are needed to respond to antigens. PMID:27270402

  5. Small-molecule enhancers of autophagy modulate cellular disease phenotypes suggested by human genetics

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Szu-Yu; Castoreno, Adam B.; Aldrich, Leslie N.; Lassen, Kara G.; Goel, Gautam; Dančík, Vlado; Kuballa, Petric; Latorre, Isabel; Conway, Kara L.; Sarkar, Sovan; Maetzel, Dorothea; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Clemons, Paul A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of human genetics and pathophysiology have implicated the regulation of autophagy in inflammation, neurodegeneration, infection, and autoimmunity. These findings have motivated the use of small-molecule probes to study how modulation of autophagy affects disease-associated phenotypes. Here, we describe the discovery of the small-molecule probe BRD5631 that is derived from diversity-oriented synthesis and enhances autophagy through an mTOR-independent pathway. We demonstrate that BRD5631 affects several cellular disease phenotypes previously linked to autophagy, including protein aggregation, cell survival, bacterial replication, and inflammatory cytokine production. BRD5631 can serve as a valuable tool for studying the role of autophagy in the context of cellular homeostasis and disease. PMID:26195741

  6. Human cytomegalovirus neutralizing antibody-resistant phenotype is associated with reduced expression of glycoprotein H.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Coelingh, K L; Britt, W J

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a neutralizing antibody-resistant mutant human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) obtained from a patient treated with a human monoclonal antiglycoprotein H (gH; unique long region 75) antibody. This virus exhibited resistance to several different neutralizing anti-gH murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), as well as to a polyvalent anti-gH serum. The resistant phenotype was unstable and could be maintained only by passage of plaque-purified virus under neutralizing MAb selection. In the absence of a MAb, the resistant phenotype reverted to a neutralizing antibody-sensitive phenotype within one passage. The predicted amino acid sequences of gH from the MAb-resistant and -susceptible parent viruses were identical. Biochemical analysis of the MAb-resistant and -susceptible parent viruses revealed a marked decrease of gH expression in the envelope of the MAb-resistant virus. Furthermore, propagation of the virus in various MAb concentrations resulted in the production of extracellular virions with various levels of resistance to the neutralizing activity of the MAb. These results suggest a mechanism for the generation of neutralizing antibody-resistant viruses which could evade host-derived antiviral antibody responses. In addition, our findings indicate that the stoichiometry of gH in the envelope of infectious HCMV virions is not rigidly fixed and therefore offer a simple explanation for production of phenotypic variants of HCMV through an assembly process in which the content of gH in the envelope of progeny virions varies randomly. PMID:7666509

  7. Blue eyes in lemurs and humans: same phenotype, different genetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Brenda J; Pedersen, Anja; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2009-06-01

    Almost all mammals have brown or darkly-pigmented eyes (irises), but among primates, there are some prominent blue-eyed exceptions. The blue eyes of some humans and lemurs are a striking example of convergent evolution of a rare phenotype on distant branches of the primate tree. Recent work on humans indicates that blue eye color is associated with, and likely caused by, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs12913832) in an intron of the gene HERC2, which likely regulates expression of the neighboring pigmentation gene OCA2. This raises the immediate question of whether blue eyes in lemurs might have a similar genetic basis. We addressed this by sequencing the homologous genetic region in the blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur macaco flavifrons; N = 4) and the closely-related black lemur (Eulemur macaco macaco; N = 4), which has brown eyes. We then compared a 166-bp segment corresponding to and flanking the human eye-color-associated region in these lemurs, as well as other primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, macaque, ring-tailed lemur, mouse lemur). Aligned sequences indicated that this region is strongly conserved in both Eulemur macaco subspecies as well as the other primates (except blue-eyed humans). Therefore, it is unlikely that this regulatory segment plays a major role in eye color differences among lemurs as it does in humans. Although convergent phenotypes can sometimes come about via the same or similar genetic changes occurring independently, this does not seem to be the case here, as we have shown that the genetic basis of blue eyes in lemurs differs from that of humans. PMID:19278018

  8. Shaping the Future for Children with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Carolyn; Carpenter, Barry; Egerton, Jo

    2010-01-01

    This article describes work undertaken in connection with an ongoing research project funded by the Training and Development Agency for Schools. It illustrates the educational implications of foetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and its implications for the educational workforce in seeking to meet the needs of those children who are affected.

  9. Hedgehog signaling maintains hair follicle stem cell phenotype in young and aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Rittié, Laure; Stoll, Stefan W; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2009-12-01

    Skin hair follicles (HF) contain bulge stem cells (SC) that regenerate HFs during hair cycles, and repair skin epithelia following injury. As natural aging is associated with decreased skin repair capacity in humans, we have investigated the impact of age on human scalp HF bulge cell number and function. Here, we isolated human bulge cells, characterized as CD200+/KRT15+/KRT19+ cells of the HF, by dissection-combined CD200 selection in young and aged human skin. Targeted transcriptional profiling indicates that KRT15, KRT19, Dkk3, Dkk4, Tcf3, S100A4, Gas1, EGFR and CTGF/CCN2 are also preferentially expressed by human bulge cells, compared to differentiated HF keratinocytes (KC). Our results demonstrate that aging does not alter expression or localization of these HF SC markers. In addition, we could not detect significant differences in HF density or bulge cell number between young and aged human scalp skin. Interestingly, hedgehog (Hh) signaling is activated in human bulge cells in vivo, and down-regulated in differentiated HF KCs, both in young and aged skin. In addition, activation of Hh signaling by lentivirus-mediated overexpression of transcription factor Gli1 induces transcription of HF SC markers KRT15, KRT19, and Gas1, in cultured KCs. Together with previously reported knock-out mouse results, these data suggest a role for Hh signaling in maintaining bulge cell phenotype in young and aged human skin.

  10. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  11. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured with salivary gland biopsies adopt an epithelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Maria, Ola M; Tran, Simon D

    2011-06-01

    Sjogren's syndrome and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer result in severe xerostomia and irreversible salivary gland damage for which no effective treatment is currently available. Cell culture methods of primary human salivary gland epithelial cells (huSGs) are slow and cannot provide a sufficient number of cells. In addition, the majority of cultured huSGs are of a ductal phenotype and thus not fluid/saliva secretory cells. Some reports indicated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possessed the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells. To test this hypothesis with huSGs, a coculture system containing 2 chambers separated by a polyester membrane was used to study the capacity of human MSCs to adopt an epithelial phenotype when cocultured with human salivary gland biopsies. Results were that 20%-40% of cocultured MSCs expressed tight junction proteins [claudin-1 (CLDN-1), -2, -3, and -4; occludin; junctional adhesion molecule-A; and zonula occludens-1] as well as other epithelial markers [aquaporin-5, α-amylase (α-AMY), and E-cadherin], and generated a higher transepithelial electrical resistance. Electron microscopy demonstrated that these MSCs had comparable cellular structures to huSGs, such as tight junction structures and numerous secretory granules. Quantitative real time (RT)-polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of several salivary genes (aquaporin-5, AMY, and CLDN-2). Moreover, the amounts of α-AMY detected in cocultured MSCs were comparable to those detected in huSGs control cultures. These data suggest that cocultured MSCs can demonstrate a temporary change into a salivary gland acinar phenotype.

  12. Humans display a reduced set of consistent behavioral phenotypes in dyadic games

    PubMed Central

    Poncela-Casasnovas, Julia; Gutiérrez-Roig, Mario; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Vicens, Julian; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Perelló, Josep; Moreno, Yamir; Duch, Jordi; Sánchez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Socially relevant situations that involve strategic interactions are widespread among animals and humans alike. To study these situations, theoretical and experimental research has adopted a game theoretical perspective, generating valuable insights about human behavior. However, most of the results reported so far have been obtained from a population perspective and considered one specific conflicting situation at a time. This makes it difficult to extract conclusions about the consistency of individuals’ behavior when facing different situations and to define a comprehensive classification of the strategies underlying the observed behaviors. We present the results of a lab-in-the-field experiment in which subjects face four different dyadic games, with the aim of establishing general behavioral rules dictating individuals’ actions. By analyzing our data with an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we find that all the subjects conform, with a large degree of consistency, to a limited number of behavioral phenotypes (envious, optimist, pessimist, and trustful), with only a small fraction of undefined subjects. We also discuss the possible connections to existing interpretations based on a priori theoretical approaches. Our findings provide a relevant contribution to the experimental and theoretical efforts toward the identification of basic behavioral phenotypes in a wider set of contexts without aprioristic assumptions regarding the rules or strategies behind actions. From this perspective, our work contributes to a fact-based approach to the study of human behavior in strategic situations, which could be applied to simulating societies, policy-making scenario building, and even a variety of business applications. PMID:27532047

  13. Humans display a reduced set of consistent behavioral phenotypes in dyadic games.

    PubMed

    Poncela-Casasnovas, Julia; Gutiérrez-Roig, Mario; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Vicens, Julian; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Perelló, Josep; Moreno, Yamir; Duch, Jordi; Sánchez, Angel

    2016-08-01

    Socially relevant situations that involve strategic interactions are widespread among animals and humans alike. To study these situations, theoretical and experimental research has adopted a game theoretical perspective, generating valuable insights about human behavior. However, most of the results reported so far have been obtained from a population perspective and considered one specific conflicting situation at a time. This makes it difficult to extract conclusions about the consistency of individuals' behavior when facing different situations and to define a comprehensive classification of the strategies underlying the observed behaviors. We present the results of a lab-in-the-field experiment in which subjects face four different dyadic games, with the aim of establishing general behavioral rules dictating individuals' actions. By analyzing our data with an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we find that all the subjects conform, with a large degree of consistency, to a limited number of behavioral phenotypes (envious, optimist, pessimist, and trustful), with only a small fraction of undefined subjects. We also discuss the possible connections to existing interpretations based on a priori theoretical approaches. Our findings provide a relevant contribution to the experimental and theoretical efforts toward the identification of basic behavioral phenotypes in a wider set of contexts without aprioristic assumptions regarding the rules or strategies behind actions. From this perspective, our work contributes to a fact-based approach to the study of human behavior in strategic situations, which could be applied to simulating societies, policy-making scenario building, and even a variety of business applications. PMID:27532047

  14. Humans display a reduced set of consistent behavioral phenotypes in dyadic games.

    PubMed

    Poncela-Casasnovas, Julia; Gutiérrez-Roig, Mario; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Vicens, Julian; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Perelló, Josep; Moreno, Yamir; Duch, Jordi; Sánchez, Angel

    2016-08-01

    Socially relevant situations that involve strategic interactions are widespread among animals and humans alike. To study these situations, theoretical and experimental research has adopted a game theoretical perspective, generating valuable insights about human behavior. However, most of the results reported so far have been obtained from a population perspective and considered one specific conflicting situation at a time. This makes it difficult to extract conclusions about the consistency of individuals' behavior when facing different situations and to define a comprehensive classification of the strategies underlying the observed behaviors. We present the results of a lab-in-the-field experiment in which subjects face four different dyadic games, with the aim of establishing general behavioral rules dictating individuals' actions. By analyzing our data with an unsupervised clustering algorithm, we find that all the subjects conform, with a large degree of consistency, to a limited number of behavioral phenotypes (envious, optimist, pessimist, and trustful), with only a small fraction of undefined subjects. We also discuss the possible connections to existing interpretations based on a priori theoretical approaches. Our findings provide a relevant contribution to the experimental and theoretical efforts toward the identification of basic behavioral phenotypes in a wider set of contexts without aprioristic assumptions regarding the rules or strategies behind actions. From this perspective, our work contributes to a fact-based approach to the study of human behavior in strategic situations, which could be applied to simulating societies, policy-making scenario building, and even a variety of business applications.

  15. Structure-phenotype correlations of human CYP21A2 mutations in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Haider, Shozeb; Islam, Barira; D'Atri, Valentina; Sgobba, Miriam; Poojari, Chetan; Sun, Li; Yuen, Tony; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2013-02-12

    Mutations in the cytochrome p450 (CYP)21A2 gene, which encodes the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase, cause the majority of cases in congenital adrenal hyperplasia, an autosomal recessive disorder. To date, more than 100 CYP21A2 mutations have been reported. These mutations can be associated either with severe salt-wasting or simple virilizing phenotypes or with milder nonclassical phenotypes. Not all CYP21A2 mutations have, however, been characterized biochemically, and the clinical consequences of these mutations remain unknown. Using the crystal structure of its bovine homolog as a template, we have constructed a humanized model of CYP21A2 to provide comprehensive structural explanations for the clinical manifestations caused by each of the known disease-causing missense mutations in CYP21A2. Mutations that affect membrane anchoring, disrupt heme and/or substrate binding, or impair stability of CYP21A2 cause complete loss of function and salt-wasting disease. In contrast, mutations altering the transmembrane region or conserved hydrophobic patches cause up to a 98% reduction in enzyme activity and simple virilizing disease. Mild nonclassical disease can result from interference in oxidoreductase interactions, salt-bridge and hydrogen-bonding networks, and nonconserved hydrophobic clusters. A simple in silico evaluation of previously uncharacterized gene mutations could, thus, potentially help predict the often diverse phenotypes of a monogenic disorder.

  16. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns.

  17. A Human Thrifty Phenotype Associated With Less Weight Loss During Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Thearle, Marie S.; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Hohenadel, Maximilian G.; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Successful weight loss is variable for reasons not fully elucidated. Whether effective weight loss results from smaller reductions in energy expenditure during caloric restriction is not known. We analyzed whether obese individuals with a “thrifty” phenotype, that is, greater reductions in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and smaller increases with overfeeding, lose less weight during caloric restriction than those with a “spendthrift” phenotype. During a weight-maintaining period, 24-h energy expenditure responses to fasting and 200% overfeeding were measured in a whole-room indirect calorimeter. Volunteers then underwent 6 weeks of 50% caloric restriction. We calculated the daily energy deficit (kilocalories per day) during caloric restriction, incorporating energy intake and waste, energy expenditure, and daily activity. We found that a smaller reduction in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and a larger response to overfeeding predicted more weight loss over 6 weeks, even after accounting for age, sex, race, and baseline weight, as well as a greater rate of energy deficit accumulation. The success of dietary weight loss efforts is influenced by the energy expenditure response to caloric restriction. Greater decreases in energy expenditure during caloric restriction predict less weight loss, indicating the presence of thrifty and spendthrift phenotypes in obese humans. PMID:25964395

  18. A single-nucleotide substitution mutator phenotype revealed by exome sequencing of human colon adenomas.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Pateras, Ioannis S; Santoni, Federico; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Edgren, Henrik; Almusa, Henrikki; Robyr, Daniel; Guipponi, Michel; Saarela, Janna; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2012-12-01

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress is thought to drive genomic instability in cancer. In particular, replication stress can explain the high prevalence of focal genomic deletions mapping within very large genes in human tumors. However, the origin of single-nucleotide substitutions (SNS) in nonfamilial cancers is strongly debated. Some argue that cancers have a mutator phenotype, whereas others argue that the normal DNA replication error rates are sufficient to explain the number of observed SNSs. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 24, mostly precancerous, colon polyps. Analysis of the sequences revealed mutations in the APC, CTNNB1, and BRAF genes as the presumptive cancer-initiating events and many passenger SNSs. We used the number of SNSs in the various lesions to calculate mutation rates for normal colon and adenomas and found that colon adenomas exhibit a mutator phenotype. Interestingly, the SNSs in the adenomas mapped more often than expected within very large genes, where focal deletions in response to DNA replication stress also map. We propose that single-stranded DNA generated in response to oncogene-induced replication stress compromises the repair of deaminated cytosines and other damaged bases, leading to the observed SNS mutator phenotype.

  19. The relationship between non-HDL cholesterol and macrophage phenotypes in human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Poledne, Rudolf; Kralova Lesna, Ivana; Kralova, Anna; Fronek, Jiri; Cejkova, Sona

    2016-01-01

    Data from experimental animal models and in vitro studies suggest that both hyperlipoproteinemia and obesity predispose to development of proinflammatory pathways of macrophages within adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze whether non-HDL cholesterol concentration in healthy living kidney donors (LKDs) is related to the number and phenotype of proinflammatory macrophages in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Adipose tissue samples were collected by cleansing the kidney grafts of LKDs obtained peroperatively. The stromal vascular fractions of these tissues were analyzed by flow cytometry. Proinflammatory macrophages were defined as CD14+ cells coexpressing CD16+ and high-expression CD36 as well (CD14+CD16+CD36+++), while CD16 negativity and CD163 positivity identified alternatively stimulated, anti-inflammatory macrophages. Non-HDL cholesterol concentration positively correlated to proinflammatory macrophages within visceral adipose tissue, with increased strength with more precise phenotype determination. On the contrary, the proportion of alternatively stimulated macrophages correlated negatively with non-HDL cholesterol. The present study suggests a relationship of non-HDL cholesterol concentration to the number and phenotype proportion of macrophages in visceral adipose tissue of healthy humans. PMID:27481939

  20. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. PMID:25716572

  1. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. PMID:24079969

  2. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation.

  3. A homozygous deletion in GRID2 causes a human phenotype with cerebellar ataxia and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Utine, G Eda; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Salanci, Bilge; Çetinkaya, Arda; Kiper, P Özlem; Alanay, Yasemin; Aktas, Dilek; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet

    2013-07-01

    GRID2 is a member of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family of excitatory neurotransmitter receptors. GRID2 encodes the glutamate receptor subunit delta-2, selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The phenotype associated with loss of GRID2 function was described only in mice until now, characterized by different degrees of cerebellar ataxia and usually relatively mild abnormalities of the cerebellum. This work describes for the first time the human phenotype associated with homozygous partial deletion of GRID2 in 3 children in one large consanguineous Turkish family. Homozygous deletion of exons 3 and 4 of GRID2 (94 153 589-94 298 037 bp) in the proband and similarly affected cousins, and heterozygous deletions in parental DNA were shown using Affymetrix® 6.0 single-nucleotide polymorphism array, confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The phenotype includes nystagmus, hypotonia with marked developmental delay in gross motor skills in early infancy followed by a static encephalopathy course with development of cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, and pyramidal tract involvement.

  4. The aggrecanopathies; an evolving phenotypic spectrum of human genetic skeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Beth G; Briggs, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The large chondroitin sulphated proteoglycan aggrecan (ACAN) is the most abundant non-collagenous protein in cartilage and is essential for its structure and function. Mutations in ACAN result in a broad phenotypic spectrum of non-lethal skeletal dysplasias including spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, familial osteochondritis dissecans and various undefined short stature syndromes associated with accelerated bone maturation. However, very little is currently known about the disease pathways that underlie these aggrecanopathies, although they are likely to be a combination of haploinsufficiency and dominant-negative (neomorphic) mechanisms. This review discusses the known human and animal aggrecanopathies in the context of clinical presentation and potential disease mechanisms. PMID:27353333

  5. Resolvin D1 Polarizes Primary Human Macrophages toward a Proresolution Phenotype through GPR32.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Mattia; Gemperle, Claudio; Rimann, Nicole; Hersberger, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Resolvin D1 (RvD1) was shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipid mediator in several animal models of inflammation, but its mechanism of action in humans is not clear. We show that the RvD1 receptor GPR32 is present on resting, proinflammatory M(LPS) and alternatively activated primary human M(IL-4) macrophages, whereas TGF-β and IL-6 reduce its membrane expression. Accordingly, stimulation of resting primary human macrophages with 10 nM RvD1 for 48 h maximally reduced the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-8; abolished chemotaxis to several chemoattractants like chemerin, fMLF, and MCP-1; and doubled the phagocytic activity of these macrophages toward microbial particles. In contrast, these functional changes were not accompanied by surface expression of markers specific for alternatively activated M(IL-4) macrophages. Similar proresolution effects of RvD1 were observed when proinflammatory M(LPS) macrophages were treated with RvD1. In addition, we show that these RvD1-mediated effects are GPR32 dependent because reduction of GPR32 expression by small interfering RNA, TGF-β, and IL-6 treatment ablated these proresolution effects in primary human macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that in humans RvD1 triggers GPR32 to polarize and repolarize macrophages toward a proresolution phenotype, supporting the role of this mediator in the resolution of inflammation in humans.

  6. Let-7b Inhibits Human Cancer Phenotype by Targeting Cytochrome P450 Epoxygenase 2J2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shenglan; Gong, Wei; Wang, Yan; Cianflone, Katherine; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Dao Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules of 20 to 22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression by binding to their 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). Increasing data implicate altered miRNA participation in the progress of cancer. We previously reported that CYP2J2 epoxygenase promotes human cancer phenotypes. But whether and how CYP2J2 is regulated by miRNA is not understood. Methods and Results Using bioinformatics analysis, we found potential target sites for miRNA let-7b in 3′UTR of human CYP2J2. Luciferase and western blot assays revealed that CYP2J2 was regulated by let-7b. In addition, let-7b decreased the enzymatic activity of endogenous CYP2J2. Furthermore, let-7b may diminish cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis of tumor cells via posttranscriptional repression of CYP2J2. Tumor xenografts were induced in nude mice by subcutaneous injection of MDA-MB-435 cells. The let-7b expression vector, pSilencer-let-7b, was injected through tail vein every 3 weeks. Let-7b significantly inhibited the tumor phenotype by targeting CYP2J2. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to determine the expression levels of let-7b and CYP2J2 protein from 18 matched lung squamous cell cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues; the expression level of CYP2J2 was inversely proportional to that of let-7b. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of let-7b could lead to the high expression of CYP2J2 protein in cancerous tissues. These findings suggest that miRNA let-7b reduces CYP2J2 expression, which may contribute to inhibiting tumor phenotypes. PMID:22761738

  7. Modulation of homeobox gene expression alters the phenotype of human hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, W F; Detmer, K; Mathews, C H; Hack, F M; Morgan, D A; Largman, C; Lawrence, H J

    1992-03-01

    We have previously reported that certain genes of the HOX2 cluster of homeobox genes on human chromosome 17 are specifically expressed in human leukemic cell lines with erythroid potential, suggesting that these genes are involved in hematopoietic differentiation. We now show that the expression of the HOX 2.2 gene decreases during erythropoietin-induced differentiation of the erythroid cell line MB02. In order to study the role of the HOX 2.2 homeobox gene in hematopoiesis, vectors producing sense or antisense transcripts were introduced into K562 and HEL cells, pluripotent lines with erythroid and myeloid features. Overexpression of HOX 2.2 is associated with loss of erythroid features in both lines and an increase in certain myelomonocytic markers in K562 cells. Expression of antisense HOX 2.2 is associated with an increase in erythroid features in HEL cells and a mild decrease in myeloid characteristics in K562 cells. Overexpression of the adjacent HOX 2.1 gene in K562 cells does not produce similar phenotype changes. These data demonstrate that modulation of a specific HOX 2 homeobox gene can change the phenotype of somatic cells and suggest that certain HOX 2 genes play a role in blood cell differentiation.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of collagen gel embedded primary human breast epithelial cells in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Guzman, R C; Popnikolov, N; Bandyopadhyay, G K; Christov, K; Collins, G; Nandi, S

    1994-06-30

    We have developed a method to characterize the phenotypes and tumorigenicity of dissociated human breast epithelial cells. The dissociated cells were first embedded in collagen gels and subsequently transplanted subcutaneously in vivo in athymic nude mice. The transplantation of dissociated epithelial cells from reduction mammoplasties, presumed to be normal, always resulted in normal histomorphology. Epithelial cells were arranged as short tubular structures consisting of lumina surrounded by epithelial cells with an occasional more complex branching structure. These outgrowths were surrounded by intact basement membrane and were embedded in collagen gel that, at termination, contained collagenous stroma with fibroblasts and blood vessels. In contrast, transplantation of dissociated breast epithelial cells from breast cancer specimens resulted in outgrowths with an invasive pattern infiltrating the collagen gel as well as frank invasion into vascular space, nerves and muscles. These observations were made long before the subsequent palpable stage which resulted if left in the mouse for a long enough time. The dissociated human breast epithelial cells thus retained their intrinsic property to undergo morphogenesis to reflect their original phenotype when placed in a suitable environment, the collagen gel.

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vagococcus fluvialis, including strains isolated from human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, L M; Carvalho, M G; Merquior, V L; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Facklam, R R

    1997-01-01

    This study presents phenotypic and genotypic data for seven isolates of Vagococcus fluvialis, including four strains recovered from human clinical sources, one strain isolated from an environmental source, and two strains isolated from pigs. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, most isolates were initially classified as "unidentified enterococci," because they resembled atypical arginine-negative enterococcal species. All seven strains as well as the type strain of V. fluvialis reacted with the AccuProbe Enterococcus genetic probe. The seven isolates had virtually indistinguishable whole-cell protein profiles that were similar to that of the V. fluvialis type strain and distinct from those of Enterococcus and Lactococcus species. DNA-DNA reassociation experiments confirmed that the strains were V. fluvialis. They were 71% or more related to the V. fluvialis type strain under optimum and stringent conditions, with 2.5% or less divergence within related sequences. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin and were resistant to clindamycin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin. Strain-to-strain variation was observed in relation to susceptibilities to 18 other antimicrobial agents. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion with SmaI. Distinctive PFGE patterns were generated, suggesting the nonclonal nature of V. fluvialis strains. Although the number of strains was small, this report provides molecular characterization of V. fluvialis and the first evidence of a possible connection of this species with human infections. PMID:9350732

  10. Elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype of Bloom syndrome cells is complemented by human chromosome 15.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, L D; Schultz, R A

    1992-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BSx) is a rare autosomal-recessive chromosome-instability disorder manifested by a constellation of clinical features including a significant predisposition to early onset of neoplasia. BSx cells display cytogenetic abnormalities, the pathognomonic feature being an increased rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 10- to 15-fold more frequent than SCEs seen in control cells. Identification of the primary biochemical defect in BSx and its relationship to SCE frequency and neoplasia have been complicated by reports that BSx cell lines exhibit defects in the structure and/or activity of a number of different enzymes. The rare occurrence of the disorder and lack of informative families have precluded mapping of the primary defect by standard linkage analysis. We have utilized BSx cells as recipients for microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to map a locus that renders complementation of the elevated SCE phenotype. Studies with the BSx cell line GM08505 demonstrated a stable frequency of SCEs 10-fold higher than control values, offering a phenotype suitable for complementation studies. Transfer of different independent human chromosomes from somatic cell hybrids into BSx cells permitted identification of a single chromosome that dramatically reduced the SCE frequency to a level near that seen in control cells. Detailed characterization revealed this complementing element to be human chromosome 15. Images PMID:1518822

  11. Does the liposuction method influence the phenotypic characteristic of human adipose-derived stem cells?

    PubMed Central

    Bajek, Anna; Gurtowska, Natalia; Gackowska, Lidia; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Bodnar, Magdalena; Marszałek, Andrzej; Januszewski, Rafał; Michalkiewicz, Jacek; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) possess a high differentiation and proliferation potential. However, the phenotypic characterization of ASCs is still difficult. Until now, there is no extensive analysis of ASCs markers depending on different liposuction methods. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyse 242 surface markers and determine the differences in the phenotypic pattern between ASCs obtained during mechanical and ultrasound-assisted liposuction. ASCs were isolated from healthy donors, due to mechanical and ultrasound-assisted liposuction and cultured in standard medium to the second passage. Differentiation potential and markers expression was evaluated to confirm the mesenchymal nature of cells. Then, the BD LyoplateTM Human Cell Surface Marker Screening Panel was used. Results shown that both population of ASCs are characterized by high expression of markers specific for ASCs: cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD10, CD34, CD44, CD49d, CD54, CD55, CD59, CD71 and low expression of CD11a, CD11c and CD144. Moreover, we have noticed significant differences in antigen expression in 58 markers from the 242 studied. Presented study shows for the first time that different liposuction methods are not a significant factor which can influence the expression of human ASCs surface markers. PMID:26182374

  12. A phenotypic in vitro model for the main determinants of human whole heart function.

    PubMed

    Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; McAleer, Christopher W; McLamb, William; Long, Christopher J; Oleaga, Carlota; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Hickman, James J

    2015-08-01

    This article details the construction and testing of a phenotypic assay system that models in vivo cardiac function in a parallel in vitro environment with human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. The major determinants of human whole-heart function were experimentally modeled by integrating separate 2D cellular systems with BioMicroelectromechanical Systems (BioMEMS) constructs. The model features a serum-free defined medium to enable both acute and chronic evaluation of drugs and toxins. The integration of data from both systems produced biologically relevant predictions of cardiac function in response to varying concentrations of selected drugs. Sotalol, norepinephrine and verapamil were shown to affect the measured parameters according to their specific mechanism of action, in agreement with clinical data. This system is applicable for cardiac side effect assessment, general toxicology, efficacy studies, and evaluation of in vitro cellular disease models in body-on-a-chip systems.

  13. A phenotypic in vitro model for the main determinants of human whole heart function

    PubMed Central

    Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; McAleer, Christopher W.; McLamb, William; Long, Christopher J.; Oleaga, Carlota; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Hickman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This article details the construction and testing of a phenotypic assay system that models in vivo cardiac function in a parallel in vitro environment with human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. The major determinants of human whole-heart function were experimentally modeled by integrating separate 2D cellular systems with BioMicroelectromechanical Systems (BioMEMS) constructs. The model featured a serum-free defined medium to enable both acute and chronic evaluation of drugs and toxins. The integration of data from both systems produced biologically relevant predictions of cardiac function in response to varying concentrations of selected drugs. Sotalol, norepinephrine and verapamil were shown to affect the measured parameters according to their specific mechanism of action, in agreement with clinical data. This system is applicable for cardiac side effect assessment, general toxicology, efficacy studies, and evaluation of in vitro cellular disease models in body-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25978005

  14. Hypothesis: is yeast a clock model to study the onset of humans aging phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Cristina; Mangiapelo, Eleonora; Palermo, Vanessa; Falcone, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the growth and aging of yeast colonies derived from single cells isolated by micromanipulation and seeded one by one on separated plates to avoid growth interference by surrounding colonies. We named this procedure clonal life span, and it could represent a third way of studying aging together with the replicative life span and chronological life span. In this study we observed over time the formation of cell mass similar to the human "senile warts" (seborrheic keratoses), the skin lesions that often appear after 30 years of life and increase in number and size over the years. We observed that similar signs of aging appear in yeast colonies after about 27 days of growth and increase during aging. In this respect we hypothesize to use yeast as a clock to study the onset of human aging phenotypes.

  15. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  16. Modulation of Human Valve Interstitial Cell Phenotype and Function Using a Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Najma; Quillon, Alfred; Sarathchandra, Padmini; McCormack, Ann; Lozanoski, Alec; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Chester, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Valve interstitial cells (VICs) are fibroblastic in nature however in culture it is widely accepted that they differentiate into a myofibroblastic phenotype. This study assessed a fibroblast culture media formulation for its ability to maintain the phenotype and function of VICs as in the intact healthy valve. Normal human VICs were cultured separately in standard DMEM and in fibroblast media consisting of FGF2 (10ng/ml), insulin (50ng/ml) and 2% FCS for at least a week. Cell morphology, aspect ratio, size, levels and distribution of protein expression, proliferation, cell cycle, contraction and migration were assessed. Some VICs and some valve endothelial cells expressed FGF2 in valve tissue and this expression was increased in calcified valves. VICs in DMEM exhibited large, spread cells whereas VICs in fibroblast media were smaller, elongated and spindly. Aspect ratio and size were both significantly higher in DMEM (p<0.01). The level of expression of α-SMA was significantly reduced in fibroblast media at day 2 after isolation (p<0.01) and the expression of α-SMA, SM22 and EDA-fibronectin was significantly reduced in fibroblast media at days 7 and 12 post-isolation (p<0.01). Expression of cytoskeletal proteins, bone marker proteins and extracellular matrix proteins was reduced in fibroblast media. Proliferation of VICs in fibroblast media was significantly reduced at weeks 1 (p<0.05) and 2 (p<0.01). Collagen gel contraction was significantly reduced in fibroblast media (p<0.05). VICs were found to have significantly fewer and smaller focal adhesions in fibroblast media (p<0.01) with significantly fewer supermature focal adhesions in fibroblast media (p<0.001). Ultrastructurally, VICs in fibroblast media resembled native VICs from intact valves. VICs in fibroblast media demonstrated a slower migratory ability after wounding at 72 hours (p<0.01). Treatment of human VICs with this fibroblast media formulation has the ability to maintain and to dedifferentiate the

  17. Network Modules of the Cross-Species Genotype-Phenotype Map Reflect the Clinical Severity of Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Inhae; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have improved our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship between genetic variants and human diseases. However, genetic variations uncovered from patient populations do not provide enough information to understand the mechanisms underlying the progression and clinical severity of human diseases. Moreover, building a high-resolution genotype-phenotype map is difficult due to the diverse genetic backgrounds of the human population. We built a cross-species genotype-phenotype map to explain the clinical severity of human genetic diseases. We developed a data-integrative framework to investigate network modules composed of human diseases mapped with gene essentiality measured from a model organism. Essential and nonessential genes connect diseases of different types which form clusters in the human disease network. In a large patient population study, we found that disease classes enriched with essential genes tended to show a higher mortality rate than disease classes enriched with nonessential genes. Moreover, high disease mortality rates are explained by the multiple comorbid relationships and the high pleiotropy of disease genes found in the essential gene-enriched diseases. Our results reveal that the genotype-phenotype map of a model organism can facilitate the identification of human disease-gene associations and predict human disease progression.

  18. Network Modules of the Cross-Species Genotype-Phenotype Map Reflect the Clinical Severity of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Inhae; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have improved our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship between genetic variants and human diseases. However, genetic variations uncovered from patient populations do not provide enough information to understand the mechanisms underlying the progression and clinical severity of human diseases. Moreover, building a high-resolution genotype-phenotype map is difficult due to the diverse genetic backgrounds of the human population. We built a cross-species genotype-phenotype map to explain the clinical severity of human genetic diseases. We developed a data-integrative framework to investigate network modules composed of human diseases mapped with gene essentiality measured from a model organism. Essential and nonessential genes connect diseases of different types which form clusters in the human disease network. In a large patient population study, we found that disease classes enriched with essential genes tended to show a higher mortality rate than disease classes enriched with nonessential genes. Moreover, high disease mortality rates are explained by the multiple comorbid relationships and the high pleiotropy of disease genes found in the essential gene-enriched diseases. Our results reveal that the genotype-phenotype map of a model organism can facilitate the identification of human disease-gene associations and predict human disease progression. PMID:26301634

  19. Brain injuries in early foetal life: consequences for brain development.

    PubMed

    Mancini, J; Lethel, V; Hugonenq, C; Chabrol, B

    2001-01-01

    Learning disability and cerebral palsy are often related to factors present before birth. We report three patients (two with schizencephaly, one with unilateral cerebellar agenesis) in whom the timing of an insult to the foetus was known. In the first case, the mother had a trauma at 16 weeks of pregnancy and schizencephaly was discovered in the male infant associated with a left hemiplegia. In the second child, amniocentesis performed at 16 weeks into pregnancy may have been responsible for the same cortical anomaly. In the third case, sequential foetal echographies clearly demonstrated that an apparent unilateral cerebellar agenesis was related to an haemorrhagic event secondary to cerebellar trauma that occurred at 19 weeks of pregnancy. It is suggested that these brain malformations are related to an ischemic mechanism or a traumatic event in foetal life. PMID:11201424

  20. Transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A C; Blakely, W F; Livengood, D; Whittaker, T; Xu, J; Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Parlette, E; John, T S; Gerstenberg, H M; Hsu, H

    1998-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Although the health effects of occupational uranium exposure are well known, limited data exist regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU in humans. We established an in vitro cellular model to study DU exposure. Microdosimetric assessment, determined using a Monte Carlo computer simulation based on measured intracellular and extracellular uranium levels, showed that few (0.0014%) cell nuclei were hit by alpha particles. We report the ability of DU-uranyl chloride to transform immortalized human osteoblastic cells (HOS) to the tumorigenic phenotype. DU-uranyl chloride-transformants are characterized by anchorage-independent growth, tumor formation in nude mice, expression of high levels of the k-ras oncogene, reduced production of the Rb tumor-suppressor protein, and elevated levels of sister chromatid exchanges per cell. DU-uranyl chloride treatment resulted in a 9.6 (+/- 2.8)-fold increase in transformation frequency compared to untreated cells. In comparison, nickel sulfate resulted in a 7.1 (+/- 2.1)-fold increase in transformation frequency. This is the first report showing that a DU compound caused human cell transformation to the neoplastic phenotype. Although additional studies are needed to determine if protracted DU exposure produces tumors in vivo, the implication from these in vitro results is that the risk of cancer induction from internalized DU exposure may be comparable to other biologically reactive and carcinogenic heavy-metal compounds (e.g., nickel). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681973

  1. Phenotypic evolution of human craniofacial morphology after admixture: a geometric morphometrics approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; González-José, Rolando; González-Martín, Antonio; Van der Molen, Silvina; Talavera, Arturo; Hernández, Patricia; Hernández, Miquel

    2006-03-01

    An evolutionary, diachronic approach to the phenotypic craniofacial pattern arisen in a human population after high levels of admixture and gene flow was achieved by means of geometric morphometrics. Admixture has long been studied after molecular data. Nevertheless, few efforts have been made to explain the morphological outcome in human craniofacial samples. The Spanish-Amerindian contact can be considered a good scenario for such an analysis. Here we present a comparative analysis of craniofacial shape changes observed between two putative ancestor groups, Spanish and precontact Aztecs, and two diachronic admixed groups, corresponding to early and late colonial periods from the Mexico's Central Valley. Quantitative shape comparisons of Amerindian, Spanish, and admixed groups were used to test the expectations of quantitative genetics for admixture events. In its simplest form, this prediction states that an admixed group will present phenotypic values falling between those of both parental groups. Results show that, in general terms, although the human skull is a complex, integrated structure, the craniofacial morphology observed fits the theoretical expectations of quantitative genetics. Thus, it is predictive of population structure and history. In fact, results obtained after the craniofacial analysis are in accordance with previous molecular and historical interpretations, providing evidence that admixture is a main microevolutionary agent influencing modern Mexican gene pool. However, expectations are not straightforward when moderate shape changes are considered. Deviations detected at localized structures, such as the upper and lower face, highlight the evolution of a craniofacial pattern exclusively inherent to the admixed groups, indicating that quantitative characters might respond to admixture in a complicated, nondirectional way. PMID:16323202

  2. Phenotypic and Genomic Analysis of Hypervirulent Human-associated Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background B. bronchiseptica infections are usually associated with wild or domesticated animals, but infrequently with humans. A recent phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct B. bronchiseptica subpopulations, designated complexes I and IV. Complex IV isolates appear to have a bias for infecting humans; however, little is known regarding their epidemiology, virulence properties, or comparative genomics. Results Here we report a characterization of the virulence of human-associated complex IV B. bronchiseptica strains. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, complex IV strains showed increased cytotoxicity in comparison to a panel of complex I strains. Some complex IV isolates were remarkably cytotoxic, resulting in LDH release levels in A549 cells that were 10- to 20-fold greater than complex I strains. In vivo, a subset of complex IV strains was found to be hypervirulent, with an increased ability to cause lethal pulmonary infections in mice. Hypercytotoxicity in vitro and hypervirulence in vivo were both dependent on the activity of the bsc T3SS and the BteA effector. To clarify differences between lineages, representative complex IV isolates were sequenced and their genomes were compared to complex I isolates. Although our analysis showed there were no genomic sequences that can be considered unique to complex IV strains, there were several loci that were predominantly found in complex IV isolates. Conclusion Our observations reveal a T3SS-dependent hypervirulence phenotype in human-associated complex IV isolates, highlighting the need for further studies on the epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics of this B. bronchiseptica lineage. PMID:22863321

  3. Human Cerberus Prevents Nodal-Receptor Binding, Inhibits Nodal Signaling, and Suppresses Nodal-Mediated Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Aykul, Senem; Ni, Wendi; Mutatu, Washington; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-ß (TGFß) family ligand Nodal is an essential embryonic morphogen that is associated with progression of breast and other cancers. It has therefore been suggested that Nodal inhibitors could be used to treat breast cancers where Nodal plays a defined role. As secreted antagonists, such as Cerberus, tightly regulate Nodal signaling during embryonic development, we undertook to produce human Cerberus, characterize its biochemical activities, and determine its effect on human breast cancer cells. Using quantitative methods, we investigated the mechanism of Nodal signaling, we evaluated binding of human Cerberus to Nodal and other TGFß family ligands, and we characterized the mechanism of Nodal inhibition by Cerberus. Using cancer cell assays, we examined the ability of Cerberus to suppress aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes. We found that human Cerberus binds Nodal with high affinity and specificity, blocks binding of Nodal to its signaling partners, and inhibits Nodal signaling. Moreover, we showed that Cerberus profoundly suppresses migration, invasion, and colony forming ability of Nodal expressing and Nodal supplemented breast cancer cells. Taken together, our studies provide mechanistic insights into Nodal signaling and Nodal inhibition with Cerberus and highlight the potential value of Cerberus as anti-Nodal therapeutic. PMID:25603319

  4. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Long-Term Cryopreserved Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kar Wey; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Choi, Jane Ru; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Chua, Kien Hui; Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman Wan

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation represents an effective technique to maintain the functional properties of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and allows pooling of cells via long-term storage for clinical applications, e.g., cell-based therapies. It is crucial to reduce freezing injury during the cryopreservation process by loading the ASCs with the optimum concentration of suitable cryoprotective agents (CPAs). In this study, human ASCs were preserved for 3 months in different combinations of CPAs, including 1) 0.25 M trehalose; 2) 5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO); 3) 10% DMSO; 4) 5% DMSO + 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS); 5) 10% DMSO + 20% FBS; 6) 10% DMSO + 90% FBS. Interestingly, even with a reduction of DMSO to 5% and without FBS, cryopreserved ASCs maintained high cell viability comparable with standard cryomedium (10% DMSO + 90% FBS), with normal cell phenotype and proliferation rate. Cryopreserved ASCs also maintained their differentiation capability (e.g., to adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes) and showed an enhanced expression level of stemness markers (e.g., NANOG, OCT-4, SOX-2 and REX-1). Our findings suggest that 5% DMSO without FBS may be an ideal CPA for an efficient long-term cryopreservation of human ASCs. These results aid in establishing standardized xeno-free long-term cryopreservation of human ASCs for clinical applications. PMID:25872464

  5. Human Natural Killer cell expression of ULBP2 is associated with a mature functional phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kiva; McSharry, Brian P; Keating, Sinéad; Petrasca, Andreea; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Keane, Joseph; Doherty, Derek G; Gardiner, Clair M

    2016-10-01

    NKG2D is an important activating receptor expressed on NK cells. Ligands (termed NKG2DL) for this receptor include ULBP1-6, MICA and MICB in humans; they are upregulated in stressed, cancerous or infected cells where they engage NKG2D to induce NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of NKG2DL on effector cells has been described in mice and more recently in human cells. We confirm that NK cell lines and IL-2 stimulated primary human NK cells also express the NKG2DL, ULBP2. However, expression of ULBP2 was not a result of transfer from a non-NK cell to an NK cell and in contrast to recent reports we saw no evidence that ULBP2 expression targeted these NK cells for fratricide or for cytotoxicity by NKG2D-expressing, non-NK effector cells. ULBP2 expression was however linked to expression of mature CD57(+) NK cells. In particular, expression of ULBP2 was strongest on those NK cells that had evidence of recent activation and proliferation. We suggest that ULBP2 could be used to identify recently activated "mature" NK cells. Defining this phenotype would be useful for understanding the ontogeny on human NK cells. PMID:27349945

  6. Relation of the slow growth phenotype to neoplastic transformation: possible significance for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Chow, M; Rubin, H

    1999-09-01

    Deletions are widely distributed over the genome in the most frequently occurring human cancers and are the most abundant genetic lesion found there. Deletions are highly correlated with the slow growth phenotype of mutated animal and human cells and result in chromosomal transposition when the retained ends are joined. Transpositions are only a minor source of mutation in rapidly multiplying bacteria but are a major cause of mutations in stationary bacteria. The NIH 3T3 line of mouse cells undergoes neoplastic transformation during prolonged incubation in a stationary state and expresses the slow growth phenotype on serial subculture at low density, suggesting a relation between transformation and chromosomal deletions. To further explore the relation between neoplastic transformation and the slow growth phenotype as a surrogate for deletions, two sublines of the NIH 3T3 cells with differing competence for transformation were serially subcultured in the stationary state at confluence and tested at each subculture for transformation and growth rate. Cell death in a fraction of the population and a heritable slowdown in proliferation of most of the survivors became increasingly pronounced with successive rounds of confluence. The reduction in growth rate was not proportional to the degree of transformation of the cultures, but all of the transformed cultures were slow growers at low density. All of the discrete colonies from cloning transformed cultures developed at a lower initial rate than control colonies under optimal conditions for growth, but they continued to grow at later stages, forming multilayered colonies under conditions that inhibited the further growth of the control colonies. The results suggest that prolonged incubation of NIH 3T3 cells in the stationary state results in growth-impairing deletions over a wide range of sites in the genome, but more restricted subsets of such lesions are responsible for neoplastic transformation. These findings

  7. Implementation of foetal e-health monitoring system through biotelemetry.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Vijay S; Tiwari, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Continuous foetal monitoring of physiological signals is of particular importance for early detection of complexities related to the foetus or the mother's health. The available conventional methods of monitoring mostly perform off-line analysis and restrict the mobility of subjects within a hospital or a room. Hence, the aim of this paper is to develop a foetal e-health monitoring system using mobile phones and wireless sensors for providing advanced healthcare services in the home environment. The system is tested by recording the real-time Foetal Phonocardiography (fPCG) signals from 15 subjects with different gestational periods. The performance of the developed system is compared with the existing ultrasound based Doppler shift technique, ensuring an overall accuracy of 98% of the developed system. The developed framework is non-invasive, cost-effective and simple enough to be used in home care application. It offers advanced healthcare facilities even to the pregnant women living in rural areas and avoids their unnecessary visits at the healthcare centres.

  8. Human lymph-node CD8+ T cells display an altered phenotype during systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Hähnlein, Janine; van Kuijk, Bo J; Choi, Ivy Y; van Boven, Leonard J; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P; van Baarsen, Lisa G

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies are focused on auto-reactive CD4+ T cells, the precise role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmunity is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to provide more insight into the phenotype and function CD8+ T cells during the development of autoimmune disease by studying CD8+ T cells in human lymph-node biopsies and peripheral blood obtained during the earliest phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we show that lymphoid pro-inflammatory CD8+ T cells exhibit a less-responsive phenotype already during the earliest phases of autoimmunity compared with healthy individuals. We found an increase in CD8+ memory T cells in lymphoid tissue during the earliest phases of autoimmunity, even before clinical onset of RA, accompanied by an increased frequency of non-circulating or recently activated (CD69+) CD8+ T cells in lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood. Importantly, lymphoid pro-inflammatory CD8+IL-17A+ T cells displayed a decreased capacity of cytokine production, which was related to disease activity in early RA patients. In addition, a decreased frequency of regulatory CD8+IL-10+ T cells in peripheral blood was also related to disease activity in early RA patients. Our results suggest that different CD8+ T-cell subsets are affected already during the earliest phases of systemic autoimmunity. PMID:27195110

  9. Collaboratively charting the gene-to-phenotype network of human congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background How to efficiently integrate the daily practice of molecular biologists, geneticists, and clinicians with the emerging computational strategies from systems biology is still much of an open question. Description We built on the recent advances in Wiki-based technologies to develop a collaborative knowledge base and gene prioritization portal aimed at mapping genes and genomic regions, and untangling their relations with corresponding human phenotypes, congenital heart defects (CHDs). This portal is not only an evolving community repository of current knowledge on the genetic basis of CHDs, but also a collaborative environment for the study of candidate genes potentially implicated in CHDs - in particular by integrating recent strategies for the statistical prioritization of candidate genes. It thus serves and connects the broad community that is facing CHDs, ranging from the pediatric cardiologist and clinical geneticist to the basic investigator of cardiogenesis. Conclusions This study describes the first specialized portal to collaboratively annotate and analyze gene-phenotype networks. Of broad interest to the biological community, we argue that such portals will play a significant role in systems biology studies of numerous complex biological processes. CHDWiki is accessible at http://www.esat.kuleuven.be/~bioiuser/chdwiki PMID:20193066

  10. Human haptoglobin phenotypes and concentration determination by nanogold-enhanced electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Tseng, Shin-Hua; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Pan, Ju-Pin; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2011-06-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase protein that binds free hemoglobin (Hb), preventing Hb-induced oxidative damage in the vascular system. There are three phenotypes in human Hp, whose heterogeneous polymorphic structures and varying concentrations in plasma have been attributed to the cause of diseases and outcome of clinical treatments. Different phenotypes of Hp may be composed of the same subunits but different copy numbers, rendering their determination difficult by a single procedure. In this study, we have developed a simple, fast, reliable and sensitive method, using label-free nanogold-modified bioprobes coupled with self-development electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). By this method, probe surface charge transfer resistance is detected. The relative charge transfer resistance ratios for Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 were characterized. We were able to determine protein size difference within 3 nm, and the linear region of the calibration curve for Hp levels in the range of 90 pg ml - 1 and 90 µg ml - 1 (~1 fM to 1 pM). We surmise that similar approaches can be used to investigate protein polymorphism and altered protein-protein interaction associated with diseases.

  11. Phenotypic differentiation does not affect tumorigenicity of primary human colon cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Dubash, Taronish D; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Oppel, Felix; Giessler, Klara M; Weber, Sarah; Dieter, Sebastian M; Hüllein, Jennifer; Zenz, Thorsten; Herbst, Friederike; Scholl, Claudia; Weichert, Wilko; Werft, Wiebke; Benner, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Schneider, Martin; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2016-02-28

    Within primary colorectal cancer (CRC) a subfraction of all tumor-initiating cells (TIC) drives long-term progression in serial xenotransplantation. It has been postulated that efficient maintenance of TIC activity in vitro requires serum-free spheroid culture conditions that support a stem-like state of CRC cells. To address whether tumorigenicity is indeed tightly linked to such a stem-like state in spheroids, we transferred TIC-enriched spheroid cultures to serum-containing adherent conditions that should favor their differentiation. Under these conditions, primary CRC cells did no longer grow as spheroids but formed an adherent cell layer, up-regulated colon epithelial differentiation markers, and down-regulated TIC-associated markers. Strikingly, upon xenotransplantation cells cultured under either condition equally efficient formed serially transplantable tumors. Clonal analyses of individual lentivirally marked TIC clones cultured under either culture condition revealed no systematic differences in contributing clone numbers, indicating that phenotypic differentiation does not select for few individual clones adapted to unfavorable culture conditions. Our results reveal that CRC TIC can be propagated under conditions previously thought to induce their elimination. This phenotypic plasticity allows addressing primary human CRC TIC properties in experimental settings based on adherent cell growth.

  12. Evaluation of Proposed In Vivo Probe Substrates and Inhibitors for Phenotyping Transporter Activity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Momper, Jeremiah D; Tsunoda, Shirley M; Ma, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    Drug transporters are present in various tissues and have a significant role in drug absorption, distribution, and elimination. The International Transporter Consortium has identified 7 transporters of increasing importance from evidence of clinically significant transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. The transporters are P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein, organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 2, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1, and OAT3. Decision trees were created based on in vitro experiments to determine whether an in vivo transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction study is needed. Phenotyping is a methodology that evaluates real-time in vivo transporter activity, whereby changes in a probe substrate or probe inhibitor reflect alternations in the activity of the specified transporter. In vivo probe substrates and/or probe inhibitors have been proposed for each aforementioned transporter. In vitro findings and animal models provide the strongest evidence regarding probe specificity. However, such findings have not conclusively correlated with human phenotyping studies. Furthermore, the extent of contribution from multiple transporters in probe disposition complicates the ability to discern if study findings are the result of a specific transporter and thus provide a recommendation for a preferred probe for a drug transporter. PMID:27385182

  13. Morphologic and phenotypic changes of human neuroblastoma cells in culture induced by cytosine arabinoside

    SciTech Connect

    Ponzoni, M.; Lanciotti, M.; Melodia, A.; Casalaro, A.; Cornaglia-Ferraris, P. )

    1989-03-01

    The effects of cytosine-arabinoside (ARA-C) on the growth and phenotypic expression of a new human neuroblastoma (NB) cell line (GI-ME-N) have been extensively tested. Low doses of ARA-C allowing more than 90% cell viability induce morphological differentiation and growth inhibition. Differentiated cells were larger and flattened with elongated dendritic processes; such cells appeared within 48 hours after a dose of ARA-C as low as 0.1 {mu}g/ml. The new morphological aspect reached the maximum expression after 5-6 days of culture being independent from the addition of extra drug to the culture. A decrease in ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation was also observed within 24 hours and the cell growth was completely inhibited on the sixth day. Moreover, ARA-C strongly inhibited anchorage-independent growth in soft agar assay. Membrane immunofluorescence showed several dramatic changes in NB-specific antigen expression after 5 days of treatment with ARA-C. At the same time ARA-C also modulated cytoskeletal proteins and slightly increased catecholamine expression. These findings suggest that noncytotoxic doses of ARA-C do promote the differentiation of GI-ME-N neuroblastoma cells associated with reduced expression of the malignant phenotype.

  14. Formation of human hepatocyte-like cells with different cellular phenotypes by human umbilical cord blood-derived cells in the human-rat chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Xi-Gu . E-mail: xiguchen1516@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-15

    We took advantage of the proliferative and permissive environment of the developing pre-immune fetus to develop a noninjury human-rat xenograft small animal model, in which the in utero transplantation of low-density mononuclear cells (MNCs) from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) into fetal rats at 9-11 days of gestation led to the formation of human hepatocyte-like cells (hHLCs) with different cellular phenotypes, as revealed by positive immunostaining for human-specific alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 8 (CK8), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), and albumin (Alb), and with some animals exhibiting levels as high as 10.7% of donor-derived human cells in the recipient liver. More interestingly, donor-derived human cells stained positively for CD34 and CD45 in the liver of 2-month-old rat. Human hepatic differentiation appeared to partially follow the process of hepatic ontogeny, as evidenced by the expression of AFP gene at an early stage and albumin gene at a later stage. Human hepatocytes generated in this model retained functional properties of normal hepatocytes. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in the recipient liver for at least 6 months after birth. Taken together, these findings suggest that the donor-derived human cells with different cellular phenotypes are found in the recipient liver and hHLCs hold biological activity. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling the situations in human, provides an invaluable approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future.

  15. Induction of predominant tenogenic phenotype in human dermal fibroblasts via synergistic effect of TGF-β and elongated cell shape.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbo; Li, Jie; Wang, Keyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Micropattern topography is widely investigated for its role in mediating stem cell differentiation, but remains unexplored for phenotype switch between mature cell types. This study investigated the potential of inducing tenogenic phenotype in human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) by artificial elongation of cultured cells. Our results showed that a parallel microgrooved topography could convert spread hDFs into an elongated shape and induce a predominant tenogenic phenotype as the expression of biomarkers was significantly enhanced, such as scleraxis, tenomodulin, collagens I, III, VI, and decorin. It also enhanced the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but not α-smooth muscle actin. Elongated hDFs failed to induce other phenotypes, such as adiopogenic, chondrogenic, neurogenic, and myogenic lineages. By contrast, no tenogenic phenotype could be induced in elongated human chondrocytes, although chondrogenic phenotype was inhibited. Exogenous TGF-β1 could enhance the tenogenic phenotype in elongated hDFs at low dose (2 ng/ml), but promoted myofibroblast transdifferentiation of hDFs at high dose (10 ng/ml), regardless of cell shape. Elongated shape also resulted in decreased RhoA activity and increased Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) activity. Antagonizing TGF-β or inhibiting ROCK activity with Y27632 or depolymerizing actin with cytochalasin D could all significantly inhibit tenogenic phenotype induction, particularly in elongated hDFs. In conclusion, elongation of cultured dermal fibroblasts can induce a predominant tenogenic phenotype likely via synergistic effect of TGF-β and cytoskeletal signaling. PMID:26632599

  16. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lore; Kling, Eva; Schiller, Evelyn; Zeh, Ramona; Schrewe, Anja; Hölter, Sabine M; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Strecker, Valentina; Wittig, Ilka; Dumitru, Iulia; Wenz, Tina; Bender, Andreas; Aichler, Michaela; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Walch, Axel; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Floss, Thomas; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Wurst, Wolfgang; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Klopstock, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1) were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  17. The complete local genotype–phenotype landscape for the alternative splicing of a human exon

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Philippe; Miñana, Belén; Baeza-Centurion, Pablo; Valcárcel, Juan; Lehner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The properties of genotype–phenotype landscapes are crucial for understanding evolution but are not characterized for most traits. Here, we present a >95% complete local landscape for a defined molecular function—the alternative splicing of a human exon (FAS/CD95 exon 6, involved in the control of apoptosis). The landscape provides important mechanistic insights, revealing that regulatory information is dispersed throughout nearly every nucleotide in an exon, that the exon is more robust to the effects of mutations than its immediate neighbours in genotype space, and that high mutation sensitivity (evolvability) will drive the rapid divergence of alternative splicing between species unless it is constrained by selection. Moreover, the extensive epistasis in the landscape predicts that exonic regulatory sequences may diverge between species even when exon inclusion levels are functionally important and conserved by selection. PMID:27161764

  18. Cystic fibrosis mice carrying the missense mutation G551D replicate human genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, S J; Alton, E W; Smith, S N; Lunn, D P; Farley, R; Lovelock, P K; Thomson, S A; Hume, D A; Lamb, D; Porteous, D J; Dorin, J R; Wainwright, B J

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a mouse carrying the human G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) by a one-step gene targeting procedure. These mutant mice show cystic fibrosis pathology but have a reduced risk of fatal intestinal blockage compared with 'null' mutants, in keeping with the reduced incidence of meconium ileus in G551D patients. The G551D mutant mice show greatly reduced CFTR-related chloride transport, displaying activity intermediate between that of cftr(mlUNC) replacement ('null') and cftr(mlHGU) insertional (residual activity) mutants and equivalent to approximately 4% of wild-type CFTR activity. The long-term survival of these animals should provide an excellent model with which to study cystic fibrosis, and they illustrate the value of mouse models carrying relevant mutations for examining genotype-phenotype correlations. Images PMID:8605891

  19. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  20. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  1. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisataka; Wu, Xin; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Noguchi, Kozou; Gotoh, Noriko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Obika, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR) 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors. PMID:25970424

  2. TLR7 and TLR9 responsive human B cells share phenotypic and genetic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Simchoni, Noa; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    B cells activated by nucleic-acid sensing Toll-like receptor 7 and TLR9 proliferate and secrete immune globulins. Memory B cells are presumably more responsive due to higher TLR expression levels, but selectivity and differential outcomes remain largely unknown. In this study, peripheral blood human B cells were stimulated by TLR7 or TLR9 ligands, with or without IFNα, and compared to activators CD40L plus IL-21, to identify differentially responsive cell populations, defined phenotypically and by BCR characteristics. While all activators induced differentiation and antibody secretion, TLR stimulation expanded IgM+ memory and plasma cell lineage committed populations and favored secretion of IgM, unlike CD40L/IL-21 which drove IgM and IgG more evenly. Patterns of proliferation similarly differed, with CD40L/IL-21 inducing proliferation of most memory and naïve B cells, in contrast to TLRs which induced robust proliferation in a subset of these cells. On deep sequencing of the IgH locus, TLR responsive B cells shared patterns of IgHV and IgHJ usage, clustering apart from CD40L/IL-21 and control conditions. TLR activators, but not CD40L/IL-21, similarly promoted increased sharing of CDR3 sequences. TLR responsive B cells were characterized by more somatic hypermutation, shorter CDR3 segments, and less negative charges. TLR activation also induced long positively charged CDR3 segments, suggestive of autoreactive antibodies. Testing this, culture supernatants from TLR stimulated B cells were found to bind HEp-2 cells, while those from CD40L/IL-21 stimulated cells did not. Human B cells possess selective sensitivity to TLR stimulation, with distinctive phenotypic and genetic signatures. PMID:25740945

  3. Using the bipartite human phenotype network to reveal pleiotropy and epistasis beyond the gene.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Harmon, Samantha H; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the quality and quantity of data generated by modern high-throughput sequencing techniques, there has been a need for innovative methods able to convert this tremendous amount of data into more accessible forms. Networks have been a corner stone of this movement, as they are an intuitive way of representing interaction data, yet they offer a full set of sophisticated statistical tools to analyze the phenomena they model. We propose a novel approach to reveal and analyze pleiotropic and epistatic effects at the genome-wide scale using a bipartite network composed of human diseases, phenotypic traits, and several types of predictive elements (i.e. SNPs, genes, or pathways). We take advantage of publicly available GWAS data, gene and pathway databases, and more to construct networks different levels of granularity, from common genetic variants to entire biological pathways. We use the connections between the layers of the network to approximate the pleiotropy and epistasis effects taking place between the traits and the predictive elements. The global graph-theory based quantitative methods reveal that the levels of pleiotropy and epistasis are comparable for all types of predictive element. The results of the magnified "glaucoma" region of the network demonstrate the existence of well documented interactions, supported by overlapping genes and biological pathway, and more obscure associations. As the amount and complexity of genetic data increases, bipartite, and more generally multipartite networks that combine human diseases and other physical attributes with layers of genetic information, have the potential to become ubiquitous tools in the study of complex genetic and phenotypic interactions.

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. Findings In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar >it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. Conclusions We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed. PMID:20537181

  5. Global Nav1.7 Knockout Mice Recapitulate the Phenotype of Human Congenital Indifference to Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Jacinthe; Smith, Sarah; Matson, David J.; Johnson, Danielle; Nye, Kim; Couture, Lauren; Feric, Elma; Yin, Ruoyuan; Moyer, Bryan D.; Peterson, Matthew L.; Rottman, James B.; Beiler, Rudolph J.; Malmberg, Annika B.; McDonough, Stefan I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical genetic studies have shown that loss of Nav1.7 function leads to the complete loss of acute pain perception. The global deletion is reported lethal in mice, however, and studies of mice with promoter-specific deletions of Nav1.7 have suggested that the role of Nav1.7 in pain transduction depends on the precise form of pain. We developed genetic and animal husbandry strategies that overcame the neonatal-lethal phenotype and enabled construction of a global Nav1.7 knockout mouse. Knockouts were anatomically normal, reached adulthood, and had phenotype wholly analogous to human congenital indifference to pain (CIP): compared to littermates, knockouts showed no defects in mechanical sensitivity or overall movement yet were completely insensitive to painful tactile, thermal, and chemical stimuli and were anosmic. Knockouts also showed no painful behaviors resulting from peripheral injection of nonselective sodium channel activators, did not develop complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia, and were insensitive to intra-dermal histamine injection. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current recorded from cell bodies of isolated sensory neurons and the mechanically-evoked spiking of C-fibers in a skin-nerve preparation each were reduced but not eliminated in tissue from knockouts compared to littermates. Results support a role for Nav1.7 that is conserved between rodents and humans and suggest several possibly translatable biomarkers for the study of Nav1.7-targeted therapeutics. Results further suggest that Nav1.7 may retain its key role in persistent as well as acute forms of pain. PMID:25188265

  6. Genome-wide genetic interaction analysis of glaucoma using expert knowledge derived from human phenotype networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Darabos, Christian; Cricco, Maria E; Kong, Emily; Moore, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of GWAS data poses great computational challenges for analyzing genetic interactions associated with common human diseases. We propose a computational framework for characterizing epistatic interactions among large sets of genetic attributes in GWAS data. We build the human phenotype network (HPN) and focus around a disease of interest. In this study, we use the GLAUGEN glaucoma GWAS dataset and apply the HPN as a biological knowledge-based filter to prioritize genetic variants. Then, we use the statistical epistasis network (SEN) to identify a significant connected network of pairwise epistatic interactions among the prioritized SNPs. These clearly highlight the complex genetic basis of glaucoma. Furthermore, we identify key SNPs by quantifying structural network characteristics. Through functional annotation of these key SNPs using Biofilter, a software accessing multiple publicly available human genetic data sources, we find supporting biomedical evidences linking glaucoma to an array of genetic diseases, proving our concept. We conclude by suggesting hypotheses for a better understanding of the disease.

  7. Co-expression of Cholinergic and Noradrenergic Phenotypes in Human and Non-Human Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Weihe, Eberhard; Schütz, Burkhard; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Anlauf, Martin; Schäfer, Martin K.; Eiden, Lee E.

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that the sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands is cholinergic in most mammalian species, and that during development, rodent sympathetic cholinergic sweat gland innervation transiently expresses noradrenergic traits. We show here that some noradrenergic traits persist in cholinergic sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands in rodents, but that lack of expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter renders these cells functionally non-noradrenergic. Adult human sweat gland innervation, however, is not only cholinergic, but co-expresses all of the proteins required for full noradrenergic function as well, including tyrosine hydroxylase, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, dopamine ß-hydroxylase, and the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2. Thus, cholinergic/noradrenergic co-transmission is apparently a unique feature of the primate autonomic sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, sympathetic neurons innervating specifically the cutaneous arteriovenous anastomoses (Hoyer Grosser organs) in humans also possess a full cholinergic/noradrenergic co-phenotype. Cholinergic/noradrenergic co-expression is absent from other portions of the human sympathetic nervous system, but is extended in the parasympathetic nervous system to the intrinsic neurons innervating the heart. These observations suggest a mode of autonomic regulation, based on co-release of norepinephrine and acetylcholine at parasympathocardiac, sudomotor, and selected vasomotor neuroeffector junctions, that is unique to the primate peripheral nervous system. PMID:16217790

  8. Tracing the sources of human salmonellosis: a multi-model comparison of phenotyping and genotyping methods.

    PubMed

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Smid, Joost; Enserink, Remko; Franz, Eelco; Schouls, Leo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella source attribution is usually performed using frequency-matched models, such as the (modified) Dutch and Hald models, based on phenotyping data, i.e. serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling. However, for practical and economic reasons, genotyping methods such as Multi-locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) are gradually replacing traditional phenotyping of salmonellas beyond the serovar level. As MLVA-based source attribution of human salmonellosis using frequency-matched models is problematic due to the high variability of the genetic targets investigated, other models need to be explored. Using a comprehensive data set from the Netherlands in 2005-2013, this study aimed at attributing sporadic and domestic cases of Salmonella Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Enteritidis to four putative food-producing animal sources (pigs, cattle, broilers, and layers/eggs) using the modified Dutch and Hald models (based on sero/phage typing data) in comparison with a widely applied population genetics model - the asymmetric island model (AIM) - supplied with MLVA data. This allowed us to compare model outcomes and to corroborate whether MLVA-based Salmonella source attribution using the AIM is able to provide sound, comparable results. All three models provided very similar results, confirming once more that most S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis cases are attributable to pigs and layers/eggs, respectively. We concluded that MLVA-based source attribution using the AIM is a feasible option, at least for S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis. Enough information seems to be contained in the MLVA profiles to trace the sources of human salmonellosis even in presence of imperfect temporal overlap between human and source isolates. Besides Salmonella, the AIM might also be applicable to other pathogens that do not always comply to clonal models. This would add further value to current surveillance

  9. JAGGED1 expression in human embryos: correlation with the Alagille syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jones, E; Clement-Jones, M; Wilson, D

    2000-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (AGS, MIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a variable phenotype characterised by hepatic, eye, cardiac, and skeletal malformations and a characteristic facial appearance. Mutations within the gene JAGGED1 (JAG1), which encodes a ligand for NOTCH receptor(s), has been shown to cause Alagille syndrome. Interactions of NOTCH receptors and their ligands influence cell fate decisions in several developmental pathways. We report the tissue expression of JAG1 in human embryos.
We have performed tissue in situ hybridisation on human embryos aged 32-52 days using 35S labelled riboprobes for JAG1. JAG1 is expressed in the distal cardiac outflow tract and pulmonary artery, major arteries, portal vein, optic vesicle, otocyst, branchial arches, metanephros, pancreas, mesocardium, around the major bronchial branches, and in the neural tube. We conclude that JAG1 is expressed in the structures affected in Alagille syndrome, such as the pulmonary artery, anterior chamber of the eye, and face.


Keywords: Alagille syndrome; arteriohepatic dysplasia; JAGGED1; NOTCH signalling PMID:10978356

  10. Human keratin diseases: the increasing spectrum of disease and subtlety of the phenotype-genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Irvine, A D; McLean, W H

    1999-05-01

    Keratins are obligate heterodimer proteins that form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. Keratins are tissue and differentiation specific and are expressed in pairs of types I and II proteins. The spectrum of inherited human keratin diseases has steadily increased since the causative role of mutations in the basal keratinocyte keratins 5 and 14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was first reported in 1991. At the time of writing, mutations in 15 epithelial keratins and two trichocyte keratins have been associated with human diseases which include EBS, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens, diffuse and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenita and monilethrix. Mutations in extracutaneous keratins have been reported in oral white sponge naevus and Meesmann's corneal dystrophy. New subtleties of phenotype-genotype correlation are emerging within the keratin diseases with widely varying clinical presentations attributable to similar mutations within the same keratin. Mutations in keratin-associated proteins have recently been reported for the first time. This article reviews clinical, ultrastructural and molecular aspects of all the keratin diseases described to date and delineates potential future areas of research in this field.

  11. Divergent phenotypes of human regulatory T cells expressing the receptors TIGIT and CD226

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, Christopher A.; Yeh, Wen-I; Seay, Howard R.; Lakshmi, Priya Saikumar; Chopra, Gaurav; Zhang, Lin; Perry, Daniel J.; McClymont, Stephanie A.; Yadav, Mahesh; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yizheng; Whitley, Maryann; von Schack, David; Atkinson, Mark A.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Brusko, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in counteracting inflammation and autoimmunity. A more complete understanding of cellular heterogeneity and the potential for lineage plasticity in human Treg subsets may identify markers of disease pathogenesis and facilitate the development of optimized cellular therapeutics. To better elucidate human Treg subsets, we conducted direct transcriptional profiling of CD4+FOXP3+Helios+ thymic-derived Treg (tTreg) and CD4+FOXP3+Helios− T cells, followed by comparison to CD4+FOXP3−Helios− T conventional (Tconv) cells. These analyses revealed that the coinhibitory receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT) was highly expressed on tTreg. TIGIT and the costimulatory factor CD226 bind the common ligand CD155. Thus, we analyzed the cellular distribution and suppressive activity of isolated subsets of CD4+CD25+CD127lo/− T cells expressing CD226 and/or TIGIT. We observed TIGIT is highly expressed and upregulated on Treg following activation and in vitro expansion and is associated with lineage stability and suppressive capacity. Conversely, the CD226+TIGIT− population was associated with reduced Treg purity and suppressive capacity following expansion, along with a marked increase in IL-10 and effector cytokine production. These studies provide additional markers to delineate functionally distinct Treg subsets that may help direct cellular therapies and provide important phenotypic markers for assessing the role of Treg in health and disease. PMID:25994968

  12. Human mesenchymal stem cells exploit the immune response mediating chemokines to impact the phenotype of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Motaln, Helena; Gruden, Kristina; Hren, Matjaz; Schichor, Christian; Primon, Monika; Rotter, Ana; Lah, Tamara T

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the application of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in regenerative medicine, only a limited number of studies are addressing their use in anticancer therapy. As the latter may represent a new hope to improve the survival of patients with glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), the most common and malignant form of the brain tumors, we aimed to investigate the interactions of hMSCs and GBM cells under in vitro conditions. Four hMSC clones and three different GBM cell lines were used to study their mutual paracrine interactions in cocultures compared to their monocultures, where cells were grown under the same experimental conditions. The effects on cell growth, proliferation, and invasion in Matrigel were quantified. Further, bioinformatics tools were used to relate these results to the data obtained from cytokine macroarrays and cDNA microarrays that revealed proteins and genes significantly involved in cellular cross-talk. We showed that hMSCs are responsible for the impairment of GBM cell invasion and growth, possibly via induction of their senescence. On the other hand, GBM cells inversely affected some of these characteristics in hMSCs. We found CCL2/MCP-1 to be the most significantly regulated chemokine during hMSC and U87-MG paracrine signaling in addition to several chemokines that may account for changed cocultured cells' phenotype by affecting genes associated with proliferation (Pmepa-1, NF-κB, IL-6, IL-1b), invasion (EphB2, Sod2, Pcdh18, Col7A1, Gja1, Mmp1/2), and senescence (Kiaa1199, SerpinB2). As we functionally confirmed the role of CCL2/MCP-1 in GBM cell invasion we thereby propose a novel mechanism of CCL2/MCP-1 antimigratory effects on GBM cells, distinct from its immunomodulatory role. Significant alterations of GBM phenotype in the presence of hMSCs should encourage the studies on the naive hMSC use for GBM treatment.

  13. Nitric oxide induces cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yongsanguanchai, Nuttida; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Rojanasakul, Yon; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-15

    Even though tremendous advances have been made in the treatment of cancers during the past decades, the success rate among patients with cancer is still dismal, largely because of problems associated with chemo/radioresistance and relapse. Emerging evidence has indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are behind the resistance and recurrence problems, but our understanding of their regulation is limited. Rapid reversible changes of CSC-like cells within tumors may result from the effect of biological mediators found in the tumor microenvironment. Here we show how nitric oxide (NO), a key cellular modulator whose level is elevated in many tumors, affects CSC-like phenotypes of human non-small cell lung carcinoma H292 and H460 cells. Exposure of NO gradually altered the cell morphology toward mesenchymal stem-like shape. NO exposure promoted CSC-like phenotype, indicated by increased expression of known CSC markers, CD133 and ALDH1A1, in the exposed cells. These effects of NO on stemness were reversible after cessation of the NO treatment for 7 days. Furthermore, such effect was reproducible using another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. Importantly, inhibition of NO by the known NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5 tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide strongly inhibited CSC-like aggressive cellular behavior and marker expression. Last, we unveiled the underlying mechanism of NO action through the activation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), which is upregulated by NO and is responsible for the aggressive behavior of the cells, including anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent cell growth, and increased cell migration and invasion. These findings indicate a novel role of NO in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors through Cav-1 upregulation.

  14. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human CD3- decidual leucocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Bulmer, J N; Meager, A; Johnson, P M

    1990-10-01

    CD3- leucocyte clones were generated from human first-trimester decidualized uterine endometrium in a culture system containing interleukin-2 (IL-2) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). All CD3- clones tested by Southern blot analysis had T-cell receptor (TcR) gamma and delta genes in germ-line configuration. Thirty-six CD3- cell clones obtained from eight decidual samples were mostly CD2+CD56+ but, unlike fresh decidual leucocytes, many were also CD16+. Morphological differences were noted between CD16+CD56+ and CD16-CD56+ clones, with the latter cells possessing granules of more variable size. All CD16+ clones expressed strong cytotoxic activity against natural killer (NK) sensitive and NK-resistant cell targets, while CD16- clones had low or negligible activity. Some CD3- clones produced high levels of interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-negligible activity. Some CD3- clones produced high levels of interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) upon stimulation, but there was no relationship between specific cytokine production and cell clone phenotype or cytotoxic function. Levels of TGF-beta were generally higher than those produced by decidual CD3+ T-cell clones. Since decidual CD3- CD16- leucocytes have a low proliferative capacity in response to IL-2, and as clones with this phenotype invariably possess low NK cell activity, it is suggested that the NK cell activity of fresh decidual leucocyte populations is mediated largely by the small numbers of CD3- CD16+ cells present.

  15. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S.; Mills, Robert W.; Macri, Vincenzo S.; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Milan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  16. Effect of maternal ethanol consumption on foetal and neonatal rat hepatic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, A K

    1976-01-01

    Effects of maternal ethanol consumption were investigated on the rates of protein synthehsis by livers of foetal and neonatal rats both in vivo and in vitro, and on the activities of enzymes involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The rates of general protein synthesis by ribosomes in vitro studied by measuring the incorporation of [14C]leucine into ribosomal protein showed that maternal ethanol consumption resulted in an inhibition of the rates of protein synthesis by both foetal and neonatal livers from the ethanol-fed group. The rates of incorporation of intravenously injected [14C]leucine into hepatic proteins were also significantly lower in the foetal, neonatal and adult livers from the ethanol-fed group. Incubation of adult-rat liver slices with ethanol resulted in an inhibition of the incorporation of [14C]leucine into hepatic proteins; however, this effect was not observed in the foetal liver slices. This effect of externally added ethanol was at least partially prevented by the addition of pyrazole to the adult liver slices. Pyrazole addition to foetal liver slices was without significant effect on the rates of protein synthesis. Cross-mixing experiments showed that the capacity of both hepatic ribosomes and pH5 enzyme fractions to synthesize proteins was decreased in the foetal liver from the ethanol-fed group. Maternal ethanol consumption resulted in a decrease in hepatic total RNA content, RNA/DNA ratio and ribosomal protein content in the foetal liver. Foetal hepatic DNA content was not significantly affected. Ethanol consumption resulted in a significant decrease in proteolytic activity and the activity of tryptophan oxygenase in the foetal, neonatal and adult livers. It is possible that the mechanisms of inhibition of protein synthesis observed here in the foetal liver after maternal ethanol consumption may be responsible for at least some of the changes observed in 'foetal alcohol syndrome'. PMID:1016246

  17. Foetal haemoglobin and the dynamics of paediatric malaria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although 80% of malaria occurs in children under five years of age, infants under six months of age are known to have low rates of infection and disease. It is not clear why this youngest age group is protected; possible factors include maternal antibodies, unique nutrition (breast milk), and the presence of foetal haemoglobin (HbF). This work aims to gain insight into possible mechanisms of protection, and suggest pathways for focused empirical work, by modelling a range of possible effects of foetal haemoglobin and other red blood cell (RBC) developmental changes on parasite dynamics in infants. Methods A set of ordinary differential equations was created to investigate the leading hypotheses about the possible protective mechanisms of HbF-containing red blood cells, in particular whether HbF suppresses parasite population growth because parasite multiplication in individual RBCs is lower, slower or absent. The model also incorporated the intrinsic changes in blood volume and haematocrit that occur with age, and the possibility of parasite affinities for HbF-containing RBCs or reticulocytes. Results The model identified several sets of conditions in which the infant remained protected, or displayed a much slower growth of parasitaemia in the first few months of life, without any intervening immune response. The most protective of the hypothesized mechanisms would be the inhibition of schizont division in foetal RBCs so that fewer merozoites are produced. The model showed that a parasite preference for HbF-containing RBCs increases protective effects for the host, while a preference for reticulocytes has little effect. Conclusions The results from this simple model of haematological changes in infants and their effects on Plasmodium falciparum infection dynamics emphasize the likely importance of HbF and RBC number as an explanatory factor in paediatric malaria, and suggest a framework for organizing related empirical research. PMID:23190739

  18. [A girl with foetal valproate syndrome and autism spectrum disorder].

    PubMed

    Solignac, I

    2016-01-01

    We study the case of a 12-year-old girl who, following intra-uterine exposure to valproate, was diagnosed with foetal valproate syndrome, characterised at birth by dysmorphic features. The use of valproate during pregnancy (because of epilepsy or bipolar disorder) can cause not only structural defects in the growing foetus, but also problems in cognitive development and in adaptive and emotional/behavioural functioning in later life. We evaluate these domains of development in our discussion and suggest several other drugs, less harmful than valproate, which can be used to treat epilepsy or bipolar disorder during pregnancy. PMID:26979855

  19. Expression of a mutant human fibrillin allele upon a normal human or murine genetic background recapitulates a Marfan cellular phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Eldadah, Z A; Brenn, T; Furthmayr, H; Dietz, H C

    1995-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a 350-kD glycoprotein that multimerizes to form extracellular microfibrils. It has been unclear whether disease results from a relative deficiency of wild-type fibrillin; from a dominant-negative effect, in which mutant fibrillin monomers disrupt the function of the wild-type protein encoded by the normal allele; or from a dynamic and variable interplay between these two pathogenetic mechanisms. We have now addressed this issue in a cell culture system. A mutant fibrillin allele from a patient with severe MFS was expressed in normal human and murine fibroblasts by stable transfection. Immunohistochemical analysis of the resultant cell lines revealed markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially reduced deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant fibrillin allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal microfibrillar assembly and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This underscores the importance of the fibrillin amino-terminus in normal microfibrillar assembly and suggests that expression of the human extreme 5' fibrillin coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Lastly, this substantiation of a dominant-negative effect offers mutant allele knockout as a potential strategy for gene therapy. Images PMID:7860770

  20. Foetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure and Verbal versus Non-Verbal Abilities at Three Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled…

  1. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  2. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  3. [Phenotypic characterization and distribution of Yersinia in human and environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Javier Castillo, F; Larraz, V; Asunción Lafarga, M; Navarro, M; Gómez-Lus, R

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of species and phenotypes of Yersinia isolated from environmental samples over an eight year period are compared to that of stool cultures obtained from patients of the same geographical location (Zaragoza, Spain). The number of samples and the percentage contamination were as follows: wastewater 362, 67.4%, freshwater 523, 13.4%, raw food 607, 24.5% and cooked food 1134, 7.9%. Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated significantly more frequently than other species in wastewater, while Yersinia intermedia was the most significant species found in freshwater. Significant differences between the percentage isolates of identified species in raw and cooked foods were not found. Fifteen different serogroups were identified from faeces, thirteen of which were also isolated from environmental samples. Three serogroups of Y. enterocolitica associated with human disease were isolated from the patients faeces as follows: O:3, 145 cases; O:8, 3 cases and O:5,27, 1 case. A low proportion were isolated from food: O:3, 3 strains; O:8, 2 strains and O:5,27, 5 strains. Only one isolate from serogroup O:3 was obtained from freshwater.

  4. The impact of cis-acting polymorphisms on the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Swallow, Dallas M

    2011-12-01

    Cis-acting polymorphisms that affect gene expression are now known to be frequent, although the extent and mechanisms by which such variation affects the human phenotype are, as yet, only poorly understood. Key signatures of cis-acting variation are differences in gene expression that are tightly associated with regulatory SNPs or expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) and an imbalance of allelic expression (AEI) in heterozygous samples. Such cis-acting sequence differences appear often to have been under selection within and between populations and are also thought to be important in speciation. Here we describe the example of lactase persistence. In medical research, variants that affect regulation in cis have been implicated in both monogenic and polygenic disorders, and in the metabolism of drugs. In this review we suggest that by further understanding common regulatory variations and how they interact with other genetic and environmental variables it will be possible to gain insight into important mechanisms behind complex disease, with the potential to lead to new methods of diagnosis and treatments. PMID:23205161

  5. Chemosensory Ca2+ dynamics correlate with diverse behavioral phenotypes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Veitinger, Thomas; Riffell, Jeffrey R; Veitinger, Sophie; Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Triller, Annika; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Schwane, Katlen; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Berns, Michael W; Neuhaus, Eva M; Zimmer, Richard K; Spehr, Marc; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-05-13

    In the female reproductive tract, mammalian sperm undergo a regulated sequence of prefusion changes that "prime" sperm for fertilization. Among the least understood of these complex processes are the molecular mechanisms that underlie sperm guidance by environmental chemical cues. A "hard-wired" Ca(2+) signaling strategy that orchestrates specific motility patterns according to given functional requirements is an emerging concept for regulation of sperm swimming behavior. The molecular players involved, the spatiotemporal characteristics of such motility-associated Ca(2+) dynamics, and the relation between a distinct Ca(2+) signaling pattern and a behavioral sperm phenotype, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we report the functional characterization of two human sperm chemoreceptors. Using complementary molecular, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we comparatively describe sperm Ca(2+) responses to specific agonists of these novel receptors and bourgeonal, a known sperm chemoattractant. We further show that individual receptor activation induces specific Ca(2+) signaling patterns with unique spatiotemporal dynamics. These distinct Ca(2+) dynamics are correlated to a set of stimulus-specific stereotyped behavioral responses that could play vital roles during various stages of prefusion sperm-egg chemical communication. PMID:21454470

  6. Human MAMLD1 Gene Variations Seem Not Sufficient to Explain a 46,XY DSD Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Audí, Laura; Mullis, Primus E; Moreno, Francisca; González Casado, Isabel; López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Corripio, Raquel; Bermúdez de la Vega, José Antonio; Blanco, José Antonio; Flück, Christa E

    2015-01-01

    MAMLD1 is thought to cause disordered sex development in 46,XY patients. But its role is controversial because some MAMLD1 variants are also detected in normal individuals, several MAMLD1 mutations have wild-type activity in functional tests, and the male Mamld1-knockout mouse has normal genitalia and reproduction. Our aim was to search for MAMLD1 variations in 108 46,XY patients with disordered sex development, and to test them functionally. We detected MAMDL1 variations and compared SNP frequencies in controls and patients. We tested MAMLD1 transcriptional activity on promoters involved in sex development and assessed the effect of MAMLD1 on androgen production. MAMLD1 expression in normal steroid-producing tissues and mutant MAMLD1 protein expression were also assessed. Nine MAMLD1 mutations (7 novel) were characterized. In vitro, most MAMLD1 variants acted similarly to wild type. Only the L210X mutation showed loss of function in all tests. We detected no effect of wild-type or MAMLD1 variants on CYP17A1 enzyme activity in our cell experiments, and Western blots revealed no significant differences for MAMLD1 protein expression. MAMLD1 was expressed in human adult testes and adrenals. In conclusion, our data support the notion that MAMLD1 sequence variations may not suffice to explain the phenotype in carriers and that MAMLD1 may also have a role in adult life.

  7. Human MAMLD1 Gene Variations Seem Not Sufficient to Explain a 46,XY DSD Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Audí, Laura; Mullis, Primus E.; Moreno, Francisca; González Casado, Isabel; López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Corripio, Raquel; Bermúdez de la Vega, José Antonio; Blanco, José Antonio; Flück, Christa E.

    2015-01-01

    MAMLD1 is thought to cause disordered sex development in 46,XY patients. But its role is controversial because some MAMLD1 variants are also detected in normal individuals, several MAMLD1 mutations have wild-type activity in functional tests, and the male Mamld1-knockout mouse has normal genitalia and reproduction. Our aim was to search for MAMLD1 variations in 108 46,XY patients with disordered sex development, and to test them functionally. We detected MAMDL1 variations and compared SNP frequencies in controls and patients. We tested MAMLD1 transcriptional activity on promoters involved in sex development and assessed the effect of MAMLD1 on androgen production. MAMLD1 expression in normal steroid-producing tissues and mutant MAMLD1 protein expression were also assessed. Nine MAMLD1 mutations (7 novel) were characterized. In vitro, most MAMLD1 variants acted similarly to wild type. Only the L210X mutation showed loss of function in all tests. We detected no effect of wild-type or MAMLD1 variants on CYP17A1 enzyme activity in our cell experiments, and Western blots revealed no significant differences for MAMLD1 protein expression. MAMLD1 was expressed in human adult testes and adrenals. In conclusion, our data support the notion that MAMLD1 sequence variations may not suffice to explain the phenotype in carriers and that MAMLD1 may also have a role in adult life. PMID:26580071

  8. Humans display a 'cooperative phenotype' that is domain general and temporally stable.

    PubMed

    Peysakhovich, Alexander; Nowak, Martin A; Rand, David G

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human cooperation is of major interest across the natural and social sciences. But it is unclear to what extent cooperation is actually a general concept. Most research on cooperation has implicitly assumed that a person's behaviour in one cooperative context is related to their behaviour in other settings, and at later times. However, there is little empirical evidence in support of this assumption. Here, we provide such evidence by collecting thousands of game decisions from over 1,400 individuals. A person's decisions in different cooperation games are correlated, as are those decisions and both self-report and real-effort measures of cooperation in non-game contexts. Equally strong correlations exist between cooperative decisions made an average of 124 days apart. Importantly, we find that cooperation is not correlated with norm-enforcing punishment or non-competitiveness. We conclude that there is a domain-general and temporally stable inclination towards paying costs to benefit others, which we dub the 'cooperative phenotype'.

  9. Chemosensory Ca2+ Dynamics Correlate with Diverse Behavioral Phenotypes in Human Sperm*

    PubMed Central

    Veitinger, Thomas; Riffell, Jeffrey R.; Veitinger, Sophie; Nascimento, Jaclyn M.; Triller, Annika; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Schwane, Katlen; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Berns, Michael W.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Spehr, Marc; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-01-01

    In the female reproductive tract, mammalian sperm undergo a regulated sequence of prefusion changes that “prime” sperm for fertilization. Among the least understood of these complex processes are the molecular mechanisms that underlie sperm guidance by environmental chemical cues. A “hard-wired” Ca2+ signaling strategy that orchestrates specific motility patterns according to given functional requirements is an emerging concept for regulation of sperm swimming behavior. The molecular players involved, the spatiotemporal characteristics of such motility-associated Ca2+ dynamics, and the relation between a distinct Ca2+ signaling pattern and a behavioral sperm phenotype, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we report the functional characterization of two human sperm chemoreceptors. Using complementary molecular, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we comparatively describe sperm Ca2+ responses to specific agonists of these novel receptors and bourgeonal, a known sperm chemoattractant. We further show that individual receptor activation induces specific Ca2+ signaling patterns with unique spatiotemporal dynamics. These distinct Ca2+ dynamics are correlated to a set of stimulus-specific stereotyped behavioral responses that could play vital roles during various stages of prefusion sperm-egg chemical communication. PMID:21454470

  10. Phenotypic and genomic characterization of human coxsackievirus A16 strains with distinct virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Feng; Yu, Nan; Pan, Yu-Xian; He, Si-Jie; Xu, Li-Juan; Cao, Rui-Yuan; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Zhang, Yu; Qin, E-De; Che, Xiao-Yan; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-01-22

    Human coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) infection results in hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) along with other severe neurological diseases in children and poses an important public health threat in Asian countries. During an HFMD epidemic in 2009 in Guangdong, China, two CA16 strains (GD09/119 and GD09/24) were isolated and characterized. Although both strains were similar in plaque morphology and growth properties in vitro, the two isolates exhibited distinct pathogenicity in neonatal mice upon intraperitoneal or intracranial injection. Complete genome sequences of both CA16 strains were determined, and the possible virulence determinants were analyzed and predicted. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these CA16 isolates from Guangdong belonged to the B1b genotype and were closely related to other recent CA16 strains isolated in mainland China. Similarity and bootscanning analyses of these CA16 strains detected homologous recombination with the EV71 prototype strain BrCr in the non-structural gene regions and the 3'-untranslated regions. Together, the phenotypic and genomic characterizations of the two clinical CA16 isolates circulating in China were compared in detail, and the potential amino acid residues responsible for CA16 virulence in mice were predicted. These findings will help explain the evolutionary relationship of the CA16 strains circulating in China, warranting future studies investigating enterovirus virulence.

  11. Mutations in collagen 18A1 and their relevance to the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Suzuki, Oscar T; Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Sertié, Andréa L; Errera, Flavia I V; Bagatini, Kelly; Kok, Fernando; Leite, Katia R M

    2006-03-01

    Collagen XVIII, a proteoglycan, is a component of basement membranes (BMs). There are three distinct isoforms that differ only by their N-terminal, but with a specific pattern of tissue and developmental expression. Cleavage of its C-terminal produces endostatin, an inhibitor of angiogenesis. In its N-terminal, there is a frizzled motif which seems to be involved in Wnt signaling. Mutations in this gene cause Knobloch syndrome KS), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by vitreoretinal and macular degeneration and occipital encephalocele. This review discusses the effect of both rare and polymorphic alleles in the human phenotype, showing that deficiency of one of the collagen XVIII isoforms is sufficient to cause KS and that null alleles causing deficiency of all collagen XVIII isoforms are associated with a more severe ocular defect. This review besides illustrating the functional importance of collagen XVIII in eye development and its structure maintenance throughout life, it also shows its role in other tissues and organs, such as nervous system and kidney.

  12. Humans display a 'cooperative phenotype' that is domain general and temporally stable.

    PubMed

    Peysakhovich, Alexander; Nowak, Martin A; Rand, David G

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human cooperation is of major interest across the natural and social sciences. But it is unclear to what extent cooperation is actually a general concept. Most research on cooperation has implicitly assumed that a person's behaviour in one cooperative context is related to their behaviour in other settings, and at later times. However, there is little empirical evidence in support of this assumption. Here, we provide such evidence by collecting thousands of game decisions from over 1,400 individuals. A person's decisions in different cooperation games are correlated, as are those decisions and both self-report and real-effort measures of cooperation in non-game contexts. Equally strong correlations exist between cooperative decisions made an average of 124 days apart. Importantly, we find that cooperation is not correlated with norm-enforcing punishment or non-competitiveness. We conclude that there is a domain-general and temporally stable inclination towards paying costs to benefit others, which we dub the 'cooperative phenotype'. PMID:25225950

  13. Phenotyping of human complement component C4, a class-III HLA antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Cross, S J

    1986-01-01

    The plasma complement protein C4 is encoded at two highly polymorphic loci, A and B, within the class-III region of the major histocompatibility complex. At least 34 different polymorphic variants of human C4 have been identified, including non-expressed or 'null' alleles. The main method of identification of C4 polymorphic allotypes is separation on the basis of charge by agarose-gel electrophoresis of plasma. On staining by immunofixation with anti-C4 antibodies, each C4 type gives three major bands, but, since individuals can have up to five allotypes, the overlapping banding pattern is difficult to interpret. We show that digestion of plasma samples with carboxypeptidase B, which removes C-terminal basic amino acids, before electrophoresis, produces a single, sharp, distinct band for each allotype and allows identification of the biochemical basis of the multiple banding pattern previously observed in C4 phenotype determination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3103606

  14. STR typing of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) aborted foetal tissue in criminal paternity cases.

    PubMed

    Reshef, Ayeleth; Barash, Mark; Voskoboinik, Lev; Brauner, Paul; Gafny, Roni

    2011-03-01

    Sexual assault or rape cases occasionally result in unwanted pregnancies. In almost all such cases the foetus is aborted. A forensic laboratory may receive the foetus, the placenta, or paraffin embedded abortion material for paternity testing. Obtaining a foetal profile DNA from a foetus or placenta may not be successful due to the age or condition of the tissue. Moreover, maternal contamination of placental material will invariably result in a mixed DNA profile. However, the use of properly screened abortion material from paraffin blocks will almost always result in obtaining a foetal DNA profile. Furthermore, foetal tissue fixed in paraffin blocks does not require special conditions for submission and storage as required to preserve fresh foetal or placental tissue. As hospitals routinely prepare foetal tissue in paraffin blocks, which should be readily obtainable by forensic laboratories, these samples would appear to be the preferred choice for paternity testing. PMID:21334577

  15. The osmotic stability of lysosomes from adult and foetal guinea-pig liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, J M; Neil, M W

    1969-02-01

    1. Lysosome-rich fractions were obtained from foetal liver tissues as early as 35 days uterine age. Foetal lysosomes showed the same ;structure-linked latency' and acid hydrolytic potentiality characteristic of their adult counterparts. 2. The osmotic stability of lysosome-rich fraction from foetal guinea-pig liver tissue was greater than that of the corresponding adult lysosome fractions, p-nitrophenyl-phosphatase being used as marker enzyme. 3. The observation was confirmed by using beta-glycerophosphatase and phenolphthalein beta-glucuronidase as alternative marker enzymes. p-Nitrophenyl phosphate and beta-glycerophosphate appear to act as substrates for the same enzyme. 4. By using p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity measurements it was shown that the osmotic stability of foetal lysosomal fractions decreased with increasing foetal age, but at no time achieved the degree of osmotic instability characteristic of adult lysosomal fractions. 5. The correlation of these findings with the intracellular environment of lysosomes is discussed.

  16. Systematic dissection of phenotypic, functional, and tumorigenic heterogeneity of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Deng, Qu; Jeter, Collene; Liu, Can; Honorio, Sofia; Li, Hangwen; Davis, Tammy; Suraneni, Mahipal; Laffin, Brian; Qin, Jichao; Li, Qiuhui; Yang, Tao; Whitney, Pamela; Shen, Jianjun; Huang, Jiaoti; Tang, Dean G.

    2015-01-01

    Human cancers are heterogeneous containing stem-like cancer cells operationally defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) that possess great tumor-initiating and long-term tumor-propagating properties. In this study, we systematically dissect the phenotypic, functional and tumorigenic heterogeneity in human prostate cancer (PCa) using xenograft models and >70 patient tumor samples. In the first part, we further investigate the PSA−/lo PCa cell population, which we have recently shown to harbor self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells and present several novel findings. We show that discordant AR and PSA expression in both untreated and castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) results in AR+PSA+, AR+PSA−, AR−PSA−, and AR−PSA+ subtypes of PCa cells that manifest differential sensitivities to therapeutics. We further demonstrate that castration leads to a great enrichment of PSA−/lo PCa cells in both xenograft tumors and CRPC samples and systemic androgen levels dynamically regulate the relative abundance of PSA+ versus PSA−/lo PCa cells that impacts the kinetics of tumor growth. We also present evidence that the PSA−/lo PCa cells possess distinct epigenetic profiles. As the PSA−/lo PCa cell population is heterogeneous, in the second part, we employ two PSA− (Du145 and PC3) and two PSA+ (LAPC9 and LAPC4) PCa models as well as patient tumor cells to further dissect the clonogenic and tumorigenic subsets. We report that different PCa models possess distinct tumorigenic subpopulations that both commonly and uniquely express important signaling pathways that could represent therapeutic targets. Our results have important implications in understanding PCa cell heterogeneity, response to clinical therapeutics, and cellular mechanisms underlying CRPC. PMID:26246472

  17. Cladistic structure within the human Lipoprotein lipase gene and its implications for phenotypic association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A R; Weiss, K M; Nickerson, D A; Boerwinkle, E; Sing, C F

    2000-01-01

    Haplotype variation in 9.7 kb of genomic DNA sequence from the human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene was scored in three populations: African-Americans from Jackson, Mississippi (24 individuals), Finns from North Karelia, Finland (24), and non-Hispanic whites from Rochester, Minnesota (23). Earlier analyses had indicated that recombination was common but concentrated into a hotspot and that recurrent mutations at multiple sites may have occurred. We show that much evolutionary structure exists in the haplotype variation on either side of the recombinational hotspot. By peeling off significant recombination events from a tree estimated under the null hypothesis of no recombination, we also reveal some cladistic structure not disrupted by recombination during the time to coalescence of this variation. Additional cladistic structure is estimated to have emerged after recombination. Many apparent multiple mutational events at sites still remain after removing the effects of the detected recombination/gene conversion events. These apparent multiple events are found primarily at sites identified as highly mutable by previous studies, strengthening the conclusion that they are true multiple events. This analysis portrays the complexity of the interplay among many recombinational and mutational events that would be needed to explain the patterns of haplotype diversity in this gene. The cladistic structure in this region is used to identify four to six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that would provide disequilibrium coverage over much of this region. These sites may be useful in identifying phenotypic associations with variable sites in this gene. Evolutionary considerations also imply that the SNPs in the 3' region should have general utility in most human populations, but the 5' SNPs may be more population specific. Choosing SNPs at random would generally not provide adequate disequilibrium coverage of the sequenced region. PMID:11063700

  18. Host and Bacterial Phenotype Variation in Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Matched Human Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Esberg, Anders; Löfgren-Burström, Anna; Öhman, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    The commensal pathogen Streptococcus mutans uses AgI/II adhesins to adhere to gp340 adsorbed on teeth. Here we analyzed isolates of S. mutans (n = 70 isolates) from caries and caries-free human extremes (n = 19 subjects) by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), AgI/II full-length gene sequencing, and adhesion to parotid saliva matched from the strain donors (nested from a case-control sample of defined gp340 and acidic proline-rich protein [PRP] profiles). The concatenated MLST as well as AgI/II gene sequences showed unique sequence types between, and identical types within, the subjects. The matched adhesion levels ranged widely (40% adhesion range), from low to moderate to high, between subjects but were similar within subjects (or sequence types). In contrast, the adhesion avidity of the strains was narrow, normally distributed for high, moderate, or low adhesion reference saliva or pure gp340 regardless of the sequence type. The adhesion of S. mutans Ingbritt and matched isolates and saliva samples correlated (r = 0.929), suggesting that the host specify about four-fifths (r2 = 0.86) of the variation in matched adhesion. Half of the variation in S. mutans Ingbritt adhesion to saliva from the caries cases-controls (n = 218) was explained by the primary gp340 receptor and PRP coreceptor composition. The isolates also varied, although less so, in adhesion to standardized saliva (18% adhesion range) and clustered into three major AgI/II groups (groups A, B1, and B2) due to two variable V-region segments and diverse AgI/II sequence types due to a set of single-amino-acid substitutions. Isolates with AgI/II type A versus types B1 and B2 tended to differ in gp340 binding avidity and qualitative adhesion profiles for saliva gp340 phenotypes. In conclusion, the host saliva phenotype plays a more prominent role in S. mutans adhesion than anticipated previously. PMID:22927045

  19. Core Concepts in Human Genetics: Understanding the Complex Phenotype of Sport Performance and Susceptibility to Sport Injury.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William T

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of multiple human exomes and genomes is rapidly identifying rare genetic variants that cause or contribute to disease. Microarray-based methodologies have also shed light onto the genes that contribute to common, non-disease human traits such as hair and eye colour. Sport scientists should keep in mind several things when interpreting the literature, and when designing their own genetic studies. First of all, most genetic association methods are more powerful for detecting disease phenotypes (such as susceptibility to injury) than they are for detecting healthy phenotypes (such as sport performance). This is because there are likely to be many more biological factors contributing to the latter, and the effect size of most of these biological factors is likely to be small. Second, implicating a particular gene in a human phenotype like athletic performance or injury susceptibility requires an unbiased population data set. Third, new types of non-coding biological variability continue to be uncovered in the human genome (e.g. epigenetic modifications, microRNAs, etc.). These other types of variability may contribute significantly to differences in athletic performance.

  20. Core Concepts in Human Genetics: Understanding the Complex Phenotype of Sport Performance and Susceptibility to Sport Injury.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William T

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of multiple human exomes and genomes is rapidly identifying rare genetic variants that cause or contribute to disease. Microarray-based methodologies have also shed light onto the genes that contribute to common, non-disease human traits such as hair and eye colour. Sport scientists should keep in mind several things when interpreting the literature, and when designing their own genetic studies. First of all, most genetic association methods are more powerful for detecting disease phenotypes (such as susceptibility to injury) than they are for detecting healthy phenotypes (such as sport performance). This is because there are likely to be many more biological factors contributing to the latter, and the effect size of most of these biological factors is likely to be small. Second, implicating a particular gene in a human phenotype like athletic performance or injury susceptibility requires an unbiased population data set. Third, new types of non-coding biological variability continue to be uncovered in the human genome (e.g. epigenetic modifications, microRNAs, etc.). These other types of variability may contribute significantly to differences in athletic performance. PMID:27287073

  1. In Situ Characterizing Membrane Lipid Phenotype of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines Using Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    PubMed Central

    He, Manwen; Guo, Shuai; Ren, Junling; Li, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolisms are closely associated with cancers. In this study, mass spectrometry was employed to in situ investigate the associations of membrane lipid phenotypes of six human lung cancer cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, H1975 from adenocarcinoma, H157 and H1703 from squamous cell carcinomas, and H460 from a large cell carcinoma) with cancer cell types and finally total 230 lipids were detected. Based these 230 lipids, partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that fifteen lipids (i.e., PE 18:0_18:1, PI 18:0_20:4, SM 42:2, PE 16:0_20:4, PE 36:2, PC 36:2, SM 34:1, PA 38:3,C18:0, C22:4, PA 34:2, C20:5, C20:2, C18:2, and CerP 36:2) with variable importance in the projection (VIP) value of > 1.0 could be used to differentiate six cancer cell lines with the Predicted Residual Sum of Square (PRESS) score of 0.1974. Positive correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., C20:4, C22:4, C22:5, and C22:6) and polyunsaturated phospholipids (PE 16:0_20:4, PE 38:4, and PI 18:0_20:4) was observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells, especially for H1975 cells. Three adenocarcinoma cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, and H1975) could be differentiated from other lung cancer cell lines based on the expression of C18:1, C20:1, C20:2, C20:5, and C22:6. PMID:27162539

  2. Thymosin β4 and β10 Levels in Pre-Term Newborn Oral Cavity and Foetal Salivary Glands Evidence a Switch of Secretion during Foetal Development

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, Sonia; Messana, Irene; Cabras, Tiziana; Manconi, Barbara; Inzitari, Rosanna; Fanali, Chiara; Vento, Giovanni; Tirone, Chiara; Romagnoli, Costantino; Riva, Alessandro; Fanni, Daniela; Di Felice, Eliana; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Background Thymosin β4, its sulfoxide, and thymosin β10 were detected in whole saliva of human pre-term newborns by reversed-phase high performance chromatography coupled to electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry. Methodology/Principal Findings Despite high inter-individual variability, concentration of β-thymosins increases with an inversely proportional trend to postmenstrual age (PMA: gestational age plus chronological age after birth) reaching a value more than twenty times higher than in adult whole saliva at 190 days (27 weeks) of PMA (thymosin β4 concentration: more than 2.0 µmol/L versus 0.1 µmol/L). On the other hand, the ratio between thymosin β4 and thymosin β10 exhibits a constant value of about 4 along all the range of PMA (190–550 days of PMA) examined. In order to investigate thymosin β4 origin and to better establish the trend of its production as a function of gestational age (GA), immunohistochemical analysis of major and minor salivary glands of different pre-term fetuses were carried out, starting from 84 days (12 weeks) of gestational age. Reactive granules were seen in all glands with a maximum of expression around 140–150 days of GA, even though with high inter- and intra-individual variability. In infants and adults reactive granules in acinar cells were not observed, but just a diffuse cytoplasmatic staining in ductal cells. Significance This study outlines for the first time that salivary glands during foetal life express and secrete peptides such as β-thymosins probably involved in the development of the oral cavity and its annexes. The secretion increases from about 12 weeks till to about 21 weeks of GA, subsequently it decreases, almost disappearing in the period of expected date of delivery, when the gland switches towards the secretion of adult specific salivary peptides. The switch observed may be an example of further secretion switches involving other exocrine and endocrine glands during foetal development. PMID

  3. Study of the Aminoglycoside Subsistence Phenotype of Bacteria Residing in the Gut of Humans and Zoo Animals

    PubMed Central

    Bello González, Teresita de J.; Zuidema, Tina; Bor, Gerrit; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that next to antibiotic resistance, bacteria are able to subsist on antibiotics as a carbon source. Here we evaluated the potential of gut bacteria from healthy human volunteers and zoo animals to subsist on antibiotics. Nine gut isolates of Escherichia coli and Cellulosimicrobium sp. displayed increases in colony forming units (CFU) during incubations in minimal medium with only antibiotics added, i.e., the antibiotic subsistence phenotype. Furthermore, laboratory strains of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida equipped with the aminoglycoside 3′ phosphotransferase II gene also displayed the subsistence phenotype on aminoglycosides. In order to address which endogenous genes could be involved in these subsistence phenotypes, the broad-range glycosyl-hydrolase inhibiting iminosugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) was used. Addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing glucose showed initial growth retardation of resistant E. coli, which was rapidly recovered to normal growth. In contrast, addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing kanamycin arrested resistant E. coli growth, suggesting that glycosyl-hydrolases were involved in the subsistence phenotype. However, antibiotic degradation experiments showed no reduction in kanamycin, even though the number of CFUs increased. Although antibiotic subsistence phenotypes are readily observed in bacterial species, and are even found in susceptible laboratory strains carrying standard resistance genes, we conclude there is a discrepancy between the observed antibiotic subsistence phenotype and actual antibiotic degradation. Based on these results we can hypothesize that aminoglycoside modifying enzymes might first inactivate the antibiotic (i.e., by acetylation of amino groups, modification of hydroxyl groups by adenylation and phosphorylation respectively), before the subsequent action of catabolic enzymes. Even though we do not dispute that antibiotics could be used as a single carbon source, our observations

  4. Study of the Aminoglycoside Subsistence Phenotype of Bacteria Residing in the Gut of Humans and Zoo Animals.

    PubMed

    Bello González, Teresita de J; Zuidema, Tina; Bor, Gerrit; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that next to antibiotic resistance, bacteria are able to subsist on antibiotics as a carbon source. Here we evaluated the potential of gut bacteria from healthy human volunteers and zoo animals to subsist on antibiotics. Nine gut isolates of Escherichia coli and Cellulosimicrobium sp. displayed increases in colony forming units (CFU) during incubations in minimal medium with only antibiotics added, i.e., the antibiotic subsistence phenotype. Furthermore, laboratory strains of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida equipped with the aminoglycoside 3' phosphotransferase II gene also displayed the subsistence phenotype on aminoglycosides. In order to address which endogenous genes could be involved in these subsistence phenotypes, the broad-range glycosyl-hydrolase inhibiting iminosugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) was used. Addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing glucose showed initial growth retardation of resistant E. coli, which was rapidly recovered to normal growth. In contrast, addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing kanamycin arrested resistant E. coli growth, suggesting that glycosyl-hydrolases were involved in the subsistence phenotype. However, antibiotic degradation experiments showed no reduction in kanamycin, even though the number of CFUs increased. Although antibiotic subsistence phenotypes are readily observed in bacterial species, and are even found in susceptible laboratory strains carrying standard resistance genes, we conclude there is a discrepancy between the observed antibiotic subsistence phenotype and actual antibiotic degradation. Based on these results we can hypothesize that aminoglycoside modifying enzymes might first inactivate the antibiotic (i.e., by acetylation of amino groups, modification of hydroxyl groups by adenylation and phosphorylation respectively), before the subsequent action of catabolic enzymes. Even though we do not dispute that antibiotics could be used as a single carbon source, our observations

  5. Approximate distribution of dose among foetal organs for radioiodine uptake via placenta transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, R. K.; Saunders, M.; Palmer, A. M.; Preece, A. W.

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed radiation doses to internal foetal organs were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) technique in this study. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the pregnant female as in MIRDOSE3 enabled estimation of absorbed dose to the whole foetus at two stages of gestation. Some foetal organ self-doses could have been estimated by invoking simple spherical models for thyroid, liver, etc, but we investigated the use of the MIRDOSE3 new-born phantom as a surrogate for the stage 3 foetus, scaled to be compatible with total foetal body mean absorbed dose/cumulated activity. We illustrate the method for obtaining approximate dose distribution in the foetus near term following intake of 1 MBq of 123I, 124I, 125I or 131I as sodium iodide by the mother using in vivo biodistribution data examples from a good model of placenta transfer. Doses to the foetal thyroid of up to 1.85 Gy MBq-1 were predicted from the 131I uptake data. Activity in the foetal thyroid was the largest contributor to absorbed dose in the foetal body, brain, heart and thymus. Average total doses to the whole foetus ranged from 0.16 to 1.2 mGy MBq-1 for stages 1 and 3 of pregnancy using the MIRDOSE3 program, and were considerably higher than those predicted from the maternal contributions alone. Doses to the foetal thymus and stomach were similar, around 2-3 mGy MBq-1. Some foetal organ doses from the radioiodides were ten times higher than to the corresponding organs of the mother, and up to 100 times higher to the thyroid. The fraction of activity uptakes in foetal organs were distributed similarly to the maternal ones.

  6. Cladistic approaches to identifying determinants of variability in multifactorial phenotypes and the evolutionary significance of variation in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Templeton, A R

    1996-01-01

    Genetic surveys based on detailed restriction site mapping or DNA sequencing allow one to identify many different classes of mutational change at the molecular level and to estimate the evolutionary history of the genetic variation (a haplotype tree). These two sources of information can be combined in a powerful fashion to test hypotheses about the evolutionary significance of genetic variation and to identify mutations that are associated with diseases. Hypotheses about selection on various classes of genetic variation can be tested by examining the distribution patterns of different mutational classes upon the haplotype tree. The power of this procedure can be enhanced if it is coupled with comparative data from other, closely related species. With respect to disease associations, all mutations that affect phenotypic variation in a population occurred at some point in the evolutionary history of the region of the gene containing the mutations. Even if this evolutionary history is estimated from mutations other than those causing phenotypic effects, the phenotypically important mutations are imbedded in this same evolutionary history. Hence, whole branches (clades) of the haplotype tree should display homogeneous phenotypic effects and this fact is utilized to search for phenotypic associations of haplotypes by using nested clades in a haplotype tree. This procedure has more power than alternatives that do not use evolutionary history, and it avoids several statistical and interpretative problems associated with single-marker analyses. All of these methods could be used more extensively if more human genetic surveys concentrated on greater genetic resolution in small DNA regions and included non-human apes.

  7. Re-investigation of the concordance of human NAT2 phenotypes and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia; Dannappel, Doris; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    A comparative study of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) genotyping and phenotyping (caffeine test method) was performed on 211 persons to elucidate apparent discrepancies in the assignment of NAT2*12 and NAT2*13 alleles which occur in the literature. The study used the standard procedures of genotyping (two PCR runs and application of seven restriction enzymes) and phenotyping (determination of the two caffeine metabolites 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil (AFMU) and 1-methylxanthine (1X)), as documented in detail and validated by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The data were consistent with an AFMU/1X molar ratio of 0.85 as cut-off point (antimode) between phenotypically slow and rapid acetylators. Under this provision, several R/S allele combinations did not comply, either fully or partly, with their associated phenotypes. In particular, there was a wide phenotypic overlap of the alleged rapid allele combination groups (i) NAT2*12A/*5A; NAT2*12C/*5D; NAT2*4/*5B, (ii) NAT2*13/*6B; NAT2*4/*6A, and (iii) NAT2*13/*7A; NAT2*4/*7B. These groups obviously contained both phenotypically rapid and slow acetylators. If one assumes that the presence of one "wild type" allele NAT2*4 defines a rapid acetylator the assignment of the alleles NAT2*12A, NAT2*12C, and NAT*13 as determinants of a rapid acetylator phenotype must be questioned. This refers in particular to the nucleotide changes A803G (NAT2*12A, NAT2*12C) and C282T (NAT2*13). Based on discussions in the literature and the data presented here, there is accumulating evidence that current assignments of the NAT2*12 and NAT2*13 alleles as determinants of a rapid acetylator state should be reconsidered.

  8. Pathophysiology of foetal oxygenation and cell damage during labour.

    PubMed

    Yli, Branka M; Kjellmer, Ingemar

    2016-01-01

    A foetus exposed to oxygenation compromise is capable of several adaptive responses, which can be categorised into those affecting metabolism and those affecting oxygen transport. However, both the extent and duration of the impairment in oxygenation will have a bearing on these adaptive responses. Although intrapartum events may account for no more than one-third of cases with an adverse neurological outcome, they are important because they can be influenced successfully. This review describes the mechanisms underlying foetal hypoxia during labour, acid-base balance and gas exchange, and the current scientific understanding of the role of intrauterine asphyxia in the pathophysiology of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Although the mechanisms involved include similar initiating events, principally ischaemia and excitotoxicity, and similar final common pathways to cell death, there are certain unique maturational factors that influence the type and pattern of cellular injury. PMID:26211833

  9. Pathophysiology of foetal oxygenation and cell damage during labour.

    PubMed

    Yli, Branka M; Kjellmer, Ingemar

    2016-01-01

    A foetus exposed to oxygenation compromise is capable of several adaptive responses, which can be categorised into those affecting metabolism and those affecting oxygen transport. However, both the extent and duration of the impairment in oxygenation will have a bearing on these adaptive responses. Although intrapartum events may account for no more than one-third of cases with an adverse neurological outcome, they are important because they can be influenced successfully. This review describes the mechanisms underlying foetal hypoxia during labour, acid-base balance and gas exchange, and the current scientific understanding of the role of intrauterine asphyxia in the pathophysiology of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Although the mechanisms involved include similar initiating events, principally ischaemia and excitotoxicity, and similar final common pathways to cell death, there are certain unique maturational factors that influence the type and pattern of cellular injury.

  10. Role of WISP-2/CCN5 in the maintenance of a differentiated and noninvasive phenotype in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fritah, Asmaà; Saucier, Cécile; De Wever, Olivier; Bracke, Marc; Bièche, Ivan; Lidereau, Rosette; Gespach, Christian; Drouot, Sylvain; Redeuilh, Gérard; Sabbah, Michèle

    2008-02-01

    WISP-2/CCN5 is an estrogen-regulated member of the "connective tissue growth factor/cysteine-rich 61/nephroblastoma overexpressed" (CCN) family of the cell growth and differentiation regulators. The WISP-2/CCN5 mRNA transcript is undetectable in normal human mammary cells, as well as in highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines, in contrast with its higher level in the breast cancer cell lines characterized by a more differentiated phenotype. We report here that knockdown of WISP-2/CCN5 by RNA interference in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells induced an estradiol-independent growth linked to a loss of ERalpha expression and promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. In contrast, forced expression of WISP-2/CCN5 directed MCF-7 cells toward a more differentiated phenotype. When introduced into the poorly differentiated, estrogen-independent, and invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, WISP-2/CCN5 was able to reduce their proliferative and invasive phenotypes. In a series of ERalpha-positive tumor biopsies, we found a positive correlation between the expression of WISP-2/CCN5 and ID2, a transcriptional regulator of differentiation in normal and transformed breast cells. We propose that WISP-2/CCN5 is an important regulator involved in the maintenance of a differentiated phenotype in breast tumor epithelial cells and may play a role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  11. Modular polymer design to regulate phenotype and oxidative response of human coronary artery cells for potential stent coating applications.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Spencer W; Gupta, Mukesh K; Hofmeister, Lucas H; Zachman, Angela L; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2012-02-01

    Polymer properties can be tailored by copolymerizing subunits with specific physico-chemical characteristics. Vascular stent materials require biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and prevention of restenosis. Here we copolymerized poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and carboxyl-PCL (cPCL) at varying molar ratios and characterized the resulting material properties. We then performed a short-term evaluation of these polymers for their applicability as potential coronary stent coating materials with two primary human coronary artery cell types: smooth muscle cells (HCASMC) and endothelial cells (HCAEC). Changes in proliferation and phenotype were dependent upon intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and 4%PEG-96%PCL-0%cPCL was identified as the most appropriate coating material for this application. After 3days on this substrate HCASMC maintained a healthy contractile phenotype and HCAEC exhibited a physiologically relevant proliferation rate and a balanced redox state. Other test substrates promoted a pathological, synthetic phenotype of HCASMC and/or hyperproliferation of HCAEC. Phenotypic changes of HCASMC appeared to be modulated by the Young's modulus and surface charge of the test substrates, indicating a structure-function relationship that can be exploited for intricate control over vascular cell functions. These data indicate that tailored copolymer properties can direct vascular cell behavior and provide insights for further development of biologically instructive stent coating materials. PMID:22019760

  12. Modular Polymer Design to Regulate Phenotype and Oxidative Response of Human Coronary Artery Cells for Potential Stent Coating Applications

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Spencer W.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Hofmeister, Lucas H.; Zachman, Angela L.; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Polymer properties can be tailored by copolymerizing subunits with specific physicochemical characteristics. Vascular stent materials require biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and prevention of restenosis. Here we copolymerized poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and carboxyl-PCL (cPCL) at varying molar ratios and characterized the resulting material properties. We then performed a short-term evaluation of these polymers for their applicability as potential coronary stent coating materials with two primary human coronary artery cell types: smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) and endothelial cells (HCAECs). Changes in proliferation and phenotype were dependent upon intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and 4%PEG-96%PCL-0%cPCL was identified as the most appropriate coating material for this application. After three days on this substrate, HCASMCs maintained a healthy contractile phenotype and HCAECs exhibited a physiologically-relevant proliferation rate and a balanced redox state. Other test substrates promoted a pathological, synthetic phenotype in HCASMCs and/or hyperproliferation in HCAECs. Phenotypic changes of HCASMCs appeared to be modulated by Young’s modulus and surface charge of test substrates, indicating a structure-function relationship that can be exploited for intricate control over vascular cell functions. These data indicate that tailored copolymer properties can direct vascular cell behavior and provide insight for further development of biologically instructive stent coating materials. PMID:22019760

  13. The ontogenetic trajectory of the phenotypic covariance matrix, with examples from craniofacial shape in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Bookstein, Fred

    2009-03-01

    Many classic quantitative genetic theories assume the covariance structure among adult phenotypic traits to be relatively static during evolution. But the cross-sectional covariance matrix arises from the joint variation of a large range of developmental processes and hence is not constant over the period during which a population of developing organisms is actually exposed to selection. To examine how development shapes the phenotypic covariance structure, we ordinate the age-specific covariance matrices of shape coordinates for craniofacial growth in rats and humans. The metric that we use for this purpose is given by the square root of the summed squared log relative eigenvalues. This is the natural metric on the space of positive-definite symmetric matrices, which we introduce and justify in a biometric context. In both species, the covariance matrices appear to change continually throughout the full period of postnatal development. The resulting ontogenetic trajectories alter their direction at major changes of the developmental programs whereas they are fairly straight in between. Consequently, phenotypic covariance matrices--and thus also response to selection--should be expected to vary both over ontogenetic and phylogenetic time scales as different phenotypes are necessarily produced by different developmental pathways.

  14. Identification of a frameshift mutation responsible for the silent phenotype of human serum cholinesterase, Gly 117 (GGT----GGAG).

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, C P; McGuire, M C; Graeser, C; Bartels, C F; Arpagaus, M; Van der Spek, A F; Lightstone, H; Lockridge, O; La Du, B N

    1990-01-01

    A frameshift mutation that causes a silent phenotype for human serum cholinesterase was identified in the DNA of seven individuals of two unrelated families. The mutation, identified using the polymerase chain reaction, causes a shift in the reading frame from Gly 117, where GGT (Gly)----GGAG (Gly+ 1 base) to a new stop codon created at position 129. This alteration is upstream of the active site (Ser 198), and, if any protein were made, it would represent only 22% of the mature enzyme found in normal serum. Results of analysis of the enzymatic activities in serum agreed with the genotypes inferred from the nucleotide sequence. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis using alpha-naphthyl acetate to detect enzymatic activity showed an absence of cross-reactive material, as expected. One additional individual with a silent phenotype did not show the same frameshift mutation. This was not unexpected, since there must be considerable molecular heterogeneity involved in causes for the silent cholinesterase phenotype. This is the first report of a molecular mechanism underlying the silent phenotype for serum cholinesterase. The analytical approach used was similar to the one we recently employed to identify the mutation that causes the atypical cholinesterase variant. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2339692

  15. Calpain 1 inhibitor BDA-410 ameliorates α-klotho-deficiency phenotypes resembling human aging-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Yoko; Washida, Miwa; Tamura, Masaru; Maeno, Akiteru; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Imura, Akihiro; Razzaque, M Shawkat; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Taking good care of elderly is a major challenge of our society, and thus identification of potential drug targets to reduce age-associated disease burden is desirable. α-klotho(-/-) (α-kl) is a short-lived mouse model that displays multiple phenotypes resembling human aging-related syndromes. Such ageing phenotype of α-kl(-/-) mice is associated with activation of a proteolytic enzyme, Calpain-1. We hypothesized that uncontrolled activation of calpain-1 might be causing age-related phenotypes in α-kl-deficient mice. We found that daily administration of BDA-410, a calpain-1 inhibitor, strikingly ameliorated multiple aging-related phenotypes. Treated mice showed recovery of reproductive ability, increased body weight, reduced organ atrophy, and suppression of ectopic calcifications, bone mineral density reduction, pulmonary emphysema and senile atrophy of skin. We also observed ectopic expression of FGF23 in calcified arteries of α-kl(-/-) mice, which might account for the clinically observed association of increased FGF23 level with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. These findings allow us to propose that modulation of calpain-1 activity is a potential therapeutic option for delaying age-associated organ pathology, particularly caused by the dysregulation of mineral ion homeostasis.

  16. Molecular phenotypes of human parvovirus B19 in patients with myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Bock, C-Thomas; Düchting, Anja; Utta, Friederike; Brunner, Eva; Sy, Bui Tien; Klingel, Karin; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Felix, Stephan B; Kandolf, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate molecular phenotypes of myocardial B19V-infection to determine the role of B19V in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). METHODS: Endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) from 498 B19V-positive patients with myocarditis and DCM were analyzed using molecular methods and functional experiments. EMBs were obtained from the University Hospitals of Greifswald and Tuebingen and additionally from 36 German cardiology centers. Control tissues were obtained at autopsy from 34 victims of accidents, crime or suicide. Identification of mononuclear cell infiltrates in EMBs was performed using immunohistological staining. Anti-B19V-IgM and anti-B19V-IgG were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). B19V viral loads were determined using in-house quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For B19V-genotyping a new B19V-genotype-specific restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-PCR was established. B19V-genotyping was verified by direct DNA-sequencing and sequences were aligned using BLAST and BioEdit software. B19V P6-promoter and HHV6-U94-transactivator constructs were generated for cell culture experiments. Transfection experiments were conducted using human endothelial cells 1. Luciferase reporter assays were performed to determine B19V-replication activity. Statistical analysis and graphical representation were calculated using SPSS and Prism5 software. RESULTS: The prevalence of B19V was significantly more likely to be associated with inflammatory cardiomyopathy (iCMP) compared to uninflamed DCM (59.6% vs 35.3%) (P < 0.0001). The detection of B19V-mRNA replication intermediates proved that replication of B19V was present. RFLP-PCR assays showed that B19V-genotype 1 (57.4%) and B19V-genotype 2 (36.7%) were the most prevalent viral genotypes. B19V-genotype 2 was observed more frequently in EMBs with iCMP (65.0%) compared to DCM (35%) (P = 0.049). Although there was no significant difference in gender-specific B19V

  17. Individual Human Metabolic Phenotype Analyzed by (1)H NMR of Saliva Samples.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Tenori, Leonardo; Mazzoleni, Antonio; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Konrad, Manuela; Hofmann, Peter; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Saliva is an important physiological fluid that contains a complex mixture of analytes that may produce a characteristic individual signature. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that urine possesses a clear signature of the individual metabolic phenotype. Here NMR-based metabolomics was employed to analyze saliva from 23 healthy volunteers. About six saliva samples were collected daily from each individual for 10 consecutive days: 7 days in a real-life situation (days 1-7, Phase I) and 3 days (days 8-10, Phase II) under a standardized diet plus a physical exercise program at day 10. The result is the first demonstration of the existence of an individual metabolic phenotype in saliva. A systematic comparative analysis with urine samples from the same collection scheme demonstrates that the individual phenotype in saliva is slightly weaker than that in urine but less influenced by diet. PMID:27087681

  18. The PLIN4 variant rs8887 modulates obesity related phenotypes in humans through creation of a novel miR-522 seed site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PLIN4 is a member of the PAT family of lipid storage droplet (LSD) proteins. Associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at human PLIN4 with obesity related phenotypes were investigated using meta-analysis followed by a determination if these phenotypes are modulated by intera...

  19. Phthalate-Induced Pathology in the Foetal Testis Involves More Than Decreased Testosterone Production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Foetal exposure to phthalates is known to adversely impact male reproductive development and function. Developmental anomalies of reproductive tract have been attributed to impaired testosterone synthesis. However, species differences in the ability to produce testosterone have...

  20. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  1. Phenotype and cell proliferation activity of duct-like structures in human sublingual glands: a histological and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; TEIXEIRA, Cleverson Soares; AZEVEDO-ALANIS, Luciana Reis; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; DAMANTE, José Humberto

    2015-01-01

    There are several age-related microscopic changes in the salivary glands, including the increase in the number of duct-like structures (DLS). However, the true origin and the phenotype of the DLS are not known. Objective To evaluate the phenotype and the cell proliferation index of the DLS of human sublingual glands. Material and Methods Sixty sublingual glands obtained from human cadavers were divided into two groups - 0-30 and 61-90 years old. The phenotype was estimated by immunostaining for cytokeratin 19 (CK 19) and the S-100 protein as well as by the presence of mucin and glycogen. The cell proliferation index was determined by the Ki-67 antibody. The histochemical techniques used periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Alcian Blue. In each captured microscopic field, the DLS were counted to establish a percentage for the staining profile. The statistical analysis was accomplished using Student’s t-test, the Mann-Whitney test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (p<0.05). Results Comparing both groups, only CK 19 showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.033), with the strongest expression in the elderly group. There was no significant difference between PAS and Alcian Blue (p=0.270). In both groups, the immunostaining for CK 19 was stronger than that for S-100 (p=0.004;p<0.001), but there was no correlation between the two immunomarkers (ρ=-0.163; p=0.315). There was no immunostaining for Ki-67. Conclusions DLS demonstrate a ductal phenotypic profile and do not present cell proliferation activity. DLS may represent a regressive process arising from acini or represent the result of metaplasia. PMID:26221919

  2. Prenatal alcohol exposure: foetal programming, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sex differences in outcome.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J; Sliwowska, J H; Lan, N; Hellemans, K G C

    2008-04-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol has adverse effects on offspring neuroendocrine and behavioural functions. Alcohol readily crosses the placenta, thus directly affecting developing foetal endocrine organs. In addition, alcohol-induced changes in maternal endocrine function can disrupt the normal hormonal interactions between the pregnant female and foetal systems, altering the normal hormone balance and, indirectly, affecting the development of foetal metabolic, physiological and endocrine functions. The present review focuses on the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on offspring neuroendocrine function, with particular emphasis on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a key player in the stress response. The HPA axis is highly susceptible to programming during foetal and neonatal development. Here, we review data demonstrating that alcohol exposure in utero programmes the foetal HPA axis such that HPA tone is increased throughout life. Importantly, we show that, although alterations in HPA responsiveness and regulation are robust phenomena, occurring in both male and female offspring, sexually dimorphic effects of alcohol are frequently observed. We present updated findings on possible mechanisms underlying differential effects of alcohol on male and female offspring, with special emphasis on effects at different levels of the HPA axis, and on modulatory influences of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormones and serotonin. Finally, possible mechanisms underlying foetal programming of the HPA axis, and the long-term implications of increased exposure to endogenous glucocorticoids for offspring vulnerability to illnesses or disorders later in life are discussed.

  3. CCN1 contributes to skin connective tissue aging by inducing age-associated secretory phenotype in human skin dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-08-01

    Dermal connective tissue collagen is the major structural protein in skin. Fibroblasts within the dermis are largely responsible for collagen production and turnover. We have previously reported that dermal fibroblasts, in aged human skin in vivo, express elevated levels of CCN1, and that CCN1 negatively regulates collagen homeostasis by suppressing collagen synthesis and increasing collagen degradation (Quan et al. Am J Pathol 169:482-90, 2006, J Invest Dermatol 130:1697-706, 2010). In further investigations of CCN1 actions, we find that CCN1 alters collagen homeostasis by promoting expression of specific secreted proteins, which include matrix metalloproteinases and proinflammatory cytokines. We also find that CCN1-induced secretory proteins are elevated in aged human skin in vivo. We propose that CCN1 induces an "Age-Associated Secretory Phenotype", in dermal fibroblasts, which mediates collagen reduction and fragmentation in aged human skin.

  4. Germ cell specific overactivation of WNT/βcatenin signalling has no effect on folliculogenesis but causes fertility defects due to abnormal foetal development

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Camlin, Nicole J.; Holt, Janet E.; Teixeira, Jose M.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    All the major components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in female germ cells and embryos. However, their functional relevance in oocyte biology is currently unclear. We examined ovaries collected from TCFGFP mice, a well-known Wnt reporter mouse model, and found dynamic changes in the Wnt/βcatenin signalling activity during different stages of oocyte development and maturation. To understand the functional importance of Wnt signalling in oocytes, we developed a mouse model with the germ cell-specific constitutive activation of βcatenin using cre recombinase driven by the DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box protein 4 (Ddx4) gene promoter. Histopathological and functional analysis of ovaries from these mutant mice (Ctnnb1ex3cko) showed no defects in ovarian functions, oocytes, ovulation and early embryonic development. However, breeding of the Ctnnb1ex3cko female mice with males of known fertility never resulted in birth of mutant pups. Examination of uteri from time pregnant mutant females revealed defects in ectoderm differentiation leading to abnormal foetal development and premature death. Collectively, our work has established the role of active WNT/βcatenin signalling in oocyte biology and foetal development, and provides novel insights into the possible mechanisms of complications in human pregnancy such as repeated spontaneous abortion, sudden intrauterine unexpected foetal death syndrome and stillbirth. PMID:27265527

  5. Arylesterase Phenotype-Specific Positive Association Between Arylesterase Activity and Cholinesterase Specific Activity in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yutaka; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Strickland, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cholinesterase (ChE) specific activity is the ratio of ChE activity to ChE mass and, as a biomarker of exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors, has a potential advantage over simple ChE activity. Objective: To examine the association of several potential correlates (serum arylesterase/paraoxonase activity, serum albumin, sex, age, month of blood collection, and smoking) with plasma ChE specific activity. Methods: We analyzed data from 195 cancer-free controls from a nested case-control study, accounting for potential confounding. Results: Arylesterase activity had an independent, statistically significant positive association with ChE specific activity, and its magnitude was the greatest for the arylesterase phenotype corresponding to the QQ PON1192 genotype followed by phenotypes corresponding to QR and RR genotypes. Serum albumin was positively associated with ChE specific activity. Conclusions: Plasma arylesterase activity was positively associated with plasma ChE specific activity. This observation is consistent with protection conferred by a metabolic phenotype resulting in reduced internal dose. PMID:24473115

  6. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development. PMID:27752099

  7. Research Resource: Correlating Human Cytochrome P450 21A2 Crystal Structure and Phenotypes of Mutations in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Lei, Li; Wang, Chunxue; Waterman, Michael R.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 21A2 is a key player in steroid 21-hydroxylation and converts progesterone to 11-deoxycorticosterone and 17α-hydroxy progesterone to 11-deoxycortisol. More than 100 mutations in P450 21A2 have been established in patients thus far; these account for the vast majority of occurrences of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), which is among the most common heritable metabolic diseases in humans. CAH phenotypes range from the most severe, salt-wasting (SW), to the simple virilizing (SV), and nonclassical (NC) CAH forms. We recently determined the crystal structure of human P450 21A2 in complex with progesterone. To gain more insight into the structural and stability changes underlying the phenotypes of individual mutations, we analyzed 24 SW, SV, and NC mutants in the context of the crystal structure of the human enzyme. Our analysis reveals clear differences in the localization of SW, SV, and NC mutations, with many of the first type mapping to the active site and near the heme and/or substrate and mostly resulting in complete loss of enzyme activity. Conversely, NC mutations are often found near the periphery and close to the surface of the protein, and mutant enzymes retain partial activity. The main conclusion from the mutation-structure-activity study is that the severity of the CAH clinical manifestations can be directly correlated with the degree of mutation-induced damage in terms of protein fold stability and active site changes in the structural model. Thus, the NC phenotype is typically associated with mutations that have a compensatory effect, ie, H-bonding replacing hydrophobic interactions and vice versa. PMID:26172259

  8. Expression cloning of multiple human cDNAs that complement the phenotypic defects of ataxia-telangiectasia group D fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Meyn, M.S.; Lu-Kuo, J.M.; Herzing, L.B.K. )

    1993-12-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited human disease of unknown etiology associated with neurologic degeneration, immune dysfunction, cancer risk, and genetic instability. A-T cells are sensitive to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs, offering the possibility of cloning A-T genes by phenotypic complementation. The authors have used this sensitivity to isolate the first human cDNAs reported to complement A-T cells in culture. Complementation group D A-T fibroblasts were transfected with an episomal vector-based human cDNA library, [approximately]610,000 resultant transformants were treated with the radiomimetic drug streptonigrin-resistent, and nine unrelated cDNAs were recovered from 20 surviving stretptonigrin-resistant clones. Five cDNAs were mapped, but none localized to 11q23, the site of A-T D fibroblasts on secondary transfection. One cDNA was identified as a fragment of dek, a gene involved in acute myeloid leukemia. The dek cDNA fragment and pCAT4.5, a 4.5-kb cDNA that mapped to 17p11, independently complemented three different phenotypic abnormalities of A-T D fibroblasts (mutagen sensitivity, hyperrecombination, and radio-resistant DNA synthesis). The pCAT4.5 cDNA did not complement the mutagen sensitivity of an A-T group C fibroblast line, suggesting that it represents a candidate disease gene for group D A-T. These results indicate that phenotypic complementation alone is insufficient evidence to prove that a candidate cDNA is an A-T disease gene. The complementing cDNAs may represent previously uncharacterized genes that function in the same pathway as does the A-T gene product(s) in the regulation of cellular responses to DNA damage. 38 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Xenopus pax6 mutants affect eye development and other organ systems, and have phenotypic similarities to human aniridia patients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Nakajima, Keisuke; Odeleye, Akinleye O; Zimmerman, Keith B; Fish, Margaret B; Yaoita, Yoshio; Chojnowski, Jena L; Lauderdale, James D; Netland, Peter A; Grainger, Robert M

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene cause ocular defects in both vertebrate and invertebrate animal species, and the disease aniridia in humans. Despite extensive experimentation on this gene in multiple species, including humans, we still do not understand the earliest effects on development mediated by this gene. This prompted us to develop pax6 mutant lines in Xenopus tropicalis taking advantage of the utility of the Xenopus system for examining early development and in addition to establish a model for studying the human disease aniridia in an accessible lower vertebrate. We have generated mutants in pax6 by using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) constructs for gene editing in X. tropicalis. Embryos with putative null mutations show severe eye abnormalities and changes in brain development, as assessed by changes in morphology and gene expression. One gene that we found is downregulated very early in development in these pax6 mutants is myc, a gene involved in pluripotency and progenitor cell maintenance and likely a mediator of some key pax6 functions in the embryo. Changes in gene expression in the developing brain and pancreas reflect other important functions of pax6 during development. In mutations with partial loss of pax6 function eye development is initially relatively normal but froglets show an underdeveloped iris, similar to the classic phenotype (aniridia) seen in human patients with PAX6 mutations. Other eye abnormalities observed in these froglets, including cataracts and corneal defects, are also common in human aniridia. The frog model thus allows us to examine the earliest deficits in eye formation as a result of pax6 lesions, and provides a useful model for understanding the developmental basis for the aniridia phenotype seen in humans.

  10. Non-ABO blood group systems phenotyping in non-human primates for blood banking laboratory and xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcon, L; Quereda, J J; Mrowiec, A; Funes, C; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A; Majado, M J

    2013-04-01

    Some biomedical research procedures, such as organ xenotransplantation, usually require intensive hemotherapy. Knowledge of the whole phenotype of blood donor and graft could be useful in the field of xenotransplantation. Human and simian-type categories of blood groups have been established and they can be tested by standard methods used for human blood grouping. The aim of this work was to study the incidence of non-ABO blood group systems in different species of non-human primates, which are employed in biomedical research. The phenotype of Rh, Lewis, Kidd, Kell, MNSs, Lutheran, P and Duffy antigens was investigated in olive baboon (n = 48), chacma baboon (n = 9), Guinea baboon (n = 14), Rhesus macaque (n = 38) and squirrel monkey (n = 30) by using commercial microtyping cards. Kell, Lutheran, Kidd and Duffy antigens have been detected in all species, Rh in squirrel monkey, MNSs in rhesus macaque and squirrel monkey, and Lewis in baboon and rhesus macaque. There were differences in frequency and haemagglutination scores between species regardless of their gender and age. The main differences were found in squirrel monkey when compared with baboons and macaques. This typing system provides a tool to assess the presence of antigens in animals used for experimental procedures, such as xenotransplantation and xenotransfusion. PMID:23563364

  11. Functional and phenotypic characteristics of alternative activation induced in human monocytes by interleukin-4 or the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Moore, Vanessa; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-10-01

    Human monocytes from patients with patent filarial infections are studded with filarial antigen and express markers associated with alternative activation of macrophages (MΦ). To explore the role of filaria-derived parasite antigen in differentiation of human monocytes, cells were exposed to microfilariae (mf) of Brugia malayi, and their phenotypic and functional characteristics were compared with those of monocytes exposed to factors known to generate either alternatively (interleukin-4 [IL-4]) or classically (macrophage colony-stimulating factor [MCSF]) activated MΦ. IL-4 upregulated mRNA expression of CCL13, CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CLEC10A, MRC1, CADH1, CD274, and CD273 associated with alternative activation of MΦ but not arginase 1. IL-4-cultured monocytes had a diminished ability to promote proliferation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared to that of unexposed monocytes. Similar to results with IL-4, exposure of monocytes to live mf induced upregulation of CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CD274, and CD273 and downregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TLR5, and TLR7. In contrast to results with MCSF-cultured monocytes, exposure of monocytes to mf resulted in significant inhibition of the phagocytic ability of these cells to the same degree as that seen with IL-4. Our data suggest that short exposure of human monocytes to IL-4 induces a phenotypic characteristic of alternative activation and that secreted filarial products skew monocytes similarly. PMID:21788379

  12. Novel Strategy for Phenotypic Characterization of Human B Lymphocytes from Precursors to Effector Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Vettier, Claire; Laurin, David; Pernollet, Martine; Raskovalova, Tatiana; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Jacob, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    A precise identification and phenotypic characterization of human B-cell subsets is of crucial importance in both basic research and medicine. In the literature, flow cytometry studies for the phenotypic characterization of B-lymphocytes are mainly focused on the description of a particular cell stage, or of specific cell stages observed in a single type of sample. In the present work, we propose a backbone of 6 antibodies (CD38, CD27, CD10, CD19, CD5 and CD45) and an efficient gating strategy to identify, in a single analysis tube, a large number of B-cell subsets covering the whole B-cell differentiation from precursors to memory and plasma cells. Furthermore, by adding two antibodies in an 8-color combination, our approach allows the analysis of the modulation of any cell surface marker of interest along B-cell differentiation. We thus developed a panel of seven 8-colour antibody combinations to phenotypically characterize B-cell subpopulations in bone marrow, peripheral blood, lymph node and cord blood samples. Beyond qualitative information provided by biparametric representations, we also quantified antigen expression on each of the identified B-cell subsets and we proposed a series of informative curves showing the modulation of seventeen cell surface markers along B-cell differentiation. Our approach by flow cytometry provides an efficient tool to obtain quantitative data on B-cell surface markers expression with a relative easy-to-handle technique that can be applied in routine explorations. PMID:27657694

  13. Recombinant virus assay: a rapid, phenotypic assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kellam, P; Larder, B A

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility assays for clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are required to monitor the development of drug resistance during clinical trials and antiretroviral drug therapy. First-generation phenotypic assays possess a number of drawbacks, not least the selection of unrepresentative virus populations during cocultivation. Here we describe a rapid phenotypic assay for the assessment of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. This procedure, called the recombinant virus assay, allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV delta BstEII. A nested PCR procedure has been optimized to allow the amplification of an RT pool from both uncultured and cocultured infected patient peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) DNA for subsequent use in the creation of recombinant viruses. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. The recombinant virus assay can be performed in approximately 3 weeks without the use of donor PBLs and therefore represents a rapid, nonselective procedure for the assay of clinical isolates. Images PMID:8141575

  14. Arsenic-induced cancer cell phenotype in human breast epithelia is estrogen receptor-independent but involves aromatase activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Tokar, Erik J.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor, and tentatively linked to breast cancer by some studies. Therefore, we tested the effects of chronic inorganic arsenic exposure on the normal, estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. Cells were chronically exposed to a low-level arsenite (500 nM) for up to 24 weeks. Markers of cancer cell phenotype and expression of critical genes relevant to breast cancer or stem cells (SCs) were examined. After 24 weeks, chronic arsenic-exposed breast epithelial (CABE) cells showed increases in secreted MMP activity, colony formation, invasion and proliferation rate, indicating an acquired cancer cell phenotype. These CABE cells presented with basal-like breast cancer characteristics, including ER-α, HER-2 and progesterone receptor negativity, and overexpression of K5 and p63. Putative CD44+/CD24−/low breast SCs were increased to 80% over control in CABE cells. CABE cells also formed multilayer cell mounds, indicative of loss of contact inhibition. These mounds showed high levels of K5 and p63 indicating the potential presence of CSCs. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurred during arsenic exposure.. Overexpression of aromatase, a key rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen synthesis, occurred with arsenic starting early on in exposure. Levels of 17β-estradiol increased in CABE cells and their conditioned medium. The aromatase inhibitor, letrozole abolished arsenic-induced increases of 17β-estradiol production, and reversed cancer cell phenotype. Thus, chronic arsenic exposure drive human breast epithelia into a cancer cell phenotype with an apparent overabundance of putative CSCs. Arsenic appears to transform breast epithelia through overexpression of aromatase, thereby activating oncogenic processes independent of ER. PMID:24068038

  15. Ellagic acid metabolism by human gut microbiota: consistent observation of three urolithin phenotypes in intervention trials, independent of food source, age, and health status.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Villalba, Rocío; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Selma, María V; Espín, Juan C

    2014-07-16

    Three phenotypes for urolithin production after ellagitannin and ellagic acid intake are consistently observed in different human intervention trials. Subjects can be stratified into three urolithin-producing groups. "Phenotype A" produced only urolithin A conjugates, which included between 25 and 80% of the volunteers in the different trials. "Phenotype B" produced isourolithin A and/or urolithin B in addition to urolithin A, this being the second relevant group (10-50%). "Phenotype 0" (5-25%) was that in which these urolithins were not detected. The three phenotypes were observed independently of the volunteers' health status and demographic characteristics (age, gender, body mass index (BMI)) and of the amount or type of ellagitannin food source ingested (walnuts and other nuts, strawberries, raspberries, and other berries or pomegranates). Interestingly, a higher percentage of phenotype B was observed in those volunteers with chronic illness (metabolic syndrome or colorectal cancer) associated with gut microbial imbalance (dysbiosis). These urolithin phenotypes could show differences in the human gut microbiota and should be considered in intervention trials dealing with health benefits of ellagitannins or ellagic acid. Whether this phenotypic variation could be a biomarker related to differential health benefits or illness predisposition deserves further research.

  16. Evolution of expression of cardiac phenotypes over a 4-year period in the β-myosin heavy chain-Q403 transgenic rabbit model of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagueh, Sherif F.; Chen, Suetnee; Patel, Rajnikant; Tsybouleva, Natalia; Lutucuta, Silvia; Kopelen, Helen A.; Zoghbi, William A.; Quiñones, Miguel A.; Roberts, Robert; Marian, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in the young, is characterized by a diverse array of cardiac phenotypes evolving over several decades. We have developed transgenic rabbits that fully recapitulate the phenotype of human HCM and provide for the opportunity to delineate the sequence of evolution of cardiac phenotypes, and thus, the pathogenesis of HCM. We determined evolution of biochemical, molecular, histological, structural and functional phenotypes at 4 age-periods in 47 β-myosin heavy chain-glutamine (MyHC-Q)-403 transgenic rabbits. Ca+2 sensitivity of myofibrillar ATPase activity was reduced very early and in the absence of other discernible phenotypes. Myocyte disarray also occurred early, prior to, and independent of hypertrophy and fibrosis. The latter phenotypes evolved predominantly during puberty in conjunction with activation of stress-related signaling kinases. Myocardial contraction and relaxation velocities were decreased early despite normal global cardiac function and in the absence of histological phenotype. Global cardiac function declined with aging, while left atrial size was increased along with Doppler indices of left ventricular filling pressure. Thus, Ca+2 sensitivity of myofibrillar ATPase activity is a primary phenotype expressed early and independent of the ensuing phenotypes. Pathogenesis of myocyte disarray, which exhibits age-independent penetrance, differs from those of hypertrophy and fibrosis, which show age-dependent expression. Myocardial dysfunction is an early marker that predicts subsequent development of hypertrophy. These findings in an animal model that recapitulates the phenotype of human HCM, implicate involvement of multiple independent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of cardiac phenotypes in HCM. PMID:15135661

  17. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others.

  18. Brain perfusion SPECT and MRI in foetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riikonen, R; Salonen, I; Partanen, K; Verho, S

    1999-10-01

    Six boys and five girls with a mean age of 8.6 (range 3 to 13) years with foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) were studied by MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to find specific areas of vulnerability. Morphological anomalies shown in six of 11 patients by MRI were situated both cortically and subcortically: cortical atrophy (N = 2), dilated ventricle (N = 1), corpus callosum hypoplasia (N = 1), cerebellar atrophy (N = 2), one of the latter with Arnold-Chiari malformation (N = 1). Delayed myelination of the white matter was seen in two patients. Volumetric studies of the hippocampus showed morphological left-right asymmetry in five of eight patients. However, SPECT showed mild hypoperfusion of the left hemisphere in all 10 subjects. The negative left-right index was located especially in the left parietooccipital region, i.e. in the brain areas implicated in arithmetical and logical-grammatical functions, which are known to be affected in FAS. Normal left-right dominance was also lacking in the frontal area, i.e. the brain area affected in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Detection of these abnormalities, although they are not unique to FAS, may be helpful in the diagnosis and any attempts at rehabilitation. Diverse morphological and functional abnormalities are more frequent than has usually been believed even in less impaired children with FAS.

  19. Retinol and retinyl palmitate in foetal lung mice: sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Olga; Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the lung retinoids content to study the possible difference between male and female mice during prenatal development and to comprehend if the vitamin A metabolism is similar in both genders. The study occurred between developmental days E15 and E19, and the retinol and retinyl palmitate lung contents were determined by HPLC analysis. We established two main groups: the control, consisting of foetuses obtained from pregnant females without any manipulation, and vitamin A, composed of foetuses from pregnant females submitted to vitamin A administration on developmental day E14. Each of these groups was subdivided by gender, establishing the four final groups. In the lung of control group, retinol was undetected in both genders and retinyl palmitate levels exhibited a sexual dimorphism. In the vitamin A group, we detected retinol and retinyl palmitate in both genders, and we observed a more evident sexual dimorphism for both retinoids. Our study also indicates that, from developmental day E15 to E19, there is an increase in the retinoids content in foetal lung and a gender difference in the retinoids metabolism. In conclusion, there is a sexual dimorphism in the lung retinoids content and in its metabolism during mice development. PMID:23365730

  20. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others. PMID:27323550

  1. Foetal presentation of cartilage hair hypoplasia with extensive granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Crahes, Marie; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Patrier, Sophie; Aziz, Moutaz; Pirot, Nathalie; Brasseur-Daudruy, Marie; Layet, Valérie; Frébourg, Thierry; Laquerrière, Annie

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage-hair-hypoplasia is a rare autosomal recessive metaphyseal dysplasia due to RMRP (the RNA component of the RNase MRP ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing complex) gene mutations. So far, about 100 mutations have been reported in the promoter and the transcribed regions. Clinical characteristics include short-limbed short stature, sparse hair and defective cell-mediated immunity. We report herein the antenatal presentation of a female foetus, in whom CHH was suspected from 23 weeks' gestation, leading to a medical termination of the pregnancy at 34 weeks gestation, and thereafter confirmed by morphological and molecular studies. Post-mortem examination confirmed short stature and limbs, and revealed thymic hypoplasia associated with severe CD4 T-cell immunodeficiency along with extensive non caseating epithelioid granulomas in almost all organs, which to our knowledge has been described only in five cases. Molecular studies evidenced on one allele the most frequently reported founder mutation NR_003051: g.70A>G, which is present in 92% of Finnish patients with Cartilage Hair Hypoplasia. On the second allele, a novel mutation consisting of a 10 nucleotide insertion at position -18 of the promoter region of the RMRP gene (M29916.1:g.726_727insCTCACTACTC) was detected. The founder mutation was inherited from the father, and the novel mutation from the mother. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first detailed foetal analysis described in the literature.

  2. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  3. A novel strategy to increase the proliferative potential of adult human β-cells while maintaining their differentiated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Aly, Haytham; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Marshall, Connie A; Grossenheider, Tiffani C; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Matkovich, Scot J; McDaniel, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that Wnt/GSK-3/β-catenin and mTOR signaling are necessary to stimulate proliferative processes in adult human β-cells. Direct inhibition of GSK-3, that engages Wnt signaling downstream of the Wnt receptor, increases β-catenin nuclear translocation and β-cell proliferation but results in lower insulin content. Our current goal was to engage canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling at the receptor level to significantly increase human β-cell proliferation while maintaining a β-cell phenotype in intact islets. We adopted a system that utilized conditioned medium from L cells that expressed Wnt3a, R-spondin-3 and Noggin (L-WRN conditioned medium). In addition we used a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) and SB-431542 (that results in RhoA inhibition) in these cultures. Treatment of intact human islets with L-WRN conditioned medium plus inhibitors significantly increased DNA synthesis ∼6 fold in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Moreover, this treatment strikingly increased human β-cell proliferation ∼20 fold above glucose alone. Only the combination of L-WRN conditioned medium with RhoA/ROCK inhibitors resulted in substantial proliferation. Transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling demonstrated that L-WRN medium provoked robust changes in several signaling families, including enhanced β-catenin-mediated and β-cell-specific gene expression. This treatment also increased expression of Nr4a2 and Irs2 and resulted in phosphorylation of Akt. Importantly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and content were not downregulated by L-WRN medium treatment. Our data demonstrate that engaging Wnt signaling at the receptor level by this method leads to necessary crosstalk between multiple signaling pathways including activation of Akt, mTOR, Wnt/β-catenin, PKA/CREB, and inhibition of RhoA/ROCK that substantially increase human β-cell proliferation while maintaining the β-cell phenotype.

  4. Phenotype, donor age and gender affect function of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are attractive for cell-based therapies ranging from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to immunomodulation. However, clinical efficacy is variable and it is unclear how the phenotypes defining bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs as well as donor characteristics affect their functional properties. Methods BM-MSCs were isolated from 53 (25 female, 28 male; age: 13 to 80 years) donors and analyzed by: (1) phenotype using flow cytometry and cell size measurement; (2) in vitro growth kinetics using population doubling time; (3) colony formation capacity and telomerase activity; and (4) function by in vitro differentiation capacity, suppression of T cell proliferation, cytokines and trophic factors secretion, and hormone and growth factor receptor expression. Additionally, expression of Oct4, Nanog, Prdm14 and SOX2 mRNA was compared to pluripotent stem cells. Results BM-MSCs from younger donors showed increased expression of MCAM, VCAM-1, ALCAM, PDGFRβ, PDL-1, Thy1 and CD71, and led to lower IL-6 production when co-cultured with activated T cells. Female BM-MSCs showed increased expression of IFN-γR1 and IL-6β, and were more potent in T cell proliferation suppression. High-clonogenic BM-MSCs were smaller, divided more rapidly and were more frequent in BM-MSC preparations from younger female donors. CD10, β1integrin, HCAM, CD71, VCAM-1, IFN-γR1, MCAM, ALCAM, LNGFR and HLA ABC were correlated to BM-MSC preparations with high clonogenic potential and expression of IFN-γR1, MCAM and HLA ABC was associated with rapid growth of BM-MSCs. The mesodermal differentiation capacity of BM-MSCs was unaffected by donor age or gender but was affected by phenotype (CD10, IFN-γR1, GD2). BM-MSCs from female and male donors expressed androgen receptor and FGFR3, and secreted VEGF-A, HGF, LIF, Angiopoietin-1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and NGFB. HGF secretion correlated negatively to the expression of CD71, CD140b and

  5. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  6. A massively parallel pipeline to clone DNA variants and examine molecular phenotypes of human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaomu; Das, Jishnu; Fragoza, Robert; Liang, Jin; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Lee, Hao Ran; Wang, Xiujuan; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Lipkin, Steven M; Smolka, Marcus B; Yu, Haiyuan

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the functional relevance of DNA variants is essential for all exome and genome sequencing projects. However, current mutagenesis cloning protocols require Sanger sequencing, and thus are prohibitively costly and labor-intensive. We describe a massively-parallel site-directed mutagenesis approach, "Clone-seq", leveraging next-generation sequencing to rapidly and cost-effectively generate a large number of mutant alleles. Using Clone-seq, we further develop a comparative interactome-scanning pipeline integrating high-throughput GFP, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H), and mass spectrometry assays to systematically evaluate the functional impact of mutations on protein stability and interactions. We use this pipeline to show that disease mutations on protein-protein interaction interfaces are significantly more likely than those away from interfaces to disrupt corresponding interactions. We also find that mutation pairs with similar molecular phenotypes in terms of both protein stability and interactions are significantly more likely to cause the same disease than those with different molecular phenotypes, validating the in vivo biological relevance of our high-throughput GFP and Y2H assays, and indicating that both assays can be used to determine candidate disease mutations in the future. The general scheme of our experimental pipeline can be readily expanded to other types of interactome-mapping methods to comprehensively evaluate the functional relevance of all DNA variants, including those in non-coding regions.

  7. Adaptive Thermogenesis in Resistance to Obesity Therapies: Issues in Quantifying Thrifty Energy Expenditure Phenotypes in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dulloo, Abdul G; Schutz, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Dieting and exercise are likely to remain the core approaches in the management of obesity in the foreseeable future despite their well-documented failures for achieving long-term weight loss. Explanations for such poor prognosis are centered on patient's self-regulatory failure and lack of compliance to the prescribed diet or exercise regimen. While a role for physiological adaptations leading to diminished rates of heat production has also been advocated, there are considerable uncertainties about the quantitative importance of such regulated heat production (i.e., adaptive thermogenesis) to the less-than-expected weight loss and ease for weight regain. This paper first reviews the most compelling evidence of what is often considered as weight loss-induced adaptive thermogenesis in various compartments of daily energy expenditure. It then discusses the major limitations and issues in quantifying such thrifty energy expenditure phenotypes and underscores the plausibility of diminished core temperature as a thrifty metabolic trait in resistance to weight loss. Although an accurate quantification of adaptive thermogenesis will have to await the applications of deep body composition phenotyping and better discrimination of physical activity energy expenditures, the magnitude of diminished energy expenditure in response to weight loss in certain individuals is large enough to support the concept that adaptive thermogenesis contribute importantly to their resistance to obesity therapies.

  8. Phenotypic Profiling of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an Opportunistic Pathogen Colonizing Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Duan, Shu Yao; Vaas, Lea A. I.; Penesyan, Anahit; Meyer, Wieland; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping studies of Australian Scedosporium isolates have revealed the strong prevalence of a recently described species: Scedosporium aurantiacum. In addition to occurring in the environment, this fungus is also known to colonise the respiratory tracts of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A high throughput Phenotype Microarray (PM) analysis using 94 assorted substrates (sugars, amino acids, hexose-acids and carboxylic acids) was carried out for four isolates exhibiting different levels of virulence, determined using a Galleria mellonella infection model. A significant difference was observed in the substrate utilisation patterns of strains displaying differential virulence. For example, certain sugars such as sucrose (saccharose) were utilised only by low virulence strains whereas some sugar derivatives such as D-turanose promoted respiration only in the more virulent strains. Strains with a higher level of virulence also displayed flexibility and metabolic adaptability at two different temperature conditions tested (28 and 37°C). Phenotype microarray data were integrated with the whole-genome sequence data of S. aurantiacum to reconstruct a pathway map for the metabolism of selected substrates to further elucidate differences between the strains. PMID:25811884

  9. Adaptive Thermogenesis in Resistance to Obesity Therapies: Issues in Quantifying Thrifty Energy Expenditure Phenotypes in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dulloo, Abdul G; Schutz, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Dieting and exercise are likely to remain the core approaches in the management of obesity in the foreseeable future despite their well-documented failures for achieving long-term weight loss. Explanations for such poor prognosis are centered on patient's self-regulatory failure and lack of compliance to the prescribed diet or exercise regimen. While a role for physiological adaptations leading to diminished rates of heat production has also been advocated, there are considerable uncertainties about the quantitative importance of such regulated heat production (i.e., adaptive thermogenesis) to the less-than-expected weight loss and ease for weight regain. This paper first reviews the most compelling evidence of what is often considered as weight loss-induced adaptive thermogenesis in various compartments of daily energy expenditure. It then discusses the major limitations and issues in quantifying such thrifty energy expenditure phenotypes and underscores the plausibility of diminished core temperature as a thrifty metabolic trait in resistance to weight loss. Although an accurate quantification of adaptive thermogenesis will have to await the applications of deep body composition phenotyping and better discrimination of physical activity energy expenditures, the magnitude of diminished energy expenditure in response to weight loss in certain individuals is large enough to support the concept that adaptive thermogenesis contribute importantly to their resistance to obesity therapies. PMID:26627218

  10. Elucidating the genotype-phenotype relationships and network perturbations of human shared and specific disease genes from an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Begum, Tina; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2014-10-05

    To date, numerous studies have been attempted to determine the extent of variation in evolutionary rates between human disease and nondisease (ND) genes. In our present study, we have considered human autosomal monogenic (Mendelian) disease genes, which were classified into two groups according to the number of phenotypic defects, that is, specific disease (SPD) gene (one gene: one defect) and shared disease (SHD) gene (one gene: multiple defects). Here, we have compared the evolutionary rates of these two groups of genes, that is, SPD genes and SHD genes with respect to ND genes. We observed that the average evolutionary rates are slow in SHD group, intermediate in SPD group, and fast in ND group. Group-to-group evolutionary rate differences remain statistically significant regardless of their gene expression levels and number of defects. We demonstrated that disease genes are under strong selective constraint if they emerge through edgetic perturbation or drug-induced perturbation of the interactome network, show tissue-restricted expression, and are involved in transmembrane transport. Among all the factors, our regression analyses interestingly suggest the independent effects of 1) drug-induced perturbation and 2) the interaction term of expression breadth and transmembrane transport on protein evolutionary rates. We reasoned that the drug-induced network disruption is a combination of several edgetic perturbations and, thus, has more severe effect on gene phenotypes.

  11. Proteome dynamics during contractile and metabolic differentiation of bovine foetal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chaze, T; Meunier, B; Chambon, C; Jurie, C; Picard, B

    2009-07-01

    Contractile and metabolic properties of bovine muscles play an important role in meat sensorial quality, particularly tenderness. Earlier studies based on Myosin heavy chain isoforms analyses and measurements of glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activities have demonstrated that the third trimester of foetal life in bovine is characterized by contractile and metabolic differentiation. In order to complete this data and to obtain a precise view of this phase and its regulation, we performed a proteomic analysis of Semitendinosus muscle from Charolais foetuses analysed at three stages of the third trimester of gestation (180, 210 and 260 days). The results complete the knowledge of important changes in the profiles of proteins from metabolic and contractile pathways. They provide new insights about proteins such as Aldehyde dehydrogenase family, Enolase, Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, Troponin T or Myosin light chains isoforms. These data have agronomical applications not only for the management of beef sensorial quality but also in medical context, as bovine myogenesis appears very similar to human one. PMID:22444818

  12. Transgenic rats overexpressing the human MrgX3 gene show cataracts and an abnormal skin phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Kaisho, Yoshihiko . E-mail: Kaisho_Yoshihiko@takeda.co.jp; Watanabe, Takuya; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Yasuhara, Yoshitaka; Shimakawa, Kozo; Mori, Ikuo; Sakura, Yasufumi; Terao, Yasuko; Matsui, Hideki; Taketomi, Shigehisa

    2005-05-13

    The human MrgX3 gene, belonging to the mrgs/SNSRs (mass related genes/sensory neuron specific receptors) family, was overexpressed in transgenic rats using the actin promoter. Two animal lines showed cataracts with liquification/degeneration and swelling of the lens fiber cells. The transient epidermal desquamation was observed in line with higher gene expression. Histopathology of the transgenic rats showed acanthosis and focal parakeratosis. In the epidermis, there was an increase in cellular keratin 14, keratin 10, and loricrin, as well as PGP 9.5 in innervating nerve fibers. These phenotypes accompanied an increase in the number of proliferating cells. These results suggest that overexpression of the human MrgX3 gene causes a disturbance of the normal cell-differentiation process.

  13. Distinct endothelial phenotypes evoked by arterial waveforms derived from atherosclerosis-susceptible and -resistant regions of human vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guohao; Kaazempur-Mofrad, Mohammad R.; Natarajan, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuzhi; Vaughn, Saran; Blackman, Brett R.; Kamm, Roger D.; García-Cardeña, Guillermo; Gimbrone, Michael A., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    Atherosclerotic lesion localization to regions of disturbed flow within certain arterial geometries, in humans and experimental animals, suggests an important role for local hemodynamic forces in atherogenesis. To explore how endothelial cells (EC) acquire functional/dysfunctional phenotypes in response to vascular region-specific flow patterns, we have used an in vitro dynamic flow system to accurately reproduce arterial shear stress waveforms on cultured human EC and have examined the effects on EC gene expression by using a high-throughput transcriptional profiling approach. The flow patterns in the carotid artery bifurcations of several normal human subjects were characterized by using 3D flow analysis based on actual vascular geometries and blood flow profiles. Two prototypic arterial waveforms, "athero-prone" and "athero-protective," were defined as representative of the wall shear stresses in two distinct regions of the carotid artery (carotid sinus and distal internal carotid artery) that are typically "susceptible" or "resistant," respectively, to atherosclerotic lesion development. These two waveforms were applied to cultured EC, and cDNA microarrays were used to analyze the differential patterns of EC gene expression. In addition, the differential effects of athero-prone vs. athero-protective waveforms were further characterized on several parameters of EC structure and function, including actin cytoskeletal organization, expression and localization of junctional proteins, activation of the NF-B transcriptional pathway, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. These global gene expression patterns and functional data reveal a distinct phenotypic modulation in response to the wall shear stresses present in atherosclerosis-susceptible vs. atherosclerosis-resistant human arterial geometries.

  14. Ginsenoside Rh1 eliminates the cytoprotective phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-transduced human macrophages by inhibiting the phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase lipoamide kinase isozyme 1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Kim, Baek; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Red ginseng (the steamed root of Panax ginseng C.A. MEYER, Araliaceae), which contains ginsenosides as its main constituents, is frequently used to treat tumor, inflammation, diabetes, stress and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Asian countries. Of these ginsenosides, only protopanaxadiol compound K has been reported to abolish the cytoprotective phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-transfected human macrophages. Here, we investigated the anti-cytoprotective effect of protopanaxatriol ginsenoside Rh1 on Tat-expressing cytoprotective CHME5 cells and D3-infected human primary macrophages. Treatment with ginsenoside Rh1 in the presence of lipopolysaccharide/cycloheximide (LPS/CHX) potently abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-transduced CHME5 cells as well as D3-infected human primary macrophages. Ginsenoside Rh1 significantly inhibited LPS/CHX-induced Akt phosphorylation, as well as mammalian target of rapamycin and Bcl-2-associated death promoter activation in both cell types. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rh1 inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase lipoamide kinase isozyme 1 (PDK-1) phosphorylation. However, ginsenoside Rh1 did not inhibit phosphoinositide 3-kinase phosphorylation. Ginsenosides Rh1 in the presence of miltefosine (5 µM) additively increased the anti-cytoprotective activity against HIV-1 Tat-expressing macrophages. On the basis of these findings, we propose that ginsenoside Rh1 could possibly eliminate HIV-1 infected macrophages by inhibiting the PDK1/Akt pathway. PMID:23811558

  15. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  16. Defect of Fc receptors and phenotypical changes in sinusoidal endothelial cells in human liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Muro, H.; Shirasawa, H.; Kosugi, I.; Nakamura, S.

    1993-01-01

    To analyze the pathological changes occurring in Fc receptors (FcRs) in sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) in chronic liver diseases, we first characterized immunohistochemically the SEC FcRs by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to FcRs and then investigated the distribution of the SEC FcRs by using peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG complexes as a ligand on frozen sections. MAb 2E1 to FcRII reacted with SECs in a similar manner to peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG and blocked the peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG binding to SECs, whereas MAbs 3G8 and Leu-11b to FcRIII did not. FcRs in normal liver were found along the sinusoidal walls, except for those in the outer periportal zones, but FcRs in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis were intermittently or focally absent. The lengths of the FcR-positive portion of sinusoids in unit areas were respectively about 54% and 76% of the normal values in active and inactive cirrhosis. Where FcRs were absent, the MAbs CD36, CD31, and EN4 revealed the presence of sinusoids and, in active cirrhosis, frequently the thickening of liver cell plates. The FcR-negative SECs in the outer periportal zones of normal livers were different from the SECs of other sites in the presence of PAL-E antigen and a rich amount of EN4 antigen, though these sinusoids possessed Kupffer cells and no perisinusoidal deposition of laminin. The FcR-negative SECs in liver diseases occasionally presented the character of ordinary blood vessels, viz., PAL-E antigen, CD34 antigen, and a deficiency of Kupffer cells, regardless of perisinusoidal laminin deposition. However, they preserved the character of normally FcR-possessing SECs, viz., CD36 antigen, and a small amount of EN4 and CD31 antigens. These findings indicate that the outer-periportal SECs in normal livers are phenotypically different from other SECs and that the SECs in diseased livers frequently undergo phenotypical changes, including loss of FcRs, regardless of perisinusoidal laminin deposition, i

  17. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Ilona J.; Spiekstra, Sander W.; Gruijl, Tanja D. de; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-08-15

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a physiologically relevant full-thickness skin equivalent model (SE-LC). We describe differences and similarities in the mechanisms regulating LC migration and plasticity upon allergen or irritant exposure. The skin equivalent consisted of a reconstructed epidermis containing primary differentiated keratinocytes and CD1a{sup +} MUTZ-LC on a primary fibroblast-populated dermis. Skin equivalents were exposed to a panel of allergens and irritants. Topical exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of allergens (nickel sulfate, resorcinol, cinnamaldehyde) and irritants (Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 80) resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis and into the dermis. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced migration, whereas anti-CCL5 blocked irritant-induced migration. In contrast to allergen exposure, irritant exposure resulted in cells within the dermis becoming CD1a{sup −}/CD14{sup +}/CD68{sup +} which is characteristic of a phenotypic switch of MUTZ-LC to a macrophage-like cell in the dermis. This phenotypic switch was blocked with anti-IL-10. Mechanisms previously identified as being involved in LC activation and migration in native human skin could thus be reproduced in the in vitro constructed skin equivalent model containing functional LC. This model therefore provides a unique and relevant research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions, and will provide a powerful tool for hazard identification, testing novel therapeutics and identifying new drug targets. - Highlights: • MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells integrated into skin equivalents are fully functional. • Anti-CXCL12 blocks allergen-induced MUTZ-LC migration.

  18. A Phenotyping Regimen for Genetically Modified Mice Used to Study Genes Implicated in Human Diseases of Aging.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Victoria L; Thompson, Brian S; Cherry, Catherine; Wang, Shao-Bin; Chen, Bo; Hoh, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Age-related diseases are becoming increasingly prevalent and the burden continues to grow as our population ages. Effective treatments are necessary to lessen the impact of debilitating conditions but remain elusive in many cases. Only by understanding the causes and pathology of diseases associated with aging, can scientists begin to identify potential therapeutic targets and develop strategies for intervention. The most common age-related conditions are neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and blindness. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Genome wide association studies have previously identified loci that are associated with increased susceptibility to this disease and identified two regions of interest: complement factor H (CFH) and the 10q26 locus, where the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) and high-temperature requirement factor A1 (HtrA1) genes are located. CFH acts as a negative regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system while HtrA1 is an extracellular serine protease. ARMS2 is located upstream of HtrA1 in the primate genome, although the gene is absent in mice. To study the effects of these genes, humanized knock-in mouse lines of Cfh and ARMS2, knockouts of Cfh, HtrA1, HtrA2, HtrA3 and HtrA4 as well as a conditional neural deletion of HtrA2 were generated. Of all the genetically engineered mice produced only mice lacking HtrA2, either systemically or in neural tissues, displayed clear phenotypes. In order to examine these mice thoroughly and systematically, an initial phenotyping schedule was established, consisting of a series of tests related to two main diseases of interest: AMD and Parkinson's. Genetically modified mice can be subjected to appropriate experiments to identify phenotypes that may be related to the associated diseases in humans. A phenotyping regimen with a mitochondrial focus is presented here alongside representative results

  19. Effect of Embryo Vitrification on Rabbit Foetal Placenta Proteome during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-de-Juano, Maria Desemparats; Vicente, José Salvador; Hollung, Kristin; Marco-Jiménez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Very limited information on the post-implantatory effects of vitrification has been published till now. We observed in a previous study that the vitrification procedure for the cryopreservation of embryos introduced transcriptomic and proteomic modifications in the rabbit foetal placenta at the middle of gestation. Now, we have conducted a proteomic study to determine whether protein alterations in the foetal placenta induced by the vitrification procedure remain during pregnancy. In this study, we used 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF and LC-MS/MS analysis) to identify the protein changes during middle and late stages of gestation (Day 14 and Day 24, respectively) in rabbit foetal placenta. We identified 11 differentially expressed proteins at Day 14 and 13 proteins at Day 24. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001840 and PXD001836. In addition, we demonstrate the presence of three proteins, serum albumin, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 [NADP+], and phosphoglycerate mutase 1, which were altered during pregnancy. We demonstrate the existence of changes in foetal placental protein during pregnancy induced by the vitrification procedure, which brings into question whether vitrification effects observed during foetal development could lead to physiological and metabolic disorders in adulthood. This effect, taken together with other effects reported in the literature, suggests that embryo cryopreservation is not neutral. PMID:25915775

  20. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-09-02

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiological differences, such as body size and longevity. In contrast, large animal models, including sheep, provide an alternative to mice for biomedical research due to their greater physiological parallels with humans. Completion of the full genome sequences of many species, and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, means it is now feasible to screen large populations of domesticated animals for genetic variants that resemble human genetic diseases, and generate models that more accurately model rare human pathologies. In this review, we discuss the notion of using sheep as large animal models, and their advantages in modelling human genetic disease. We exemplify several existing naturally occurring ovine variants in genes that are orthologous to human disease genes, such as the Cln6 sheep model for Batten disease. These, and other sheep models, have contributed significantly to our understanding of the relevant human disease process, in addition to providing opportunities to trial new therapies in animals with similar body and organ size to humans. Therefore sheep are a significant species with respect to the modelling of rare genetic human disease, which we summarize in this review.

  1. Structure and function in urinary bladder of foetal sheep.

    PubMed

    France, V M; Stanier, M W; Wooding, F B

    1974-06-01

    1. The structure and function of the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder of sheep foetuses was investigated by electron microscopic studies made in conjunction with a series of experiments in which the permeability of the bladder to sodium and water was measured in vitro. Measurements were made at gestational ages ranging from 50 to 141 days (term = 147 days) Osmolarity and electrolyte concentrations of urine found in the foetal bladder were also measured.2. The development of tight junctions between the bladder epithelial cells was investigated by incubating the tissue with solutions containing 1 mM-LaCl(3) on the mucosal surface. No penetration of the junctions by lanthanum was observed in foetuses of 90 days or older. In younger bladders, the epithelial layer was stripped by treatment with lanthanum, but tight junctions appeared to be fully developed in early bladders incubated without lanthanum.3. The surface structure of the luminal (mucosal) plasmalemma was fully developed at 50 days.4. Unidirectional fluxes of labelled sodium and water were measured with identical solutions bathing the two surfaces of the bladder wall. No net water movement occurred; the mean ratio of efflux to influx in nine bladders was 1.002 +/- 0.039 (S.E. of mean). Under these conditions, the flux ratio for sodium was 1.735 +/- 0.143 (S.E. of mean) in twelve bladders.5. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) had no effect on net water movement but reduced the net efflux of sodium so that the flux ratio became 1.285 +/- 0.255 (S.E. of mean) n = 8. ADH also had a striking effect on the structure of the epithelium, causing marked swelling of the intercellular spaces. The tight junctions remained an effective barrier to lanthanum penetration under these conditions; lanthanum was not observed in the enlarged spaces.

  2. MicroRNA-193a Regulates the Transdifferentiation of Human Parietal Epithelial Cells toward a Podocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kietzmann, Leonie; Guhr, Sebastian S.O.; Meyer, Tobias N.; Ni, Lan; Sachs, Marlies; Panzer, Ulf; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Saleem, Moin A.; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Gebeshuber, Christoph A.

    2015-01-01

    Parietal epithelial cells have been identified as potential progenitor cells in glomerular regeneration, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not fully defined. Here, we established an immortalized polyclonal human parietal epithelial cell (hPEC) line from naive human Bowman’s capsule cells isolated by mechanical microdissection. These hPECs expressed high levels of PEC-specific proteins and microRNA-193a (miR-193a), a suppressor of podocyte differentiation through downregulation of Wilms’ tumor 1 in mice. We then investigated the function of miR-193a in the establishment of podocyte and PEC identity and determined whether inhibition of miR-193a influences the behavior of PECs in glomerular disease. After stable knockdown of miR-193a, hPECs adopted a podocyte-like morphology and marker expression, with decreased expression levels of PEC markers. In mice, inhibition of miR-193a by complementary locked nucleic acids resulted in an upregulation of the podocyte proteins synaptopodin and Wilms’ tumor 1. Conversely, overexpression of miR-193a in vivo resulted in the upregulation of PEC markers and the loss of podocyte markers in isolated glomeruli. Inhibition of miR-193a in a mouse model of nephrotoxic nephritis resulted in reduced crescent formation and decreased proteinuria. Together, these results show the establishment of a human PEC line and suggest that miR-193a functions as a master switch, such that glomerular epithelial cells with high levels of miR-193a adopt a PEC phenotype and cells with low levels of miR-193a adopt a podocyte phenotype. miR-193a–mediated maintenance of PECs in an undifferentiated reactive state might be a prerequisite for PEC proliferation and migration in crescent formation. PMID:25270065

  3. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Person, Rachel J; Ngalame, Ntube N Olive; Makia, Ngome L; Bell, Matthew W; Waalkes, Michael P; Tokar, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer.

  4. Cadherin 13: Human cis-Regulation and Selectively Altered Addiction Phenotypes and Cerebral Cortical Dopamine in Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna; Hartstein, G Luke; Bukhari, Mohammad O; Baumann, Michael H; Katz, Jonathan; Hall, F Scott; Arnold, Elizabeth R; Flax, Shaun; Riley, Anthony; Rivero, Olga; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Troncoso, Juan; Ranscht, Barbara; Uhl, George R

    2016-01-01

    The cadherin 13 (CDH13) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule likely to influence development and connections of brain circuits that modulate addiction, locomotion and cognition, including those that involve midbrain dopamine neurons. Human CDH13 mRNA expression differs by more than 80% in postmortem cerebral cortical samples from individuals with different CDH13 genotypes, supporting examination of mice with altered CDH13 expression as models for common human variation at this locus. Constitutive CDH13 knockout mice display evidence for changed cocaine reward: shifted dose response relationship in tests of cocaine-conditioned place preference using doses that do not alter cocaine-conditioned taste aversion. Reduced adult CDH13 expression in conditional knockouts also alters cocaine reward in ways that correlate with individual differences in cortical CDH13 mRNA levels. In control and comparison behavioral assessments, knockout mice display modestly quicker acquisition of rotarod and water maze tasks, with a trend toward faster acquisition of 5-choice serial reaction time tasks that otherwise displayed no genotype-related differences. They display significant differences in locomotion in some settings, with larger effects in males. In assessments of brain changes that might contribute to these behavioral differences, there are selective alterations of dopamine levels, dopamine/metabolite ratios, dopaminergic fiber densities and mRNA encoding the activity dependent transcription factor npas4 in cerebral cortex of knockout mice. These novel data and previously reported human associations of CDH13 variants with addiction, individual differences in responses to stimulant administration and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) phenotypes suggest that levels of CDH13 expression, through mechanisms likely to include effects on mesocortical dopamine, influence stimulant reward and may contribute modestly to cognitive and locomotor phenotypes relevant to ADHD.

  5. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    PubMed

    Etcoff, Nancy L; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E; Vickery, Sarah A; House, David M

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  6. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  7. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    PubMed

    Etcoff, Nancy L; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E; Vickery, Sarah A; House, David M

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  8. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    PubMed Central

    Etcoff, Nancy L.; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  9. Metabolic and Behavioural Phenotypes in Nestin-Cre Mice Are Caused by Hypothalamic Expression of Human Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Pruniau, Vincent P. E. G.; Stijnen, Pieter; de Faudeur, Geoffroy; Tuand, Krizia; Meulemans, Sandra; Serneels, Lutgarde; Schraenen, Anica; Schuit, Frans; Creemers, John W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Nestin-Cre driver mouse line has mild hypopituitarism, reduced body weight, a metabolic phenotype and reduced anxiety. Although several causes have been suggested, a comprehensive explanation is still lacking. In this study we examined the molecular mechanisms leading to this compound phenotype. Upon generation of the Nestin-Cre mice, the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene was inserted downstream of the Cre recombinase to ensure efficient transgene expression. As a result, hGH is expressed in the hypothalamus. This results in the auto/paracrine activation of the GH receptor as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and reduced expression of growth hormone releasing hormone (Ghrh). Low Ghrh levels cause hypopituitarism consistent with the observed mouse growth hormone (mGH) deficiency. mGH deficiency caused reduced activation of the GH receptor and hence reduced phosphorylation of STAT5 in the liver. This led to decreased levels of hepatic Igf-1 mRNA and consequently postnatal growth retardation. Furthermore, genes involved in lipid uptake and synthesis, such as CD36 and very low-density lipoprotein receptor were upregulated, resulting in liver steatosis. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the unexpected expression of hGH in the hypothalamus of Nestin-Cre mice which is able to activate both the GH receptor and the prolactin receptor. Increased hypothalamic GH receptor signaling explains the observed hypopituitarism, reduced growth and metabolic phenotype of Nestin-Cre mice. Activation of either receptor is consistent with reduced anxiety. PMID:26275221

  10. Shared alterations in NK cell frequency, phenotype, and function in chronic human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3- CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56(dim) cell fraction compared to CD56(bright) cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56(dim) NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections. PMID:16160163

  11. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  12. Release of Tensile Strain on Engineered Human Tendon Tissue Disturbs Cell Adhesions, Changes Matrix Architecture, and Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Monika L.; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja M.; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro-inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors showed a contrasting response with a clear drop in integrin subunit α11 mRNA and protein expression, and an increase in α2 integrin mRNA and protein levels. Further, specific markers for tendon cell differentiation declined and normal tendon architecture was disturbed, whereas pro-inflammatory molecules were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads to a decrease in phenotypical markers for tendon, while expression of pro-inflammatory mediators is induced. PMID:24465881

  13. A base substitution in the promoter associated with the human haptoglobin 2-1 modified phenotype decreases transcriptional activity and responsiveness to interleukin-6 in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.J.; Maeda, N. )

    1993-05-01

    An A-to-C base substitution at nucleotide position -61 in the promoter region of the human haptoglobin gene (Hp) has been shown to be strongly associated with the haptoglobin 2-1 modified (Hp2-1mod) phenotype. In order to investigate whether this base substitution is the cause of reduced expression of the Hp[sup 2] allele relative to the Hp[sup 1] allele in individuals with the Hp2-1mod phenotype, the authors used the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) expression system to evaluate promoter function. In HepG2 cells, which normally express their endogenous haptoglobin genes, CAT plasmid constructs with the -61C base change in the promoter had about 10-fold-lower transcriptional activity after transfection than did the Hp control construct. The -61C substitution also rendered the construct unresponsive to treatment by interleukin-6 after transfection into Hep3B2 cells, which normally do not express haptoglobin but do so in response to stimulation by acute-phase reactants. In addition, two base substitutions, T to A and A to G, at positions -104 and -55G, respectively, in the promoter region of the Hp[sup 1] allele, are also associated with the Hp2-1mod phenotype. CAT constructs with both substitutions (-104A-55G) and with one substitution (-55G) showed activity similar to that in the Hp control when transfected into both HepG2 and Hep3B2 cells, although interleukin-6 induction was less than with the Hp control construct. These results further support the hypothesis that the Hp2-1mod phenotype results, in part, from the -61C mutation in the promoter region of the Hp[sup 2] gene.

  14. A novel low-profile ventriculoamniotic shunt for foetal aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanfei; Emery, Stephen P; Maxey, Antonina P; Gu, Xinzhu; Wagner, William R; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    This study proposed a novel ventriculoamniotic shunt device for foetal aqueductal stenosis treatment fabricated with 3Fr or 4Fr size catheters that have a longitudinal bending stiffness with kink resistance, sufficient luminal area for cerebrospinal fluid drainage and capacity for valve integration. Computational flow dynamics studies were carried out to optimise the device design, including size of the lumen and length of the device. An in vitro pressure and flow rate measurement test circuit was constructed to assess the high pressure relieving functionality of draining cerebrospinal fluid from foetal brain. Additionally, a resistance force measurement test platform was built to quantitatively evaluate the anchor performance of various geometric designs. The valve functionality was qualitatively evaluated through the visualisation of the flow patterns in the amniotic sac with injected red coloured fluid under stereomicroscopy. These in vitro results demonstrate the feasibility of the ventriculoamniotic shunt device designed for placement in the foetal brain. PMID:27004923

  15. Mutations in the human UBR1 gene and the associated phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sukalo, Maja; Fiedler, Ariane; Guzmán, Celina; Spranger, Stephanie; Addor, Marie-Claude; McHeik, Jiad N; Oltra Benavent, Manuel; Cobben, Jan M; Gillis, Lynette A; Shealy, Amy G; Deshpande, Charu; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Everman, David B; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Liebelt, Jan; Keller, Klaus-Michael; Bertola, Débora Romeo; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Bergmann, Carsten; Liu, Zhifeng; Düker, Gesche; Rezaei, Nima; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Oğur, Gönül; Alrajoudi, Abdullah; Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Richmond, Erick J; Kirbiyik, Ozgür; Ranganath, Prajnya; Singh, Ankur; Godbole, Koumudi; Ali, Fouad A M; Alves, Crésio; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Witt, Heiko; Zenker, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, typical facial features, dental anomalies, hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, scalp defects, urogenital and anorectal anomalies, short stature, and cognitive impairment of variable degree. This syndrome is caused by a defect of the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBR1, which is part of the proteolytic N-end rule pathway. Herein, we review previously reported (n = 29) and a total of 31 novel UBR1 mutations in relation to the associated phenotype in patients from 50 unrelated families. Mutation types include nonsense, frameshift, splice site, missense, and small in-frame deletions consistent with the hypothesis that loss of UBR1 protein function is the molecular basis of JBS. There is an association of missense mutations and small in-frame deletions with milder physical abnormalities and a normal intellectual capacity, thus suggesting that at least some of these may represent hypomorphic UBR1 alleles. The review of clinical data of a large number of molecularly confirmed JBS cases allows us to define minimal clinical criteria for the diagnosis of JBS. For all previously reported and novel UBR1 mutations together with their clinical data, a mutation database has been established at LOVD.

  16. Reversion of the differentiated phenotype and maturation block in Sertoli cells in pathological human testis.

    PubMed

    Steger, K; Rey, R; Louis, F; Kliesch, S; Behre, H M; Nieschlag, E; Hoepffner, W; Bailey, D; Marks, A; Bergmann, M

    1999-01-01

    To study the relationship between abnormal Sertoli cell differentiation and spermatogenic impairment, we examined the expression of Sertoli cell markers normally lost at puberty, cytokeratin 18 (CK18), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and M2A antigen, in three children (aged 1-2 years), 50 adults (aged 19-45 years) with obstructive or non-obstructive azoospermia or oligozoospermia, and six patients (aged 1-18 years) with 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. There was CK18 and/or AMH expression, but never M2A antigen expression, associated with spermatogonial arrest or Sertoli cell-only (SCO) syndrome in infertile men. Loss of M2A antigen suggests the transition of Sertoli cells to an adult phenotype, while CK18 and/or AMH expression may be a manifestation of de-differentiation of Sertoli cells. In 5 alpha-reductase deficiency, there was a sequential loss of CK18, M2A antigen and AMH around puberty, associated with partial spermatogenesis. The persistence of immature Sertoli cells expressing M2A antigen was associated with prepubertal seminiferous cords and SCO syndrome. Therefore, 5 alpha-reductase deficiency may prevent the maturation of Sertoli cells, resulting in impairment of spermatogenesis, and loss of M2A antigen expression coincides with a critical step in the Sertoli cell maturation. High follicle stimulating hormone concentrations due to failure of normal Sertoli cell differentiation indicate a normal development pattern of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  17. PhenoScanner: a database of human genotype–phenotype associations

    PubMed Central

    Staley, James R.; Blackshaw, James; Kamat, Mihir A.; Ellis, Steve; Surendran, Praveen; Sun, Benjamin B.; Paul, Dirk S.; Freitag, Daniel; Burgess, Stephen; Danesh, John; Young, Robin; Butterworth, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: PhenoScanner is a curated database of publicly available results from large-scale genetic association studies. This tool aims to facilitate ‘phenome scans’, the cross-referencing of genetic variants with many phenotypes, to help aid understanding of disease pathways and biology. The database currently contains over 350 million association results and over 10 million unique genetic variants, mostly single nucleotide polymorphisms. It is accompanied by a web-based tool that queries the database for associations with user-specified variants, providing results according to the same effect and non-effect alleles for each input variant. The tool provides the option of searching for trait associations with proxies of the input variants, calculated using the European samples from 1000 Genomes and Hapmap. Availability and Implementation: PhenoScanner is available at www.phenoscanner.medschl.cam.ac.uk. Contact: jrs95@medschl.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27318201

  18. Protein O-mannosylation in animal development and physiology: from human disorders to Drosophila phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Naosuke; Lyalin, Dmitry; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2010-01-01

    Protein O-mannosylation has a profound effect on the development and physiology of mammalian organisms. Mutations in genes affecting O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis result in congenital muscular dystrophies. The main pathological mechanism triggered by O-mannosylation defects is a compromised interaction of cells with the extracellular matrix due to abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan impairs its ligand-binding activity and results in muscle degeneration and failure of neuronal migration. Recent experiments revealed the existence of compensatory mechanisms that could ameliorate defects of O-mannosylation. However, these mechanisms remain poorly understood. O-mannosylation and dystroglycan pathway genes show remarkable evolutionary conservation in a wide range of metazoans. Mutations and downregulation of these genes in zebrafish and Drosophila result in muscle defects and degeneration, also causing neurological phenotypes, which suggests that O-mannosylation has similar functions in mammals and lower animals. Thus, future studies in genetically tractable model organisms, such as zebrafish and Drosophila, should help to reveal molecular and genetic mechanisms of mammalian O-mannosylation and its role in the regulation of dystroglycan function. PMID:20362685

  19. Sequence to Medical Phenotypes: A Framework for Interpretation of Human Whole Genome DNA Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Frederick E.; Grove, Megan E.; Priest, James R.; Waggott, Daryl; Batra, Prag; Miller, Clint L.; Wheeler, Matthew; Zia, Amin; Pan, Cuiping; Karzcewski, Konrad J.; Miyake, Christina; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Klein, Teri E.; Datta, Somalee; Altman, Russ B.; Snyder, Michael; Quertermous, Thomas; Ashley, Euan A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High throughput sequencing has facilitated a precipitous drop in the cost of genomic sequencing, prompting predictions of a revolution in medicine via genetic personalization of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. There are significant barriers to realizing this goal that are related to the difficult task of interpreting personal genetic variation. A comprehensive, widely accessible application for interpretation of whole genome sequence data is needed. Here, we present a series of methods for identification of genetic variants and genotypes with clinical associations, phasing genetic data and using Mendelian inheritance for quality control, and providing predictive genetic information about risk for rare disease phenotypes and response to pharmacological therapy in single individuals and father-mother-child trios. We demonstrate application of these methods for disease and drug response prognostication in whole genome sequence data from twelve unrelated adults, and for disease gene discovery in one father-mother-child trio with apparently simplex congenital ventricular arrhythmia. In doing so we identify clinically actionable inherited disease risk and drug response genotypes in pre-symptomatic individuals. We also nominate a new candidate gene in congenital arrhythmia, ATP2B4, and provide experimental evidence of a regulatory role for variants discovered using this framework. PMID:26448358

  20. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  1. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P.; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J.; Gathercole, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  2. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux.

  3. Sex Differences in the Association between Foetal Growth and Child Attention at Age Four: Specific Vulnerability of Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Elizabeth; Matijasevich, Alicia; Santos, Iná S.; Barros, Aluísio J. D.; Anselmi, Luciana; Barros, Fernando C.; Stein, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that impaired foetal growth may provide an early indication of increased risk of child attention problems. However, despite both foetal growth and child attention problems differing by sex, few studies have examined sex differences in this association. Furthermore, no studies have been conducted in low- and…

  4. Role of embryonic and maternal genotype on prenatal survival and foetal growth in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Naturil-Alfonso, C; Marco-Jiménez, F; Jiménez-Trigos, E; Saenz-de-Juano, M D; Viudes-de-Castro, M P; Lavara, R; Vicente, J S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of maternal and embryonic genotype on prenatal survival and foetal growth during pregnancy. Embryos were recovered at 48 h of gestation from two different donor lines (R = 46 and A = 40) and transferred to nulliparous recipient does (26 R and 24 A). Each recipient doe received six embryos into one oviduct from line R, and six embryos form line A into the other. Laparoscopy was performed at Day 14 to determine implantation rate. Recipient females were slaughter at Days 14, 24 and 30 (12, 24, and 14, respectively) to determine the number of live foetuses and the weight of live foetuses, foetal placenta and maternal placenta. A transcriptome analysis was performed to search for differences between foetal placentas at Days 14 and 24 of development. Prenatal survival at Days 14, and 24 was affected by embryonic genotype and determined by maternal genotype at Day 30. Foetal weight at Day 14 was influenced by both genotypes, being the weight higher for group A/A (0.29 ± 0.01 g vs 0.19 ± 0.01 g, for group R/R). However, both genotypes were determinant for foetal placenta weight at Day 24, while those genotypes affected maternal placenta weight at Day 30. Nevertheless, no differences in foetal placenta at transcriptome level and progesterone and IGF-I plasma levels in recipient does were found. In conclusion, results indicate that the influence of embryo and maternal genotype on the prenatal survival and growth seems to be changing over gestation.

  5. Selection for a CEACAM Receptor-Specific Binding Phenotype during Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection of the Human Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Sintsova, Anna; Wong, Henry; MacDonald, Kelly S.; Kaul, Rupert; Virji, Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    Infections by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are increasingly common, are often caused by antibiotic-resistant strains, and can result in serious and lasting sequelae, prompting the reemergence of gonococcal disease as a leading global health concern. N. gonorrhoeae is a human-restricted pathogen that primarily colonizes urogenital mucosal surfaces. Disease progression varies greatly between the sexes: men usually present with symptomatic infection characterized by a painful purulent urethral discharge, while in women, the infection is often asymptomatic, with the most severe pathology occurring when the bacteria ascend from the lower genital tract into the uterus and fallopian tubes. Classical clinical studies demonstrated that clinically infectious strains uniformly express Opa adhesins; however, their specificities were unknown at the time. While in vitro studies have since identified CEACAM proteins as the primary target of Opa proteins, the gonococcal specificity for this human family of receptors has not been addressed in the context of natural infection. In this study, we characterize a collection of low-passage-number clinical-specimen-derived N. gonorrhoeae isolates for Opa expression and assess their CEACAM-binding profiles. We report marked in vivo selection for expression of phase-variable Opa proteins that bind CEACAM1 and CEACAM5 but selection against expression of Opa variants that bind to the neutrophil-restricted decoy receptor CEACAM3. This is the first study showing phenotypic selection for distinct CEACAM-binding phenotypes in vivo, and it supports the opposing functions of CEACAMs that facilitate infection versus driving inflammation within the genital tract. PMID:25605771

  6. Manufacture of Gene-Modified Human T-Cells with a Memory Stem/Central Memory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N.; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the infusion product, and on the basis of data obtained in preclinical models, this is likely to impact the efficacy of these products. We set out to develop a good manufacturing practice (GMP) protocol that yields T-cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T-cells with more favorable properties for clinical application. Here, we show the robust clinical-scale production of human peripheral blood T-cells with an early memory phenotype that express a MART-1-specific TCR. By combining selection and stimulation using anti-CD3/CD28 beads for retroviral transduction, followed by expansion in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15, production of a well-defined clinical-scale TCR gene-modified T-cell product could be achieved. A major fraction of the T-cells generated in this fashion were shown to coexpress CD62L and CD45RA, and express CD27 and CD28, indicating a central memory or memory stemlike phenotype. Furthermore, these cells produced IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 and displayed cytolytic activity against target cells expressing the relevant antigen. The T-cell products manufactured by this robust and validated GMP production process are now undergoing testing in a phase I/IIa clinical trial in HLA-A*02:01 MART-1-positive advanced stage melanoma patients. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial protocol in which the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 has been applied for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products. PMID:25143008

  7. Phenotypic and functional characterization of macrophages with therapeutic potential generated from human cirrhotic monocytes in a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Joanna K.; Mackinnon, Alison C.; Wojtacha, Dvina; Pope, Caroline; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Burgoyne, Paul; Bailey, Laura; Pass, Chloe; Atkinson, Anne; Mcgowan, Neil W.A.; Manson, Lynn; Turner, Mark L.; Campbell, John D.M.; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Background aims Macrophages have complex roles in the liver. The aim of this study was to compare profiles of human monocyte-derived macrophages between controls and cirrhotic patients, to determine whether chronic inflammation affects precursor number or the phenotype, with the eventual aim to develop a cell therapy for cirrhosis. Methods Infusion of human macrophages in a murine liver fibrosis model demonstrated a decrease in markers of liver injury (alanine transaminase, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β, α-smooth muscle actin, phosphatidylserine receptor) and an increase in markers of liver regeneration (matrix metalloproteinases [MMP]-9, MMP-12 and TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis). CD14+ monocytes were then isolated from controls. Monocytes were matured into macrophages for 7 days using a Good Manufacturing Practice–compatible technique. Results There was no significant difference between the mean number of CD14+ monocytes isolated from cirrhotic patients (n = 9) and controls (n = 10); 2.8 ± SEM 0.54 × 108 and 2.5 ± 0.56 × 108, respectively. The mean yield of mature macrophages cultured was also not significantly different between cirrhotic patients and controls (0.9 × 108 ± 0.38 × 108, with more than 90% viability and 0.65 × 108 ± 0.16 × 108, respectively. Maturation to macrophages resulted in up-regulation of a number of genes (MMP-9, CCL2, interleukin [IL]-10 and TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis). A cytokine and chemokine polymerase chain reaction array, comparing the control and cirrhotic macrophages, revealed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions Macrophages can be differentiated from cirrhotic patients' apheresis-derived CD14 monocytes and develop the same pro-resolution phenotype as control macrophages, indicating their suitability for clinical therapy. PMID:26342993

  8. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin isolates from cattle and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance (AR), particularly multi-drug resistance (MDR), is of global concern. Salmonella causes approximately 93.8 million human infections worldwide/year including 1.2 million cases in the US. An increase in both AR and MDR among some serotypes has been observed. Sa...

  9. Endogenous myoglobin in human breast cancer is a hallmark of luminal cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, G; Rose, M; Geisler, C; Fritzsche, F R; Gerhardt, J; Lüke, C; Ladhoff, A-M; Knüchel, R; Dietel, M; Moch, H; Varga, Z; Theurillat, J-P; Gorr, T A; Dahl, E

    2010-01-01

    Background: We aimed to clarify the incidence and the clinicopathological value of non-muscle myoglobin (Mb) in a large cohort of non-invasive and invasive breast cancer cases. Methods: Matched pairs of breast tissues from 10 patients plus 17 breast cell lines were screened by quantitative PCR for Mb mRNA. In addition, 917 invasive and 155 non-invasive breast cancer cases were analysed by immunohistochemistry for Mb expression and correlated to clinicopathological parameters and basal molecular characteristics including oestrogen receptor-α (ERα)/progesteron receptor (PR)/HER2, fatty acid synthase (FASN), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), HIF-2α, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). The spatial relationship of Mb and ERα or FASN was followed up by double immunofluorescence. Finally, the effects of estradiol treatment and FASN inhibition on Mb expression in breast cancer cells were analysed. Results: Myoglobin mRNA was found in a subset of breast cancer cell lines; in microdissected tumours Mb transcript was markedly upregulated. In all, 71% of tumours displayed Mb protein expression in significant correlation with a positive hormone receptor status and better prognosis. In silico data mining confirmed higher Mb levels in luminal-type breast cancer. Myoglobin was also correlated to FASN, HIF-2α and CAIX, but not to HIF-1α or GLUT1, suggesting hypoxia to participate in its regulation. Double immunofluorescence showed a cellular co-expression of ERα or FASN and Mb. In addition, Mb levels were modulated on estradiol treatment and FASN inhibition in a cell model. Conclusion: We conclude that in breast cancer, Mb is co-expressed with ERα and co-regulated by oestrogen signalling and can be considered a hallmark of luminal breast cancer phenotype. This and its possible new role in fatty acid metabolism may have fundamental implications for our understanding of Mb in solid tumours. PMID:20531416

  10. [Investigation of metabolic kinetics and reaction phenotyping of ligustrazin by using liver microsomes and recombinant human enzymes].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Shen, Guo-Lin; Li, Hua; Gao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic characteristics of ligustrazin (TMPz) in liver microsomes were investigated in the present study. The reaction phenotyping of TMPz metabolism was also identified by in vitro assessment using recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) and UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). TMPz was incubated at 37 degrees C with human (HLM) and rat liver microsomes (RLM) in the presence of different co-factors. The metabolic stability and enzyme kinetics of TMPz were studied by determining its remaining concentrations with a LC-MS/MS method. TMPz was only metabolically eliminated in the microsomes with NADPH or NADPH+UDPGA. In the HLM and RLM with NADPH+UDPGA, t1/2, K(m) and V(max) of TMPz were 94.24 +/- 4.53 and 105.07 +/- 9.44 min, 22.74 +/- 1.89 and 33.09 +/- 2.74 micromol x L(-1), 253.50 +/- 10.06 and 190.40 +/- 8.35 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) (protein), respectively. TMPz showed a slightly higher metabolic rate in HLM than that in RLM. Its primary oxidative metabolites, 2-hydroxymethyl-3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazine (HTMP), could undergo glucuronide conjugation. The CYP reaction phenotyping of TMPz metabolism was identified using a panel of recombinant CYP isoforms (rCYP) and specific CYP inhibitors in HLM. CYP1A2, 2C9 and 3A4 were found to be the major CYP isoforms involved in TMPz metabolism. Their individual contributions were assessed b) using the method of the total normalized rate to be 19.32%, 27.79% and 52.90%, respectively. It was observed that these CYP isoforms mediated the formation of HTMP in rCYP incubation. The UGT reaction phenotyping of HTMP glucuronidation was also investigated preliminarily by using a panel of 6 UGT isoforms (rUGT). UGT1A1, 1A4 and 1A6 were the predominant isoforms mediated the HTMP glucuronidation. The results above indicate that the metabolism of TMPz involves multiple enzymes mediated phase I and phase II reactions.

  11. UV-sensitive rodent mutant cell lines of complementation groups 6 and 8 differ phenotypically from their human counterparts.

    PubMed

    Collins, A R; Mitchell, D L; Zunino, A; de Wit, J; Busch, D

    1997-01-01

    Rodent UV-sensitive mutant cell lines of complementation groups 6 and 8 are the genetic counterparts of human Cockayne syndrome CS-B and CS-A, respectively. The original mutant in this group, UV61, was described as defective in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer removal after high doses of UV. We have examined the responses of several cell lines from group 6 to low doses of UV irradiation, and find that these mutants have wild-type capacity for DNA repair as indicated by incision, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, and (6-4) photoproduct removal. ERCC6, the product of the gene defective in CS-B and group 6 mutants, is implicated in the regulation of repair of actively transcribed genes in Cockayne syndrome; however, this protein clearly is not required for the processing of low levels of damage in CHO cells, which occurs remarkably efficiently, 40-50% of dimers being removed in both wild-type and group 6 mutants in 5 hours following 0.1 Jm(-2) of UV. The group 8 mutant cell line US31, on the other hand, is very deficient in repair of UV damage, showing a more extreme phenotype than is seen in the corresponding human syndrome CS-A. In both complementation groups, expression of mutations in a gene involved in regulation of DNA repair takes very different forms in human and rodent cells. PMID:9118967

  12. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. Lifespan Extension and Sustained Expression of Stem Cell Phenotype of Human Breast Epithelial Stem Cells in a Medium with Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai-Hung; Kao, An-Pei; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Ta-Chin

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the isolation and culture of a human breast epithelial cell type with stem cell characteristics (Type I HBEC) from reduction mammoplasty using the MSU-1 medium. Subsequently, we have developed several different normal human adult stem cell types from different tissues using the K-NAC medium. In this study, we determined whether this low calcium K-NAC medium with antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine and L-ascorbic acid-2-phosphate) is a better medium to grow human breast epithelial cells. The results clearly show that the K-NAC medium is a superior medium for prolonged growth (cumulative population doubling levels ranged from 30 to 40) of normal breast epithelial cells that expressed stem cell phenotypes. The characteristics of these mammary stem cells include deficiency in gap junctional intercellular communication, expression of Oct-4, and the ability to differentiate into basal epithelial cells and to form organoid showing mammary ductal and terminal end bud-like structures. Thus, this new method of growing Type I HBECs will be very useful in future studies of mammary development, breast carcinogenesis, chemoprevention, and cancer therapy. PMID:27807451

  14. Long-term neural and physiological phenotyping of a single human.

    PubMed

    Poldrack, Russell A; Laumann, Timothy O; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi; Gregory, Brenda; Hover, Ashleigh; Chen, Mei-Yen; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Luci, Jeffrey; Joo, Sung Jun; Boyd, Ryan L; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Simpson, Zack Booth; Caven, Thomas; Sochat, Vanessa; Shine, James M; Gordon, Evan; Snyder, Abraham Z; Adeyemo, Babatunde; Petersen, Steven E; Glahn, David C; Reese Mckay, D; Curran, Joanne E; Göring, Harald H H; Carless, Melanie A; Blangero, John; Dougherty, Robert; Leemans, Alexander; Handwerker, Daniel A; Frick, Laurie; Marcotte, Edward M; Mumford, Jeanette A

    2015-12-09

    Psychiatric disorders are characterized by major fluctuations in psychological function over the course of weeks and months, but the dynamic characteristics of brain function over this timescale in healthy individuals are unknown. Here, as a proof of concept to address this question, we present the MyConnectome project. An intensive phenome-wide assessment of a single human was performed over a period of 18 months, including functional and structural brain connectivity using magnetic resonance imaging, psychological function and physical health, gene expression and metabolomics. A reproducible analysis workflow is provided, along with open access to the data and an online browser for results. We demonstrate dynamic changes in brain connectivity over the timescales of days to months, and relations between brain connectivity, gene expression and metabolites. This resource can serve as a testbed to study the joint dynamics of human brain and metabolic function over time, an approach that is critical for the development of precision medicine strategies for brain disorders.

  15. Gene expression patterns associated with the metastatic phenotype in rodent and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Nestl, A; Von Stein, O D; Zatloukal, K; Thies, W G; Herrlich, P; Hofmann, M; Sleeman, J P

    2001-02-15

    Using subtractive technology, we have generated metastasis-associated gene expression profiles for rat mammary and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Several genes whose expression is thought to be related to tumor progression such as c-Met, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, ezrin, HMG-1, oncomodulin, cathepsin, and caveolin were thereby isolated. Half of the metastasis-associated clones showed no significant homology to genes with known function. Notably, several of the metastasis-associated clones were also expressed in metastatic lines but not in nonmetastatic lines of other tumor models. Furthermore, in situ hybridization using selected clones documents the relevance of these results for human cancer because strong expression in tumor cells including metastases was detected in human colorectal cancer samples and, to a lesser extent, in mammary cancer samples. These data support the concept that tumors express a "metastatic program" of genes. PMID:11245467

  16. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity.

  17. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S.; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity. PMID:26384561

  18. Reward sensitivity: issues of measurement, and achieving consilience between human and animal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Stephens, David N; Duka, Theodora; Crombag, Hans S; Cunningham, Christopher L; Heilig, Markus; Crabbe, John C

    2010-04-01

    Reward is a concept fundamental to discussions of drug abuse and addiction. The idea that altered sensitivity to either drug-reward, or to rewards in general, contributes to, or results from, drug-taking is a common theme in several theories of addiction. However, the concept of reward is problematic in that it is used to refer to apparently different behavioural phenomena, and even to diverse neurobiological processes (reward pathways). Whether these different phenomena are different behavioural expressions of a common underlying process is not established, and much research suggests that there may be only loose relationships among different aspects of reward. Measures of rewarding effects of drugs in humans often depend upon subjective reports. In animal studies, such insights are not available, and behavioural measures must be relied upon to infer rewarding effects of drugs or other events. In such animal studies, but also in many human methods established to objectify measures of reward, many other factors contribute to the behaviour being studied. For that reason, studying the biological (including genetic) bases of performance of tasks that ostensibly measure reward cannot provide unequivocal answers. The current overview outlines the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches that hinder the conciliation of cross-species studies of the genetics of reward sensitivity and the dysregulation of reward processes by drugs of abuse. Some suggestions are made as to how human and animal studies may be made to address more closely homologous behaviours, even if those processes are only partly able to isolate 'reward' from other factors contributing to behavioural output.

  19. An endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis inversely correlates with side population phenotype and function in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, H; Bourboulia, D; Jensen-Taubman, S; Isaac, B; Wei, B; Stetler-Stevenson, W G

    2014-02-27

    The side population (SP) in human lung cancer cell lines and tumors is enriched with cancer stem cells. An endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis known as tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), characterized for its ability to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), has been shown by several laboratories to impede tumor progression through MMP-dependent or -independent mechanisms. We recently reported that forced expression of TIMP-2, as well as the modified form Ala+TIMP-2 (that lacks MMP inhibitory activity) significantly blocks growth of A549 human lung cancer cells in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying TIMP-2 antitumor effects are not fully characterized. Here, we examine the hypothesis that the TIMP-2 antitumor activity may involve regulation of the SP in human lung cancer cells. Indeed, using Hoechst dye efflux assay and flow cytometry, as well as quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis, we found that endogenous TIMP-2 mRNA levels showed a significant inverse correlation with SP fraction size in six non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. In A549 cells expressing increased levels of TIMP-2, a significant decrease in SP was observed, and this decrease was associated with lowered gene expression of ABCG2, ABCB1 and AKR1C1. Functional analysis of A549 cells showed that TIMP-2 overexpression increased chemosensitivity to cytotoxic drugs. The SP isolated from TIMP-2-overexpressing A549 cells also demonstrated impaired migratory capacity compared with the SP from empty vector control. More importantly, our data provide strong evidence that these TIMP-2 functions occur independent of MMP inhibition, as A549 cells overexpressing Ala+TIMP-2 exhibited identical behavior to those overexpressing TIMP-2 alone. Our findings provide the first indication that TIMP-2 modulates SP phenotype and function, and suggests that TIMP-2 may act as an endogenous suppressor of the SP in human lung cancer cells.

  20. Short-term mechanical stretch fails to differentiate human adipose-derived stem cells into cardiovascular cell phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We and others have previously demonstrated that adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) transplantation improve cardiac dysfunction post-myocardium infarction (MI) under hemodynamic stress in rats. The beneficial effects appear to be associated with pleiotropic factors due to a complex interplay between the transplanted ASCs and the microenvironment in the absence of cell transdifferentiation. In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that mechanical stretch per se could change human ASCs (hASCs) into cardiovascular cell phenotypes that might influence post-MI outcomes. Methods Human ASCs were obtained from patients undergoing liposuction procedures. These cells were stretched 12%, 1Hz up to 96 hours by using Flexercell 4000 system. Protein and gene expression were evaluated to identify cardiovascular cell markers. Culture medium was analyzed to determine cell releasing factors, and contraction potential was also evaluated. Results Mechanical stretch, which is associated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, failed to induce the expression of cardiovascular cell markers in human ASCs, and mesenchymal cell surface markers (CD29; CD90) remained unchanged. hASCs and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) displayed comparable contraction ability. In addition, these cells demonstrated a profound ability to secrete an array of cytokines. These two properties of human ASCs were not influenced by mechanical stretch. Conclusions Altogether, our findings demonstrate that hASCs secrete an array of cytokines and display contraction ability even in the absence of induction of cardiovascular cell markers or the loss of mesenchymal surface markers when exposed to mechanical stretch. These properties may contribute to beneficial post-MI cardiovascular outcomes and deserve to be further explored under the controlled influence of other microenvironment components associated with myocardial infarction, such as tissue hypoxia. PMID:24885410

  1. Characterizing Phenotypes and Signaling Networks of Single Human Cells by Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Leelatian, Nalin; Diggins, Kirsten E; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Single cell mass cytometry is revolutionizing our ability to quantitatively characterize cellular biomarkers and signaling networks. Mass cytometry experiments routinely measure 25-35 features of each cell in primary human tissue samples. The relative ease with which a novice user can generate a large amount of high quality data and the novelty of the approach have created a need for example protocols, analysis strategies, and datasets. In this chapter, we present detailed protocols for two mass cytometry experiments designed as training tools. The first protocol describes detection of 26 features on the surface of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the second protocol, a mass cytometry signaling network profile measures 25 node states comprised of five key signaling effectors (AKT, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT5, and p38) quantified under five conditions (Basal, FLT3L, SCF, IL-3, and IFNγ). This chapter compares manual and unsupervised data analysis approaches, including bivariate plots, heatmaps, histogram overlays, SPADE, and viSNE. Data files in this chapter have been shared online using Cytobank ( http://www.cytobank.org/irishlab/ ). PMID:26542718

  2. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  3. Mouse-human experimental epigenetic analysis unmasks dietary targets and genetic liability for diabetic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Michael L.; Seldin, Marcus; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Lei, Xia; Kirchner, Henriette; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Rodriguez, Varenka; Drong, Alexander; Hussain, Mehboob; Lindgren, Cecilia; McCarthy, Mark; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R.; Wong, G. William; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a functional approach to investigate the epigenetics of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), we combine three lines of evidence – diet-induced epigenetic dysregulation in mouse, epigenetic conservation in humans, and T2D clinical risk evidence – to identify genes implicated in T2D pathogenesis through epigenetic mechanisms related to obesity. Beginning with dietary manipulation of genetically homogeneous mice, we identify differentially DNA-methylated genomic regions. We then replicate these results in adipose samples from lean and obese patients pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, identifying regions where both the location and direction of methylation change is conserved. These regions overlap with 27 genetic T2D risk loci, only one of which was deemed significant by GWAS alone. Functional analysis of genes associated with these regions revealed four genes with roles in insulin resistance, demonstrating the potential general utility of this approach for complementing conventional human genetic studies by integrating cross-species epigenomics and clinical genetic risk. PMID:25565211

  4. Characterizing Phenotypes and Signaling Networks of Single Human Cells by Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Leelatian, Nalin; Diggins, Kirsten E; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Single cell mass cytometry is revolutionizing our ability to quantitatively characterize cellular biomarkers and signaling networks. Mass cytometry experiments routinely measure 25-35 features of each cell in primary human tissue samples. The relative ease with which a novice user can generate a large amount of high quality data and the novelty of the approach have created a need for example protocols, analysis strategies, and datasets. In this chapter, we present detailed protocols for two mass cytometry experiments designed as training tools. The first protocol describes detection of 26 features on the surface of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the second protocol, a mass cytometry signaling network profile measures 25 node states comprised of five key signaling effectors (AKT, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT5, and p38) quantified under five conditions (Basal, FLT3L, SCF, IL-3, and IFNγ). This chapter compares manual and unsupervised data analysis approaches, including bivariate plots, heatmaps, histogram overlays, SPADE, and viSNE. Data files in this chapter have been shared online using Cytobank ( http://www.cytobank.org/irishlab/ ).

  5. Troglitazone thiol adduct formation in human liver microsomes: enzyme kinetics and reaction phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinping; Qu, Qinling; He, Bing; Shyu, Wen C; Rodrigues, A David; He, Kan

    2008-08-01

    Troglitazone (TGZ) induced hepatotoxicity has been linked to cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed reactive metabolite formation. Therefore, the kinetics and CYP specificity of reactive metabolite formation were studied using dansyl glutathione (dGSH) as a trapping agent after incubation of TGZ with human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human CYP proteins. CYP2C8 exhibited the highest rate of TGZ adduct (TGZ-dGS) formation, followed by CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP2C19. The involvement of CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 was confirmed with CYP form-selective chemical inhibitors. The impact of TGZ concentration on the rate of TGZ-dGS formation was also evaluated. In this instance, two distinctly different profiles were observed with recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. It is concluded that both CYP3A4/5 and CYP2C8 play a major role in the formation of TGZ adduct in HLM. However, the contribution of these CYPs varies depending on their relative expression and the concentration of TGZ. PMID:19356091

  6. Long-term neural and physiological phenotyping of a single human

    PubMed Central

    Poldrack, Russell A.; Laumann, Timothy O.; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi; Gregory, Brenda; Hover, Ashleigh; Chen, Mei-Yen; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Luci, Jeffrey; Joo, Sung Jun; Boyd, Ryan L.; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Simpson, Zack Booth; Caven, Thomas; Sochat, Vanessa; Shine, James M.; Gordon, Evan; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Adeyemo, Babatunde; Petersen, Steven E.; Glahn, David C.; Reese Mckay, D.; Curran, Joanne E.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Carless, Melanie A.; Blangero, John; Dougherty, Robert; Leemans, Alexander; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Frick, Laurie; Marcotte, Edward M.; Mumford, Jeanette A.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are characterized by major fluctuations in psychological function over the course of weeks and months, but the dynamic characteristics of brain function over this timescale in healthy individuals are unknown. Here, as a proof of concept to address this question, we present the MyConnectome project. An intensive phenome-wide assessment of a single human was performed over a period of 18 months, including functional and structural brain connectivity using magnetic resonance imaging, psychological function and physical health, gene expression and metabolomics. A reproducible analysis workflow is provided, along with open access to the data and an online browser for results. We demonstrate dynamic changes in brain connectivity over the timescales of days to months, and relations between brain connectivity, gene expression and metabolites. This resource can serve as a testbed to study the joint dynamics of human brain and metabolic function over time, an approach that is critical for the development of precision medicine strategies for brain disorders. PMID:26648521

  7. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-12-03

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma.

  8. Decreasing matrix modulus of PEG hydrogels induces a vascular phenotype in human cord blood stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevaiah, Shruthi; Robinson, Karyn G.; Kharkar, Prathamesh M.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Akins, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult and congenital cardiovascular diseases are significant health problems that are often managed using surgery. Bypass grafting is a principal therapy, but grafts fail at high rates due to hyperplasia, fibrosis, and atherosclerosis. Biocompatible, cellularized materials that attenuate these complications and encourage healthy microvascularization could reduce graft failure, but an improved understanding of biomaterial effects on human stem cells is needed to reach clinical utility. Our group investigates stem-cell-loaded biomaterials for placement along the adventitia of at-risk vessels and grafts. Here, the effects of substrate modulus on human CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood were evaluated. Cells were isolated by immunomagnetic separation and encapsulated in 3, 4, and 6 weight% PEG hydrogels containing 0.032% gelatin and 0.0044% fibronectin. Gels reached moduli of 0.34, 4.5, and 9.1 kPa. Cell viability approached 100%. Cell morphologies appeared similar across gels, but proliferation was significantly lower in 6 wt% gels. Expression profiling using stem cell signaling arrays indicated enhanced self-renewal and differentiation into vascular endothelium among cells in the lower weight percent gels. Thus, modulus was associated with cell proliferation and function. Gels with moduli in the low kilopascal range may be useful in stimulating cell engraftment and microvascularization of graft adventitia. PMID:26016692

  9. Reversal of multidrug resistance phenotype in human breast cancer cells using doxorubicin-liposome-microbubble complexes assisted by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiting; Yan, Fei; Jin, Qiaofeng; Li, Fei; Wu, Junru; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-28

    The circumvention of multidrug resistance (MDR) plays a critically important role in the success of chemotherapy. The aim of this work is to investigate the effectiveness and possible mechanisms of the reversal of MDR phenotype in human breast cancer cells by using doxorubicin-liposome-microbubble complexes (DLMC) assisted by ultrasound (US). DLMC is fabricated through conjugating doxorubicin (DOX)-liposome (DL) to the surface of microbubbles (MBs) via the biotin-avidin linkage. The resulting drug-loaded complexes are then characterized and incubated with MCF-7/ADR human breast cancer cells and followed by US exposure. Our results show the more rapid cellular uptake, evident enhancement of nuclear accumulation and less drug efflux in the resistant cells treated by DLMC+US than those treated by DL, DL+verapamil under the same US treatment or DLMC without US. The enhanced drug delivery and cellular uptake also associated with the increase of cytotoxicity against MCF-7/ADR cells, lower MCF-7/ADR cell viability and higher apoptotic cells. Mechanism investigations further disclose a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, enhanced DNA damage and obvious reduction of P-glycoprotein expression in the resistant cells treated with DLMC+US compared with the control cases of cells treated by DLMC, DL+US or DL+verapamil+US. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that DLMC in combination with US may provide an effective delivery of drug to sensitize cells to circumvent MDR and to enhance the therapeutic index of the chemotherapy.

  10. OSBP-Related Proteins (ORPs) in Human Adipose Depots and Cultured Adipocytes: Evidence for Impacts on the Adipocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, You; Robciuc, Marius R.; Wabitsch, Martin; Juuti, Anne; Leivonen, Marja; Ehnholm, Christian; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) homologues, ORPs, are implicated in lipid homeostatic control, vesicle transport, and cell signaling. We analyzed here the quantity of ORP mRNAs in human subcutaneous (s.c.) and visceral adipose depots, as well as in the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell model. All of the ORP mRNAs were present in the s.c and visceral adipose tissues, and the two depots shared an almost identical ORP mRNA expression pattern. SGBS adipocytes displayed a similar pattern, suggesting that the adipose tissue ORP expression pattern mainly derives from adipocytes. During SGBS cell adipogenic differentiation, ORP2, ORP3, ORP4, ORP7, and ORP8 mRNAs were down-regulated, while ORP11 was induced. To assess the impacts of ORPs on adipocyte differentiation, ORP3 and ORP8, proteins down-regulated during adipogenesis, were overexpressed in differentiating SGBS adipocytes, while ORP11, a protein induced during adipogenesis, was silenced. ORP8 overexpression resulted in reduced expression of the aP2 mRNA, while down-regulation of adiponectin and aP2 was observed in ORP11 silenced cells. Furthermore, ORP8 overexpression or silencing of ORP11 markedly decreased cellular triglyceride storage. These data identify the patterns of ORP expression in human adipose depots and SGBS adipocytes, and provide the first evidence for a functional impact of ORPs on the adipocyte phenotype. PMID:23028956

  11. Azelaic acid reduced senescence-like phenotype in photo-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts: possible implication of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Briganti, Stefania; Flori, Enrica; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Kovacs, Daniela; Camera, Emanuela; Ludovici, Matteo; Cardinali, Giorgia; Picardo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA) has been used for the treatment for inflammatory skin diseases, such as acne and rosacea. Interestingly, an improvement in skin texture has been observed after long-time treatment with AzA. We previously unrevealed that anti-inflammatory activity of AzA involves a specific activation of PPARγ, a nuclear receptor that plays a relevant role in inflammation and even in ageing processes. As rosacea has been considered as a photo-aggravated disease, we investigated the ability of AzA to counteract stress-induced premature cell senescence (SIPS). We employed a SIPS model based on single exposure of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) to UVA and 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA), previously reported to activate a senescence-like phenotype, including long-term growth arrest, flattened morphology and increased synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). We found that PUVA-treated HDFs grown in the presence of AzA maintained their morphology and reduced MMP-1 release and SA-β-galactosidase-positive cells. Moreover, AzA induced a reduction in ROS generation, an up-modulation of antioxidant enzymes and a decrease in cell membrane lipid damages in PUVA-treated HDFs. Further evidences of AzA anti-senescence effect were repression of p53 and p21, increase in type I pro-collagen and abrogation of the enhanced expression of growth factors, such as HGF and SCF. Interestingly, PUVA-SIPS showed a decreased activation of PPARγ and AzA counteracted this effect, suggesting that AzA effect involves PPARγ modulation. All together these data showed that AzA interferes with PUVA-induced senescence-like phenotype and its ability to activate PPAR-γ provides relevant insights into the anti-senescence mechanism. PMID:23278893

  12. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I.

    PubMed

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N; Schoeb, Trenton R; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Bedwell, David M; Zinn, Kurt R; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H; Korf, Bruce R; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1(Arg681*) and missense NF1(Gly848Arg) mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1(Gly848Arg) mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1(Arg681*) mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1(Arg681*) allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf1(4F/Arg681*); DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  13. A position effect on TRPS1 is associated with Ambras syndrome in humans and the Koala phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fantauzzo, Katherine A.; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; You, Yun; Mentzer, Sarah E.; Baumeister, Friedrich A.M.; Cianfarani, Stefano; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Warburton, Dorothy; Sundberg, John P.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    Ambras syndrome (AS) is a rare form of congenital hypertrichosis with excessive hair on the shoulders, face and ears. Cytogenetic studies have previously implicated an association with rearrangements of chromosome 8. Here we define an 11.5 Mb candidate interval for AS on chromosome 8q based on cytogenetic breakpoints in three patients. TRPS1, a gene within this interval, was deleted in a patient with an 8q23 chromosomal rearrangement, while its expression was significantly downregulated in another patient with an inversion breakpoint 7.3 Mb downstream of TRPS1. Here, we describe the first potential long-range position effect on the expression of TRPS1. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which Trps1 affects the hair follicle, we performed a detailed analysis of the hair abnormalities in Koa mice, a mouse model of hypertrichosis. We found that the proximal breakpoint of the Koa inversion is located 791 kb upstream of Trps1. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Trps1 expression levels are reduced in Koa mutant mice at the sites of pathology for the phenotype. We determined that the Koa inversion creates a new Sp1 binding site and translocates additional Sp1 binding sites within a highly conserved stretch spanning the proximal breakpoint, providing a potential mechanism for the position effect. Collectively, these results describe a position effect that downregulates TRPS1 expression as the probable cause of hypertrichosis in AS in humans and the Koa phenotype in mice. PMID:18713754

  14. Genotype and Phenotype Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Resistance to Enfuvirtide during Long-Term Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Menzo, Stefano; Castagna, Antonella; Monachetti, Alessia; Hasson, Hamid; Danise, Anna; Carini, Elisabetta; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Lazzarin, Adriano; Clementi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide has recently been introduced into clinical practice and has exhibited efficient anti-HIV-1 activity in combination with other antiretroviral agents. In the present study, we addressed the effect of long-term treatment with enfuvirtide on the intrahost evolution of HIV-1. The genotype and phenotype patterns and the relative replication capacity (rRC) of enfuvirtide-resistant HIV-1 mutants were evaluated in samples from 11 subjects (7 virological nonresponders and 4 responders) who received the compound for more than 1 year in combination with different regimens. Selection of one or more mutations clustering in a sequence (amino acids 36 to 45) of the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat was observed in samples from the seven virological nonresponders but not in those from responders. In two subjects who discontinued enfuvirtide, reversion of the resistant genotype was detected within 3 months. Recombinant clones bearing mutated gp41 sequences displayed reduced susceptibilities to enfuvirtide, with the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 0.6 to 12.8 μg/ml, whereas the IC50 for isolates with baseline sequences was 0.013 ± 0.010 μg/ml. Interestingly, long-term monitoring of resistant variants provided evidence that ongoing adaptation to the drug is paralleled by phenotypic changes. A limited drop in the rRC in the absence of drug was observed for clones from four of the seven nonresponders bearing mutations associated with resistance. Overall, the data indicate that the different genotype patterns associated with a detectable degree of HIV-1 resistance to enfuvirtide generated during long-term treatments are characterized by a substantially low genetic barrier, possible ongoing adaptation with increased degrees of resistance, and limited influence on the viral rRC. PMID:15328081

  15. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N.; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Messiaen, Ludwine M.; Bedwell, David M.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H.; Korf, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  16. Recent insights into cerebral cavernous malformations: animal models of CCM and the human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aubrey C.; Li, Dean Y.; Berg, Michel J.; Whitehead, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are common vascular lesions of the central nervous system that predispose to seizures, focal neurologic deficits and potentially fatal hemorrhagic stroke. Human genetic studies have identified three genes associated with the disease and biochemical studies of these proteins have identified interaction partners and possible signaling pathways. A variety of animal models of CCM have been described to help translate the cellular and biochemical insights into a better understanding of disease mechanism. In this minireview, we discuss the contributions of animal models to our growing understanding of the biology of cavernous malformations, including the elucidation of the cellular context of CCM protein actions and the in vivo confirmation of abnormal endothelial cell–cell interactions. Challenges and progress towards developing a faithful model of CCM biology are reviewed. PMID:20096037

  17. A nuclear-directed human pancreatic ribonuclease (PE5) targets the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Ribonucleases represent a new class of antitumor RNA-damaging drugs. However, many wild-type members of the vertebrate secreted ribonuclease family are not cytotoxic because they are not able to evade the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor. We previously engineered the human pancreatic ribonuclease to direct it to the cell nucleus where the inhibitor is not present. The best characterized variant is PE5 that kills cancer cells through apoptosis mediated by the p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and the inactivation of JNK. Here, we have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify PE5 regulated genes on the NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cell line. RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the expression microarray findings. The results show that PE5 cause pleiotropic effects. Among them, it is remarkable the down-regulation of multiple genes that code for enzymes involved in deregulated metabolic pathways in cancer cells.

  18. A nuclear-directed human pancreatic ribonuclease (PE5) targets the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleases represent a new class of antitumor RNA-damaging drugs. However, many wild-type members of the vertebrate secreted ribonuclease family are not cytotoxic because they are not able to evade the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor. We previously engineered the human pancreatic ribonuclease to direct it to the cell nucleus where the inhibitor is not present. The best characterized variant is PE5 that kills cancer cells through apoptosis mediated by the p21WAF1/CIP1 induction and the inactivation of JNK. Here, we have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify PE5 regulated genes on the NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cell line. RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the expression microarray findings. The results show that PE5 cause pleiotropic effects. Among them, it is remarkable the down-regulation of multiple genes that code for enzymes involved in deregulated metabolic pathways in cancer cells. PMID:26918450

  19. Knock-in of human BACE1 cleaves murine APP and reiterates Alzheimer-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Plucińska, Kaja; Crouch, Barry; Koss, David; Robinson, Lianne; Siebrecht, Michael; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2014-08-01

    Key neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are elevated levels of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) species generated via amyloid precursor protein (APP) endoproteolysis and cleavage by the rate-limiting β-site enzyme 1 (BACE1). Because rodents do not develop amyloid pathologies, we here investigated whether AD-like endophenotypes can be created in mice by expression of human bace1. To avoid pitfalls of existing models, we introduced hbace1 via knock-in under the control of the CaMKII α promoter into the safe HPRT locus. We report amyloidogenic processing of murine APP in the hBACE1 mice (termed PLB4), resulting in the formation of toxic APP metabolites that accumulate intra- and extraneuronally in hippocampus and cortex. Pronounced accumulation of Aβ*56 and Aβ hexamers in the absence of plaque deposition was detected in brain tissue from symptomatic PLB4 mice. Heightened levels of inflammation (gliosis) also appeared in several AD-related brain regions (dentate gyrus, hippocampal area CA1, piriform and parietal cortices) at 6 and 12 months of age. Behaviorally, deficits in habituation to a novel environment and semantic-like memory (social transmission of food preference) were detected from 3 to 4 months of age. Impairments in spatial learning strategies in long-term reference (water maze) and working memory (Y-maze) tasks presented at 6 months, and were distinct from reductions in locomotor activity and anxiety. Overall, our data indicate for the first time that targeted, subtle forebrain-specific expression through single gene knock-in of hBACE1 is sufficient to generate AD-relevant cognitive impairments amid corresponding histopathologies, confirming human BACE as the key parameter in amyloid pathogenesis. PMID:25100603

  20. Pedagogically Bereft! Improving Learning Outcomes for Children with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the most common non-genetic cause of learning disability, affecting around 1% of live births in Europe, and costing an estimated $2.9 million per individual across their lifespan. In adulthood, non-reversible brain damage is often compounded by secondary disabilities in adulthood, such as mental health…

  1. "One More for My Baby": Foetal Alcohol Syndrome and Its Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Wendy; Wells, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Foetal alcohol syndrome has been described as the commonest preventable cause of mental retardation in the Western world. It refers to a pattern of malformations, growth retardation and central nervous system impairments found in children of mothers who drink large amounts of alcohol while they are pregnant. This paper describes the nature of…

  2. Frequency and Time Domain Analysis of Foetal Heart Rate Variability with Traditional Indexes: A Critical Survey.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria; Iuppariello, Luigi; Ponsiglione, Alfonso Maria; Improta, Giovanni; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of foetal heart rate and its variability (FHRV) covers an important role in assessing health of foetus. Many analysis methods have been used to get quantitative measures of FHRV. FHRV has been studied in time and in frequency domain and interesting clinical results have been obtained. Nevertheless, a standardized definition of FHRV and a precise methodology to be used for its evaluation are lacking. We carried out a literature overview about both frequency domain analysis (FDA) and time domain analysis (TDA). Then, by using simulated FHR signals, we defined the methodology for FDA. Further, employing more than 400 real FHR signals, we analysed some of the most common indexes, Short Term Variability for TDA and power content of the spectrum bands and sympathovagal balance for FDA, and evaluated their ranges of values, which in many cases are a novelty. Finally, we verified the relationship between these indexes and two important parameters: week of gestation, indicator of foetal growth, and foetal state, classified as active or at rest. Our results indicate that, according to literature, it is necessary to standardize the procedure for FHRV evaluation and to consider week of gestation and foetal state before FHR analysis. PMID:27195018

  3. Frequency and Time Domain Analysis of Foetal Heart Rate Variability with Traditional Indexes: A Critical Survey

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Maria; Iuppariello, Luigi; Ponsiglione, Alfonso Maria; Improta, Giovanni; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of foetal heart rate and its variability (FHRV) covers an important role in assessing health of foetus. Many analysis methods have been used to get quantitative measures of FHRV. FHRV has been studied in time and in frequency domain and interesting clinical results have been obtained. Nevertheless, a standardized definition of FHRV and a precise methodology to be used for its evaluation are lacking. We carried out a literature overview about both frequency domain analysis (FDA) and time domain analysis (TDA). Then, by using simulated FHR signals, we defined the methodology for FDA. Further, employing more than 400 real FHR signals, we analysed some of the most common indexes, Short Term Variability for TDA and power content of the spectrum bands and sympathovagal balance for FDA, and evaluated their ranges of values, which in many cases are a novelty. Finally, we verified the relationship between these indexes and two important parameters: week of gestation, indicator of foetal growth, and foetal state, classified as active or at rest. Our results indicate that, according to literature, it is necessary to standardize the procedure for FHRV evaluation and to consider week of gestation and foetal state before FHR analysis. PMID:27195018

  4. Caregiver Perceptions of the Community Integration of Adults with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Erica; Minnes, Patricia; Lutke, Jan; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene

    2008-01-01

    Background: Adults with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) require support to be part of the community; however, most have few supports other than family and friends. The purpose of this study was to assess caregiver perceptions of community integration of adults with FASD living in British Columbia. Method: The Assimilation, Integration,…

  5. Secondary School Experiences of Individuals with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Perspectives of Parents and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duquette, Cheryll; Stodel, Emma; Fullarton, Stephanie; Hagglund, Karras

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine persistence in school among students with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) from the perspectives of the students themselves and their parents. Tinto's (1975, 1997) Student Integration Model (SIM) provided the theoretical framework for this research. This model involves an interplay between (1)…

  6. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  7. Scourge of intra-partum foetal death in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Adekanbi, Adesina Oa; Olayemi, Oladapo O; Fawole, Adeniran O; Afolabi, Kayode A

    2015-07-16

    Intra-partum foetal death has been variously defined. However, a definition adopted at a technical consultation in 2006 is employed in this review. The quality of intra-partum care is a crucial factor for pregnancy outcome for both mothers and new-borns. Intra-partum stillbirth is defined as late foetal death during labour, which clinically presents as fresh stillbirth. The largest proportion of the world's stillbirths occurs in the late preterm, term and intra-partum periods. The Western Pacific region has the greatest reduction in stillbirth with a 3.8% annual decline between 1995 and 2009; however, the annual decline in the African region is less than 1%. Caesarean delivery is still uncommon, especially in rural areas: 1% of births in rural Sub-Saharan Africa and 5% in rural South Asia are by caesarean delivery; 62% of stillbirths occurred during the intra-partum period; 61.4% of stillbirths are attributable to obstetrical complications. Preventive measures aimed at reducing the incidence of intra-partum foetal death entail all measures aimed at improving quality antenatal care and preventing intra-partum asphyxia. This review discusses intra-partum foetal deaths from a Sub-Saharan African perspective. It explores the contribution of research within the region to identifying its impact on new-born health and potential cost-effective policy interventions. PMID:26244155

  8. Scourge of intra-partum foetal death in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adekanbi, Adesina OA; Olayemi, Oladapo O; Fawole, Adeniran O; Afolabi, Kayode A

    2015-01-01

    Intra-partum foetal death has been variously defined. However, a definition adopted at a technical consultation in 2006 is employed in this review. The quality of intra-partum care is a crucial factor for pregnancy outcome for both mothers and new-borns. Intra-partum stillbirth is defined as late foetal death during labour, which clinically presents as fresh stillbirth. The largest proportion of the world’s stillbirths occurs in the late preterm, term and intra-partum periods. The Western Pacific region has the greatest reduction in stillbirth with a 3.8% annual decline between 1995 and 2009; however, the annual decline in the African region is less than 1%. Caesarean delivery is still uncommon, especially in rural areas: 1% of births in rural Sub-Saharan Africa and 5% in rural South Asia are by caesarean delivery; 62% of stillbirths occurred during the intra-partum period; 61.4% of stillbirths are attributable to obstetrical complications. Preventive measures aimed at reducing the incidence of intra-partum foetal death entail all measures aimed at improving quality antenatal care and preventing intra-partum asphyxia. This review discusses intra-partum foetal deaths from a Sub-Saharan African perspective. It explores the contribution of research within the region to identifying its impact on new-born health and potential cost-effective policy interventions. PMID:26244155

  9. Fenoterol treatment and desensitization of beta-adrenoceptors in rabbit foetal lung.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Török, I; Kovács, L

    1988-01-01

    The foetal lung responds to beta-receptor agonists with a release of surfactant from alveolar cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the administration of the betamimetic fenoterol could influence the desensitization - associated decrease of beta-adrenoreceptors in the rabbit foetal lung. With experiments on pregnant rabbits, this hypothesis was put to the test and found to be true. At a gestational age of 27-28 days, does were infused 7.5-10.0 mg of fenoterol or given Ringer's solution. The does and foetuses were sacrificed at 12 hours from the start of the infusion, and the number and affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors in lung tissues were determined by a direct binding technique using 3H-dihydroprenolol. These studies show that fenoterol can induce desensitization of beta-receptors in the foetal lung but not in the doe. Thus, it is concluded that desensitization of foetal pulmonary adrenoreceptors may result in diminished lung function after long-term treatment with beta-2 sympathicomimetics.

  10. Demographic and Phenotypic Effects of Human Mediated Trophic Subsidy on a Large Australian Lizard (Varanus varius): Meal Ticket or Last Supper?

    PubMed Central

    Jessop, Tim S.; Smissen, Peter; Scheelings, Franciscus; Dempster, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Humans are increasingly subsidizing and altering natural food webs via changes to nutrient cycling and productivity. Where human trophic subsidies are concentrated and persistent within natural environments, their consumption could have complex consequences for wild animals through altering habitat preferences, phenotypes and fitness attributes that influence population dynamics. Human trophic subsidies conceptually create both costs and benefits for animals that receive increased calorific and altered nutritional inputs. Here, we evaluated the effects of a common terrestrial human trophic subsidies, human food refuse, on population and phenotypic (comprising morphological and physiological health indices) parameters of a large predatory lizard (∼2 m length), the lace monitor (Varanus varius), in southern Australia by comparison with individuals not receiving human trophic subsidies. At human trophic subsidies sites, lizards were significantly more abundant and their sex ratio highly male biased compared to control sites in natural forest. Human trophic subsidies recipient lizards were significantly longer, heavier and in much greater body condition. Blood parasites were significantly lower in human trophic subsidies lizards. Collectively, our results imply that human trophic subsidized sites were especially attractive to adult male lace monitors and had large phenotypic effects. However, we cannot rule out that the male-biased aggregations of large monitors at human trophic subsidized sites could lead to reductions in reproductive fitness, through mate competition and offspring survival, and through greater exposure of eggs and juveniles to predation. These possibilities could have negative population consequences. Aggregations of these large predators may also have flow on effects to surrounding food web dynamics through elevated predation levels. Given that flux of energy and nutrients into food webs is central to the regulation of populations and their

  11. Demographic and phenotypic effects of human mediated trophic subsidy on a large Australian lizard (Varanus varius): meal ticket or last supper?

    PubMed

    Jessop, Tim S; Smissen, Peter; Scheelings, Franciscus; Dempster, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Humans are increasingly subsidizing and altering natural food webs via changes to nutrient cycling and productivity. Where human trophic subsidies are concentrated and persistent within natural environments, their consumption could have complex consequences for wild animals through altering habitat preferences, phenotypes and fitness attributes that influence population dynamics. Human trophic subsidies conceptually create both costs and benefits for animals that receive increased calorific and altered nutritional inputs. Here, we evaluated the effects of a common terrestrial human trophic subsidies, human food refuse, on population and phenotypic (comprising morphological and physiological health indices) parameters of a large predatory lizard (∼2 m length), the lace monitor (Varanus varius), in southern Australia by comparison with individuals not receiving human trophic subsidies. At human trophic subsidies sites, lizards were significantly more abundant and their sex ratio highly male biased compared to control sites in natural forest. Human trophic subsidies recipient lizards were significantly longer, heavier and in much greater body condition. Blood parasites were significantly lower in human trophic subsidies lizards. Collectively, our results imply that human trophic subsidized sites were especially attractive to adult male lace monitors and had large phenotypic effects. However, we cannot rule out that the male-biased aggregations of large monitors at human trophic subsidized sites could lead to reductions in reproductive fitness, through mate competition and offspring survival, and through greater exposure of eggs and juveniles to predation. These possibilities could have negative population consequences. Aggregations of these large predators may also have flow on effects to surrounding food web dynamics through elevated predation levels. Given that flux of energy and nutrients into food webs is central to the regulation of populations and their

  12. Stereomicroscopic 3D-pattern profiling of murine and human intestinal inflammation reveals unique structural phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Kodani, Tomohiro; Kaydo, Lindsey; Pietropaoli, Davide; Corridoni, Daniele; Howell, Scott; Katz, Jeffry; Xin, Wei; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Histology is fundamental to assess two-dimensional intestinal inflammation; however, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are often indistinguishable microscopically on the basis of mucosal biopsies. Here, we use stereomicroscopy (SM) to rapidly profile the entire intestinal topography and assess inflammation. We examine the mucosal surface of >700 mice (encompassing >16 strains and various IBD-models), create a profiling catalogue of 3D-stereomicroscopic abnormalities and demonstrate that mice with comparable histological scores display unique sub-clusters of 3D-structure-patterns of IBD pathology, which we call 3D-stereoenterotypes, and which are otherwise indiscernible histologically. We show that two ileal IBD-stereoenterotypes (‘cobblestones' versus ‘villous mini-aggregation') cluster separately within two distinct mouse lines of spontaneous ileitis, suggesting that host genetics drive unique and divergent inflammatory 3D-structural patterns in the gut. In humans, stereomicroscopy reveals ‘liquefaction' lesions and hierarchical fistulous complexes, enriched with clostridia/segmented filamentous bacteria, running under healthy mucosa in Crohn's disease. We suggest that stereomicroscopic (3D-SMAPgut) profiling can be easily implemented and enable the comprehensive study of inflammatory 3D structures, genetics and flora in IBD. PMID:26154811

  13. Advances in Pemphigus and its Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem) Phenotype: A Paradigm of Human Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Qian, Ye; Li, Ning; Rubenstein, David; Aoki, Valeria; Filhio, Gunter Hans; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Pemphigus encompasses a group of organ specific, antibody mediated autoimmune diseases of the skin characterized by keratinocyte detachment that leads to the development of blisters and erosions, which can become life-threatening. The pathogenic autoantibodies recognize desmogleins, which are members of the desmosomal cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules. Desmoglein 3 is targeted in pemphigus vulgaris while desmoglein 1 is targeted in pemphigus foliaceus and its endemic form, fogo selvagem. This review will briefly define the salient features of pemphigus and the proposed steps in pathogenesis. We will then summarize the most recent advances in three important areas of investigation: (i) epidemiologic, genetic, and immunologic features of fogo selvagem, (ii) molecular mechanisms of injury to the epidermis, and (iii) novel therapeutic strategies targeting specific steps in disease pathogenesis. The advances in each of these three seemingly separate areas contribute to the overall understanding of the pemphigus disease model. These recent advancements also underscore the dynamic interplay between the treatment of patients in a clinical setting and basic science research, which has led to an integrative understanding disease pathogenesis and treatment and allow pemphigus to serve as a paradigm of human autoimmunity. PMID:18838249

  14. Comparison of Human Neonatal and Adult Blood Leukocyte Subset Composition Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Savit B; Rathore, Deepak K; Nair, Deepa; Chaudhary, Anita; Raza, Saimah; Kanodia, Parna; Sopory, Shailaja; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddharth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C; Chellani, Harish K; Arya, Sugandha; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Wadhwa, Nitya; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    2016-01-01

    The human peripheral leukocyte subset composition depends on genotype variation and pre-natal and post-natal environmental influence diversity. We quantified this composition in adults and neonates, and compared the median values and dispersal ranges of various subsets in them. We confirmed higher frequencies of monocytes and regulatory T cells (Tregs), similar frequencies of neutrophils, and lower frequencies of CD8 T cells, NKT cells, B1 B cells and gamma-delta T cells in neonatal umbilical cord blood. Unlike previous reports, we found higher frequencies of eosinophils and B cells, higher CD4:CD8 ratios, lower frequencies of T cells and iNKT cells, and similar frequencies of CD4 T cells and NK cells in neonates. We characterized monocyte subsets and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in far greater detail than previously reported, using recently described surface markers and gating strategies and observed that neonates had lower frequencies of patrolling monocytes and lower myeloid dendritic cell (mDC):plasmacytoid DC (pDC) ratios. Our data contribute to South Asian reference values for these parameters. We found that dispersal ranges differ between different leukocyte subsets, suggesting differential determination of variation. Further, some subsets were more dispersed in adults than in neonates suggesting influences of postnatal sources of variation, while some show the opposite pattern suggesting influences of developmental process variation. Together, these data and analyses provide interesting biological possibilities for future exploration. PMID:27610624

  15. High mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic capacity represent a metabolic phenotype of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Malinarich, Frano; Duan, Kaibo; Hamid, Raudhah Abdull; Bijin, Au; Lin, Wu Xue; Poidinger, Michael; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie; Connolly, John E

    2015-06-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) regulate the balance between immunity and tolerance through selective activation by environmental and pathogen-derived triggers. To characterize the rapid changes that occur during this process, we analyzed the underlying metabolic activity across a spectrum of functional DC activation states, from immunogenic to tolerogenic. We found that in contrast to the pronounced proinflammatory program of mature DCs, tolerogenic DCs displayed a markedly augmented catabolic pathway, related to oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis. Functionally, tolerogenic DCs demonstrated the highest mitochondrial oxidative activity, production of reactive oxygen species, superoxide, and increased spare respiratory capacity. Furthermore, assembled, electron transport chain complexes were significantly more abundant in tolerogenic DCs. At the level of glycolysis, tolerogenic and mature DCs showed similar glycolytic rates, but glycolytic capacity and reserve were more pronounced in tolerogenic DCs. The enhanced glycolytic reserve and respiratory capacity observed in these DCs were reflected in a higher metabolic plasticity to maintain intracellular ATP content. Interestingly, tolerogenic and mature DCs manifested substantially different expression of proteins involved in the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathway, and FAO activity was significantly higher in tolerogenic DCs. Inhibition of FAO prevented the function of tolerogenic DCs and partially restored T cell stimulatory capacity, demonstrating their dependence on this pathway. Overall, tolerogenic DCs show metabolic signatures of increased oxidative phosphorylation programing, a shift in redox state, and high plasticity for metabolic adaptation. These observations point to a mechanism for rapid genome-wide reprograming by modulation of underlying cellular metabolism during DC differentiation.

  16. Comparison of Human Neonatal and Adult Blood Leukocyte Subset Composition Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Deepak K.; Nair, Deepa; Chaudhary, Anita; Raza, Saimah; Kanodia, Parna; Sopory, Shailaja; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddharth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C.; Chellani, Harish K.; Arya, Sugandha; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Wadhwa, Nitya; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    2016-01-01

    The human peripheral leukocyte subset composition depends on genotype variation and pre-natal and post-natal environmental influence diversity. We quantified this composition in adults and neonates, and compared the median values and dispersal ranges of various subsets in them. We confirmed higher frequencies of monocytes and regulatory T cells (Tregs), similar frequencies of neutrophils, and lower frequencies of CD8 T cells, NKT cells, B1 B cells and gamma-delta T cells in neonatal umbilical cord blood. Unlike previous reports, we found higher frequencies of eosinophils and B cells, higher CD4:CD8 ratios, lower frequencies of T cells and iNKT cells, and similar frequencies of CD4 T cells and NK cells in neonates. We characterized monocyte subsets and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in far greater detail than previously reported, using recently described surface markers and gating strategies and observed that neonates had lower frequencies of patrolling monocytes and lower myeloid dendritic cell (mDC):plasmacytoid DC (pDC) ratios. Our data contribute to South Asian reference values for these parameters. We found that dispersal ranges differ between different leukocyte subsets, suggesting differential determination of variation. Further, some subsets were more dispersed in adults than in neonates suggesting influences of postnatal sources of variation, while some show the opposite pattern suggesting influences of developmental process variation. Together, these data and analyses provide interesting biological possibilities for future exploration. PMID:27610624

  17. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT.

  18. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    PubMed

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil--3/7, base of tongue--1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)--3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process.

  19. Association between Maternal Pelvis Height and Intrapartum Foetal Head Moulding in Ugandan Mothers with Spontaneous Vertex Deliveries

    PubMed Central

    Luboga, Samuel Abilemech; Luboobi, Livingstone; Mirembe, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In Sub-Saharan Africa, excessive foetal head moulding is commonly associated with cephalopelvic disproportion and obstructed labour. This study set out to determine the associations of maternal pelvis height and maternal height with intrapartum foetal head moulding. Methods. This was a multisite secondary analysis of maternal birth records of mothers with singleton pregnancies ending in a spontaneous vertex delivery. A summary of the details of the pregnancy and delivery records were reviewed and analysed using multilevel logistic regression respect to foetal head moulding. The alpha level was set at P < 0.05. Results. 412 records were obtained, of which 108/385 (28%) observed foetal head moulding. There was a significant reduction in risk of foetal head moulding with increasing maternal height (Adj. IRR 0.97, P = 0.05), maternal pelvis height (Adj. IRR 0.88, P < 0.01), and raptured membranes (Adj. IRR 0.10, P < 0.01). There was a significant increased risk of foetal head moulding with increasing birth weight (Adj. IRR 1.90, P < 0.01) and duration of monitored active labour (Adj. IRR 1.21, P < 0.01) in the final model. Conclusion. This study showed that increasing maternal height and maternal pelvis height were associated with a significant reduction in intrapartum foetal head moulding. PMID:27034678

  20. Human-mouse hybrids with an embryonal carcinoma phenotype continue to transcribe HLA-A,B,C.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, F J; Quintero, M A; Goodfellow, P N

    1983-01-01

    We previously constructed a hybrid cell line, MCP6, which contains an X/6 translocation chromosome as its sole human genetic component in a mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell background. This chromosome, which carries the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) originated from a human B cell which expresses class I and class II MHC antigens. EC cells do not express class I or class II antigens on their cell surface. Northern blot analysis has now shown that in the MCP6 hybrid, human class I genes, i.e., HLA-A,B,C, continued to be transcribed, and cellular levels of the transcripts were similar to, or only slightly lower than, levels in hybrids with a non-EC phenotype. However, very low levels of mRNA species recognised by a mouse class I gene (H-2) probe were also detected in EC cells and EC hybrids. Comparison of the relative levels of H-2 and HLA class I gene transcripts in the EC hybrids and non-EC hybrids indicated that the introduced HLA-A,B,C genes were not appropriately regulated in the EC cell but were subject at least in part to cis control. In contrast to the class I genes, no class II gene (i.e. HLA-DR alpha) transcripts were detected in MCP6. Hybrid EC lines thus provide a system to investigate the different levels of control of MHC gene expression during development and may help to elucidate mechanisms whereby the embryonic genome programs expression of differentiated cell functions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6641706

  1. Foetal antiepileptic drug exposure and verbal versus non-verbal abilities at three years of age.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J; Baker, Gus A; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D; Pennell, Page B; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W

    2011-02-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled pregnant females with epilepsy on monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study seeks to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin and valproate). This report compares verbal versus non-verbal cognitive outcomes in 216 children who completed testing at the age of three years. Verbal and non-verbal index scores were calculated from the Differential Ability Scales, Preschool Language Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration. Verbal abilities were lower than non-verbal in children exposed in utero to each drug. Preconceptional folate use was associated with higher verbal outcomes. Valproate was associated with poorer cognitive outcomes. Performance was negatively associated with valproate dose for both verbal and non-verbal domains and negatively associated with carbamazepine dose for verbal performance. No dose effects were seen for lamotrigine and phenytoin. Since foetal antiepileptic drug exposure is associated with lower verbal than non-verbal abilities, language may be particularly susceptible to foetal exposure. We hypothesize that foetal drug exposure may alter normal cerebral lateralization. Further, a dose-dependent relationship is present for both lower verbal and non-verbal abilities with valproate and for lower verbal abilities with carbamazepine. Preconceptional folate may improve cognitive outcomes. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings, extend the study to other drugs, define the risks associated with drug treatment for seizures in the neonates, and

  2. Foetal antiepileptic drug exposure and verbal versus non-verbal abilities at three years of age

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled pregnant females with epilepsy on monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study seeks to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin and valproate). This report compares verbal versus non-verbal cognitive outcomes in 216 children who completed testing at the age of three years. Verbal and non-verbal index scores were calculated from the Differential Ability Scales, Preschool Language Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration. Verbal abilities were lower than non-verbal in children exposed in utero to each drug. Preconceptional folate use was associated with higher verbal outcomes. Valproate was associated with poorer cognitive outcomes. Performance was negatively associated with valproate dose for both verbal and non-verbal domains and negatively associated with carbamazepine dose for verbal performance. No dose effects were seen for lamotrigine and phenytoin. Since foetal antiepileptic drug exposure is associated with lower verbal than non-verbal abilities, language may be particularly susceptible to foetal exposure. We hypothesize that foetal drug exposure may alter normal cerebral lateralization. Further, a dose-dependent relationship is present for both lower verbal and non-verbal abilities with valproate and for lower verbal abilities with carbamazepine. Preconceptional folate may improve cognitive outcomes. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings, extend the study to other drugs, define the risks associated with drug treatment for seizures in the neonates, and

  3. Glut1 deficiency (G1D): Epilepsy and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of the most common human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Duarte, Joao; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Sinton, Christopher M.; Heilig, Charles W.; Pascual, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain glucose supplies most of the carbon required for acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) generation (an important step for myelin synthesis) and for neurotransmitter production via further metabolism of acetyl-CoA in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, it is not known whether reduced brain glucose transporter type I (GLUT-1) activity, the hallmark of the GLUT-1 deficiency (G1D) syndrome, leads to acetyl-CoA, TCA or neurotransmitter depletion. This question is relevant because, in its most common form in man, G1D is associated with cerebral hypomyelination (manifested as microcephaly) and epilepsy, suggestive of acetyl-CoA depletion and neurotransmitter dysfunction, respectively. Yet, brain metabolism in G1D remains underexplored both theoretically and experimentally, partly because computational models of limited brain glucose transport are subordinate to metabolic assumptions and partly because current hemizygous G1D mouse models manifest a mild phenotype not easily amenable to investigation. In contrast, adult antisense G1D mice replicate the human phenotype of spontaneous epilepsy associated with robust thalamocortical electrical oscillations. Additionally, and in consonance with human metabolic imaging observations, thalamus and cerebral cortex display the lowest GLUT-1 expression and glucose uptake in the mutant mouse. This depletion of brain glucose is associated with diminished plasma fatty acids and elevated ketone body levels, and with decreased brain acetyl-CoA and fatty acid contents, consistent with brain ketone body consumption and with stimulation of brain beta-oxidation and/or diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. In contrast with other epilepsies, astrocyte glutamine synthetase expression, cerebral TCA cycle intermediates, amino acid and amine neurotransmitter contents are also intact in G1D. The data suggest that the TCA cycle is preserved in G1D because reduced glycolysis and acetyl-CoA formation can be balanced by enhanced ketone body

  4. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  5. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  6. Effects of Activin A on the phenotypic properties of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Hideki; Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naohide; Wada, Naohisa; Koori, Katsuaki; Hasegawa, Daigaku; Hamano, Sayuri; Yuda, Asuka; Monnouchi, Satoshi; Akamine, Akifumi

    2014-09-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue plays an important role in tooth preservation by structurally maintaining the connection between the tooth root and the bone. The mechanisms involved in the healing and regeneration of damaged PDL tissue, caused by bacterial infection, caries and trauma, have been explored. Accumulating evidence suggests that Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and a dimer of inhibinβa, contributes to tissue healing through cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation of various target cells. In bone, Activin A has been shown to exert an inhibitory effect on osteoblast maturation and mineralization. However, there have been no reports examining the expression and function of Activin A in human PDL cells (HPDLCs). Thus, we aimed to investigate the biological effects of Activin A on HPDLCs. Activin A was observed to be localized in HPDLCs and rat PDL tissue. When PDL tissue was surgically damaged, Activin A and IL-1β expression increased and the two proteins were shown to be co-localized around the lesion. HPDLCs treated with IL-1β or TNF-α also up-regulated the expression of the gene encoding inhibinβa. Activin A promoted chemotaxis, migration and proliferation of HPDLCs, and caused an increase in fibroblastic differentiation of these cells while down-regulating their osteoblastic differentiation. These osteoblastic inhibitory effects of Activin A, however, were only noted during the early phase of HPDLC osteoblastic differentiation, with later exposures having no effect on differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that Activin A could be used as a therapeutic agent for healing and regenerating PDL tissue in response to disease, trauma or surgical reconstruction. PMID:24928494

  7. Effects of Activin A on the phenotypic properties of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Hideki; Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naohide; Wada, Naohisa; Koori, Katsuaki; Hasegawa, Daigaku; Hamano, Sayuri; Yuda, Asuka; Monnouchi, Satoshi; Akamine, Akifumi

    2014-09-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue plays an important role in tooth preservation by structurally maintaining the connection between the tooth root and the bone. The mechanisms involved in the healing and regeneration of damaged PDL tissue, caused by bacterial infection, caries and trauma, have been explored. Accumulating evidence suggests that Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and a dimer of inhibinβa, contributes to tissue healing through cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation of various target cells. In bone, Activin A has been shown to exert an inhibitory effect on osteoblast maturation and mineralization. However, there have been no reports examining the expression and function of Activin A in human PDL cells (HPDLCs). Thus, we aimed to investigate the biological effects of Activin A on HPDLCs. Activin A was observed to be localized in HPDLCs and rat PDL tissue. When PDL tissue was surgically damaged, Activin A and IL-1β expression increased and the two proteins were shown to be co-localized around the lesion. HPDLCs treated with IL-1β or TNF-α also up-regulated the expression of the gene encoding inhibinβa. Activin A promoted chemotaxis, migration and proliferation of HPDLCs, and caused an increase in fibroblastic differentiation of these cells while down-regulating their osteoblastic differentiation. These osteoblastic inhibitory effects of Activin A, however, were only noted during the early phase of HPDLC osteoblastic differentiation, with later exposures having no effect on differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that Activin A could be used as a therapeutic agent for healing and regenerating PDL tissue in response to disease, trauma or surgical reconstruction.

  8. Phenotypic and functional cellular differences between human CD3- decidual and peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Deniz, G; Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Johnson, P M

    1994-05-01

    CD3- leukocyte clones derived from human decidualized endometrial tissue of first trimester pregnancy have been compared with CD3- PBL clones. Most CD3- decidual granulated leukocyte (DGL) clones were CD16- CD56+, whereas most CD3- PBL clones were CD16+ CD56+. CD3- DGL and PBL clones, whether CD16+ or not, showed MHC-nonrestricted NK cell activity. However, CD3- CD16- DGL clones had low cytotoxic activity against the NK-resistant cell line BSM, whereas CD3- CD16+ DGL and CD3- PBL clones were strongly cytotoxic. Cytolytic activity has also been investigated in respect of target cell HLA-G expression, because this nonpolymorphic class I MHC molecule is expressed selectively by invasive fetal cytotrophoblast. Class I HLA Ag loss cell mutants were killed efficiently by CD3- DGL clones. Expression of transfected HLA-B8 increased their sensitivity to lysis by most CD3- DGL clones, whereas expression of transfected HLA-G commonly led to decreased target cell killing. In addition, the effects of uncloned CD3- DGL on the one-way MLR have been examined. These cells were very poor responders and, unless cultured to induce expression of class II MHC molecules, were also very poor stimulators. When fresh CD3- DGLs were added as third-party cells, either autologous or allogeneic to responder cells, [3H]TdR incorporation was decreased in the MLR. Thus, CD3- DGL clones express MHC-nonrestricted cytolytic activity, notably against HLA-negative cells, but expression of HLA-G offers protection to target cells. In addition, CD3- DGL may function to suppress allogeneic responses.

  9. Human embryonic epidermis contains a diverse Langerhans cell precursor pool.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Mairhofer, Mario; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fiala, Christian; Prior, Marion; Eppel, Wolfgang; Kolbus, Andrea; Tschachler, Erwin; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2014-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the exact phenotype of the epidermal Langerhans cell (LC) precursors during human ontogeny has not been determined yet. These elusive precursors are believed to migrate into the embryonic skin and to express primitive surface markers, including CD36, but not typical LC markers such as CD1a, CD1c and CD207. The aim of this study was to further characterize the phenotype of LC precursors in human embryonic epidermis and to compare it with that of LCs in healthy adult skin. We found that epidermal leukocytes in first trimester human skin are negative for CD34 and heterogeneous with regard to the expression of CD1c, CD14 and CD36, thus contrasting the phenotypic uniformity of epidermal LCs in adult skin. These data indicate that LC precursors colonize the developing epidermis in an undifferentiated state, where they acquire the definitive LC marker profile with time. Using a human three-dimensional full-thickness skin model to mimic in vivo LC development, we found that FACS-sorted, CD207(-) cord blood-derived haematopoietic precursor cells resembling foetal LC precursors but not CD14(+)CD16(-) blood monocytes integrate into skin equivalents, and without additional exogenous cytokines give rise to cells that morphologically and phenotypically resemble LCs. Overall, it appears that CD14(-) haematopoietic precursors possess a much higher differentiation potential than CD14(+) precursor cells.

  10. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  11. Gene Expression Correlations in Human Cancer Cell Lines Define Molecular Interaction Networks for Epithelial Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Kurt W.; Zeeberg, Barry M.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute’s CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1); interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3); interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP); transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2); epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2); epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B); epithelial Ca(+2) signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY); terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2); maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3). The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets. PMID:24940735

  12. Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis and Immunological Memory: Effect on Phenotypic Lymphocyte Profiles and Humoral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, Veerle; Mumba Ngoyi, Dieudonné; Kestens, Luc; Boel, Luc; Barbé, Barbara; Kande Betu, Victor; van Griensven, Johan; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Muyembe Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Jacobs, Jan; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In mice, experimental infection with Trypanosoma brucei causes decreased bone marrow B-cell development, abolished splenic B-cell maturation and loss of antibody mediated protection including vaccine induced memory responses. Nothing is known about this phenomenon in human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), but if occurring, it would imply the need of revaccination of HAT patients after therapy and abolish hope for a HAT vaccine. The effect of gambiense HAT on peripheral blood memory T- and B-cells and on innate and vaccine induced antibody levels was examined. The percentage of memory B- and T-cells was quantified in peripheral blood, prospectively collected in DR Congo from 117 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected HAT patients before and six months after treatment and 117 controls at the same time points. Antibodies against carbohydrate antigens on red blood cells and against measles were quantified. Before treatment, significantly higher percentages of memory B-cells, mainly T-independent memory B-cells, were observed in HAT patients compared to controls (CD20+CD27+IgM+, 13.0% versus 2.0%, p<0.001). The percentage of memory T-cells, mainly early effector/memory T-cells, was higher in HAT (CD3+CD45RO+CD27+, 19.4% versus 16.7%, p = 0.003). After treatment, the percentage of memory T-cells normalized, the percentage of memory B-cells did not. The median anti-red blood cell carbohydrate IgM level was one titer lower in HAT patients than in controls (p<0.004), and partially normalized after treatment. Anti-measles antibody concentrations were lower in HAT patients than in controls (medians of 1500 versus 2250 mIU/ml, p = 0.02), and remained so after treatment, but were above the cut-off level assumed to provide protection in 94.8% of HAT patients, before and after treatment (versus 98.3% of controls, p = 0.3). Although functionality of the B-cells was not verified, the results suggest that immunity was conserved in T.b. gambiense infected HAT patients and

  13. Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattoso-Barbosa, Armanda Moreira; Perdigão-de-Oliveira, Marcelo; Costa, Ronaldo Peres; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; do Amaral, Laurence Rodrigues; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Dick, Edward J.; Hubbard, Gene B.; VandeBerg, Jane F.; VandeBerg, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) represent a feasible model for research on Chagas disease since natural T. cruzi infection in these primates leads to clinical outcomes similar to those observed in humans. However, it is still unknown whether these clinical similarities are accompanied by equivalent immunological characteristics in the two species. We have performed a detailed immunophenotypic analysis of circulating leukocytes together with systems biology approaches from 15 cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with T. cruzi (CH) presenting the chronic phase of Chagas disease to identify biomarkers that might be useful for clinical investigations. Methods and Findings Our data established that CH displayed increased expression of CD32+ and CD56+ in monocytes and enhanced frequency of NK Granzyme A+ cells as compared to non-infected controls (NI). Moreover, higher expression of CD54 and HLA-DR by T-cells, especially within the CD8+ subset, was the hallmark of CH. A high level of expression of Granzyme A and Perforin underscored the enhanced cytotoxicity-linked pattern of CD8+ T-lymphocytes from CH. Increased frequency of B-cells with up-regulated expression of Fc-γRII was also observed in CH. Complex and imbricate biomarker networks demonstrated that CH showed a shift towards cross-talk among cells of the adaptive immune system. Systems biology analysis further established monocytes and NK-cell phenotypes and the T-cell activation status, along with the Granzyme A expression by CD8+ T-cells, as the most reliable biomarkers of potential use for clinical applications. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrated that the similarities in phenotypic features of circulating leukocytes observed in cynomolgus macaques and humans infected with T. cruzi further supports the use of these monkeys in preclinical toxicology and pharmacology studies applied to development and testing of new drugs for Chagas disease. PMID:26808481

  14. Modeling the human MTM1 p.R69C mutation in murine Mtm1 results in exon 4 skipping and a less severe myotubular myopathy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Christopher R.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Durban, Ashley N.; Marshall, Morgan L.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Snyder, Andrew D.; Naiyer, Nada; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Dowling, James J.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM) is a severe neuromuscular disease of infancy caused by mutations of MTM1, which encodes the phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1 knockout (KO) mouse has a severe phenotype and its short lifespan (8 weeks) makes it a challenge to use as a model in the testing of certain preclinical therapeutics. Many MTM patients succumb early in life, but some have a more favorable prognosis. We used human genotype–phenotype correlation data to develop a myotubularin-deficient mouse model with a less severe phenotype than is seen in Mtm1 KO mice. We modeled the human c.205C>T point mutation in Mtm1 exon 4, which is predicted to introduce the p.R69C missense change in myotubularin. Hemizygous male Mtm1 p.R69C mice develop early muscle atrophy prior to the onset of weakness at 2 months. The median survival period is 66 weeks. Histopathology shows small myofibers with centrally placed nuclei. Myotubularin protein is undetectably low because the introduced c.205C>T base change induced exon 4 skipping in most mRNAs, leading to premature termination of myotubularin translation. Some full-length Mtm1 mRNA bearing the mutation is present, which provides enough myotubularin activity to account for the relatively mild phenotype, as Mtm1 KO and Mtm1 p.R69C mice have similar muscle phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels. These data explain the basis for phenotypic variability among human patients with MTM1 p.R69C mutations and establish the Mtm1 p.R69C mouse as a valuable model for the disease, as its less severe phenotype will expand the scope of testable preclinical therapies. PMID:22068590

  15. Stimulators of Mineralization Limit the Invasive Phenotype of Human Osteosarcoma Cells by a Mechanism Involving Impaired Invadopodia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cmoch, Anna; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Palczewska, Malgorzata; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Groves, Patrick; Pikula, Slawomir

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly aggressive bone cancer affecting children and young adults. Growing evidence connects the invasive potential of OS cells with their ability to form invadopodia (structures specialized in extracellular matrix proteolysis). Results In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commonly used in vitro stimulators of mineralization limit the invadopodia formation in OS cells. Here we examined the invasive potential of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) and osteolytic-like (143B) OS cells treated with the stimulators of mineralization (ascorbic acid and B-glycerophosphate) and observed a significant difference in response of the tested cells to the treatment. In contrast to 143B cells, osteoblast-like cells developed a mineralization phenotype that was accompanied by a decreased proliferation rate, prolongation of the cell cycle progression and apoptosis. On the other hand, stimulators of mineralization limited osteolytic-like OS cell invasiveness into collagen matrix. We are the first to evidence the ability of 143B cells to degrade extracellular matrix to be driven by invadopodia. Herein, we show that this ability of osteolytic-like cells in vitro is limited by stimulators of mineralization. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that mineralization competency determines the invasive potential of cancer cells. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which stimulators of mineralization regulate and execute invadopodia formation would reveal novel clinical targets for treating osteosarcoma. PMID:25314307

  16. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer’s Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Waseem K.; Mungenast, Alison E.; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Ko, Tak; Abdurrob, Fatema; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD) patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1) mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD. PMID:27622770

  17. Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Accumulate in Human Placenta and Polarize toward a Th2 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Köstlin, Natascha; Hofstädter, Kathrin; Ostermeir, Anna-Lena; Spring, Bärbel; Leiber, Anja; Haen, Susanne; Abele, Harald; Bauer, Peter; Pollheimer, Jürgen; Hartl, Dominik; Poets, Christian F; Gille, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Tolerance induction toward the semiallogeneic fetus is crucial to enable a successful pregnancy; its failure is associated with abortion or preterm delivery. Skewing T cell differentiation toward a Th2-dominated phenotype seems to be pivotal in maternal immune adaption, yet underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that mediate T cell suppression and are increased in cord blood of healthy newborns and in peripheral blood of pregnant women. In this study, we demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs (GR-MDSCs) accumulate in human placenta of healthy pregnancies but are diminished in patients with spontaneous abortions. Placental GR-MDSCs effectively suppressed T cell responses by expression of arginase I and production of reactive oxygen species and were activated at the maternal-fetal interface through interaction with trophoblast cells. Furthermore, GR-MDSCs isolated from placenta polarized CD4(+) T cells toward a Th2 cytokine response. These results highlight a potential role of GR-MDSCs in inducing and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance and suggest them as a promising target for therapeutic manipulation of pregnancy complications. PMID:26712947

  18. Requirement of a dopaminergic neuronal phenotype for toxicity of low concentrations of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium to human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schildknecht, Stefan; Poeltl, Dominik; Nagel, Daniel M.; Matt, Florian; Scholz, Diana; Lotharius, Julie; Schmieg, Nathalie; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Leist, Marcel

    2009-11-15

    LUHMES cells are conditionally-immortalized non-transformed human fetal cells that can be differentiated to acquire a dopaminergic neuron-like phenotype under appropriate growth conditions. After differentiation by GDNF and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, LUHMES were sensitive to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}) toxicity at <= 5 muM, but resistant to the parental compound 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The high homogeneity and purity of the cultures allowed the detection of metabolic changes during the degeneration. Cellular ATP dropped in two phases after 24 and 48 h; cellular glutathione (GSH) decreased continuously, paralleled by an increase in lipid peroxidation. These events were accompanied by a time-dependent degeneration of neurites. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR 12909 or mazindol completely abrogated MPP{sup +} toxicity. Inhibition of de novo dopamine synthesis by alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine or 3-iodo-L-tyrosine attenuated toxicity, but did not reduce the initial drop in ATP. Inhibition of mixed lineage kinases by CEP1347 completely prevented the MPP{sup +}-induced loss of viability and intracellular GSH, but failed to attenuate the initial drop of ATP. For the quantitative assessment of neurite degeneration, an automated imaging-based high content screening approach was applied and confirmed the findings made by pharmacological interventions in this study. Our data indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis is not sufficient to trigger cell death in MPP{sup +}-treated LUHMES.

  19. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem K; Mungenast, Alison E; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Ko, Tak; Abdurrob, Fatema; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD) patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1) mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD. PMID:27622770

  20. Allele-specific RNA interference rescues the long-QT syndrome phenotype in human-induced pluripotency stem cell cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matsa, Elena; Dixon, James E.; Medway, Christopher; Georgiou, Orestis; Patel, Minal J.; Morgan, Kevin; Kemp, Paul J.; Staniforth, Andrew; Mellor, Ian; Denning, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aims Long-QT syndromes (LQTS) are mostly autosomal-dominant congenital disorders associated with a 1:1000 mutation frequency, cardiac arrest, and sudden death. We sought to use cardiomyocytes derived from human-induced pluripotency stem cells (hiPSCs) as an in vitro model to develop and evaluate gene-based therapeutics for the treatment of LQTS. Methods and results We produced LQTS-type 2 (LQT2) hiPSC cardiomyocytes carrying a KCNH2 c.G1681A mutation in a IKr ion-channel pore, which caused impaired glycosylation and channel transport to cell surface. Allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) directed towards the mutated KCNH2 mRNA caused knockdown, while leaving the wild-type mRNA unaffected. Electrophysiological analysis of patient-derived LQT2 hiPSC cardiomyocytes treated with mutation-specific siRNAs showed normalized action potential durations (APDs) and K+ currents with the concurrent rescue of spontaneous and drug-induced arrhythmias (presented as early-afterdepolarizations). Conclusions These findings provide in vitro evidence that allele-specific RNAi can rescue diseased phenotype in LQTS cardiomyocytes. This is a potentially novel route for the treatment of many autosomal-dominant-negative disorders, including those of the heart. PMID:23470493

  1. Genomic Features of the Human Dopamine Transporter Gene and Its Potential Epigenetic States: Implications for Phenotypic Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-06-01

    Human dopamine transporter gene (DAT1 or SLC6A3) has been associated with various brain-related diseases and behavioral traits and, as such, has been investigated intensely in experimental- and clinical-settings. However, the abundance of research data has not clarified the biological mechanism of DAT regulation; similarly, studies of DAT genotype-phenotype associations yielded inconsistent results. Hence, our understanding of the control of the DAT protein product is incomplete; having this knowledge is critical, since DAT plays the major role in the brain's dopaminergic circuitry. Accordingly, we reevaluated the genomic attributes of the SLC6A3 gene that might confer sensitivity to regulation, hypothesizing that its unique genomic characteristics might facilitate highly dynamic, region-specific DAT expression, so enabling multiple regulatory modes. Our comprehensive bioinformatic analyzes revealed very distinctive genomic characteristics of the SLC6A3, including high inter-individual variability of its sequence (897 SNPs, about 90 repeats and several CNVs spell out all abbreviations in abstract) and pronounced sensitivity to regulation by epigenetic mechanisms, as evident from the GC-bias composition (0.55) of the SLC6A3, and numerous intragenic CpG islands (27 CGIs). We propose that this unique combination of the genomic features and the regulatory attributes enables the differential expression of the DAT1 gene and fulfills seemingly contradictory demands to its regulation; that is, robustness of region-specific expression and functional dynamics.

  2. Spinal muscular atrophy phenotype is ameliorated in human motor neurons by SMN increase via different novel RNA therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Dametti, Sara; Salani, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Pagliarani, Serena; Rizzo, Federica; Frattini, Emanuele; Pagani, Franco; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a primary genetic cause of infant mortality due to mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) 1 gene. No cure is available. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) aimed at increasing SMN levels from the paralogous SMN2 gene represent a possible therapeutic strategy. Here, we tested in SMA human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-differentiated motor neurons, three different RNA approaches based on morpholino antisense targeting of the ISSN-1, exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (ExSpeU1), and Transcription Activator-Like Effector-Transcription Factor (TALE-TF). All strategies act modulating SMN2 RNA: ASO affects exon 7 splicing, TALE-TF increase SMN2 RNA acting on the promoter, while ExSpeU1 improves pre-mRNA processing. These approaches induced up-regulation of full-length SMN mRNA and differentially affected the Delta-7 isoform: ASO reduced this isoform, while ExSpeU1 and TALE-TF increased it. All approaches upregulate the SMN protein and significantly improve the in vitro SMA motor neurons survival. Thus, these findings demonstrate that therapeutic tools that act on SMN2 RNA are able to rescue the SMA disease phenotype. Our data confirm the feasibility of SMA iPSCs as in vitro disease models and we propose novel RNA approaches as potential therapeutic strategies for treating SMA and other genetic neurological disorders. PMID:26123042

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi B isolates from environmental and human sources in Galicia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Echeita, Aurora; Liebana, Ernesto

    2006-06-01

    Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B isolates obtained from shellfish and human infections in Galicia (northwest Spain) from 1998 were investigated by different phenotypic and genetic methods to evaluate their systemic or enteric nature. Isolates were investigated for D-tartrate fermentation, presence of genes encoding the effector proteins sopE1 and avrA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Systemic variant strains (dT-) were the dominant among the marine environment isolates. All dT- isolates were sopE1 positive and avrA negative, presented an indistinguishable electrophoresis profile, and were grouped in a single cluster. More electrophoresis heterogeneity was observed among dT+ isolates. Only two isolates showed resistance to any of the 16 antibiotics included in our panel. The present study identified the marine environment as a potential natural source of systemic variant isolates of Salmonella Paratyphi B. The presence of systemic variant isolates of Salmonella Paratyphi B in the marine environment is of notable public health significance as a result of the potential risk of acquiring enteric fever linked to the consumption of raw shellfish.

  4. A Comprehensive Overview of Skeletal Phenotypes Associated with Alterations in Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maupin, Kevin A.; Droscha, Casey J.; Williams, Bart O.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays key roles in differentiation and development and alterations in this signaling pathway are causally associated with numerous human diseases. While several laboratories were examining roles for Wnt signaling in skeletal development during the 1990s, interest in the pathway rose exponentially when three key papers were published in 2001–2002. One report found that loss of the Wnt co-receptor, Low-density lipoprotein related protein-5 (LRP5), was the underlying genetic cause of the syndrome Osteoporosis pseudoglioma (OPPG). OPPG is characterized by early-onset osteoporosis causing increased susceptibility to debilitating fractures. Shortly thereafter, two groups reported that individuals carrying a specific point mutation in LRP5 (G171V) develop high-bone mass. Subsequent to this, the causative mechanisms for these observations heightened the need to understand the mechanisms by which Wnt signaling controlled bone development and homeostasis and encouraged significant investment from biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to develop methods to activate Wnt signaling to increase bone mass to treat osteoporosis and other bone disease. In this review, we will briefly summarize the cellular mechanisms underlying Wnt signaling and discuss the observations related to OPPG and the high-bone mass disorders that heightened the appreciation of the role of Wnt signaling in normal bone development and homeostasis. We will then present a comprehensive overview of the core components of the pathway with an emphasis on the phenotypes associated with mice carrying genetically engineered mutations in these genes and clinical observations that further link alterations in the pathway to changes in human bone. PMID:26273492

  5. Loss of SOD3 (EcSOD) expression promotes an aggressive phenotype in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Hrabe, Jennifer E.; Button, Anna M.; Allen, Bryan G.; Case, Adam J.; Altekruse, Sean; Wagner, Brett A.; Buettner, Garry R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Cozen, Wendy; Beardsley, Robert A.; Keene, Jeffery; Henry, Michael D.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells are known to produce excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, which may contribute to the aggressive and refractory nature of this disease. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide in the extracellular environment. The current work tests the hypothesis that EcSOD modulates PDA growth and invasion by modifying the redox balance in PDA. Experimental Design We evaluated the prognostic significance of EcSOD in a human tissue microarray of patients with PDA. EcSOD overexpression was performed in PDA cell lines and animal models of disease. The impact of EcSOD on PDA cell lines was evaluated with Matrigel invasion in combination with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor to determine the mechanism of action of EcSOD in PDA. Results Loss of EcSOD expression is a common event in PDA, which correlated with worse disease biology. Overexpression of EcSOD in PDA cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness that appeared to be related to reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide. Pancreatic cancer xenografts overexpressing EcSOD also demonstrated slower growth and peritoneal metastasis. Over-expression of EcSOD or treatment with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic caused significant decreases in PDA cell invasive capacity. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that loss of EcSOD leads to increased reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide which contributes to the invasive phenotype. These results allow for the speculation that superoxide dismutase mimetics might inhibit PDA progression in human clinical disease. PMID:25634994

  6. Effects of the differentiated keratinocyte phenotype on expression levels of CYP1-4 family genes in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Du Liping; Neis, Mark M.; Ladd, Patricia A.; Yost, Garold S.; Keeney, Diane S. . E-mail: diane.keeney@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-06-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids produced by mouse CYP2B19 have been implicated in mechanisms regulating epidermal cornification (Ladd, P.A., Du, L., Capdevila, J.H., Mernaugh, R., Keeney, D.S., 2003. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids activate transglutaminases in situ and induce cornification of epidermal keratinocytes. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 35184-35192). In this study, we aimed to identify CYPs that are up-regulated during keratinocyte differentiation and potentially responsible for epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation in human skin. The cellular differentiation state of human epidermal cell cultures was manipulated to resemble the basal, spinous, and granular cell phenotypes in vivo. Changes in CYP mRNA levels were measured as a function of differentiation state for a panel of 15 CYPs that included known and putative arachidonate monooxygenases. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that all of the CYPs were expressed in differentiating epidermal cell cultures and in human epidermis, with the exception of CYP2B6, which was poorly expressed in vitro. Six CYPs were strongly up-regulated at Day 6 and Day 8 of in vitro differentiation (CYP4B1, 2W1, 2C18, 3A4, 2C19, 2C9); the increase in mRNA levels ranged from 27- to 356-fold. Only CYP2U1 mRNA levels decreased (6-fold change) during cellular differentiation. Six CYPs showed little variation (<2-fold change) in mRNA levels during in vitro differentiation (CYP2S1, 2J2, 1B1, 1A1, 2E1, 2D6). No single CYP was identifiable as being a functional counterpart to CYP2B19 in mouse skin since none qualified as being mainly responsible for epidermal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation. Rather, the data suggest that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in human skin are formed by several CYPs expressed in different cell layers of the epidermis. This would predict that CYP-derived eicosanoids have different functions in different epidermal cell layers.

  7. Theophylline Pharmacokinetics in Foetal Sheep: Maternal Metabolic Capacity is the Principal Driver.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Barent; Louey, Samantha; Giraud, George D; Cherala, Ganesh; Jonker, Sonnet S

    2015-10-01

    Understanding theophylline pharmacokinetics (PK) in the foetus is essential to prevent in utero toxicity and optimize prophylactic therapies. Previous studies in pregnancy have been obfuscated by maternal dosing and inadequate sampling in the foetus; both render modelling of foetal PK difficult. Six ewes carrying singleton foetuses received theophylline (60 mg) into the foetal jugular vein. Blood samples were drawn from the foetus and ewe over 36 hr. Serum concentrations were measured. Maternal and foetal pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Foetal non-compartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows: half-life 7.37 ± 1.22 hr; volume of distribution 44.62 ± 11.45 L; area under the curve 14.82 ± 2.71 hr/(μg/mL); and clearance 4.15 ± 0.70 L/hr. Rapid theophylline distribution across the placenta was observed. Maternal non-compartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows: half-life 6.54 ± 2.44 hr; volume of distribution 32.48 ± 9.99 L; area under the curve 16.28 ± 4.53 hr/(μg/mL); and clearance 3.69 ± 1.47 L/hr. Foetal and ewe serum concentration-time profiles were fit together into a 3-compartment population pharmacokinetic model, and parameters were as follows: central volume 1.38 ± 0.11 L; 2nd peripheral compartment volume 3.11 ± 0.29 L; 3rd peripheral compartment volume 60.14 ± 6.02 L; elimination clearance 9.89 ± 0.90 L/hr; distribution clearance between central and 2nd compartment 30.87 ± 2.31 L/hr; and distribution clearance between 2nd and 3rd compartments 13.89 ± 1.11 L/hr. Cytochrome P4501A expression was robust in maternal liver; negligible activities were observed in placenta, foetal liver and foetal kidney. In vitro protein binding of theophylline was 30% lower in foetal serum compared to maternal serum (29.7 ± 4.4 versus 42.0 ± 3.6%-bound). Free concentrations were lower in the foetus than in the ewe, suggesting active transport across placenta. In summary, foetal

  8. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Śliwka, Joanna; Garbacz, Marcin; Szczypior, Mateusz; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Langrzyk, Agnieszka; Zembala, Michał; Szala, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation. Methods and Results MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO). Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb). MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed. Conclusion In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI) we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart. PMID:27415778

  9. Mutations of the KIT (Mast/Stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene account for a continuous range of phenotypes in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Holmes, S.A. ); Ramesar, R.; Greenberg, J.; Beighton, P.; Curtis, D.

    1992-11-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of pigmentation, characterized by congenital patches of white skin and hair from which melanocytes are absent. The authors have previously shown that piebaldism can result from missense and frameshift mutations of the KIT proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular receptor tyrosine kinase for the mast/stem cell growth factor. Here, the authors report two novel KIT mutations associated with human piebaldism. A proximal frameshift is associated with a mild piebald phenotype, and a splice-junction mutation is associated with a highly variable piebald phenotype. They discuss the apparent relationship between the predicted impact of specific KIT mutations on total KIT-dependent signal transduction and the severity of the resultant piebald phenotypes. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  10. TGF-β1 induces human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype switch through PI3K/AKT/ID2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shui-Bo; Zhu, Jian; Zhou, Zi-Zi; Xi, Er-Ping; Wang, Rong-Ping; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic switch is considered to be the key pathophysiological change in various cardiovascular diseases, such as aortic dissection, atherosclerosis, and hypertension. The results in this study showed that TGF-β1 promotes the proliferation, migration and morphological changes of VSMC.TGF-β1 promoted the expressions of PI3K, P-PI3K, AKT, P-AKT, ID2, and OPN protein and suppressed the expressions of α-SMA and SM22α protein; the opposite results were observed for TGF-β1 inhibitor group, AKT inhibitor group and Combined inhibitors group. After the stimulation of TGF-β1 signaling, the mRNA levels of PI3K, AKT, ID2, and OPN were the highest, while the mRNA levels of α-SMA and SM22α were the lowest; the opposite results were found in the same groups above. These results suggested the PI3K/AKT/ID2 signaling pathway is involved in TGF-β1-mediated human aortic VSMC phenotypic switching, that is from a contractile to synthetic phenotype, and Combined inhibitors was more effective in inhibiting the phenotypic switch than a single inhibitor. The Combined inhibitors experiments may provide new avenues for the prevention and treatment of thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) that are based on the pathological effects of phenotypic switching. PMID:26885273

  11. Preserved functional autonomic phenotype in adult mice overexpressing moderate levels of human alpha‐synuclein in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tank, Jens; da Costa‐Goncalves, Andrey C.; Kamer, Ilona; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Ubhi, Kiren; Rockenstein, Edward; Diedrich, André; Masliah, Eliezer; Gross, Volkmar; Jordan, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mice overexpressing human alpha‐synuclein in oligodendrocytes (MBP1‐α‐syn) recapitulate some key functional and neuropathological features of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Whether or not these mice develop severe autonomic failure, which is a key feature of human MSA, remains unknown. We explored cardiovascular autonomic regulation using long‐term blood pressure (BP) radiotelemetry and pharmacological testing. We instrumented 12 MBP1‐α‐syn mice and 11 wild‐type mice aged 9 months for radiotelemetry. Animals were tested with atropine, metoprolol, clonidine, and trimethaphan at 9 and 12 months age. We applied spectral and cross‐spectral analysis to assess heart rate (HR) and BP variability. At 9 months of age daytime BP (transgenic: 101 ± 2 vs. wild type: 99 ± 2 mmHg) and HR (497 ± 11 vs. 505 ± 16 beats/min) were similar. Circadian BP and HR rhythms were maintained. Nighttime BP (109 ± 2 vs. 108 ± 2 mmHg) and HR (575 ± 15 vs. 569 ± 14 beats/min), mean arterial BP responses to trimethaphan (−21 ± 8 vs. −10 ± 5 mmHg, P = 0.240) and to clonidine (−8 ± 3 vs. −5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.314) were similar. HR responses to atropine (+159 ± 24 vs. +146 ± 22 beats/min), and to clonidine (−188 ± 21 vs. −163 ± 33 beats/min) did not differ between strains. Baroreflex sensitivity (4 ± 1 vs. 4 ± 1 msec/mmHg) and HR variability (total power, 84 ± 17 vs. 65 ± 21 msec²) were similar under resting conditions and during pharmacological testing. Repeated measurements at 12 months of age provided similar results. In mice, moderate overexpression of human alpha‐synuclein in oligodendrocytes is not sufficient to induce overt autonomic failure. Additional mechanisms may be required to express the autonomic failure phenotype including higher levels of expression or more advanced age. PMID:25428949

  12. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  13. Expression of Human Carbonic Anhydrase in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC7942 Creates a High CO2-Requiring Phenotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Price, G. D.; Badger, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Active human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII) protein was expressed in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC7942 by means of transformation with the bidirectional expression vector, pCA. This expression was driven by the bacterial Tac promoter and was regulated by the IacIQ repressor protein, which was expressed from the same plasmid. Expression levels reached values of around 0.3% of total cell protein and this protein appeared to be entirely soluble in nature and located within the cytosol of the cell. The expression of this protein has dramatic effects on the photosynthetic physiology of the cell. Induction of expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in both high dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) and low Ci grown cells leads the creation of a high Ci requiring phenotype causing: (a) a dramatic increase in the K0.5 (Ci) for photosynthesis, (b) a loss of the ability to accumulate internal Ci, and (c) a decrease in the lag between the initial Ci accumulation following illumination and the efflux of CO2 from the cells. In addition, the effects of the expressed CA can largely be reversed by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor ethoxyzolamide. As a result of the above findings, it is concluded that the CO2 concentrating mechanism in Synechococcus PCC7942 is largely dependent on (a) the absence of CA activity from the cytosol, and (b) the specific localization of CA activity in the carboxysome. A theoretical model of photosynthesis and Ci accumulation is developed in which the carboxysome plays a central role as both the site of CO2 generation from HCO3− and a resistance barrier to CO2 efflux from the cell. There is good qualitative agreement between this model and the measured physiological effects of expressed cytosolic CA in Synechococcus cells. Images Figure 7 PMID:16667062

  14. Fructose induces prothrombotic phenotype in human endothelial cells : A new role for "added sugar" in cardio-metabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Plinio; Pellegrino, Grazia; Conte, Stefano; Maresca, Fabio; Pacifico, Francesco; Leonardi, Antonio; Trimarco, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Intake of large amounts of added sweeteners has been associated with the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic risk. Several studies have shown that fructose increases the cardiovascular risk by modulating endothelial dysfunction and promoting atherosclerosis. Recently, a potential role for fructose in cardiovascular thrombosis has been suggested but with controversial results. Tissue factor (TF) plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular thrombosis by triggering the formation of intracoronary thrombi following endothelial injury. This study investigates the effects of fructose, in a concentration range usually observed in the plasma of patients with increased cardiovascular risk, on TF in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs). Cells were stimulated with increasing concentrations of fructose (0.25, 1 and 2.5 mM) and then processed to evaluate TF-mRNA levels by real-time PCR as well as TF expression/activity by FACS analysis and procoagulant activity. Finally, a potential molecular pathway involved in modulating this phenomenon was investigated. We demonstrate that fructose induces transcription of mRNA for TF. In addition, we show that this monosaccharide promotes surface expression of TF that is functionally active. Fructose effects on TF appear modulated by the oxygen free radicals through activation of the transcription factor NF-κB since superoxide dismutase and NF-κB inhibitors suppressed TF expression. Data of the present study, although in vitro, indicate that fructose, besides promoting atherosclerosis, induces a prothrombotic phenotype in HUVECs, thus indicating one the mechanism(s) by which this sweetener might increase cardiometabolic risk.

  15. Expanded CD8+ T cells of murine and human CLL are driven into a senescent KLRG1+ effector memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Göthert, Joachim Rudolf; Eisele, Lewin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Weber, Stefanie; Zesewitz, Marie-Louise; Sellmann, Ludger; Röth, Alexander; Pircher, Hanspeter; Dührsen, Ulrich; Dürig, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Altered numbers and functions of T cells have previously been demonstrated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. However, dynamics and specific T-cell subset alterations have not been studied in great detail. Therefore, we studied CLL blood lymphocyte subsets of individual patients in a longitudinal manner. Dynamic expansions of blood CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell numbers were consistently associated with a progressively increasing CLL leukemic compartment. Interestingly, the T-cell subset expansion over time was more pronounced in CD38 + CLL. Additionally, we performed gene expression profiling of CD3 + T cells of CLL patients and normal donors. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we found significant enrichment of genes with higher expression in CLL T cells within CD8+ effector memory and terminal effector T-cell gene signatures. In agreement with these data, we observed a marked expansion of phenotypic CD8 + effector memory T cells in CLL by flow cytometry. Moreover, we observed that increments of CD8 + effector memory T cells in human CLL and also mouse CLL (Eμ-TCL1 model) were due to an expansion of the inhibitory killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) expressing cellular subset. Furthermore, higher plasma levels of the natural KLRG1 ligand E-cadherin were detected in CLL patients compared to normal donor controls. The predominance of KLRG1+ expression within CD8+ T cells in conjunction with increased systemic soluble E-cadherin might significantly contribute to CLL immune dysfunction and might additionally represent an important component of the CLL microenvironment.

  16. Molecular and Phenotypic Evaluation of Lichtheimia corymbifera (Formerly Absidia corymbifera) Complex Isolates Associated with Human Mucormycosis: Rehabilitation of L. ramosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Hoinard, Damien; Gantier, Jean-Charles; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Dromer, Françoise; Dannaoui, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight isolates (including 28 isolates from patients) morphologically identified as Lichtheimia corymbifera (formerly Absidia corymbifera) were studied by sequence analysis (analysis of the internal transcribed spacer [ITS] region of the ribosomal DNA, the D1-D2 region of 28S, and a portion of the elongation factor 1α [EF-1α] gene). Phenotypic characteristics, including morphology, antifungal susceptibility, and carbohydrate assimilation, were also determined. Analysis of the three loci uncovered two well-delimited clades. The maximum sequence similarity values between isolates from both clades were 66, 95, and 93% for the ITS, 28S, and EF-1α loci, respectively, with differences in the lengths of the ITS sequences being detected (763 to 770 bp for isolates of clade 1 versus 841 to 865 bp for isolates of clade 2). Morphologically, the shapes and the sizes of the sporangiospores were significantly different among the isolates from both clades. On the basis of the molecular and morphological data, we considered isolates of clade 2 to belong to a different species named Lichtheimia ramosa because reference strains CBS 269.65 and CBS 270.65 (which initially belonged to Absidia ramosa) clustered within this clade. As neotype A. corymbifera strain CBS 429.75 belongs to clade 1, the name L. corymbifera was conserved for clade 1 isolates. Of note, the amphotericin B MICs were significantly lower for L. ramosa than for L. corymbifera (P < 0.005) but were always ≤0.5 μg/ml for both species. Among the isolates tested, the assimilation of melezitose was positive for 67% of the L. ramosa isolates and negative for all L. corymbifera isolates. In conclusion, this study reveals that two Lichtheimia species are commonly associated with mucormycosis in humans. PMID:19759217

  17. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p < 0.001) and associated with CD163+ macrophages (p < 0.0001), poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.021) and significantly increased numbers of TGF-α+ cells. While G-CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  18. A comparison of foetal SAR in three sets of pregnant female models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter J.; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Xu, X. George

    2009-05-01

    This paper compares the foetal SAR in the HPA hybrid mathematical phantoms with the 26-week foetal model developed at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, and the set of 13-, 26- and 38-week boundary representation models produced at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. FDTD calculations are performed at a resolution of 2 mm for a plane wave with a vertically aligned electric field incident upon the body from the front, back and two sides from 20 MHz to 3 GHz under isolated conditions. The external electric field values required to produce the ICNIRP public exposure localized restriction of 2 W kg-1 when averaged over 10 g of the foetus are compared with the ICNIRP reference levels.

  19. Prevalence and economic implications of calf foetal wastage in an abattoir in Northcentral Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, Nma Bida

    2011-03-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the volume of pregnant cows slaughtered at Minna abattoir, Niger State, Nigeria between 2001 and 2009 based on abattoir meat inspection records. Of the 98,407 cows slaughtered, 4,368 were pregnant, translating to a ratio of one calf foetal wastage in every 23 cows slaughtered. The wastage was significantly (P<0.05) high during the early rainy season (April to June). There was no significant difference observed across the years. The economic impact of the wastage is estimated at N8, 353,800.00 ($56,828.57) which is a great loss to the livestock industry. With these findings, there is the need to advocate for adequate enforcement of legislations on routine veterinary examinations at the slaughter houses in Nigeria. Also, livestock owners should be educated on the seasonal breeding patterns of cattle in order to avoid selling cows during the calving season to salvage high level of calf foetal wastage.

  20. Foetal serum but not urinary β2-microglobulin correlates with histological injury to the kidney.

    PubMed

    Luton, D; Delezoide, A L; Leguy, M C; Gobeaux, C; Vuillard, E; Grangé, G; Guibourdenche, J

    2013-10-01

    In a context of foetal obstructive uropathies, biochemical markers can be helpful to assess the renal function, but most studies to date have focused on their correlation with ultrasound findings and neonatal outcome. Our aim was to evaluate foetal β2-microglobulin as an index of histological injury to the kidney. β2-microglobulin was measured in serum and/or urine from 27 foetuses with bilateral obstructive uropathy, and compared to the findings of kidney examination following the termination of pregnancy. In serum, increased β2-microglobulin levels correlated to a decreased number of glomeruli, a reduction in the blastema and the presence of primitive ducts reflecting renal hypoplasia and dysplasia. However, elevated β2-microglobulin levels in the urine correlated only to a decreased number of glomeruli.

  1. Cardiac primitive cells become committed to a cardiac fate in adult human heart with chronic ischemic disease but fail to acquire mature phenotype: genetic and phenotypic study.

    PubMed

    Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Romano, Veronica; Miraglia, Rita; Sacco, Anna Maria; Latino, Francesca; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Maiello, Ciro; Amarelli, Cristiano; Montagnani, Stefania; Castaldo, Clotilde

    2013-01-01

    Adult human heart hosts a population of cardiac primitive CD117-positive cells (CPCs), which are responsible for physiological tissue homeostasis and regeneration. While the bona fide stem cells express telomerase, their progenies are no longer able to preserve telomeric DNA; hence the balance between their proliferation and differentiation has to be tightly controlled in order to prevent cellular senescence and apoptosis of CPCs before their maturation can be accomplished. We have examined at cellular and molecular level the proliferation, apoptosis and commitment of CPCs isolated from normal (CPC-N) and age-matched pathological adult human hearts (CPC-P) with ischemic heart disease. In the CPC-P, genes related to early stages of developmental processes, nervous system development and neurogenesis, skeletal development, bone and cartilage development were downregulated, while those involved in mesenchymal cell differentiation and heart development were upregulated, together with the transcriptional activation of TGFβ/BMP signaling pathway. In the pathological heart, asymmetric division was the prevalent type of cardiac stem cell division. The population of CPC-P consisted mainly of progenitors of cardiac cell lineages and less precursors; these cells proliferated more, but were also more susceptible to apoptosis with respect to CPC-N. These results indicate that CPCs fail to reach terminal differentiation and functional competence in pathological conditions. Adverse effects of underlying pathology, which disrupts cardiac tissue structure and composition, and cellular senescence, resulting from cardiac stem cell activation in telomere dysfunctional environment, can be responsible for such outcome.

  2. Foetal dose conversion coefficients for ICRP-compliant pregnant models from idealised proton exposures

    PubMed Central

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2009-01-01

    Protection of pregnant women and their foetus against external proton irradiations poses a unique challenge. Assessment of foetal dose due to external protons in galactic cosmic rays and as secondaries generated in aircraft walls is especially important during high-altitude flights. This paper reports a set of fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetus and its brain for external monoenergetic proton beams of six standard configurations (the antero-posterior, the postero-anterior, the right lateral, the left lateral, the rotational and the isotropic). The pregnant female anatomical definitions at each of the three gestational periods (3, 6 and 9 months) are based on newly developed RPI-P series of models whose organ masses were matched within 1% with the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference values. Proton interactions and the transport of secondary particles were carefully simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) and the phantoms consisting of several million voxels at 3 mm resolution. When choosing the physics models in the MCNPX, it was found that the advanced Cascade-Exciton intranuclear cascade model showed a maximum of 9% foetal dose increase compared with the default model combination at intermediate energies below 5 GeV. Foetal dose results from this study are tabulated and compared with previously published data that were based on simplified anatomy. The comparison showed a strong dependence upon the source geometry, energy and gestation period: the dose differences are typically less than 20% for all sources except ISO where systematically 40–80% of higher doses were observed. Below 200 MeV, a larger discrepancy in dose was found due to the Bragg peak shift caused by different anatomy. The tabulated foetal doses represent the latest and most detailed study to date offering a useful set of data to improve radiation protection dosimetry against external protons. PMID:19246483

  3. Foetal Exposure to Maternal Passive Smoking Is Associated with Childhood Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. L.; Lam, T. H.; Leung, T. H.; Wong, W. H. S.; Schooling, M.; Leung, G. M.; Lau, Y. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We examined the hypothesis that foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking is associated with childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. Methods. The study was a population-based cross-sectional survey of Hong Kong Chinese children aged ≤14 years carried out in 2005 to 2006. Results. Foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking was significantly associated with wheeze ever (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.58–2.67), current wheeze (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.48–2.86), allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09–1.37), and eczema ever (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38–1.87). Foetal exposure to maternal active smoking was significantly associated with asthma ever (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.14–3.84), wheeze ever (OR 2.46; 95% CI 1.27–4.78), and current wheeze (OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.24–6.01) but not with allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.70–1.46) or eczema ever (OR 1.38; 95% CI 0.87–2.18). The dose response relationship between wheeze ever and current wheeze with increasing exposure, from no exposure to maternal passive smoking and then to maternal active smoking, further supports causality. Conclusion. There is significant association between foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking and maternal active smoking with childhood asthma and related atopic illnesses. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential causal relationship. PMID:22927783

  4. Similarities between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Genetic and Phenotypic Protease Quasispecies Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nevot, Maria; Jordan-Paiz, Ana; Franco, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are two highly variable RNA viruses that cause chronic infections in humans. Although HCV likely preceded the AIDS epidemic by some decades, the global spread of both viruses is a relatively recent event. Nevertheless, HCV global diversity is higher than that of HIV-1. To identify differences in mutant diversity, we compared the HIV-1 protease and HCV NS3 protease quasispecies. Three protease gene quasispecies samples per virus, isolated from a total of six infected patients, were genetically and phenotypically analyzed at high resolution (HIV-1, 308 individual clones; HCV, 299 clones). Single-nucleotide variant frequency did not differ between quasispecies from the two viruses (HIV-1, 2.4 × 10−3 ± 0.4 × 10−3; HCV, 2.1 × 10−3 ± 0.5 × 10−3) (P = 0.1680). The proportion of synonymous substitutions to potential synonymous sites was similar (3.667 ± 0.6667 and 2.183 ± 0.9048, respectively) (P = 0.2573), and Shannon's entropy values did not differ between HIV-1 and HCV (0.84 ± 0.02 and 0.83 ± 0.12, respectively) (P = 0.9408). Of note, 65% (HIV-1) and 67% (HCV) of the analyzed enzymes displayed detectable protease activity, suggesting that both proteases have a similar mutational robustness. In both viruses, there was a rugged protease enzymatic activity landscape characterized by a sharp peak, representing the master sequence, surrounded by a collection of diverse variants present at lower frequencies. These results indicate that nucleotide quasispecies diversification during chronic infection is not responsible for the higher worldwide genetic diversity observed in HCV. IMPORTANCE HCV global diversity is higher than that of HIV-1. We asked whether HCV genetic diversification during infection is responsible for the higher worldwide genetic diversity observed in HCV. To this end, we analyzed and compared the genotype and enzymatic activities of HIV-1 and HCV protease

  5. Development of intrahepatic bile ducts in rat foetal liver explants in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gall, J. A.; Bhathal, P. S.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of intrahepatic bile ducts was investigated in organ cultures of 13, 16 and 19-day foetal rat livers embedded for up to 10 days in a semi-solid agar gel on a filter-raft assembly. Following 10 days in culture, 13-day foetal explants consisted of liver cell trabeculae lined by endothelial cells. Although maturation of the liver cells and bile canaliculi was observed, duct development was found in less than 10% of the explants. Supplementation of the media with putative inducers of bile duct development or culture of explants adjacent to other tissues did not induce regular duct development. By contrast, explants from the porta hepatis of 19-day foetuses cultured for 4 days, but not 10 days, regularly contained duct-like structures. The formation of the few ducts in cultures of 13-day foetal liver explants indicates that these cells can arise by transformation of hepatoblasts but that specific inducers of development are required for predictable and continuous differentiation of biliary epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2310614

  6. Paradoxical diurnal cortisol changes in neonates suggesting preservation of foetal adrenal rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Iwata, Sachiko; Okamura, Hisayoshi; Saikusa, Mamoru; Hara, Naoko; Urata, Chihoko; Araki, Yuko; Iwata, Osuke

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggested the presence of foetal adrenal rhythms of cortisol, which are entrained in antiphase to maternal rhythms. In contrast, neonates are thought to have no adrenal rhythm until 2–3 months after birth. To test the hypothesis that a foetal-type adrenal rhythm is preserved after birth, saliva samples were collected from 65 preterm/term infants during hospital stay (30–40 weeks corrected age) at 10:00 and 19:00 h. Cortisol levels were assessed for their diurnal difference and dependence on antenatal/postnatal clinical variables. Cortisol levels were lower during periods 15–28 days and >28 days than ≤5 days of life. Lower cortisol was associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational age <28 weeks, and mechanical ventilation after birth. Higher cortisol was associated with vaginal delivery and non-invasive ventilation support at saliva collection. PIH and non-invasive mechanical ventilation at saliva collection were associated with cortisol levels even after adjustment for postnatal age. Cortisol levels were higher in the evening than in the morning, which was unassociated with gestational and postnatal age. Higher cortisol levels in the evening suggest the preservation of a foetal-type diurnal rhythm. Cortisol levels are associated with intrinsic and extrinsic variables, such as PIH, delivery mode, gestational age, and respiratory conditions. PMID:27752095

  7. The effect of foetal movement counting on maternal anxiety: A randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Delaram, M; Shams, S

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of foetal movement counting on maternal anxiety. In a randomised, controlled trial, 208 primigravida women with a singleton pregnancy were allocated either to perform daily foetal movement counting (n100) from 28 weeks ’ gestation or to follow standard Iranian antenatal care (n108). Maternal anxiety was measured by Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS (16.0). There was no significant difference in mean state and trait anxiety scores at 28 weeks ’ gestation; the difference was significant at 37 weeks ’ gestation in state anxiety score between the intervention and control groups (35.34 9.98 vs. 38.25 9.63, respectively, P0.001). A significant difference was found in mean trait anxiety score at 37 weeks ’ gestation between the two groups (35.88 8.19 vs. 39.15 9.25, respectively, P 0.008). Women who performed foetal movement counting from 28 to 37 weeks ’ gestation reported less anxiety compared with those in control group.

  8. Controversies and considerations regarding the termination of pregnancy for Foetal Anomalies in Islam

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately one-fourth of all the inhabitants on earth are Muslims. Due to unprecedented migration, physicians are often confronted with cultures other than their own that adhere to different pdigms. Discussion In Islam, and most religions, abortion is forbidden. Islam is considerably liberal concerning abortion, which is dependent on (i) the threat of harm to mothers, (ii) the status of the pregnancy before or after ensoulment (on the 120th day of gestation), and (iii) the presence of foetal anomalies that are incompatible with life. Considerable variation in religious edicts exists, but most Islamic scholars agree that the termination of a pregnancy for foetal anomalies is allowed before ensoulment, after which abortion becomes totally forbidden, even in the presence of foetal abnormalities; the exception being a risk to the mother’s life or confirmed intrauterine death. Summary The authors urge Muslim law makers to also consider abortion post ensoulment if it is certain that the malformed foetus will decease soon after birth or will be severely malformed and physically and mentally incapacitated after birth to avoid substantial hardship that may continue for years for mothers and family members. The authors recommend that an institutional committee governed and monitored by a national committee make decisions pertaining to abortion to ensure that ethics are preserved and mistakes are prevented. Anomalous foetuses must be detected at the earliest possible time to enable an appropriate medical intervention prior to the 120th day. PMID:24499356

  9. THE EFFECT OF ANTISERUM, ALONE AND WITH HYDROCORTISONE, ON FOETAL MOUSE BONES IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Honor B.; Weiss, L.

    1965-01-01

    1. The effects of normal rabbit serum and of rabbit antiserum to whole foetal mouse tissues, on the isolated limb bones of late foetal mice were studied in organ culture, and the influence of hydrocortisone on these effects was investigated. 2. Unheated normal serum caused slight loss of metachromatic material from the cartilage matrix, and some resorption of both cartilage and bone. 3. In unheated antiserum to foetal mouse tissues, the terminal cartilage was smaller and less metachromatic than in paired controls in normal serum, while osteoclasis was so intense that in many explants the bone had almost disappeared. The amount of necrosis varied with different batches of antiserum. 4. The changes produced by normal serum and antiserum could be largely prevented by heating the sera to 57°C for 45 minutes. 5. The effects could also be inhibited by the addition of hydrocortisone to the unheated sera; as little as 0.1 µg hydrocortisone per ml of medium had a well marked protective action. 6. It is suggested that (a) unheated antiserum causes a release of lysosomal enzymes with consequent breakdown of intercellular material, (b) this release is due to an indirect action on the lysosome via an increased permeability of the cell membrane, (c) hydrocortisone does not affect the antigen-antibody reaction, but inhibits the autolytic changes that normally follow this reaction, possibly by stabilising both the lysosomal and cell membranes. PMID:14276776

  10. H-ras, but not N-ras, induces an invasive phenotype in human breast epithelial cells: a role for MMP-2 in the H-ras-induced invasive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Moon, A; Kim, M S; Kim, T G; Kim, S H; Kim, H E; Chen, Y Q; Kim, H R

    2000-01-15

    Elevated p21ras expression is associated with tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer including the extent of invasion into fat tissues, infiltration into lymphatic vessels and tumor recurrence. In the present study, we have examined the roles of H-ras and N-ras, members of the human ras gene family, in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. We show that H-ras, but not N-ras, induces an invasive phenotype in human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A) as determined by the Matrigel invasion assay, whereas both H-ras and N-ras induce anchorage-independent growth, as shown by soft agar assay. We examined the effects of H-ras and N-ras activation on the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, which can degrade type IV collagen, the major structural collagen of the basement membrane. We show that MMP-2 is efficiently induced by H-ras, whereas MMP-9 induction is more prominent in N-ras-activated MCF10A cells. We also show that H-ras-mediated invasiveness is significantly inhibited when the expression of MMP-2 is down-regulated, using an oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary to the MMP-2 mRNA, or when MMP-2 activity is blocked by its inhibitor TIMP-2 (tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-2). Our results show that the H-ras-induced invasive phenotype is associated more closely with the expression of MMP-2 in human breast epithelial cells, rather than the induction of MMP-9 expression, as shown previously for rat embryonic fibroblasts.

  11. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Prevents the Transformed Phenotypes Induced by 17 β-estradiol in Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kocdor, Hilal; Kocdor, Mehmet A.; Russo, Jose; Snider, Kara E.; Vanegas, Johana E.; Russo, Irma H.; Fernandez, Sandra V.

    2009-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced during pregnancy, can elicit life-long refractoriness to carcinogenesis by differentiation of the breast epithelium. Human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F form tubules in collagen, mimicking the normal ductules, We have shown that 17 β-estradiol (E2) alter the ductulogenic pattern of these cells. The effect of the recombinant hCG (rhCG) in vitro was evaluated on the transformation of MCF-10F induced by E2. MCF-10F cells were treated with 70nM E2 alone or in combination with 50 IU/ml rhCG during 2 weeks, while the controls were treated with DMSO (the solvent in which E2 was dissolved) or rhCG alone. At the end of treatment, the cells were plated in type I collagen matrix (3D-cultures) for detecting 2 main phenotypes of cell transformation, namely the loss of ductulogenic capacity and the formation of solid masses. Although E2 significantly increased solid mass formation, this effect was prevented when MCF-10F cells were treated with E2 in combination with rhCG. Furthermore, E2 increased the main duct width (p<0.001), and caused a disruption of the luminal architecture, whereas rhCG increased the length of the tubules (p<0.001) and produced tertiary branching. In conclusion, rhCG was able to abrogate the transforming abilities of estradiol, and had the differentiating property by increasing the branching of the tubules formed by breast epithelial cells in collagen. These results further support our hypothesis, known as the terminal differentiation hypothesis of breast cancer prevention, that predicts that hCG treatment results in protection from tumorigenic changes by the loss of susceptible stem cells 1 through a differentiation to refractory stem cells 2 and increase differentiation of the mammary gland. PMID:19647089

  12. siRNA Knockdown of Ribosomal Protein Gene RPL19 Abrogates the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Beesley, Carol; Dodson, Andrew; Forootan, Shiva; Dickinson, Timothy; Gerard, Patricia; Lane, Brian; Yao, Sheng; Cooper, Colin S.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.; Gosden, Christine M.; Ke, Youqiang; Foster, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We provide novel functional data that posttranscriptional silencing of gene RPL19 using RNAi not only abrogates the malignant phenotype of PC-3M prostate cancer cells but is selective with respect to transcription and translation of other genes. Reducing RPL19 transcription modulates a subset of genes, evidenced by gene expression array analysis and Western blotting, but does not compromise cell proliferation or apoptosis in-vitro. However, growth of xenografted tumors containing the knocked-down RPL19 in-vivo is significantly reduced. Analysis of the modulated genes reveals induction of the non-malignant phenotype principally to involve perturbation of networks of transcription factors and cellular adhesion genes. The data provide evidence that extra-ribosomal regulatory functions of RPL19, beyond protein synthesis, are critical regulators of cellular phenotype. Targeting key members of affected networks identified by gene expression analysis raises the possibility of therapeutically stabilizing a benign phenotype generated by modulating the expression of an individual gene and thereafter constraining a malignant phenotype while leaving non-malignant tissues unaffected. PMID:21799931

  13. Different cryopreservation requirements in foetal versus adult skin cells from an endangered mammal, the Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    León-Quinto, Trinidad; Simón, Miguel A; Cadenas, Rafael; Martínez, Africa; Serna, Arturo

    2014-04-01

    Cryobanking somatic foetal cells acquire much relevance in endangered species for biodiversity conservation purposes. Such cells could be later used to reintroduce the lost genes into the breeding pool, by inducing pluripotency and/or nuclear transfer if necessary. Since requirements for preserving foetal cells are not always the same as for adult ones, we evaluated the cryosensitivity of foetal skin cells in comparison with adult ones from the critically endangered Iberian lynx. Responses to cryoinjury were analyzed in both thawed cell types by means of cell viability and functionality (by analyzing their membrane integrity, metabolic activity, glycosaminoglycan content and proliferative activity). Freezing media included the permeating cryoprotectant Me2SO, either alone or along with the non-permeating cryoprotectant sucrose at 0.1 or 0.2M. When Me2SO was the only cryoprotectant, survival rate fell in thawed foetal cells to 54±4% (against 89±6% for thawed adult ones) and both proliferative and metabolic activities remained significantly lower than values for thawed adult cells. However, the combination of sucrose (both 0.1 as 0.2) and Me2SO in foetal cells significantly increased their survival rates (to 71±4% and 73±5%, respectively), proliferative activities (partially at day 7 and completely at day 14 after thawing) and metabolic activities. Our findings clearly show a difference between foetal and adult cells concerning their cryopreservation sensitivity and requirements, as well as their recovery time after thawing. These results are of relevance for the cryopreservation of foetal and adult cells from the Iberian lynx and could be also useful for other mammals.

  14. A Case of Bordetella brochiseptica at a Military Medical Facility in Hawai'i: Phenotypic and Molecular Testing of an Uncommon Human Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Washington, Michael A; Agee, Willie A; Kajiura, Lauren; Hawley-Molloy, Joshua S; Staege, Catherine M; Barnhill, Jason C

    2015-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) is rarely implicated in human disease. Human infections typically occur in the context of immunosuppression and while human infection has been sporadically reported in the literature, the majority of these reports are largely descriptive and do not explore the molecular and phenotypic properties of the isolates in question. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a B. bronchiseptica isolate derived from an HIV positive patient at Tripler Army Medical Center on O'ahu. This case represents the first published report of human infection of B. bronchiseptica in the state of Hawai'i and the most detailed description of the biochemical and molecular features of a Hawaiian isolate to date. PMID:26225268

  15. A Case of Bordetella brochiseptica at a Military Medical Facility in Hawai‘i: Phenotypic and Molecular Testing of an Uncommon Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Agee, Willie A; Kajiura, Lauren; Hawley-Molloy, Joshua S; Staege, Catherine M; Barnhill, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) is rarely implicated in human disease. Human infections typically occur in the context of immunosuppression and while human infection has been sporadically reported in the literature, the majority of these reports are largely descriptive and do not explore the molecular and phenotypic properties of the isolates in question. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a B. bronchiseptica isolate derived from an HIV positive patient at Tripler Army Medical Center on O‘ahu. This case represents the first published report of human infection of B. bronchiseptica in the state of Hawai‘i and the most detailed description of the biochemical and molecular features of a Hawaiian isolate to date. PMID:26225268

  16. The Drosophila phenotype ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phenotype ontologies are queryable classifications of phenotypes. They provide a widely-used means for annotating phenotypes in a form that is human-readable, programatically accessible and that can be used to group annotations in biologically meaningful ways. Accurate manual annotation requires clear textual definitions for terms. Accurate grouping and fruitful programatic usage require high-quality formal definitions that can be used to automate classification. The Drosophila phenotype ontology (DPO) has been used to annotate over 159,000 phenotypes in FlyBase to date, but until recently lacked textual or formal definitions. Results We have composed textual definitions for all DPO terms and formal definitions for 77% of them. Formal definitions reference terms from a range of widely-used ontologies including the Phenotype and Trait Ontology (PATO), the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Cell Ontology (CL). We also describe a generally applicable system, devised for the DPO, for recording and reasoning about the timing of death in populations. As a result of the new formalisations, 85% of classifications in the DPO are now inferred rather than asserted, with much of this classification leveraging the structure of the GO. This work has significantly improved the accuracy and completeness of classification and made further development of the DPO more sustainable. Conclusions The DPO provides a set of well-defined terms for annotating Drosophila phenotypes and for grouping and querying the resulting annotation sets in biologically meaningful ways. Such queries have already resulted in successful function predictions from phenotype annotation. Moreover, such formalisations make extended queries possible, including cross-species queries via the external ontologies used in formal definitions. The DPO is openly available under an open source license in both OBO and OWL formats. There is good potential for it to be used more broadly by the Drosophila

  17. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P < 0.0001 in all instances). Present analysis supports the idea that phenotypic divergence of Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human

  18. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P < 0.0001 in all instances). Present analysis supports the idea that phenotypic divergence of Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human

  19. Studying the Genetics of Complex Disease With Ancestry‐Specific Human Phenotype Networks: The Case of Type 2 Diabetes in East Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jingya; Darabos, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the discovery of over 200 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Additionally, East Asians develop T2DM at a higher rate, younger age, and lower body mass index than their European ancestry counterparts. The reason behind this occurrence remains elusive. With comprehensive searches through the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) GWAS catalog literature, we compiled a database of 2,800 ancestry‐specific SNPs associated with T2DM and 70 other related traits. Manual data extraction was necessary because the GWAS catalog reports statistics such as odds ratio and P‐value, but does not consistently include ancestry information. Currently, many statistics are derived by combining initial and replication samples from study populations of mixed ancestry. Analysis of all‐inclusive data can be misleading, as not all SNPs are transferable across diverse populations. We used ancestry data to construct ancestry‐specific human phenotype networks (HPN) centered on T2DM. Quantitative and visual analysis of network models reveal the genetic disparities between ancestry groups. Of the 27 phenotypes in the East Asian HPN, six phenotypes were unique to the network, revealing the underlying ancestry‐specific nature of some SNPs associated with T2DM. We studied the relationship between T2DM and five phenotypes unique to the East Asian HPN to generate new interaction hypotheses in a clinical context. The genetic differences found in our ancestry‐specific HPNs suggest different pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM among different populations. Our study underlines the importance of ancestry in the development of T2DM and its implications in pharmocogenetics and personalized medicine. PMID:27061195

  20. Toward harmonized phenotyping of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells by flow cytometry: results from an interim study.

    PubMed

    Mandruzzato, Susanna; Brandau, Sven; Britten, Cedrik M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Damuzzo, Vera; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Maurer, Dominik; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Welters, Marij J P; Walter, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing interest for monitoring circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in cancer patients, but there are also divergences in their phenotypic definition. To overcome this obstacle, the Cancer Immunoguiding Program under the umbrella of the Association of Cancer Immunotherapy is coordinating a proficiency panel program that aims at harmonizing MDSC phenotyping. After a consultation period, a two-stage approach was designed to harmonize MDSC phenotype. In the first step, an international consortium of 23 laboratories immunophenotyped 10 putative MDSC subsets on pretested, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors to assess the level of concordance and define robust marker combinations for the identification of circulating MDSCs. At this stage, no mandatory requirements to standardize reagents or protocols were introduced. Data analysis revealed a small intra-laboratory, but very high inter-laboratory variance for all MDSC subsets, especially for the granulocytic subsets. In particular, the use of a dead-cell marker altered significantly the reported percentage of granulocytic MDSCs, confirming that these cells are especially sensitive to cryopreservation and/or thawing. Importantly, the gating strategy was heterogeneous and associated with high inter-center variance. Overall, our results document the high variability in MDSC phenotyping in the multicenter setting if no harmonization/standardization measures are applied. Although the observed variability depended on a number of identified parameters, the main parameter associated with variation was the gating strategy. Based on these findings, we propose further efforts to harmonize marker combinations and gating parameters to identify strategies for a robust enumeration of MDSC subsets.

  1. An open-source framework for stress-testing non-invasive foetal ECG extraction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Fernando; Behar, Joachim; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decades, many studies have been published on the extraction of non-invasive foetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) from abdominal recordings. Most of these contributions claim to obtain excellent results in detecting foetal QRS (FQRS) complexes in terms of location. A small subset of authors have investigated the extraction of morphological features from the NI-FECG. However, due to the shortage of available public databases, the large variety of performance measures employed and the lack of open-source reference algorithms, most contributions cannot be meaningfully assessed. This article attempts to address these issues by presenting a standardised methodology for stress testing NI-FECG algorithms, including absolute data, as well as extraction and evaluation routines. To that end, a large database of realistic artificial signals was created, totaling 145.8 h of multichannel data and over one million FQRS complexes. An important characteristic of this dataset is the inclusion of several non-stationary events (e.g. foetal movements, uterine contractions and heart rate fluctuations) that are critical for evaluating extraction routines. To demonstrate our testing methodology, three classes of NI-FECG extraction algorithms were evaluated: blind source separation (BSS), template subtraction (TS) and adaptive methods (AM). Experiments were conducted to benchmark the performance of eight NI-FECG extraction algorithms on the artificial database focusing on: FQRS detection and morphological analysis (foetal QT and T/QRS ratio). The overall median FQRS detection accuracies (i.e. considering all non-stationary events) for the best performing methods in each group were 99.9% for BSS, 97.9% for AM and 96.0% for TS. Both FQRS detections and morphological parameters were shown to heavily depend on the extraction techniques and signal-to-noise ratio. Particularly, it is shown that their evaluation in the source domain, obtained after using a BSS technique, should be

  2. A health promotion perspective on the House of Commons' report "Foetal Alcohol Syndrome: a Preventable Tragedy".

    PubMed

    Loney, E A; Green, K L; Nanson, J L

    1994-01-01

    The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion is used as a conceptual framework to examine the recommendations concerning prevention in the House of Commons' Report "Foetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Tragedy." Fetal alcohol syndrome cannot be separated from the complex social, physical and economic environments affecting alcohol consumption. For substantial progress to be made in preventing this significant cause of mental handicap, it will be necessary to consider a wide range of preventive actions, beyond public education and mandatory warning labels on alcoholic beverages. A health promotion framework offers a comprehensive, intersectoral approach to this problem.

  3. Low- versus high-baseline epinephrine output shapes opposite innate cytokine profiles: presence of Lewis- and Fischer-like neurohormonal immune phenotypes in humans?

    PubMed

    Elenkov, Ilia J; Kvetnansky, Richard; Hashiramoto, Akira; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Link, Amrey A; Zachman, Keith; Crane, Marianna; Jezova, Daniela; Rovensky, Jozef; Dimitrov, Mariana A; Gold, Philip W; Bonini, Sergio; Fleisher, Thomas; Chrousos, George P; Wilder, Ronald L

    2008-08-01

    Immunogenetic mechanisms operating within the immune system are known to influence cytokine profiles and disease susceptibility. Yet the role of the individual's neurohormonal background in these processes remains undefined. Hormonal imbalances are documented in immune-related diseases, but it is unclear whether this represents a secondary phenomenon or a primary "defect" related to specific neurohormonal immune phenotype(s). We report that in a large subpopulation of healthy humans the baseline epinephrine output (but not cortisol and sex steroid hormones) correlated inversely with proinflammatory and positively with anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Thus, low vs high epinephrine excretors had a 2- to 5-fold higher TNF-alpha and IL-12 production but 2-fold lower IL-10 production induced by LPS ex vivo. In alternative settings, we found low baseline levels and profoundly blunted stress-induced epinephrine responses but high TNF-alpha levels in Lewis vs Fischer inbred rats. Additionally, isoproterenol, a beta adrenoreceptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced TNF-alpha production, with more pronounced effect in Lewis than in Fischer rats. In human monocytes, epinephrine and the beta(2) adrenoreceptor agonist fenoterol potently inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-12, but stimulated IL-10 production. The order of potency for hormones able to inhibit IL-12 production ex vivo was: epinephrine > norepinephrine > or = 1,25-(OH)(2) vitamin D(3) > hydrocortisone. This indicates that baseline epinephrine conditions cytokine responsiveness and through this mechanism intrinsic hypo- or hyperactive adrenal medullas in some individuals may shape opposite cytokine profiles. Since Lewis and Fischer rats have opposite susceptibility to experimental immunological diseases, this suggests that the parallel human phenotypes could be linked to differing responsiveness and susceptibility to infections and immune/inflammatory-related conditions. PMID:18641310

  4. Analysis of the Catecholaminergic Phenotype in Human SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Roberta; Civiero, Laura; Ferrari, Vanni; Codolo, Gaia; Greggio, Elisa; Bubacco, Luigi; Beltramini, Mariano; Bisaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Human cell lines are often used to investigate cellular pathways relevant for physiological or pathological processes or to evaluate cell toxicity or protection induced by different compounds, including potential drugs. In this study, we analyzed and compared the differentiating activities of three agents (retinoic acid, staurosporine and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) on the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 cell lines; the first cell line is largely used in the field of neuroscience, while the second is still poorly characterized. After evaluating their effects in terms of cell proliferation and morphology, we investigated their catecholaminergic properties by assessing the expression profiles of the major genes involved in catecholamine synthesis and storage and the cellular concentrations of the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline. Our results demonstrate that the two cell lines possess similar abilities to differentiate and acquire a neuron-like morphology. The most evident effects in SH-SY5Y cells were observed in the presence of staurosporine, while in BE(2)-M17 cells, retinoic acid induced the strongest effects. Undifferentiated SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 cells are characterized by the production of both NA and DA, but their levels are considerably higher in BE(2)-M17 cells. Moreover, the NAergic phenotype appears to be more pronounced in SH-SY5Y cells, while BE(2)-M17 cells have a more prominent DAergic phenotype. Finally, the catecholamine concentration strongly increases upon differentiation induced by staurosporine in both cell lines. In conclusion, in this work the catecholaminergic phenotype of the human BE(2)-M17 cell line upon differentiation was characterized for the first time. Our data suggest that SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-M17 represent two alternative cell models for the neuroscience field.

  5. Up-regulation of Store-operated Ca2+ Entry and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Promote the Acinar Phenotype of the Primary Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Alevizos, Ilias; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-04-15

    The signaling pathways involved in the generation and maintenance of exocrine gland acinar cells have not yet been established. Primary human salivary gland epithelial cells, derived from salivary gland biopsies, acquired an acinar-like phenotype when the [Ca(2+)] in the serum-free medium (keratinocyte growth medium, KGM) was increased from 0.05 mm (KGM-L) to 1.2 mm (KGM-H). Here we examined the mechanism underlying this Ca(2+)-dependent generation of the acinar cell phenotype. Compared with cells in KGM-L, those in KGM-H display enhancement of Orai1, STIM1, STIM2, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression together with an increase in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), SOCE-dependent nuclear translocation of pGFP-NFAT1, and NFAT-dependent but not NFκB-dependent gene expression. Importantly, AQP5, an acinar-specific protein critical for function, is up-regulated in KGM-H via SOCE/NFAT-dependent gene expression. We identified critical NFAT binding motifs in the AQP5 promoter that are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent up-regulation of AQP5. These important findings reveal that the Ca(2+)-induced switch of salivary epithelial cells to an acinar-like phenotype involves remodeling of SOCE and NFAT signaling, which together control the expression of proteins critically relevant for acinar cell function. Our data provide a novel strategy for generating and maintaining acinar cells in culture.

  6. A Diagnostically Promising Technique for Tallying Nominal Reference Errors in the Narratives of School-Aged Children with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, John C.; Coggins, Truman

    2008-01-01

    Background: Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) include the range of disabilities that occur in children exposed to alcohol during pregnancy, with Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) on the severe end of the spectrum. Clinical research has documented a range of cognitive, social, and communication deficits in FASD and it indicates the need for…

  7. Evolution of Phenotypic Drug Susceptibility and Viral Replication Capacity during Long-Term Virologic Failure of Protease Inhibitor Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Jason D.; Wrin, Terri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Segal, Mark R.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2002-01-01

    Continued use of antiretroviral therapy despite the emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been associated with the durable maintenance of plasma HIV RNA levels below pretherapy levels. The factors that may account for this partial control of viral replication were assessed in a longitudinal observational study of 20 HIV-infected adults who remained on a stable protease inhibitor-based regimen despite ongoing viral replication (plasma HIV RNA levels consistently >500 copies/ml). Longitudinal plasma samples (n = 248) were assayed for drug susceptibility and viral replication capacity (measured by using a single-cycle recombinant-virus assay). The initial treatment-mediated decrease in plasma viremia was directly proportional to the reduction in replicative capacity (P = 0.01). Early virologic rebound was associated the emergence of a virus population exhibiting increased protease inhibitor phenotypic resistance, while replicative capacity remained low. During long-term virologic failure, plasma HIV RNA levels often remained stable or increased slowly, while phenotypic resistance continued to increase and replicative capacity decreased slowly. The emergence of primary genotypic mutations within protease (particularly V82A, I84V, and L90M) was temporally associated with increasing phenotypic resistance and decreasing replicative capacity, while the emergence of secondary mutations within protease was associated with more-gradual changes in both phenotypic resistance and replicative capacity. We conclude that HIV may be constrained in its ability to become both highly resistant and highly fit and that this may contribute to the continued partial suppression of plasma HIV RNA levels that is observed in some patients with drug-resistant viremia. PMID:12368352

  8. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T).

  9. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, A. M.; Humrighouse, B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324T, 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496T, and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300T. A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844T = CCUG 67100T = LMG 28801T. PMID:26763962

  10. Efficient recellularisation of decellularised whole-liver grafts using biliary tree and foetal hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ogiso, Satoshi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Fukumitsu, Ken; Ishii, Takamichi; Kojima, Hidenobu; Miyauchi, Yuya; Yamaoka, Ryoya; Komori, Junji; Katayama, Hokahiro; Kawai, Takayuki; Yoshitoshi, Elena Yukie; Kita, Sadahiko; Yasuda, Katsutaro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    A whole-organ regeneration approach, using a decellularised xenogeneic liver as a scaffold for the construction of a transplantable liver was recently reported. Deriving suitable scaffolds was the first step towards clinical application; however, effective recellularisation remains to be achieved. This report presents a strategy for the improvement of the recellularisation process, using novel cell-seeding technique and cell source. We evaluated recellularised liver grafts repopulated through the portal vein or the biliary duct with mice adult hepatocytes or E14.5 foetal hepatocytes. More than 80% of the cells seeded through the biliary tree entered the parenchyma beyond the ductule-lining matrix barrier and distributed throughout the liver lobule. In contrast, about 20% of the cells seeded through the portal tree entered the parenchyma. The gene expression levels of foetal hepatocyte albumin, glucose 6-phosphatase, transferrin, cytokeratin 19, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were increased in three-dimensional cultures in the native liver-derived scaffolds, and the activation of liver detoxification enzymes and formation of biliary duct-like structures were supported. The metabolic functions of liver grafts recellularised with different cell types were similar. These results suggest that biliary tree cell-seeding approach is promising, and that liver progenitor cells represent a good cell source candidate. PMID:27767181

  11. Expression pattern of CD34 at the maternal-foetal interface during pregnancy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hong, L; Hou, C; Li, X; Li, C; Yu, M

    2013-10-01

    The pig exhibits a non-invasive, epitheliochorial placentation. Adhesion molecules are indispensable for successful implantation and establishment of placentation. CD34 is an adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). To take the first step to investigate the role of CD34 in placentation, we examined the expression pattern of CD34 at the maternal-foetal interface in Yorkshire gilts on days 15, 26, 50 or 95 and in Meishan gilts on days 26, 50 or 95 of pregnancy (n = 3 gilts/breed/day of pregnancy) by immunohistochemical technique. The CD34-positive signals were detected in uterine luminal epithelium and trophectoderm in Yorkshire pigs; the staining for CD34 was located in trophectoderm but barely detectable at the uterine luminal epithelium on day 15 of pregnancy. Then, the expression of CD34 increased dramatically in both the uterine luminal epithelium and trophectoderm by day 26, and weak staining intensity was observed at the maternal-foetal interface on days 50 and 95 of pregnancy. The expression pattern of CD34 in Meishan pigs is similar to that in Yorkshire pigs except that only a few positive signals were observed at the luminal epithelium on day 26 of pregnancy. These results suggest that CD34 may be involved in mediating the cell-to-cell adhesion between trophectoderm and the luminal epithelial cells during early pregnancy in pigs.

  12. Offspring Hormones Reflect the Maternal Prenatal Social Environment: Potential for Foetal Programming?

    PubMed

    Meise, Kristine; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Forcada, Jaume; Hoffman, Joseph Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Females of many species adaptively program their offspring to predictable environmental conditions, a process that is often mediated by hormones. Laboratory studies have shown, for instance, that social density affects levels of maternal cortisol and testosterone, leading to fitness-relevant changes in offspring physiology and behaviour. However, the effects of social density remain poorly understood in natural populations due to the difficulty of disentangling confounding influences such as climatic variation and food availability. Colonially breeding marine mammals offer a unique opportunity to study maternal effects in response to variable colony densities under similar ecological conditions. We therefore quantified maternal and offspring hormone levels in 84 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) from two closely neighbouring colonies of contrasting density. Hair samples were used as they integrate hormone levels over several weeks or months and therefore represent in utero conditions during foetal development. We found significantly higher levels of cortisol and testosterone (both P < 0.001) in mothers from the high density colony, reflecting a more stressful and competitive environment. In addition, offspring testosterone showed a significant positive correlation with maternal cortisol (P < 0.05). Although further work is needed to elucidate the potential consequences for offspring fitness, these findings raise the intriguing possibility that adaptive foetal programming might occur in fur seals in response to the maternal social environment. They also lend support to the idea that hormonally mediated maternal effects may depend more strongly on the maternal regulation of androgen rather than cortisol levels.

  13. Offspring Hormones Reflect the Maternal Prenatal Social Environment: Potential for Foetal Programming?

    PubMed Central

    Meise, Kristine; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Forcada, Jaume; Hoffman, Joseph Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Females of many species adaptively program their offspring to predictable environmental conditions, a process that is often mediated by hormones. Laboratory studies have shown, for instance, that social density affects levels of maternal cortisol and testosterone, leading to fitness-relevant changes in offspring physiology and behaviour. However, the effects of social density remain poorly understood in natural populations due to the difficulty of disentangling confounding influences such as climatic variation and food availability. Colonially breeding marine mammals offer a unique opportunity to study maternal effects in response to variable colony densities under similar ecological conditions. We therefore quantified maternal and offspring hormone levels in 84 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) from two closely neighbouring colonies of contrasting density. Hair samples were used as they integrate hormone levels over several weeks or months and therefore represent in utero conditions during foetal development. We found significantly higher levels of cortisol and testosterone (both P < 0.001) in mothers from the high density colony, reflecting a more stressful and competitive environment. In addition, offspring testosterone showed a significant positive correlation with maternal cortisol (P < 0.05). Although further work is needed to elucidate the potential consequences for offspring fitness, these findings raise the intriguing possibility that adaptive foetal programming might occur in fur seals in response to the maternal social environment. They also lend support to the idea that hormonally mediated maternal effects may depend more strongly on the maternal regulation of androgen rather than cortisol levels. PMID:26761814

  14. Diagnostic nomenclature for foetal alcohol spectrum disorders: the continuing challenge of causality.

    PubMed

    Miller, A R

    2013-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is a risk factor for neurologically based cognitive and adaptive disability. Diagnostic nomenclature for prenatally exposed children with cognitive and adaptive disability who lack features for foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or partial FAS includes the terms alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) and foetal alcohol spectrum disorder(s) (FASD). Although these terms are now widely used, this paper argues that both are problematic. ARND is flawed by unjustifiably turning a risk factor into a causal factor and shrouding the result in terminological ambiguity, while FASD is not appropriate as a clinical label, and its use as a proxy for ARND deflects critical attention from the causal inferencing that is integral to diagnosing children with an alcohol-related teratogenic condition. Existing nomenclature is at odds with logical and evidence-based diagnosing and also has implications for interpretation of epidemiological data. Diagnostic nomenclature that is not tightly linked to causal inference is preferable at the present stage of this field's development.

  15. Assessment of foetal risk associated with 93 non-US-FDA approved medications during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-jedai, Ahmed H.; Balhareth, Sakra S.; Algain, Roaa A.

    2012-01-01

    Health care practitioners utilize the United States-Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) pregnancy categorization (A, B, C, D, X) for making decision on the appropriateness of certain medications during pregnancy. Many non US-FDA approved medications are registered and marketed in Saudi Arabia. However, these medications do not have an assigned pregnancy risk categorization like those approved in the US. The objective of this review is to evaluate, report, and categorize the foetal risk associated with non-US-FDA approved medications registered by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (S-FDA) according to the US-FDA pregnancy risk categorization system. We identified 109 non-US-FDA approved medications in the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) as of October 2007. We searched for data on functional or anatomical birth defects or embryocidal-associated risk using different databases and references. An algorithm for risk assessment was used to determine a pregnancy risk category for each medication. Out of 93 eligible medications, 73% were assigned category risk C, 10 medications (11%) were assigned category risk D, and 12 medications (13%) were assigned category risk B. Only three medications were judged to be safe during pregnancy based on the available evidence and were assigned category risk A. Inconsistencies in defining and reporting the foetal risk category among different drug regulatory authorities could create confusion and affect prescribing. We believe that standardization and inclusion of this information in the medication package insert is extremely important to all health care practitioners. PMID:23960803

  16. Foetal programming and cortisol secretion in early childhood: A meta-analysis of different programming variables.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jessica; Tarabulsy, George M; Bussières, Eve-Line

    2015-08-01

    It is widely recognized that different events may take place in the intrauterine environment that may influence later developmental outcome. Scholars have long postulated that maternal prenatal stress, alcohol or drug use, and cigarette smoking may impact foetal formation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may later influence different aspects of early childhood socioemotional and cognitive development. However, results linking each of these factors with child cortisol secretion have been mixed. The current meta-analysis examined the relation between each of these programming variables and child cortisol secretion in studies conducted up to December 31st, 2012. Studies were included if they were conducted prior to child age 60 months, and if they reported an index of effect size linking either maternal prenatal stress, alcohol or drug use, or cigarette smoking with an index of child cortisol secretion. In total, 19 studies (N=2260) revealed an average effect size of d=.36 (p<.001). Moderator analyses revealed that greater effect sizes could be traced to maternal alcohol use, to the use of retrospective research methodology, where mothers are questioned after childbirth regarding programming variables, and to the use of baseline measures of cortisol secretion, as opposed to recovery measures. Discussion focuses on processes that link the environment to foetal development and how both are linked to later adaptation.

  17. Fasciola hepatica phenotypic characterization in Andean human endemic areas: valley versus altiplanic patterns analysed in liver flukes from sheep from Cajamarca and Mantaro, Peru.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Adela; Perez-Crespo, Ignácio; Khoubbane, Messaoud; Artigas, Patricio; Panova, Miroslava; Ortiz, Pedro; Maco, Vicente; Espinoza, José R; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2012-03-01

    Fascioliasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. Of both species, F. hepatica is the only one described in the Americas, mainly transmitted by lymnaeid snail vectors of the Galba/Fossaria group. Human fascioliasis endemic areas are mainly located in high altitude areas of Andean countries. Given the necessity to characterize F. hepatica populations involved, the phenotypic features of fasciolid adults infecting sheep present in human fascioliasis endemic areas were analysed in the Cajamarca Valley and Mantaro Valley (valley transmission patterns) and the northern Bolivian Altiplano (altiplanic transmission pattern). A computer image analysis system (CIAS) was applied on the basis of standardized measurements. The aforementioned highland populations were compared to standard lowland natural and experimental populations of European origin. Liver fluke size was studied by multivariate analyses. Two phenotypic patterns could be distinguished in F. hepatica adult size: the valley pattern (Cajamarca and Mantaro, Peru) and the altiplanic pattern (northern Altiplano, Bolivia). Results showed that the Andean valley population and European standard populations presented a phenotypic homogeneity. The Altiplano population showed a large size range with a pronouncedly lower minimum size indicating that uterus gravidity is reached at a smaller size than in valley populations. The results of this study demonstrate that there is no apparent relationship between the shape of fasciolid adults with regard to altitudinal difference or geographical origin and that allometry-free shape appears as a more stable trait than size in fasciolid species. Results are analysed in terms of intensity/crowding effect aspects and permanent/seasonal transmission characteristics.

  18. Three deaf mice: mouse models for TECTA-based human hereditary deafness reveal domain-specific structural phenotypes in the tectorial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Legan, P. Kevin; Goodyear, Richard J.; Morín, Matías; Mencia, Angeles; Pollard, Hilary; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Korchagina, Julia; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mayo, Fernando; Moreno, Felipe; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel-Angel; Richardson, Guy P.

    2014-01-01

    Tecta is a modular, non-collagenous protein of the tectorial membrane (TM), an extracellular matrix of the cochlea essential for normal hearing. Missense mutations in Tecta cause dominant forms of non-syndromic deafness and a genotype–phenotype correlation has been reported in humans, with mutations in different Tecta domains causing mid- or high-frequency hearing impairments that are either stable or progressive. Three mutant mice were created as models for human Tecta mutations; the TectaL1820F,G1824D/+ mouse for zona pellucida (ZP) domain mutations causing stable mid-frequency hearing loss in a Belgian family, the TectaC1837G/+ mouse for a ZP-domain mutation underlying progressive mid-frequency hearing loss in a Spanish family and the TectaC1619S/+ mouse for a zonadhesin-like (ZA) domain mutation responsible for progressive, high-frequency hearing loss in a French family. Mutations in the ZP and ZA domains generate distinctly different changes in the structure of the TM. Auditory brainstem response thresholds in the 8–40 kHz range are elevated by 30–40 dB in the ZP-domain mutants, whilst those in the ZA-domain mutant are elevated by 20–30 dB. The phenotypes are stable and no evidence has been found for a progressive deterioration in TM structure or auditory function. Despite elevated auditory thresholds, the Tecta mutant mice all exhibit an enhanced tendency to have audiogenic seizures in response to white noise stimuli at low sound pressure levels (≤84 dB SPL), revealing a previously unrecognised consequence of Tecta mutations. These results, together with those from previous studies, establish an allelic series for Tecta unequivocally demonstrating an association between genotype and phenotype. PMID:24363064

  19. The common occurrence of epistasis in the determination of human pigmentation and its impact on DNA-based pigmentation phenotype prediction.

    PubMed

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Maeda, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Skowron, Małgorzata; Kayser, Manfred; Branicki, Wojciech

    2014-07-01

    The role of epistatic effects in the determination of complex traits is often underlined but its significance in the prediction of pigmentation phenotypes has not been evaluated so far. The prediction of pigmentation from genetic data can be useful in forensic science to describe the physical appearance of an unknown offender, victim, or missing person who cannot be identified via conventional DNA profiling. Available forensic DNA prediction systems enable the reliable prediction of several eye and hair colour categories. However, there is still space for improvement. Here we verified the association of 38 candidate DNA polymorphisms from 13 genes and explored the extent to which interactions between them may be involved in human pigmentation and their impact on forensic DNA prediction in particular. The model-building set included 718 Polish samples and the model-verification set included 307 independent Polish samples and additional 72 samples from Japan. In total, 29 significant SNP-SNP interactions were found with 5 of them showing an effect on phenotype prediction. For predicting green eye colour, interactions between HERC2 rs12913832 and OCA2 rs1800407 as well as TYRP1 rs1408799 raised the prediction accuracy expressed by AUC from 0.667 to 0.697 and increased the prediction sensitivity by >3%. Interaction between MC1R 'R' variants and VDR rs731236 increased the sensitivity for light skin by >1% and by almost 3% for dark skin colour prediction. Interactions between VDR rs1544410 and TYR rs1042602 as well as between MC1R 'R' variants and HERC2 rs12913832 provided an increase in red/non-red hair prediction accuracy from an AUC of 0.902-0.930. Our results thus underline epistasis as a common phenomenon in human pigmentation genetics and demonstrate that considering SNP-SNP interactions in forensic DNA phenotyping has little impact on eye, hair and skin colour prediction.

  20. Using Task Analytic Models and Phenotypes of Erroneous Human Behavior to Discover System Failures Using Model Checking.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Matthew L; Bass, Ellen J

    2010-09-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in ways unanticipated by analysts or designers. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. This paper presents a method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both erroneous and normative human behavior from normative task models. The resulting model can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human automation-interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. This method is illustrated with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. In this example, a problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. Future extensions of our method are discussed.

  1. Differentiation of human adipose stem cells into neural phenotype by neuroblastoma- or olfactory ensheathing cells-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Lo Furno, Debora; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Graziano, Adriana C E; Giuffrida, Rosario; Vancheri, Carlo; Gili, Elisa; Cardile, Venera

    2013-11-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are known to be capable of continuous neurogenesis throughout lifetime and are a source of multiple trophic factors important in central nervous system regeneration. B104 neuroblastoma cells are recognized to induce differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify if conditioned medium (CM) obtained from OECs or B104 cells was capable of inducing differentiation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) to a neuronal phenotype. In order to this goal, immunocytochemical procedures and flow cytometry analysis were used and some neural markers, as nestin, protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuron cell surface antigen (A2B5) were examined 24 h and 7 days after the treatment. The results showed that both OECs- or B104-CM treated AT-MSCs express markers of progenitor and mature neurons (nestin, PGP 9.5 and MAP2) in time-dependent manner, display morphological features resembling neuronal cells, and result negative for GFAP and A2B5, astrocyte and oligodendrocyte markers, respectively. This study demonstrated that AT-MSCs can be influenced by the environment, indicating that these cells can respond to environmental cues also versus a neuronal phenotype.

  2. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Iksoo; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data) to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket) for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively. PMID:26406920

  3. A population of human brain cells expressing phenotypic markers of more than one lineage can be induced in vitro to differentiate into mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rieske, Piotr; Augelli, Brian J.; Stawski, Robert; Gaughan, John; Azizi, S. Ausim; Krynska, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    Proliferating astrocytic cells from germinal, as well as mature areas of brain parenchyma, have the characteristics of neural stem/progenitor cells and are capable of generating both neurons and glia. We previously reported that primary fetal human brain cells, designated as Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA), expressed, in addition to GFAP, Vimentin and Nestin, low levels of {beta}III-Tubulin, an early neuronal marker, and differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in vitro. Here, we showed that primary NHA cells co-express low levels of mesenchymal markers Fibronectin and Collagen-1 in culture. These cells transitioned into mesenchymal-like cells when cultured in adherent conditions in serum containing media. The mesenchymal-like derivatives of these cells were characterized based on their morphological changes, high expression of Vimentin and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, Collagen-1 and Fibronectin, and decline of neural markers. When incubated in osteogenic and adipogenic induction media, the mesenchymal-like cells differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Furthermore, NHA cells express markers of neural crest cells, SOX-10 and p75. These data support the idea of ectoderm-derived mesenchymal lineages. These findings suggest that a population of primitive fetal brain cells with neural/neural crest/mesenchymal phenotype, resembles the remarkable phenotypic plasticity of neural crest cells, and differentiates into adipocytes and osteocytes under the influence of environmental factors.

  4. A High-Throughput (HTS) Assay for Enzyme Reaction Phenotyping in Human Recombinant P450 Enzymes Using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofeng; Suhar, Tom; Glass, Lateca; Rajaraman, Ganesh

    2014-03-03

    Enzyme reaction phenotyping is employed extensively during the early stages of drug discovery to identify the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of new chemical entities (NCEs). Early identification of metabolic pathways facilitates prediction of potential drug-drug interactions associated with enzyme polymorphism, induction, or inhibition, and aids in the design of clinical trials. Incubation of NCEs with human recombinant enzymes is a popular method for such work because of the specificity, simplicity, and high-throughput nature of this approach for phenotyping studies. The availability of a relative abundance factor and calculated intersystem extrapolation factor for the expressed recombinant enzymes facilitates easy scaling of in vitro data, enabling in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Described in this unit is a high-throughput screen for identifying enzymes involved in the metabolism of NCEs. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the human recombinant enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4, including the calculation of the intrinsic clearance for each.

  5. Phenotypic and functional characterization of a new human macrophage cell line K1m demonstrating immunophagocytic activity and signalling through HLA class II.

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, D P; Lee, M J; Shao, L E; Tan, P C; Yu, J

    1997-01-01

    A human macrophage line, designated K1m, has been established from peripheral blood. K1m expresses a number of lineage-specific markers as well as a broad array of intercellular adhesion molecules. In particular, K1m expresses high levels of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II. In response to ligation of HLA class II (HLA-DR), but not in response to ligation of HLA class 1, K1m forms tighter homotypic aggregates and develops a striking 'stellate' culture phenotype. K1m also expresses Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (IgG) (CD64, CD32, and CD16) and can be shown to phagocytose polystyrene latex beads, as well as neuroblastoma cells in the presence of tumour-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb). The K1m cell line should therefore prove useful for studying both signalling through macrophage HLA class II and immunophagocytosis. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9176097

  6. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  7. MiR-210 promotes a hypoxic phenotype and increases radioresistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Grosso, S; Doyen, J; Parks, S K; Bertero, T; Paye, A; Cardinaud, B; Gounon, P; Lacas-Gervais, S; Noël, A; Pouysségur, J; Barbry, P; Mazure, N M; Mari, B

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiotherapy and chemotherapy is a major problem in the treatment of cancer. Recently, an additional mode of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF