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Sample records for human glioblastoma intracellular

  1. The interplay between intracellular progesterone receptor and PKC plays a key role in migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marquina-Sánchez, Brenda; González-Jorge, Jesús; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Wegman-Ostrosky, Talia; Baranda-Ávila, Noemi; Mejía-Pérez, Sonia; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; González-Arenas, Aliesha

    2016-10-04

    Intracellular progesterone receptors (PRs) and protein kinases C (PKCs) are known regulators of cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Both PRs and PKCs are found overexpressed in grade IV human astrocytomas, also known as glioblastomas, which are the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether PR activation by PKC induces the migration and invasion of glioblastoma derived cell lines and if PKCα and δ isoforms are involved in PR activation. We observed that PKC activation with tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) increases the migration and invasion capacity of two human glioblastoma derived human cell lines (U251 MG and U87) and that the treatment with the PR receptor antagonist RU486 blocks these processes. Interestingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the isoenzymes PKCα and PKCδ also resulted in a blocked PR transcriptional activity. Also, TPA-dependent PR activation increases the expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), a known PR target gene. These results hint to an existing cross-talk between PKCs and PRs in regulating the infiltration process of human glioblastomas.

  2. Glioblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common form of glioblastoma; it is very aggressive. Secondary: These tumors have a longer, somewhat slower growth history, but still are very aggressive. They may begin as lower-grade tumors which ...

  3. Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wirsching, Hans-Georg; Galanis, Evanthia; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Defining histopathologic features are necrosis and endothelial proliferation, resulting in the assignment of grade IV, the highest grade in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of brain tumors. The classic clinical term "secondary glioblastoma" refers to a minority of glioblastomas that evolve from previously diagnosed WHO grade II or grade III gliomas. Specific point mutations of the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 or 2 appear to define molecularly these tumors that are associated with younger age and more favorable outcome; the vast majority of glioblastomas are IDH wild-type. Typical molecular changes in glioblastoma include mutations in genes regulating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/rat sarcoma (RAS)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), p53, and retinoblastoma protein (RB) signaling. Standard treatment of glioblastoma includes surgery, radiotherapy, and alkylating chemotherapy. Promoter methylation of the gene encoding the DNA repair protein, O(6)-methylguanyl DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), predicts benefit from alkylating chemotherapy with temozolomide and guides choice of first-line treatment in elderly patients. Current developments focus on targeting the molecular characteristics that drive the malignant phenotype, including altered signal transduction and angiogenesis, and more recently, various approaches of immunotherapy.

  4. Autophagy and lysosomal related protein expression patterns in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Mitrakas, Achileas; Kalamida, Dimitra; Zois, Christos E; Haider, Syed; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Pappa, Aglaia; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells are resistant to apoptotic stimuli with autophagic death prevailing under cytotoxic stress. Autophagy interfering agents may represent a new strategy to test in combination with chemo-radiation. We investigated the patterns of expression of autophagy related proteins (LC3A, LC3B, p62, Beclin 1, ULK1 and ULK2) in a series of patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Experiments with glioblastoma cell lines (T98 and U87) were also performed to assess autophagic response under conditions simulating the adverse intratumoral environment. Glioblastomas showed cytoplasmic overexpression of autophagic proteins in a varying extent, so that cases could be grouped into low and high expression groups. 10/23, 5/23, 13/23, 5/23, 8/23 and 9/23 cases examined showed extensive expression of LC3A, LC3B, Beclin 1, Ulk 1, Ulk 2 and p62, respectively. Lysosomal markers Cathepsin D and LAMP2a, as well as the lyososomal biogenesis transcription factor TFEB were frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas (10/23, 11/23, and 10/23 cases, respectively). TFEB was directly linked with PTEN, Cathepsin D, HIF1α, LC3B, Beclin 1 and p62 expression. PTEN was also significantly related with LC3B but not LC3A expression, in both immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Confocal microscopy in T98 and U87 cell lines showed distinct identity of LC3A and LC3B autophagosomes. The previously reported stone-like structure (SLS) pattern of LC3 expression was related with prognosis. SLS were inducible in glioblastoma cell lines under exposure to acidic conditions and 2DG mediated glucose antagonism. The present study provides the basis for autophagic characterization of human glioblastoma for further translational studies and targeted therapy trials.

  5. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways.

    PubMed

    2008-10-23

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large-scale multi-dimensional analysis of these molecular characteristics in human cancer and to provide the data rapidly to the research community. Here we report the interim integrative analysis of DNA copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation aberrations in 206 glioblastomas--the most common type of adult brain cancer--and nucleotide sequence aberrations in 91 of the 206 glioblastomas. This analysis provides new insights into the roles of ERBB2, NF1 and TP53, uncovers frequent mutations of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase regulatory subunit gene PIK3R1, and provides a network view of the pathways altered in the development of glioblastoma. Furthermore, integration of mutation, DNA methylation and clinical treatment data reveals a link between MGMT promoter methylation and a hypermutator phenotype consequent to mismatch repair deficiency in treated glioblastomas, an observation with potential clinical implications. Together, these findings establish the feasibility and power of TCGA, demonstrating that it can rapidly expand knowledge of the molecular basis of cancer.

  6. Delivery of doxorubicin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles into U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Malinovskaya, Julia; Melnikov, Pavel; Baklaushev, Vladimir; Gabashvili, Anna; Osipova, Nadezhda; Mantrov, Sergey; Ermolenko, Yulia; Maksimenko, Olga; Gorshkova, Marina; Balabanyan, Vadim; Kreuter, Jörg; Gelperina, Svetlana

    2017-03-27

    The paramount problem in the therapy of brain tumors is the inability of most drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier. PLGA nanoparticles overcoated with poloxamer 188 could overcome this problem and enabled a high anti-tumoral effect against the very aggressive intracranial 101.8 glioblastoma in rats that closely resembles human grade IV glioblastomas. The basis for the transport of these particles across the blood-brain barrier appears to be adsorption of blood apolipoproteins (ApoE or ApoA-I) on the nanoparticle surface caused by the poloxamer 188-coating, followed by receptor-mediated transcytosis of the nanoparticles. The objective of the present study is the elucidation of the mechanism by which the poloxamer 188-coated nanoparticles then enter the brain tumor cells. Their intracellular fate, therefore, was investigated using the U87 human glioma cell line. The main mechanism of the PLGA nanoparticle internalization by U87 cells was clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Within 1h free doxorubicin was released from late endosomes and could reach its target site, i.e. the DNA in the nuclei without degradation, whereas the PLGA nanoparticles, which were labeled with Cy5.5, still were observed in the endo-lysosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that the underlying mechanism of action in the brain cells is by diffusive doxorubicin release from the nanoparticles rather than by their intracellular degradation.

  7. DIETARY ISOTHIOCYANATE IBERIN INHIBITS GROWTH AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of the isothiocyanate iberin, a bioactive agent in Brassicaceae species, in human glioblastoma cells. The human glioblastoma cell cultures were treated with different concentrations of iberin and tested for growth inhibition...

  8. Sulfasalazine intensifies temozolomide cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ignarro, Raffaela Silvestre; Facchini, Gustavo; Vieira, André Schwambach; De Melo, Daniela Rodrigues; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Rogerio, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an alkylating agent used to treat glioblastoma. This tumor type synthesizes the antioxidant glutathione through system X c (-) , which is inhibited by sulfasalazine (SAS). We exposed A172 and T98G human glioblastoma cells to a presumably clinically relevant concentration of TMZ (25 µM) and/or 0.5 mM SAS for 1, 3, or 5 days and assessed cell viability. For both cell lines, TMZ alone did not alter viability at any time point, while the coadministration of TMZ and SAS significantly reduced cell viability after 5 days. The drug combination exerted a synergistic effect on A172 cells after 3 and 5 days. Therefore, this particular lineage was subjected to complementary analyses on the genetic (transcriptome) and functional (glutathione and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein) levels. Cellular pathways containing differentially expressed genes related to the cell cycle were modified by TMZ alone. On the other hand, SAS regulated pathways associated with glutathione metabolism and synthesis, irrespective of TMZ. Moreover, SAS, but not TMZ, depleted the total glutathione level. Compared with the vehicle-treated cells, the level of PCNA protein was lower in cells treated with TMZ alone or in combination with SAS. In conclusion, our data showed that the association of TMZ and SAS is cytotoxic to T98G and A172 cells, thus providing useful insights for improving TMZ clinical efficacy through testing this novel drug combination. Moreover, the present study not only reports original information on differential gene expression in glioblastoma cells exposed to TMZ and/or SAS but also describes an antiproliferative effect of TMZ, which has not yet been observed in A172 cells.

  9. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbor multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large-scale multidimensional analysis of these molecular characteristics in human cancer and to provide the data rapidly to the research community. Here, we report the interim integrative analysis of DNA copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation aberrations in 206 glioblastomas (GBM), the most common type of adult brain cancer, and nucleotide sequence aberrations in 91 of the 206 GBMs. This analysis provides new insights into the roles of ERBB2, NF1 and TP53, uncovers frequent mutations of the PI3 kinase regulatory subunit gene PIK3R1, and provides a network view of the pathways altered in the development of GBM. Furthermore, integration of mutation, DNA methylation and clinical treatment data reveals a link between MGMT promoter methylation and a hypermutator phenotype consequent to mismatch repair deficiency in treated glioblastomas, an observation with potential clinical implications. Together, these findings establish the feasibility and power of TCGA, demonstrating that it can rapidly expand knowledge of the molecular basis of cancer. PMID:18772890

  10. Effects of stratospheric radiations on human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cristiano, Loredana; Colafarina, Sabrina; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Falone, Stefano; Cinque, Benedetta; Ursini, Ornella; Moscardelli, Roberto; Ragni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of stratospheric radiations on neural tumour cells. ADF human glioblastoma cells were hosted on a stratospheric balloon within the 2002 biological experiment campaign of the Italian Space Agency. The flight at an average height of 37 km lasted about 24 hrs. Cell morphology, number and viability, cell cycle and apoptosis, some antioxidant enzymes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and gene expression were studied. Stratospheric radiations caused a significant decrease in cell number, as well as a block of proliferation, but not apoptosis or necrosis. Radiations also induced activation and induction of some antioxidant enzymes, increase in DNA repair-related proteins (p53 and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and variations of the transcription factors Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors. Morphologically, test cells exhibited more electron dense cytoplasm and less condensed chromatin than controls and modification of their surfaces. Our results indicate that glioblastoma cells, exposed to continuous stratospheric radiations for 24 hrs, show activation of cell cycle check point, decrease of cell number, variations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and increase of Reactive Oxygen Species-scavenging enzymes.

  11. VEGF promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Naoki; Soeda, Akio . E-mail: ccd29400@nyc.odn.ne.jp; Inagaki, Akihito; Onodera, Masafumi; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro; Mori, Hideki; Iwama, Toru

    2007-08-31

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in malignant brain tumors, and these CSCs may play a pivotal role in tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and the neurogenesis of neural stem cells. Using CSCs derived from human glioblastomas and a retrovirus expressing VEGF, we examined the effects of VEGF on the properties of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Although VEGF did not affect the property of CSCs in vitro, the injection of mouse brains with VEGF-expressing CSCs led to the massive expansion of vascular-rich GBM, tumor-associated hemorrhage, and high morbidity, suggesting that VEGF promoted tumorigenesis via angiogenesis. These results revealed that VEGF induced the proliferation of VEC in the vascular-rich tumor environment, the so-called stem cell niche.

  12. The involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in eugenol-induced cell death in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-Zhe; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Tseng, Hui-Wen; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-01-05

    Eugenol, a natural phenolic constituent of clove oil, has a wide range of applications in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. However, the effect of eugenol on human glioblastoma is unclear. This study examined whether eugenol elevated intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) and induced apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells. Eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises which were reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+). Eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises were not altered by store-operated Ca(2+) channel blockers but were inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the transient receptor potential channel melastatin 8 (TRPM8) antagonist capsazepine. In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 significantly inhibited eugenol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Eugenol killed cells which were not reversed by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Eugenol induced apoptosis through increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, releasing cytochrome c and activating caspase-9/caspase-3. Together, in DBTRG-05MG cells, eugenol evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises by inducing PLC-dependent release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum and caused Ca(2+) influx possibly through TRPM8 or PKC-sensitive channels. Furthermore, eugenol induced the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  13. IGF-IR: a new prognostic biomarker for human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Maris, C; D'Haene, N; Trépant, A-L; Le Mercier, M; Sauvage, S; Allard, J; Rorive, S; Demetter, P; Decaestecker, C; Salmon, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glioblastomas (GBMs) are the most common malignant primary brain tumours in adults and are refractory to conventional therapy, including surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is a complex network that includes ligands (IGFI and IGFII), receptors (IGF-IR and IGF-IIR) and high-affinity binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to IGFBP-6). Many studies have reported a role for the IGF system in the regulation of tumour cell biology. However, the role of this system remains unclear in GBMs. Methods: We investigate the prognostic value of both the IGF ligands' and receptors' expression in a cohort of human GBMs. Tissue microarray and image analysis were conducted to quantitatively analyse the immunohistochemical expression of these proteins in 218 human GBMs. Results: Both IGF-IR and IGF-IIR were overexpressed in GBMs compared with normal brain (P<10−4 and P=0.002, respectively). Moreover, with regard to standard clinical factors, IGF-IR positivity was identified as an independent prognostic factor associated with shorter survival (P=0.016) and was associated with a less favourable response to temozolomide. Conclusions: This study suggests that IGF-IR could be an interesting target for GBM therapy. PMID:26291053

  14. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  15. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma cells by increasing reactive oxygen species and activating MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Festa, Michela; Capasso, Anna; D'Acunto, Cosimo W; Masullo, Milena; Rossi, Adriano G; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2011-12-27

    The effect of the biologically active prenylated chalcone and potential anticancer agent xanthohumol (1) has been investigated on apoptosis of the T98G human malignant glioblastoma cell line. Compound 1 decreased the viability of T98G cells by induction of apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis induced by 1 was associated with activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage and was mediated by the mitochondrial pathway, as exemplified by mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Xanthohumol induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), an effect that was reduced by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Intracellular ROS production appeared essential for the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and induction of apoptosis after exposure to 1. Oxidative stress due to treatment with 1 was associated with MAPK activation, as determined by ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 was attenuated using NAC to inhibit ROS production. After treatment with 1, ROS provided a specific environment that resulted in MAPK-induced cell death, with this effect reduced by the ERK1/2 specific inhibitor PD98059 and partially inhibited by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These findings suggest that xanthohumol (1) is a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  16. Transforming fusions of FGFR and TACC genes in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devendra; Chan, Joseph Minhow; Zoppoli, Pietro; Niola, Francesco; Sullivan, Ryan; Castano, Angelica; Liu, Eric Minwei; Reichel, Jonathan; Porrati, Paola; Pellegatta, Serena; Qiu, Kunlong; Gao, Zhibo; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Riccardo; Brat, Daniel J; Guha, Abhijit; Aldape, Ken; Golfinos, John G; Zagzag, David; Mikkelsen, Tom; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Lasorella, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Iavarone, Antonio

    2012-09-07

    The brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most lethal forms of human cancer. Here, we report that a small subset of GBMs (3.1%; 3 of 97 tumors examined) harbors oncogenic chromosomal translocations that fuse in-frame the tyrosine kinase coding domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) genes (FGFR1 or FGFR3) to the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) coding domains of TACC1 or TACC3, respectively. The FGFR-TACC fusion protein displays oncogenic activity when introduced into astrocytes or stereotactically transduced in the mouse brain. The fusion protein, which localizes to mitotic spindle poles, has constitutive kinase activity and induces mitotic and chromosomal segregation defects and triggers aneuploidy. Inhibition of FGFR kinase corrects the aneuploidy, and oral administration of an FGFR inhibitor prolongs survival of mice harboring intracranial FGFR3-TACC3-initiated glioma. FGFR-TACC fusions could potentially identify a subset of GBM patients who would benefit from targeted FGFR kinase inhibition.

  17. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Pathogenesis and Outcome of Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Winward; Lagman, Carlito; Lee, Seung J.; Bui, Timothy T.; Safaee, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement in antiviral therapies have been accompanied by an increased frequency of non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we investigated all reported cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with glioblastoma and evaluated their clinical outcomes. A comprehensive review of the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying glioblastoma development in the setting of HIV/AIDS is provided. Methods We performed a PubMed search using keywords “HIV glioma” AND “glioblastoma,” and “AIDS glioma” AND “glioblastoma.” Case reports and series describing HIV-positive patients with glioblastoma (histologically-proven World Health Organization grade IV astrocytoma) and reporting on HAART treatment status, clinical follow-up, and overall survival (OS), were included for the purposes of quantitative synthesis. Patients without clinical follow-up data or OS were excluded. Remaining articles were assessed for data extraction eligibility. Results A total of 17 patients met our inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 14 (82.4%) were male and 3 (17.6%) were female, with a mean age of 39.5±9.2 years (range 19–60 years). Average CD4 count at diagnosis of glioblastoma was 358.9±193.4 cells/mm3. Tumor progression rather than AIDS-associated complications dictated patient survival. There was a trend towards increased median survival with HAART treatment (12.0 vs 7.5 months, p=0.10) Conclusion Our data suggests that HAART is associated with improved survival in patients with HIV-associated glioblastoma, although the precise mechanisms underlying this improvement remain unclear. PMID:27867916

  18. Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Tomoko; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hu, Lily J.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

  19. Oxygen-dependent regulation of NDRG1 in human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Said, Harun M; Stein, Susanne; Hagemann, Carsten; Polat, Buelent; Staab, Adrian; Anacker, Jelena; Schoemig, Beate; Theobald, Matthias; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    NDRG1 is a member of the N-myc downregulated gene (NDRG) family. Its induction occurs via diverse physiological and pathological conditions (hypoxia, cellular differentiation, heavy metal, N-myc, neoplasia) which modulate NDRG1 transcription, mRNA stability and translation. Hypoxia, among other factors, induces NDRG1 expression and plays an important role in its regulation of expression. To date, the complete detailed function of this protein in humans remains unknown. Hypoxia represents a common feature of solid tumors. In our study, differences in NDRG1 expression between different WHO grades of astrocytic tumors were comparatively examined in vivo in human low-grade astrocytoma (WHO grade 2) and glioblastoma (WHO grade 4) at both the protein and mRNA level by Western blot analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Furthermore, the same proteins were determined in vitro in U373, U251 and GaMG human glioblastoma cells using the same methods. HIF-1alpha protein and mRNA regulation under hypoxia was also determined in vitro in U251, U373 and GaMG cells. This regulation was shown at the same levels in vivo in human low-grade astrocytoma (WHO grade 2) and glioblastoma which showed a higher NDRG1 overexpression level in glioblastoma than in low-grade astrocytoma. siRNA- and iodoacetate (IAA)-mediated downregulation of NDRG1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro in human glioblastoma cell lines showed a nearly complete inhibition of NDRG1 expression when compared to the results obtained due to the inhibitory role of glycolysis inhibitor IAA. Hypoxia responsive elements (HREs) bound by nuclear HIF-1alpha in human glioblastoma cells in vitro under different oxygenation conditions and the clearly enhanced binding of nuclear extracts from glioblastoma cell samples exposed to extreme hypoxic conditions confirmed the HIF-1 Western blotting results. Due to its clear regulatory behavior under hypoxic condition in human tumor cells, NDRG1 represents an additional

  20. MRP3: a molecular target for human glioblastoma multiforme immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is refractory to conventional therapies. To overcome the problem of heterogeneity, more brain tumor markers are required for prognosis and targeted therapy. We have identified and validated a promising molecular therapeutic target that is expressed by GBM: human multidrug-resistance protein 3 (MRP3). Methods We investigated MRP3 by genetic and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of human gliomas to determine the incidence, distribution, and localization of MRP3 antigens in GBM and their potential correlation with survival. To determine MRP3 mRNA transcript and protein expression levels, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, raising MRP3-specific antibodies, and IHC analysis with biopsies of newly diagnosed GBM patients. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the correlation of RNA expression and IHC of MRP3 with patient survival, with and without adjustment for age, extent of resection, and KPS. Results Real-time PCR results from 67 GBM biopsies indicated that 59/67 (88%) samples highly expressed MRP3 mRNA transcripts, in contrast with minimal expression in normal brain samples. Rabbit polyvalent and murine monoclonal antibodies generated against an extracellular span of MRP3 protein demonstrated reactivity with defined MRP3-expressing cell lines and GBM patient biopsies by Western blotting and FACS analyses, the latter establishing cell surface MRP3 protein expression. IHC evaluation of 46 GBM biopsy samples with anti-MRP3 IgG revealed MRP3 in a primarily membranous and cytoplasmic pattern in 42 (91%) of the 46 samples. Relative RNA expression was a strong predictor of survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients. Hazard of death for GBM patients with high levels of MRP3 RNA expression was 2.71 (95% CI: 1.54-4.80) times that of patients with low/moderate levels (p = 0.002). Conclusions Human GBMs overexpress MRP3 at both mRNA and protein levels, and elevated MRP3 mRNA levels in GBM biopsy samples correlated with a

  1. Ultrastructural evidence for differentiation in a human glioblastoma cell line treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.E.; Anderson, K.M. ); Seed, T.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Human glioblastoma cells incubated in the presence of inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis show decreased cellular proliferation without cytotoxicity. The authors studied the ultrastructural morphology of a human glioblastoma cell line cultured with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor, or 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitor. When glioblastoma cells were treated for 3 days with antiproliferative concentrations of either agent, they shared many morphological characteristics, including evidence for increased astrocytic differentiation with only limited signs of toxicity. The inhibited glioma cells demonstrated an increase in the number and length of astrocytic processes containing greater numbers of glial filaments, and the NDGA-treated cells also demonstrated extensive lateral pseudopod formation along the processes. The glioblastoma cell shape also become more elongated, losing the usual nuclear lobularity and nuclear inclusions, especially in NDGA-treated cells. Many cytoplasmic organelles packed the cytosol of the inhibited glioma cells, including prominent Golgi apparatus, dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum evolving into dilated vesicles, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and numerous concentric laminations. There was limited evidence for toxicity, however, as the mitochondria were more pleomorphic with some mitochondrial distension and disruption of the cristae along with an increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization. The authors conclude that the inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis. NDGA and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, not only suppress glioblastoma cell proliferation, but also include increased astrocytic differentiation.

  2. Activation of multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells treated with sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, S; Weinberg, M S; Banik, N L; Patel, S J; Ray, S K

    2006-09-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and prevalent brain tumor that still remains incurable. Recent studies reported anti-cancer effect of the broccoli-derived compound sulforaphane. We explored the mechanisms of sulforaphane-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells. Wright staining and ApopTag assay confirmed apoptosis in glioblastoma cells treated with sulforaphane. Increase in intracellular free Ca2+ was detected by fura-2 assay, suggesting activation of Ca2+-dependent pathways for apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect changes in expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins resulting in increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio that indicated a commitment of glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. Upregulation of calpain, a Ca2+-dependent cysteine protease, activated caspase-12 that in turn caused activation of caspase-9. With the increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria to cytosol for sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Increased calpain and caspase-3 activities generated 145 kD spectrin breakdown product and 120 kD spectrin breakdown product, respectively. Activation of caspase-3 also cleaved the inhibitor-of-caspase-activated-DNase. Accumulation of apoptosis-inducing-factor in cytosol suggested caspase-independent pathway of apoptosis as well. Two of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins were downregulated because of an increase in 'second mitochondrial activator of caspases/Direct inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein binding protein with low pI.' Decrease in nuclear factor kappa B and increase in inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B alpha expression favored the process of apoptosis. Collectively, our results indicated activation of multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis in glioblastoma cells following treatment with sulforaphane.

  3. FTY720 induces autophagy-related apoptosis and necroptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Handong; Ding, Ke; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-02

    FTY720 is a potent immunosuppressant which has preclinical antitumor efficacy in various cancer models. However, its role in glioblastoma remains unclear. In the present study, we found that FTY720 induced extrinsic apoptosis, necroptosis and autophagy in human glioblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by either RNA interference or chemical inhibitors attenuated FTY720-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Furthermore, autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis induction were dependent on reactive oxygen species-c-Jun N-terminal kinase-protein 53 (ROS-JNK-p53) loop mediated phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6 kinase (PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K) pathway. In addition, receptor-interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1 and RIP3) served as an upstream of ROS-JNK-p53 loop. However, the phosphorylation form of FTY720 induced autophagy but not apoptosis and necroptosis. Finally, the in vitro results were validated in vivo in xenograft mouse of glioblastoma cells. In conclusion, the current study provided novel insights into understanding the mechanisms and functions of FTY720-induced apoptosis, necroptosis and autophagy in human glioblastoma cells.

  4. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β negatively regulates progesterone receptor expression in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2017-01-05

    Many progesterone (P4) actions are mediated by its intracellular receptor (PR), which has two isoforms (PR-A and PR-B) differentially transcribed from separate promoters of a single gene. In glioblastomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors, PR-B is the predominant isoform. In an in silico analysis we showed putative CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein (C/EBP) binding sites at PR-B promoter. We evaluated the role of C/EBPβ in PR-B expression regulation in glioblastoma cell lines, which expressed different ratios of PR and C/EBPβ isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, and LIP). ChIP assays showed a significant basal binding of C/EBPβ, specific protein 1 (Sp1) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) to PR-B promoter. C/EBPβ knockdown increased PR-B expression and treatment with estradiol (E2) reduced C/EBPβ binding to the promoter and up-regulated PR-B expression. P4 induced genes were differently regulated when CEBP/β was silenced. These data show that C/EBPβ negatively regulates PR-B expression in glioblastoma cells.

  5. Functional expression of the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor in human glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mahé, Cécile; Bernhard, Michel; Bobirnac, Ionel; Keser, Corinna; Loetscher, Erika; Feuerbach, Dominik; Dev, Kumlesh K; Schoeffter, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are present in astrocytes. Understanding their role in this type of cell would greatly benefit from the identification of astroglial cell lines expressing this receptor type. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of native 5-HT7 receptors and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in a number of human glioblastoma cell lines, by means of cAMP measurements, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) analysis. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced concentration-dependent stimulations of cAMP accumulation in the human glioblastoma cell lines, U-373 MG, U-138 MG, U-87 MG, DBTRG-05MG, T98G, H4, CCF-STTG1 and Hs 683. The rank order of potency was 5-CT>5-HT=5-MeOT≫8-OH-DPAT. The effect of 5-CT was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 in all human glioblastoma cells. Schild analyses yielded slope factors close to unity (0.89–1.13) and pA2 values of 8.69–9.05. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of immunoreactive bands corresponding to the human 5-HT7 receptor in extracts of all human glioblastoma cell lines. The presence of the three splice variants of the 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7(a/b/d)) was visualized by RT–PCR analysis with specific primers in all human glioblastoma cell lines. In conclusion, human glioblastoma cell lines express functional 5-HT7 receptors and the three splice variants of the corresponding mRNA. These cell lines could serve as model systems of native 5-HT7 receptors in glial cells to investigate their putative role in processes like release of neurotrophic factors or inflammatory cytokines. PMID:15339860

  6. Expression and stability of c-sis mRNA in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Press, R.D.; Samols, D.; Goldthwait, D.A.

    1988-07-26

    The production of platelet-derived growth factor like (PDGF-like) material by glioblastomas may be involved in the conversion of normal cells to tumor cells. In an investigation of this problem, the authors have examined some of the properties of the platelet-derived growth factor B-chain mRNA (c-sis mRNA) by a sensitive and quantitative RNA-RNA solution hybridization method. In 5 out of 8 human glioblastoma cell lines, c-sis mRNA was present, and in the line with the highest level, there were approximately 4-10 molecules per cell. The half-lives of the c-sis mRNA in two glioblastoma cell lines were 2.6 and 3.4 h, while in human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) and bladder carcinoma (T24) cells they were 1.6 and 2.5 h, respectively. Inhibiting protein synthesis produced no significant alteration of the c-sis mRNA half-lives in the glioblastoma or HUVE cells. The A-U-rich sequence at the 3' end of the c-sis mRNA therefore does not appear to affect the mRNA stability in the presence of cycloheximide as it does in other transcripts. The similarity of the c-sis mRNA half-lives in normal and tumor cells suggests that regulation of stability of c-sis mRNA is not a major factor in tumorigenesis in the glioblastoma cell lines examined.

  7. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of bortezomib and gefitinib compared to alkylating agents on human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pédeboscq, Stéphane; L'Azou, Béatrice; Passagne, Isabelle; De Giorgi, Francesca; Ichas, François; Pometan, Jean-Paul; Cambar, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant astrocytic tumor with a median survival of about 12 months for which new therapeutic strategies are required. We therefore examined the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs with different mechanisms of action on two human glioblastoma cell lines expressing various levels of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor). Apoptosis induced by these anticancer agents was evaluated by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of alkylating drugs followed a dose-effect curve and cytotoxicity index values were lower with carboplatin than with BCNU and temozolomide. Anti-EGFR gefitinib (10 microM) cytotoxicity on DBTRG.05-MG expressing high levels of EGFR was significantly higher than on U87-MG expressing low levels of EGFR. Carboplatin and temozolomide cytotoxicity was potentiated with the addition of gefitinib on DBTRG.05-MG. Among the anticancer agents tested, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was the most cytotoxic with very low IC50 on the two cell lines. Moreover, all anticancer drugs tested induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Bortezomib proved to be a more potent inductor of apoptosis than gefitinib and alkylating agents. These results show the efficacy of bortezomib and of the association between conventional chemotherapy and gefitinib on glioblastoma cells and therefore suggest the interest of these molecules in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  8. Direct effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas; Coquerel, Bérénice; Petit, Alexandre; Kassim, Yusra; Demange, Elise; Le Cerf, Didier; Perrot, Valérie; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the pro-angiogenic factor vascular and endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) used in the treatment of glioblastomas. Although most patients respond initially to this treatment, studies have shown that glioblastomas eventually recur. Several non-mutually exclusive theories based on the anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab have been proposed to explain these mechanisms of resistance. In this report, we studied whether bevacizumab can act directly on malignant glioblastoma cells. We observe changes in the expression profiles of components of the VEGF/VEGF-R pathway and in the response to a VEGF-A stimulus following bevacizumab treatment. In addition, we show that bevacizumab itself acts on glioblastoma cells by activating the Akt and Erks survival signaling pathways. Bevacizumab also enhances proliferation and invasiveness of glioblastoma cells in hyaluronic acid hydrogel. We propose that the paradoxical effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cells could be due to changes in the VEGF-A-dependent autocrine loop as well as in the intracellular survival pathways, leading to the enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. Investigation of how bevacizumab interacts with glioblastoma cells and the resulting downstream signaling pathways will help targeting populations of resistant glioblastoma cells.

  9. Proliferative and Invasive Effects of Progesterone-Induced Blocking Factor in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) is a progesterone (P4) regulated protein expressed in different types of high proliferative cells including astrocytomas, the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. It has been shown that PIBF increases the number of human astrocytoma cells. In this work, we evaluated PIBF regulation by P4 and the effects of PIBF on proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells, both derived from human glioblastomas. PIBF mRNA expression was upregulated by P4 (10 nM) from 12 to 24 h. Glioblastoma cells expressed two PIBF isoforms, 90 and 57 kDa. The content of the shorter isoform was increased by P4 at 24 h, while progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (10 μM) blocked this effect. PIBF (100 ng/mL) increased the number of U87 cells on days 4 and 5 of treatment and induced cell proliferation on day 4. Wound-healing assays showed that PIBF increased the migration of U87 (12–48 h) and U251 (24 and 48 h) cells. Transwell invasion assays showed that PIBF augmented the number of invasive cells in both cell lines at 24 h. These data suggest that PIBF promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells. PMID:28168193

  10. Phenylbutyrate Sensitizes Human Glioblastoma Cells Lacking Wild-Type P53 Function to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Carlos A. Feng, Felix Y.; Herman, Joseph M.; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ljungman, Mats

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a HDAC inhibitor used clinically for treatment of urea cycle disorders. Because of its low cytotoxicity, cerebrospinal fluid penetration, and high oral bioavailability, we investigated PB as a potential radiation sensitizer in human glioblastoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: Four glioblastoma cell lines were selected for this study. Phenylbutyrate was used at a concentration of 2 mM, which is achievable in humans. Western blots were used to assess levels of acetylated histone H3 in tumor cells after treatment with PB. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed to assess the effect of PB on radiation sensitivity. We used shRNA against p53 to study the role of p53 in radiosensitization. Results: Treatment with PB alone resulted in hyperacetylation of histones, confirmed by Western blot analysis. The PB alone resulted in cytostatic effects in three cell lines. There was no evidence of G{sub 1} arrest, increase in sub-G{sub 1} fraction or p21 protein induction. Clonogenic assays showed radiosensitization in two lines harboring p53 mutations, with enhancement ratios ({+-} SE) of 1.5 ({+-} 0.2) and 1.3 ({+-} 0.1), respectively. There was no radiopotentiating effect in two cell lines with wild-type p53, but knockdown of wild-type p53 resulted in radiosensitization by PB. Conclusions: Phenylbutyrate can produce p21-independent cytostasis, and enhances radiation sensitivity in p53 mutant human glioblastoma cells in vitro. This suggests the potential application of combined PB and radiotherapy in glioblastoma harboring mutant p53.

  11. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne; Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  12. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  13. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates ‘aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  14. Uptake and intracellular activity of fluconazole in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, A; García, I; Conejo, C; Perea, E J

    1993-01-01

    The penetration of fluconazole into human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and tissue culture epithelial cells (McCoy) was evaluated. At different extracellular concentrations (0.5 to 10 mg/liter), fluconazole reached cell-associated concentrations greater than the extracellular ones in either human PMNs (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 2.2) or McCoy cells (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 1.3). The uptake of fluconazole by PMNs was rapid and reversible but was not energy dependent. The intracellular penetration of fluconazole was not affected by environmental pH or temperature. Ingestion of opsonized zymosan and opsonized Candida albicans did not significantly increase the amount of PMN-associated fluconazole. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, the intracellular activity of fluconazole against C. albicans in PMNs was significantly lower than that of amphotericin B. It was concluded that fluconazole reaches high intracellular concentrations within PMNs but shows moderate activity against intracellular C. albicans in vitro. PMID:8452347

  15. Inhibition of N-Myc down regulated gene 1 in in vitro cultured human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Said, Harun M; Polat, Buelent; Stein, Susanne; Guckenberger, Mathias; Hagemann, Carsten; Staab, Adrian; Katzer, Astrid; Anacker, Jelena; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study short dsRNA oligonucleotides (siRNA) as a potent tool for artificially modulating gene expression of N-Myc down regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene induced under different physiological conditions (Normoxia and hypoxia) modulating NDRG1 transcription, mRNA stability and translation. METHODS: A cell line established from a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Plasmid DNA for transfections was prepared with the Endofree Plasmid Maxi kit. From plates containing 5 × 107 cells, nuclear extracts were prepared according to previous protocols. The pSUPER-NDRG1 vectors were designed, two sequences were selected from the human NDRG1 cDNA (5’-GCATTATTGGCATGGGAAC-3’ and 5’-ATGCAGAGTAACGTGGAAG-3’. reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed using primers designed using published information on β-actin and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α mRNA sequences in GenBank. NDRG1 mRNA and protein level expression results under different conditions of hypoxia or reoxygenation were compared to aerobic control conditions using the Mann-Whitney U test. Reoxygenation values were also compared to the NDRG1 levels after 24 h of hypoxia (P < 0.05 was considered significant). RESULTS: siRNA- and iodoacetate (IAA)-mediated downregulation of NDRG1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro in human glioblastoma cell lines showed a nearly complete inhibition of NDRG1 expression when compared to the results obtained due to the inhibitory role of glycolysis inhibitor IAA. Hypoxia responsive elements bound by nuclear HIF-1 in human glioblastoma cells in vitro under different oxygenation conditions and the clearly enhanced binding of nuclear extracts from glioblastoma cell samples exposed to extreme hypoxic conditions confirmed the HIF-1 Western blotting results. CONCLUSION: NDRG1 represents an additional diagnostic marker for brain tumor detection, due to the role of hypoxia in regulating this gene, and it can represent a potential target for tumor treatment in human

  16. Cellular and molecular portrait of eleven human glioblastoma cell lines under photon and carbon ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ferrandon, S; Magné, N; Battiston-Montagne, P; Hau-Desbat, N-H; Diaz, O; Beuve, M; Constanzo, J; Chargari, C; Poncet, D; Chautard, E; Ardail, D; Alphonse, G; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2015-04-28

    This study aimed to examine the cellular and molecular long-term responses of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and hadrontherapy in order to better understand the biological effects of carbon beams in cancer treatment. Eleven human glioblastoma cell lines, displaying gradual radiosensitivity, were irradiated with photons or carbon ions. Independently of p53 or O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase(1) status, all cell lines responded to irradiation by a G2/M phase arrest followed by the appearance of mitotic catastrophe, which was concluded by a ceramide-dependent-apoptotic cell death. Statistical analysis demonstrated that: (i) the SF2(2) and the D10(3) values for photon are correlated with that obtained in response to carbon ions; (ii) regardless of the p53, MGMT status, and radiosensitivity, the release of ceramide is associated with the induction of late apoptosis; and (iii) the appearance of polyploid cells after photon irradiation could predict the Relative Biological Efficiency(4) to carbon ions. This large collection of data should increase our knowledge in glioblastoma radiobiology in order to better understand, and to later individualize, appropriate radiotherapy treatment for patients who are good candidates.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of the effect of TGF-β1 on U87 human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryukhovetskiy, Igor; Shevchenko, Valeriy

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most widespread and aggressive type of primary brain tumor. The prognosis following diagnosis with GBM is poor, with a median survival time of 14 months. Tumor cell invasion, metastasis and proliferation are the major causes of mortality in patients with GBM. In order to develop effective GBM treatment methods it is necessary to identify novel targets involved in these processes. Recently, there has been increasing interest in investigating the signaling pathways involved in GBM development, and the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway is understood to be significant for regulating the behavior of GBM, as well as stimulating its invasion and metastatic development. Particular interest has been given to investigating the modulation of TGF-β-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT); during this process, epithelial cells transdifferentiate into mobile cells with a mesenchymal phenotype. The induction of EMT increases the invasiveness of various types of carcinoma; however, the role of TGF-β in this process remains to be elucidated, particularly in the case of GBM. The current study presents a comparative proteome mapping of the U87 human glioblastoma cell line, with and without TGF-β1 treatment. Proteome analysis identified numerous proteins involved in the molecular mechanisms of GBM oncogenesis and TGF-β1 signaling in glioblastoma. The results of the present study facilitated the identification of novel potential markers of metastasis and candidates for targeted glioblastoma therapy, which may potentially be validated and used in clinical medicine to develop improved approaches for GBM diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27446475

  18. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  19. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  20. Semiconductor Microcavity Flow Spectroscopy of Intracellular Protein in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; Cox, Jim; Hendricks, Judy; McDonald, Anthony; Copeland, Guild; Sasaki, Darryl; Skirboll, Steve; Curry, Mark

    2001-03-01

    The speed of light through a biofluid or biological cell is inversely related to the biomolecular concentration of proteins and other complex molecules that modify the refractive index at wavelengths accessible to semiconductor lasers. By placing a fluid or cell into a semiconductor microcavity laser, these decreases in light speed can be sensitively recorded in picoseconds as frequency red-shifts in the laser output spectrum. This biocavity laser equipped with microfluidics for transporting cells at high speed through the laser microcavity has shown potential for rapid analysis of biomolecular mass of normal and malignant human cells in their physiologic condition without time-consuming fixing, staining, or tagging. We have used biocavity laser spectroscopy to measure the optical properties of solutions of standard biomolecules (sugars, proteins, DNA, and ions) and human cells. The technique determines the frequency shift, relative to that of water, of spontaneous or stimulated emission from cavity filled with a biomolecular solution. The shift was also measured in human glioblastoma cells that had been sorted by conventional fluorescence-activated cell sorting according to protein content. The results show a direct correlation between protein measured by fluorescence and the frequency shift observed in the microcavity laser.

  1. Coibamide A Induces mTOR-Independent Autophagy and Cell Death in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Andrew M.; Greenwood, Jeffrey A.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Serrill, Jeffrey D.; Proteau, Philip J.; Ganley, Ian G.; McPhail, Kerry L.; Ishmael, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Coibamide A is an N-methyl-stabilized depsipeptide that was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium as part of an International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) program based in Panama. Previous testing of coibamide A in the NCI in vitro 60 cancer cell line panel revealed a potent anti-proliferative response and “COMPARE-negative” profile indicative of a unique mechanism of action. We report that coibamide A is a more potent and efficacious cytotoxin than was previously appreciated, inducing concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity (EC50<100 nM) in human U87-MG and SF-295 glioblastoma cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). This activity was lost upon linearization of the molecule, highlighting the importance of the cyclized structure for both anti-proliferative and cytotoxic responses. We show that coibamide A induces autophagosome accumulation in human glioblastoma cell types and MEFs via an mTOR-independent mechanism; no change was observed in the phosphorylation state of ULK1 (Ser-757), p70 S6K1 (Thr-389), S6 ribosomal protein (Ser-235/236) and 4EBP-1 (Thr-37/46). Coibamide A also induces morphologically and biochemically distinct forms of cell death according to cell type. SF-295 glioblastoma cells showed caspase-3 activation and evidence of apoptotic cell death in a pattern that was also seen in wild-type and autophagy-deficient (ATG5-null) MEFs. In contrast, cell death in U87-MG glioblastoma cells was characterized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and lacked clear apoptotic features. Cell death was attenuated, but still triggered, in Apaf-1-null MEFs lacking a functional mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. From the study of ATG5-null MEFs we conclude that a conventional autophagy response is not required for coibamide A-induced cell death, but likely occurs in dying cells in response to treatment. Coibamide A represents a natural product scaffold with potential for the study of mTOR-independent signaling and cell death

  2. Expression profile of genes modulated by Aloe emodin in human U87 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Haris, Khalilah; Ismail, Samhani; Idris, Zamzuri; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Yusoff, Abdul Aziz Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive and malignant form of glioma, appears to be resistant to various chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, approaches have been intensively investigated to targeti specific molecular pathways involved in glioblastoma development and progression. Aloe emodin is believed to modulate the expression of several genes in cancer cells. We aimed to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of Aloe emodin on gene expression profiles in the human U87 glioblastoma cell line utilizing microarray technology. The gene expression analysis revealed that a total of 8,226 gene alterations out of 28,869 genes were detected after treatment with 58.6 μg/ml for 24 hours. Out of this total, 34 genes demonstrated statistically significant change (p<0.05) ranging from 1.07 to 1.87 fold. The results revealed that 22 genes were up-regulated and 12 genes were down-regulated in response to Aloe emodin treatment. These genes were then grouped into several clusters based on their biological functions, revealing induction of expression of genes involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death) and tissue remodelling in U87 cells (p<0.01). Several genes with significant changes of the expression level e.g. SHARPIN, BCAP31, FIS1, RAC1 and TGM2 from the apoptotic cluster were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These results could serve as guidance for further studies in order to discover molecular targets for the cancer therapy based on Aloe emodin treatment.

  3. Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation potentiates myricetin-induced cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Gui, Hui; Wang, Jun-Jie; Lu, Jun-Ti; Dai, Long-Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    As one of the natural herbal flavonoids, myricetin has attracted much research interest, mainly owing to its remarkable anticancer properties and negligible side effects. It holds great potential to be developed as an ideal anticancer drug through improving its bioavailability. This study was performed to investigate the effects of Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation on myricetin-induced cytotoxicity and the mechanisms underlying its anticancer properties in human glioblastoma cells. Cell viability was assessed using a methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and a real-time cell analyzer. Immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction techniques were used for determining the expression levels of related molecules in protein and mRNA. The results indicated that myricetin-induced cytotoxicity was highly potentiated by the encapsulation of myricetin. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was demonstrated to be involved in myricetin-induced glioblastoma cell death. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/PI3K/Akt pathway located in the plasma membrane and cytosol and the RAS-ERK pathway located in mitochondria served as upstream and downstream targets, respectively, in myricetin-induced apoptosis. MiR-21 inhibitors interrupted the expression of EGFR, p-Akt, and K-Ras in the same fashion as myricetin-loaded mixed micelles (MYR-MCs) and miR-21 expression were dose-dependently inhibited by MYR-MCs, indicating the interaction of miR-21 with MYR-MCs. This study provided evidence supportive of further development of MYR-MC formulation for preferentially targeting mitochondria of glioblastoma cells. PMID:27757032

  4. Puerarin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-An; Li, Ji-Qiang; Shao, Ling-Min; Yang, Qian; Liu, Bao-Hui; Wu, Ting-Feng; Wu, Peng; Yi, Wei; Chen, Qian-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin has been widely used in clinical treatment and experiment research and is considered to exert an anticancer effect recently. The present study investigated the anticancer activity of puerarin in U251 and U87 human glioblastoma cells. The cells were treated with puerarin at various concentrations for different times. Cell viability and cell proliferation were detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and 5-ethynyl-2’-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining respectively. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured separately with PI staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining method by flow cytometry. DNA damage of glioblastoma cells caused by puerarin exposure was evaluated by γ-H2AX foci detection, and the expressions of p-AKT, caspase-3 and apoptosis-related proteins were detected by Western blotting after puerarin treatment. Cell viability and proliferation of glioblastoma cells treated with puerarin were significantly lower than that of the control group; the apoptosis rate increased obviously compared to the control group. Puerarin significantly decreased the proportion at G1 phase of cell cycling accompanied by increased populations at the S and G2/M phases in both cell lines. At the same time, DNA damage level of puerarin treated cells was significantly higher than that in the control cells. Moreover, puerarin treatment suppressed the expression of p-Akt and Bcl-2 and promoted the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 in U251 cells. These findings indicate that puerarin exerts antitumor effects both in U251 and U87 cells. PMID:26309712

  5. Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation potentiates myricetin-induced cytotoxicity in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Gui, Hui; Wang, Jun-Jie; Lu, Jun-Ti; Dai, Long-Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Gang

    As one of the natural herbal flavonoids, myricetin has attracted much research interest, mainly owing to its remarkable anticancer properties and negligible side effects. It holds great potential to be developed as an ideal anticancer drug through improving its bioavailability. This study was performed to investigate the effects of Pluronic-based micelle encapsulation on myricetin-induced cytotoxicity and the mechanisms underlying its anticancer properties in human glioblastoma cells. Cell viability was assessed using a methylthiazol tetrazolium assay and a real-time cell analyzer. Immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction techniques were used for determining the expression levels of related molecules in protein and mRNA. The results indicated that myricetin-induced cytotoxicity was highly potentiated by the encapsulation of myricetin. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was demonstrated to be involved in myricetin-induced glioblastoma cell death. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/PI3K/Akt pathway located in the plasma membrane and cytosol and the RAS-ERK pathway located in mitochondria served as upstream and downstream targets, respectively, in myricetin-induced apoptosis. MiR-21 inhibitors interrupted the expression of EGFR, p-Akt, and K-Ras in the same fashion as myricetin-loaded mixed micelles (MYR-MCs) and miR-21 expression were dose-dependently inhibited by MYR-MCs, indicating the interaction of miR-21 with MYR-MCs. This study provided evidence supportive of further development of MYR-MC formulation for preferentially targeting mitochondria of glioblastoma cells.

  6. miR-22 inhibits the proliferation, motility, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells by directly targeting SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchun; Lu, Qiong; Fei, Xifeng; Shen, Likui; Jiang, Dongyi; Dai, Dongwei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), a kind of small and non-coding RNA, can target the downstream molecules. Increasing evidence demonstrates that miRNAs meditate the onset and progression of a variety of tumors. In the present study, we carried out gene transfection, western blot, and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to explore the role of miR-22 in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines. Here, we verified that the expression of miR-22 was downregulated in glioblastoma tissues and cells rather than matched non-tumor tissues and normal human astrocyte (NHA) cells (p < 0.001). By contrast, SIRT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were upregulated in glioblastoma tissues and cells (p < 0.001). In vitro miR-22 mimics interfered with cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells. Mechanically, the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of SIRT1 were a direct target of miR-22, leading to the decreased expression of SIRT1 protein in U87 and U251 cells. Meanwhile, miR-22 mimics also inhibited the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9). In conclusion, miR-22 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion via targeting the 3'-UTR of SIRT1 in the progression of glioblastoma and miR-22-SIRT1 pathway can be recommended as a potential target for treatment of glioblastoma.

  7. PB-100: a potent and selective inhibitor of human BCNU resistant glioblastoma cell multiplication.

    PubMed

    Beljanski, M; Crochet, S; Beljanski, M S

    1993-01-01

    Major drawbacks to present-day cancer chemotherapy are its intrinsic lack of selectivity for tumour cells, resulting in severe damage to normal rapidly dividing cells, and the widespread emergence of drug resistance. Here experimental evidence is presented demonstrating that PB-100, a beta-carboline alkaloid, selectively inhibits in vitro multiplication of human BCNU-resistant glioblastoma cells (U251), but has no effect on normal astrocyte (CRL 1656) multiplication. PB-100 activity is dose-dependent. In the presence of ferritin or CaCl2, which are highly mitogenic for glioblastoma cells, higher doses of the alkaloid are required to inhibit multiplication completely. PB-100 is one of several compounds which were selected for their specific action on cancer DNA and cells, together with lack of activity on normal DNA and cells. Both the selectivity of PB-100 and its ability to overcome drug resistance stem from its effect on cancer DNA secondary structure. This activity is described and discussed, and therapeutic applications are mentioned.

  8. Human β-Cell Proliferation and Intracellular Signaling: Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob A.; García-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C.; Bhushan, Anil; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This is the third in a series of Perspectives on intracellular signaling pathways coupled to proliferation in pancreatic β-cells. We contrast the large knowledge base in rodent β-cells with the more limited human database. With the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes and the recognition that type 2 diabetes is also due in part to a deficiency of functioning β-cells, there is great urgency to identify therapeutic approaches to expand human β-cell numbers. Therapeutic approaches might include stem cell differentiation, transdifferentiation, or expansion of cadaver islets or residual endogenous β-cells. In these Perspectives, we focus on β-cell proliferation. Past Perspectives reviewed fundamental cell cycle regulation and its upstream regulation by insulin/IGF signaling via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, glucose, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and liver kinase B1, protein kinase Cζ, calcium-calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells, epidermal growth factor/platelet-derived growth factor family members, Wnt/β-catenin, leptin, and estrogen and progesterone. Here, we emphasize Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription, Ras/Raf/extracellular signal–related kinase, cadherins and integrins, G-protein–coupled receptors, and transforming growth factor β signaling. We hope these three Perspectives will serve to introduce these pathways to new researchers and will encourage additional investigators to focus on understanding how to harness key intracellular signaling pathways for therapeutic human β-cell regeneration for diabetes. PMID:25999530

  9. Glioblastoma-dependent differentiation and angiogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Tobias; Hildebrandt, Jenna; Nuebling, Georg; Sostak, Petra; Straube, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is of central importance in the malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). As previously shown, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) migrate towards GBM and are incorporated into tumor microvessels. However, phenotype and function of recruited hMSC remain unclear. We evaluated the differentiation and angiogenic potential of hMSC after stimulation with glioblastoma-conditioned medium in vitro. Immunostaining with endothelial, smooth muscle cell and pericyte markers was used to analyze hMSC differentiation in different concentrations of tumor-conditioned medium (CM), and the angiogenic potential was evaluated by matrigel-based tube-formation assay (TFA). Immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumor-conditioned hMSC (CM-hMSC) expressed CD 151, VE-cadherin, desmin, α-smooth muscle actin, nestin, and nerval/glial antigen 2 (NG2) in a CM concentration-dependent manner, whereas no expression of von-Willebrand factor (vWF) and smooth myosin could be detected. These findings are indicative of GBM-dependent differentiation of hMSC into pericyte-like cells, rather than endothelial or smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, TFA of hMSC and CM-hMSC revealed CM-dependent formation of capillary-like networks, which differed substantially from those formed by human endothelial cells (HUVEC), also implying pericyte-like tube formation. These results are indicative of GBM-derived differentiation of hMSC into pericyte-like mural cells, which might contribute to the neovascularization and stabilization of tumor vessels.

  10. Evidence of association of human papillomavirus with prognosis worsening in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Vidone, Michele; Alessandrini, Federica; Marucci, Gianluca; Farnedi, Anna; de Biase, Dario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Calabrese, Claudia; Kurelac, Ivana; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain tumor in adults, but its etiology still remains unknown. Recently, a role of viruses such as cytomegalovirus and JC virus in gliomagenesis has been suggested. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered the most common oncogenic virus in humans, we evaluated its occurrence in GBM samples. Material and Methods Fifty-two formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary glioblastoma specimens were retrospectively analyzed. The presence of HPV genome on tumor DNA was assessed by MY/GP nested PCR. Confirmation of HPV detection was obtained by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody directed against the L1 capsidic protein. Finally, univariate and multivariate proportional-hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients. Results Strikingly, viral DNA was detected after PCR in 12 cases (23%). HPV16 genome was present in 25% infected samples, whereas the remaining samples tested positive for HPV6. CISH confirmed positivity in all infected samples for which enough material was available. Moreover, IHC positivity suggested that production of viral proteins from HPV genome is an ongoing process in GBM cancer cells. Finally an association between HPV infection and a worse prognosis was found in patients upon age stratification with a univariate analysis (HR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.00–4.44; log-rank P = .045). Conclusions HPV infection status may be considered an independent prognostic factor in GBM patients and suggests that prevention may be considered, should HPV be recognized as a causative agent in gliomagenesis. PMID:24285549

  11. Effect of chlorpromazine on human and murine intracellular carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Radenovic, L; Kartelija, G

    2004-04-01

    Clinical use of chlorpromazine (CPZ), an antipsychotic drug, is limited due to its hepatotoxicity. CPZ is found to inhibit in vitro intracellular carboxylesterases (CE), such as alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase, naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase, and alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase in polymorphonuclear neutrophils, hepatocytes, and neuronal brain cells from mice. CPZ inhibits CE of all these cell types, whereby the degree of the inhibition depends on the incubation time and CPZ concentration. The polymorphonuclear neutrophils are most sensitive to CPZ. Comparable results were obtained with polymorphonuclear neutrophils from mice and humans. Since leukocytes are much more available than hepatocytes or neuronal cells in humans, we assume that CE in peripheral blood leukocytes (neutrophils and monocytes) can be used as markers for indication of pending liver damage by CPZ.

  12. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  13. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future.

  14. Anticancer potential and mechanism of action of mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) supercritical CO₂ extract in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Cheppail; Lollett, Ivonne V; Escalon, Enrique; Quirin, Karl-Werner; Melnick, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is among the less-investigated species of Curcuma for anticancer properties. We have investigated the anticancer potential and the mechanism of action of a supercritical CO2 extract of mango ginger (CA) in the U-87MG human glioblastoma cell line. CA demonstrated higher cytotoxicity than temozolomide, etoposide, curcumin, and turmeric force with IC50, IC75, and IC90 values of 4.92 μg/mL, 12.87 μg/mL, and 21.30 μg/mL, respectively. Inhibitory concentration values of CA for normal embryonic mouse hypothalamus cell line (mHypoE-N1) is significantly higher than glioblastoma cell line, indicating the specificity of CA against brain tumor cells. CompuSyn analysis indicates that CA acts synergistically with temozolomide and etoposide for the cytotoxicity with combination index values of <1. CA treatment also induces apoptosis in glioblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and downregulates genes associated with apoptosis, cell proliferation, telomerase activity, oncogenesis, and drug resistance in glioblastoma cells.

  15. Controlled release microspheres loaded with BMP7 suppress primary tumors from human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Gómez, P.; de la Fuente, M.; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Mira, H.; Sánchez-Gómez, P.; Garcia-Fuentes, M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma tumor initiating cells are believed to be the main drivers behind tumor recurrence, and therefore therapies that specifically manage this population are of great medical interest. In a previous work, we synthesized controlled release microspheres optimized for intracranial delivery of BMP7, and showed that these devices are able to stop the in vitro growth of a glioma cell line. Towards the translational development of this technology, we now explore these microspheres in further detail and characterize the mechanism of action and the in vivo therapeutic potential using tumor models relevant for the clinical setting: human primary glioblastoma cell lines. Our results show that BMP7 can stop the proliferation and block the self-renewal capacity of those primary cell lines that express the receptor BMPR1B. BMP7 was encapsulated in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres in the form of a complex with heparin and Tetronic, and the formulation provided effective release for several weeks, a process controlled by carrier degradation. Data from xenografts confirmed reduced and delayed tumor formation for animals treated with BMP7-loaded microspheres. This effect was coincident with the activation of the canonical BMP signaling pathway. Importantly, tumors treated with BMP7-loaded microspheres also showed downregulation of several markers that may be related to a malignant stem cell-like phenotype: CD133+, Olig2, and GFAPδ. We also observed that tumors treated with BMP7-loaded microspheres showed enhanced expression of cell cycle inhibitors and reduced expression of the proliferation marker PCNA. In summary, BMP7-loaded controlled release microspheres are able to inhibit GBM growth and reduce malignancy markers. We envisage that this kind of selective therapy for tumor initiating cells could have a synergistic effect in combination with conventional cytoreductive therapy (chemo-, radiotherapy) or with immunotherapy. PMID:25860932

  16. Cordyceps militaris and mycelial fermentation induced apoptosis and autophagy of human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C-H; Kao, Y-H; Huang, K-S; Wang, C-Y; Lin, L-W

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first report that investigated the apoptosis-inducing effects of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its mycelial fermentation in human glioblastoma cells. Both fractions arrested the GBM8401 cells in the G0/G1 phase, whereas the U-87MG cells were arrested at the G2/M transitional stage. Western blot data suggested that upregulation of p53 and p21 might be involved in the disruption of cell cycle progression. Induction of chromosomal condensation and the appearance of a sub-G1 hypodipoid population further supported the proapoptogenicity, possibly through the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8, and the downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and the upregulation of proapoptotic Bax protein expression. Downregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin and upregulation of Atg5 and LC3 II levels in GBM8401 cells implicated the involvement of autophagy. The signaling profiles with mycelial fermentation treatment indicated that mycelial fermentation triggered rapid phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK, and JNK, but suppressed constitutively high levels of ERK1/2 in GBM8401 cells. Mycelial fermentation treatment only significantly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but decreased constitutively high levels of Akt, ERK1/2, and JNK phosphorylation in U-87MG cells. Pretreatment with PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 prevented the mycelial fermentation-induced cytotoxicity in GBM8401 and U-87MG cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3K/Akt and MEK1 pathways in mycelial fermentation-driven glioblastoma cell apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23190603

  17. Controlled release microspheres loaded with BMP7 suppress primary tumors from human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    González-Gómez, Pilar; Crecente-Campo, Jose; Zahonero, Cristina; de la Fuente, Maria; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Mira, Helena; Sánchez-Gómez, Pilar; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos

    2015-05-10

    Glioblastoma tumor initiating cells are believed to be the main drivers behind tumor recurrence, and therefore therapies that specifically manage this population are of great medical interest. In a previous work, we synthesized controlled release microspheres optimized for intracranial delivery of BMP7, and showed that these devices are able to stop the in vitro growth of a glioma cell line. Towards the translational development of this technology, we now explore these microspheres in further detail and characterize the mechanism of action and the in vivo therapeutic potential using tumor models relevant for the clinical setting: human primary glioblastoma cell lines. Our results show that BMP7 can stop the proliferation and block the self-renewal capacity of those primary cell lines that express the receptor BMPR1B. BMP7 was encapsulated in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres in the form of a complex with heparin and Tetronic, and the formulation provided effective release for several weeks, a process controlled by carrier degradation. Data from xenografts confirmed reduced and delayed tumor formation for animals treated with BMP7-loaded microspheres. This effect was coincident with the activation of the canonical BMP signaling pathway. Importantly, tumors treated with BMP7-loaded microspheres also showed downregulation of several markers that may be related to a malignant stem cell-like phenotype: CD133(+), Olig2, and GFAPδ. We also observed that tumors treated with BMP7-loaded microspheres showed enhanced expression of cell cycle inhibitors and reduced expression of the proliferation marker PCNA. In summary, BMP7-loaded controlled release microspheres are able to inhibit GBM growth and reduce malignancy markers. We envisage that this kind of selective therapy for tumor initiating cells could have a synergistic effect in combination with conventional cytoreductive therapy (chemo-, radiotherapy) or with immunotherapy.

  18. Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David A; Hooton, Thomas M; Stamm, Walter E; Humphrey, Peter A; Hultgren, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. Methods and Findings We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18%) urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41%) urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29%) of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001). Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22%) had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45%) had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. Conclusions The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The findings

  19. New role of osteopontin in DNA repair and impact on human glioblastoma radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Aurélie; Nokin, Marie-Julie; Leroi, Natacha; Lallemand, François; Lambert, Jérémy; Goffart, Nicolas; Roncarati, Patrick; Bianchi, Elettra; Peixoto, Paul; Blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei; Peulen, Olivier; Habraken, Yvette; Scholtes, Félix; Martinive, Philippe; Delvenne, Philippe; Rogister, Bernard; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) represents the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. We have recently demonstrated the importance of osteopontin (OPN) in the acquisition/maintenance of stemness characters and tumorigenicity of glioma initiating cells. Consultation of publicly available TCGA database indicated that high OPN expression correlated with poor survival in GBM patients. In this study, we explored the role of OPN in GBM radioresistance using an OPN-depletion strategy in U87-MG, U87-MG vIII and U251-MG human GBM cell lines. Clonogenic experiments showed that OPN-depleted GBM cells were sensitized to irradiation. In comet assays, these cells displayed higher amounts of unrepaired DNA fragments post-irradiation when compared to control. We next evaluated the phosphorylation of key markers of DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Activating phosphorylation of H2AX, ATM and 53BP1 was significantly decreased in OPN-deficient cells. The addition of recombinant OPN prior to irradiation rescued phospho-H2AX foci formation thus establishing a new link between DNA repair and OPN expression in GBM cells. Finally, OPN knockdown improved mice survival and induced a significant reduction of heterotopic human GBM xenograft when combined with radiotherapy. This study reveals a new function of OPN in DNA damage repair process post-irradiation thus further confirming its major role in GBM aggressive disease. PMID:27563812

  20. Evaluation of the potential of mobile phone specific electromagnetic fields (UMTS) to produce micronuclei in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Serori, Halh; Kundi, Michael; Ferk, Franziska; Mišík, Miroslav; Nersesyan, Armen; Murbach, Manuel; Lah, Tamara T; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2017-04-01

    Some epidemiological studies indicate that mobile phones cause glioblastomas in humans. Since it is known that genomic instability plays a key role in the etiology of cancer, we investigated the effects of the universal mobile telecommunications system radiofrequency (UMTS-RF) signal, which is used in "smart" phones, on micronucleus (MN) formation and other anomalies such as nuclear buds (NBUDs) and nucleoplasmatic bridges (NPBs). MN are formed by structural and numerical aberrations, NBs reflect gene amplification and NPBs are formed from dicentric chromosomes. The experiments were conducted with human glioblastoma cell lines, which differ in regard to their p53 status, namely U87 (wild-type) and U251 (mutated). The cells were cultivated for 16h in presence and absence of fetal calf serum and exposed to different SAR doses (0.25, 0.50 and 1.00W/kg), which reflect the exposure of humans, in presence and absence of mitomycin C as former studies indicate that RF may cause synergistic effects in combination with this drug. We found no evidence for induction of MN and other anomalies. However, with the highest dose, induction of apoptosis was observed in U251 cells on the basis of the morphological features of the cells. Our findings indicate that the UMTS-RF signal does not cause chromosomal damage in glioblastoma cells; the mechanisms which lead to induction of programmed cell death will be investigated in further studies.

  1. Fluvoxamine, an anti-depressant, inhibits human glioblastoma invasion by disrupting actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiichiro; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Nakayama, Hiroki; Wei, Fan-Yan; Fujimura, Atsushi; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Asai, Akira; Ogo, Naohisa; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Nishiki, Tei-ichi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Takei, Kohji; Matsui, Hideki

    2016-03-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor with a median survival time about one year. Invasion of GBM cells into normal brain is the major cause of poor prognosis and requires dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, which includes lamellipodial protrusions, focal adhesions, and stress fibers at the leading edge of GBM. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibitors of actin polymerization can suppress GBM migration and invasion. First, we adopted a drug repositioning system for screening with a pyrene-actin-based actin polymerization assay and identified fluvoxamine, a clinically used antidepressant. Fluvoxamine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was a potent inhibitor of actin polymerization and confirmed as drug penetration through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and accumulation of whole brain including brain tumor with no drug toxicity. Fluvoxamine inhibited serum-induced ruffle formation, cell migration, and invasion of human GBM and glioma stem cells in vitro by suppressing both FAK and Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Daily treatment of athymic mice bearing human glioma-initiating cells with fluvoxamine blocked tumor cell invasion and prolonged the survival with almost same dose of anti-depressant effect. In conclusion, fluvoxamine is a promising anti-invasive treatment against GBM with reliable approach.

  2. Copper induces cellular senescence in human glioblastoma multiforme cells through downregulation of Bmi-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Hu, Jifan; Guan, Fangxia; Song, Laijun; Fan, Ruitai; Zhu, Huaijie; Hu, Xiang; Shen, Eileen; Yang, Bo

    2013-05-01

    Most human tumor cells, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells, have aberrant control of cell aging and apoptosis. Subcytotoxic concentrations of oxidative or stress‑causing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, may induce human cell senescence. Thus, induction of tumor cells into premature senescence may provide a useful in vitro model for developing novel therapeutic strategy to combat tumors. In the present study, we assessed the molecular mechanism(s) underlying senescence in GBM cells induced by copper sulfate. Following pretreatment with subcytotoxic concentrations of copper sulfate, U87-MG tumor cells showed typical aging characteristics, including reduced cell proliferation, cell enlargement, increased level of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity, and overexpression of several senescence-associated genes, p16, p21, transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1), insulin growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) and apolipoprotein J (ApoJ). We further demonstrated that the Bmi-1 pathway was downregulated in GBM cells in parallel with the induced senescence. The present study for the first time demonstrates the ability of copper to induce GBM cell senescence by downregulating Bmi-1.

  3. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  4. In vitro expansion of human glioblastoma cells at non-physiological oxygen tension irreversibly alters subsequent in vivo aggressiveness and AC133 expression

    PubMed Central

    BOURSEAU-GUILMAIN, ERIKA; LEMAIRE, LAURENT; GRIVEAU, AUDREY; HERVOUET, ERIC; VALLETTE, FRANÇOIS; BERGER, FRANÇOIS; MENEI, PHILIPPE; BENOIT, JEAN-PIERRE; WION, DIDIER; GARCION, EMMANUEL

    2012-01-01

    Among markers of glioblastoma initiating cells, AC133 has been shown to be associated with glioblastoma resistance and malignancy. Recently, it was demonstrated that increasing oxygen tension (pO2) down-regulated AC133 expression in glioblastoma cells in vitro. In order to better understand extrinsic factor regulation of AC133, this work aimed to investigate the relationship between cell culture pO2, AC133 expression, and tumor development and phenotype. Using treatments with CoCl2 and HIF-1α shRNA knockdowns on non-sorted human primary glioblastoma cells cultured at low (3%) versus high (21%) oxygen tension, we established a responsibility for low pO2 in the maintenance of high levels of AC133 expression, with a major but non-exclusive role for HIF-1α. We also demonstrated that human glioblastoma cells previously cultured under high oxygen tension can lose part of their aggressiveness when orthotopically engrafted in SCID mice or lead to tumors with distinct phenotypes and no re-expression of AC133. These observations showed that the specific pO2 microenvironment irreversibly impacts glioblastoma cell phenotypes, highlighting the pertinence of culture conditions when extrapolating data from xenogenic models to human cells in their source environment. They also raised AC133 as a marker of non-exposure to oxygenated areas rather than a marker of aggressiveness or low pO2 niches. PMID:22134773

  5. (68)Ga-labeled 3PRGD2 for dual PET and Cerenkov luminescence imaging of orthotopic human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Di; Zhang, Xin; Zhong, Lijun; Liu, Xujie; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Huiyun; Jia, Bing; Liu, Zhaofei; Zhu, Zhaohui; Shi, Jiyun; Wang, Fan

    2015-06-17

    β-Emitters can produce Cerenkov radiation that is detectable by Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), allowing the combination of PET and CLI with one radiotracer for both tumor diagnosis and visual guidance during surgery. Recently, the clinical feasibility of CLI with the established therapeutic reagent Na(131)I and the PET tracer (18)F-FDG was demonstrated. (68)Ga possesses a higher Cerenkov light output than (18)F and (131)I, which would result in higher sensitivity for CLI and improve the outcome of CLI in clinical applications. However, the research on (68)Ga-based tumor-specific tracers for CLI is limited. In this study, we examined the use of (68)Ga-radiolabeled DOTA-3PRGD2 ((68)Ga-3PRGD2) for dual PET and CLI of orthotopic U87MG human glioblastoma. For this purpose, the Cerenkov efficiencies of (68)Ga and (18)F were measured with the IVIS Spectrum system (PerkinElmer, USA). The CLI signal intensity of (68)Ga was 15 times stronger than that of (18)F. PET and CLI of (68)Ga-3PRGD2 were performed in U87MG human glioblastoma xenografts. Both PET and CLI revealed a remarkable accumulation of (68)Ga-3PRGD2 in the U87MG human glioblastoma xenografts at 1 h p.i. with an extremely low background in the brain when compared with (18)F-FDG. Furthermore, (68)Ga-3PRGD2 was used for dual PET and CLI of orthotopic human glioblastoma. The orthotopic human glioblastoma was clearly visualized by both imaging modalities. In addition, the biodistribution of (68)Ga-3PRGD2 was assessed in normal mice to estimate the radiation dosimetry. The whole-body effective dose is 20.1 ± 3.3 μSv/MBq, which is equal to 3.7 mSv per whole-body PET scan with a 5 mCi injection dose. Thus, (68)Ga-3PRGD2 involves less radiation exposure in patients when compared with (18)F-FDG (7.0 mSv). The use of (68)Ga-3PRGD2 in dual PET and CLI shows great promise for tumor diagnosis and image-guided surgery.

  6. Intracellular and circulating neuronal antinuclear antibodies in human epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Iffland, Philip H; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Trigunaite, Abhishek; Man, Shumei; Rasmussen, Peter; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Ghosh, Chaitali; Jørgensen, Trine N; Janigro, Damir

    2013-11-01

    There are overwhelming data supporting the inflammatory origin of some epilepsies (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis and limbic encephalitis). Inflammatory epilepsies with an autoimmune component are characterized by autoantibodies against membrane-bound, intracellular or secreted proteins (e.g., voltage gated potassium channels). Comparably, little is known regarding autoantibodies targeting nuclear antigen. We tested the hypothesis that in addition to known epilepsy-related autoantigens, the human brain tissue and serum from patients with epilepsy contain autoantibodies recognizing nuclear targets. We also determined the specific nuclear proteins acting as autoantigen in patients with epilepsy. Brain tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing brain resections to treat refractory seizures, from the brain with arteriovenous malformations or from post-mortem multiple sclerosis brain. Patients with epilepsy had no known history of autoimmune disease and were not diagnosed with autoimmune epilepsy. Tissue was processed for immunohistochemical staining. We also obtained subcellular fractions to extract intracellular IgGs. After separating nuclear antibody-antigen complexes, the purified autoantigen was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Western blots using autoantigen or total histones were probed to detect the presence of antinuclear antibodies in the serum of patients with epilepsy. Additionally, HEp-2 assays and antinuclear antibody ELISA were used to detect the staining pattern and specific presence of antinuclear antibodies in the serum of patients with epilepsy. Brain regions from patients with epilepsy characterized by blood-brain barrier disruption (visualized by extravasated albumin) contained extravasated IgGs. Intracellular antibodies were found in epilepsy (n=13/13) but not in multiple sclerosis brain (n=4/4). In the brain from patients with epilepsy, neurons displayed higher levels of nuclear IgGs compared to glia. IgG colocalized with extravasated

  7. Intracellular and circulating neuronal antinuclear antibodies in human epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Iffland, Philip H.; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Trigunaite, Abhishek; Man, Shumei; Rasmussen, Peter; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Ghosh, Chaitali; Jørgensen, Trine N.; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    There are overwhelming data supporting the inflammatory origin of some epilepsies (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis and limbic encephalitis). Inflammatory epilepsies with an autoimmune component are characterized by autoantibodies against membrane-bound, intracellular or secreted proteins (e.g., voltage gated potassium channels). Comparably, little is known regarding autoantibodies targeting nuclear antigen. We tested the hypothesis that in addition to known epilepsy-related autoantigens, human brain tissue and serum from patients with epilepsy contain autoantibodies recognizing nuclear targets. We also determined the specific nuclear proteins acting as autoantigen in patients with epilepsy. Brain tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing brain resections to treat refractory seizures, from brain with arteriovenous malformations or from post-mortem multiple sclerosis brain. Patients with epilepsy had no known history of autoimmune disease and were not diagnosed with autoimmune epilepsy. Tissue was processed for immunohistochemical staining. We also obtained subcellular fractions to extract intracellular IgGs. After separating nuclear antibody-antigen complexes, the purified autoantigen was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Western blots using autoantigen or total histones were probed to detect the presence of antinuclear antibodies in the serum of patients with epilepsy. Additionally, HEp-2 assays and antinuclear antibody ELISA were used to detect the staining pattern and specific presence of antinuclear antibodies in serum of patients with epilepsy. Brain regions from patients with epilepsy characterized by blood-brain barrier disruption (visualized by extravasated albumin) contained extravasated IgGs. Intracellular antibodies were found in epilepsy (n=13/13) but not in multiple sclerosis brain (n= 4/4). In brain from patients with epilepsy, neurons displayed higher levels of nuclear IgGs compared to glia. IgG colocalized with extravasated albumin. All

  8. REST controls self-renewal and tumorigenic competence of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luciano; Crisafulli, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Tortoreto, Monica; Brilli, Elisa; Conforti, Paola; Zunino, Franco; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Schiffer, Davide; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST/NRSF) is a master repressor of neuronal programs in non-neuronal lineages shown to function as a central regulator of developmental programs and stem cell physiology. Aberrant REST function has been associated with a number of pathological conditions. In cancer biology, REST has been shown to play a tumor suppressor activity in epithelial cancers but an oncogenic role in brain childhood malignancies such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. Here we examined REST expression in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens and its role in GBM cells carrying self-renewal and tumorigenic competence. We found REST to be expressed in GBM specimens, its presence being particularly enriched in tumor cells in the perivascular compartment. Significantly, REST is highly expressed in self-renewing tumorigenic-competent GBM cells and its knock down strongly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo and affects levels of miR-124 and its downstream targets. These results indicate that REST contributes to GBM maintenance by affecting its self-renewing and tumorigenic cellular component and that, hence, a better understanding of these circuitries in these cells might lead to new exploitable therapeutic targets.

  9. Detection of complex genetic alterations in human glioblastoma multiforme using comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.; Stumm, G.; Scherthan, H.; Arens, N.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect complex genetic alterations in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by comparative genomic in situ hybridization (CGH). Of the 24 GBM that were examined, increased fluorescence intensities indicating chromosomal polysomy of chromosome 7 and gene amplification at chromosome 7p were found in 42% of the tumors. In addition, signal enhancement of chromosome 19 was present in 29% and at 12q13-15 in 21% of the tumors. We also detected reduction of fluorescence intensities indicating gross deletions on chromosomes 10 (58%), 9p (46%), and 13 (29%). There was a close correlation of CGH results when compared with Southern analysis of the EGFR gene localized on chromosome 7 and loss of heterozygosity detection of chromosome 9 and 10 by microsatellite PCR. A close correlation was also observed between copy number changes of chromosome 7 and deletions of chromosome 10. Amplification of chromosome 12q and deletions of chromosomes 9p and 13 seemed to be complementary in the tumors investigated in the present study. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Vitamin D receptor expression is associated with improved overall survival in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Salomón, Débora G; Fermento, María E; Gandini, Norberto A; Ferronato, María J; Arévalo, Julián; Blasco, Jorge; Andrés, Nancy C; Zenklusen, Jean C; Curino, Alejandro C; Facchinetti, María M

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin D and its analogs have been shown to display anti-proliferative effects in a wide variety of cancer types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). These anticancer effects are mediated by its active metabolite, 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) acting mainly through vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In addition to its involvement in calcitriol action, VDR has also been demonstrated to be useful as a prognostic factor for some types of cancer. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies evaluating the expression of VDR protein and its association with outcome in gliomas. Therefore, we investigated VDR expression by using immunohistochemical analysis in human glioma tissue microarrays, and analyzed the association between VDR expression and clinico-pathological parameters. We further investigated the effects of genetic and pharmacologic modulation of VDR on survival and migration of glioma cell lines. Our data demonstrate that VDR is increased in tumor tissues when compared with VDR in non-malignant brains, and that VDR expression is associated with an improved outcome in patients with GBM. We also show that both genetic and pharmacologic modulation of VDR modulates GBM cellular migration and survival and that VDR is necessary for calcitriol-mediated effects on migration. Altogether these results provide some limited evidence supporting a role for VDR in glioma progression.

  11. Proton and photon beams interaction with radiosensitizing agents in human glioblastoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafiandra, M.

    2016-03-01

    In oncological field, chemoradiotherapy treatments that combine radiations to radiosensitizing chemical agents are spreading out. The aim of this kind of treatment is to obtain a better tumor local control and at the same time to reduce the distant failure. The combination of radiation with microtubule-stabilizing agents is very promising in cancer therapy. In the present study, the combination of clinical proton beams and the microtubule-stabilizing agent Epothilone B has been investigated in human glioblastoma cells cultured in vitro. Photon beams have been used for comparison. Cell survival has been evaluated by colony forming assay and the interaction mechanism between radiation and Epothilone B has been investigated: survival curves relative to the combined treatment (protons or photons with Epothilone B) showed a linear trend, different from the linear quadratic behavior found with radiation alone. The analysis performed showed a synergism in the radiation-drug interaction. Thus, Epothilone B in conjunction with radiation acts as a radiosensitizer. Finally proton Relative Biological Effectiveness has been determined and results are reported in this paper.

  12. Oxymatrine Inhibits Proliferation and Migration While Inducing Apoptosis in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baocheng; Wang, Jiajia; Li, Qifeng; Meng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT), an alkaloid derived from the traditional Chinese medicine herb Sophora flavescens Aiton, has been shown to exhibit anticancer properties on various types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigate the anticancer properties of OMT on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and evaluate their underlying mechanisms. MTT assays were performed and demonstrated that OMT significantly inhibits the proliferation of GBM cells. Flow cytometry suggested that OMT at a concentration of 10−5 M may induce apoptosis in U251 and A172 cells. Western blot analyses demonstrated a significant increase in the expression of Bax and caspase-3 and a significant decrease in expression of Bcl-2 in both U251 and A172 cells. Additionally, OMT was found by transwell and high-content screening assays to decrease the migratory ability of the evaluated GBM cells. These findings suggest that the antitumor effects of OMT may be the result of inhibition of cell proliferation and migration and the induction of apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins. OMT may represent a novel anticancer therapy for the treatment of GBM. PMID:27957488

  13. Human Glioblastoma Multiforme: p53 Reactivation by a Novel MDM2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Bendinelli, Sara; Gabelloni, Pamela; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Daniele, Simona; Scatena, Fabrizio; Vanacore, Renato; Campiglia, Pietro; Bertamino, Alessia; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Sorriento, Daniela; Del Giudice, Carmine; Iaccarino, Guido; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Cancer development and chemo-resistance are often due to impaired functioning of the p53 tumor suppressor through genetic mutation or sequestration by other proteins. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), p53 availability is frequently reduced because it binds to the Murine Double Minute-2 (MDM2) oncoprotein, which accumulates at high concentrations in tumor cells. The use of MDM2 inhibitors that interfere with the binding of p53 and MDM2 has become a valid approach to inhibit cell growth in a number of cancers; however little is known about the efficacy of these inhibitors in GBM. We report that a new small-molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with a spirooxoindolepyrrolidine core structure, named ISA27, effectively reactivated p53 function and inhibited human GBM cell growth in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In immunoincompetent BALB/c nude mice bearing a human GBM xenograft, the administration of ISA27 in vivo activated p53, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumor tissue. Significantly, ISA27 was non-toxic in an in vitro normal human cell model and an in vivo mouse model. ISA27 administration in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) produced a synergistic inhibitory effect on GBM cell viability in vitro, suggesting the possibility of lowering the dose of TMZ used in the treatment of GBM. In conclusion, our data show that ISA27 releases the powerful antitumor capacities of p53 in GBM cells. The use of this MDM2 inhibitor could become a novel therapy for the treatment of GBM patients. PMID:23977270

  14. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  15. Cytopathic Effects of X-ray Irradiation and MnO Nanoparticles on Human Glioblastoma (U87)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, K. E.; Zavjalov, E. L.; Razumov, I. A.; Romaschenko, A. V.; Stupak, A. S.; Troicky, S. Yu; Goldenberg, B. G.; Legkodymov, A. G.; Lemzyakov, A. A.; Moshkin, M. P.

    Glioblastoma is a leader among the most malignant brain tumors with the average lifespan of patients around 9-12 months. For prevention and treatment of neuropathology, a variety of therapeutic and surgical approaches are being developed and improved, including radiation and chemical therapy methods. In our work, we investigated cytopathic effect of X-ray irradiation with application of metal oxides nanoparticles such as manganese oxide (MnO) on U87 human glioblastoma cells. We used the X-ray irradiation dose of 0.5, 4, 40 and 100 Gy in combination with nanoparticles at the concentration of 0.5 ng/ml. The irradiation of glioma cell was carried out at the synchrotron radiation source VEPP-4. After cells treatments with nanoparticles for about 24 h and radiation the results were assessed by MTT assay test with 106/ml cells densities. We demonstrate that preincubation of the glioblastoma cell lines U87 with MnO nanoparticles allows reducing dose of irradiation. This combination of nanoparticles and X-ray irradiation provides new possibilities for the treatment of brain tumors.

  16. Isolation of cancer stem cells from three human glioblastoma cell lines: characterization of two selected clones.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, Fortunata; Angelucci, Cristiana; Piacentini, Roberto; Biamonte, Filippo; Mangiola, Annunziato; Maira, Giulio; Grassi, Claudio; Sica, Gigliola

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) were isolated via a non-adherent neurosphere assay from three glioma cell lines: LI, U87, and U373. Using a clonal assay, two clones (D2 and F11) were selected from spheres derived from LI cells and were characterized for the: expression of stem cell markers (CD133, Nestin, Musashi-1 and Sox2); proliferation; differentiation capability (determined by the expression of GalC, βIII-Tubulin and GFAP); Ca(2+) signaling and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Both D2 and F11 clones expressed higher levels of all stem cell markers with respect to the parental cell line. Clones grew more slowly than LI cells with a two-fold increase in duplication time. Markers of differentiation (βIII-Tubulin and GFAP) were expressed at high levels in both LI cells and in neurospheres. The expression of Nestin, Sox2, and βIII-Tubulin was down-regulated in D2 and F11 when cultured in serum-containing medium, whereas Musashi-1 was increased. In this condition, duplication time of D2 and F11 increased without reaching that of LI cells. D2, F11 and parental cells did not express voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels but they exhibited increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP. These Ca(2+) signals were larger in LI cells and in spheres cultured in serum-containing medium, while they were smaller in serum-free medium. The ATP treatment did not affect cell proliferation. Both D2 and F11 induced the appearance of tumors when ortotopically injected in athymic nude mice at a density 50-fold lower than that of LI cells. All these data indicate that both clones have characteristics of CSC and share the same stemness properties. The findings regarding the expression of differentiation markers and Ca(2+)-channels show that both clones are unable to reach the terminal differentiation. Both D2 and F11 might represent a good model to improve the knowledge on CSC in glioblastoma and to identify new therapeutic approaches.

  17. Down-regulation of ribosomal protein S15A inhibits proliferation of human glioblastoma cells in vivo and in vitro via AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yiqun; Liu, Yongjian; Lv, Xiupeng; Dong, Bin; Wang, Feng; Li, Jun; Zhang, Qiuping; Xu, Ruixue; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-04-01

    Ribosomal protein s15a (RPS15A), a highly conserved cytoplasmic protein, promotes mRNA/ribosome interaction in translation. Recent evidence showed that RPS15A is essential for tumor growth. RPS15A expression level was measured in glioblastoma tissue samples and normal brain (NB) tissue samples. RPS15A RNAi stable cell line U87 and U251 was generated by the pLVTHM-GFP lentiviral RNAi expression system. The knockdown efficiency was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. Molecular mechanisms and the effect of RPS15A on cell growth and migration were investigated by using western blot, MTT assay, wound healing assay, transwell migration assay, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. Here, we report that RPS15A is overexpressed in human glioblastoma tumor tissues. RPS15A knockdown inhibits proliferation and migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Knocking down RPS15A leads to the level of p-Akt decrease and cell cycle arrested in G0/G1 phase in U87 and U251 cells. Furthermore, the growth of glioblastoma cell-transplanted tumors in nude mice is inhibited by transduction with Lv-shRPS15A. Our findings indicate that RPS15A promotes cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma for the first time. RPS15A might play a distinct role in glioblastoma and serve as a potential target for therapy.

  18. Allopregnanolone promotes proliferation and differential gene expression in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Sánchez, Carmen J; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Salido-Guadarrama, Ivan; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    Allopregnanolone (3α-THP) is one of the main reduced progesterone (P4) metabolites that is recognized as a neuroprotective and myelinating agent. 3α-THP also induces proliferation of different neural cells. It has been shown that P4 favors the progression of glioblastomas (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors. However, the role of 3α-THP in the growth of GBMs is unknown. Here, we studied the effects of 3α-THP on the number of cells, proliferation and gene expression in U87 cell line derived from a human GBM. 3α-THP (10, 100nM and 1μM) increased the number of U87 cells, and at 10nM exerted a similar increase in both the number of total and proliferative U87 cells as compared with P4 (10nM). Interestingly, finasteride (F; 100nM), an inhibitor of 5α-reductase (5αR), an enzyme necessary to metabolize P4 and produce 3α-THP, blocked the increase in the number of U87 cells induced by P4. By using RT-qPCR, we determined that U87 cells express 5α-R isoenzymes 1 and 2 (5αR1 and 5αR2), being 5αR1 the predominant one in these cells. 3α-THP (10nM) increased the expression of TGFβ1, EGFR, VEGF and cyclin D1 genes. P4 increased TGFβ1 and EGFR expression, and this effect was blocked by F. These data provide evidence that P4, through its metabolite 3α-THP, can promote in part cell proliferation of human GBM cells by changing the expression of genes involved in tumor progression.

  19. Rational development and characterization of humanized anti-EGFR variant III chimeric antigen receptor T cells for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura A; Scholler, John; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Kosaka, Akemi; Patel, Prachi R; McGettigan, Shannon E; Nace, Arben K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Thekkat, Pramod; Loew, Andreas; Boesteanu, Alina C; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Chen, Taylor; Fraietta, Joseph A; Kloss, Christopher C; Posey, Avery D; Engels, Boris; Singh, Reshma; Ezell, Tucker; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Ramones, Melissa H; Li, Na; Zhou, Li; Plesa, Gabriela; Seykora, John T; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2015-02-18

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic molecules designed to redirect T cells to specific antigens. CAR-modified T cells can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but expanding this platform to solid tumors requires the discovery of surface targets with limited expression in normal tissues. The variant III mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) results from an in-frame deletion of a portion of the extracellular domain, creating a neoepitope. We chose a vector backbone encoding a second-generation CAR based on efficacy of a murine scFv-based CAR in a xenograft model of glioblastoma. Next, we generated a panel of humanized scFvs and tested their specificity and function as soluble proteins and in the form of CAR-transduced T cells; a low-affinity scFv was selected on the basis of its specificity for EGFRvIII over wild-type EGFR. The lead candidate scFv was tested in vitro for its ability to direct CAR-transduced T cells to specifically lyse, proliferate, and secrete cytokines in response to antigen-bearing targets. We further evaluated the specificity of the lead CAR candidate in vitro against EGFR-expressing keratinocytes and in vivo in a model of mice grafted with normal human skin. EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells were also able to control tumor growth in xenogeneic subcutaneous and orthotopic models of human EGFRvIII(+) glioblastoma. On the basis of these results, we have designed a phase 1 clinical study of CAR T cells transduced with humanized scFv directed to EGFRvIII in patients with either residual or recurrent glioblastoma (NCT02209376).

  20. Therapeutic Efficacy of Aldoxorubicin in an Intracranial Xenograft Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma12

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, Luis; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Musto, Alberto E.; Wilk, Anna; Vashistha, Himanshu; Zapata, Adriana; Walker, Chelsey; Velasco-Gonzalez, Cruz; Parsons, Christopher; Wieland, Scott; Levitt, Daniel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Prakash, Om

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo), aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo), which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc) was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents—3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD)], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD)], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67) and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3). Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM. PMID:25379024

  1. IL22/IL-22R pathway induces cell survival in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Akil, Hussein; Abbaci, Amazigh; Lalloué, Fabrice; Bessette, Barbara; Costes, Léa M M; Domballe, Linda; Charreau, Sandrine; Guilloteau, Karline; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Bernard, François-Xavier; Morel, Franck; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Lecron, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family that binds to a heterodimeric receptor consisting of IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1) and IL-10R2. IL-22R expression was initially characterized on epithelial cells, and plays an essential role in a number of inflammatory diseases. Recently, a functional receptor was detected on cancer cells such as hepatocarcinoma and lung carcinoma, but its presence was not reported in glioblastoma (GBM). Two GBM cell lines and 10 primary cell lines established from patients undergoing surgery for malignant GBM were used to investigate the expression of IL-22 and IL-22R by using quantitative RT-PCR, western blotting and confocal microscopy studies. The role of IL-22 in proliferation and survival of GBM cell lines was investigated in vitro by BrdU and ELISA cell death assays. We report herein that the two subunits of the IL-22R complex are expressed on human GBM cells. Their activation, depending on exogenous IL-22, induced antiapoptotic effect and cell proliferation. IL-22 treatment of GBM cells resulted in increased levels of phosphorylated Akt, STAT3 signaling protein and its downstream antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL and decreased level of phosphorylated ERK1/2. In addition, IL-22R subunits were expressed in all the 10 tested primary cell lines established from GBM tumors. Our results showed that IL-22R is expressed on GBM established and primary cell lines. Depending on STAT3, ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways, IL-22 induced GBM cell survival. These data are consistent with a potential role of IL-22R in tumorigenesis of GBM. Since endogenous IL-22 was not detected in all studied GBM cells, we hypothesize that IL-22R could be activated by immune microenvironmental IL-22 producing cells.

  2. SV40 DNA in a carrier system of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, V I; Norkin, L C

    1988-04-01

    The state of the SV40 DNA in a stable carrier system of A172 human glioblastoma cells was examined by Southern blot hybridization analysis. At a sensitivity of 0.1 viral genome equivalents per cell, we detected only free, apparently nondefective, viral genomes. However, when we overexposed our autoradiograms or examined cloned cell populations, integrated viral sequences were observed. Furthermore, aberrant forms of free viral DNA were seen as well. Four clones, isolated at 15 weeks, produced T antigen and displayed enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency characteristic of SV40 transformation. None of these clones produced capsid proteins or infectious virus, even upon fusion with CV-1 cells, Viral DNA in the clones ranged from 0.5 to 50 equivalents per cell, on the average. Two of the Week-15 clones contained a similar (but not identical) predominant truncated SV40 sequence which was present both in a free state and integrated at a single major site in a reiterated head-to-tail array. These clones also contained other minor integrated sequences. Another Week-15 clone contained viral sequences integrated at two major sites as well as heterogeneous free DNA. Only free aberrant DNA was detected in the fourth Week-15 clone. Seven of eight clones isolated at 23 weeks produced no infectious virus or T antigen. No viral DNA was detected in those clones. The eighth clone did produce infectious virus and contained a predominance of free viral DNA. All of the clones were susceptible to superinfection with wild-type SV40, although less so than uninfected A172 cultures.

  3. Comparison of microarray and sage techniques in gene expression analysis of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kavsan, V M; Dmitrenko, V V; Shostak, K O; Bukreieva, T V; Vitak, N Y; Simirenko, O E; Malisheva, T A; Shamayev, M I; Rozumenko, V D; Zozulya, Y A

    2007-01-01

    To enhance glioblastoma (GB) marker discovery we compared gene expression in GB with human normal brain (NB) by accessing SAGE Genie web site and compared obtained results with published data. Nine GB and five NB SAGE-libraries were analyzed using the Digital Gene Expression Displayer (DGED), the results of DGED were tested by Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR of arbitrary selected genes. Review of available data from the articles on gene expression profiling by microarray-based hybridization showed as few as 35 overlapped genes with increased expression in GB. Some of them were identified in four articles, but most genes in three or even in two investigations. There was found also some differences between SAGE results of GB analysis. Digital Gene Expression Displayer approach revealed 676 genes differentially expressed in GB vs. NB with cut-off ratio: twofold change and P < or = 0.05. Differential expression of selectedgenes obtained by DGED was confirmed by Northern analysis and RT-PCR. Altogether, only 105 of 955 genes presented in published investigations were among the genes obtained by DGED. Comparison of the results obtained by microarrays and SAGE is very complicated because authors present only the most prominent differentially expressed genes. However, even available data give quite poor overlapping of genes revealed by microarrays. Some differences between results obtained by SAGE in different investigations can be explained by high dependence on the statistical methods used. As for now, the best solution to search for molecular tumor markers is to compare all available results and to select only those genes, which significant expression in tumor combined with very low expression in normal tissues was reproduced in several articles. 105 differentially expressed genes, common to both methods, can be included in the list of candidates for the molecular typing of GBs. Some genes, encoded cell surface or extra-cellular proteins may be useful for targeting

  4. The malignancy of miR-18a in human glioblastoma via directly targeting CBX7

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weining; Zhou, Xu; Yu, Tianfu; Bao, Zhongyuan; Zhi, Tongle; Jiang, Kuan; Nie, Er; Wang, Yingyi; Zhang, Junxia; You, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) are linked to tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Here we analyzed the expression of microRNA 18a in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) within groups of coexpressed groups of genes through analysis of expression profiling databases and clinical tissues. Cell proliferation and flow cytometry experiments were performed to determine the roles of miR-18a in the proliferation of glioblastoma cells in vitro. We employed bioinformatics analyses, luciferase reporter assays, and immunoblotting to identify chromobox protein homolog 7 (CBX7) as the target gene of miR-18a. A significant inverse correlation was observed between miR-18a and CBX7 expression in GBM tissues (r = -0.6264, P = 0.0094). Bioinformatics analyses revealed that most CBX7-associated genes were enriched in terms associated with cell cycle pathways. Upregulated expression of CBX7 inhibited the growth of GBM cells and reduced the expression of CDK2 and cyclin A2 (CCNA2). Rescue experiments indicated that overexpression of CBX7 significantly recovered the increase in cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution induced by miR-18a overexpression. In vivo studies revealed that decreased levels of miR-18a delayed the growth of intracranial tumors, which was accompanied by increased CBX7 expression. We suggest that miR-18a promotes glioblastoma progression via altering CBX7 expression and therefore may serve as a potential target for treating glioblastoma. PMID:28123848

  5. Cannabidiol enhances the inhibitory effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol on human glioblastoma cell proliferation and survival

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Jahan P.; Christian, Rigel T.; Lau, Darryl; Zielinski, Anne J.; Horowitz, Maxx P.; Lee, Jasmine; Pakdel, Arash; Allison, Juanita; Limbad, Chandani; Moore, Dan H.; Yount, Garret L.; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D.

    2009-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor agonist, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has been shown to be a broad range inhibitor of cancer in culture and in vivo, and is currently being used in a clinical trial for the treatment of glioblastoma. It has been suggested that other plant-derived cannabinoids, which do not interact efficiently with CB1 and CB2 receptors, can modulate the actions of Δ9-THC. However, there are conflicting reports as to what extent other cannabinoids can modulate Δ9-THC activity, and most importantly, it is not clear whether other cannabinoid compounds can either potentiate or inhibit the actions of Δ9-THC. We therefore tested cannabidiol (CBD), the second most abundant plant derived cannabiniod, in combination with Δ9-THC. In U251 and SF126 glioblastoma cell lines, Δ9-THC and CBD acted synergistically to inhibit cell proliferation. The treatment of glioblastoma cells with both compounds led to significant modulations of the cell cycle and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis as well as specific modulations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and caspase activities. These specific changes were not observed with either compound individually, indicating that the signal transduction pathways affected by the combination treatment were unique. Our results suggest that the addition of CBD to Δ9-THC may improve the overall effectiveness of Δ9-THC in the treatment of glioblastoma in cancer patients. PMID:20053780

  6. Resistance of human glioblastoma multiforme cells to growth factor inhibitors is overcome by blockade of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, David S.; Wright, Renee D.; Kesari, Santosh; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Tran, Mary A.; Jain, Monish; Zawel, Leigh; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including PDGFR, have been validated as therapeutic targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), yet inhibitors of RTKs have had limited clinical success. As various antiapoptotic mechanisms render GBM cells resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, we hypothesized that these antiapoptotic mechanisms also confer resistance to RTK inhibition. We found that in vitro inhibition of PDGFR in human GBM cells initiated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as evidenced by mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, but downstream caspase activation was blocked by inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Consistent with this, inhibition of PDGFR combined with small molecule inactivation of IAPs induced apoptosis in human GBM cells in vitro and had synergistic antitumor effects in orthotopic mouse models of GBM and in primary human GBM neurospheres. These results demonstrate that concomitant inhibition of IAPs can overcome resistance to RTK inhibitors in human malignant GBM cells, and suggest that blockade of IAPs has the potential to improve treatment outcomes in patients with GBM. PMID:18677408

  7. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, Francesco; Dallatomasina, Alice; Rizzi, Marco; Errede, Mariella; Wälchli, Thomas; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Frei, Karl; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto; Virgintino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG) recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM) components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS, discriminating

  8. PROX1 promotes human glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasion via activation of the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuchang; Wan, Xuefeng; Wei, Xinting

    2017-02-01

    Prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1) is highly expressed in high-grade malignant astrocytic gliomas. However, the role of PROX1 in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains unclear. The present study overexpressed PROX1 in human GBM cell lines and examined its effects on cell growth, tumorigenesis, and invasiveness. In addition, the involvement of the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway in the action of PROX1 was examined. It was identified that overexpression of PROX1 significantly increased the proliferation and colony formation of glioblastoma cells, compared with empty vector‑transfected controls. Furthermore, ectopic expression of PROX1 promoted the growth of GBM xenograft tumors. Western blot analysis revealed that PROX1 overexpression induced nuclear accumulation of NF‑κB p65 and upregulated the expression levels of the NF‑κB responsive genes cyclin D1 and matrix metallopeptidase 9. An NF‑κB reporter assay demonstrated that PROX1‑overexpressing glioblastoma cells had significantly greater NF‑κB‑dependent reporter activities compared with empty vector‑transfected controls. Transfection of a dominant inhibitor of κBα mutant into PROX1‑overexpressing cells significantly impaired their proliferation and invasion capacities, which was accompanied by reduced levels of nuclear NF‑κB p65. Collectively, these data indicated that PROX1 serves an oncogenic role in GBM and promotes cell proliferation and invasiveness potentially via activation of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. Therefore, PROX1 may represent a potential target for the treatment of GBM.

  9. Irradiation combined with SU5416: Microvascular changes and growth delay in a human xenograft glioblastoma tumor line

    SciTech Connect

    Schuuring, Janneke; Bussink, Johan . E-mail: J.Bussink@rther.umcn.nl; Bernsen, Hans; Peeters, Wenny; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and the antiangiogenic compound SU5416 was tested and compared with irradiation alone in a human glioblastoma tumor line xenografted in nude mice. The aim of this study was to monitor microenvironmental changes and growth delay. Methods and materials: A human glioblastoma xenograft tumor line was implanted in nude mice. Irradiations consisted of 10 Gy or 20 Gy with and without SU5416. Several microenvironmental parameters (tumor cell hypoxia, tumor blood perfusion, vascular volume, and microvascular density) were analyzed after imunohistochemical staining. Tumor growth delay was monitored for up to 200 days after treatment. Results: SU5416, when combined with irradiation, has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation alone. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment showed a decreased vascular density during treatment with SU5416. In tumors regrowing after reaching only a partial remission, vascular characteristics normalized shortly after cessation of SU5416. However, in tumors regrowing after reaching a complete remission, permanent microenvironmental changes and an increase of tumor necrosis with a subsequent slower tumor regrowth was found. Conclusions: Permanent vascular changes were seen after combined treatment resulting in complete remission. Antiangiogenic treatment with SU5416 when combined with irradiation has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation or antiangiogenic treatment alone.

  10. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, CHIEN-MIN; SYU, JHIH-PU; WAY, TZONG-DER; HUANG, LI-JIAU; KUO, SHENG-CHU; LIN, CHUNG-TIEN; LIN, CHIH-LI

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti-glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti-proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell-cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy-mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B-induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug-resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ. PMID:26329365

  11. Human chorionic gonadotropin β induces cell motility via ERK1/2 and MMP-2 activation in human glioblastoma U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwen; Du, Lianlian; Li, Chunliu; Wu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin β (hCGβ) promotes tumorigenesis in a variety of tumors including glioblastoma, breast and prostate cancer cells, etc. However, the involved mechanisms remain elusive. Distinct from the other tumors, glioblastoma is a highly invasive brain tumor; invasion causes high recurrence and mortality. Characterization of hCGβ signaling is to determine therapeutic targets to inhibit invasion and lower recurrence. Through both a stable cell line over-expressing hCGβ and hCGβ standards, we tested hCGβ signaling, migration and invasion in human glioblastoma U87MG cells. ELISA showed that hCGβ secreted into culture medium at an amount of 237.8 ± 7.8 ng/10(7) cells in hCGβ transfected stable cells after the cells were grown for 24 h. Through Western blot and Gelatin zymography, we found that hCGβ standards phosphorylated ERK1/2 and upregulated MMP-2 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, overexpressed hCGβ phosphorylated ERK1/2, and upregulated MMP-2 expression and activity, whereas ERK1/2 blocker PD98059 (25 μM) significantly decreased both ERK1/2 and MMP-2 expression and activity. In addition, in the same conditions as the signaling test, hCGβ promoted cell migration and invasion, whereas the PD98059 diminished these effects. These findings demonstrated that hCGβ phosphorylated ERK1/2 upregulating MMP-2 expression and activity leading to cell migration and invasion, suggesting that hCGβ, ERK1/2 and MMP-2 are the potential targets to inhibit glioblastoma invasion.

  12. Down regulation of Akirin-2 increases chemosensitivity in human glioblastomas more efficiently than Twist-1

    PubMed Central

    Krossa, Sebastian; Schmitt, Anne Dorothée; Hattermann, Kirsten; Fritsch, Jürgen; Scheidig, Axel J.; Mehdorn, Hubertus Maximilian; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2015-01-01

    The Twist-1 transcription factor and its interacting protein Akirin-2 regulate apoptosis. We found that in glioblastomas, highly malignant brain tumors, Akirin-2 and Twist-1 were expressed in glial fibrillary acidic protein positive tumor regions as well as in tumor endothelial cells and infiltrating macrophages / microglia. Temozolomide (TMZ) induced the expression of both molecules, partly shifting their nuclear to cytosolic localization. The knock-down (kd) of Akirin-2 increased the activity of cleaved (c)Caspase-3/-7, the amounts of cCaspases-3, -7 and cPARP-1 and resulted in an increased number of apoptotic cells after TMZ exposure. Glioblastoma cells containing decreased amounts of Akirin-2 after kd contained increased amounts of cCaspase-3 as determined by the ImageStreamx Mark II technology. For Twist-1, similar results were obtained with the exception that the combination of TMZ treatment and Twist-1 kd failed to significantly reduce chemoresistance compared with controls. This could be attributed to a cell population containing only slightly increased cCaspase-3 together with decreased Twist-1 levels, which was clearly larger than the respective population observed under Akirin-2 kd. Our results showed that, compared with Twist-1, Akirin-2 is the more promising target for RNAi strategies antagonizing Twist-1/Akirin-2 facilitated glioblastoma cell survival. PMID:26036627

  13. Intracranial elimination of human glioblastoma brain tumors in nude rats using the bispecific ligand-directed toxin, DTEGF13 and convection enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seunguk; Ohlfest, John R; Todhunter, Deborah A; Vallera, Vincent D; Hall, Walter A; Chen, Hua; Vallera, Daniel A

    2009-12-01

    A bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT) consisting of human interleukin-13, epithelial growth factor, and the first 389 amino acids of diphtheria toxin was assembled in order to target human glioblastoma. In vitro, DTEGF13 selectively killed the human glioblastoma cell line U87-luc as well as other human glioblastomas. DTEGF13 fulfilled the requirement of a successful BLT by having greater activity than either of its monospecific counterparts or their mixture proving it necessary to have both ligands on the same single chain molecule. Aggressive brain tumors established intracranially (IC) in nude rats with U87 glioma genetically marked with a firefly luciferase reporter gene were treated with two injections of DTEGF13 using convection enhanced delivery resulting in tumor eradication in 50% of the rats which survived with tumor free status at least 110 days post tumor inoculation. An irrelevant BLT control did not protect establishing specificity. The bispecific DTEGF13 MTD dose was measured at 2 microg/injection or 0.5 microg/kg and toxicity studies indicated safety in this dose. Combination of monospecific DTEGF and DTIL13 did not inhibit tumor growth. ELISA assay indicated that anti-DT antibodies were not generated in normal immunocompetent rats given identical intracranial DTEGF13 therapy. Thus, DTEGF13 is safe and efficacious as an alternative drug for glioblastoma therapy and warrants further study.

  14. Columbia University: Computational Human High-grade Glioblastoma Multiforme Interactome - miRNA (Post-transcriptional) Layer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Human High-Grade Glioma Interactome (HGi) contains a genome-wide complement of molecular interactions that are Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)-specific. HGi v3 contains the post-transcriptional layer of the HGi, which includes the miRNA-target (RNA-RNA) layer of the interactome. Read the Abstract

  15. D11-Mediated Inhibition of Protein Kinase CK2 Impairs HIF-1α-Mediated Signaling in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Susanne; Svenstrup, Tina H.; Fischer, Mette; Guerra, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that protein kinase CK2 plays an important role in many steps of cancer initiation and progression, therefore, the development of effective and cell-permeable inhibitors targeting this kinase has become an important objective for the treatment of a variety of cancer types including glioblastoma. We have recently identified 1,3-dichloro-6-[(E)-((4-methoxyphenyl)imino)methyl]dibenzo(b,d)furan-2,7-diol (D11) as a potent and selective inhibitor of protein kinase CK2. In this study, we have further characterized this compound and demonstrated that it suppresses CK2 kinase activity by mixed type inhibition (KI 7.7 nM, KI′ 42 nM). Incubation of glioblastoma cells with D11 induces cell death and upon hypoxia the compound leads to HIF-1α destabilization. The analysis of differential mRNA expression related to human hypoxia signaling pathway revealed that D11-mediated inhibition of CK2 caused strong down-regulation of genes associated with the hypoxia response including ANGPTL4, CA9, IGFBP3, MMP9, SLC2A1 and VEGFA. Taken together, the results reported here support the notion that including D11 in future treatment regimens might turn out to be a promising strategy to target tumor hypoxia to overcome resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. PMID:28045438

  16. Highly efficient radiosensitization of human glioblastoma and lung cancer cells by a G-quadruplex DNA binding compound

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Patrick; Gueugneau, Marine; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Chautard, Emmanuel; Guetta, Corinne; Dedieu, Véronique; Communal, Yves; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Gallego, Maria; White, Charles; Verrelle, Pierre; Tchirkov, Andreï

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes which stabilize and protect them from nucleotidic degradation and end-to-end fusions. The G-rich telomeric single-stranded DNA overhang can adopt a four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA structure (G4). Stabilization of the G4 structure by binding of small molecule ligands enhances radiosensitivity of tumor cells, and this combined treatment represents a novel anticancer approach. We studied the effect of the platinum-derived G4-ligand, Pt-ctpy, in association with radiation on human glioblastoma (SF763 and SF767) and non-small cell lung cancer (A549 and H1299) cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatments with submicromolar concentrations of Pt-ctpy inhibited tumor proliferation in vitro with cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis. Non-toxic concentrations of the ligand were then combined with ionizing radiation. Pt-ctpy radiosensitized all cell lines with dose-enhancement factors between 1.32 and 1.77. The combined treatment led to increased DNA breaks. Furthermore, a significant radiosensitizing effect of Pt-ctpy in mice xenografted with glioblastoma SF763 cells was shown by delayed tumor growth and improved survival. Pt-ctpy can act in synergy with radiation for efficient killing of cancer cells at concentrations at which it has no obvious toxicity per se, opening perspectives for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26542881

  17. D11-Mediated Inhibition of Protein Kinase CK2 Impairs HIF-1α-Mediated Signaling in Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Susanne; Svenstrup, Tina H; Fischer, Mette; Guerra, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that protein kinase CK2 plays an important role in many steps of cancer initiation and progression, therefore, the development of effective and cell-permeable inhibitors targeting this kinase has become an important objective for the treatment of a variety of cancer types including glioblastoma. We have recently identified 1,3-dichloro-6-[(E)-((4-methoxyphenyl)imino)methyl]dibenzo(b,d)furan-2,7-diol (D11) as a potent and selective inhibitor of protein kinase CK2. In this study, we have further characterized this compound and demonstrated that it suppresses CK2 kinase activity by mixed type inhibition (KI 7.7 nM, KI' 42 nM). Incubation of glioblastoma cells with D11 induces cell death and upon hypoxia the compound leads to HIF-1α destabilization. The analysis of differential mRNA expression related to human hypoxia signaling pathway revealed that D11-mediated inhibition of CK2 caused strong down-regulation of genes associated with the hypoxia response including ANGPTL4, CA9, IGFBP3, MMP9, SLC2A1 and VEGFA. Taken together, the results reported here support the notion that including D11 in future treatment regimens might turn out to be a promising strategy to target tumor hypoxia to overcome resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.

  18. Icaritin induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaopei; Meng, Xiangwen; Jin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background: GBM represents the most aggressive type of glioma which is featured by extremely aggressive invasion and destructive malignancy with a high proliferation rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-tumor effect of icaritin in human GBM cell line U87. Methods: The effect of icaritin on In vitro cell viability was determined by MTT assay and colony formation assay. The inducing effect of icaritin on cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, apoptosis, autophagy and intracellular ROS generation was assessed by flow cytometry. The apoptotic cell death was also confirmed by TUNEL assay. The expression levels of target or marker molecules were examined by western blot. The activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9 was detected with ELISA kit. Results: Our results showed that icaritin significantly induced both caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in human GBM cell line U87. Additionally, our findings revealed that icaritin exerted anti-tumor effect by modulating Stat3 through generating ROS and subsequent activation of AMPK and inhibition of mTOR. Further investigation also showed that icaritin-induced autophagy served as a pro-death function and possibly contributed to icaritin-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: Icaritin potently inhibit the cell growth of human GBM cell line U87 through inducing both caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Base on our findings, icaritin can be considered as a promising candidate therapeutic agent for treatment of GBM, though further studies are needed. PMID:27904667

  19. Pre-clinical analysis of changes in intra-cellular biochemistry of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells due to c-Myc silencing.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vishal; Vaidyanathan, Muthukumar; Janardhanam, Vanisree Arambakkam; Bradner, James E

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of brain Tumor that has few cures. In this study, we analyze the anti-proliferative effects of a new molecule JQ1 against GBMs induced in Wistar Rats. JQ1 is essentially a Myc inhibitor. c-Myc is also known for altering the biochemistry of a tumor cell. Therefore, the study is intended to analyze certain other oncogenes associated with c-Myc and also the change in cellular biochemistry upon c-Myc inhibition. The quantitative analysis of gene expression gave a co-expressive pattern for all the three genes involved namely; c-Myc, Bcl-2, and Akt. The cellular biochemistry analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed high glycogen and lipid aggregation in Myc inhibited cells and excessive autophagy. The study demonstrates the role of c-Myc as a central metabolic regulator and Bcl-2 and Akt assisting in extending c-Myc half-life as well as in regulation of autophagy, so as to regulate cell survival on the whole. The study also demonstrates that transient treatment by JQ1 leads to aggressive development of tumor and therefore, accelerating death, emphasizing the importance of dosage fixation, and duration for clinical use in future.

  20. Galectin-3 Guides Intracellular Trafficking of Some Human Serotransferrin Glycoforms*

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Michael C.; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena; Leffler, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Transferrin internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and subsequent recycling after iron delivery has been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate a previously unrecognized parameter regulating this recycling, the binding of galectin-3 to particular glycoforms of transferrin. Two fractions of transferrin, separated by affinity chromatography based on their binding or not to galectin-3, are targeted to kinetically different endocytic pathways in HFL-1 cells expressing galectin-3 but not in SKBR3 cells lacking galectin-3; the SKBR3 cells, however, can acquire the ability to target these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3-bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting a pathophysiological regulation. These are novel aspects of transferrin cell biology, which has previously considered only a degree of iron loading, but not other forms of heterogeneity. PMID:23926108

  1. Non–invasive Quantification of Intracellular Sodium in Human Brain using Ultra–High–Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fleysher, Lazar; Oesingmann, Niels; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Wiggins, Graham C.; Inglese, Matilde

    2012-01-01

    In vivo sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a measure of the tissue sodium content in living human brain, but current methods do not allow non–invasive quantitative assessment of intracellular sodium concentration (ISC) – the most useful marker of tissue viability. In this study we report the first non–invasive quantitative in–vivo measurement of the ISC and of the intracellular sodium volume fraction (ISVF) in the healthy human brain made possible by measuring the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) and the intracellular sodium molar fraction (ISMF) at ultra–high–field MRI. The method features the use of single–quantum (SQ) and triple–quantum filtered (TQF) imaging at 7 Tesla to separate intracellular and extracellular sodium signals and to provide quantification of ISMF, ISC and ISVF. This novel method allows non–invasive quantitative measurement of ISC and ISVF, opening many possibilities for structural and functional metabolic studies in the healthy and diseased brain. PMID:22714793

  2. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the genetic level and are

  3. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M.; Burke, Ryan C.; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2017-01-01

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules. PMID:28117459

  4. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  5. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M; Burke, Ryan C; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-01-24

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules.

  6. Interindividual differences in anticancer drug cytotoxicity in primary human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pédeboscq, Stéphane; L'Azou, Béatrice; Liguoro, Dominique; Pometan, Jean-Paul; Cambar, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a malignant astrocytic tumor characterized by rapid growth, extensive invasiveness and high vascularity. Despite advances in surgical techniques and in the development of new protocols in radio- and chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients suffering from this malignancy remains poor. Since the clinical response to chemotherapy varies greatly owing to different interindividual gene expression profiles, it would be of considerable interest to develop an in vitro model able to evaluate anticancer drug toxicity and the effectiveness of therapeutic strategies on cells obtained from individual patients. In the protocol for obtaining primary cultures of glioblastoma cells described in this report, a confluent monolayer of cells can be obtained within 1 or 2 weeks. A complementary immunocytochemical assay using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to reliably mark glial cells confirms the glial origin of the cultured cells. A cytotoxicity test based on mitochondrial activity is then used to evaluate in vitro drug efficacy. Cell dedifferentiation as evidenced by loss of GFAP expression after a few passages requires determination of drug toxicity before the fourth passage. Data show a wide range of response to temozolomide (1000 microM) after 72 h with 24-81% cell death depending on patients. Results presented confirm the heterogeneity of response to anticancer drugs between the patients and methods described allow to carry out cytotoxicity studies in order to determine the individualized most effective treatment.

  7. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Physical Processes in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Emblem, Kyrre E.; Andronesi, Ovidiu; Rosen, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The most common malignant primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating disease with a grim prognosis. Patient survival is typically less than 2 years and fewer than 10% of patients survive more than 5 years. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can have great utility in the diagnosis, grading and management of patients with GBM as many of the physical manifestations of the pathological processes in GBM can be visualized and quantified using MRI. Newer MRI techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI provide functional information regarding the tumor hemodynamic status. Diffusion MRI can shed light on tumor cellularity and the disruption of white matter tracts in the proximity of tumors. MR spectroscopy can be used to study new tumor tissue markers such as IDH mutations. MRI is helping to noninvasively explore the link between the molecular basis of gliomas and the imaging characteristics of their physical processes. We will review several approaches to MR-based imaging and discuss the potential for these techniques to quantify the physical processes in glioblastoma including tumor cellularity and vascularity, metabolite expression, and patterns of tumor growth and recurrence. We will conclude with challenges and opportunities for further research in applying physical principles to better understand the biological process in this deadly disease. PMID:25183787

  8. The effect of gallic acid on cytotoxicity, Ca(2+) homeostasis and ROS production in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells and CTX TNA2 rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Jan, Chung-Ren; Liang, Wei-Zhe

    2016-05-25

    Gallic acid, a polyhydroxylphenolic compound, is widely distributed in various plants, fruits and foods. It has been shown that gallic acid passes into blood brain barrier and reaches the brain tissue of middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. However, the effect of gallic acid on Ca(2+) signaling in glia cells is unknown. This study explored whether gallic acid affected Ca(2+) homeostasis and induced Ca(2+)-associated cytotoxicity in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells and CTX TNA2 rat astrocytes. Gallic acid (20-40 μM) concentration-dependently induced cytotoxicity and intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)]i) increases in DBTRG-05MG cells but not in CTX TNA2 cells. In DBTRG-05MG cells, the Ca(2+) response was decreased by half by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). In Ca(2+)-containing medium, gallic acid-induced Ca(2+) entry was inhibited by store-operated Ca(2+) channel inhibitors (2-APB, econazole and SKF96365). In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin abolished gallic acid-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Conversely, incubation with gallic acid also abolished thapsigargin-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 abolished gallic acid-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Gallic acid significantly caused cytotoxicity in DBTRG-05MG cells, which was partially prevented by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with BAPTA-AM. Moreover, gallic acid activated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved ROS production. Together, in DBTRG-05MG cells but not in CTX TNA2 cells, gallic acid induced [Ca(2+)]i increases by causing Ca(2+) entry via 2-APB, econazole and SKF96365-sensitive store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and phospholipase C-dependent release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This Ca(2+) signal subsequently evoked mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis that involved ROS production.

  9. Downregulation of solute carriers of glutamate in gliosomes and synaptosomes may explain local brain metastasis in anaplastic glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huaiyu; Yu, Xinguang; Lu, Xuechun; Wang, Peng

    2015-04-01

    Advanced grades of glioblastoma are highly aggressive, especially in terms of multisite spread within the brain or even to distant sites at the spinal cord. In advanced grades of glioblastoma, glutamate and glutamine are reported to be increased in concentration in the extracellular fluid. It has been reported that glutamate acts as an extracellular signaling molecule for facilitating local spread of advanced grades of glioblastoma. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether glutamate uptake mechanisms is impaired in advanced glioblastoma. The possible downregulated mechanisms of glutamate uptake would facilitate persistence of glutamate in the extracellular environment, rather than intracellular uptake. We obtained biobanked human specimens of glioblastoma and tested expression of proteins belonging to the solute carrier families of proteins that are known to function as membrane-located excitatory amino acid like glutamate transporters. The present study provides preliminary evidence of the downregulation of membrane expression of excitatory amino acid transporters solute carrier family 1 member 3 (SLC1A3) and its palmitoylated form in gliosomes, as well as SLC1A2 in the glio-synaptosomes. Compounds like riluzole used in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the antibiotic ceftriaxone have the potential to facilitate glutamate uptake. These medications may be examined as adjunct chemotherapy in the massively aggressive tumor glioblastoma multiforme.

  10. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a clinically approved boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent currently being used in clinical trials of glioblastoma multiforme, melanoma and liver metastases. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) observations from the Cornell SIMS Laboratory provided support for using a 6 h infusion of BPA, instead of a 2 h infusion, for achieving higher levels of boron in brain tumor cells. These observations were clinically implemented in Phase II experimental trials of glioblastoma multiforme in Sweden. However, the mechanisms for higher BPA accumulation with longer infusions have remained unknown. In this work, by using 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine and T98G human glioblastoma cells, comparisons between the 10B-delivery of BPA and the accumulation of labeled phenylalanine after 2 and 6 h treatments were made with a Cameca IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution in fast frozen, freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Due to the presence of the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, the cells maintain an approximately 10/1 ratio of K/Na in the intracellular milieu. Therefore, the quantitative imaging of these highly diffusible species in the identical cell in which the boron or labeled amino acid was imaged provides a rule-of-thumb criterion for validation of SIMS observations and the reliability of the cryogenic sampling. The labeled phenylalanine was detected at mass 28, as the 28(13C15N)- molecular ion. Correlative analysis with optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that fractured freeze-dried glioblastoma cells contained well-preserved ultrastructural details with three discernible subcellular regions: a nucleus or multiple nuclei, a mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region and the remaining cytoplasm. SIMS analysis revealed that the overall cellular signals of both 10B from BPA and 28CN- from labeled phenylalanine increased approximately 1.6-fold between the 2 and 6 h exposures

  11. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A.; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication. PMID:26270679

  12. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeniou, Maria; Fève, Marie; Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  13. Morphine modulates doxorubicin uptake and improves efficacy of chemotherapy in an intracranial xenograft model of human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    da Ros, Martina; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Consolante, Dario; Cardile, Francesco; Muratori, Monica; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Guidi, Milena; Pisano, Claudio; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    Morphine may alter the permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), enhancing the access of molecules normally unable to cross it, as Doxorubicin (Dox). In addition, morphine seems to mediate the uptake of Dox into the brain by its reduced efflux mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We evaluated the antitumor efficacy of Dox plus morphine treatment by an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft model. Foxn1 mice were injected with U87MG-luc cells in the left lobe of the brain and treated with Dox (5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, weekly) with or without morphine pretreatment (10 mg/kg, weekly). Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was used to monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy. Additionally, we investigated the role of morphine on the uptake of Dox by MDCKII cells transfected with human MDR1 gene encoding for P-gp. The data demonstrate that only Dox 5 mg/kg determined a significant tumor regression while the lower dose (2.5 mg/kg) was not effective. However, if combined with morphine, the group treated with Dox 2.5 mg/kg showed a decreasing tumor growth. The average BLI for Dox 2.5 mg/kg plus morphine was 5 fold lower than Dox 2.5 mg/kg alone (P=0.0053) and 8 fold lower than vehicle (P=0.0004). Additionally, Dox increased in MDCKII-P-gp transfected cells only in the presence of morphine with a significantly higher level comparing control group (3.84) vs Dox plus morphine group (12.29, P<0.05). Our results indicate that Dox alone and in combination with morphine appear to be effective in controlling the growth of glioblastoma in a xenograft mouse model. PMID:27152241

  14. Most human non-GCIMP glioblastoma subtypes evolve from a common proneural-like precursor glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Tatsuya; Riester, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Huse, Jason T; Squatrito, Massimo; Helmy, Karim; Charles, Nikki; Michor, Franziska; Holland, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To understand the relationships between the non-GCIMP glioblastoma (GBM) subgroups, we performed mathematical modeling to predict the temporal sequence of driver events during tumorigenesis. The most common order of evolutionary events is 1) chromosome (chr) 7 gain and chr10 loss, followed by 2) CDKN2A loss and/or TP53 mutation, and 3) alterations canonical for specific subtypes. We then developed a computational methodology to identify drivers of broad copy number changes, identifying PDGFA (chr7) and PTEN (chr10) as driving initial non-disjunction events. These predictions were validated using mouse modeling, showing that PDGFA is sufficient to induce proneural-like gliomas, and additional NF1 loss converts proneural to the mesenchymal subtype. Our findings suggest most non-GCIMP-mesenchymal GBMs arise as, and evolve from, a proneural-like precursor. PMID:25117714

  15. Multispectral optoacoustic and MRI coregistration for molecular imaging of orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Tay, Hui Chien; Burton, Neal C; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modality imaging methods are of great importance in oncologic studies for acquiring complementary information, enhancing the efficacy in tumor detection and characterization. We hereby demonstrate a hybrid non-invasive in vivo imaging approach of utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) for molecular imaging of glucose uptake in an orthotopic glioblastoma in mouse. The molecular and functional information from MSOT can be overlaid on MRI anatomy via image coregistration to provide insights into probe uptake in the brain, which is verified by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and histological validation. In vivo MSOT and MRI imaging of an orthotopic glioma mouse model injected with IRDye800-2DG. Image coregistration between MSOT and MRI enables multifaceted (anatomical, functional, molecular) information from MSOT to be overlaid on MRI anatomy images to derive tumor physiological parameters such as perfusion, haemoglobin and oxygenation.

  16. Propolis changes the anticancer activity of temozolomide in U87MG human glioblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis is a honey bee product which contains many active compounds, such as CAPE or chrysin, and has many beneficial activities. Recently, its anti-tumor properties have been discussed. We have tested whether the ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) interferes with temozolomide (TMZ) to inhibit U87MG cell line growth. Methods The U87MG glioblastoma cell line was exposed to TMZ (10-100 μM), EEP (10-100 μg/ml) or a mixture of TMZ and EEP during 24, 48 or 72 hours. The cell division was examined by the H3-thymidine incorporation, while the western blot method was used for detection of p65 subunit of NF-κB and ELISA test to measure the concentration of its p50 subunit in the nucleus. Results We have found that both, TMZ and EEP administrated alone, had a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the U87MG cell line growth, which was manifested by gradual reduction of cell viability and alterations in proliferation rate. The anti-tumor effect of TMZ (20 μM) was enhanced by EEP, which was especially well observed after a short time of exposition, where simultaneous usage of TMZ and EEP resulted in a higher degree of growth inhibition than each biological factor used separately. In addition, cells treated with TMZ presented no changes in NF-κB activity in prolonged time of treatment and EEP only slightly reduced the nuclear translocation of this transcription factor. In turn, the combined incubation with TMZ and EEP led to an approximately double reduction of NF-κB nuclear localization. Conclusions We conclude that EEP presents cytotoxic properties and may cooperate with TMZ synergistically enhancing its growth inhibiting activity against glioblastoma U87MG cell line. This phenomenon may be at least partially mediated by a reduced activity of NF-κB. PMID:23445763

  17. Pharmacologic blockade of FAK autophosphorylation decreases human glioblastoma tumor growth and synergizes with temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Huang, Grace; Ho, Baotran; Yemma, Michael; Morrison, Carl D; Lee, Jisook; Eliceiri, Brian P; Cance, William G

    2013-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by aggressive tumor growth with a mean survival of 15 to 18 months and frequently developed resistance to temozolomide. Therefore, strategies that sensitize glioma cells to temozolomide have a high translational impact. We have studied focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a tyrosine kinase and emerging therapeutic target that is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma. In this report, we tested the FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15, in DBTRG and U87 glioblastoma cells. Y15 significantly decreased viability and clonogenicity in a dose-dependent manner, increased detachment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, caused apoptosis, and inhibited cell invasion in both cell lines. In addition, Y15 treatment decreased autophosphorylation of FAK in a dose-dependent manner and changed cell morphology by causing cell rounding in DBTRG and U87 cells. Administration of Y15 significantly decreased subcutaneous DBTRG tumor growth with decreased Y397-FAK autophosphorylation, activated caspase-3 and PARP. Y15 was administered in an orthotopic glioma model, leading to an increase in mouse survival. The combination of Y15 with temozolomide was more effective than either agent alone in decreasing viability and activating caspase-8 in DBTRG and U87 cells in vitro. In addition, the combination of Y15 and temozolomide synergistically blocked U87 brain tumor growth in vivo. Thus, pharmacologic blockade of FAK autophosphorylation with the oral administration of a small-molecule inhibitor Y15 has a potential to be an effective therapy approach for glioblastoma either alone or in combination with chemotherapy agents such as temozolomide.

  18. Magnolol and honokiol exert a synergistic anti-tumor effect through autophagy and apoptosis in human glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Huang, Hua-Yin; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chen, Ying

    2016-05-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor associated with a high mortality rate. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effects of honokiol (Hono) and magnolol (Mag), extracted from Magnolia officinalis, on cytotoxicity and inhibition of human GBM tumor progression in cellular and animal models. In comparison with Hono or Mag alone, co-treatment with Hono and Mag (Hono-Mag) decreased cyclin A, D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2, 4, 6 significantly, leading to cell cycle arrest in U87MG and LN229 human glioma cells. In addition, phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K), p-Akt, and Ki67 were decreased after Hono-Mag treatment, showing proliferation inhibition. Hono-Mag treatment also reduced p-p38 and p-JNK but elevated p-ERK expression. Besides, Hono-Mag treatment induced autophagy and intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Both ERK and autophagy inhibitors enhanced Hono-Mag-induced apoptosis in LN229 cells, indicating a rescuer role of ERK. In human GBM orthotopic xenograft model, the Hono-Mag treatment inhibited the tumor progression and induced apoptosis more efficiently than Temozolomide, Hono, or Mag group. In conclusion, the Hono-Mag exerts a synergistic anti-tumor effect by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy and apoptosis in human GBM cells. The Hono-Mag may be applied as an adjuvant therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of GBM treatment.

  19. Human islet amyloid polypeptide expression in COS-1 cells. A model of intracellular amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T. D.; Butler, P. C.; Kreutter, D. K.; Kane, L. A.; Eberhardt, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is characterized by concurrent loss of beta-cells and deposition of islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). We have previously demonstrated that IAPP-derived amyloid forms intracellularly in humans with chronic excess insulin expression (eg, insulinoma and insulin receptor antibody-induced insulin resistance). To determine whether overexpression of IAPP results in intracellular amyloid in mammalian cells, we transfected COS cells with vectors expressing amyloidogenic human IAPP or non-amyloidogenic rat IAPP. Transfected COS-1 cells secreted comparable amounts of human IAPP and rat IAPP (2.1 to 2.8 nmol/L/48 hours). After 96 hours, 90% of cells expressing human IAPP contained amyloid fibrils and were degenerating or dead, whereas cells transfected with rat IAPP lacked amyloid and were viable. Thus, overexpression of human IAPP can result in intracellular amyloid formation that is associated with cell death, suggesting that intracellular amyloid may play a role in beta-cell loss in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7677175

  20. Nanotechnology Applications for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Nduom, Edjah; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Glioblastoma remains one of the most difficult cancers to treat and represents the most common primary malignancy of the brain. While conventional treatments have found modest success in reducing the initial tumor burden, infiltrating cancer cells beyond the main mass are responsible for tumor recurrence and ultimate patient demise. Targeting the residual infiltrating cancer cells requires the development of new treatment strategies. The emerging field of cancer nanotechnology holds much promise in the use of multifunctional nanoparticles for the imaging and targeted therapy of GBM.. Nanoparticles have emerged as potential “theranostic” agents that can permit the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of GBM tumors. A recent human clinical trial with magnetic nanoparticles has provided feasibility and efficacy data for potential treatment of GBM patients with thermotherapy. Here we examine the current state of nanotechnology in the treatment of glioblastoma and interesting directions of further study. PMID:22748656

  1. Modulation of Sonic hedgehog signaling and WW domain containing oxidoreductase WOX1 expression enhances radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Hong; Chi, Chih-Wen; Sze, Chun-I; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Lin, Chin-Ping; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-03-01

    WW domain containing oxidoreductase, designated WWOX, FOR or WOX1, is a known pro-apoptotic factor when ectopically expressed in various types of cancer cells, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The activation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, especially paracrine Shh secretion in response to radiation, is associated with impairing the effective irradiation of cancer cells. Here, we examined the role of Shh signaling and WOX1 overexpression in the radiosensitivity of human GBM cells. Our results showed that ionizing irradiation (IR) increased the cytoplasmic Shh and nuclear Gli-1 content in GBM U373MG and U87MG cells. GBM cells with exogenous Shh treatment exhibited similar results. Pretreatment with Shh peptides protected U373MG and U87MG cells against IR in a dose-dependent manner. Cyclopamine, a Hedgehog/Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor, reversed the protective effect of Shh in U87MG cells. Cyclopamine increased Shh plus IR-induced H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, in these cells. To verify the role of Shh signaling in the radiosensitivity of GBM cells, we tested the effect of the Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli-1) inhibitor zerumbone and found that it could sensitize GBM cells to IR. We next examined the role of WOX1 in radiosensitivity. Overexpression of WOX1 enhanced the radiosensitivity of U87MG (possessing wild type p53 or WTp53) but not U373MG (harboring mutant p53 or MTp53) cells. Pretreatment with Shh peptides protected both WOX1-overexpressed U373MG and U87MG cells against IR and increased the cytoplasmic Shh and nuclear Gli-1 content. Zerumbone enhanced the radiosensitivity of WOX1-overexpressed U373MG and U87MG cells. In conclusion, overexpression of WOX1 preferentially sensitized human GBM cells possessing wild type p53 to radiation therapy. Blocking of Shh signaling may enhance radiosensitivity independently of the expression of p53 and WOX1. The crosstalk between Shh signaling and WOX1 expression in human glioblastoma warrants further

  2. 18F-FET and 18F-FCH uptake in human glioblastoma T98G cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Persico, Marco Giovanni; Buroni, Federica Eleonora; Pasi, Francesca; Aprile, Carlo; Nano, Rosanna; Hodolic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite complex treatment of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, high grade gliomas often recur. Differentiation between post-treatment changes and recurrence is difficult. 18F-methyl-choline (18F-FCH) is frequently used in staging and detection of recurrent prostate cancer disease as well as some brain tumours; however accumulation in inflammatory tissue limits its specificity. The 18F-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET) shows a specific uptake in malignant cells, resulting from increased expression of amino acid transporters or diffusing through the disrupted blood-brain barrier. 18F-FET exhibits lower uptake in machrophages and other inflammatory cells. Aim of this study was to evaluate 18F-FCH and 18F-FET uptake by human glioblastoma T98G cells. Material and methods Human glioblastoma T98G or human dermal fibroblasts cells, seeded at a density to obtain 2 × 105 cells per flask when radioactive tracers were administered, grew adherent to the plastic surface at 37°C in 5% CO2 in complete medium. Equimolar amounts of radiopharmaceuticals were added to cells for different incubation times (20 to 120 minutes) for 18F-FCH and 18F-FET respectively. The cellular radiotracer uptake was determined with a gamma counter. All experiments were carried out in duplicate and repeated three times. The uptake measurements are expressed as the percentage of the administered dose of tracer per 2 × 105 cells. Data (expressed as mean values of % uptake of radiopharmaceuticals) were compared using parametric or non-parametric tests as appropriate. Differences were regarded as statistically significant when p<0.05. Results A significant uptake of 18F-FCH was seen in T98G cells at 60, 90 and 120 minutes. The percentage uptake of 18F-FET in comparison to 18F-FCH was lower by a factor of more than 3, with different kinetic curves.18F-FET showed a more rapid initial uptake up to 40 minutes and 18F-FCH showed a progressive rise reaching a maximum after 90 minutes

  3. The effect of methylprednisolone on intracellular calcium of normal and dystrophic human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vandebrouck, C; Imbert, N; Duport, G; Cognard, C; Raymond, G

    1999-07-09

    Clinical trials have shown that a glucocorticoid, the methyiprednisolone (PDN), has a beneficial effect on muscle strength and function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. The aim of this study was to test if the effect of PDN could be mediated via a possible action on intracellular calcium. The intracellular calcium activity, at rest and during calcium mobilizing drug superfusion protocols was recorded in normal and dystrophic human cocultured muscle cells. PDN (10 microM) pretreatment induced an elevation of the resting calcium concentration of 51, 34 and 38% in proliferating normal myoblasts, DMD myoblasts and DMD myotubes, respectively, while normal myotubes resting [Ca2+]i was not altered.

  4. Human SERPINB12 Is an Abundant Intracellular Serpin Expressed in Most Surface and Glandular Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, Jason Z; Good, Misty; Jackson, Laura E; Ozolek, John A; Silverman, Gary A; Luke, Cliff J

    2015-11-01

    The intracellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are an important family of proteins that protect cells form proteinase-mediated injury. Understanding the tissue and cellular expression pattern of this protein family can provide important insights into their physiologic roles. For example, high expression in epithelial tissues, such as lung, may suggest a biologic function in cellular defense, secretion, or selective absorption. Although the expression pattern of many of the intracellular serpins has been well described, one member of this class, SERPINB12, has not been carefully examined. We generated a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against human SERPINB12 and delineated its specificity and tissue and cell type distribution pattern through immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. This monoclonal antibody was human specific and did not cross-react with other human intracellular serpins or mouse Serpinb12. SERPINB12 was found in nearly all the tissues investigated. In addition, this serpin was found in multiple cell types within individual tissues but primarily the epithelium. These data suggest that SERPINB12, like some other intracellular serpins, may play a vital role in barrier function by providing protection of epithelial cells.

  5. Evidence for a physiological role of intracellularly occurring photolabile nitrogen oxides in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Opländer, Christian; Wetzel, Wiebke; Cortese, Miriam M; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2008-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in human skin biology. Cutaneous NO can be produced enzymatically by NO synthases (NOS) as well as enzyme independently via photodecomposition of photolabile nitrogen oxides (PNOs) such as nitrite or nitroso compounds, both found in human skin tissue in comparably high concentrations. Although the physiological role of NOS-produced NO in human skin is well defined, nothing is known about the biological relevance or the chemical origin of intracellularly occurring PNOs. We here, for the first time, give evidence that in human skin fibroblasts (FB) PNOs represent the oxidation products of NOS-produced NO and that in human skin fibroblasts intracellularly occurring PNOs effectively protect against the injurious effects of UVA radiation by a NO-dependent mechanism. In contrast, in PNO-depleted FB cultures an increased susceptibility to UVA-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death is observed, whereas supplementation of PNO-depleted FB cultures with physiological nitrite concentrations (10 microM) or with exogenously applied NO completely restores UVA-increased injuries. Thus, intracellular PNOs are biologically relevant and represent an important initial shield functioning in human skin physiology against UVA radiation. Consequently, nonphysiological low PNO concentrations might promote known UVA-related skin injuries such as premature aging and carcinogenesis.

  6. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neural cancer stem cells inside the tumour. The study is divided into three phases: removal of tumoral specimens in different areas of the tumour (centre, periphery, marginal zone) in an operative room equipped with a 1.5 T scanner; isolation and characterization of neural cancer stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme; identification of neural cancer stem cell distribution inside the tumour. PMID:24750704

  7. Methylglyoxal (MGO) inhibits proliferation and induces cell death of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G and U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Łasut, Barbara; Pudełko, Adam; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Suchanek-Raif, Renata; Zieliński, Michał; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor and it is characterized by a poor prognosis and short survival time. Current treatment strategies for GBM using surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are ineffective. Thus new therapeutic strategies to target GBM are urgently needed. The effect of methylglyoxal (MGO) on the cell cycle, cell death and proliferation of human GBM cells was investigated. The T98G and U87MG cell lines were cultured in modified EMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and maintained at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air. Cells were exposed to methylglyoxal (0.025mM) per 72h. The influence of MGO on T98G and U87MG cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis was evaluated as well. Cell cycle phase distribution, proliferation, apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MGO causes changes in cell cycle and induces accumulation of G1/G0-phase cells and reduced fraction of cells in S and G2/M phases. We have also observed inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We have also revealed that MGO induces senescence of U87MG but not T98G cells, but further studies are necessary in order to clarify and check mechanism of action of methylglyoxal and it Is a positive phenomenon for the treatment of GBM.

  8. Kukoamine A inhibits human glioblastoma cell growth and migration through apoptosis induction and epithelial-mesenchymal transition attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiaoping; Li, Haiyan; Sun, Zhen; Dong, Lihua; Gao, Ling; Liu, Chunlan; Wang, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Cortex lycii radicis is the dried root bark of Lycium chinense, a traditional Chinese herb used in multiple ailments. The crude extract of Cortex lycii radicis has growth inhibition effect on GBM cells. Kukoamine A (KuA) is a spermine alkaloid derived from it. KuA possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities, but its anticancer activity is unknown. In this study, the growth and migration inhibition effect of KuA on human GBM cells and the possible mechanism of its activity were investigated. After KuA treatment, proliferation and colony formation of GBM cells were decreased significantly; apoptotic cells were increased; the cell cycle was arrested G0/G1 phase; the migration and invasion were decreased, the growth of tumors initiated from GBM cells was inhibited significantly; the expressions of 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) were decreased, apoptotic proteins, Bax and caspase-3 were increased, and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was decreased significantly; The expressions of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ), N-cadherin, vimentin, twist and snail+slug were decreased significantly, while the expression of E-cadherin was increased significantly in KuA treated GBM cells and tumor tissues. KuA inhibited human glioblastoma cell growth and migration in vitro and in vivo through apoptosis induction and epithelial-mesenchymal transition attenuation by downregulating expressions of 5-LOX and C/EBPβ. PMID:27824118

  9. Static magnetic fields modulate X-ray-induced DNA damage in human glioblastoma primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Laura; Giovanetti, Anna; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Rocchi, Marco; Perniconi, Barbara; Valente, Maria Giovanna; Coletti, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Although static magnetic fields (SMFs) are used extensively in the occupational and medical fields, few comprehensive studies have investigated their possible genotoxic effect and the findings are controversial. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy, the potential effects of SMFs on ionizing radiation (IR) have become increasingly important. In this study we focused on the genotoxic effect of 80 mT SMFs, both alone and in combination with (i.e. preceding or following) X-ray (XR) irradiation, on primary glioblastoma cells in culture. The cells were exposed to: (i) SMFs alone; (ii) XRs alone; (iii) XR, with SMFs applied during recovery; (iv) SMFs both before and after XR irradiation. XR-induced DNA damage was analyzed by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis assay (comet assay) using statistical tools designed to assess the tail DNA (TD) and tail length (TL) as indicators of DNA fragmentation. Mitochondrial membrane potential, known to be affected by IR, was assessed using the JC-1 mitochondrial probe. Our results showed that exposure of cells to 5 Gy of XR irradiation alone led to extensive DNA damage, which was significantly reduced by post-irradiation exposure to SMFs. The XR-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was to a large extent averted by exposure to SMFs. These data suggest that SMFs modulate DNA damage and/or damage repair, possibly through a mechanism that affects mitochondria. PMID:24345558

  10. Static magnetic fields modulate X-ray-induced DNA damage in human glioblastoma primary cells.

    PubMed

    Teodori, Laura; Giovanetti, Anna; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Rocchi, Marco; Perniconi, Barbara; Valente, Maria Giovanna; Coletti, Dario

    2014-03-01

    Although static magnetic fields (SMFs) are used extensively in the occupational and medical fields, few comprehensive studies have investigated their possible genotoxic effect and the findings are controversial. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy, the potential effects of SMFs on ionizing radiation (IR) have become increasingly important. In this study we focused on the genotoxic effect of 80 mT SMFs, both alone and in combination with (i.e. preceding or following) X-ray (XR) irradiation, on primary glioblastoma cells in culture. The cells were exposed to: (i) SMFs alone; (ii) XRs alone; (iii) XR, with SMFs applied during recovery; (iv) SMFs both before and after XR irradiation. XR-induced DNA damage was analyzed by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis assay (comet assay) using statistical tools designed to assess the tail DNA (TD) and tail length (TL) as indicators of DNA fragmentation. Mitochondrial membrane potential, known to be affected by IR, was assessed using the JC-1 mitochondrial probe. Our results showed that exposure of cells to 5 Gy of XR irradiation alone led to extensive DNA damage, which was significantly reduced by post-irradiation exposure to SMFs. The XR-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was to a large extent averted by exposure to SMFs. These data suggest that SMFs modulate DNA damage and/or damage repair, possibly through a mechanism that affects mitochondria.

  11. Acetate is a Bioenergetic Substrate for Human Glioblastoma and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Pichumani, Kumar; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara G.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Foong, Chan; Huang, Zhiguang; Barnett, Samuel; Mickey, Bruce E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Tu, Benjamin P.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas and brain metastases are highly proliferative brain tumors with short survival times. Previously, using 13C-NMR analysis of brain tumors resected from patients during infusion of 13C-glucose, we demonstrated that there is robust oxidation of glucose in the citric acid cycle, yet glucose contributes less than 50% of the carbons to the acetyl-CoA pool. Here we show that primary and metastatic mouse orthotopic brain tumors have the capacity to oxidize [1,2-13C]acetate and can do so simultaneously with [1,6-13C]glucose oxidation. The tumors do not oxidize [U-13C]glutamine. In vivo oxidation of [1,2-13C]acetate was validated in brain tumor patients and was correlated with expression of acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme 2, ACSS2. Together the data demonstrate a strikingly common metabolic phenotype in diverse brain tumors that includes the ability to oxidize acetate in the citric acid cycle. This adaptation may be important for meeting the high biosynthetic and bioenergetic demands of malignant growth. PMID:25525878

  12. 5-Iodo-2-Pyrimidinone-2'-Deoxyribose-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Radiosensitization in U87 Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, Timothy J. Kinsella, Michael T.; Seo, Yuji; Berk, Gregory

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: 5-Iodo-2-pyrimidinone-2'-deoxyribose (IPdR) is a novel orally administered (p.o.) prodrug of 5-iododeoxyuridine. Because p.o. IPdR is being considered for clinical testing as a radiosensitizer in patients with high-grade gliomas, we performed this in vivo study of IPdR-mediated cytotoxicity and radiosensitization in a human glioblastoma xenograft model, U87. Methods and Materials: Groups of 8 or 9 athymic male nude mice (6-8 weeks old) were implanted with s.c. U87 xenograft tumors (4 x 10{sup 6} cells) and then randomized to 10 treatment groups receiving increasing doses of p.o. IPdR (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg/d) administered once daily (q.d.) x 14 days with or without radiotherapy (RT) (0 or 2 Gy/d x 4 days) on days 11-14 of IPdR treatment. Systemic toxicity was determined by body weight measurements during and after IPdR treatment. Tumor response was assessed by changes in tumor volumes. Results: IPdR alone at doses of {>=}500 mg/kg/d resulted in moderate inhibition of tumor growth. The combination of IPdR plus RT resulted in a significant IPdR dose-dependent tumor growth delay, with the maximum radiosensitization using {>=}500 mg/kg/d. IPdR doses of 500 and 1000 mg/kg/d resulted in transient 5-15% body weight loss during treatment. Conclusions: In U87 human glioblastoma s.c. xenografts, p.o. IPdR given q.d. x 14 days and RT given 2 Gy/d x 4 days (days 11-14 of IPdR treatment) results in a significant tumor growth delay in an IPdR dose-dependent pattern. The use of p.o. IPdR plus RT holds promise for Phase I/II testing in patients with high-grade gliomas.

  13. Molecular Determinants of the Human α2C-Adrenergic Receptor Temperature-Sensitive Intracellular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Pullikuth, Ashok K.; Guidry, Jessie J.

    2015-01-01

    The human α2C-adrenergic receptor (α2C-AR) is localized intracellularly at physiologic temperature. Decreasing the environmental temperature strongly stimulates the receptor transport to the cell surface. In contrast, rat and mouse α2C-AR plasma membrane levels are less sensitive to decrease in temperature, whereas the opossum α2C-AR cell surface levels are not changed in these conditions. Structural analysis demonstrated that human α2C-AR has a high number of arginine residues in the third intracellular loop and in the C-terminus, organized as putative RXR motifs. Although these motifs do not affect the receptor subcellular localization at 37°C, deletion of the arginine clusters significantly enhanced receptor plasma membrane levels at reduced temperature. We found that this exaggerated transport of the human receptor is mediated by two functional arginine clusters, one in the third intracellular loop and one in the C-terminus. This effect is mediated by interactions with COPI vesicles, but not by 14-3-3 proteins. In rat α2C-AR, the arginine cluster from the third intracellular loop is shifted to the left due to three missing residues. Reinsertion of these residues in the rat α2C-AR restored the same temperature sensitivity as in the human receptor. Proteomic and coimmunoprecipitation experiments identified pontin as a molecule having stronger interactions with human α2C-AR compared with rat α2C-AR. Inhibition of pontin activity enhanced human receptor plasma membrane levels and signaling at 37°C. Our results demonstrate that human α2C-AR has a unique temperature-sensitive traffic pattern within the G protein–coupled receptor class due to interactions with different molecular chaperones, mediated in part by strict spatial localization of specific arginine residues. PMID:25680754

  14. A gene delivery system with a human artificial chromosome vector based on migration of mesenchymal stem cells towards human glioblastoma HTB14 cells.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yusuke; Kamitani, Hideki; Mamun, Mahabub Hasan; Wasita, Brian; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been expected to become useful gene delivery vehicles against human malignant gliomas when coupled with an appropriate vector system, because they migrate towards the lesion. Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) are non-integrating vectors with several advantages for gene therapy, namely, no limitations on the size and number of genes that can be inserted. We investigated the migration of human immortalized MSCs bearing a HAC vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HAC-tk-hiMSCs) towards malignant gliomas in vivo. Red fluorescence protein-labeled human glioblastoma HTB14 cells were implanted into a subcortical region in nude mice. Four days later, green fluorescence protein-labeled HAC-tk-hiMSCs were injected into a contralateral subcortical region (the HTB14/HAC-tk-hiMSC injection model). Tropism to the glioma mass and the route of migration were visualized by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemical staining. HAC-tk-hiMSCs began to migrate toward the HTB14 glioma area via the corpus callosum on day 4, and gathered around the HTB14 glioma mass on day 7. To test whether the delivered gene could effectively treat glioblastoma in vivo, HTB14/HAC-tk-hiMSC injected mice were treated with ganciclovir (GCV) or PBS. The HTB14 glioma mass was significantly reduced by GCV treatment in mice injected with HAC-tk-hiMSCs. It was confirmed that gene delivery by our HAC-hiMSC system was effective after migration of MSCs to the glioma mass in vivo. Therefore, MSCs containing HACs carrying an anticancer gene or genes may provide a new tool for the treatment of malignant gliomas and possibly of other tumor types.

  15. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  16. Phenethyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression and the levels of protein associated with cell cycle regulation in human glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a member of the isothiocyanate family, can induce apoptosis in many human cancer cells. Our previous study disclosed that PEITC induces apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, dysfunction of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway in human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) 8401 cells. To the best of our knowledge, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels of GBM 8401 cells in vitro. PEITC may induce G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest through affecting the proteins such as cdk2, cyclin E, and p21 in GBM 8401 cells. Many genes associated with cell-cycle regulation of GBM 8401 cells were changed after PEITC treatment: 48 genes were upregulated and 118 were downregulated. The cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), Budding uninhibited by benzimidazole 1 homolog beta (BUB1B), and cyclin B1 were downregulated, and clusterin was upregulated in GBM 8401 cells treated with PEITC. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels and potential biomarkers for glioblastoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 176-187, 2017.

  17. Differential expression of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) cannabinoid receptor protein by human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Kiertscher, Sylvia M; Roth, Jeffrey D; Roth, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    mRNA encoding for the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor is expressed by many subsets of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), but little is known about the resulting protein expression and function. Employing clones from the A549 and 293T cell lines that were constructed to express both full-length human CB(2) and GFP, we developed a flow cytometry assay for characterizing CB(2) protein expression. A monoclonal antibody directed against human CB(2) selectively stained the surface of transduced but not parental cell lines. When cells were fixed and permeabilized, imaging flow cytometry identified large stores of intracellular protein. Total cellular staining for CB(2) corresponded closely with the level of GFP expression. When exposed to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB(2)-expressing cells internalized cell surface CB(2) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Applying these approaches to human PBL, CB(2) protein was identified on the surface of human B cells but not on T cells or monocytes. In contrast, when PBL were fixed and permeabilized, intracellular CB(2) expression was readily detected in all three subsets by both conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Similar to the protein expression pattern observed in fixed and permeabilized PBL, purified B cells, T cells, and monocytes expressed relatively equal levels of CB(2) mRNA by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our findings confirm that human PBL express CB(2) protein but that its distribution is predominantly intracellular with only B cells expressing CB(2) protein at the extracellular membrane. The differential role of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) receptors in mediating ligand signaling and immune function remains to be determined.

  18. Adherence and intracellular survival within human macrophages of Enterococcus faecalis isolates from coastal marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Raffaella; Di Cesare, Andrea; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Vignaroli, Carla; Citterio, Barbara; Amiri, Mehdi; Rossi, Luigia; Magnani, Mauro; Mauro, Alessandro; Biavasco, Francesca

    2015-09-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the human intestinal microbiota and an important nosocomial pathogen. It can be found in the marine environment, where it is also employed as a fecal indicator. To assess the pathogenic potential of marine E. faecalis, four strains isolated from marine sediment were analyzed for their ability to survive in human macrophages. Escherichia coli DH5α was used as a negative control. The number of adherent and intracellular bacteria was determined 2.5 h after the infection (T0) and after further 24h (T24) by CFU and qPCR counts. At T24 adherent and intracellular enterococcal CFU counts were increased for all strains, the increment in intracellular bacteria being particularly marked. No CFU of E. coli DH5α were detected. In contrast, qPCR counts of intracellular enterococcal and E. coli bacteria were similar at both time points. These findings suggest that whereas E. coli was killed within macrophages (no CFU, positive qPCR), the E. faecalis isolates not only escaped killing, but actually multiplied, as demonstrated by the increase in the viable cell population. These findings support earlier data by our group, further documenting that marine sediment can be a reservoir of pathogenic enterococci.

  19. Direct transfection of miR-137 mimics is more effective than DNA demethylation of miR-137 promoter to augment anti-tumor mechanisms of delphinidin in human glioblastoma U87MG and LN18 cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-11-15

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. Recent studies suggested that 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (AzaC) could inhibit cell cycle progression in human glioblastoma stem cells by an indirect increase in expression of the tumor suppressor microRNA-137 (miR-137). Delphinidin (DPN), a new anthocyanidin, inhibits cell growth in different cancers. We investigated inhibition of glioblastoma growth after indirect or direct overexpression of miR-137 and then DPN treatment. The highest inhibition of cell growth occurred due to treatment with combination of 10 μM AzaC and 50 μM DPN in human glioblastoma U87MG and LN18 cells. The methylation sensitive-polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) results showed that AzaC inhibited methylation of miR-137 promoter region, which was hypermethylated in both glioblastoma cell lines, to cause indirect increase in miR-137 expression. Our results also indicated the highest miR-137 expression after direct transfection of miR-137 mimics and DPN treatment. Combination of miR-137 mimics transfection and DPN treatment caused the highest inhibition of cell invasion and prevented angiogenic network formation due to the least expression of angiogenic factor (VEGF) in human glioblastoma cells in co-culture with human microvascular endothelial cells. This combination strategy most effectively inhibited survival factors (p-Akt and NF-κB), angiogenic factors (VEGF and b-FGF), growth factor receptor (EGFR), and invasive factors (MMP-9 and MMP-2). Direct overexpression of miR-137 most effectively augmented efficacy of DPN to induce apoptosis with activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. So, sequential miR-137 overexpression and DPN treatment could be a promising combination treatment to inhibit growth of human glioblastoma cells.

  20. Intravenous Formulation of HET0016 Decreased Human Glioblastoma Growth and Implicated Survival Benefit in Rat Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Jain, Meenu; Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; Alsulami, Meshal; Shankar, Adarsh; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Angara, Kartik; Rashid, Mohammad H; Iskander, Asm; Borin, Thaiz F; Wenbo, Zhi; Ara, Roxan; Ali, Meser M; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Chwang, Wilson B; Guo, Austin; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S

    2017-01-31

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. HET0016 is a selective CYP450 inhibitor, which has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, to explore novel treatments, we have generated an improved intravenous (IV) formulation of HET0016 with HPßCD and tested in animal models of human and syngeneic GBM. Administration of a single IV dose resulted in 7-fold higher levels of HET0016 in plasma and 3.6-fold higher levels in tumor at 60 min than that in IP route. IV treatment with HPßCD-HET0016 decreased tumor growth, and altered vascular kinetics in early and late treatment groups (p < 0.05). Similar growth inhibition was observed in syngeneic GL261 GBM (p < 0.05). Survival studies using patient derived xenografts of GBM811, showed prolonged survival to 26 weeks in animals treated with focal radiation, in combination with HET0016 and TMZ (p < 0.05). We observed reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67), decreased neovascularization (laminin and αSMA), in addition to inflammation and angiogenesis markers in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that HPßCD-HET0016 is effective in inhibiting tumor growth through decreasing proliferation, and neovascularization. Furthermore, HPßCD-HET0016 significantly prolonged survival in PDX GBM811 model.

  1. Intravenous Formulation of HET0016 Decreased Human Glioblastoma Growth and Implicated Survival Benefit in Rat Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Meenu; Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H.; Alsulami, Meshal; Shankar, Adarsh; Achyut, Bhagelu R.; Angara, Kartik; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Iskander, Asm; Borin, Thaiz F.; Wenbo, Zhi; Ara, Roxan; Ali, Meser M.; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Chwang, Wilson B.; Guo, Austin; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. HET0016 is a selective CYP450 inhibitor, which has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, to explore novel treatments, we have generated an improved intravenous (IV) formulation of HET0016 with HPßCD and tested in animal models of human and syngeneic GBM. Administration of a single IV dose resulted in 7-fold higher levels of HET0016 in plasma and 3.6-fold higher levels in tumor at 60 min than that in IP route. IV treatment with HPßCD-HET0016 decreased tumor growth, and altered vascular kinetics in early and late treatment groups (p < 0.05). Similar growth inhibition was observed in syngeneic GL261 GBM (p < 0.05). Survival studies using patient derived xenografts of GBM811, showed prolonged survival to 26 weeks in animals treated with focal radiation, in combination with HET0016 and TMZ (p < 0.05). We observed reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67), decreased neovascularization (laminin and αSMA), in addition to inflammation and angiogenesis markers in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that HPßCD-HET0016 is effective in inhibiting tumor growth through decreasing proliferation, and neovascularization. Furthermore, HPßCD-HET0016 significantly prolonged survival in PDX GBM811 model. PMID:28139732

  2. Human cytomegalovirus encoded chemokine receptor US28 activates the HIF-1α/PKM2 axis in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    van Senten, Jeffrey R.; Fraile-Ramos, Alberto; Siderius, Marco; Smit, Martine J.

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes tumorigenesis through activation of various proliferative and angiogenic signaling pathways. Upon infection, US28 displays constitutive activity and signals in a G protein-dependent manner, hijacking the host's cellular machinery. In tumor cells, the hypoxia inducible factor-1α/pyruvate kinase M2 (HIF-1α/PKM2) axis plays an important role by supporting proliferation, angiogenesis and reprogramming of energy metabolism. In this study we show that US28 signaling results in activation of the HIF-1α/PKM2 feedforward loop in fibroblasts and glioblastoma cells. The constitutive activity of US28 increases HIF-1 protein stability through a Gαq-, CaMKII- and Akt/mTOR-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, we found that VEGF and lactate secretion are increased and HIF-1 target genes, glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), involved in glucose metabolism, are upregulated in US28 expressing cells. In addition, PKM2 is phosphorylated and found to be in a tumor-associated dimeric state upon US28 expression. Also in HCMV-infected cells HIF-1 activity is enhanced, which in part is US28-dependent. Finally, increased proliferation of cells expressing US28 is abolished upon inhibition of the HIF-1α/PKM2 cascade. These data highlight the importance of HIF-1α and PKM2 in US28-induced proliferation, angiogenesis and metabolic reprogramming. PMID:27602585

  3. Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors by tivozanib has potential anti-tumour effects on human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Momeny, Majid; Moghaddaskho, Farima; Gortany, Narges K.; Yousefi, Hassan; Sabourinejad, Zahra; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Barghi, Farinaz; Ahmadinia, Leila; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Amanpour, Saeid; Tavangar, Seyyed M.; Dardaei, Leila; Emami, Amir H.; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most fatal human malignancies due to its high angiogenic and infiltrative capacities. Even with optimal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide, it is essentially incurable. GBM is among the most neovascularised neoplasms and its malignant progression associates with striking neovascularisation, evidenced by vasoproliferation and endothelial cell hyperplasia. Targeting the pro-angiogenic pathways is therefore a promising anti-glioma strategy. Here we show that tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, inhibited proliferation of GBM cells through a G2/M cell cycle arrest via inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) signalling pathway and down-modulation of Aurora kinases A and B, cyclin B1 and CDC25C. Moreover, tivozanib decreased adhesive potential of these cells through reduction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Tivozanib diminished GBM cell invasion through impairing the proteolytic cascade of cathepsin B/urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Combination of tivozanib with EGFR small molecule inhibitor gefitinib synergistically increased sensitivity to gefitinib. Altogether, these findings suggest that VEGFR blockade by tivozanib has potential anti-glioma effects in vitro. Further in vivo studies are warranted to explore the anti-tumour activity of tivozanib in combinatorial approaches in GBM. PMID:28287096

  4. Human intracellular ISG15 prevents interferon-α/β over-amplification and auto-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianqin; Bogunovic, Dusan; Payelle-Brogard, Béatrice; Francois-Newton, Véronique; Speer, Scott D.; Yuan, Chao; Volpi, Stefano; Li, Zhi; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Tezcan, Ilhan; Rice, Gillian I.; Chen, Chunyuan; Mansouri, Nahal; Alireza Mahdaviani, Seyed; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Okada, Satoshi; Zeng, Lu; Wang, Xing; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Wenqiang; Han, Tiantian; Liu, Delin; Ma, Tao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Mugen; Liu, Jing-Yu; Wang, Qing K.; Yalnizoglu, Dilek; Radoshevich, Lilliana; Uzé, Gilles; Gros, Philippe; Rozenberg, Flore; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Bustamante, Jacinta; Garcìa-Sastre, Adolfo; Abel, Laurent; Lebon, Pierre; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Crow, Yanick J.; Boisson-Dupuis, Stèphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pellegrini, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible ubiquitin-like modifier which can covalently bind other proteins in a process called ISGylation; it is an effector of IFN-α/β-dependent antiviral immunity in mice1–4. We previously published a study describing humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency but without unusually severe viral diseases5. We showed that these patients were prone to mycobacterial disease and that human ISG15 was non-redundant as an extracellular IFN-γ-inducing molecule. We show here that ISG15-deficient patients also display unanticipated cellular, immunological and clinical signs of enhanced IFN-α/β immunity, reminiscent of the Mendelian autoinflammatory interferonopathies Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and spondyloenchondrodysplasia6–9.We further show that an absence of intracellular ISG15 in the patients’ cells prevents the accumulation of USP1810,11, a potent negative regulator of IFN-α/β signalling, resulting in the enhancement and amplification of IFN-α/β responses. Human ISG15, therefore, is not only redundant for antiviral immunity, but is a key negative regulator of IFN-α/β immunity. In humans, intracellular ISG15 is IFN-α/β-inducible not to serve as a substrate for ISGylation-dependent antiviral immunity, but to ensure USP18-dependent regulation of IFN-α/β and prevention of IFN-α/β-dependent autoinflammation. PMID:25307056

  5. Human intracellular ISG15 prevents interferon-α/β over-amplification and auto-inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianqin; Bogunovic, Dusan; Payelle-Brogard, Béatrice; Francois-Newton, Véronique; Speer, Scott D; Yuan, Chao; Volpi, Stefano; Li, Zhi; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Tezcan, Ilhan; Rice, Gillian I; Chen, Chunyuan; Mansouri, Nahal; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Okada, Satoshi; Zeng, Lu; Wang, Xing; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Wenqiang; Han, Tiantian; Liu, Delin; Ma, Tao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Mugen; Liu, Jing-Yu; Wang, Qing K; Yalnizoglu, Dilek; Radoshevich, Lilliana; Uzé, Gilles; Gros, Philippe; Rozenberg, Flore; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Bustamante, Jacinta; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Abel, Laurent; Lebon, Pierre; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Crow, Yanick J; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pellegrini, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible ubiquitin-like modifier which can covalently bind other proteins in a process called ISGylation; it is an effector of IFN-α/β-dependent antiviral immunity in mice. We previously published a study describing humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency but without unusually severe viral diseases. We showed that these patients were prone to mycobacterial disease and that human ISG15 was non-redundant as an extracellular IFN-γ-inducing molecule. We show here that ISG15-deficient patients also display unanticipated cellular, immunological and clinical signs of enhanced IFN-α/β immunity, reminiscent of the Mendelian autoinflammatory interferonopathies Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and spondyloenchondrodysplasia. We further show that an absence of intracellular ISG15 in the patients' cells prevents the accumulation of USP18, a potent negative regulator of IFN-α/β signalling, resulting in the enhancement and amplification of IFN-α/β responses. Human ISG15, therefore, is not only redundant for antiviral immunity, but is a key negative regulator of IFN-α/β immunity. In humans, intracellular ISG15 is IFN-α/β-inducible not to serve as a substrate for ISGylation-dependent antiviral immunity, but to ensure USP18-dependent regulation of IFN-α/β and prevention of IFN-α/β-dependent autoinflammation.

  6. Human glioblastoma ADF cells express tyrosinase, L-tyrosine hydroxylase and melanosomes and are sensitive to L-tyrosine and phenylthiourea.

    PubMed

    Bonfigli, Antonella; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Colafarina, Sabrina; Cimini, Anna Maria; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Miranda, Michele

    2006-06-01

    Melanocytes and neuroblasts share the property of transforming L-tyrosine through two distinct metabolic pathways leading to melanogenesis and catecholamine synthesis, respectively. While tyrosinase (TYR) activity has been shown to be expressed by neuroblastoma it remains to be established as to whether also glioblastomas cells are endowed with this property. We have addressed this issue using the human continuous glioblastoma cell line ADF. We demonstrated that these cells possess tyrosinase as well as L-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and synthesize melanosomes. Because the two pathways are potentially cyto-genotoxic due to production of quinones, semiquinones, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have also investigated the expression of the peroxisomal proliferators activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) transcription factor as well the effect of L-tyrosine concentration on cell survival. We report that L-tyrosine down-regulates PPARalpha expression in ADF cells but not neuroblastoma and that this aminoacid and phenylthiourea (PTU) induces apoptosis in glioblastoma and neuroblastoma.

  7. Role of intracellular free calcium in killing Penicillium marneffei within human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) promote phagocyte antimicrobial responses. Here, we investigated macrophages stimulated by Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei). [Ca(2+)]c was determined in macrophages loaded with the fluorescent calcium probe Fura 2/AM as they were stimulated by P. marneffei. We found that P. marneffei induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in human macrophages. Further, increased [Ca(2+)]c with the ionophore A23187 promoted phagosomal acidification and maturation and reduced intracellular replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages, whereas decreased [Ca(2+)]c with the chelation MAPTAM decreased TNF-α production, inhibited phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular replication of P. marneffei. These data indicate that Ca(2+) signaling may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei within macrophages.

  8. Role of intracellular calcium handling in force-interval relationships of human ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Gwathmey, J K; Slawsky, M T; Hajjar, R J; Briggs, G M; Morgan, J P

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were performed in human working myocardium to investigate the relationship of intracellular calcium handling and availability to alterations in the strength of contraction produced by changes in stimulation rate and pattern. Both control and myopathic muscles exhibited potentiation of peak isometric force during the postextrasystolic contraction which was associated with an increase in the peak intracellular calcium transient. Frequency-related force potentiation was attenuated in myopathic muscles compared to controls. This occurred despite an increase in resting intracellular calcium and in the peak amplitude of the calcium transient as detected with aequorin. Therefore, abnormalities in contractile function of myopathic muscles during frequency-related force potentiation are not due to decreased availability of intracellular calcium, but more likely reflect differences in myofibrillar calcium responsiveness. Sarcolemmal calcium influx may also contribute to frequency-related changes in contractile force in myopathic muscles as suggested by a decrease in action potential duration with increasing stimulation frequency which is associated with fluctuations in peak calcium transient amplitude. PMID:2332508

  9. Biochemical manipulation of intracellular glutathione levels influences cytotoxicity to isolated human lymphocytes by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.L.; Innace, J.K.; Hovatter, R.C.; Meier, H.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major nonprotein thiol that can protect cells from damage due to electrophilic alkylating agents by forming conjugates with the agent. Sulfur mustard (HD) is an electrophilic alkylating agent that has potent mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, and vesicant properties. Compounds that elevate or reduce intracellular levels of GSH may produce changes in cytotoxicity induced by sulfur mustard. Pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for 72 hr with 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which reduces intracellular GSH content to approximately 26% of control, appears to sensitize these in vitro cells to the cytotoxic effects of 10 AM HD but not to higher HD concentrations. Pretreatment of PBL for 48 hr with 10 mM N-acetyl cysteine (NA C), which elevates intracellular glutathione levels to 122% of control, appears to partially protect these in vitro cells from the cytotoxic effects of 10 LAIHD but not to higher HD concentrations. Augmentation of intracellular levels of glutathione may provide partial protection against cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard.

  10. Acoustic tweezers for studying intracellular calcium signaling in SKBR-3 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Yoon, Chi Woo; Lim, Hae Gyun; Park, Jin Man; Yoon, Sangpil; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K Kirk

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin (FNT) play crucial roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. For better understanding of these associated cellular activities, various microscopic manipulation tools have been used to study their intracellular signaling pathways. Recently, it has appeared that acoustic tweezers may possess similar capabilities in the study. Therefore, we here demonstrate that our newly developed acoustic tweezers with a high-frequency lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer have potentials to study intracellular calcium signaling by FNT-binding to human breast cancer cells (SKBR-3). It is found that intracellular calcium elevations in SKBR-3 cells, initially occurring on the microbead-contacted spot and then eventually spreading over the entire cell, are elicited by attaching an acoustically trapped FNT-coated microbead. Interestingly, they are suppressed by either extracellular calcium elimination or phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. Hence, this suggests that our acoustic tweezers may serve as an alternative tool in the study of intracellular signaling by FNT-binding activities.

  11. Potent Antiproliferative Cembrenoids Accumulate in Tobacco upon Infection with Rhodococcus fascians and Trigger Unusual Microtubule Dynamics in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nacoulma, Aminata P.; Megalizzi, Veronique; Pottier, Laurent R.; De Lorenzi, Manuela; Thoret, Sylviane; Dubois, Joëlle; Vandeputte, Olivier M.; Duez, Pierre; Vereecke, Danny; Jaziri, Mondher El

    2013-01-01

    Aims Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls) induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. Methods We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Results The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability. PMID:24167576

  12. Inhibition of the Autophagy Pathway Synergistically Potentiates the Cytotoxic Activity of Givinostat (ITF2357) on Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Francesca; Fossati, Gianluca; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Würth, Roberto; Solari, Agnese; Daga, Antonio; Masiello, Irene; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio; Comincini, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlighted the role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the development of tumor resistance to therapy, particularly in glioblastoma (GBM). Therefore, the development of new therapies, specifically directed against GBM CSCs, constitutes an important research avenue. Considering the extended range of cancer-related pathways modulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation processes, we studied the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic efficacy of givinostat (GVS), a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor, on cell cultures enriched in CSCs, isolated from nine human GBMs. We report that GVS induced a significant reduction of viability and self-renewal ability in all GBM CSC cultures; conversely, GVS exposure did not cause a significant cytotoxic activity toward differentiated GBM cells and normal mesenchymal human stem cells. Analyzing the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved, we demonstrated that GVS affected CSC viability through the activation of programmed cell death pathways. In particular, a marked stimulation of macroautophagy was observed after GVS treatment. To understand the functional link between GVS treatment and autophagy activation, different genetic and pharmacological interfering strategies were used. We show that the up-regulation of the autophagy process, obtained by deprivation of growth factors, induced a reduction of CSC sensitivity to GVS, while the pharmacological inhibition of the autophagy pathway and the silencing of the key autophagy gene ATG7, increased the cell death rate induced by GVS. Altogether these findings suggest that autophagy represents a pro-survival mechanism activated by GBM CSCs to counteract the efficacy of the anti-proliferative activity of GVS. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GVS is a novel pharmacological tool able to target GBM CSC viability and its efficacy can be enhanced by autophagy inhibitory strategies. PMID:27833530

  13. The interaction of bee products with temozolomide in human diffuse astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme and astroglia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borawska, Maria H; Markiewicz-Żukowska, Renata; Naliwajko, Sylwia K; Moskwa, Justyna; Bartosiuk, Emilia; Socha, Katarzyna; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Kochanowicz, Jan; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of extracts from Salix spp. honey (ESH), beebread (EBB), and royal jelly (ERJ) with and without temozolomide (TMZ) on cell lines derived from a patient with diffuse astrocytoma (DASC), human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), and normal human astroglia (SVGp12). DASC was identified by immunocytochemistry. TMZ (20 μM) in combination with ESH (30 μg/mL), EBB (50 μg/mL), and ERJ (30 μg/mL) has stronger cytotoxic activity on U87MG cells after 72 h (20.0, 26.5, and 29.3% of control, respectively) than TMZ alone (about 6% of control). An increase of the cytotoxic effect and inhibition of DNA synthesis in SVGp12 were detected after administering TMZ with the studied extracts. NF-κB p50 subunit was reduced in U87MG cells after treatment with ESH (70.9%) and ESH + TMZ (74.7%). A significant decline of MMP-9 and MMP-2 secretion in cultured U87MG was detected after incubation with EBB (42.9% and 73.0%, respectively) and EBB + TMZ (38.4% and 68.5%, respectively). In conclusion, the use of bee products may increase the cytotoxic effect of TMZ in U87MG but also in SVGp12 cell line. It is important to note that the U87MG cells were sensitive to natural bee products, although there was no influence of natural bee products on the DASC cells.

  14. Impact of intracellular domain flexibility upon properties of activated human 5-HT3 receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kozuska, J L; Paulsen, I M; Belfield, W J; Martin, I L; Cole, D J; Holt, A; Dunn, S M J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been proposed that arginine residues lining the intracellular portals of the homomeric 5-HT3A receptor cause electrostatic repulsion of cation flow, accounting for a single-channel conductance substantially lower than that of the 5-HT3AB heteromer. However, comparison of receptor homology models for wild-type pentamers suggests that salt bridges in the intracellular domain of the homomer may impart structural rigidity, and we hypothesized that this rigidity could account for the low conductance. Experimental Approach Mutations were introduced into the portal region of the human 5-HT3A homopentamer, such that putative salt bridges were broken by neutralizing anionic partners. Single-channel and whole cell currents were measured in transfected tsA201 cells and in Xenopus oocytes respectively. Computational simulations of protein flexibility facilitated comparison of wild-type and mutant receptors. Key Results Single-channel conductance was increased substantially, often to wild-type heteromeric receptor values, in most 5-HT3A mutants. Conversely, introduction of arginine residues to the portal region of the heteromer, conjecturally creating salt bridges, decreased conductance. Gating kinetics varied significantly between different mutant receptors. EC50 values for whole-cell responses to 5-HT remained largely unchanged, but Hill coefficients for responses to 5-HT were usually significantly smaller in mutants. Computational simulations suggested increased flexibility throughout the protein structure as a consequence of mutations in the intracellular domain. Conclusions and Implications These data support a role for intracellular salt bridges in maintaining the quaternary structure of the 5-HT3 receptor and suggest a role for the intracellular domain in allosteric modulation of cooperativity and agonist efficacy. Linked Article This article is commented on by Vardy and Kenakin, pp. 1614–1616 of volume 171 issue 7. To view this commentary

  15. A salt bridge in intracellular loop 2 is essential for folding of human p-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2013-05-14

    There is no high-resolution structure of the human P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) drug pump. Homology models based on the crystal structures of mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans P-gps show extensive contacts between intracellular loop 2 (ICL2, in the first transmembrane domain) and the second nucleotide-binding domain. Human P-gp modeled on these P-gp structures yields different ICL2 structures. Only the model based on the C. elegans P-gp structure predicts the presence of a salt bridge. We show that the Glu256-Arg276 salt bridge was critical for P-gp folding.

  16. Multiphoton imaging reveals that nanosecond pulsed electric fields collapse tumor and normal vascular perfusion in human glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Sylvia M.; Carr, Lynn; Soueid, Malak; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the biomedical advances of the last century, many cancers including glioblastoma are still resistant to existing therapies leaving patients with poor prognoses. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are a promising technology for the treatment of cancer that have thus far been evaluated in vitro and in superficial malignancies. In this paper, we develop a tumor organoid model of glioblastoma and apply intravital multiphoton microscopy to assess their response to nsPEFs. We demonstrate for the first time that a single 10 ns, high voltage electric pulse (35–45 kV/cm), collapses the perfusion of neovasculature, and also alters the diameter of capillaries and larger vessels in normal tissue. These results contribute to the fundamental understanding of nsPEF effects in complex tissue environments, and confirm the potential of nsPEFs to disrupt the microenvironment of solid tumors such as glioblastoma. PMID:27698479

  17. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  18. Activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by muramyl dipeptide requires specific intracellular interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, W.E.; Fidler, I.J.

    1986-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism by which muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates antitumor cytotoxic properties in normal and interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..)-primed human peripheral blood monocytes. The structurally and functionally active MDP analog, nor-muramyl dipeptide (nor-MDP), and (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP were used as reference glycopeptides. Direct activation of normal, noncytotoxic monocytes by nor-MDP was enhanced its encapsulation within multilamellar vesicles (MLV). Studies with (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP revealed that the activation of monocytes by nor-MDP was not attributable to its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor, nor did it result merely from the internalization by monocytes of glycopeptide. Subthreshold concentrations of nor-MDP could activate tumor cytotoxic properties in IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes. The intracellular interaction of (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP with IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes was specific in that intracellular levels of radiolabeled material could be displaced and recovered as intact molecules by unlabeled nor-MDP, but not by a biologically inactive MDP stereoisomer. Collectively, these results suggest that the activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by MDP occurs subsequent to intracellular interaction with specific MDP receptors.

  19. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Blanco, Víctor M; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2015-10-27

    Viable cancer cells expose elevated levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms leading to elevated PS exposure in viable cancer cells have not been defined. We previously showed that externalized PS may be used to monitor, target and kill tumor cells. In addition, PS on tumor cells is recognized by macrophages and has implications in antitumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular details of PS exposure on cancer cells in order to improve therapeutic targeting. Here we explored the mechanisms regulating the surface PS exposure in human cancer cells and found that differential flippase activity and intracellular calcium are the major regulators of surface PS exposure in viable human cancer cells. In general, cancer cell lines with high surface PS exhibited low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium, whereas cancer cells with low surface PS exhibited high flippase activity and low intracellular calcium. High surface PS cancer cells also had higher total cellular PS than low surface PS cells. Together, our results indicate that the amount of external PS in cancer cells is regulated by calcium dependent flippase activity and may also be influenced by total cellular PS.

  20. Sensitivity to PRIMA-1MET is associated with decreased MGMT in human glioblastoma cells and glioblastoma stem cells irrespective of p53 status.

    PubMed

    Patyka, Mariia; Sharifi, Zeinab; Petrecca, Kevin; Mansure, Jose; Jean-Claude, Bertrand; Sabri, Siham

    2016-09-13

    Alterations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene occur in ~30% of primary glioblastoma (GBM) with a high frequency of missense mutations associated with the acquisition of oncogenic "gain-of-function" (GOF) mutant (mut)p53 activities. PRIMA-1MET/APR-246, emerged as a promising compound to rescue wild-type (wt)p53 function in different cancer types. Previous studies suggested the role of wtp53 in the negative regulation of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a major determinant in resistance to therapy in GBM treatment. The potential role of MGMT in expression of p53 and the efficacy of PRIMA-1MET with respect to TP53 status and expression of MGMT in GBM remain unknown. We investigated response to PRIMA-1MET of wtp53/MGMT-negative (U87MG, A172), mutp53/MGMT-positive U138, LN-18, T98/Empty vector (T98/EV) and its isogenic MGMT/shRNA gene knockdown counterpart (T98/shRNA). We show that MGMT silencing decreased expression of mutp53/GOF in T98/shRNA. PRIMA-1MET further cleared T98/shRNA cells of mutp53, decreased proliferation and clonogenic potential, abrogated the G2 checkpoint control, increased susceptibility to apoptotic cell death, expression of GADD45A and sustained expression of phosphorylated Erk1/2. PRIMA-1MET increased expression of p21 protein in U87MG and A172 and promoted senescence in U87MG cell line. Importantly, PRIMA-1MET decreased relative cell numbers, disrupted the structure of neurospheres of patient-derived GBM stem cells (GSCs) and enabled activation of wtp53 with decreased expression of MGMT in MGMT-positive GSCs or decreased expression of mutp53. Our findings highlight the cell-context dependent effects of PRIMA-1MET irrespective of p53 status and suggest the role of MGMT as a potential molecular target of PRIMA-1MET in MGMT-positive GSCs.

  1. Sensitivity to PRIMA-1MET is associated with decreased MGMT in human glioblastoma cells and glioblastoma stem cells irrespective of p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Patyka, Mariia; Sharifi, Zeinab; Petrecca, Kevin; Mansure, Jose; Jean-Claude, Bertrand; Sabri, Siham

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene occur in ~30% of primary glioblastoma (GBM) with a high frequency of missense mutations associated with the acquisition of oncogenic “gain-of-function” (GOF) mutant (mut)p53 activities. PRIMA-1MET/APR-246, emerged as a promising compound to rescue wild-type (wt)p53 function in different cancer types. Previous studies suggested the role of wtp53 in the negative regulation of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a major determinant in resistance to therapy in GBM treatment. The potential role of MGMT in expression of p53 and the efficacy of PRIMA-1MET with respect to TP53 status and expression of MGMT in GBM remain unknown. We investigated response to PRIMA-1MET of wtp53/MGMT-negative (U87MG, A172), mutp53/MGMT-positive U138, LN-18, T98/Empty vector (T98/EV) and its isogenic MGMT/shRNA gene knockdown counterpart (T98/shRNA). We show that MGMT silencing decreased expression of mutp53/GOF in T98/shRNA. PRIMA-1MET further cleared T98/shRNA cells of mutp53, decreased proliferation and clonogenic potential, abrogated the G2 checkpoint control, increased susceptibility to apoptotic cell death, expression of GADD45A and sustained expression of phosphorylated Erk1/2. PRIMA-1MET increased expression of p21 protein in U87MG and A172 and promoted senescence in U87MG cell line. Importantly, PRIMA-1MET decreased relative cell numbers, disrupted the structure of neurospheres of patient-derived GBM stem cells (GSCs) and enabled activation of wtp53 with decreased expression of MGMT in MGMT-positive GSCs or decreased expression of mutp53. Our findings highlight the cell-context dependent effects of PRIMA-1MET irrespective of p53 status and suggest the role of MGMT as a potential molecular target of PRIMA-1MET in MGMT-positive GSCs. PMID:27533246

  2. Intracellular RNA recognition pathway activates strong anti-viral response in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, J; Rintahaka, J; Kovanen, P T; Matikainen, S; Eklund, K K

    2013-04-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the first line of defence against parasites and bacteria, but less is known about their role in anti-viral responses. Allergic diseases often exacerbate during viral infection, suggesting an increased activation of mast cells in the process. In this study we investigated human mast cell response to double-stranded RNA and viral infection. Cultured human mast cells were incubated with poly(I:C), a synthetic RNA analogue and live Sendai virus as a model of RNA parainfluenza virus infection, and analysed for their anti-viral response. Mast cells responded to intracellular poly(I:C) by inducing type 1 and type 3 interferons and TNF-α. In contrast, extracellular Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR)-3-activating poly(I:C) failed to induce such response. Infection of mast cells with live Sendai virus induced an anti-viral response similar to that of intracellular poly(I:C). Type 1, but not type 3 interferons, up-regulated the expression of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene-1 (RIG-1), and TLR-3, demonstrating that human mast cells do not express functional receptors for type 3 interferons. Furthermore, virus infection induced the anti-viral proteins MxA and IFIT3 in human mast cells. In conclusion, our results support the notion that mast cells can recognize an invading virus through intracellular virus sensors and produce high amounts of type 1 and type 3 interferons and the anti-viral proteins human myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) and interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 3 (IFIT3) in response to the virus infection.

  3. Intracellular trafficking pathway of BK virus in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Takahito; Sorokin, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking of BK Virus (BKV) in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HRPTEC) is critical for BKV nephritis. However, the major trafficking components utilized by BKV remain unknown. Co-incubation of HRPTEC with BKV and microtubule disrupting agents prevented BKV infection as detected by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis with antibodies which recognize BKV large T antigen. However, inhibition of a dynein, cellular motor protein, did not interfere with BKV infection in HRPTEC. A colocalization study of BKV with the markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus (GA), indicated that BKV reached the ER from 6 to 10 hours, while bypassing the GA or passing through the GA too transiently to be detected. This study contributes to the understanding of mechanisms of intracellular trafficking used by BKV in the infection of HRPTEC. PMID:17976677

  4. Effect of solute concentration on intracellular water volume and hydraulic conductivity of human blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, W J

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular water volume of human blood platelets was determined using tritiated water. The cells responded as osmometers over an observed range of solute concentration from 0.292 to 2.180 osmol kg-1. Only 87% of intracellular water was apparently osmotically active (i.e. Ponder's R was 0.87). Changes in cell volume induced by small step changes in external osmolality were followed photometrically and the time constant for the exponential approach of cell volume to its new equilibrium value was determined. Hydraulic conductivity (LP) was calculated from the time constant and was 1.41 X 10(-6) cm atm-1 s-1 under isotonic conditions at 37 degrees C. LP was inversely dependent on extracellular solute concentration, but it was independent of the direction of movement of water across the plasma membrane. PMID:3746695

  5. Ethynyldeoxyuridine (EdU) suppresses in vitro population expansion and in vivo tumor progression of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ross, Heather H; Rahman, Maryam; Levkoff, Lindsay H; Millette, Sebastien; Martin-Carreras, Teresa; Dunbar, Erin M; Reynolds, Brent A; Laywell, Eric D

    2011-12-01

    Thymidine analogs (TAs) are synthetic nucleosides that incorporate into newly synthesized DNA. Halogenated pyrimidines (HPs), such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), are a class of TAs that can be detected with antibodies and are commonly used for birthdating individual cells and for assessing the proliferative index of cell populations. It is well established that HPs can act as radiosensitizers when incorporated into DNA chains, but they are generally believed not to impair normal cell function in the absence of secondary stressors. However, we and others have shown that HP incorporation leads to a sustained suppression of cell cycle progression in mammalian cells, resulting in cellular senescence in somatic cells. In addition, we have shown that HP incorporation results in delayed tumor progression in a syngeneic rat model of glioma. Here we examine ethynyldeoxyuridine (EdU), a newly developed and alkylated TA, for its anti-cancer activity, both in vitro and in vivo. We show that EdU, like HPs, leads to a severe reduction in the proliferation rate of normal and transformed cells in vitro. Unlike HPs, however, EdU incorporation also causes DNA damage resulting in the death of a substantial subset of treated cells. When administered over an extended time as a monotherapy to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of human glioblastoma multiforme tumors, EdU significantly reduces tumor volume and increases survival without apparent significant toxicity. These results, combined with the fact that EdU readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, support the continued investigation of EdU as a potential therapy for malignant brain tumors.

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors interact with melanoma differentiation associated-7/interleukin-24 to kill primary human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Hossein A; Yacoub, Adly; Park, Margaret A; Archer, Kellie; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Grant, Steven; Fisher, Paul B; Dent, Paul

    2013-08-01

    We presently demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) enhance toxicity of melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin 24 (mda-7/IL-24) in invasive primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Additionally, a method is described to augment the efficacy of adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 in these cells. HDACIs synergized with melanoma differentiation-associated (MDA)-7/IL-24 killing GBM cells. Enhanced lethality correlated with increased autophagy that was dependent on the expression of ceramide synthase 6. HDACIs interacted with MDA-7/IL-24 prolonging generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+). Quenching of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) blocked HDACI and MDA-7/IL-24 killing. In vivo MDA-7/IL-24 prolonged the survival of animals carrying orthotopic tumors, and HDACIs enhanced survival further. A serotype 5/3 adenovirus more effectively delivers mda-7/IL-24 to GBM tumors than a serotype 5 virus. Hence, we constructed a serotype 5/3 adenovirus that conditionally replicates in tumor cells expressing MDA-7/IL-24, in which the adenoviral early region 1A (E1A) gene was driven by the cancer-specific promoter progression elevated gene-3 [Ad.5/3 (INGN 241)-PEG-E1A-mda-7; also called Ad.5/3-CTV (cancer terminator virus)]. Ad.5/3-CTV increased the survival of mice carrying GBM tumors to a significantly greater extent than did a nonreplicative virus Ad.5/3-mda-7. Ad.5/3-CTV exhibited no toxicity in the brains of Syrian hamsters. Collectively our data demonstrate that HDACIs enhance MDA-7/IL-24 lethality, and adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 combined with tumor-specific viral replication is an effective preclinical GBM therapeutic.

  7. Cell proliferation and drug sensitivity of human glioblastoma cells are altered by the stable modulation of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II.

    PubMed

    Cividini, F; Cros-Perrial, E; Pesi, R; Machon, C; Allegrini, S; Camici, M; Dumontet, C; Jordheim, L P; Tozzi, M G

    2015-08-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) has been reported to be involved in cell survival, nucleotide metabolism and in the cellular response to anticancer drugs. With the aim to further evaluate the role of this enzyme in cell biology, we stably modulated its expression the human glioblastoma cell ADF in which the transient inhibition of cN-II has been shown to induce cell death. Stable cell lines were obtained both with inhibition, obtained with plasmids coding cN-II-targeting short hairpin RNA, and stimulation, obtained with plasmids coding Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP)-fused wild type cN-II or a GFP-fused hyperactive mutant (GFP-cN-II-R367Q), of cN-II expression. Silenced cells displayed a decreased proliferation rate while the over expressing cell lines displayed an increased proliferation rate as evidenced by impedance measurement using the xCELLigence device. The expression of nucleotide metabolism relevant genes was only slightly different between cell lines, suggesting a compensatory mechanism in transfected cells. Cells with decreased cN-II expression were resistant to the nucleoside analog fludarabine confirming the involvement of cN-II in the metabolism of this drug. Finally, we observed sensitivity to cisplatin in cN-II silenced cells and resistance to this same drug in cN-II over-expressing cells indicating an involvement of cN-II in the mechanism of action of platinum derivatives, and most probably in DNA repair. In summary, our findings confirm some previous data on the role of cN-II in the sensitivity of cancer cells to cancer drugs, and suggest its involvement in other cellular phenomenon such as cell proliferation.

  8. Glioblastoma Multiforme: Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, Arsenio M.; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Manna, Sunil; Mahali, Sidharth; Chakrabarty, Ananda M.

    2012-01-01

    The current therapy for glioblastoma multiforme involves total surgical resection followed by combination of radiation therapy and temozolomide. Unfortunately, the efficacy for such current therapy is limited, and newer approaches are sorely needed to treat this deadly disease. We have recently described the isolation of bacterial proteins and peptides with anticancer activity. In phase I human clinical trials, one such peptide, p28, derived from a bacterial protein azurin, showed partial and complete regression of tumors in several patients among 15 advanced-stage cancer patients with refractory metastatic tumors where the tumors were no longer responsive to current conventional drugs. An azurin-like protein called Laz derived from Neisseria meningitides demonstrates efficient entry and high cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. Laz differs from azurin in having an additional 39-amino-acid peptide called an H.8 epitope, which allows entry and high cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. Since p28 has been shown to have very little toxicity and high anti-tumor activity in advanced-stage cancer patients, it will be worthwhile to explore the use of H.8-p28, H.8-azurin, and Laz in toxicity studies and glioblastoma therapy in preclinical and human clinical trials. PMID:22462021

  9. Regulation of cAMP Intracellular Levels in Human Platelets Stimulated by 2-Arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Signorello, Maria Grazia; Leoncini, Giuliana

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated that in human platelets the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) decreased dose- and time-dependently cAMP intracellular levels. No effect on cAMP decrease induced by 2-AG was observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 as well in platelets pretreated with the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548 or with aspirin, inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway. An almost complete recovering of cAMP level was measured in platelets pretreated with the specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A, milrinone. In platelets pretreated with LY294002 or MK2206, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT pathway, and with U73122, inhibitor of phospholipase C pathway, only a partial prevention was shown. cAMP intracellular level depends on synthesis by adenylate cyclase and hydrolysis by PDEs. In 2-AG-stimulated platelets adenylate cyclase activity seems to be unchanged. In contrast PDEs appear to be involved. In particular PDE3A was specifically activated, as milrinone reversed cAMP reduction by 2-AG. 2-AG enhanced PDE3A activity through its phosphorylation. The PI3K/AKT pathway and PKC participate to this PDE3A phosphorylation/activation mechanism as it was greatly inhibited by platelet pretreatment with LY294002, MK2206, U73122, or the PKC specific inhibitor GF109203X. Taken together these data suggest that 2-AG potentiates its power of platelet agonist reducing cAMP intracellular level.

  10. Combined flow cytometric analysis of surface and intracellular antigens reveals surface molecule markers of human neuropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Turaç, Gizem; Hindley, Christopher J; Thomas, Ria; Davis, Jason A; Deleidi, Michela; Gasser, Thomas; Karaöz, Erdal; Pruszak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Surface molecule profiles undergo dynamic changes in physiology and pathology, serve as markers of cellular state and phenotype and can be exploited for cell selection strategies and diagnostics. The isolation of well-defined cell subsets is needed for in vivo and in vitro applications in stem cell biology. In this technical report, we present an approach for defining a subset of interest in a mixed cell population by flow cytometric detection of intracellular antigens. We have developed a fully validated protocol that enables the co-detection of cluster of differentiation (CD) surface antigens on fixed, permeabilized neural cell populations defined by intracellular staining. Determining the degree of co-expression of surface marker candidates with intracellular target population markers (nestin, MAP2, doublecortin, TUJ1) on neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y, BE(2)-M17) yielded a combinatorial CD49f(-)/CD200(high) surface marker panel. Its application in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) generated enriched neuronal cultures from differentiated cell suspensions derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Our data underlines the feasibility of using the described co-labeling protocol and co-expression analysis for quantitative assays in mammalian neurobiology and for screening approaches to identify much needed surface markers in stem cell biology.

  11. Intracellular calcium mobilization and phospholipid degradation in sphingosylphosphorylcholine-stimulated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orlati, S; Porcelli, A M; Hrelia, S; Lorenzini, A; Rugolo, M

    1998-01-01

    Extracellular sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) caused a remarkable elevation in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in immortalized human airway epithelial cells (CFNP9o-). An increase in total inositol phosphates formation was determined; however, the dose responses for [Ca2+]i elevation and inositol phosphates production were slightly different and, furthermore, PMA and pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited [Ca2+]i mobilization by SPC, whereas inositol phosphates production was only partially reduced. The possible direct interaction of SPC with Ca2+ channels of intracellular stores was determined by experiments with permeabilized cells, where SPC failed to evoke Ca2+ release, whereas lysophosphatidic acid was shown to be effective. The level of phosphatidic acid was increased by SPC only in the presence of AACOCF3, a specific inhibitor of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and blocked by both pertussis toxin and R59022, an inhibitor of diacylglycerol kinase. R59022 enhanced diacylglycerol production by SPC and also significantly reduced [Ca2+]i mobilization. Only polyunsaturated diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid were generated by SPC. Lastly, SPC caused stimulation of arachidonic acid release, indicating the involvement of PLA2. Taken together, these data suggest that, after SPC stimulation, phospholipase C-derived diacylglycerol is phosphorylated by a diacylglycerol kinase to phosphatidic acid, which is further hydrolysed by PLA2 activity to arachidonic and lysophosphatidic acids. We propose that lysophosphatidic acid might be the intracellular messenger able to release Ca2+ from internal stores. PMID:9729473

  12. Intracellular Na(+) modulates large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K (+) currents in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guo Hua; Kim, Moon Young; Park, Seonghee; Kim, Ji Aee; Choi, Shinkyu; Suh, Suk Hyo

    2008-10-01

    We studied the effects of Na(+) influx on large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by means of patch clamp and SBFI microfluorescence measurements. In current-clamped HUVECs, extracellular Na(+) replacement by NMDG(+) or mannitol hyperpolarized cells. In voltage-clamped HUVECs, changing membrane potential from 0 mV to negative potentials increased intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)) and vice versa. In addition, extracellular Na(+) depletion decreased [Na(+)](i). In voltage-clamped cells, BK(Ca) currents were markedly increased by extracellular Na(+) depletion. In inside-out patches, increasing [Na(+)](i) from 0 to 20 or 40 mM reduced single channel conductance but not open probability (NPo) of BK(Ca) channels and decreasing intracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)](i)) gradually from 140 to 70 mM reduced both single channel conductance and NPo. Furthermore, increasing [Na(+)](i) gradually from 0 to 70 mM, by replacing K(+), markedly reduced single channel conductance and NPo. The Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange blocker Ni(2+) or KB-R7943 decreased [Na(+)](i) and increased BK(Ca) currents simultaneously, and the Na(+) ionophore monensin completely inhibited BK(Ca) currents. BK(Ca) currents were significantly augmented by increasing extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)](o)) from 6 to 12 mM and significantly reduced by decreasing [K(+)](o) from 12 or 6 to 0 mM or applying the Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibitor ouabain. These results suggest that intracellular Na(+) inhibit single channel conductance of BK(Ca) channels and that intracellular K(+) increases single channel conductance and NPo.

  13. Intracellular Survival of Brucella spp. in Human Monocytes Involves Conventional Uptake but Special Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, Michael G.; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria-Teresa; Porte, Françoise; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Rouot, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular parasites of various mammals, including humans, typically infecting lymphoid as well as reproductive organs. We have investigated how B. suis and B. melitensis enter human monocytes and in which compartment they survive. Peripheral blood monocytes readily internalized nonopsonized brucellae and killed most of them within 12 to 18 h. The presence of Brucella-specific antibodies (but not complement) increased the uptake of bacteria without increasing their intracellular survival, whereas adherence of the monocytes or incubation in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free medium reduced the uptake. Engulfment of all Brucella organisms (regardless of bacterial viability or virulence) initially resulted in phagosomes with tightly apposed walls (TP). Most TP were fully fusiogenic and matured to spacious phagolysosomes containing degraded bacteria, whereas some TP (more in monocyte-derived macrophages, HeLa cells, and CHO cells than in monocytes) remained tightly apposed to intact bacteria. Immediate treatment of infected host cells with the lysosomotropic base ammonium chloride caused a swelling of all phagosomes and a rise in the intraphagosomal pH, abolishing the intracellular survival of Brucella. These results indicate that (i) human monocytes readily internalize Brucella in a conventional way using various phagocytosis-promoting receptors, (ii) the maturation of some Brucella phagosomes is passively arrested between the steps of acidification and phagosome-lysosome fusion, (iii) brucellae are killed in maturing but not in arrested phagosomes, and (iv) survival of internalized Brucella depends on an acidic intraphagosomal pH and/or close contact with the phagosomal wall. PMID:11349069

  14. F NMR measurement of intracellular free calcium in human red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Schanne, F.A.X.

    1986-03-01

    Optical techniques for the measurement of intracellular Ca are not readily applicable to the human red cell because of the intense absorption of hemoglobin. The authors have therefore examined the use of /sup 19/F NMR of 5,5'-difluoro-1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (5FBAPTA) introduced non-disruptively by intracellular hydrolysis of the membrane-permeant acetoxymethyl ester derivative. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of 5FBAPTA-containing erythrocytes at 188 MHz displayed two well resolved resonances corresponding to the free and Ca-bound forms of the chelator, the resonance of the free form being ten-fold larger than that of the Ca-bound form. Addition of the ionophore A23187 resulted in the disappearance of the resonance of the free anion and a quantitative increase in the intensity of the resonance of the Ca-complex. From these data, and a K/sub D/ of 708 nM for the Ca-5FBAPTA complex, the authors estimate red cell free Ca to be 70 nM, which is in the range of values obtained for other cells, despite the fact that the human red cell, which lacks intracellular organelles for storing Ca, possesses only 1 ..mu..mol total Ca/1. cells in comparison to mmols of total Ca found in other cells. The authors ability to use /sup 19/F NMR to measure free Ca in the red blood cell paves the way for future NMR studies of red cell free Ca concentrations in human essential hypertension as well as in other diseases states in which alterations in cellular Ca homeostasis may be involved.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular-scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Ahmad, T; Barth, R F; Kabalka, G W

    2014-06-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 ((10)B) atoms to individual tumour cells. Cell killing results from the (10)B (n, α)(7) Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of (10)B atoms are localized in the tumour cells. Intranuclear (10)B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of (10)B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumour cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular-scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, a secondary ion mass spectrometry based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high-grade gliomas, recurrent tumours of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumour cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This

  16. Down-regulation of Connexin43 expression reveals the involvement of caveolin-1 containing lipid rafts in human U251 glioblastoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Lamiche, Coralie; Cronier, Laurent; Mesnil, Marc; Defamie, Norah

    2012-11-01

    Glioblastoma cells are characterized by high proliferation and invasive capacities. Tumor development has been associated with a decrease of gap-junctional intercellular communication, but the concrete involvement of gap junction proteins, connexins, remains elusive since they are also suspected to promote cell invasion. In order to better understand how connexins control the glioma cell phenotype, we studied the consequences of inhibiting the intrinsic expression of the major astrocytic connexin, Connexin43, in human U251 glioblastoma cells by the shRNA strategy. The induced down-regulation of Cx43 expression has various effects on the U251 cells such as increased clonogenicity, angiogenesis and decreased adhesion on specific extracellular matrix proteins. We demonstrate that the invasion capacity measured in vitro and ex vivo correlates with Cx43 expression level. For the first time in a cancer cell context, our work demonstrates that Cx43 cofractionates, colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with a lipid raft marker, caveolin-1 and that this interaction is inversely correlated to the level of Cx43. This localization of Cx43 in these lipid raft microdomains regulates both homo- and heterocellular gap junctional communications (respectively between U251 cells, or between U251 cells and astrocytes). Moreover, the adhesive and invasive capacities are not dependent, in our model, on Cav-1 expression level. Our results tend to show that heterocellular gap junctional communication between cancer and stroma cells may affect the behavior of the tumor cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cx43 controls the tumor phenotype of glioblastoma U251 cells and in particular, invasion capacity, through its localization in lipid rafts containing Cav-1.

  17. Sorafenib induces growth arrest and apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells through the dephosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Brown, Christine; Buettner, Ralf; Hedvat, Michael; Starr, Renate; Scuto, Anna; Schroeder, Anne; Jensen, Michael; Jove, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common type of primary brain tumor and is rapidly progressive with few treatment options. Here, we report that sorafenib (< or =10 micromol/L) inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in two established cell lines (U87 and U251) and two primary cultures (PBT015 and PBT022) from human glioblastomas. The effects of sorafenib on these tumor cells were associated with inhibiting phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3; Tyr705). Expression of a constitutively activated STAT3 mutant partially blocked the effects of sorafenib, consistent with a role for STAT3 inhibition in the response to sorafenib. Phosphorylated Janus-activated kinase (JAK)1 was inhibited in U87 and U251 cells, whereas phosphorylated JAK2 was inhibited in primary cultures. Sodium vanadate, a general inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, blocked the inhibition of phosphorylation of STAT3 (Tyr705) induced by sorafenib. These data indicate that the inhibition of STAT3 activity by sorafenib involves both the inhibition of upstream kinases (JAK1 and JAK2) of STAT3 and increased phosphatase activity. Phosphorylation of AKT was also reduced by sorafenib. In contrast, mitogen-activated protein kinases were not consistently inhibited by sorafenib in these cells. Two key cyclins (D and E) and the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 were downregulated by sorafenib in both cell lines and primary cultures. Our data suggest that inhibition of STAT3 signaling by sorafenib contributes to growth arrest and induction of apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. These findings provide a rationale for potential treatment of malignant gliomas with sorafenib. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 953-62. (c)2010 AACR.

  18. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  19. Transmembrane protein CD9 is glioblastoma biomarker, relevant for maintenance of glioblastoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Podergajs, Neža; Motaln, Helena; Rajčević, Uroš; Verbovšek, Urška; Koršič, Marjan; Obad, Nina; Espedal, Heidi; Vittori, Miloš; Herold-Mende, Christel; Miletic, Hrvoje; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Turnšek, Tamara Lah

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model suggests that glioblastomas contain a subpopulation of stem-like tumor cells that reproduce themselves to sustain tumor growth. Targeting these cells thus represents a novel treatment strategy and therefore more specific markers that characterize glioblastoma stem cells need to be identified. In the present study, we performed transcriptomic analysis of glioblastoma tissues compared to normal brain tissues revealing sensible up-regulation of CD9 gene. CD9 encodes the transmembrane protein tetraspanin which is involved in tumor cell invasion, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Using the public REMBRANDT database for brain tumors, we confirmed the prognostic value of CD9, whereby a more than two fold up-regulation correlates with shorter patient survival. We validated CD9 gene and protein expression showing selective up-regulation in glioblastoma stem cells isolated from primary biopsies and in primary organotypic glioblastoma spheroids as well as in U87-MG and U373 glioblastoma cell lines. In contrast, no or low CD9 gene expression was observed in normal human astrocytes, normal brain tissue and neural stem cells. CD9 silencing in three CD133+ glioblastoma cell lines (NCH644, NCH421k and NCH660h) led to decreased cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and self-renewal ability, and altered expression of the stem-cell markers CD133, nestin and SOX2. Moreover, CD9-silenced glioblastoma stem cells showed altered activation patterns of the Akt, MapK and Stat3 signaling transducers. Orthotopic xenotransplantation of CD9-silenced glioblastoma stem cells into nude rats promoted prolonged survival. Therefore, CD9 should be further evaluated as a target for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:26573230

  20. Transmembrane protein CD9 is glioblastoma biomarker, relevant for maintenance of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Podergajs, Neža; Motaln, Helena; Rajčević, Uroš; Verbovšek, Urška; Koršič, Marjan; Obad, Nina; Espedal, Heidi; Vittori, Miloš; Herold-Mende, Christel; Miletic, Hrvoje; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Turnšek, Tamara Lah

    2016-01-05

    The cancer stem cell model suggests that glioblastomas contain a subpopulation of stem-like tumor cells that reproduce themselves to sustain tumor growth. Targeting these cells thus represents a novel treatment strategy and therefore more specific markers that characterize glioblastoma stem cells need to be identified. In the present study, we performed transcriptomic analysis of glioblastoma tissues compared to normal brain tissues revealing sensible up-regulation of CD9 gene. CD9 encodes the transmembrane protein tetraspanin which is involved in tumor cell invasion, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Using the public REMBRANDT database for brain tumors, we confirmed the prognostic value of CD9, whereby a more than two fold up-regulation correlates with shorter patient survival. We validated CD9 gene and protein expression showing selective up-regulation in glioblastoma stem cells isolated from primary biopsies and in primary organotypic glioblastoma spheroids as well as in U87-MG and U373 glioblastoma cell lines. In contrast, no or low CD9 gene expression was observed in normal human astrocytes, normal brain tissue and neural stem cells. CD9 silencing in three CD133+ glioblastoma cell lines (NCH644, NCH421k and NCH660h) led to decreased cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and self-renewal ability, and altered expression of the stem-cell markers CD133, nestin and SOX2. Moreover, CD9-silenced glioblastoma stem cells showed altered activation patterns of the Akt, MapK and Stat3 signaling transducers. Orthotopic xenotransplantation of CD9-silenced glioblastoma stem cells into nude rats promoted prolonged survival. Therefore, CD9 should be further evaluated as a target for glioblastoma treatment.

  1. Cloning and molecular characterization of a human intracellular serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, P; Sun, J; Cerruti, L; Salem, H H; Bird, P

    1993-01-01

    We describe a cDNA encoding a serine proteinase inhibitor present in placental tissue and the cytosolic fraction of K562 cells. On the basis of its interaction with thrombin, through which it was discovered, the inhibitor has been operationally named the placental thrombin inhibitor (PTI). Amino acid sequence comparisons suggest that its reactive center is located at Arg-341 and Cys-342, that it lacks a classical N-terminal signal sequence, and that it has the highest degree of similarity to intracellular serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins), such as the human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor and the equine leukocyte elastase inhibitor. PTI also resembles these inhibitors in that it contains oxidation-sensitive residues adjacent to the reactive site. The PTI cDNA was expressed in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in COS-7 cells and a 42-kDa protein was produced. Recombinant PTI formed a 67-kDa complex when incubated with thrombin. The ability of native PTI to bind thrombin was destroyed by incubation with iodoacetamide. Analysis of human tissue mRNA indicated that PTI is expressed widely with the highest levels in cardiac and skeletal muscle and placenta. We conclude that PTI is a member of an emerging class of intracellular serpins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415716

  2. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications.

  3. Immunosuppressive mechanisms in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nduom, Edjah K; Weller, Michael; Heimberger, Amy B

    2015-11-01

    Despite maximal surgical and medical therapy, the treatment of glioblastoma remains a seriously vexing problem, with median survival well under 2 years and few long-term survivors. Targeted therapy has yet to produce significant advances in treatment of these lesions in spite of advanced molecular characterization of glioblastoma and glioblastoma cancer stem cells. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising mode for some of the hardest to treat tumors, including metastatic melanoma. Although immunotherapy has been evaluated in glioblastoma in the past with limited success, better understanding of the failures of these therapies could lead to more successful treatments in the future. Furthermore, there is a persistent challenge for the use of immune therapy to treat glioblastoma secondary to the existence of redundant mechanisms of tumor-mediated immune suppression. Here we will address these mechanisms of immunosuppression in glioblastoma and therapeutic approaches.

  4. Analysis of the Cytotoxicity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles, Diamond and Graphite, in Human Glioblastoma and Hepatoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests. PMID:25816103

  5. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Samluk, Anna; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests.

  6. Changes in Intracellular Na+ following Enhancement of Late Na+ Current in Virtual Human Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Karen; Trenor, Beatriz; Giles, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    The slowly inactivating or late Na+ current, INa-L, can contribute to the initiation of both atrial and ventricular rhythm disturbances in the human heart. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these pro-arrhythmic influences are not fully understood. At present, the major working hypothesis is that the Na+ influx corresponding to INa-L significantly increases intracellular Na+, [Na+]i; and the resulting reduction in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ reduces and (may reverse) Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These changes increase intracellular Ca2+, [Ca2+]i; which may further enhance INa-L due to calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of the Na+ channels. This paper is based on mathematical simulations using the O'Hara et al (2011) model of baseline or healthy human ventricular action potential waveforms(s) and its [Ca2+]i homeostasis mechanisms. Somewhat surprisingly, our results reveal only very small changes (≤ 1.5 mM) in [Na+]i even when INa-L is increased 5-fold and steady-state stimulation rate is approximately 2 times the normal human heart rate (i.e. 2 Hz). Previous work done using well-established models of the rabbit and human ventricular action potential in heart failure settings also reported little or no change in [Na+]i when INa-L was increased. Based on our simulations, the major short-term effect of markedly augmenting INa-L is a significant prolongation of the action potential and an associated increase in the likelihood of reactivation of the L-type Ca2+ current, ICa-L. Furthermore, this action potential prolongation does not contribute to [Na+]i increase.

  7. Changes in Intracellular Na+ following Enhancement of Late Na+ Current in Virtual Human Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Wayne R.

    2016-01-01

    The slowly inactivating or late Na+ current, INa-L, can contribute to the initiation of both atrial and ventricular rhythm disturbances in the human heart. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these pro-arrhythmic influences are not fully understood. At present, the major working hypothesis is that the Na+ influx corresponding to INa-L significantly increases intracellular Na+, [Na+]i; and the resulting reduction in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ reduces and (may reverse) Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These changes increase intracellular Ca2+, [Ca2+]i; which may further enhance INa-L due to calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of the Na+ channels. This paper is based on mathematical simulations using the O’Hara et al (2011) model of baseline or healthy human ventricular action potential waveforms(s) and its [Ca2+]i homeostasis mechanisms. Somewhat surprisingly, our results reveal only very small changes (≤ 1.5 mM) in [Na+]i even when INa-L is increased 5-fold and steady-state stimulation rate is approximately 2 times the normal human heart rate (i.e. 2 Hz). Previous work done using well-established models of the rabbit and human ventricular action potential in heart failure settings also reported little or no change in [Na+]i when INa-L was increased. Based on our simulations, the major short-term effect of markedly augmenting INa-L is a significant prolongation of the action potential and an associated increase in the likelihood of reactivation of the L-type Ca2+ current, ICa-L. Furthermore, this action potential prolongation does not contribute to [Na+]i increase. PMID:27875582

  8. Olanzapine inhibits proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent growth in human glioblastoma cell lines and enhances temozolomide's antiproliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Kast, Richard Eric; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Dwucet, Annika; Welscher, Nathalie; Nonnenmacher, Lisa; Hlavac, Michal; Siegelin, Markus David; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2015-03-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma fuels the search for more effective therapeutic compounds. We previously hypothesised that the neuroleptic olanzapine may enhance antineoplastic effects of temozolomide the standard chemotherapeutic agent used in this disease. This study tested this hypothesis. The anti-proliferative effect of olanzapine was examined by MTT assays and cell count analysis. Soft-agar assays were performed to examine colony-forming ability. In addition, the inhibitory effect of olanzapine on the migratory capacity of U87MG and A172 cells was analyzed by Transwell(®) assays. Moreover, staining for annexin V/propidium iodide or carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester was performed prior to flow cytometric analysis in order to better understand the subjacent cellular mechanism. Our initial hypothesis that olanzapine may enhance temozolomide's anti-tumor activity could be confirmed in U87MG and A172 glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, treatment with olanzapine alone resulted in a marked anti-proliferative effect on U87MG, A172 and two glioma stem-like cells with IC50 values ranging from 25 to 79.9 µM. In U87MG cells, anchorage-independent growth was dose-dependently inhibited. In A172 cells, migration was also shown to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, olanzapine was shown to exert a cell line-dependent pleomorphism with respect to the induction of apoptosis, necrosis and/or cytostasis. Our data show that the neuroleptic olanzapine enhances the anti-tumor activity of temozolomide against glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, this is the first study to show that olanzapine provides on its own anti-cancer activity in glioblastoma and thus may have potential for repurposing.

  9. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promote intracellular crawling of lymphocytes during recruitment: A new step in migration.

    PubMed

    Patten, Daniel A; Wilson, Garrick K; Bailey, Dalan; Shaw, Robert K; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Rot, Antal; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-01-01

    The recruitment of lymphocytes via the hepatic sinusoidal channels and positioning within liver tissue is a critical event in the development and persistence of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. The hepatic sinusoid is a unique vascular bed lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs), a functionally and phenotypically distinct subpopulation of endothelial cells. Using flow-based adhesion assays to study the migration of lymphocytes across primary human HSECs, we found that lymphocytes enter into HSECs, confirmed by electron microscopy demonstrating clear intracellular localization of lymphocytes in vitro and by studies in human liver tissues. Stimulation by interferon-γ increased intracellular localization of lymphocytes within HSECs. Furthermore, using confocal imaging and time-lapse recordings, we demonstrated "intracellular crawling" of lymphocytes entering into one endothelial cell from another. This required the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and stabilin-1 and was facilitated by the junctional complexes between HSECs.

  10. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  11. Establishment and genetic characterization of ANGM-CSS, a novel, immortal cell line derived from a human glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Notarangelo, Angelantonio; Trombetta, Domenico; D'Angelo, Vincenzo; Parrella, Paola; Palumbo, Orazio; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Impera, Luciana; Muscarella, Lucia Anna; La Torre, Antonella; Affuso, Andrea; Fazio, Vito Michele; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (World Health Organization, grade IV astrocytoma) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. We report a novel cell line, designated as ANGM-CSS, which was established from a 56-year-old male patient with a surgically removed glioblastoma multiforme. The ANGM-CSS cell line was established in vitro and characterized using histological and immunohistochemical staining, classical and molecular cytogenetic analyses, molecular studies and functional assays using a xenograft model in immunodeficient animals. ANGM-CSS was positive for CD133, nestin and vimentin proteins, whereas GFAP showed staining only in a fraction of the cells. Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis revealed a near-tetraploid karyotype, with a modal chromosome number from 88 to 91, and additional cytogenetic abnormalities, such as the t(6;14)(p12;q11.2), t(8;10)(q24.2;q21.1) and t(5;9)(q34;p21) unbalanced translocations. Moreover, ANGM-CSS showed amplification of the MET and EGFR genes whose overexpression was observed at the mRNA level. Interestingly, ANGM-CSS is tumorigenic when implanted in immunodeficient mice, and the cells obtained from the xenografts showed the same morphology and karyotype in vitro as the original cell line. ANGM-CSS represents a biologically relevant cell line to be used to investigate the molecular pathology of glioblastoma multiforme, also to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic drugs in vitro.

  12. Adenosine A3 receptor elicits chemoresistance mediated by multiple resistance-associated protein-1 in human glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Angelo; Vargas, Yosselyn; Uribe, Daniel; Jaramillo, Catherine; Gleisner, Alejandra; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; López, Mercedes N; Melo, Rómulo; Oyarzún, Carlos; San Martín, Rody; Quezada, Claudia

    2016-10-11

    MRP1 transporter correlates positively with glioma malignancy and the Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) phenotype in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). Evidence shows that the MRP1 transporter is controlled by the adenosine signalling axis. The aim of this study was to identify the role of adenosine on the MDR phenotype in Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells (GSCs), the cell population responsible for the tumorigenic and chemoresistance capabilities of this tumour. We found that GSCs have increased intrinsic capacity to generate extracellular adenosine, thus controlling MRP1 transporter expression and activity via activation of the adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR). We showed PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathways downstream A3AR to control MRP1 in GSCs. In vitro pharmacological blockade of A3AR had a chemosensitizing effect, enhancing the actions of antitumour drugs and decreasing cell viability and proliferation of GSCs. In addition, we produced an in vivo xenograft model by subcutaneous inoculation of human GSCs in NOD/SCID-IL2Rg null mice. Pharmacological blockade of A3AR generated a chemosensitizing effect, enhancing the effectiveness of the MRP1 transporter substrate, vincristine, reducing tumour size and the levels of CD44 and Nestin stem cell markers as well as the Ki-67 proliferation indicator. In conclusion, we demonstrated the chemosensitizing effect of A3AR blockade on GSCs.

  13. Cross-talk between Smad and p38 MAPK signalling in transforming growth factor {beta} signal transduction in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dziembowska, Magdalena; Danilkiewicz, Malgorzata; Wesolowska, Aleksandra; Zupanska, Agata; Chouaib, Salem; Kaminska, Bozena . E-mail: bozenakk@nencki.gov.pl

    2007-03-23

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-{beta}) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Malignant tumour cells often do not respond to TGF-{beta} by growth inhibition, but retain responsiveness to cytokine in regulating extracellular matrix deposition, cell adhesion, and migration. We demonstrated that TGF-{beta}1 does not affect viability or proliferation of human glioblastoma T98G, but increases transcriptional responses exemplified by induction of MMP-9 expression. TGF-{beta} receptors were functional in T98G glioblastoma cells leading to SMAD3/SMAD4 nuclear translocation and activation of SMAD-dependent promoter. In parallel, a selective activation of p38 MAPK, and phosphorylation of its substrates: ATF2 and c-Jun proteins were followed by a transient activation of AP-1 transcription factor. Surprisingly, an inhibition of p38 MAPK with a specific inhibitor, SB202190, abolished TGF-inducible activation of Smad-dependent promoter and decreased Smad2 phosphorylation. It suggests an unexpected interaction between Smad and p38 MAPK pathways in TGF-{beta}1-induced signalling.

  14. Adenosine A3 receptor elicits chemoresistance mediated by multiple resistance-associated protein-1 in human glioblastoma stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Angelo; Vargas, Yosselyn; Uribe, Daniel; Jaramillo, Catherine; Gleisner, Alejandra; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; López, Mercedes N.; Melo, Rómulo; Oyarzún, Carlos; Martín, Rody San; Quezada, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    MRP1 transporter correlates positively with glioma malignancy and the Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) phenotype in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). Evidence shows that the MRP1 transporter is controlled by the adenosine signalling axis. The aim of this study was to identify the role of adenosine on the MDR phenotype in Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells (GSCs), the cell population responsible for the tumorigenic and chemoresistance capabilities of this tumour. We found that GSCs have increased intrinsic capacity to generate extracellular adenosine, thus controlling MRP1 transporter expression and activity via activation of the adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR). We showed PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathways downstream A3AR to control MRP1 in GSCs. In vitro pharmacological blockade of A3AR had a chemosensitizing effect, enhancing the actions of antitumour drugs and decreasing cell viability and proliferation of GSCs. In addition, we produced an in vivo xenograft model by subcutaneous inoculation of human GSCs in NOD/SCID-IL2Rg null mice. Pharmacological blockade of A3AR generated a chemosensitizing effect, enhancing the effectiveness of the MRP1 transporter substrate, vincristine, reducing tumour size and the levels of CD44 and Nestin stem cell markers as well as the Ki-67 proliferation indicator. In conclusion, we demonstrated the chemosensitizing effect of A3AR blockade on GSCs. PMID:27634913

  15. Rapid intracellular release of calcium in human platelets by stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Erne, P.; Pletscher, A.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ( [Ca2+]i) in human blood platelets was measured by use of the fluorescent probe quin-2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of Ca2+ in the medium. The [Ca2+]i-rise was less marked in the absence of Ca2+ and could be antagonized by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate-hydrochloride (TMB-8), an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores. 5-HT induced a shape change reaction in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, but the pEC50 of 5-HT was slightly higher in the presence of the cation. Shape change reaction and [Ca2+]i-rise showed similar time courses. Various 5-HT-agonists caused a rise of [Ca2+]i, whereas 5-HT-antagonists, but not the 5-HT-uptake inhibitor desmethylimipramine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, counteracted the 5-HT-induced rise of the cation in a stereospecific manner. The antagonists were more potent than the agonists. The orders of potencies of the drugs affecting [Ca2+]i and platelet shape were similar. It is concluded that stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors of platelets causes a rapid release of intracellular calcium which, by activation of the contractile system, mediates the shape change reaction. PMID:3156650

  16. Influence of Acanthamoeba castellanii on intracellular growth of different Legionella species in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Neumeister, B; Reiff, G; Faigle, M; Dietz, K; Northoff, H; Lang, F

    2000-03-01

    Previous studies using a murine model of coinhalation of Legionella pneumophila and Hartmannella vermiformis have shown a significantly enhanced intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in comparison to inhalation of legionellae alone (J. Brieland, M. McClain, L. Heath, C. Chrisp, G. Huffnagle, M. LeGendre, M. Hurley, J. Fantone, and C. Engleberg, Infect. Immun. 64:2449-2456, 1996). In this study, we introduce an in vitro coculture model of legionellae, Mono Mac 6 cells (MM6) and Acanthamoeba castellanii, using a cell culture chamber system which separates both cell types by a microporous polycarbonate membrane impervious to bacteria, amoebae, and human cells. Whereas L. pneumophila has shown a maximal 4-log-unit multiplication within MM6, which could not be further increased by coculture with Acanthamoeba castellanii, significantly enhanced replication of L. gormanii, L. micdadei, L. steigerwaltii, L. longbeachae, and L. dumoffii was seen after coculture with amoebae. This effect was seen only with uninfected amoebae, not with Legionella-infected amoebae. The supporting effect for intracellular multiplication in MM6 could be reproduced in part by addition of a cell-free coculture supernatant obtained from a coincubation experiment with uninfected A. castellanii and Legionella-infected MM6, suggesting that amoeba-derived effector molecules are involved in this phenomenon. This coculture model allows investigations of molecular and biochemical mechanisms which are responsible for the enhancement of intracellular multiplication of legionellae in monocytic cells after interaction with amoebae.

  17. Intracellular localization of human cytidine deaminase. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Somasekaram, A; Jarmuz, A; How, A; Scott, J; Navaratnam, N

    1999-10-01

    The cytidine deaminases belong to the family of multisubunit enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of their substrate to a corresponding uracil product. They play a major role in pyrimidine nucleoside and nucleotide salvage. The intracellular distribution of cytidine deaminase and related enzymes has previously been considered to be cytosolic. Here we show that human cytidine deaminase (HCDA) is present in the nucleus. A highly specific, affinity purified polyclonal antibody against HCDA was used to analyze the intracellular localization of native HCDA in a variety of mammalian cells by in situ immunochemistry. Native HCDA was found to be present in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm in several cell types. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated a predominantly nuclear localization of FLAG-tagged HCDA overexpressed in these cells. We have identified an amino-terminal bipartite nuclear localization signal that is both necessary and sufficient to direct HCDA and a non-nuclear reporter protein to the nucleus. We also show HCDA binding to the nuclear import receptor, importin alpha. Similar putative bipartite nuclear localization sequences are found in other cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminases. The results presented here suggest that the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway may operate in the nucleus. This localization may have implications in the regulation of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  18. Quantitative subcellular imaging of boron compounds in individual mitotic and interphase human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Tjarks, W; Lorey, D R; Barth, R F

    2008-01-01

    Boron measurements at subcellular scale are essential in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer as the nuclear localization of boron-10 atoms can enhance the effectiveness of killing individual tumour cells. Since tumours contain a heterogeneous population of cells in interphase as well as in the M phase (mitotic division) of the cell cycle, it is important to evaluate the subcellular distribution of boron in both phases. In this work, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging technique of ion microscopy was used to quantitatively image boron from two BNCT agents, clinically used p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 3-[4-(o-carboran-1-yl)butyl]thymidine (N4), in mitotic metaphase and interphase human glioblastoma T98G cells. N4 belongs to a class of experimental BNCT agents, designated 3-carboranyl thymidine analogues (3CTAs), which presumably accumulate selectively in cancer cells due to a process referred to as kinase-mediated trapping (KMT). The cells were exposed to BPA for 1 h and N4 for 2 h. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing isotopic images with 500 nm spatial resolution was used in the study. Observations were made in cryogenically prepared fast frozen, and freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Three discernible subcellular regions were studied: the nucleus, a characteristic mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region, and the remaining cytoplasm in interphase T98G cells. In metaphase cells, the chromosomes and the cytoplasm were studied for boron localization. Intracellular concentrations of potassium and sodium also were measured in each cell in which the subcellular boron concentrations were imaged. Since the healthy cells maintain a K/Na ratio of approximately 10 due to the presence of Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells, these measurements provided validation for cryogenic sample preparation and indicated the analysis healthy, well preserved cells. The BPA-treated interphase

  19. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  20. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T

    2016-02-22

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects.

  1. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  2. Intracellular acidification-induced alkali metal cation/H+ exchange in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment of isolated human neutrophils (resting pHi congruent to 7.25 at pHo 7.40) with 30 mM NH4Cl for 30 min leads to an intracellular acidification (pHi congruen to 6.60) when the NH4Cl prepulse is removed. Thereafter, in 140 mM Na+ medium, pHi recovers exponentially with time (initial rate, approximately 0.12 pH/min) to reach the normal resting pHi by approximately 20 min, a process that is accomplished mainly, if not exclusively, though an exchange of internal H+ for external Na+. This Na+/H+ countertransport is stimulated by external Na+ (Km congruent to 21 mM) and by external Li+ (Km congruent to 14 mM), though the maximal transport rate for Na+ is about twice that for Li+. Both Na+ and Li+ compete as substrates for the same translocation sites on the exchange carrier. Other alkali metal cations, such as K+, Rb+, or Cs+, do not promote pHi recovery, owing to an apparent lack of affinity for the carrier. The exchange system is unaffected by ouabain or furosemide, but can be competitively inhibited by the diuretic amiloride (Ki congruent to 8 microM). The influx of Na+ or Li+ is accompanied by an equivalent counter-reflux of H+, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for the exchange reaction, a finding consistent with the lack of voltage sensitivity (i.e., electroneutrality) of pHi recovery. These studies indicate that the predominant mechanism in human neutrophils for pHi regulation after intracellular acidification is an amiloride-sensitive alkali metal cation/H+ exchange that shares a number of important features with similar recovery processes in a variety of other mammalian cell types. PMID:3694176

  3. Actions of serum and plasma albumin on intracellular Ca2+ in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, E; Nadal, A; Jacob, R; McNaughton, P

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of serum and plasma albumin on [Ca2+]i in human endothelial cells were examined using single-cell Ca2+ imaging. Two types of endothelial cell were used: human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in primary culture, and the endothelial-derived cell line ECV304. 2. Serum albumin caused a large and transient rise in [Ca2+]i, due to Ca2+ release from an IP3-sensitive internal store, followed by a maintained elevation in [Ca2+]i attributable to Ca2+ influx from the external medium. A half-maximal rise in [Ca2+]i was produced by a concentration of serum albumin of about 1 microgram ml-1. 3. The Ca(2+)-releasing action of serum albumin is abolished by methanol extraction and is therefore attributable to an attached polar lipid. A possible candidate is lysophosphatidic acid, known to be released from platelets during blood coagulation, which produced similar effects to those of serum albumin. 4. In HUVEC, plasma albumin caused a sustained decrease in [Ca2+]i from the mean resting level of 114 nM to 58 nM. No effect of plasma albumin was observed in ECV304 cells. 5. The decrease in [Ca2+]i caused by plasma albumin is due to an uptake into intracellular stores. The store loading substantially potentiates the action of Ca(2+)-releasing agonists such as histamine. 6. The results show that normal plasma albumin, which carries few lipids, lowers [Ca2+]i and potentiates the actions of Ca(2+)-releasing agonists by promoting Ca2+ uptake into intracellular stores. When converted to the serum form, by binding lysophosphatidic acid released during blood coagulation, albumin has a potent effect in elevating [Ca2+]i. Blood coagulation may therefore play a role in regulating vascular tone and capillary permeability. PMID:9365906

  4. Electrogenic Binding of Intracellular Cations Defines a Kinetic Decision Point in the Transport Cycle of the Human Serotonin Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The plasmalemmal monoamine transporters clear the extracellular space from their cognate substrates and sustain cellular monoamine stores even during neuronal activity. In some instances, however, the transporters enter a substrate-exchange mode, which results in release of intracellular substrate. Understanding what determines the switch between these two transport modes demands time-resolved measurements of intracellular (co-)substrate binding and release. Here, we report an electrophysiological investigation of intracellular solute-binding to the human serotonin transporter (SERT) expressed in HEK-293 cells. We measured currents induced by rapid application of serotonin employing varying intracellular (co-)substrate concentrations and interpreted the data using kinetic modeling. Our measurements revealed that the induction of the substrate-exchange mode depends on both voltage and intracellular Na+ concentrations because intracellular Na+ release occurs before serotonin release and is highly electrogenic. This voltage dependence was blunted by electrogenic binding of intracellular K+ and, notably, also H+. In addition, our data suggest that Cl− is bound to SERT during the entire catalytic cycle. Our experiments, therefore, document an essential role of electrogenic binding of K+ or of H+ to the inward-facing conformation of SERT in (i) cancelling out the electrogenic nature of intracellular Na+ release and (ii) in selecting the forward-transport over the substrate-exchange mode. Finally, the kinetics of intracellular Na+ release and K+ (or H+) binding result in a voltage-independent rate-limiting step where SERT may return to the outward-facing state in a KCl- or HCl-bound form. PMID:27756841

  5. Concurrent therapy to enhance radiotherapeutic outcomes in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most fatal and incurable human cancers characterized by nuclear atypia, mitotic activity, intense microvascular proliferation and necrosis. The current standard of care includes maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). The prognosis remains poor with median survival of 14.6 months with RT plus TMZ. Majority will have a recurrence within 2 years from diagnosis despite adequate treatment. Radiosensitizers, radiotherapy dose escalation and altered fractionation have failed to improve outcome. The molecular biology of glioblastoma is complex and poses treatment challenges. High rate of mutation, genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, rapid development of resistance, existence of blood-brain barrier (BBB), multiple intracellular and intercellular signalling pathways, over-expression of growth factor receptors, angiogenesis and antigenic diversity renders the tumor cells differentially susceptible to various treatment modalities. Thus, the treatment strategies require personalised or individualized approach based on the characteristics of tumor. Several targeted agents have been evaluated in clinical trials but the results have been modest despite these advancements. This review summarizes the current standard of care, results of concurrent chemoradiation trials, evolving innovative treatments that use targeted therapy with standard chemoradiation or RT alone, outcome of various recent trials and future outlook. PMID:26904576

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Intracellular Spies: Quantitative Real-Time Measurement of Intracellular Parameters In Vivo during Interaction of the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus with Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbi, Sara; Erfurth, Florian; Hennersdorf, Philipp; Brakhage, Axel A.; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technique based on the combination of classical spectroscopy and conventional digital image processing. It is also well suited for the biological assays and quantitative real-time analysis since it provides spectral and spatial data of samples. The method grants detailed information about a sample by recording the entire spectrum in each pixel of the whole image. We applied HSI to quantify the constituent pH variation in a single infected apoptotic monocyte as a model system. Previously, we showed that the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus conidia interfere with the acidification of phagolysosomes. Here, we extended this finding to monocytes and gained a more detailed analysis of this process. Our data indicate that melanised A. fumigatus conidia have the ability to interfere with apoptosis in human monocytes as they enable the apoptotic cell to recover from mitochondrial acidification and to continue with the cell cycle. We also showed that this ability of A. fumigatus is dependent on the presence of melanin, since a non-pigmented mutant did not stop the progression of apoptosis and consequently, the cell did not recover from the acidic pH. By conducting the current research based on the HSI, we could measure the intracellular pH in an apoptotic infected human monocyte and show the pattern of pH variation during 35 h of measurements. As a conclusion, we showed the importance of melanin for determining the fate of intracellular pH in a single apoptotic cell. PMID:27727286

  7. UVB radiation induces an increase in intracellular zinc in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Martorano, Lisa M; Li, Yang V

    2010-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage and apoptotic cell death; however, many details of these malign mechanism have yet to be elucidated. In this study, the exposure of adult human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) with UVB (>100 mJ/cm(2)) resulted in the significant increase of intracellular zinc that was released from its storage and was detected by fluorescent zinc indicators. Toxicity testing revealed that UVB-induced zinc release in HEKa is associated with HEKa cell death. Cells that showed elevated intracellular zinc fluorescence upon UVB exposure were also stained by propidium iodide (PI), a traditional viability indicator whose fluorescent signal is as a result of its intercalating with DNA fragments and is unaffected by zinc concentration, showing significant colocalization [Pearson's correlation coefficients r=0.956 (n=6)]. The cytotoxicity of zinc was also determined by an MTT assay after applying the exogenous zinc (ZnCl2) along with its ionophore pyrithione (20 microM) into HEKa culture medium. A significant reduction in cell viability as a function of both zinc concentration and exposure time was observed. The treatments of 1, 10 and 100 microM ZnCl2 with pyrithione demonstrated 2.3, 60 and 84% cell deaths, respectively (control 0.5%) after 30 min. ZnCl2 (100 microM) was also found to induce complete HEKa death after 1 h. Thus, the present study demonstrates that UVB irradiation-induced increased zinc is detrimental to HEKa viability, and zinc may be a necessary step in UVB-induced cell death signaling pathways.

  8. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  9. Role of intracellular Ca2+ signal in the ascorbate-induced apoptosis in a human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Soo

    2004-12-01

    Although ascorbate (vitamin C) has been shown to have anti-cancer actions, its effect on human hepatoma cells has not yet been investigated, and thus, the exact mechanism of this action is not fully understood. In this study, the mechanism by which ascorbate induces apoptosis using HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells is investigated. Ascorbate induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner in the cells, was assessed through flow cytometric analysis. Contrary to expectation, ascorbate did not alter the cellular redox status, and treatment with antioxidants (N-acetyl cysteine and N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine) had no influence on the ascorbate-induced apoptosis. However, ascorbate induced a rapid and sustained increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. EGTA, an extracellular Ca2+ chelator did not significantly alter the ascorbate-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase and apoptosis, whereas dantrolene, an intracellular Ca2+ release blocker, completely blocked these actions of ascorbate. In addition, phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitors (U-73122 and manoalide) significantly suppressed the intracellular Ca2+ release and apoptosis induced by ascorbate. Collectively, these results suggest that ascorbate induced apoptosis without changes in the cellular redox status in HepG2 cells, and that the PLC-coupled intracellular Ca2+ release mechanism may mediate ascorbate-induced apoptosis.

  10. Nanotechnology applications for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nduom, Edjah K; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Hadjipanayis, Costas G

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma remains one of the most difficult cancers to treat and represents the most common primary malignancy of the brain. Although conventional treatments have found modest success in reducing the initial tumor burden, infiltrating cancer cells beyond the main mass are responsible for tumor recurrence and ultimate patient demise. Targeting residual infiltrating cancer cells requires the development of new treatment strategies. The emerging field of cancer nanotechnology holds promise in the use of multifunctional nanoparticles for imaging and targeted therapy of glioblastoma. This article examines the current state of nanotechnology in the treatment of glioblastoma and directions of further study.

  11. Dual effects of mastoparan on intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, N.; Ishimoto, H.; Mizuno, K.; Ohizumi, Y.; Nakanishi, H.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of mastoparan, a wasp venom toxin, on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was examined in human astrocytoma cells. Mastoparan inhibited [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol (100 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, consistent with our previous results showing that mastoparan inhibits phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells. 2. In contrast, mastoparan itself increased [Ca2+]i and augmented carbachol-induced increase in the [Ca2+]i in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that mastoparan elicited Ca2+ influx from the extracellular medium. The increase appeared to be maximum at extracellular Ca2+ concentrations of 0.1-0.2 mM. The higher concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ depressed the influx. 3. Pertussis toxin did not affect mastoparan-induced inhibition of [Ca2+]i in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, consistent with the previous results that pertussis toxin did not affect mastoparan-induced inhibition of phosphoinositide hydrolysis. 4. Pertussis toxin augmented mastoparan-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that pertussis toxin substrate(s) seems to be inhibitory for Ca2+ influx induced by mastoparan. 5. Verapamil, nifedipine and diltiazem (each 10 microM), L-type Ca2+ antagonists, did not affect mastoparan-induced Ca2+ influx. However, verapamil (10 microM) slightly inhibited the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol in the presence of mastoparan. 6. The results obtained in the present study indicate that mastoparan has two opposite effects on [Ca2+]i in human astrocytoma cells and possibly has at least two sites of action. PMID:8032654

  12. Luteinizing hormone modulates intracellular calcium, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and motility during human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Aideé S; González-González, María E; Mata-Martínez, Esperanza; Larrea, Fernando; Treviño, Claudia L; Chirinos, Mayel

    2017-02-05

    In order to fertilize, spermatozoa must undergo physiological and biochemical changes during their transit along the female reproductive tract before reaching and fusing with the oocyte, process known as capacitation. Sperm modifications associated with capacitation are modulated by their interaction with molecules present in the female reproductive tract. During the woman fertile window, some reproductive hormones reach their maximum concentrations in serum, such as the luteinizing hormone (LH). Since spermatozoa preparing to fertilize may be exposed to LH, the purpose of this work was to study the effects of this hormone on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), protein tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm motility and acrosome reaction under capacitating conditions. The results showed that LH increases the duration and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. Furthermore, motility analysis indicated that LH decreases rapid progressive motility and that sperm hyperactivation as well as several kinetic parameters augment in the presence of 0.5 and 1 μg/ml of the hormone. In addition, these two hormone concentrations also consistently promoted protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, no effects on acrosome reaction were observed. In conclusion, the evidence indicates that LH modulates several sperm function variables involved in capacitation, suggesting that may have an important and unexplored role during human fertilization.

  13. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation.

  14. Intracellular delivery of dendrimer triamcinolone acetonide conjugates into microglial and human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Oh, Yumin; Lutty, Gerard A.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2016-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent, intermediate-acting, steroid that has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activity. Intravitreal administration of TA has been used for diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the hydrophobicity, lack of solubility, and the side effects limit its effectiveness in the treatment of retinal diseases. In this study, we explore a PAMAM dendrimer-TA conjugate (D-TA) as a potential strategy to improve intracellular delivery and efficacy of TA to target cells. The conjugates were prepared with a high drug payload (~21%) and were readily soluble in saline. Compared to free TA, D-TA demonstrated a significantly improved toxicity profile in two important target [microglial and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)] cells. The D-TA was ~100-fold more effective than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity (measured in microglia), and in suppressing VEGF production (in hypoxic RPE cells). Dendrimer-based delivery may improve the efficacy of TA towards both its key targets of inflammation and VEGF production, with significant clinical implications. PMID:25701805

  15. Lactate modulates the intracellular pH sensitivity of human TREK1 channels.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Swagata; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Tissue acidosis and high lactate concentrations are associated with cerebral ischaemia. The degree of acidosis is dependent on circulating glucose concentration, hyperglycaemia being associated with increased acidosis. Among other agents, lactate and protons have been shown to activate the leak potassium channel; TREK1 (TWIK related potassium channel 1) from the intracellular side and its increased activity is implicated in tolerance towards ischaemic cell damage. In the present study, we show that ischaemic concentrations of lactate (30 mM) at pH 7.0 and 6.5, commonly observed during ischemia, cause robust potentiation of human TREK1 (hTREK1) activity at single-channel level in cell-free inside-out membrane patches, while 30 mM lactate at pH 6.0 to 5.5, commonly observed during hyperglycaemic ischemia, reduces hTREK1 channel activity significantly. The biphasic effect of 30 mM lactate (ischaemic concentrations) on modulation of hTREK1 by varying pH conditions is specific since basal concentrations of lactate (3 mM) and 30 mM pyruvate at pH 7.0 and 5.5 failed to show similar effect as lactate. Experiments with deletion and point mutants of hTREK1 channel suggest that lactate changes the pH modulation of hTREK1 by interacting differently with the histidine residue at 328th position (H328) above and below its pKa (∼6.0) in the intracellular carboxyl-terminal domain of TREK1. This lactate-induced pH modulation of hTREK1 is absent in C-terminal deletion mutant, CTDΔ100, and is similar in E321A-hTREK1 mutant as in wild-type hTREK1 suggesting that it is independent of pH-sensitive glutamate residue at 321st position. Such a differential pH-dependent effect of lactate on an ion channel function has not been reported earlier and has important implications in different stages of ischaemia.

  16. Secondary Lymphoid Organ Homing Phenotype of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Disrupted by an Intracellular Oral Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Zakhary, Ibrahim; El-Awady, Ahmed; Scisci, Elizabeth; Carrion, Julio; O'Neill, John C.; Rawlings, Aaron; Stern, J. Kobi; Susin, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including a key etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, infect blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). This infection results in pathogen dissemination to distant inflammatory sites (i.e., pathogen trafficking). The alteration in chemokine-chemokine receptor expression that contributes to this pathogen trafficking function, particularly toward sites of neovascularization in humans, is unclear. To investigate this, we utilized human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and primary endothelial cells in vitro, combined with ex vivo-isolated blood mDCs and serum from chronic periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. Our results, using conditional fimbria mutants of P. gingivalis, show that P. gingivalis infection of MoDCs induces an angiogenic migratory profile. This profile is enhanced by expression of DC-SIGN on MoDCs and minor mfa-1 fimbriae on P. gingivalis and is evidenced by robust upregulation of CXCR4, but not secondary lymphoid organ (SLO)-homing CCR7. This disruption of SLO-homing capacity in response to respective chemokines closely matches surface expression of CXCR4 and CCR7 and is consistent with directed MoDC migration through an endothelial monolayer. Ex vivo-isolated mDCs from the blood of chronic periodontitis subjects, but not healthy controls, expressed a similar migratory profile; moreover, sera from chronic periodontitis subjects expressed elevated levels of CXCL12. Overall, we conclude that P. gingivalis actively “commandeers” DCs by reprogramming the chemokine receptor profile, thus disrupting SLO homing, while driving migration toward inflammatory vascular sites. PMID:24126519

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis Evasion of Autophagy and Intracellular Killing by Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B.; Palani, Chithra D.; Arce, Roger M.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Genco, Caroline A.; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V.; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs. PMID:25679217

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis evasion of autophagy and intracellular killing by human myeloid dendritic cells involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 crosstalk.

    PubMed

    El-Awady, Ahmed R; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B; Palani, Chithra D; Arce, Roger M; Waller, Jennifer L; Genco, Caroline A; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V; Cutler, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs.

  19. The potential origin of glioblastoma initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Chesler, David A.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive clinical and laboratory research and effort, Glioblastoma remains the most common and invariably lethal primary cancer of the central nervous system. The identification of stem cell and lineage-restricted progenitor cell populations within the adult human brain in conjunction with the discovery of stem-like cells derived from gliomas which are themselves tumorigenic and have been shown to have properties of self-renewal and multipotency, has led to the hypothesis that this population of cells may represent glioma initiating cells. Extensive research characterizing the anatomic distribution and phenotype of neural stem cells in the adult brain, and the genetic underpinnings needed for malignant transformation may ultimately lead to the identification of the cellular origin for glioblastoma. Defining the cellular origin of this lethal disease may ultimately provide new therapeutic targets and modalities finally altering an otherwise bleak outcome for patients with glioblastoma. PMID:22202053

  20. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH. PMID:28255266

  1. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  2. Increased level of H19 long noncoding RNA promotes invasion, angiogenesis, and stemness of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaochun; Yan, Yukui; Hu, Minghua; Chen, Xiande; Wang, Yaxian; Dai, Yi; Wu, Degang; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Xia, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Increased levels of H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) have been observed in many cancers, suggesting that overexpression of H19 may be important in the development of carcinogenesis. However, the role of H19 in human glioblastoma is still unclear. The object of this study was to examine the level of H19 in glioblastoma samples and investigate the role of H19 in glioblastoma carcinogenesis. METHODS Glioblastoma and nontumor brain tissue specimens were obtained from tissue obtained during tumor resection in 30 patients with glioblastoma. The level of H19 lncRNA was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The role of H19 in invasion, angiogenesis, and stemness of glioblastoma cells was then investigated using commercially produced cell lines (U87 and U373). The effects of H19 overexpression on glioblastoma cell invasion and angiogenesis were detected by in vitro Matrigel invasion and endothelial tube formation assay. The effects of H19 on glioblastoma cell stemness and tumorigenicity were investigated by neurosphere formation and an in vivo murine xenograft model. RESULTS The authors found that H19 is significantly overexpressed in glioblastoma tissues, and the level of expression was associated with patient survival. In the subsequent investigations, the authors found that overexpression of H19 promotes glioblastoma cell invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Interestingly, H19 was also significantly overexpressed in CD133(+) glioblastoma cells, and overexpression of H19 was associated with increased neurosphere formation of glioblastoma cells. Finally, stable overexpression of H19 was associated with increased tumor growth in the murine xenograft model. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that increased expression of H19 lncRNA promotes invasion, angiogenesis, stemness, and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that H19 plays an important role in tumorigenicity and

  3. Radiosensitisation by pharmacological ascorbate in glioblastoma multiforme cells, human glial cells, and HUVECs depends on their antioxidant and DNA repair capabilities and is not cancer specific.

    PubMed

    Castro, M Leticia; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that 5 mM ascorbate radiosensitized early passage radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells derived from one patient tumor. Here we investigate the sensitivity of a panel of cell lines to 5 mM ascorbate and 6 Gy ionizing radiation, made up of three primary human GBM cells, three GBM cell lines, a human glial cell line, and primary human vascular endothelial cells. The response of different cells lines to ascorbate and/or radiation was determined by measuring viability, colony-forming ability, generation and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs), cell cycle progression, antioxidant capacity and generation of reactive oxygen species. Individually, radiation and ascorbate both decreased viability and clonogenicity by inducing DNA damage, but had differential effects on cell cycle progression. Radiation led to G2/M arrest in most cells whereas ascorbate caused accumulation in S phase, which was moderately associated with poor DSB repair. While high dose ascorbate radiosensitized all cell lines in clonogenic assays, the sensitivity to radiation, high dose ascorbate, and combined treatment varied between cell lines. Normal glial cells were similar to GBM cells with respect to free radical scavenging potential and effect of treatment on DNA damage and repair, viability, and clonogenicity. Both GBM cells and normal cells coped equally poorly with oxidative stress caused by radiation and/or high dose ascorbate, dependent primarily on their antioxidant and DSB repair capacity.

  4. Heat and exercise acclimation increases intracellular levels of Hsp72 and inhibits exercise-induced increase in intracellular and plasma Hsp72 in humans.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Passos, Renata L Freitas; Fonseca, Michele Atalla; Oliveira, Kenya Paula Moreira; Lima, Milene Rodrigues Malheiros; Guimarães, Juliana Bohen; Ferreira-Júnior, João Batista; Martini, Angelo R P; Lima, Nilo R V; Soares, Danusa Dias; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro

    2010-11-01

    In order to verify the effects of heat and exercise acclimation (HA) on resting and exercise-induced expression of plasma and leukocyte heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) in humans, nine healthy young male volunteers (25.0 ± 0.7 years; 80.5 ± 2.0 kg; 180 ± 2 cm, mean ± SE) exercised for 60 min in a hot, dry environment (40 ± 0°C and 45 ± 0% relative humidity) for 11 days. The protocol consisted of running on a treadmill using a controlled hyperthermia technique in which the work rate was adjusted to elevate the rectal temperature by 1°C in 30 min and maintain it elevated for another 30 min. Before and after the HA, the volunteers performed a heat stress test (HST) at 50% of their individual maximal power output for 90 min in the same environment. Blood was drawn before (REST), immediately after (POST) and 1 h after (1 h POST) HST, and plasma and leukocytes were separated and stored. Subjects showed expected adaptations to HA: reduced exercise rectal and mean skin temperatures and heart rate, and augmented sweat rate and exercise tolerance. In HST1, plasma Hsp72 increased from REST to POST and then returned to resting values 1 h POST (REST: 1.11 ± 0.07, POST: 1.48 ± 0.10, 1 h POST: 1.22 ± 0.11 ng mL(-1); p < 0.05). In HST2, there was no change in plasma Hsp72 (REST: 0.94 ± 0.08, POST: 1.20 ± 0.15, 1 h POST: 1.17 ± 0.16 ng mL(-1); p > 0.05). HA increased resting levels of intracellular Hsp72 (HST1: 1 ± 0.02 and HST2: 4.2 ± 1.2 density units, p < 0.05). Exercise-induced increased intracellular Hsp72 expression was observed on HST1 (HST1: REST, 1 ± 0.02 vs. POST, 2.9 ± 0.9 density units, mean ± SE, p < 0.05) but was inhibited on HST2 (HST2: REST, 4.2 ± 1.2 vs. POST, 4.4 ± 1.1 density units, p > 0.05). Regression analysis showed that the lower the pre-exercise expression of intracellular Hsp72, the higher the exercise-induced increase (R = -0.85, p

  5. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promote intracellular crawling of lymphocytes during recruitment- a new step in migration

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Daniel A.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Bailey, Dalan; Shaw, Robert K.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Rot, Antal; Weston, Christopher J.; Adams, David H.; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-01-01

    The recruitment of lymphocytes via the hepatic sinusoidal channels and positioning within liver tissue is a critical event in the development and persistence of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. The hepatic sinusoid is a unique vascular bed lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSEC), a functionally and phenotypically distinct sub-population of endothelial cells. Using flow based adhesion assays to study the migration of lymphocytes across primary human HSEC, we found that lymphocytes enter into HSEC, confirmed by electron microscopy demonstrating clear intracellular localization of lymphocytes in vitro and by studies in human liver tissues. Stimulation by interferon gamma increased intracellular localization of lymphocytes within HSECs. Furthermore using confocal imaging and time-lapse recordings we demonstrated ‘intracellular crawling’ of lymphocytes entering into one endothelial cell from another. This required the expression of ICAM-1 and stabilin-1 and was facilitated by the junctional complexes between HSEC. Conclusion: We demonstrate a new step in lymphocyte migration which is facilitated by the unique structure of HSEC. We believe ‘intracellular crawling’ contributes to optimal lymphocyte positioning in liver tissue during chronic hepatitis. PMID:27770554

  6. Intracellular scFvs against the viral E6 oncoprotein provoke apoptosis in human papillomavirus-positive cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Magali; Boulade-Ladame, Charlotte; Mailly, Laurent; Weiss, Etienne; Orfanoudakis, Georges; Deryckere, Francois . E-mail: francois.deryckere@esbs.u-strasbg.fr

    2007-09-21

    The E6 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 (16E6) is involved in the tumorigenesis of human cervical cells by targeting numerous cellular proteins. We have designed a strategy for neutralizing 16E6 based on the intracellular expression of single-chain Fv antibodies (scFvs) specific to 16E6. Recombinant adenovirus vectors were constructed to allow expression of two 16E6-binding scFvs and one 16E6-non-binding scFv in HPV16-positive and -negative cells. Expression of the scFvs provoked two types of effects: (i) inhibition of proliferation of all cell lines tested, this aspecific toxicity being likely due to the aggregation of unfolded scFvs; and (ii) apoptosis observed only in HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell lines after expression of 16E6-binding scFvs, this specific effect being proportional to the intracellular solubility of the scFvs. These data demonstrate the feasibility of intracellular immunization with anti-16E6 scFvs and highlight the importance of the solubility of the intracellular antibodies.

  7. Annexin A2 and S100A10 Regulate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Entry and Intracellular Trafficking in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dziduszko, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause benign and malignant tumors of the mucosal and cutaneous epithelium. The initial events regulating HPV infection impact the establishment of viral persistence, which is requisite for malignant progression of HPV-infected lesions. However, the precise mechanisms involved in HPV entry into host cells, including the cellular factors regulating virus uptake, are not clearly defined. We show that HPV16 exposure to human keratinocytes initiates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent Src protein kinase activation that results in phosphorylation and extracellular translocation of annexin A2 (AnxA2). HPV16 particles interact with AnxA2 in association with S100A10 as a heterotetramer at the cell surface in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and the interaction appears to involve heparan-sulfonated proteoglycans. We show multiple lines of evidence that this interaction promotes virus uptake into host cells. An antibody to AnxA2 prevents HPV16 internalization, whereas an antibody to S100A10 blocks infection at a late endosomal/lysosomal site. These results suggest that AnxA2 and S100A10 have separate roles during HPV16 binding, entry, and trafficking. Our data additionally imply that AnxA2 and S100A10 may be involved in regulating the intracellular trafficking of virus particles prior to nuclear delivery of the viral genome. PMID:23637395

  8. Annexin A2 and S100A10 regulate human papillomavirus type 16 entry and intracellular trafficking in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dziduszko, Agnieszka; Ozbun, Michelle A

    2013-07-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause benign and malignant tumors of the mucosal and cutaneous epithelium. The initial events regulating HPV infection impact the establishment of viral persistence, which is requisite for malignant progression of HPV-infected lesions. However, the precise mechanisms involved in HPV entry into host cells, including the cellular factors regulating virus uptake, are not clearly defined. We show that HPV16 exposure to human keratinocytes initiates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent Src protein kinase activation that results in phosphorylation and extracellular translocation of annexin A2 (AnxA2). HPV16 particles interact with AnxA2 in association with S100A10 as a heterotetramer at the cell surface in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and the interaction appears to involve heparan-sulfonated proteoglycans. We show multiple lines of evidence that this interaction promotes virus uptake into host cells. An antibody to AnxA2 prevents HPV16 internalization, whereas an antibody to S100A10 blocks infection at a late endosomal/lysosomal site. These results suggest that AnxA2 and S100A10 have separate roles during HPV16 binding, entry, and trafficking. Our data additionally imply that AnxA2 and S100A10 may be involved in regulating the intracellular trafficking of virus particles prior to nuclear delivery of the viral genome.

  9. Intracellular Ca2+ signals in human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cells (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Squires, P E; Amiranoff, B; Dunne, M J

    1994-10-01

    Single-cell microfluorimetry techniques have been used to examine the effects of acetylcholine (0.1-100 microM) on the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cell line, QGP-1N. When applied to the bath solution, acetylcholine was found to evoke a marked and rapid increase in [Ca2+]i at all concentrations tested. These responses were either sustained, or associated with the generation of complex patterns of [Ca2+]i transients. Overall, the pattern of response was concentration related. In general, 0.1-10 microM acetylcholine initiated a series of repetitive oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+, whilst at higher concentrations the responses consisted of a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i followed by a smaller more sustained increase. Without external Ca2+, 100 microM acetylcholine caused only a transient rise in [Ca2+]i, whereas lower concentrations of the agonist were able to initiate, but not maintain, [Ca2+]i oscillations. Acetylcholine-evoked Ca2+ signals were abolished by atropine (1-10 microM), verapamil (100 microM) and caffeine (20 mM). Nifedipine failed to have any significant effect upon agonist-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, whilst 50 mM KCl, used to depolarise the cell membrane, only elicited a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Ryanodine (50-500 nM) and caffeine (1-20 mM) did not increase basal Ca2+ levels, but the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-hydroquinone (TBQ) and thapsigargin both elevated [Ca2+]i levels. These data demonstrate for the first time cytosolic Ca2+ signals in single isolated somatostatin-secreting cells of the pancreas. We have demonstrated that acetylcholine will evoke both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilisation, and we have partially addressed the subcellular mechanism responsible for these events.

  10. A Dual Role for the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase Pyk2 during the Intracellular Trafficking of Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Elinor Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infectious process of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has been studied considerably, and many cellular components required for viral entry and trafficking continue to be revealed. In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during HPV16 pseudovirion infection of human keratinocytes. We found that Pyk2 is necessary for infection and appears to be involved in the intracellular trafficking of the virus. Small interfering RNA-mediated reduction of Pyk2 resulted in a significant decrease in infection but did not prevent viral entry at the plasma membrane. Pyk2 depletion resulted in altered endolysosomal trafficking of HPV16 and accelerated unfolding of the viral capsid. Furthermore, we observed retention of the HPV16 pseudogenome in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in Pyk2-depleted cells, suggesting that the kinase could be required for the viral DNA to exit the TGN. While Pyk2 has previously been shown to function during the entry of enveloped viruses at the plasma membrane, the kinase has not yet been implicated in the intracellular trafficking of a nonenveloped virus such as HPV. Additionally, these data enrich the current literature on Pyk2's function in human keratinocytes. IMPORTANCE In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of human skin cells. Infections with high-risk types of HPV such as HPV16 are the leading cause of cervical cancer and a major cause of genital and oropharyngeal cancer. As a nonenveloped virus, HPV enters cells by interacting with cellular receptors and established cellular trafficking routes to ensure that the viral DNA reaches the nucleus for productive infection. This study identified Pyk2 as a cellular component required for the intracellular trafficking of HPV16 during infection. Understanding the infectious pathways of HPVs is critical for developing additional preventive therapies. Furthermore, this study

  11. Establishment and partial characterization of a human tumor cell line, GBM-HSF, from a glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jiagui; Rizak, Joshua D; Fan, Yaodong; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Li, Jiejing; Huma, Tanzeel; Ma, Yuanye

    2014-07-01

    This paper outlines the establishment of a new and stable cell line, designated GBM-HSF, from a malignant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) removed from a 65-year-old Chinese woman. This cell line has been grown for 1 year without disruption and has been passaged over 50 times. The cells were adherently cultured in RPMI-1640 media with 10% fetal bovine serum supplementation. Cells displayed spindle and polygonal morphology, and displayed multi-layered growth without evidence of contact inhibition. The cell line had a high growth rate with a doubling time of 51 h. The cells were able to grow without adhering to the culture plates, and 4.5% of the total cells formed colonies in soft agar. The cell line has also been found to form tumors in nude mice and to be of a highly invasive nature. The cells were also partially characterized with RT-PCR. The RT-PCR revealed that Nestin, β-tubulin III, Map2, Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and CD26 were positively transcribed, whereas GFAP, Rex1, and CD133 were negatively transcribed in this cell line. These results suggest that the GBM-HSF cell line will provide a good model to study the properties of cancer stem cells and metastasis. It will also facilitate more detailed molecular and cellular studies of GBM cell division and pathology.

  12. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  13. PPARα Antagonist AA452 Triggers Metabolic Reprogramming and Increases Sensitivity to Radiation Therapy in Human Glioblastoma Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; d'Angelo, Michele; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Laezza, Chiara; Antonosante, Andrea; Panella, Gloria; Cinque, Benedetta; Cristiano, Loredana; Dhez, Anne Chloè; Astarita, Carlo; Galzio, Renato; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Amoroso, Rosa; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2017-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common cancer in the brain and with an increasing incidence. Despite major advances in the field, there is no curative therapy for GB to date. Many solid tumors, including GB, experienced metabolic reprogramming in order to sustain uncontrolled proliferation, hypoxic conditions, and angiogenesis. PPARs, member of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily, are particularly involved in the control of energetic metabolism, particularly lipid metabolism, which has been reported deregulated in gliomas. PPARα was previously indicated by us as a potential therapeutic target for this neoplasm, due to the malignancy grade dependency of its expression, being particularly abundant in GB. In this work, we used a new PPARα antagonist on patient-derived GB primary cells, with particular focus on the effects on lipid metabolism and response to radiotherapy. The results obtained demonstrated that blocking PPARα results in cell death induction, increase of radiosensitivity, and decrease of migration. Therefore, AA452 is proposed as a new adjuvant for the gold standard therapies for GB, opening the possibility for preclinical and clinical trials for this class of compounds. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1458-1466, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inflammatory landscape of human brain tumors reveals an NFκB dependent cytokine pathway associated with mesenchymal glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Klafke, Karina; de Souza, Priscila Oliveira; Dillenburg, Fabiane Cristine; Carro, Luigi; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment is being increasingly recognized as a key factor in cancer aggressiveness. In this study, we characterized the inflammatory gene signatures altered in glioma cell lines and tumor specimens of differing histological and molecular subtypes. The results showed that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) shows upregulation of a subset of inflammatory genes when compared to astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. With molecular subtypes of GBM, the expression of inflammatory genes is heterogeneous, being enriched in mesenchymal and downregulated in Proneural/GCIMP. Other inflammation-associated processes such as tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) signatures are upregulated in mesenchymal, and a subset of 33 mesenchymal-enriched inflammatory and TAM markers showed correlation with poor survival. We found that various GBM tumor-upregulated genes such as IL6, IL8 and CCL2 are also actively expressed in glioma cell lines, playing differential and cooperative roles in promoting proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and macrophage polarization in vitro. These genes can be stimulated by pathways typically altered in GBM, including the EGFR, PDGFR, MEK1/2-ERK1/2, PI3K/Akt and NFκB cascades. Taken together, the results presented herein depict some inflammatory pathways altered in gliomas and highlight potentially relevant targets to therapy improvement.

  15. Development of an Intracellular Screen for New Compounds Able To Inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Flavia; Gonzalez del Rio, Ruben; Zheng, Xingji; Presa Matilla, Jesus; Torres Gomez, Pedro; Martinez Hoyos, Maria; Perez Herran, Maria Esther; Mendoza Losana, Alfonso; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2015-10-26

    Here we describe the development and validation of an intracellular high-throughput screening assay for finding new antituberculosis compounds active in human macrophages. The assay consists of a luciferase-based primary identification assay, followed by a green fluorescent protein-based secondary profiling assay. Standard tuberculosis drugs and 158 previously recognized active antimycobacterial compounds were used to evaluate assay robustness. Data show that the assay developed is a short and valuable tool for the discovery of new antimycobacterial compounds.

  16. P2X7 Receptor Regulates Internalization of Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 by Human Macrophages That Promotes Intracellular Pathogen Clearance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao; Basavarajappa, Devaraj; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Wan, Min

    2015-08-01

    Bioactive peptide LL-37/hCAP18, the only human member of the cathelicidin family, plays important roles in killing various pathogens, as well as in immune modulation. We demonstrate that LL-37 is internalized by human macrophages in a time-, dose-, temperature-, and peptide sequence-dependent endocytotic process. Both clathrin- and caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis pathways are involved in LL-37 internalization. We find that the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role in LL-37 internalization by human macrophages because significantly less internalized LL-37 was detected in macrophages pretreated with P2X7R antagonists or, more specifically, in differentiated THP-1 cells in which the P2X7R gene had been silenced. Furthermore, this P2X7R-mediated LL-37 internalization is primarily connected to the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. In addition, our results demonstrate that internalized LL-37 traffics to endosomes and lysosomes and contributes to intracellular clearance of bacteria by human macrophages, coinciding with increased reactive oxygen species and lysosome formation. Finally, we show that human macrophages have the potential to import LL-37 released from activated human neutrophils. In conclusion, our study unveils a novel mechanism by which human macrophages internalize antimicrobial peptides to improve their intracellular pathogen clearance.

  17. An Image-Based High-Content Screening Assay for Compounds Targeting Intracellular Leishmania donovani Amastigotes in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gyongseon; Lee, Changbok; Moon, Hong Kee; Chatelain, Eric; Genovesio, Auguste; Cechetto, Jonathan; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a tropical disease threatening 350 million people from endemic regions. The available drugs for treatment are inadequate, with limitations such as serious side effects, parasite resistance or high cost. Driven by this need for new drugs, we developed a high-content, high-throughput image-based screening assay targeting the intracellular amastigote stage of different species of Leishmania in infected human macrophages. The in vitro infection protocol was adapted to a 384-well-plate format, enabling acquisition of a large amount of readouts by automated confocal microscopy. The reading method was based on DNA staining and required the development of a customized algorithm to analyze the images, which enabled the use of non-modified parasites. The automated analysis generated parameters used to quantify compound activity, including infection ratio as well as the number of intracellular amastigote parasites and yielded cytotoxicity information based on the number of host cells. Comparison of this assay with one that used the promastigote form to screen 26,500 compounds showed that 50% of the hits selected against the intracellular amastigote were not selected in the promastigote screening. These data corroborate the idea that the intracellular amastigote form of the parasite is the most appropriate to be used in primary screening assay for Leishmania. PMID:22720099

  18. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-03

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD(+) or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD(+)/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD(+) and NADH contents and the NAD(+)/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD(+), total NAD contents, and NAD(+)/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ.

  19. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca(2+) with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca(2+) signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca(2+) level could be induced by applying a high-K(+) solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca(2+) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na(+) channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca(2+) oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na(+) channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca(2+) oscillations are discussed.

  20. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  1. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD+ or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD+/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD+-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD+ and NADH contents and the NAD+/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD+, total NAD contents, and NAD+/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ. PMID:25730862

  2. Biotransport and intracellular ice formation phenomena in freezing human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunpeng; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Ding, Weiping; Shu, Zhiquan; Gao, Dayong

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the cryobiological characteristics of human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. The cell membrane hydraulic conductivity (L(pg)) and the activation energy of water transport (E(Lp)) were determined in the absence/presence of cryoprotectant agent (CPA), while the nucleation rate kinetic and thermodynamic parameters (Ωo(SCN) and κo(SCN)) were determined in the absence of CPA. Since dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) are two factors that may cause damage to cells during the freezing process, systematical freezing experiments were carried out at different cooling rates (5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60°C/min) under the commercial available cryomicroscopy (FDCS 196, Linkham, Waterfield, UK) to further explore the cryoinjury mechanism for HEK293T cells. By simultaneously fitting the water transport equation to the experimentally measured volumetric shrinkage data at 5, 10, and 15°C/min, the "combined best fit" membrane permeability parameters for HEK293T cells in both phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and CPA media (0.75M Me2SO in PBS) are determined. They are L(pg)=2.85×10(-14)m/s/Pa (0.17μm/min/atm), E(Lp)=142.91kJ/mol (34.13kcal/mol) (R(2)=0.990), and L(pg)[cpa]=2.73±0.44×10(-14)m/s/Pa (0.16±0.03μm/min/atm), E(Lp)[cpa]=152.52±27.69kJ/mol (36.42±6.61kcal/mol) (R(2)=0.993), respectively. An optimal cooling rate B(opt) (the highest cooling rate without IIF) was determined to be 14.24°C/min in the absence of CPA. Additionally, the ice nucleation parameters (Ωo(SCN) and κo(SCN)) were averaged to be 1.31±0.11×10(8)m(-2)s(-1) and 7.67±2.55×10(9)K(5) for the cooling rates 20, 30, and 60°C/min.

  3. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor stimulation in human colonic epithelial cells induces intracellular calcium oscillations and proliferation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rey, Osvaldo; Young, Steven H; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Moyer, Mary P; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    The extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) is increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions in the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. However, the signaling mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. Here we examined signaling pathways activated by the CaR, including Ca(2+) oscillations, in individual human colon epithelial cells. Single cell imaging of colon-derived cells expressing the CaR, including SW-480, HT-29, and NCM-460 cells, shows that stimulation of this receptor by addition of aromatic amino acids or by an elevation of the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration promoted striking intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to extracellular Ca(2+) were of sinusoidal pattern and mediated by the phospholipase C/diacylglycerol/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway as revealed by a biosensor that detects the accumulation of diacylglycerol in the plasma membrane. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to aromatic amino acids were of transient type, that is, Ca(2+) spikes that returned to baseline levels, and required an intact actin cytoskeleton, a functional Rho, Filamin A and the ion channel TRPC1. Further analysis showed that re-expression and stimulation of the CaR in human epithelial cells derived from normal colon and from colorectal adenocarcinoma inhibits their proliferation. This inhibition was associated with the activation of the signaling pathway that mediates the generation of sinusoidal, but not transient, intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. Thus, these results indicate that the CaR can function in two signaling modes in human colonic epithelial cells offering a potential link between gastrointestinal responses and food/nutrients uptake and metabolism.

  4. Computational identification of tumor anatomic location associated with survival in two large cohorts of human primary glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiffany T.; Achrol, Achal S.; Mitchell, Lex A.; Du, William A.; Loya, Joshua J.; Rodriguez, Scott A.; Feroze, Abdullah; Westbroek, Erick M.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Tumor location has been shown to be a significant prognostic factor in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). The purpose of this study is to characterize GBM lesions by identifying MRI voxel-based tumor location features that are associated with tumor molecular profiles, patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods Preoperative T1 anatomic MR images of 384 GBM patients were obtained from two independent cohorts (N=253 from our local (name withheld to preserve anonymity) Medical Center for training and N=131 from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) for validation). An automated computational image analysis pipeline was developed to determine the anatomic locations of tumor in each patient. Voxel-based differences in tumor location between good (overall survival (OS) > 17 months) and poor (OS < 11 months) survival groups identified in the training cohort were used to classify patients in the TCGA cohort into two brain location groups, for which clinical features, mRNA expression, and copy number changes were compared to elucidate the biological basis of tumors located in different brain regions. Results Tumors in the right occipito-temporal periventricular white matter were significantly associated with poor survival in both training and test cohorts (both log-rank P < 0.05) and had larger tumor volume compared to tumors in other locations. Tumors in the right peri-atrial location were associated with hypoxia pathway enrichment and PDGFRA amplification, making them potential targets for subgroup-specific therapies. Conclusion Voxel-based location in GBM is associated with patient outcome and may have a potential role for guiding personalized treatment. PMID:26744442

  5. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3′-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  6. Hydrogen sulfide generation from l-cysteine in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG and neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja; Bentke, Anna; Wróbel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is endogenously synthesized from l-cysteine in reactions catalyzed by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22) and gamma-cystathionase (CSE, EC 4.4.1.1). The role of 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST, EC 2.8.1.2) in H2S generation is also considered; it could be important for tissues with low CTH activity, e.g. cells of the nervous system. The expression and activity of CBS, CTH, and MPST were detected in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma (U-87 MG) and neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. In both cell lines, the expression and activity of MPST were the highest among the investigated enzymes, suggesting its possible role in the generation of H2S. The RP-HPLC method was used to determine the concentration of cystathionine and alpha-ketobutyrate, products of the CBS- and CTH-catalyzed reactions. The difference in cystathionine levels between cell homogenates treated with totally CTH-inhibiting concentrations of dl-propargylglycine and without the inhibitor was used to evaluate the activity of CBS. The higher expression and activity of CBS, CTH and MPST in the neuroblastoma cells were associated with more intensive generation of H2S in the presence of 2 mM cysteine. A threefold higher level of sulfane sulfur, a potential source of hydrogen sulfide, was detected in the astrocytoma cells in comparison to the neuroblastoma cells.

  7. MiR224-3p inhibits hypoxia-induced autophagy by targeting autophagy-related genes in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xing; Xue, Hao; Guo, Xiaofan; Gao, Xiao; Xu, Shugang; Yan, Shaofeng; Han, Xiao; Li, Tong; Shen, Jie; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant solid tumor characterized by severe hypoxia. Autophagy plays a protective role in cancer cells under hypoxia. However, the microRNA (miRNA)-related molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-reduced autophagy remain poorly understood in GBM. In this study, we performed a miRNA microarray analysis on GBM cells and found that numerous miRNAs were differentially expressed under hypoxic conditions. Further research showed that miR224-3p, one of the significantly down-regulated miRNAs, was involved in regulating hypoxia-induced autophagy in GBM cells. Overexpression of miR224-3p abolished hypoxia-induced autophagy, whereas knocking down endogenous miR224-3p increased autophagic activity under normoxia. In addition, we demonstrated that miR224-3p inhibited autophagy by directly suppressing the expression of two autophagy-related genes (ATGs), ATG5 and FAK family-interacting protein of 200 kDa (FIP200). Furthermore, in vitro, miR224-3p attenuated cell proliferation and promoted hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and in vivo, overexpression of miR224-3p inhibited tumorigenesis of GBM cells. Collectively, our study identified a novel hypoxia-down-regulated miRNA, miR224-3p, as a key modulator of autophagy by inhibiting ATGs in GBM cells. PMID:26536662

  8. Trichloroethylene-mediated cytotoxicity in human epidermal keratinocytes is mediated by the rapid accumulation of intracellular calcium: Interception by naringenin.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Khan, A Q; Khan, R; Sultana, S

    2016-02-01

    Industrial solvents pose a significant threat to the humankind. The mechanisms of their toxicity still remain in debate. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread industrial solvent responsible for severe liver dysfunction, cutaneous toxicity in occupationally exposed humans. We utilized an in vitro system of human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells in this study to avoid complex cell and extracellular interactions. We report the cytotoxicity of organic solvent TCE in HaCaT and its reversal by a natural flavanone, naringenin (Nar). The cytotoxicity was attributed to the rapid intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+)) release, which might lead to the elevation of protein kinase C along with robust free radical generation, instability due to energy depletion, and sensitization of intracellular stress signal transducer nuclear factor κB. These effects were actually seen to induce significant amount of genomic DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, all these effects of TCE were effectively reversed by the treatment of Nar, a natural flavanone. Our studies identify intracellular Ca as a unique target used by organic solvents in the cytotoxicity and highlight the Ca(2+) ion stabilizer properties of Nar.

  9. Angiogenesis and expression of PDGF-C, VEGF, CD105 and HIF-1α in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Clara, Carlos Afonso; Marie, Suely K N; de Almeida, José Reynaldo Walther; Wakamatsu, Alda; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Uno, Miyuki; Neville, Munro; Rosemberg, Sérgio

    2014-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most frequent and aggressive brain tumor, is characterized by marked angiogenesis directly related to invasiveness and poor prognosis. Hypoxia is considered to be an important stimulus for angiogenesis by inducing hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) overexpression that activates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and VEGF. The aim of this study is to analyze the expression of PDGF-C, VEGF in endothelial and tumor cells of GBM and their relation to HIF-1α expression. Two hundred and eight GBM cases were studied by tissue microarray immunohistochemical preparation. Expression of HIF-1α, VEGF and PDGF-C was observed in 184 (88.5%), 131 (63%) and 160 (76.9%) tumor cases, respectively. The numbers of vessels were quantified by CD34, PDGF-C, VEGF and CD105 staining, and were in median 20, 16, 5 and 6, respectively. The GBMs that showed positive or negative expression for HIF-1α showed a median vascular density of 30 and 14, respectively, for CD34 (P < 0.015). Positive expression for HIF-1α was correlated with VEGF and PDGF-C expression in tumors (P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between VEGF and PDGF-C expression in the cytoplasm of GBM tumor cells (P < 0.0001). We showed that VEGF expression in tumor cells was correlated with its expression in blood vessels (P < 0.0001). Endothelial cells with PDGF-C and VEGF positive expression were also positive for CD105 and their nuclei for Ki-67, confirming the neoangiogenic and proliferative influence of VEGF and PDGF-C. VEGF nuclear staining in tumor cells (P = 0.002) as well as nuclear staining for HIF-1α and VEGF (P = 0.005) correlated with survival. In summary, our present findings of the concomitant upregulation of PDGF-C with VEGF in GBM tumor cells and vessels further reinforce the benefit of using combined anti-angiogenic approaches to potentially improve the therapeutic response for GBM.

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression Modulates Antitumor Efficacy of Vandetanib or Cediranib Combined With Radiotherapy in Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsberger, Phyllis R.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Liu Yi; Daroczi, Borbala; Xu Xia; Dicker, Adam P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of radiation therapy (RT) combined with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) vandetanib (antiepidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] plus antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor [anti-VEGFR]) and cediranib (anti-VEGFR) to inhibit glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) growth. A secondary aim was to investigate how this regimen is modulated by tumor EGFR expression. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic cell survival assay. VEGF secretion was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GBM (U87MG wild-type EGFR [wtEGFR] and U87MG EGFR-null) xenografts were treated with vandetanib, cediranib, and RT, alone or in combinations. Excised tumor sections were stained for proliferative and survival biomarkers. Results: In vitro, U87MG wtEGFR and U87 EGFR-null cells had similar growth kinetics. Neither TKI affected clonogenic cell survival following RT. However, in vivo, exogenous overexpression of wtEGFR decreased tumor doubling time (T2x) in U87MG xenografts (2.70 vs. 4.41 days for U87MG wtEGFR vs. U87MG vector, respectively). In U87MG EGFR-null cells, TKI combined with radiation was no better than radiation therapy alone. In U87MG wtEGFR, RT in combination with vandetanib (but not with cediranib) significantly increased tumor T2x compared with RT alone (T2x, 10.4 days vs. 4.8 days; p < 0.001). In vivo, growth delay correlated with suppression of pAkt, survivin, and Ki67 expression in tumor samples. The presence of EGFR augmented RT-stimulated VEGF release; this effect was inhibited by vandetanib. Conclusions: EGFR expression promoted tumor growth in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting a microenvironmental effect. GBM xenografts expressing EGFR exhibited greater sensitivity to both cediranib and vandetanib than EGFR-null tumors. Hence EGFR status plays a major role in determining a tumor's in vivo response to radiation combined with TKI, supporting a 'personalized' approach to

  11. Glibenclamide induces apoptosis through inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, J A; Kang, Y S; Lee, S H; Lee, E H; Yoo, B H; Lee, Y S

    1999-08-11

    Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels, induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells. Glibenclamide increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which was significantly inhibited by Ca(2+) release blockers dantrolene and TMB-8. BAPTA/AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, and the Ca(2+) release blockers significantly inhibited glibenclamide-induced apoptosis. Glibanclamide also increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration, which was significantly blocked by CFTR Cl(-) channel activators levamisole and bromotetramisole. These activators also significantly inhibited both intracellular Ca(2+) release and apoptosis induced by glibenclamide. The expression of CFTR protein in the cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results suggest that glibenclamide induced apoptosis through inhibition of CFTR Cl(-) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release and that this protein may be a good target for treatment of human hepatomas.

  12. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Re, Michelle; Pampillo, Macarena; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; McArdle, Craig A; Millar, Robert P; Conn, P Michael; Gobeil, Fernand; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Babwah, Andy V

    2010-07-08

    The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME). Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  13. Intracellular free zinc and zinc buffering in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Simons, T J

    1991-07-01

    Zn2+ has been allowed to equilibrate across the red cell membrane using two agents that increase membrane permeability to this ion: the ionophore A23187 and the specific carrier ethylmaltol. Extracellular free Zn2+ was controlled with EGTA (1,2-di(2-aminoethoxy)ethane-NNN'N'tetra-acetic acid] buffers, except in the case of ethylmaltol, which itself acts as a buffer. Measurement of cellular zinc content at different levels of free Zn2+ facilitated the study of intracellular Zn2+ binding. It was also possible to estimate intracellular free Zn2+ concentration in untreated cells using a "null-point" technique. Intracellular zinc was found to consist of an inexchangeable component of about 129 mumol/10(13) cells and an exchangeable component of 6.7 +/- 1.5 mumol/10(13) cells, with a free concentration of about 2.4 x 10(-11) M. The main component of Zn2+ buffering is hemoglobin, with a dissociation constant of about 2 x 10(-8) M.

  14. Catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase isoform IX is displayed both extra- and intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Klier, Michael; Jamali, Somayeh; Ames, Samantha; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    Most carbonic anhydrases catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, either as soluble cytosolic enzymes, in or at intracellular organelles, or at the extracellular face of the cell membrane as membrane-anchored proteins. Carbonic anhydrase isoform IX (CA IX), a membrane-bound enzyme with catalytic activity at the extracellular membrane surface, has come to prominence in recent years because of its association with hypoxic tissue, particularly tumours, often indicating poor prognosis. We have evaluated the catalytic activity of CA IX heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by measuring the amplitude and rate of cytosolic pH changes as well as pH changes at the outer membrane surface (pHs ) during addition and removal of 5% CO2 /25 mm HCO3-, and by mass spectrometry. Our results indicate both extracellular and intracellular catalytic activity of CA IX. Reduced rates of CO2 -dependent intracellular pH changes after knockdown of CA IX confirmed these findings in two breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our results demonstrate a new function of CA IX that may be important in the search for therapeutic cancer drugs targeting CA IX.

  15. Space Flight Effects on Intracellular Ions in Sublingual Cells of Non-Human Primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Dotsenko, R.; Fung, P.; Navidi, M.; Silver, B.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have used a novel technique that quantifies minerals and electrolytes from smears of sublingual cells by x-ray microanalysis to monitor metabolic changes in bed rest subjects. Increases in intracellular calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were characteristic of subjects whose exercise regimen was inadequate to maintain calcium metabolism. To test the effects of space flight on intracellular ions, we analyzed cells from 2-4 kg Rhesus monkeys before and after 2 weeks in space or chair restraint (CR). There were increases in sublingual cell Ca, P and K after space flight which paralleled the clinical estimates of metabolic status of the animals and exceeded the levels found during CR on R+11. Increases after 2 weeks CR were 26% in Ca, 6% in P and 29% in K. Species similarity ill responses of intracellular ions to inactivity imposed by bed rest, restraint or microgravity suggest that this innovative non-invasive technique would be a useful in-flight monitor of exercise countermeasures directed toward maintaining calcium balance.

  16. Regulation of transepithelial ion transport and intracellular calcium by extracellular ATP in human normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, S. J.; Paradiso, A. M.; Boucher, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    1 The role of extracellular nucleotides in regulation of ion transport activities (short circuit current, Isc) of human respiratory epithelia was studied. 2 Application of nucleotides to the apical or basolateral membrane of human nasal epithelium induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc. 3 The rank order of potency of purine- or pyrimidine-induced changes in Isc of normal human nasal epithelium when applied to the apical membrane (UTP greater than or equal to ATP greater than ATP gamma S greater than 2MeSATP greater than ADP beta S much greater than beta gamma MeATP greater than or equal to alpha beta MeATP) or basolateral membrane (2MeSATP greater than UTP greater than ATP greater than ATP gamma S greater than alpha beta MeATP greater than beta gamma MeATP) is consistent with involvement of a P2 purinoceptor. A similar rank order of potencies was observed for nucleotide effects on intracellular calcium measured by Fura-2 fluorescence using microspectrofluorimetry. 4 Similar nucleotide potency in the regulation of ion transport and intracellular calcium in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelium (UTP greater than or equal to ATP) was observed, suggesting purinoceptors might be used to stimulate ion transport processes that would promote hydration of airway secretions and facilitate their clearance from CF lungs. 5 These data provide evidence for the regulation of ion transport by P2 purinoceptors in normal and cystic fibrosis human airway epithelium. PMID:1718521

  17. The Cytoskeletal Adapter Protein Spinophilin Regulates Invadopodia Dynamics and Tumor Cell Invasion in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahiman; Avci, Naze G; Guerrero, Paola A; Tang, Leung K; Popp, Julia; Morales, John E; Chen, Zhihua; Carnero, Amancio; Lang, Frederick F; Ballif, Bryan A; Rivera, Gonzalo M; McCarty, Joseph H

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma is a primary brain cancer that is resistant to all treatment modalities. This resistance is due, in large part, to invasive cancer cells that disperse from the main tumor site, escape surgical resection, and contribute to recurrent secondary lesions. The adhesion and signaling mechanisms that drive glioblastoma cell invasion remain enigmatic, and as a result there are no effective anti-invasive clinical therapies. Here we have characterized a novel adhesion and signaling pathway comprised of the integrin αvβ8 and its intracellular binding partner, Spinophilin (Spn), which regulates glioblastoma cell invasion in the brain microenvironment. We show for the first time that Spn binds directly to the cytoplasmic domain of β8 integrin in glioblastoma cells. Genetically targeting Spn leads to enhanced invasive cell growth in preclinical models of glioblastoma. Spn regulates glioblastoma cell invasion by modulating the formation and dissolution of invadopodia. Spn-regulated invadopodia dynamics are dependent, in part, on proper spatiotemporal activation of the Rac1 GTPase. Glioblastoma cells that lack Spn showed diminished Rac1 activities, increased numbers of invadopodia, and enhanced extracellular matrix degradation. Collectively, these data identify Spn as a critical adhesion and signaling protein that is essential for modulating glioblastoma cell invasion in the brain microenvironment.

  18. Specificity of immunoglobulin M antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron by by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Bjornson, H S; Kitko, B P

    1980-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the specificity of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis 1365 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Purified normal human IgM was adsorbed with washed heat-killed cells of the homologous strains and heterologous strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from the homologous strains. Hypogammaglobulinemic serum was supplemented with the adsorbed IgM preparations, and the ability of the supplemented sera to support opsonophagocytosis and killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was measured in vitro under anaerobic conditions. Normal IgM adsorbed with heat-killed cells of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 or with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from these strains failed to restore the ability of hypogammaglobulinemic serum to support opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of the homologous strain. In contrast, adsorption of normal IgM with heat-killed cells of the heterologous strains did not alter its opsonophagocytosis-promoting activity for either test strain. These results indicated that the IgM antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 are directed against strain-specific antigenic determinants contained in the outer membrane complex. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6160104

  19. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lizarte, F.S.; Tirapelli, D.P.C.; Ambrosio, S.R.; Tirapelli, C.R.; Oliveira, F.M.; Novais, P.C.; Peria, F.M.; Oliveira, H.F.; Carlotti, C.G.; Tirapelli, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors. PMID:23314342

  20. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Lizarte Neto, F S; Tirapelli, D P C; Ambrosio, S R; Tirapelli, C R; Oliveira, F M; Novais, P C; Peria, F M; Oliveira, H F; Carlotti Junior, C G; Tirapelli, L F

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  1. Reduced intracellular oxidative metabolism promotes firm adhesion of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to vascular endothelium under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Montoya, M C; Luscinskas, F W; del Pozo, M A; Aragonés, J; de Landázuri, M O

    1997-08-01

    The interaction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with the vascular endothelium and their subsequent extravasation to the tissues is a key step during different physiological and pathological processes. In certain of these pathologies the oxygen tension becomes very low, leading to reduced cellular oxidative status. To evaluate the effect of lowering the intracellular redox status in the interaction of PMN with the endothelium, exposure to hypoxic conditions as well as treatment with different antioxidant agents was carried out. PMN exposure to hypoxia enhanced beta2 integrin-dependent adhesion to intercellular adhesion molecule-1-coated surfaces, concomitant with a decrease in the intracellular redox status of the cell. As occurs with hypoxia, treatment with antioxidants produced a decrease in the oxidation state of PMN. These agents enhanced adhesion of PMN to human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and this effect was also mediated by beta2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. Adhesion studies under defined laminar flow conditions showed that the antioxidant treatment induced an enhanced adhesion mediated by beta2 integrins with a decrease in the fraction of PMN rolling on TNF-alpha-activated endothelial cells. The up-regulated PMN adhesion was correlated to an increase in the expression and activation of integrin Mac-1, without loss of L-selectin surface expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that a reduction in the intracellular oxidative state produces an enhanced beta2 integrin-dependent adhesion of PMN to stimulated endothelial cells under conditions of flow.

  2. A novel exon in the human Ca2+-activated Cl- channel Ano1 imparts greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca2.

    PubMed

    Strege, Peter R; Bernard, Cheryl E; Mazzone, Amelia; Linden, David R; Beyder, Arthur; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-11-01

    Anoctamin 1 (Ano1; TMEM16A) is a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CACC) expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal. The mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates Ano1 are incompletely understood. In the gastrointestinal tract, Ano1 is required for normal slow wave activity and is involved in regulating cell proliferation. Splice variants of Ano1 have varying electrophysiological properties and altered expression in disease states. Recently, we identified a transcript for human Ano1 containing a novel exon-"exon 0" upstream of and in frame with exon 1. The electrophysiological properties of this longer Ano1 isoform are unknown. Our aim was to determine the functional contribution of the newly identified exon to the Ca(2+) sensitivity and electrophysiological properties of Ano1. Constructs with [Ano1(+0)] or without [Ano1(-0)] the newly identified exon were transfected into human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to determine voltage- and time-dependent parameters of whole cell Cl(-) currents between isoforms with varying concentrations of intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular anions, or Cl(-) channel inhibitors. We found that exon 0 did not change voltage sensitivity and had no impact on the relative permeability of Ano1 to most anions. Ano1(+0) exhibited greater changes in current density but lesser changes in kinetics than Ano1(-0) in response to varying intracellular Ca(2+). The CACC inhibitor niflumic acid inhibited current with greater efficacy and higher potency against Ano1(+0) compared with Ano1(-0). Likewise, the Ano1 inhibitor T16Ainh-A01 reduced Ano1(+0) more than Ano1(-0). In conclusion, human Ano1 containing exon 0 imparts its Cl(-) current with greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca(2+) and CACC inhibitors.

  3. A novel exon in the human Ca2+-activated Cl− channel Ano1 imparts greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Strege, Peter R.; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Mazzone, Amelia; Linden, David R.; Beyder, Arthur; Gibbons, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Anoctamin 1 (Ano1; TMEM16A) is a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CACC) expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal. The mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates Ano1 are incompletely understood. In the gastrointestinal tract, Ano1 is required for normal slow wave activity and is involved in regulating cell proliferation. Splice variants of Ano1 have varying electrophysiological properties and altered expression in disease states. Recently, we identified a transcript for human Ano1 containing a novel exon-“exon 0” upstream of and in frame with exon 1. The electrophysiological properties of this longer Ano1 isoform are unknown. Our aim was to determine the functional contribution of the newly identified exon to the Ca2+ sensitivity and electrophysiological properties of Ano1. Constructs with [Ano1(+0)] or without [Ano1(−0)] the newly identified exon were transfected into human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to determine voltage- and time-dependent parameters of whole cell Cl− currents between isoforms with varying concentrations of intracellular Ca2+, extracellular anions, or Cl− channel inhibitors. We found that exon 0 did not change voltage sensitivity and had no impact on the relative permeability of Ano1 to most anions. Ano1(+0) exhibited greater changes in current density but lesser changes in kinetics than Ano1(−0) in response to varying intracellular Ca2+. The CACC inhibitor niflumic acid inhibited current with greater efficacy and higher potency against Ano1(+0) compared with Ano1(−0). Likewise, the Ano1 inhibitor T16Ainh-A01 reduced Ano1(+0) more than Ano1(−0). In conclusion, human Ano1 containing exon 0 imparts its Cl− current with greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca2+ and CACC inhibitors. PMID:26359375

  4. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  5. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  6. An Epigenetic Biomarker Panel for Glioblastoma Multiforme Personalized Medicine through DNA Methylation Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-like Signature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan-Shu; Hood, Leroy; Tian, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alterations of DNA methylation occur during the course of both stem cell development and tumorigenesis. We present a novel strategy that can be used to stratify glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients through the epigenetic states of genes associated with human embryonic stem cell (hESC) identity in order to 1) assess linkages between the methylation signatures of these stem cell genes and survival of GBM patients, and 2) delineate putative mechanisms leading to poor prognosis in some patient subgroups. A DNA methylation signature was established for stratifying GBM patients into several hESC methylator subgroups. The hESC methylator-negative phenotype has demonstrated poor survival and upregulation of glioma stem cell (GSC) markers, and is enriched in one of the previously defined transcriptomic phenotypes—the mesenchymal phenotype. We further identified a refined signature of 36 genes as the gene panel, including SOX2, POU3F2, FGFR2, GAP43, NTRK2, NTRK3, and NKX2-2, which are highly enriched in the nervous system. Both signatures outperformed the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation test in predicting patient's outcome. These findings were also validated through an independent dataset of patients. Furthermore, through statistical analyses, both signatures were examined significantly. Hypomethylation of hESC-associated genes predicted poorer clinical outcome in GBM, supporting the idea that epigenetic activation of stem cell genes contributes to GBM aggression. The gene panel presented herein may be developed into clinical assays for patient stratification and future personalized medicine interventions. PMID:24601786

  7. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent.

  8. Alkylphospholipids deregulate cholesterol metabolism and induce cell-cycle arrest and autophagy in U-87 MG glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Martín-Fernández, Mario; Soria-Bretones, Isabel; Ríos, Antonio; Carrasco, María P; Marco, Carmen

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumour in adults and one of the most lethal of all cancers. Growing evidence suggests that human tumours undergo abnormal lipid metabolism, characterised by an alteration in the mechanisms that regulate cholesterol homeostasis. We have investigated the effect that different antitumoural alkylphospholipids (APLs) exert upon cholesterol metabolism in the U-87 MG glioblastoma cell line. APLs altered cholesterol homeostasis by interfering with its transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus hindering its esterification. At the same time they stimulated the synthesis of cholesterol from radiolabelled acetate and its internalisation from low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), inducing both 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and LDL receptor (LDLR) genes. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that these effects promoted the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol. Filipin staining demonstrated that this accumulation was not confined to the late endosome/lysosome (LE/LY) compartment since it did not colocalise with LAMP2 lysosomal marker. Furthermore, APLs inhibited cell growth, producing arrest at the G2/M phase. We also used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate ultrastructural alterations induced by APLs and found an abundant presence of autophagic vesicles and autolysosomes in treated cells, indicating the induction of autophagy. Thus our findings clearly demonstrate that antitumoural APLs interfere with the proliferation of the glioblastoma cell line via a complex mechanism involving cholesterol metabolism, cell-cycle arrest or autophagy. Knowledge of the interrelationship between these processes is fundamental to our understanding of tumoural response and may facilitate the development of novel therapeutics to improve treatment of glioblastoma and other types of cancer.

  9. Role of LIMP-2 in the intracellular trafficking of β-glucosidase in different human cellular models.

    PubMed

    Malini, Erika; Zampieri, Stefania; Deganuto, Marta; Romanello, Milena; Sechi, Annalisa; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Acid β-glucosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease (GD), is transported to lysosomes by the lysosomal integral membrane protein (LIMP)-2. In humans, LIMP-2 deficiency leads to action myoclonus-renal failure (AMRF) syndrome. GD and AMRF syndrome share some clinical features. However, they are different from clinical and biochemical points of view, suggesting that the role of LIMP-2 in the targeting of GCase would be different in different tissues. Besides, the role of LIMP-2 in the uptake and trafficking of the human recombinant (hr)GCase used in the treatment of GD is unknown. Thus, we compared GCase activity and intracellular localization in immortalized lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and a neuronal model derived from multipotent adult stem cells, from a patient with AMRF syndrome, patients with GD, and control subjects. In fibroblasts and neuronlike cells, GCase targeting to the lysosomes is completely dependent on LIMP-2, whereas in blood cells, GCase is partially targeted to lysosomes by a LIMP-2-independent mechanism. Although hrGCase cellular uptake is independent of LIMP-2, its trafficking to the lysosomes is mediated by this receptor. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the intracellular trafficking of GCase and in the pathogeneses of GD and AMRF syndrome.

  10. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  11. The involvement of hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human spinal glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deliang; Wang, Li; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Xinjun; Xiong, Hui

    2016-05-01

    To date, hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein (HPIP), a co-repressor for the transcription factor PBX, has been involved into the initiation and onset in a wide variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HPIP-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the spinal glioblastoma have been under investigation. In the present study, spinal glioblastoma tissues, U87, and U251 cell lines were used and subjected to in vitro assays, such as RT-PCR, and Western blot. Here, in vitro assays revealed that HPIP mRNA and protein were highly expressed in five cases of spinal glioblastoma tissues, compared with non-tumor tissues. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrated HPIP promoted the U87 and U251 cell growth and regulated the G1/S phase transitions in U87 and U251 cell cycle, respectively, accompanied by the increased expression of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1. Furthermore, HPIP increased the expression of N-cadherin, Slug, and MMP2, and decreased the expression of E-cadherin. By contrast, knockdown of HPIP reversed HPIP-induced EMT biomarkers, migration, and invasion in U87 and U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings identified HPIP plays an important role in the progression and EMT of spinal glioblastoma, by which cell growth is improved. Thus, HPIP gene or protein could act as a useful target in the clinical practice.

  12. Immunological Evasion in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Maldonado, Roxana; Chávez-Cortez, Elda Georgina; Olascoaga-Arellano, Nora Karen; López-Mejía, Mariana; Maldonado-Leal, Fernando Manuel; Sotelo, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive tumor in Central Nervous System in adults. Among its features, modulation of immune system stands out. Although immune system is capable of detecting and eliminating tumor cells mainly by cytotoxic T and NK cells, tumor microenvironment suppresses an effective response through recruitment of modulator cells such as regulatory T cells, monocyte-derived suppressor cells, M2 macrophages, and microglia as well as secretion of immunomodulators including IL-6, IL-10, CSF-1, TGF-β, and CCL2. Other mechanisms that induce immunosuppression include enzymes as indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase. For this reason it is important to develop new therapies that avoid this immune evasion to promote an effective response against glioblastoma. PMID:27294132

  13. Synthesis, structural characterization and effect on human granulocyte intracellular cAMP levels of abscisic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Bellotti, Marta; Salis, Annalisa; Grozio, Alessia; Damonte, Gianluca; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Galatini, Andrea; Zocchi, Elena; Benatti, Umberto; Millo, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), in addition to regulating physiological functions in plants, is also produced and released by several mammalian cell types, including human granulocytes, where it stimulates innate immune functions via an increase of the intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i). We synthesized several ABA analogs and evaluated the structure-activity relationship, by the systematical modification of selected regions of these analogs. The resulting molecules were tested for their ability to inhibit the ABA-induced increase of [cAMP]i in human granulocytes. The analogs with modified configurations at C-2' and C-3' abrogated the ABA-induced increase of the [cAMP]i and also inhibited several pro-inflammatory effects induced by exogenous ABA on granulocytes and monocytes. Accordingly, these analogs could be suitable as novel putative anti-inflammatory compounds.

  14. Intracellular colon cancer-associated Escherichia coli promote protumoral activities of human macrophages by inducing sustained COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Raisch, Jennifer; Rolhion, Nathalie; Dubois, Anaëlle; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Bringer, Marie-Agnès

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis has been reported in patients with colorectal cancer, and there is a high prevalence of Escherichia coli belonging to B2 phylogroup and producing a genotoxin, termed colibactin. Macrophages are one of the predominant tumor-infiltrating immune cells supporting key processes in tumor progression by producing protumoral factors such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Here, we investigated whether B2 E. coli colonizing colon tumors could influence protumoral activities of macrophages. In contrast to commensal or nonpathogenic E. coli strains that were efficiently and rapidly degraded by macrophages at 24 h after infection, colon cancer-associated E. coli were able to resist killing by human THP-1 macrophages, to replicate intracellularly, and to persist inside host cells until at least 72 h after infection. Significant increases in COX-2 expression were observed in macrophages infected with colon cancer E. coli compared with macrophages infected with commensal and nonpathogenic E. coli strains or uninfected cells at 72 h after infection. Induction of COX-2 expression required live bacteria and was not due to colibactin production, as similar COX-2 levels were observed in macrophages infected with the wild-type colon cancer-associated E. coli 11G5 strain or a clbQ mutant unable to produce colibactin. Treatment of macrophages with ofloxacin, an antibiotic with intracellular tropism, efficiently decreased the number of intracellular bacteria and suppressed bacteria-induced COX-2 expression. This study provides new insights into the understanding of how tumor- infiltrating bacteria could influence cancer progression through their interaction with immune cells. Manipulation of microbes associated with tumors could have a deep influence on the secretion of protumoral molecules by infiltrating macrophages.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation through EP4 receptor and intracellular cAMP in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L.; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. NLRP3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, due to mutations in the NLRP3 gene causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Here, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, while its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. PKA or Epac agonists did not mimic and their antagonists did not reverse PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. In addition, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of CAPS patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or siRNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator. PMID:25917098

  16. Cooperativity between MAPK and PI3K signaling activation is required for glioblastoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vitucci, Mark; Karpinich, Natalie O.; Bash, Ryan E.; Werneke, Andrea M.; Schmid, Ralf S.; White, Kristen K.; McNeill, Robert S.; Huff, Byron; Wang, Sophie; Van Dyke, Terry; Miller, C. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) genomes feature recurrent genetic alterations that dysregulate core intracellular signaling pathways, including the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint and the MAPK and PI3K effector arms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Elucidation of the phenotypic consequences of activated RTK effectors is required for the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Methods Genetically defined, G1/S checkpoint-defective cortical murine astrocytes with constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations were used to systematically investigate the individual and combined roles of these 2 RTK signaling effectors in phenotypic hallmarks of glioblastoma pathogenesis, including growth, migration, and invasion in vitro. A novel syngeneic orthotopic allograft model system was used to examine in vivo tumorigenesis. Results Constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations activated both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Their combination led to maximal growth, migration, and invasion of G1/S-defective astrocytes in vitro and produced progenitor-like transcriptomal profiles that mimic human proneural GBM. Activation of both RTK effector arms was required for in vivo tumorigenesis and produced highly invasive, proneural-like GBM. Conclusions These results suggest that cortical astrocytes can be transformed into GBM and that combined dysregulation of MAPK and PI3K signaling revert G1/S-defective astrocytes to a primitive gene expression state. This genetically-defined, immunocompetent model of proneural GBM will be useful for preclinical development of MAPK/PI3K-targeted, subtype-specific therapies. PMID:23814263

  17. Intracellular Loop 2 Peptides of the Human 5HT1a Receptor are Differential Activators of Gi

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brian; Squires, Carley; Parker, Keith K.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide mimics of intracellular loop 2 (ic2) of the human 5HT1a receptor have been studied with respect to their ability to inhibit agonist binding via interference with receptor-G-protein coupling. These peptides give shallow concentration-effect relationships. Additionally, these peptides have been studied with respect to their ability to trigger the signal transduction system of this Gi-coupled receptor. Two signaling parameters have been quantified: concentration of intracellular cAMP and changes in incorporation into the G protein of a stable analog of GTP. In both cases, peptide mimics near midloop of ic2 actually show agonist activity with efficacy falling off toward both loop termini near TM 3 and TM 4. Previous results have suggested that the loop region near the TM3/ic2 interface is primarily responsible for receptor-G-protein coupling, while the current result emphasizes the mid-ic2 loop region's ability to activate the G protein following initial coupling. A limited number of peptides from the receptor's TM5/ic3 loop vicinity were also studied regarding agonist inhibition and G-protein activation. These peptides provide additional evidence that the human 5HT1a receptor, TM5/ic3 loop region, is involved in both coupling and activation actions. Overall, these results provide further information about potential pharmacological intervention and drug development with respect to the human 5HT1a receptor/G-protein system. Finally, the structural evidence generated here provides testable models pending crystallization and X-ray analysis of the receptor. PMID:22649462

  18. Comparative Proteomics of Human Monkeypox and Vaccinia Intracellular Mature and Extracellular Enveloped Virions

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, Nathan P.; Estep, Ryan D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Clauss, Therese RW; Monroe, Matthew E.; Du, Xiuxia; Adkins, Joshua N.; Wong, Scott; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-07

    Orthopoxviruses are the largest and most complex of the animal viruses. In response to the recent emergence of monkeypox in Africa and the threat of smallpox bioterrorism, virulent (monkeypox virus) and benign (vaccinia virus) orthopoxviruses were proteomically compared with the goal of identifying proteins required for pathogenesis. Orthopoxviruses were grown in HeLa cells to two different viral forms (intracellular mature virus and extracellular enveloped virus), purified by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, denatured using RapiGest™ surfactant, and digested with trypsin. Unfractionated samples and strong cation exchange HPLC fractions were analyzed by reversed-phase LC-MS/MS, and analyses of the MS/MS spectra using SEQUEST® and X! Tandem resulted in the identification of hundreds of monkeypox, vaccinia, and copurified host proteins. The unfractionated samples were additionally analyzed by LC-MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap™, and the accurate mass and elution time tag approach was used to perform quantitative comparisons. Possible pathophysiological roles of differentially expressed orthopoxvirus genes are discussed.

  19. Fluoxetine suppresses calcium signaling in human T lymphocytes through depletion of intracellular calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Gobin, V; De Bock, M; Broeckx, B J G; Kiselinova, M; De Spiegelaere, W; Vandekerckhove, L; Van Steendam, K; Leybaert, L; Deforce, D

    2015-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, have recently been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Although the effects on cytokine secretion, proliferation and viability of T lymphocytes have been extensively characterized, little is known about the mechanism behind these effects. It is well known that Ca(2+) signaling is an important step in the signaling transduction pathway following T cell receptor activation. Therefore, we investigated if fluoxetine interferes with Ca(2+) signaling in Jurkat T lymphocytes. Fluoxetine was found to suppress Ca(2+) signaling in response to T cell receptor activation. Moreover, fluoxetine was found to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores, thereby leaving less Ca(2+) available for release upon IP3- and ryanodine-receptor activation. The Ca(2+)-modifying effects of fluoxetine are not related to its capability to block the serotonin transporter, as even a large excess of 5HT did not abolish the effects. In conclusion, these data show that fluoxetine decreases IP3- and ryanodine-receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in Jurkat T lymphocytes, an effect likely to be at the basis of the observed immunosuppression.

  20. Complete genome of Phenylobacterium zucineum – a novel facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from human erythroleukemia cell line K562

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingfeng; Xu, Xiaoli; Ding, Zonghui; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Bing; Yan, Zhiyu; Sun, Jie; Hu, Songnian; Hu, Xun

    2008-01-01

    Background Phenylobacterium zucineum is a recently identified facultative intracellular species isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562. Unlike the known intracellular pathogens, P. zucineum maintains a stable association with its host cell without affecting the growth and morphology of the latter. Results Here, we report the whole genome sequence of the type strain HLK1T. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3,996,255 bp) and a circular plasmid (382,976 bp). It encodes 3,861 putative proteins, 42 tRNAs, and a 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that it is phylogenetically closest to Caulobacter crescentus, a model species for cell cycle research. Notably, P. zucineum has a gene that is strikingly similar, both structurally and functionally, to the cell cycle master regulator CtrA of C. crescentus, and most of the genes directly regulated by CtrA in the latter have orthologs in the former. Conclusion This work presents the first complete bacterial genome in the genus Phenylobacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the CtrA regulon is well conserved between C. crescentus and P. zucineum. PMID:18700039

  1. Nanoparticle-Mediated Intracellular Delivery Enables Cryopreservation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Using Trehalose as the Sole Cryoprotectant

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Wei; Huang, Haishui; Wang, Hai; Zhao, Shuting; Dumbleton, Jenna; Zhao, Gang; He, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, pH responsive genipin-crosslinked Pluronic F127-chitosan nanoparticles (GNPs) was synthesized to encapsulate trehalose for intracellular delivery to cryopreserve primary human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Trehalose is a disaccharide of glucose used by lower-organisms to survive extreme cold in nature and has been used to cryopreserve various biomacromolecules. However, it does not enter mammalian cells due to its highly hydrophilic nature and has only been used in combination with other cell-penetrating cryoprotectants such as DMSO to cryopreserve mammalian cells. Our data show that trehalose can be efficiently encapsulated in our GNPs for intracellular delivery, which enables cryopreservation of primary hADSCs using the nontoxic sugar as the sole cryoprotectant. This capability is important because the conventional approach of cryopreserving mammalian cells using highly toxic (at body temperature) cell-penetrating cryoprotectants requires multi-step washing of the cryopreserved cells to remove the toxic cryoprotectant for further use, which is time-consuming and associated with significant cell loss (~10% during each washing step). By contrast, the trehalose-cryopreserved cells can be used without washing, which should significantly facilitate the wide application of the burgeoning cell-based medicine. PMID:25679454

  2. P2X7 receptor-mediated killing of an intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, by human and murine macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Michael P.; Fuller, Stephen J.; McLeod, Rima; Boulter, Nicola R.; Miller, Catherine M.; Zakrzewski, Alana M.; Mui, Ernest J.; Witola, William H.; Coyne, Jessica J.; Hargrave, Aubrey C.; Jamieson, Sarra E.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Wiley, James S.; Smith, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R)4 is highly expressed on the macrophage cell surface and activation of infected cells by extracellular ATP has been shown to kill intracellular bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that decrease receptor function reduce the ability of human macrophages to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are associated with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In this paper we show that macrophages from people with the 1513C (rs3751143) loss-of-function P2X7R SNP are less effective in killing intracellular Toxoplasma gondii after exposure to ATP compared with macrophages from people with the 1513A wild-type allele. Supporting a P2X7R-specific effect on T. gondii, macrophages from P2X7R knock-out mice (P2X7R−/−) are unable to kill T. gondii as effectively as macrophages from wild-type mice. We show that P2X7R-mediated T. gondii killing occurs in parallel with host cell apoptosis and is independent of NO production. PMID:20488797

  3. Caffeine-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO1 triggers Bim-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Han, Dong-Feng; Cao, Bo-Qiang; Wang, Bo; Dong, Nan; Jiang, De-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly ingested neuroactive compounds and exhibits anticancer effects through induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of caffeine-induced apoptosis in U251 cells (human glioma cell line). We analyzed the inhibitory effects of caffeine on cell proliferation by performing WST-8 and colony formation assays; in addition, cell survival was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was used to investigate the role played by FoxO1 in the proapoptotic effects of caffeine on glioma cells. Results showed that caffeine inhibited proliferation and survival of human glioma cells, induced apoptosis, and increased the expression of FoxO1 and its proapoptotic target Bim. In addition, we found that FoxO1 enhanced the transcription of its proapoptotic target Bim. In summary, our data indicates that FoxO1-Bim mediates caffeine-induced regression of glioma growth by activating cell apoptosis, thereby providing new mechanistic insight into the possible use of caffeine in treating human cancer.

  4. Comparative expression study of the endo-G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells, U87-MG cells and non malignant cells of neural origin unveils new potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Fève, Marie; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Zeniou, Maria; Lennon, Sarah; Carapito, Christine; Dong, Jihu; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Cianférani, Sarah; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs), U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs). The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs). Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-like properties of CD133+ glioblastoma initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; de Oliveira, Daniela Mara; Marti, Luciana C.; Cabral, Francisco Romero; de Souza, Jean Gabriel; Boufleur, Pamela; Malheiros, Suzana M.F.; de Paiva Neto, Manuel A.; da Cruz, Edgard Ferreira; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa; Cavalheiro, Sérgio

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is composed of dividing tumor cells, stromal cells and tumor initiating CD133+ cells. Recent reports have discussed the origin of the glioblastoma CD133+ cells and their function in the tumor microenvironment. The present work sought to investigate the multipotent and mesenchymal properties of primary highly purified human CD133+ glioblastoma-initiating cells. To accomplish this aim, we used the following approaches: i) generation of tumor subspheres of CD133+ selected cells from primary cell cultures of glioblastoma; ii) analysis of the expression of pluripotency stem cell markers and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers in the CD133+ glioblastoma-initiating cells; iii) side-by-side ultrastructural characterization of the CD133+ glioblastoma cells, MSC and CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood (UCB); iv) assessment of adipogenic differentiation of CD133+ glioblastoma cells to test their MSC-like in vitro differentiation ability; and v) use of an orthotopic glioblastoma xenograft model in the absence of immune suppression. We found that the CD133+ glioblastoma cells expressed both the pluripotency stem cell markers (Nanog, Mush-1 and SSEA-3) and MSC markers. In addition, the CD133+ cells were able to differentiate into adipocyte-like cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the CD133+ glioblastoma-initiating cells had ultrastructural features similar to those of undifferentiated MSCs. In addition, when administered in vivo to non-immunocompromised animals, the CD133+ cells were also able to mimic the phenotype of the original patient's tumor. In summary, we showed that the CD133+ glioblastoma cells express molecular signatures of MSCs, neural stem cells and pluripotent stem cells, thus possibly enabling differentiation into both neural and mesodermal cell types. PMID:27244897

  6. AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Calle-Guisado, Violeta; de Llera, Ana Hurtado; Martin-Hidalgo, David; Mijares, Jose; Gil, Maria C; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Bragado, Maria J; Garcia-Marin, Luis J

    2016-09-27

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work's aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%-80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS) in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC). AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied.

  7. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  8. Inhibition of P-Glycoprotein by HIV Protease Inhibitors Increases Intracellular Accumulation of Berberine in Murine and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Weibin; Wang, Guangji; Xu, Weiren; Liu, Xuyuan; Wang, Yun; Zha, Beth S.; Shi, Jian; Zhao, Qijin; Gerk, Phillip M.; Studer, Elaine; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Pandak, William M.; Zhou, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV protease inhibitor (PI)-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR), a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages. Methodology and Principal Findings Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT) and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp) cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123) efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp. Conclusion and Significance HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic. PMID:23372711

  9. Melatonin counteracts alterations in oxidative metabolism and cell viability induced by intracellular calcium overload in human leucocytes: changes with age.

    PubMed

    Espino, Javier; Bejarano, Ignacio; Paredes, Sergio D; González, David; Barriga, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2010-07-01

    Ageing is associated with an increased production of free radicals and alterations in the mechanisms of adaptation to oxidative stress. In fact, the free radical theory of ageing proposes that deleterious actions of free radicals are responsible for the functional deterioration associated with ageing. Moreover, a close relationship exists between calcium homeostasis and oxidative stress. The current work was aimed at proving that intracellular calcium overload induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and/or thapsigargin leads to oxidative stress. We additionally examined the effect of melatonin on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell viability in human leucocytes collected from young (20-30-year-old) and elderly (65-75-year-old) individuals under both basal and oxidative stress-induced conditions. Treatments with 10 nM FMLP and/or 1 microM thapsigargin induced a transient increase in cytosolic free-calcium concentration ([Ca(2 + )](c)) in human leucocytes due to calcium release from internal stores, and led in turn to oxidative stress, as assessed by intracellular ROS measurement. Non-treated leucocytes from aged individuals exhibited higher ROS levels and lower rates of cell survival when compared to leucocytes from young individuals. Similar results were obtained in FMLP and/or thapsigargin-treated leucocytes from elderly individuals when compared to those from the young individuals. Melatonin treatment significantly reduced both hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and superoxide anion levels, likely due to its free-radical scavenging properties, and enhanced leucocyte viability in both age groups. Therefore, melatonin may be a useful tool for the treatment of disease states and processes where an excessive production of oxidative damage occurs.

  10. Ring Expanded Nucleoside Analogues Inhibit RNA Helicase and Intracellular Human Immunodeficiency virus type 1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yedavalli, Venkat S.R.K; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Hongyi; Zhang, Peng; Starost, Matthew F.; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2008-01-01

    A series of ring expanded nucleoside (REN) analogues were synthesized and screened for inhibition of cellular RNA helicase activity and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We identified two compounds 1 and 2 that inhibited the ATP dependent activity of human RNA helicase DDX3. Compounds 1 and 2 also suppressed HIV-1 replication in T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. Neither compound at therapeutic doses was significantly toxic in ex vivo cell culture or in vivo in mice. Our findings provide proof-of-concept that a cellular factor, an RNA helicase, could be targeted for inhibiting HIV-1 replication. PMID:18680273

  11. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  12. Maternal obesity modulates intracellular lipid turnover in the human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    Hirschmugl, B; Desoye, G; Catalano, P; Klymiuk, I; Scharnagl, H; Payr, S; Kitzinger, E; Schliefsteiner, C; Lang, U; Wadsack, C; Hauguel-de Mouzon, S

    2017-01-01

    hydrolysis, contributes to the turnover of intracellular lipids in placenta of obese women, and is tightly regulated by metabolic factors of the mother. PMID:27780978

  13. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Raudonis, Raimondas; Majiene, Daiva

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA) is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h). RA at concentration 80-130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM-200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies.

  14. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Raudonis, Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA) is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h). RA at concentration 80–130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM–200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies. PMID:27688825

  15. Oncogenic role of Merlin/NF2 in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, P A; Yin, W; Camacho, L; Marchetti, D

    2015-05-14

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults, with a poor prognosis because of its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Merlin/NF2 (moesin-ezrin-radixin-like protein/neurofibromatosis type 2) is a tumor suppressor found to be mutated in most nervous system tumors; however, it is not mutated in glioblastomas. Merlin associates with several transmembrane receptors and intracellular proteins serving as an anchoring molecule. Additionally, it acts as a key component of cell motility. By selecting sub-populations of U251 glioblastoma cells, we observed that high expression of phosphorylated Merlin at serine 518 (S518-Merlin), NOTCH1 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) correlated with increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. These cells were defective in cell-contact inhibition with changes in Merlin phosphorylation directly affecting NOTCH1 and EGFR expression, as well as downstream targets HES1 (hairy and enhancer of split-1) and CCND1 (cyclin D1). Of note, we identified a function for S518-Merlin, which is distinct from what has been reported when the expression of Merlin is diminished in relation to EGFR and NOTCH1 expression, providing first-time evidence that demonstrates that the phosphorylation of S518-Merlin in glioblastoma promotes oncogenic properties that are not only the result of inactivation of the tumor suppressor role of Merlin but also an independent process implicating a Merlin-driven regulation of NOTCH1 and EGFR.

  16. Use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as an intracellular defense against HIV-1 infection in human cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsin-Kai; Gu, Ying; Diaz, Arturo; Marlett, John; Takahashi, Yuta; Li, Mo; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Xu, Ruo; Hishida, Tomoaki; Chang, Chan-Jung; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Young, John; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-10

    To combat hostile viruses, bacteria and archaea have evolved a unique antiviral defense system composed of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), together with CRISPR-associated genes (Cas). The CRISPR/Cas9 system develops an adaptive immune resistance to foreign plasmids and viruses by creating site-specific DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). Here we adapt the CRISPR/Cas9 system to human cells for intracellular defense against foreign DNA and viruses. Using HIV-1 infection as a model, our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system disrupts latently integrated viral genome and provides long-term adaptive defense against new viral infection, expression and replication in human cells. We show that engineered human-induced pluripotent stem cells stably expressing HIV-targeted CRISPR/Cas9 can be efficiently differentiated into HIV reservoir cell types and maintain their resistance to HIV-1 challenge. These results unveil the potential of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as a new therapeutic strategy against viral infections.

  17. delta- and mu-opioid receptor mobilization of intracellular calcium in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, M.; Henderson, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study we have investigated delta and mu opioid receptor-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y. 2. The Ca(2+)-sensitive dye, fura-2, was used to measure [Ca2+]i in confluent monolayers of SH-SY5Y cells. Neither the delta-opioid agonist, DPDPE ([D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin) nor the mu-opioid agonist, DAMGO (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-Me-Phe-Gly-ol enkephalin) elevated [Ca2+]i when applied alone. However, when either DPDPE or DAMGO was applied in the presence of the cholinoceptor agonist, carbachol (100 nM-1 mM) they evoked an elevation of [Ca2+]i above that caused by carbachol alone. 3. In the presence of 1 microM or 100 microM carbachol, DPDPE elevated [Ca2+]i with an EC50 of 10 nM. The elevation of [Ca2+]i was independent of the concentration of carbachol. The EC50 for DAMGO elevating [Ca2+]i in the presence of 1 microM and 100 microM carbachol was 270 nM and 145 nM respectively. 4. The delta-receptor antagonist, naltrindole (30 nM), blocked the elevations of [Ca2+]i by DPDPE (100 nM) without affecting those caused by DAMGO while the mu-receptor antagonist, CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Pen-Thr-NH2) (100 nM-1 microM) blocked the elevations of [Ca2+]i caused by DAMGO (1 microM) without affecting those caused by DPDPE. 5. Block of carbachol activation of muscarinic receptors with atropine (10 microM) abolished the elevation of [Ca2+]i by the opioids. The nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine (10 microM), did not affect the elevations of [Ca2+]i caused by opioids in the presence of carbachol. 6. Muscarinic receptor activation, not a rise in [Ca2+]i, was required to reveal the opioid response. The Ca2+ channel activator, maitotoxin (3 ng ml-1), also elevated [Ca2+]i but subsequent application of opioid in the presence of maitotoxin caused no further changes in [Ca2+]i. 7. The elevations of [Ca2+]i by DPDPE and DAMGO were abolished by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin (200 ng ml-1, 16 h

  18. A comparative study of the structural organization of spheres derived from the adult human subventricular zone and glioblastoma biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Vik-Mo, Einar Osland; Sandberg, Cecilie; Joel, Mrinal; Stangeland, Biljana; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Moe, Morten Carstens; Murrell, Wayne; Langmoen, Iver Arne

    2011-04-15

    Sphere forming assays have been useful to enrich for stem like cells in a range of tumors. The robustness of this system contrasts the difficulties in defining a stem cell population based on cell surface markers. We have undertaken a study to describe the cellular and organizational composition of tumorspheres, directly comparing these to neurospheres derived from the adult human subventricular zone (SVZ). Primary cell cultures from brain tumors were found to contain variable fractions of cells positive for tumor stem cell markers (CD133 (2-93%)/SSEA1 (3-15%)/CXCR4 (1-72%)). All cultures produced tumors upon xenografting. Tumorspheres contained a heterogeneous population of cells, but were structurally organized with stem cell markers present at the core of spheres, with markers of more mature glial progenitors and astrocytes at more peripheral location. Ultrastructural studies showed that tumorspheres contained a higher fraction of electron dense cells in the core than the periphery (36% and 19%, respectively). Neurospheres also contained a heterogeneous cell population, but did not have an organization similar to tumorspheres. Although tumorspheres clearly display irregular and neoplastic cells, they establish an organized structure with an outward gradient of differentiation. We suggest that this organization is central in maintaining the tumor stem cell pool.

  19. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  20. Intracellular mitochondrial DNA transfers to the nucleus in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok

    2016-06-01

    Genome instability is a well-known hallmark of cancer cells. With the revolution of high-throughput sequencing technologies, our knowledge of somatically acquired genome structural variation (SV) has greatly improved over the last decade. Remarkably, surveys of thousands of human whole-cancer genomes have shown that chromosomal rearrangements are frequently combined with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments somatically transferred to the nucleus. The high transfer rate and features of integration breakpoints provide clues for understanding the potential mechanisms underlying these events and provide insights into the role of mtDNA segments transferred into the nucleus. In this review, I discuss our current understanding of somatic nuclear transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

  1. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  2. The anti-hypertensive drug prazosin inhibits glioblastoma growth via the PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Assad Kahn, Suzana; Costa, Silvia Lima; Gholamin, Sharareh; Nitta, Ryan T; Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Coelho, Paulo Lucas Cerqueira; El-Habr, Elias; Cadusseau, Josette; Varlet, Pascale; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Devaux, Bertrand; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Cheshier, Samuel H; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Haiech, Jacques; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2016-05-01

    A variety of drugs targeting monoamine receptors are routinely used in human pharmacology. We assessed the effect of these drugs on the viability of tumor-initiating cells isolated from patients with glioblastoma. Among the drugs targeting monoamine receptors, we identified prazosin, an α1- and α2B-adrenergic receptor antagonist, as the most potent inducer of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cell death. Prazosin triggered apoptosis of glioblastoma-initiating cells and of their differentiated progeny, inhibited glioblastoma growth in orthotopic xenografts of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cells, and increased survival of glioblastoma-bearing mice. We found that prazosin acted in glioblastoma-initiating cells independently from adrenergic receptors. Its off-target activity occurred via a PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway, which resulted in caspase-3 activation. Blockade of PKCδ activation prevented all molecular changes observed in prazosin-treated glioblastoma-initiating cells, as well as prazosin-induced apoptosis. Based on these data, we conclude that prazosin, an FDA-approved drug for the control of hypertension, inhibits glioblastoma growth through a PKCδ-dependent mechanism. These findings open up promising prospects for the use of prazosin as an adjuvant therapy for glioblastoma patients.

  3. Synergistic anti-tumor actions of luteolin and silibinin prevented cell migration and invasion and induced apoptosis in glioblastoma SNB19 cells and glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-12-10

    Glioblastoma is the most lethal brain tumor. Failure of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for treatment of glioblastoma. Plant-derived flavonoids could be alternative medicine for inhibiting not only glioblastoma cells but also glioblastoma stem cells (GSC). Two plant-derived flavonoids are luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL). We investigated anti-tumor mechanisms of LUT and SIL in different human glioblastoma cells and GSC and found significant synergistic inhibition of human glioblastoma LN18 and SNB19 cells and GSC following treatment with combination of 20µM LUT and 50µM SIL. Combination of 20µM LUT and 50µM SIL was more effective than a conventional chemotherapeutic agent (BCNU or TMZ). We continued our studies with SNB19 cells and GSC and found dramatic inhibition of cell migration from spheroids and also cell invasion through matrigel following treatment with combination of LUT and SIL. This combination was highly effective to block angiogenesis and survival pathways leading to induction of apoptosis. Inhibition of PKCα, XIAP, and iNOS ultimately caused induction of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Collectively, synergistic efficacy of LUT and SIL could be a promising therapy to inhibit cell migration and invasion and induce apoptosis in different glioblastoma cells including GSC.

  4. Increased intracellular levels of lysosomal beta-glucuronidase in peripheral blood PMNs from humans with rapidly progressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pippin, D J; Cobb, C M; Feil, P

    1995-01-01

    Release of potent lysosomal enzymes by degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in host gingiva may contribute significantly to tissue destruction and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A pilot study established that peripheral blood PMNs from humans with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) contained significantly increased amounts of intracellular lysosomal beta-glucuronidase as compared to healthy controls. This investigation gained insight into the question: are the increased levels of beta-glucuronidase in persons with RPP an a priori genetically determined PMN characteristic, or a reactive phenomenon induced by the periodontal disease process during granulopoiesis? Twelve healthy controls and twelve otherwise healthy individuals with RPP participated in a repeated measures design to T0 (initial, baseline), T1 (four weeks after disease control therapy), and T2 (two months later). At each visit clinical indices (GI, pocket depths, GCF flow, plaque index) were performed and peripheral blood obtained. PMNs were isolated and suspended as 5 x 10(6) cells in 2.0 ml of HBSS. PMN suspensions were tested for total intracellular beta-glucuronidase, degranulation induced by 1 x 10(-6)M and 5 x 10(-7) M FMLP challenges, and unchallenged for non-specific enzyme release. PMNs from individuals with RPP contained significantly higher absolute amounts of beta-glucuronidase and released greater absolute amounts at FMLP challenge at T0, T1, and T2 compared to controls. No relationship was found between any of the clinical indices and beta-glucuronidase levels and no pattern was discovered relating to the repeated measures over time. We conclude that RPP peripheral blood PMNs contain elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase that are not induced by the periodontal disease process.

  5. Progesterone Impairs Human Ether-a-go-go-related Gene (HERG) Trafficking by Disruption of Intracellular Cholesterol Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, De-Jie; Soong, Tuck Wah; Dawe, Gavin S.; Bian, Jin-Song

    2011-01-01

    The prolongation of QT intervals in both mothers and fetuses during the later period of pregnancy implies that higher levels of progesterone may regulate the function of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channel, a key ion channel responsible for controlling the length of QT intervals. Here, we studied the effect of progesterone on the expression, trafficking, and function of HERG channels and the underlying mechanism. Treatment with progesterone for 24 h decreased the abundance of the fully glycosylated form of the HERG channel in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes and HERG-HEK293 cells, a cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Progesterone also concentration-dependently decreased HERG current density, but had no effect on voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ and K+ channels. Immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis show that progesterone preferentially decreased HERG channel protein abundance in the plasma membrane, induced protein accumulation in the dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and increased the protein expression of C/EBP homologous protein, a hallmark of ER stress. Application of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (a sterol-binding agent) or overexpression of Rab9 rescued the progesterone-induced HERG trafficking defect and ER stress. Disruption of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis with simvastatin, imipramine, or exogenous application of cholesterol mimicked the effect of progesterone on HERG channel trafficking. Progesterone may impair HERG channel folding in the ER and/or block its trafficking to the Golgi complex by disrupting intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Our findings may reveal a novel molecular mechanism to explain the QT prolongation and high risk of developing arrhythmias during late pregnancy. PMID:21525004

  6. Intracellular Aβ pathology and early cognitive impairments in a transgenic rat overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein: a multidimensional study.

    PubMed

    Iulita, M Florencia; Allard, Simon; Richter, Luise; Munter, Lisa-Marie; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Weise, Christoph; Do Carmo, Sonia; Klein, William L; Multhaup, Gerhard; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-06-05

    Numerous studies have implicated the abnormal accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) as an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, capable of triggering neuroinflammation, tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive deficits. However, the occurrence and pathological relevance of intracellular Aβ remain a matter of controversial debate. In this study, we have used a multidimensional approach including high-magnification and super-resolution microscopy, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) mass spectrometry analysis and ELISA to investigate the Aβ pathology and its associated cognitive impairments, in a novel transgenic rat model overexpressing human APP. Our microscopy studies with quantitative co-localization analysis revealed the presence of intraneuronal Aβ in transgenic rats, with an immunological signal that was clearly distinguished from that of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its C-terminal fragments (CTFs). The early intraneuronal pathology was accompanied by a significant elevation of soluble Aβ42 peptides that paralleled the presence and progression of early cognitive deficits, several months prior to amyloid plaque deposition. Aβ38, Aβ39, Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides were detected in the rat CSF by MALDI-MS analysis even at the plaque-free stages; suggesting that a combination of intracellular and soluble extracellular Aβ may be responsible for impairing cognition at early time points. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the intraneuronal development of AD-like amyloid pathology includes a mixture of molecular species (Aβ, APP and CTFs) of which a considerable component is Aβ; and that the early presence of these species within neurons has deleterious effects in the CNS, even before the development of full-blown AD-like pathology.

  7. Human Female Genital Tract Infection by the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis Elicits Robust Type 2 Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D.; Harvey, Stephen A. K.; LaFramboise, William A.; Reighard, Seth D.; Matthews, Dean B.; Cherpes, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    While Chlamydia trachomatis infections are frequently asymptomatic, mechanisms that regulate host response to this intracellular Gram-negative bacterium remain undefined. This investigation thus used peripheral blood mononuclear cells and endometrial tissue from women with or without Chlamydia genital tract infection to better define this response. Initial genome-wide microarray analysis revealed highly elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 10 and other molecules characteristic of Type 2 immunity (e.g., fibrosis and wound repair) in Chlamydia-infected tissue. This result was corroborated in flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry studies that showed extant upper genital tract Chlamydia infection was associated with increased co-expression of CD200 receptor and CD206 (markers of alternative macrophage activation) by endometrial macrophages as well as increased expression of GATA-3 (the transcription factor regulating TH2 differentiation) by endometrial CD4+ T cells. Also among women with genital tract Chlamydia infection, peripheral CD3+ CD4+ and CD3+ CD4- cells that proliferated in response to ex vivo stimulation with inactivated chlamydial antigen secreted significantly more interleukin (IL)-4 than tumor necrosis factor, interferon-γ, or IL-17; findings that repeated in T cells isolated from these same women 1 and 4 months after infection had been eradicated. Our results thus newly reveal that genital infection by an obligate intracellular bacterium induces polarization towards Type 2 immunity, including Chlamydia-specific TH2 development. Based on these findings, we now speculate that Type 2 immunity was selected by evolution as the host response to C. trachomatis in the human female genital tract to control infection and minimize immunopathological damage to vital reproductive structures. PMID:23555586

  8. Intracellular Acid-extruding regulators and the effect of lipopolysaccharide in cultured human renal artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Loh, Shih-Hurng; Lee, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Shih, Shou-Jou; Chen, Li-Wei; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Chang, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Chein-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the intracellular pH (pHi) in mammalian cells plays a pivotal role in maintaining cell function. Thus far, the housekeeping Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (NHE) and the Na(+)-HCO3(-) co-transporter (NBC) have been confirmed in many mammalian cells as major acid extruders. However, the role of acid-extruding regulators in human renal artery smooth muscle cells (HRASMCs) remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular occlusion is associated with the apoptosis, activating calpain and increased [Ca(2+)]i that are related to NHE1 activity in endothelia cells. This study determines the acid-extruding mechanisms and the effect of LPS on the resting pHi and active acid extruders in cultured HRASMCs. The mechanism of pHi recovery from intracellular acidosis (induced by NH4Cl-prepulse) is determined using BCECF-fluorescence in cultured HRASMCs. It is seen that (a) the resting pHi is 7.19 ± 0.03 and 7.10 ± 0.02 for HEPES- and CO2/HCO3(-)- buffered solution, respectively; (b) apart from the housekeeping NHE1, another Na(+)-coupled HCO3(-) transporter i.e. NBC, functionally co-exists to achieve acid-equivalent extrusion; (c) three different isoforms of NBC: NBCn1 (SLC4A7; electroneutral), NBCe1 (SLC4A4; electrogenic) and NBCe2 (SLC4A5), are detected in protein/mRNA level; and (d) pHi and NHE protein expression/activity are significantly increased by LPS, in both a dose- and time- dependent manner, but NBCs protein expression is not. In conclusion, it is demonstrated, for the first time, that four pHi acid-extruding regulators: NHE1, NBCn1, NBCe1 and NBCe2, co-exist in cultured HRASMCs. LPS also increases cellular growth, pHi and NHE in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  9. Intracellular Immunization of Human Fetal Cord Blood Stem/Progenitor Cells with a Ribozyme Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mang; Leavitt, Mark C.; Maruyama, Midori; Yamada, Osamu; Young, Dennis; Ho, Anthony D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1995-01-01

    Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection may ultimately require targeting of hematopoietic stem cells. Here we used retroviral vectors carrying the ribozyme gene to transduce CD34^+ cells from human fetal cord blood. Transduction and ribozyme expression had no apparent adverse effect on cell differentiation and/or proliferation. The macrophage-like cells, differentiated from the stem/progenitor cells in vitro, expressed the ribozyme gene and resisted infection by a macrophage tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These results suggest the feasibility of stem cell gene therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

  10. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Sabrina; Rinaldi, Laura; Cangiano, Alfonsina Mariarosaria; Brandi, Giorgio; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s) of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701) after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila) characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages. PMID:27437406

  11. Overexpression of human alpha-galactosidase A results in its intracellular aggregation, crystallization in lysosomes, and selective secretion

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Human lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A) was stably overexpressed in CHO cells and its biosynthesis and targeting were investigated. Clone AGA5.3-1000Mx, which was the highest enzyme overexpressor, produced intracellular alpha-Gal A levels of 20,900 U/mg (approximately 100 micrograms of enzyme/10(7) cells) and secreted approximately 13,000 U (or 75 micrograms/10(7) cells) per day. Ultrastructural examination of these cells revealed numerous 0.25-1.5 microns crystalline structures in dilated trans-Golgi network (TGN) and in lysosomes which stained with immunogold particles using affinity- purified anti-human alpha-Gal A antibodies. Pulse-chase studies revealed that approximately 65% of the total enzyme synthesized was secreted, while endogenous CHO lysosomal enzymes were not, indicating that the alpha-Gal A secretion was specific. The recombinant intracellular and secreted enzyme forms were normally processed and phosphorylated; the secreted enzyme had mannose-6-phosphate moieties and bound the immobilized 215-kD mannose-6-phosphate receptor (M6PR). Thus, the overexpressed enzyme's selective secretion did not result from oversaturation of the M6PR-mediated pathway or abnormal binding to the M6PR. Of note, the secreted alpha-Gal A was sulfated and the percent of enzyme sulfation decreased with increasing amplification, presumably due to the inaccessibility of the enzyme's tyrosine residues for the sulfotransferase in the TGN. Overexpression of human lysosomal alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase and acid sphingomyelinase in CHO cell lines also resulted in their respective selective secretion. In vitro studies revealed that purified secreted alpha-Gal A was precipitated as a function of enzyme concentration and pH, with 30% of the soluble enzyme being precipitated when 10 mg/ml of enzyme was incubated at pH 5.0. Thus, it is hypothesized that these overexpressed lysosomal enzymes are normally modified until they reach the TGN where the more acidic environment of

  12. Attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of Helicobacter pylori by human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, M; Paziak-Domanska, B; Wadström, T

    1995-02-01

    The different steps of phagocytosis, attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of cells of Helicobacter pylori strain 17874 (expressing sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) and cells of H. pylori strain 17875 (expressing non-sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) have been studied. More cells of sialopositive H. pylori strain 17874 have been found attached to human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBM) and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (PIM) than cells of sialonegative H. pylori strain 17875. Binding of cells of H. pylori strain 17874 has been significantly inhibited by treatment of phagocytes with neuraminidase. Inhibition of adhesion of these bacteria preincubated with foetuin to normal phagocytic cells has also been found. Well adhering cells of H. pylori strain 17874 were more resistant to killing mechanisms of human PBM and mouse PIM than cells of strain 17875. Good, probably sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin dependent, adhesion of H. pylori bacteria to phagocytes can be considered as an important virulence factor which facilitates the pathogen to avoid the defence mechanisms.

  13. Juice of Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) inhibits oxytocin-induced increase of the intracellular calcium concentration in human myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Simões-Wüst, A P; Grãos, M; Duarte, C B; Brenneisen, R; Hamburger, M; Mennet, M; Ramos, M H; Schnelle, M; Wächter, R; Worel, A M; von Mandach, U

    2010-10-01

    The use of preparations from Bryophyllum pinnatum in tocolysis is supported by both clinical (retrospective comparative studies) and experimental (using uterus strips) evidence. We studied here the effect of B. pinnatum juice on the response of cultured human myometrial cells to stimulation by oxytocin, a hormone known to be involved in the control of uterine contractions by increasing the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In this work, [Ca2+]i was measured online during stimulation of human myometrial cells (hTERT-C3 and M11) with oxytocin, which had been pre-incubated in the absence or in the presence of B. pinnatum juice. Since no functional voltage-gated Ca2+ channels could be detected in these myometrial cells, the effect of B. pinnatum juice was as well studied in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which are known to have such channels and can be depolarised with KCl. B. pinnatum juice prevented the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in hTERT-C3 human myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner, achieving a ca. 80% inhibition at a 2% concentration. Comparable results were obtained with M11 human primary myometrial cells. In hTERT-C3 cells, prevention of the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration and of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels. B. pinnatum juice delayed, but did not prevent the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, the data suggest a specific and concentration-dependent effect of B. pinnatum juice on the oxytocin signalling pathway, which seems to corroborate its use in tocolysis. Such a specific mechanism would explain the rare and minor side-effects in tocolysis with B. pinnatum as well as its high therapeutic index.

  14. GLUT-1-independent infection of the glioblastoma/astroglioma U87 cells by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-09-15

    The human glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) functions as a receptor for human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). GLUT-1 is a twelve-transmembrane cell surface receptor with six extracellular (ECL) and seven intracellular domains. To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we utilized polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the large extracellular domain of GLUT-1. The antibodies caused significant blocking of envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and pseudotyped virus infection of HeLa cells but had no significant effect on infection of U87 cells. This differential effect correlated with the detection of high-level surface expression of GLUT-1 on HeLa cells and very weak staining of U87 cells. To investigate this in terms of viral cytotropism, we cloned GLUT-1 cDNA from U87 cells and isolated two different versions of cDNA clones: the wild-type sequence (encoding 492 residues) and a mutant cDNA with a 5-base pair deletion (GLUT-1{delta}5) between nucleotides 1329 and 1333. The deletion, also detected in genomic DNA, resulted in a frame-shift and premature termination producing a truncated protein of 463 residues. Transfection of the wild-type GLUT-1 but not GLUT-1{delta}5 cDNA into CHO cells resulted in efficient surface expression of the human GLUT-1. Co-expression of GLUT-1 with GLUT-1{delta}5 produces a trans-inhibition by GLUT-1{delta}5 of GLUT-1-mediated HTLV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated fusion. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated physical interaction of the wild-type and mutant proteins. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated lower GLUT-1 RNA expression in U87 cells. We propose two mechanisms to account for the impaired cell surface expression of GLUT-1 on U87 cells: low GLUT-1 RNA expression and the formation of GLUT-1/GLUT-1{delta}5 heterodimers that are retained intracellularly. Significant RNAi-mediated reduction of endogenous GLUT-1 expression impaired HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with HeLa cells but not with U87 cells. We propose a

  15. Replacement of Val3 in Human Thymidylate Synthase Affects Its Kinetic Properties and Intracellular Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiao; Gibson, Lydia M.; Bell, Brittnaie J.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Pea, Maria Marjorette O.; Berger, Franklin G.; Berger, Sondra H.; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2010-11-03

    Human and other mammalian thymidylate synthase (TS) enzymes have an N-terminal extension of {approx}27 amino acids that is not present in bacterial TSs. The extension, which is disordered in all reported crystal structures of TSs, has been considered to play a primary role in protein turnover but not in catalytic activity. In mammalian cells, the variant V3A has a half-life similar to that of wild-type human TS (wt hTS) while V3T is much more stable; V3L, V3F, and V3Y have half-lives approximately half of that for wt hTS. Catalytic turnover rates for most Val3 mutants are only slightly diminished, as expected. However, two mutants, V3L and V3F, have strongly compromised dUMP binding, with K{sub m,app} values increased by factors of 47 and 58, respectively. For V3L, this observation can be explained by stabilization of the inactive conformation of the loop of residues 181-197, which prevents substrate binding. In the crystal structure of V3L, electron density corresponding to a leucine residue is present in a position that stabilizes the loop of residues 181-197 in the inactive conformation. Since this density is not observed in other mutants and all other leucine residues are ordered in this structure, it is likely that this density represents Leu3. In the crystal structure of a V3F {center_dot} FdUMP binary complex, the nucleotide is bound in an alternative mode to that proposed for the catalytic complex, indicating that the high K{sub m,app} value is caused not by stabilization of the inactive conformer but by substrate binding in a nonproductive, inhibitory site. These observations show that the N-terminal extension affects the conformational state of the hTS catalytic region. Each of the mechanisms leading to the high K{sub m,app} values can be exploited to facilitate design of compounds acting as allosteric inhibitors of hTS.

  16. Genomic understanding of glioblastoma expanded

    Cancer.gov

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was the first cancer type to be systematically studied by TCGA in 2008. In a new, complementary report, TCGA experts examined more than 590 GBM samples--the largest to date utilizing genomic characterization techniques and ne

  17. Growth factors from tumor microenvironment possibly promote the proliferation of glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, JingJing; Niu, Rui; Huang, Wenhui; Zhou, Mengliang; Shi, Jixing; Zhang, Luyong; Liao, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiform is a lethal brain glial tumor characterized by low survival and high recurrence, partially attributed to the glioblastoma stem cells according to recent researches. Microenvironment or niche in tumor tissue is believed to provide essential support for the aberrant growth of tumor stem cells. In order to explore the effect of growth factors in tumor microenvironment on glioblastoma stem cells behavior, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GDSCs) were isolated from adult human glioblastoma specimen with antibody against surface marker CD133 and were co-cultured with various tumor cells including U87MG cells, unsorted glioblastoma tumor cells, CD133(-) cells and normal rat primary astrocytes. Results suggested that tumor cells could promote GDSCs proliferation while non-tumor cells could not, and several growth factors were exclusively detected in the co-culture system with tumor cells. It was concluded that growth factors derived from tumor microenvironment possibly contributed to the uncontrolled proliferation of GDSCs.

  18. Intracellular ionized calcium concentration in muscles from humans with malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    López, J R; Alamo, L; Caputo, C; Wikinski, J; Ledezma, D

    1985-06-01

    Ca2+ selective microelectrodes have been used to determine the free myoplasmic [Ca2+] in human skeletal muscle obtained from patients who had developed early signs associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH) during anesthesia. Intercostal muscle biopsies were performed under local anesthesia in four MH patients 15 days to 4 months after developing the MH crisis and in three control subjects. We used only microelectrodes that showed a Nernstian response between pCa3 and pCa7 (30.5 mV per decade at 37 degrees C). Membrane resting potential (V(m)) and calcium potential (V(Ca)) were obtained from superficial fibers. The free cytosolic [Ca2+] was 0.39 +/- 0.1 microM (mean +/- SEM, n = 18) in muscle fibers obtained from malignant hyperthermic patients, whereas in control subjects it was 0.11 +/- 0.02 microM (n = 10). These results suggest that this syndrome might be related to an abnormally high myoplasmic free resting calcium concentration, probably due to a defective function of the plasma membrane or the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  19. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  20. Evidence that leishmania donovani utilizes a mannose receptor on human mononuclear phagocytes to establish intracellular parasitism

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.E.; Pearson, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoan Leishmania donovani must gain entrance into mononuclear phagocytes to successfully parasitize man. The parasite's extracellular promastigote stage is ingested by human peripheral blood monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages in the absence of serum, in a manner characteristic of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Remarkable similarities have been found between the macrophage receptor(s) for promastigotes and a previously characterized eucaryotic receptor system, the mannose/fucose receptor (MFR), that mediates the binding of zymosan particles and mannose- or fucose-terminal glycoconjugates to macrophages. Ingestion of promastigotes by monocyte-derived macrophages was inhibited by several MFR ligands; that is mannan, mannose-BSA and fucose-BSA. In contrast, promastigote ingestion by monocytes was unaffected by MFR ligands. Furthermore, attachment of promastigotes to macrophages, assessed by using cytochalasin D to prevent phagocytosis, was reduced 49.8% by mannan. Reorientation of the MFR to the ventral surface of the cell was achieved by plating macrophages onto mannan-coated coverslips, reducing MFR activity on the exposed cell surface by 94% as assessed by binding of /sup 125/I-mannose-BSA. Under these conditions, ingestion of promastigotes was inhibited by 71.4%. Internalization of the MFR by exposure of macrophages to zymosan before infection with promastigotes resulted in a 62.3% decrease in parasite ingestion. Additionally, NH/sub 4/Cl decreased macrophage ingestion of promastigotes by 38.2%. Subinhibitory concentration of NH/sub 4/Cl (10 mM) and of mannan (0.25 mg/ml) together inhibited parsite ingestion by 76.4%.

  1. Functional Effect of Pim1 Depends upon Intracellular Localization in Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Samse, Kaitlen; Emathinger, Jacqueline; Hariharan, Nirmala; Quijada, Pearl; Ilves, Kelli; Völkers, Mirko; Ormachea, Lucia; De La Torre, Andrea; Orogo, Amabel M; Alvarez, Roberto; Din, Shabana; Mohsin, Sadia; Monsanto, Megan; Fischer, Kimberlee M; Dembitsky, Walter P; Gustafsson, Åsa B; Sussman, Mark A

    2015-05-29

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPC) improve heart function after autologous transfer in heart failure patients. Regenerative potential of hCPCs is severely limited with age, requiring genetic modification to enhance therapeutic potential. A legacy of work from our laboratory with Pim1 kinase reveals effects on proliferation, survival, metabolism, and rejuvenation of hCPCs in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that subcellular targeting of Pim1 bolsters the distinct cardioprotective effects of this kinase in hCPCs to increase proliferation and survival, and antagonize cellular senescence. Adult hCPCs isolated from patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation were engineered to overexpress Pim1 throughout the cell (PimWT) or targeted to either mitochondrial (Mito-Pim1) or nuclear (Nuc-Pim1) compartments. Nuc-Pim1 enhances stem cell youthfulness associated with decreased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, preserved telomere length, reduced expression of p16 and p53, and up-regulation of nucleostemin relative to PimWT hCPCs. Alternately, Mito-Pim1 enhances survival by increasing expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL and decreasing cell death after H2O2 treatment, thereby preserving mitochondrial integrity superior to PimWT. Mito-Pim1 increases the proliferation rate by up-regulation of cell cycle modulators Cyclin D, CDK4, and phospho-Rb. Optimal stem cell traits such as proliferation, survival, and increased youthful properties of aged hCPCs are enhanced after targeted Pim1 localization to mitochondrial or nuclear compartments. Targeted Pim1 overexpression in hCPCs allows for selection of the desired phenotypic properties to overcome patient variability and improve specific stem cell characteristics.

  2. Differential distribution of erbB receptors in human glioblastoma multiforme: expression of erbB3 in CD133-positive putative cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Duhem-Tonnelle, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Vacher, Sophie; Loyens, Anne; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Collier, Francis; Baroncini, Marc; Blond, Serge; Prevot, Vincent; Sharif, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastomas are the most common CNS tumors in adults, and they remain resistant to current treatments. ErbB1 signaling is frequently altered in these tumors, which indicates that the erbB receptor family is a promising target for molecular therapy. However, data on erbB signaling in glioblastomas are still sparse. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of erbB receptor and ligand expression profiles in a panel of nine glioblastomas that were compared to non-neoplastic cerebral tissue containing neocortex and corresponding portions of subcortical convolutional white matter and we determined the distribution patterns of erbB receptors among the main neural cell types that are present in these tumors, particularly the putative tumoral stem cell population. Using quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, we showed that erbB1 signaling and erbB2 receptors exhibited highly variable deregulation profiles among tumors, ranging from under- to overexpression, while erbB3 and erbB4 were down-regulated. Immunohistochemistry revealed an important inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in all four erbB expression profiles. However, each receptor exhibited a distinct repartition pattern among the GFAP-, Olig2-, NeuN- and CD133-positive populations. Interestingly, while erbB1 immunoreactivity was only detected in small subsets of CD133-positive putative tumoral stem cells, erbB3 immunoreactivity was prominent in this cell population thus suggesting that erbB3 may represent a new potential target for molecular therapy. PMID:20467331

  3. Human Sirtuin 2 Localization, Transient Interactions, and Impact on the Proteome Point to Its Role in Intracellular Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Budayeva, Hanna G; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-10-01

    previously unrecognized involvement in intracellular trafficking pathways, which may contribute to its roles in cellular homeostasis and human diseases.

  4. Establishment, Maintenance and in vitro and in vivo Applications of Primary Human Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Xenograft Models for Translational Biology Studies and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Brett L.; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2011-01-01

    Development of clinically relevant tumor model systems for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is important for advancement of basic and translational biology. One model that has gained wide acceptance in the neuro-oncology community is the primary xenograft model. This model entails the engraftment of patient tumor specimens into the flank of nude mice and subsequent serial passage of these tumors in the flank of mice. These tumors then can be used to establish short-term explant cultures or intracranial xenografts. The focus of this manuscript is to review the procedures associated with the establishment, maintenance and utilization of a primary GBM xenograft panel. PMID:21743824

  5. Leptin Promotes Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Johnathan E.; Cook, Nicholas J.; Rovin, Richard A.; Winn, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The hormone leptin has a variety of functions. Originally known for its role in satiety and weight loss, leptin more recently has been shown to augment tumor growth in a variety of cancers. Within gliomas, there is a correlation between tumor grade and tumor expression of leptin and its receptor. This suggests that autocrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment may promote the growth of high-grade gliomas. Leptin does this through stimulation of cellular pathways that are also advantageous for tumor growth and recurrence: antiapoptosis, proliferation, angiogenesis, and migration. Conversely, a loss of leptin expression attenuates tumor growth. In animal models of colon cancer and melanoma, a decline in the expression and secretion of leptin resulted in a reduction of tumor growth. In these models, positive mental stimulation through environmental enrichment decreased leptin secretion and improved tumor outcome. This review explores the link between leptin and glioblastoma. PMID:22263109

  6. Cerebral cryptococcoma mimicking glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ulett, Kimberly B; Cockburn, James W J; Jeffree, Rosalind; Woods, Marion L

    2017-02-10

    Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii cause invasive fungal disease, with meningitis being the most common manifestation of central nervous system (CNS) disease. Encapsulated cryptococcomas occur rarely, predominantly in immunocompetent hosts, usually related to C. gattii Our patient was an immunocompetent man who presented with headache and a large cystic CNS lesion thought to be glioblastoma. Biopsy of a concomitant lung lesion confirmed cryptococcoma and empiric antifungal therapy was started for presumed CNS cryptococcoma. Antifungal therapy failed to shrink the CNS lesion, and surgical excision confirmed C. gattii CNS cryptococcoma. Following surgery he had complete resolution of symptoms. This case highlights that cryptococcoma cannot be distinguished from tumour on clinical or imaging findings. A combined medical and surgical approach is optimal for the management of large or surgically accessible cryptococcomas, as antifungal therapy alone is unlikely to penetrate large lesions sufficiently to lead to a cure.

  7. Over-expression of CHAF1A promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in glioblastoma cells via AKT/FOXO3a/Bim pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Honghai; Du, Bin; Jiang, Huili; Gao, Jun

    2016-01-22

    Chromatinassembly factor 1 subunit A (CHAF1A) has been reported to be involved in several human diseases including cancer. However, the biological and clinical significance of CHAF1A in glioblastoma progression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that up-regulation of CHAF1A happens frequently in glioblastoma tissues and is associated with glioblastoma prognosis. Knockout of CHAF1A by CRISPR/CAS9 technology induce G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma cell U251 and U87. In addition, inhibition of CHAF1A influenced the signal transduction of the AKT/FOXO3a/Bim axis, which is required for glioblastoma cell proliferation. Taken together, these results show that CHAF1A contributes to the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and may be developed as a de novo drug target and prognosis biomarker of glioblastoma.

  8. Human endothelial cells are activated by interferon-γ plus tumour necrosis factor-α to kill intracellular Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    De Assis, M C; Da Costa, A O; Barja-Fidalgo, T C; Plotkowski, M C

    2000-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to activate endothelial cells. To investigate the effect of cytokines on the interaction of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cells were treated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plus tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) for 24 hr and exposed to P. aeruginosa suspension for 1 hr. Light microscopy showed that activated cells internalized significantly more bacteria than control cells. To ascertain the effect of cytokines on the microbicidal activity of HUVEC, the concentrations of viable intracellular (IC) bacteria in control and activated cells were determined, at 1 and 5 hr postinfection, by the gentamicin exclusion assay. In control cells, no significant decrease in the concentration of bacteria was detected 5 hr postinfection. In contrast, in activated cells the concentration of viable bacteria at 5 hr was significantly lower. Concentrations of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide detected in supernatants of activated cells were significantly higher than in control cell supernatants. HUVEC anti-P. aeruginosa activity was insensitive to the antioxidants superoxide dismutase, dimethylthiourea and allopurinol as well as to the l-arginine analogues aminoguanidine and NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), but was significantly inhibited by catalase. Our results indicate that HUVEC can be activated by IFN-γ plus TNF-α to kill IC P. aeruginosa and suggest a role for reactive oxygen radicals, notably hydrogen peroxide, in HUVEC antibacterial activity. PMID:11012781

  9. Bloody cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage alters intracellular calcium regulation in cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K; Hirai, K; Aoyagi, M; Yamamoto, K; Hirakawa, K; Katayama, Y

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction may contribute to cerebral vasospasm and aggravation of ischemic brain damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It has been suggested that oxyhemoglobin derived from subarachnoid blood clots might be a prime candidate for cerebral vasospasm. In this study, cisternal bloody cerebrospinal fluid (bCSF) was collected from SAH patients four and seven days after aneurysmal rupture, and the effects of bCSF on the cell growth and intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) dynamics were investigated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CSF collected from patients undergoing other intracranial surgeries was used as a control. Pre-treatment with bCSF4 significantly facilitated cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in the cultured endothelial cells, and significantly enhanced histamine-induced [Ca2+]i increase, while acute treatment of the bCSF elicited no [Ca2+]i change. Pre-treatment with interleukin-1 beta showed a similar significant enhancement of the histamine-induced [Ca2+]i response, while pre-treatment with high concentrations of serum or interleukin-6 did not change the [Ca2+]i response. It is concluded that bCSF collected from SAH patients contains some substances which enhance endothelial cell proliferation and sensitivity to inflammatory mediator.

  10. Intracellular trafficking of hyaluronic acid-chitosan oligomer-based nanoparticles in cultured human ocular surface cells

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Ruiz, Laura; de la Fuente, María; Párraga, Jenny E.; López-García, Antonio; Fernández, Itziar; Seijo, Begoña; Sánchez, Alejandro; Calonge, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Nanoparticles are a promising alternative for ocular drug delivery, and our group has proposed that they are especially suited for ocular mucosal disorders. The goal of the present study was to determine which internalization pathway is used by cornea-derived and conjunctiva-derived cell lines to take up hyaluronic acid (HA)-chitosan oligomer (CSO)-based nanoparticles (HA-CSO NPs). We also determined if plasmids loaded onto the NPs reached the cell nucleus. Methods HA-CSO NPs were made of fluoresceinamine labeled HA and CSO by ionotropic gelation and were conjugated with a model plasmid DNA for secreted alkaline phosphatase. Human epithelial cell lines derived from the conjunctiva and the cornea were exposed to HA-CSO NPs for 1 h and the uptake was investigated in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. The influence of temperature and metabolic inhibition, the effect of blocking hyaluronan receptors, and the inhibition of main endocytic pathways were studied by fluorometry. Additionally, the metabolic pathways implicated in the degradation of HA-CSO NPs were evaluated by lysosome identification. Results There was intracellular localization of plasmid-loaded HACSO NPs in both corneal and conjunctival cells. The intracellular presence of NPs diminished with time. HA-CSO NP uptake was significantly reduced by inhibition of active transport at 4 °C and by sodium azide. Uptake was also inhibited by blocking hyaluronan receptors with anti-CD44 Hermes-1 antibody, by excess HA, and by filipin, an inhibitor of caveolin-dependent endocytosis. HA-CSO NPs had no effect on cell viability. The transfection efficiency of the model plasmid was significantly higher in NP treated cells than in controls. Conclusions HA-CSO NPs were internalized by two different ocular surface cell lines by an active transport mechanism. The uptake was mediated by hyaluronan receptors through a caveolin-dependent endocytic pathway, yielding remarkable transfection efficiency. Most of HA

  11. Shikonin Inhibits the Migration and Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells by Targeting Phosphorylated β-Catenin and Phosphorylated PI3K/Akt: A Potential Mechanism for the Anti-Glioma Efficacy of a Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Ying; Hu, Yi; Que, Zhong-You; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-Hui; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Yi-Xue

    2015-10-09

    Shikonin is an anthraquinone derivative extracted from the root of lithospermum. Shikonin is traditionally used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases such as hepatitis. Shikonin also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in various tumors. However, the effect of shikonin on gliomas has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of shikonin on the migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells as well as the underlying mechanisms. U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cells were treated with shikonin at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μmol/L and cell viability, migration and invasiveness were assessed with CCK8, scratch wound healing, in vitro Transwell migration, and invasion assays. The expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the expression of phosphorylated β-catenin (p-β-catenin) and phosphorylated PI3K/Akt were also checked. Results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in U87 and U251 cells. The expression of p-β-catenin showed contrary trends in two cell lines. It was significantly inhibited in U87 cells and promoted in U251 cells. Results in this work indicated that shikonin displayed an inhibitory effect on the migration and invasion of glioma cells by inhibiting the expression and activity of MMP-2 and -9. In addition, shikonin also inhibited the expression of p-PI3K and p-Akt to attenuate cell migration and invasion and MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in both cell lines, which could be reversed by the PI3K/Akt pathway agonist, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).

  12. Shikonin Inhibits the Migration and Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells by Targeting Phosphorylated β-Catenin and Phosphorylated PI3K/Akt: A Potential Mechanism for the Anti-Glioma Efficacy of a Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-Ying; Hu, Yi; Que, Zhong-You; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-Hui; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Yi-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin is an anthraquinone derivative extracted from the root of lithospermum. Shikonin is traditionally used in the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases such as hepatitis. Shikonin also inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in various tumors. However, the effect of shikonin on gliomas has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of shikonin on the migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cells as well as the underlying mechanisms. U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cells were treated with shikonin at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μmol/L and cell viability, migration and invasiveness were assessed with CCK8, scratch wound healing, in vitro Transwell migration, and invasion assays. The expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the expression of phosphorylated β-catenin (p-β-catenin) and phosphorylated PI3K/Akt were also checked. Results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in U87 and U251 cells. The expression of p-β-catenin showed contrary trends in two cell lines. It was significantly inhibited in U87 cells and promoted in U251 cells. Results in this work indicated that shikonin displayed an inhibitory effect on the migration and invasion of glioma cells by inhibiting the expression and activity of MMP-2 and -9. In addition, shikonin also inhibited the expression of p-PI3K and p-Akt to attenuate cell migration and invasion and MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in both cell lines, which could be reversed by the PI3K/Akt pathway agonist, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). PMID:26473829

  13. Comparative Expression Study of the Endo–G Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Repertoire in Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cells, U87-MG Cells and Non Malignant Cells of Neural Origin Unveils New Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Sarah; Carapito, Christine; Dong, Jihu; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Cianférani, Sarah; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs), U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs). The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs). Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24662753

  14. RhoE interferes with Rb inactivation and regulates the proliferation and survival of the U87 human glioblastoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, Enric; Minambres, Rebeca; Mocholi, Enric; Ivorra, Carmen; Perez-Arago, Amparo; Guerri, Consuelo; Perez-Roger, Ignacio . E-mail: iperez@uch.ceu.es; Guasch, Rosa M. . E-mail: guasch@cipf.es

    2007-02-15

    Rho GTPases are important regulators of actin cytoskeleton, but they are also involved in cell proliferation, transformation and oncogenesis. One of this proteins, RhoE, inhibits cell proliferation, however the mechanism that regulates this effect remains poorly understood. Therefore, we undertook the present study to determine the role of RhoE in the regulation of cell proliferation. For this purpose we generated an adenovirus system to overexpress RhoE in U87 glioblastoma cells. Our results show that RhoE disrupts actin cytoskeleton organization and inhibits U87 glioblastoma cell proliferation. Importantly, RhoE expressing cells show a reduction in Rb phosphorylation and in cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, RhoE inhibits ERK activation following serum stimulation of quiescent cells. Based in these findings, we propose that RhoE inhibits ERK activation, thereby decreasing cyclin D1 expression and leading to a reduction in Rb inactivation, and that this mechanism is involved in the RhoE-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, we also demonstrate that RhoE induces apoptosis in U87 cells and also in colon carcinoma and melanoma cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and survival, and suggest that this protein may be considered as an oncosupressor since it is capable to induce apoptosis in several tumor cell lines.

  15. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Replication, Intracellular Trafficking, and Pathogenicity in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D.; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route. PMID

  16. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Achazi, Katharina; Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route.

  17. Quantitative comparison of functional screening by measuring intracellular Ca2+ with radioligand binding at recombinant human dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kassack, Matthias U

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether screening at dopamine receptors performed with a recently described functional assay for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides data that correlate significantly with radioligand binding data in the literature, thus possibly allowing researchers to replace radioligand binding with nonradioactive functional screening. Human dopamine receptors hD1 and hD2L (representing Gs [hD1] or Gi [hD2L] coupled GPCRs) were recombinantly expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Cells were loaded with Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1/AM and evenly distributed in 384 well plates. Seventeen test compounds were screened for agonistic activity by injection into the cell suspension and monitoringH of intracellular Ca2+ with a fluorescence microplate reader. Then, standard agonists (100nM SKF38393 for hD1, 30nM quinpirole for hD2L) were injected into wells preincubated with test compounds (screening for antagonism). Injection of various agonists resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in fluorescence. Further, preincubation of antagonists with dopamine receptor expressing cells inhibits concentration-dependent the agonist-induced increase in fluorescence. Calculated apparent functional Ki values correlate with radioligand binding data in the literature (r2 = 0.7796 for D1, r2 = 0.7743 for D2). The correlation between apparent functional Ki values and radioligand binding data for the 17 tested compounds suggests that screening of test compounds at dopamine receptors with the functional Ca2+ assay can replace radioligand binding studies. Furthermore, besides apparent Ki values, information about agonistic or antagonistic properties of a test compound can be obtained with the functional Ca2+ assay.

  18. Differential regulation of intracellular factors mediating cell cycle, DNA repair and inflammation following exposure to silver nanoparticles in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Investigating the cellular and molecular signatures in eukaryotic cells following exposure to nanoparticles will further our understanding on the mechanisms mediating nanoparticle induced effects. This study illustrates the molecular effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) in normal human lung cells, IMR-90 and human brain cancer cells, U251 with emphasis on gene expression, induction of inflammatory mediators and the interaction of Ag-np with cytosolic proteins. Results We report that silver nanoparticles are capable of adsorbing cytosolic proteins on their surface that may influence the function of intracellular factors. Gene and protein expression profiles of Ag-np exposed cells revealed up regulation of many DNA damage response genes such as Gadd 45 in both the cell types and ATR in cancer cells. Moreover, down regulation of genes necessary for cell cycle progression (cyclin B and cyclin E) and DNA damage response/repair (XRCC1 and 3, FEN1, RAD51C, RPA1) was observed in both the cell lines. Double strand DNA damage was observed in a dose dependant manner as evidenced in γH2AX foci assay. There was a down regulation of p53 and PCNA in treated cells. Cancer cells in particular showed a concentration dependant increase in phosphorylated p53 accompanied by the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP. Our results demonstrate the involvement of NFκB and MAP kinase pathway in response to Ag-np exposure. Up regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukins (IL-8, IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor, macrophage inflammatory protein in fibroblasts following Ag-np exposure were also observed. Conclusion In summary, Ag-np can modulate gene expression and protein functions in IMR-90 cells and U251 cells, leading to defective DNA repair, proliferation arrest and inflammatory response. The observed changes could also be due to its capability to adsorb cytosolic proteins on its surface. PMID:22321936

  19. Improbability of Effective Vaccination Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Because of Its Intracellular Transmission and Rectal Portal of Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1992-09-01

    The worldwide effort to produce a vaccine against AIDS continues to disregard the fact that even human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity are ineffective against virus within cells without viral antigens on the cell membrane-and that much of HIV infection is transmitted in this manner. According to a recent report, a simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine that protected monkeys against an intravenous challenge with cell-free virus was, as predicted, ineffective against an intravenous challenge with the same amount of virus in infected cells. Moreover, antibody and HIV have been found to coexist in cell-free plasma from asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Excluding direct introduction of HIV into the bloodstream, the most common and efficient form of transmission of HIV infection is by receptive anal intercourse, and semen contains large numbers of infected cells per milliliter. Recent reports showing that colorectal cells can be persistently infected by HIV and that HIV RNA and cDNA are present in the cells of the colon of dead AIDS patients indicate that either cell-free or intracellular HIV has the capacity to multiply at the portal of entry in the colorectal area without interference from neutralizing antibodies. The available data provide no basis for testing any HIV vaccine in human beings either before or after infection. The main challenge is to find a way to kill cells with chromosomally integrated HIV cDNA without harming normal cells, perhaps by identifying repressor proteins that might be produced by the cells with integrated HIV cDNA and thus could become specific targets for cell-killing drugs.

  20. Identification of a novel intracellular cholesteryl ester hydrolase (carboxylesterase 3) in human macrophages: compensatory increase in its expression after carboxylesterase 1 silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Marqueen, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the removal of free cholesterol (FC) from macrophage foam cells, and several enzymes have been identified as intracellular CE hydrolases in human macrophages. We have previously reported the antiatherogenic role of a carboxylesterase [carboxylesterase 1 (CES1)], and the objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of CES1 to total CE hydrolytic activity in human macrophages. Two approaches, namely, immune depletion and short hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated knockdown, were used. Immuneprecipitation by a CES1-specific antibody resulted in a 70–80% decrease in enzyme activity, indicating that CES1 is responsible for >70% of the total CE hydrolytic activity. THP1-shRNA cells were generated by stably transfecting human THP1 cells with four different CES1-specific shRNA vectors. Despite a significant (>90%) reduction in CES1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels, CES1 knockdown neither decreased intracellular CE hydrolysis nor decreased FC efflux. Examination of the underlying mechanisms for the observed lack of effects of CES1 knockdown revealed a compensatory increase in the expression of a novel CES, CES3, which is only expressed at <30% of the level of CES1 in human macrophages. Transient overexpression of CES3 led to an increase in CE hydrolytic activity, mobilization of intracellular lipid droplets, and a reduction in cellular CE content, establishing CES3 as a bona fide CE hydrolase. This study provides the first evidence of functional compensation whereby increased expression of CES3 restores intracellular CE hydrolytic activity and FC efflux in CES1-deficient cells. Furthermore, these data support the concept that intracellular CE hydrolysis is a multienzyme process. PMID:22700792

  1. Oncogenic effects of miR-10b in glioblastoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guessous, Fadila; Alvarado-Velez, Melissa; Marcinkiewicz, Lukasz; Zhang, Ying; Kim, Jungeun; Heister, Simon; Kefas, Benjamin; Godlewski, Jakub; Schiff, David; Purow, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs and cancer stem cells have emerged as critical players in glioblastoma, one of the deadliest human cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of microRNA-10b in glioblastoma cells and stem cells. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed a correlation between high miR-10b levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. We measured the levels of miR-10b and found that it is upregulated in human glioblastoma tissues, glioblastoma cell and stem cell lines as compared to normal human tissues or astrocytes. Inhibition of miR-10b with a specific antagomir inhibited the proliferation of glioblastoma established and stem cell lines. Inhibition of miR-10b strongly reduced cell invasion and migration in glioblastoma cell and stem cell lines while overexpression of miR-10b induced cell migration and invasion. We also investigated several predicted targets of miR-10b but could not verify any of them experimentally. Additionally, miR-10b inhibition significantly decreased the in vivo growth of stem cell-derived orthotopic GBM xenografts. Altogether, our findings confirm the oncogenic effects of miR-10b in GBM cells and show for the first time a role of this microRNA in GBM stem cells. Targeting miR-10b might therefore inhibit glioblastoma stem cells, which are thought to be at the origin of glioblastoma and to contribute its recurrence and resistance to therapy. PMID:23307328

  2. Supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme with spinal metastases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Redhu, Rakesh; Nadkarni, Trimurti; Goel, Atul

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Metastasis of intracranial glioblastoma via the cerebrospinal fluid to the spine is a rare occurrence. We present two cases of glioblastoma multiforme with spinal leptomeningeal spread who presented with back pain and paraparesis. PMID:21572635

  3. Human IDO-competent, long-lived immunoregulatory dendritic cells induced by intracellular pathogen, and their fate in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rajeev K.; Miles, Brodie; Parmar, Rajesh; Garg, Neeraj K.; Dalai, Sarat K.; Baban, Babak; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    Targeting of myeloid-dendritic cell receptor DC-SIGN by numerous chronic infectious agents, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, is shown to drive-differentiation of monocytes into dysfunctional mDCs. These mDCs exhibit alterations of their fine-tuned homeostatic function and contribute to dysregulated immune-responses. Here, we utilize P. gingivalis mutant strains to show that pathogen-differentiated mDCs from primary human-monocytes display anti-apoptotic profile, exhibited by elevated phosphorylated-Foxo1, phosphorylated-Akt1, and decreased Bim-expression. This results in an overall inhibition of DC-apoptosis. Direct stimulation of complex component CD40 on DCs leads to activation of Akt1, suggesting CD40 involvement in anti-apoptotic effects observed. Further, these DCs drove dampened CD8+ T-cell and Th1/Th17 effector-responses while inducing CD25+Foxp3+CD127− Tregs. In vitro Treg induction was mediated by DC expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and was confirmed in IDO-KO mouse model. Pathogen-infected & CMFDA-labeled MoDCs long-lasting survival was confirmed in a huMoDC reconstituted humanized mice. In conclusion, our data implicate PDDCs as an important target for resolution of chronic infection. PMID:28198424

  4. Human IDO-competent, long-lived immunoregulatory dendritic cells induced by intracellular pathogen, and their fate in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rajeev K; Miles, Brodie; Parmar, Rajesh; Garg, Neeraj K; Dalai, Sarat K; Baban, Babak; Cutler, Christopher W

    2017-02-15

    Targeting of myeloid-dendritic cell receptor DC-SIGN by numerous chronic infectious agents, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, is shown to drive-differentiation of monocytes into dysfunctional mDCs. These mDCs exhibit alterations of their fine-tuned homeostatic function and contribute to dysregulated immune-responses. Here, we utilize P. gingivalis mutant strains to show that pathogen-differentiated mDCs from primary human-monocytes display anti-apoptotic profile, exhibited by elevated phosphorylated-Foxo1, phosphorylated-Akt1, and decreased Bim-expression. This results in an overall inhibition of DC-apoptosis. Direct stimulation of complex component CD40 on DCs leads to activation of Akt1, suggesting CD40 involvement in anti-apoptotic effects observed. Further, these DCs drove dampened CD8(+) T-cell and Th1/Th17 effector-responses while inducing CD25(+)Foxp3(+)CD127(-) Tregs. In vitro Treg induction was mediated by DC expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and was confirmed in IDO-KO mouse model. Pathogen-infected &CMFDA-labeled MoDCs long-lasting survival was confirmed in a huMoDC reconstituted humanized mice. In conclusion, our data implicate PDDCs as an important target for resolution of chronic infection.

  5. Rapid Method To Determine Intracellular Drug Concentrations in Cellular Uptake Assays: Application to Metformin in Organic Cation Transporter 1-Transfected Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Huan-Chieh; Zur, Arik A; Maurer, Tristan S; Yee, Sook Wah; Tolsma, John; Jasper, Paul; Scott, Dennis O; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    Because of the importance of intracellular unbound drug concentrations in the prediction of in vivo concentrations that are determinants of drug efficacy and toxicity, a number of assays have been developed to assess in vitro unbound concentrations of drugs. Here we present a rapid method to determine the intracellular unbound drug concentrations in cultured cells, and we apply the method along with a mechanistic model to predict concentrations of metformin in subcellular compartments of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Intracellular space (ICS) was calculated by subtracting the [(3)H]-inulin distribution volume (extracellular space, ECS) from the [(14)C]-urea distribution volume (total water space, TWS). Values obtained for intracellular space (mean ± S.E.M.; μl/10(6) cells) of monolayers of HEK cells (HEK-empty vector [EV]) and cells overexpressing human organic cation transporter 1 (HEK-OCT1), 1.21± 0.07 and 1.25±0.06, respectively, were used to determine the intracellular metformin concentrations. After incubation of the cells with 5 µM metformin, the intracellular concentrations were 26.4 ± 7.8 μM and 268 ± 11.0 μM, respectively, in HEK-EV and HEK-OCT1. In addition, intracellular metformin concentrations were lower in high K(+) buffer (140 mM KCl) compared with normal K(+) buffer (5.4 mM KCl) in HEK-OCT1 cells (54.8 ± 3.8 μM and 198.1 ± 11.2 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Our mechanistic model suggests that, depending on the credible range of assumed physiologic values, the positively charged metformin accumulates to particularly high levels in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. This method together with the computational model can be used to determine intracellular unbound concentrations and to predict subcellular accumulation of drugs in other complex systems such as primary cells.

  6. Regulation of intracellular calcium in cortical neurons transgenic for human Aβ40 and Aβ42 following nutritive challenge

    PubMed Central

    Shirwany, Najeeb A; Xie, Jun; Guo, Qing

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is not fully understood. Amyloid plaques could be causally linked to neuronal loss in AD. Two proteolytic products of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), Amyloid β40 (Aβ40) and Amyloid β42 (Aβ42), are considered to be critical in the neurodegeneration seen in AD. However, in transgenic mice that overexpress human Aβ40 or Aβ42, it was shown that Aβ42 was much more amyloidogenic than Aβ40. In contrast to this observation, we have found that cultured cortical neurons from mice transgenic for human Aβ40 and for Aβ42 are both and statistically equally vulnerable to nutritive challenge induced by trophic factor withdrawal (TFW). Aberrant regulation of InsP3R (Inositol triphosphate receptor)-mediated calcium release has been implicated in neuronal cell death. It is however not clear whether this pathway plays a critical role in cortical neurons transgenic for different species of human Aβ. We now report that Aβ40 and Aβ42 equally exacerbated intracellular calcium response to TFW in cortical neurons following TFW. When bradykinin (BK), a potent stimulant of InsP3R-mediated calcium release from ER, was applied to these cells, wild-type (WT) neurons exhibited a steep rise in [Ca2+]i but this was not observed in either Aβ transgenic type. Similarly, when 1 μM Xestopongin C (XeC), a specific blocker of InsP3R, was applied to these neurons, WT cells showed a significant attenuation of increase in [Ca2+]i following TFW, while elevation in [Ca2+]i induced by TFW remained largely unchanged in Aβ40 and Aβ42 cells. Finally, when we treated these cells with a Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA; 10 μM), all three cell types had a marked attenuation of [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that the exacerbated calcium dysregulation following TFW in Aβ transgenic neurons are likely to be mediated by calcium channels other than ER InsP3R receptors. Overall, our results also suggest that a highly amyloidogenic Abeta species, such as Aβ42

  7. The pleiotrophin-ALK axis is required for tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama-Nasu, R; Haruta, R; Nasu-Nishimura, Y; Taniue, K; Katou, Y; Shirahige, K; Todo, T; Ino, Y; Mukasa, A; Saito, N; Matsui, M; Takahashi, R; Hoshino-Okubo, A; Sugano, H; Manabe, E; Funato, K; Akiyama, T

    2014-04-24

    Increasing evidence suggests that brain tumors arise from the transformation of neural stem/precursor/progenitor cells. Much current research on human brain tumors is focused on the stem-like properties of glioblastoma. Here we show that anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand pleiotrophin are required for the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). Furthermore, we demonstrate that pleiotrophin is transactivated directly by SOX2, a transcription factor essential for the maintenance of both neural stem cells and GSCs. We speculate that the pleiotrophin-ALK axis may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  8. Targeting and killing glioblastoma with monoclonal antibody to O-acetyl GD2 ganglioside

    PubMed Central

    Fougeray, Sophie; Oliver, Lisa; Geraldo, Fanny; Terme, Mickaël; Dorvillius, Mylène; Loussouarn, Delphine; Vallette, François; Paris, François; Birklé, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    There are still unmet medical needs in the treatment of glioblastoma, the most common and the most aggressive glioma of all brain tumors. Here, we found that O-acetyl GD2 is expressed in surgically resected human glioblastoma tissue. In addition, we demonstrated that 8B6 monoclonal antibody specific for O-acetylat GD2 could effectively inhibit glioblastoma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate that O-acetylated GD2 represents a novel antigen for immunotherapeutic-based treatment of high-grade gliomas. PMID:27172791

  9. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950`s While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma.

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Is Frequently Expressed in Glioblastoma and May Be Induced in Vitro by Combined 5-Aza-2′-Deoxycytidine and Interferon-γ Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wastowski, Isabela J.; Simões, Renata T.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Pancoto, João T.; Poras, Isabelle; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuèle; Bernaudin, Myriam; Valable, Samuel; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Flajollet, Sébastien; Jensen, Stine S.; Ferrone, Soldano; Carosella, Edgardo D.; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Moreau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule involved in immune tolerance processes, playing an important role in the maintenance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. Although HLA-G expression is restricted in normal tissues, it is broadly expressed in malignant tumors and may favor tumor immune escape. We analyzed HLA-G protein and mRNA expression in tumor samples from patients with glioblastoma collected in France, Denmark, and Brazil. We found HLA-G protein expression in 65 of 108 samples and mRNA in 20 of 21 samples. The absence of HLA-G protein expression was associated with a better long-term survival rate. The mechanisms underlying HLA-G gene expression were investigated in glioma cell lines U251MG, D247MG, and U138MG. Induction of HLA-G transcriptional activity was dependent of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment and enhanced by interferon-γ. HLA-G protein expression was observed in U251MG cells only. These cells exhibited a permissive chromatin state at the HLA-G gene promoter and the highest levels of induced HLA-G transcriptional activity following 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment. Several antigen-presenting machinery components were up-regulated in U251MG cells after demethylating and IFN-γ treatments, suggesting an effect on the up-regulation of HLA-G cell surface expression. Therefore, because of its role in tumor tolerance, HLA-G found to be expressed in glioblastoma samples should be taken into consideration in clinical studies on the pathology and in the design of therapeutic strategies to prevent its expression in HLA-G–negative tumors. PMID:23219427

  11. Mutation-Driven Divergence and Convergence Indicate Adaptive Evolution of the Intracellular Human-Restricted Pathogen, Bartonella bacilliformis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sandip; Minnick, Michael F.; Chattopadhyay, Sujay

    2016-01-01

    Among all species of Bartonella, human-restricted Bartonella bacilliformis is the most virulent but harbors one of the most reduced genomes. Carrión’s disease, the infection caused by B. bacilliformis, has been afflicting poor rural populations for centuries in the high-altitude valleys of the South American Andes, where the pathogen’s distribution is probably restricted by its sand fly vector’s range. Importantly, Carrión’s disease satisfies the criteria set by the World Health Organization for a disease amenable to elimination. However, to date, there are no genome-level studies to identify potential footprints of B. bacilliformis (patho)adaptation. Our comparative genomic approach demonstrates that the evolution of this intracellular pathogen is shaped predominantly via mutation. Analysis of strains having publicly-available genomes shows high mutational divergence of core genes leading to multiple sub-species. We infer that the sub-speciation event might have happened recently where a possible adaptive divergence was accelerated by intermediate emergence of a mutator phenotype. Also, within a sub-species the pathogen shows inter-clonal adaptive evolution evidenced by non-neutral accumulation of convergent amino acid mutations. A total of 67 non-recombinant core genes (over-representing functional categories like DNA repair, glucose metabolic process, ATP-binding and ligase) were identified as candidates evolving via adaptive mutational convergence. Such convergence, both at the level of genes and their encoded functions, indicates evolution of B. bacilliformis clones along common adaptive routes, while there was little diversity within a single clone. PMID:27167125

  12. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1.

  13. Effect of toluene diisocyanate on homeostasis of intracellular-free calcium in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.-S. . E-mail: psliu@mail.scu.edu.tw; Chiung, Y.-M.; Kao, Y.-Y.

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms of TDI (2,4-toluene diisocyanate)-induced occupational asthma are not fully established. Previous studies have indicated that TDI induces non-specific bronchial hyperreactivity to methacholine and induces contraction of smooth muscle tissue by activating 'capsaicin-sensitive' nerves resulting asthma. Cytosolic-free calcium ion concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) are elevated when either capsaicin acts at vanilloid receptors, or methacholine at muscarinic receptors. This study therefore investigated the effects of TDI on Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. TDI was found to elevate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} by releasing Ca{sup 2+} from the intracellular stores and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx. 500 {mu}M TDI induced a net [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} increase of 112 {+-} 8 and 78 {+-} 6 nM in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}, respectively. In Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer, TDI induced Ca{sup 2+} release from internal stores to reduce their Ca{sup 2+} content and this reduction was evidenced by a suppression occurring on the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} rise induced by thapsigargin, ionomycin, and methacholine after TDI incubation. In the presence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}, simultaneous exposure to TDI and methacholine led a higher level of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} compared to single methacholine stimulation, that might explain that TDI induces bronchial hyperreactivity to methacholine. We conclude that TDI is capable of interfering the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} homeostasis including releasing Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores and inducing extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx. The interaction of this novel character and bronchial hyperreactivity need further investigation.

  14. Mannose-inhibitable adhesins and T3-T7 receptors of Klebsiella pneumoniae inhibit phagocytosis and intracellular killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pruzzo, C; Debbia, E; Satta, G

    1982-01-01

    It has recently been shown that Klebsiella pneumoniae strains adhere to human epithelial cells and that adherence is mediated by mannose-inhibitable adhesins which are also receptors for coliphages T3 and T7. We have now found that Klebsiella strain K59, which adheres to human epithelial cells and carries the receptors for coliphages T3 and T7, adheres to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) at 4 degrees C. Strains KRTT1 and KRTT2, which are spontaneous mutants unable to adsorb coliphages T3 and T7 and adhere to human epithelial cells, at this temperature did not adhere to PMN. Adherence of K59 cells to PMN at 4 degrees C was inhibited by D-mannose, by UV-inactivated T7 phages, and by pepsin-digested anti-K59 antibodies absorbed with KRTT1 cells. At 37 degrees C the number of PMN with KRTT bacteria associated was fourfold higher than at 4 degrees C. On the contrary, the number of PMN with K59 bacteria associated at this temperature was fourfold lower than at 4 degrees C. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing experiments performed at 37 degrees C showed that KRTT1 and KRTT2 were phagocytized and killed at a higher rate than K59. After blocking of the mannose-inhibitable adhesins and T3-T7 receptors (MIAT) by D-mannose, UV-inactivated bacteriophage T7, or specific antibodies, K59 cells became more sensitive to phagocytosis and intracellular killing at 37 degrees C. K59 cells lysogenic for prophage AP3 were approximately as sensitive to phagocytosis and intracellular killing by human PMN as strains KRTT1 and KRTT2. Unencapsulated Klebsiella strains isolated from clinical specimens were found to carry MIAT most often. Four such strains were found much more resistant to phagocytosis and intracellular killing than their spontaneous mutants resistant to bacteriophages T3 and T7. PMID:7047402

  15. Calpain 2 Is Required for the Invasion of Glioblastoma Cells in the Zebrafish Brain Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sangeet; La Du, Jane; Tanguay, Robert L.; Greenwood, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. The ability of glioblastoma cells to invade surrounding brain tissue presents the primary challenge for the success of focal therapeutic approaches. We previously reported that the calcium-activated protease calpain 2 is critical for glioblastoma cell invasion in vitro. Here, we show that expression of calpain 2 is required for the dispersal of glioblastoma cells in a living brain microenvironment. Knockdown of calpain 2 resulted in a 2.9-fold decrease in the invasion of human glioblastoma cells in zebrafish brain. Control cells diffusely migrated up to 450 μm from the site of injection, whereas knockdown cells remained confined in clusters. The invasion study was repeated in organotypic mouse brain tissues, and calpain 2 knockdown cells demonstrated a 2.3-fold lower area of dispersal compared with control cells. In zebrafish brain, glioblastoma cells appeared to migrate in part along the blood vessels of the host. Furthermore, angiogenesis was detected in 27% of zebrafish injected with control cells, whereas only 12.5% of fish receiving knockdown cells showed the formation of new vessels, suggesting a role for calpain 2 in tumor cell angiogenesis. Consistent with the progression of glioblastoma in humans, transplanted tumor cells were not observed to metastasize outside the brain of zebrafish. This study demonstrates that calpain 2 expression is required for the dispersal of glioblastoma cells within the dynamic microenvironment of the brain, identifying zebrafish as a valuable orthotopic system for studying glioblastoma cell invasion. PMID:22183788

  16. Salinomycin encapsulated nanoparticles as a targeting vehicle for glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tığlı Aydın, R Seda; Kaynak, Gökçe; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-02-01

    Salinomycin has been introduced as a novel alternative to traditional anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to test a strategy designed to deliver salinomycin to glioblastoma cells in vitro. Salinomycin-encapsulated polysorbate 80-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (P80-SAL-PLGA) were prepared and characterized with respect to particle size, morphology, thermal properties, drug encapsulation efficiency and controlled salinomycin-release behaviour. The in vitro cellular uptake of P80-SAL-PLGA (5 and 10 µM) or uncoated nanoparticles was assessed in T98G human glioblastoma cells, and the cell viability was investigated with respect to anti-growth activities. SAL, which was successfully transported to T98G glioblastoma cells via P80 coated nanoparticles (∼14% within 60 min), greatly decreased (p < 0.01) the cellular viability of T98G cells. Substantial morphological changes were observed in the T98G cells with damaged actin cytoskeleton. Thus, P80-SAL-PLGA nanoparticles induced cell death, suggesting a potential therapeutic role for this salinomycin delivery system in the treatment of human glioblastoma.

  17. Glioblastoma: changing expectations?

    PubMed

    Arribas Alpuente, Leoncio; Menéndez López, Antonio; Yayá Tur, Ricardo

    2011-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) represents the most aggressive glioma in the adult population. Despite recent research efforts, the prognosis of patients with GB has remained dismal. Lately, the knowledge of genetic information about gliomagenesis has increased; we even have a classification of the genetic expression of the tumour. The main problem is that at the moment we do not have any therapeutical resources to help us better treat these tumours, as we can do, with others tumours like breast, lung and colorectal cancer. We have also improved on diagnostic imaging, especially with the new MRI sequences; we can now better define the characteristics of the tumour area and the surrounding brain structures, allowing us to adjust resections. Thanks to the most advanced surgery techniques, such as neuronavigation, intraoperative control of the nervous function and the tumour volume, the neurosurgeon is able to complete tumour exeresis with less morbidity. These imaging techniques allow the radiation oncologist to better contour the irradiation target volume, the structures and the organs at risk, to diminish the irradiation of apparently healthy tissue. Nowadays, knowledge of brain stem cells provides new expectations for future treatments. Novel targeted agents such as bevacizumab, imatinib, erlotinib, temsirolimus, immunotherapy, cilengitide, talampanel, etc. are helping classical chemotherapeutic agents, like temozolomide, to achieve an increase in overall survival. The main objective is to improve median overall survival, which is currently between 9 and 12 months, with a good quality of life, measured by the ability to carry out daily life activities.

  18. Coordinate activation of Shh and PI3K signaling in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma: new therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Filbin, Mariella Gruber; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Kung, Andrew L; Pak, Ekaterina; Chung, Jarom; Theisen, Matthew A; Sun, Yanping; Franchetti, Yoko; Sun, Yu; Shulman, David S; Redjal, Navid; Tabak, Barbara; Beroukhim, Rameen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Jean; Dorsch, Marion; Buonamici, Silvia; Ligon, Keith L; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2013-11-01

    In glioblastoma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling is frequently activated by loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). However, it is not known whether inhibiting PI3K represents a selective and effective approach for treatment. We interrogated large databases and found that sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is activated in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. We demonstrate that the SHH and PI3K pathways synergize to promote tumor growth and viability in human PTEN-deficient glioblastomas. A combination of PI3K and SHH signaling inhibitors not only suppressed the activation of both pathways but also abrogated S6 kinase (S6K) signaling. Accordingly, targeting both pathways simultaneously resulted in mitotic catastrophe and tumor apoptosis and markedly reduced the growth of PTEN-deficient glioblastomas in vitro and in vivo. The drugs tested here appear to be safe in humans; therefore, this combination may provide a new targeted treatment for glioblastoma.

  19. Coordinate activation of Shh and PI3K signaling in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma: new therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Filbin, Mariella; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Kung, Andrew L.; Pak, Ekaterina; Chung, Jarom; Theisen, Matthew A.; Sun, Yanping; Franchetti, Yoko; Sun, Yu; Shulman, David S.; Redjal, Navid; Tabak, Barbara; Beroukhim, Rameen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Jean; Dorsch, Marion; Buonamici, Silvia; Ligon, Keith L.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    In glioblastoma, PI3kinase (PI3K) signaling is frequently activated by loss of the tumor suppressor PTEN1. However, it is not known whether inhibiting PI3K represents a selective and effective approach for treatment. Here we interrogate large databases and find that Shh signaling is activated in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. We demonstrate that Shh and PI3K pathways synergize to promote tumor growth and viability in human PTEN-deficient glioblastomas. A combination of PI3K and Shh signaling inhibitors not only suppresses activation of both pathways, but also abrogates S6kinase signaling. Accordingly, simultaneously targeting both pathways results in mitotic catastrophe and tumor apoptosis, and dramatically reduces growth of PTEN-deficient glioblastomas in vitro and in vivo. The drugs tested here appear safe in humans; therefore this combination may provide new targeted treatment for glioblastoma. PMID:24076665

  20. MicroRNA-153 regulates glutamine metabolism in glioblastoma through targeting glutaminase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Junyu; Li, Yunjun; Fan, Juan; Chen, Lihua; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive manifestation of malignant gliomas and considered to be among the deadliest forms of human cancers. MicroRNAs are found to tightly regulate diverse biological processes and considered to play important roles in cancer etiology. In this study, we found that microRNA-153 was significantly downregulated in glioblastoma tissues compared to matched non-tumor tissues and in glioblastoma cell lines. To investigate the potential function of microRNA-153 in glioblastoma, we transfected glioblastoma cell line U87MG as well as U373MG with synthetic microRNA-153 oligos and observed decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We further found that microRNA-153 restrained glutamine utilization and glutamate generation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that glutaminase, which catalyzed the formation of glutamate from glutamine, is the potential target of microRNA-153. Indeed, microRNA-153 cannot further reduce glutamine utilization when glutaminase was knocked down. Overexpression of glutaminase abrogates the effect of microRNA-153 on glutamine utilization. Furthermore, the relative expression of microRNA-153 and glutaminase in glioblastoma versus matched non-tumor tissues showed a reverse correlation, further indicating that microRNA-153 may negatively regulate glutaminase in vivo. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of microRNA-153 in regulating glutamine metabolism and strengthen the role of microRNA-153 as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  1. A Review of VEGF/VEGFR-Targeted Therapeutics for Recurrent Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, David A.; Turner, Scott; Peters, Katherine B.; Desjardins, Annick; Gururangan, Sridharan; Sampson, John H.; McLendon, Roger E.; Herndon, James E.; Jones, Lee W.; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Friedman, Allan H.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Bigner, Darell D.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, is a highly angiogenic and deadly tumor. Angiogenesis in glioblastoma, driven by hypoxia-dependent and independent mechanisms, is primarily mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and generates blood vessels with distinctive features. The outcome for patients with recurrent glioblastoma is poor because of ineffective therapies. However, recent encouraging rates of radiographic response and progression-free survival, and adequate safety, led the FDA to grant accelerated approval of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma in May 2009. These results have triggered significant interest in additional antiangiogenic agents and therapeutic strategies for patients with both recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Given the potent antipermeability effect of VEGF inhibitors, the Radiologic Assessment in Neuro- Oncology (RANO) criteria were recently implemented to better assess response among patients with glioblastoma. Although bevacizumab improves survival and quality of life, eventual tumor progression is the norm. Better understanding of resistance mechanisms to VEGF inhibitors and identification of effective therapy after bevacizumab progression are currently a critical need for patients with glioblastoma. PMID:21464146

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of intracellular concentrations of active drug metabolites in human target cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Garner, R C; Lee, L S; Seymour, M; Fuchs, E J; Hubbard, W C; Parsons, T L; Pakes, G E; Fletcher, C V; Flexner, C

    2010-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultrasensitive technique to detect radiolabeled compounds. We administered a microdose (100 µg) of (14)C-labeled zidovudine (ZDV) with or without a standard unlabeled dose (300 mg) to healthy volunteers. Intracellular ZDV-triphosphate (ZDV-TP) concentration was measured using AMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). AMS analysis yielded excellent concordance with LC/MS/MS and was 30,000-fold more sensitive. The kinetics of intracellular ZDV-TP formation changed several-fold over the dose range studied (100 µg-300 mg). AMS holds promise as a tool for quantifying intracellular drug metabolites and other biomediators in vivo.

  3. A Zebrafish Live Imaging Model Reveals Differential Responses of Microglia Toward Glioblastoma Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lloyd; Astell, Katy R.; Velikova, Gergana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and deadliest form of brain cancer. Glioblastomas are infiltrated by a high number of microglia, which promote tumor growth and surrounding tissue invasion. However, it is unclear how microglia and glioma cells physically interact and if there are differences, depending on glioma cell type. Hence, we have developed a novel live imaging assay to study microglia–glioma interactions in vivo in the zebrafish brain. We transplanted well-established human glioblastoma cell lines, U87 and U251, into transgenic zebrafish lines with labelled macrophages/microglia. Our confocal live imaging results show distinct interactions between microglia and U87, as well as U251 glioblastoma cells that differ in number and nature. Importantly these interactions do not appear to be antitumoral as zebrafish microglia do not engulf and phagocytose the human glioblastoma cells. Finally, xenotransplants into the irf8−/− zebrafish mutant that lacks microglia, as well as pharmacological inhibition of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) on microglia, confirm a prominent role for zebrafish microglia in promoting human glioblastoma cell growth. This new model will be an important tool for drug screening and the development of future immunotherapeutics targeting microglia within glioma. PMID:27779463

  4. Human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, controls intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Won; Chan, Qilin; Afton, Scott E; Caruso, Joseph A; Lai, Barry; Weintraub, Neal L; Qin, Zhenyu

    2012-02-01

    The copper transporter ATP7A has attracted significant attention since the discovery of its gene mutation leading to human Menkes disease. We previously reported that ATP7A is highly expressed in the human vasculature and identified a novel vascular function of ATP7A in modulation of the expression and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase. We recently identified that ATP7A expression in THP-1 cells (a monocyte/macrophage model cell line) plays a role in the oxidation of low density lipoproteins, indicating that it is necessary to further investigate its expression and function in monocytes/macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrated the protein and mRNA expression of ATP7A in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. ATP7A was strongly co-localized with the trans-Golgi apparatus in PBMC-derived macrophages. Intracellular copper, detected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, was found to be distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm in human THP-1 cells. To confirm the role of endogenous ATP7A in macrophage copper homeostasis, we performed inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in murine peritoneal macrophages, which showed markedly increased intracellular copper levels in macrophages isolated from ATP7A-deficient mice versus control mice. Moreover, the role of ATP7A in regulating macrophage responses to dermal wounds was studied by introduction of control and ATP7A-downregulated THP-1 cells into dermal wounds of nude mice. Infiltration of THP-1 cells into the wounded area (detected by expression of human macrophage markers MAC2 and CD68) was reduced in response to downregulation of ATP7A, hinting decreased macrophage accumulation subsequent to dermal wounds. In summary, alongside our previous studies, these findings indicate that human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, regulates intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to a dermal wound.

  5. Human Macrophage ATP7A is Localized in the trans-Golgi Apparatus, Controls Intracellular Copper Levels, and Mediates Macrophage Responses to Dermal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won; Chan, Qilin; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Lai, Barry; Weintraub, Neal L.; Qin, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    The copper transporter ATP7A has attracted significant attention since the discovery of its gene mutation leading to human Menkes disease. We previously reported that ATP7A is highly expressed in the human vasculature and identified a novel vascular function of ATP7A in modulation of the expression and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase. We recently identified that ATP7A expression in THP-1 cells (a monocyte/macrophage model cell line) plays a role in the oxidation of low density lipoproteins, indicating that it is necessary to further investigate its expression and function in monocytes/macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrated the protein and mRNA expression of ATP7A in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. ATP7A was strongly co-localized with the trans-Golgi apparatus in PBMC-derived macrophages. Intracellular copper, detected by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, was found to be distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm in human THP-1 cells. To confirm the role of endogenous ATP7A in macrophage copper homeostasis, we performed inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in murine peritoneal macrophages, which showed markedly increased intracellular copper levels in macrophages isolated from ATP7A-deficient mice versus control mice. Moreover, the role of ATP7A in regulating macrophage responses to dermal wounds was studied by introduction of control and ATP7A-downregulated THP-1 cells into dermal wounds of nude mice. Infiltration of THP-1 cells into the wounded area (detected by expression of human macrophage markers MAC2 and CD68) was reduced in response to downregulation of ATP7A, hinting decreased macrophage accumulation subsequent to dermal wounds. In summary, alongside our previous studies, these findings indicate that human macrophage ATP7A is localized in the trans-Golgi apparatus, regulates intracellular copper levels, and mediates macrophage responses to a dermal wound

  6. Agaricus blazei Murill enhances doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by NFκB-mediated increase of intracellular doxorubicin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Seok; Hong, Eock Kee

    2011-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) mushroom, which primarily consists of polysaccharides, possesses anti-tumor activities. However, the mechanisms by which ABM inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma growth remain unknown. Our study demonstrates that ABM acts as an enhancer to sensitize doxorubicin (Dox)-mediated apoptotic signaling, and this sensitization can be achieved by enhancing intracellular Dox accumulation via the inhibition of NFκB activity. These findings suggest that ABM, when combined with low doses of Dox, has the potential to provide more efficient therapeutic effects against drug-resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Fenofibrate-Induced Metabolic Catastrophe and Glioblastoma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Anna; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Zapata, Adriana; Dean, Matthew; Mullinax, Jennifer; Marrero, Luis; Parsons, Christopher; Peruzzi, Francesca; Culicchia, Frank; Ochoa, Augusto; Grabacka, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Fenofibrate (FF) is a common lipid-lowering drug and a potent agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). FF and several other agonists of PPARα have interesting anticancer properties, and our recent studies demonstrate that FF is very effective against tumor cells of neuroectodermal origin. In spite of these promising anticancer effects, the molecular mechanism(s) of FF-induced tumor cell toxicity remains to be elucidated. Here we report a novel PPARα-independent mechanism explaining FF's cytotoxicity in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioblastoma. The mechanism involves accumulation of FF in the mitochondrial fraction, followed by immediate impairment of mitochondrial respiration at the level of complex I of the electron transport chain. This mitochondrial action sensitizes tested glioblastoma cells to the PPARα-dependent metabolic switch from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation. As a consequence, prolonged exposure to FF depletes intracellular ATP, activates the AMP-activated protein kinase–mammalian target of rapamycin–autophagy pathway, and results in extensive tumor cell death. Interestingly, autophagy activators attenuate and autophagy inhibitors enhance FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity. Our results explain the molecular basis of FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity and reveal a new supplemental therapeutic approach in which intracranial infusion of FF could selectively trigger metabolic catastrophe in glioblastoma cells. PMID:25332241

  8. Molecular mechanisms of fenofibrate-induced metabolic catastrophe and glioblastoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Anna; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Zapata, Adriana; Dean, Matthew; Mullinax, Jennifer; Marrero, Luis; Parsons, Christopher; Peruzzi, Francesca; Culicchia, Frank; Ochoa, Augusto; Grabacka, Maja; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Fenofibrate (FF) is a common lipid-lowering drug and a potent agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). FF and several other agonists of PPARα have interesting anticancer properties, and our recent studies demonstrate that FF is very effective against tumor cells of neuroectodermal origin. In spite of these promising anticancer effects, the molecular mechanism(s) of FF-induced tumor cell toxicity remains to be elucidated. Here we report a novel PPARα-independent mechanism explaining FF's cytotoxicity in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioblastoma. The mechanism involves accumulation of FF in the mitochondrial fraction, followed by immediate impairment of mitochondrial respiration at the level of complex I of the electron transport chain. This mitochondrial action sensitizes tested glioblastoma cells to the PPARα-dependent metabolic switch from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation. As a consequence, prolonged exposure to FF depletes intracellular ATP, activates the AMP-activated protein kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin-autophagy pathway, and results in extensive tumor cell death. Interestingly, autophagy activators attenuate and autophagy inhibitors enhance FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity. Our results explain the molecular basis of FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity and reveal a new supplemental therapeutic approach in which intracranial infusion of FF could selectively trigger metabolic catastrophe in glioblastoma cells.

  9. Glioblastoma care in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Justin T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Batchelor, Tracy T; Cahill, Daniel P; Plotkin, Scott R

    2016-01-15

    Glioblastoma is common among elderly patients, a group in which comorbidities and a poor prognosis raise important considerations when designing neuro-oncologic care. Although the standard of care for nonelderly patients with glioblastoma includes maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, the safety and efficacy of these modalities in elderly patients are less certain given the population's underrepresentation in many clinical trials. The authors reviewed the clinical trial literature for reports on the treatment of elderly patients with glioblastoma to provide evidence-based guidance for practitioners. In elderly patients with glioblastoma, there is a survival advantage for those who undergo maximal safe resection, which likely includes an incremental benefit with increasing completeness of resection. Radiotherapy extends survival in selected patients, and hypofractionation appears to be more tolerable than standard fractionation. In addition, temozolomide chemotherapy is safe and extends the survival of patients with tumors that harbor O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation. The combination of standard radiation with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide has not been studied in this population. Although many questions remain unanswered regarding the treatment of glioblastoma in elderly patients, the available evidence provides a framework on which providers may base individual treatment decisions. The importance of tumor biomarkers is increasingly apparent in elderly patients, for whom the therapeutic efficacy of any treatment must be weighed against its potential toxicity. MGMT promoter methylation status has specifically demonstrated utility in predicting the efficacy of temozolomide and should be considered in treatment decisions when possible. Cancer 2016;122:189-197. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. Intracellular Protein Degradation: From a Vague Idea through the Lysosome and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and onto Human Diseases and Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23908826

  11. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  12. Cucurbitacin B purified from Ecballium elaterium (L.) A. Rich from Tunisia inhibits α5β1 integrin-mediated adhesion, migration, proliferation of human glioblastoma cell line and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Touihri-Barakati, Imen; Kallech-Ziri, Olfa; Ayadi, Wiem; Kovacic, Hervé; Hanchi, Belgacem; Hosni, Karim; Luis, José

    2017-02-15

    Integrins are essential protagonists in the complex multistep process of cancer progression and are thus attractive targets for the development of anticancer agents. Cucurbitacin B, a triterpenoid purified from the leaves of Tunisian Ecballium elaterium exhibited an anticancer effect and displayed anti-integrin activity on human glioblastoma U87 cells, without being cytotoxic at concentrations up to 500nM. Here we show that cucurbitacin B affected the adhesion and migration of U87 cells to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 86.2nM and 84.6nM, respectively. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that cucurbitacin B significantly reduced U87 cells motility and affected directional persistence. Cucurbitacin B also inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 70.1nM using Crystal Violet assay. Moreover, cucurbitacin B efficiently inhibited in vitro human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) angiogenesis with concentration up to 10nM. Interestingly, we demonstrate for the first time that this effect was specifically mediated by α5β1 integrins. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of action for cucurbitacin B, which displays a potential interest as a specific anti-integrin drug.

  13. Inhibition of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and 2 (ACC2) Reduces Proliferation and De Novo Lipogenesis of EGFRvIII Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jessica E. C.; Esler, William P.; Patel, Rushi; Lanba, Adhiraj; Vera, Nicholas B.; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Vernochet, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cell proliferation and migration processes are regulated by multiple metabolic pathways including glycolysis and de novo lipogenesis. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is at the junction of lipids synthesis and oxidative metabolic pathways, we investigated whether use of a dual ACC inhibitor would provide a potential therapy against certain lipogenic cancers. The impact of dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibition was investigated using a dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibitor as well as dual siRNA knock down on the cellular viability and metabolism of two glioblastoma multiform cancer cell lines, U87 and a more aggressive form, U87 EGFRvIII. We first demonstrated that while ACCi inhibited DNL in both cell lines, ACCi preferentially blunted the U87 EGFRvIII cellular proliferation capacity. Metabolically, chronic treatment with ACCi significantly upregulated U87 EGFRvIII cellular respiration and extracellular acidification rate, a marker of glycolytic activity, but impaired mitochondrial health by reducing maximal respiration and decreasing mitochondrial ATP production efficiency. Moreover, ACCi treatment altered the cellular lipids content and increased apoptotic caspase activity in U87 EGFRvIII cells. Collectively these data indicate that ACC inhibition, by reducing DNL and increasing cellular metabolic rate, may have therapeutic utility for the suppression of lipogenic tumor growth and warrants further investigation. PMID:28081256

  14. Microarray gene expression profiling of a human glioblastoma cell line exposed in vitro to a 1.9 GHz pulse-modulated radiofrequency field.

    PubMed

    Qutob, S S; Chauhan, V; Bellier, P V; Yauk, C L; Douglas, G R; Berndt, L; Williams, A; Gajda, G B; Lemay, E; Thansandote, A; McNamee, J P

    2006-06-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones has led to public concerns about the health effects associated with exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields. The paramount concern of most persons relates to the potential of these fields to cause cancer. Unlike ionizing radiation, RF fields used for mobile telecommunications (800-1900 MHz) do not possess sufficient energy to directly damage DNA. Most rodent bioassay and in vitro genotoxicity/mutation studies have reported that RF fields at non-thermal levels have no direct mutagenic, genotoxic or carcinogenic effects. However, some evidence has suggested that RF fields may cause detectable postexposure changes in gene expression. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the ability of exposure to a 1.9 GHz pulse-modulated RF field for 4 h at specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 W/kg to affect global gene expression in U87MG glioblastoma cells. We found no evidence that non-thermal RF fields can affect gene expression in cultured U87MG cells relative to the nonirradiated control groups, whereas exposure to heat shock at 43 degrees C for 1 h up-regulated a number of typical stress-responsive genes in the positive control group. Future studies will assess the effect of RF fields on other cell lines and on gene expression in the mouse brain after in vivo exposure.

  15. Selection of DNA Aptamers against Glioblastoma Cells with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dezhi; Wang, Jiangjie; Zhang, Weiyun; Song, Yanling; Li, Xilan; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Mingtao; Zhu, Zhi; Chen, Fuyong; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common and most lethal form of brain tumor in human. Unfortunately, there is still no effective therapy to this fatal disease and the median survival is generally less than one year from the time of diagnosis. Discovery of ligands that can bind specifically to this type of tumor cells will be of great significance to develop early molecular imaging, targeted delivery and guided surgery methods to battle this type of brain tumor. Methodology/Principal Findings We discovered two target-specific aptamers named GBM128 and GBM131 against cultured human glioblastoma cell line U118-MG after 30 rounds selection by a method called cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX). These two aptamers have high affinity and specificity against target glioblastoma cells. They neither recognize normal astraglial cells, nor do they recognize other normal and cancer cell lines tested. Clinical tissues were also tested and the results showed that these two aptamers can bind to different clinical glioma tissues but not normal brain tissues. More importantly, binding affinity and selectivity of these two aptamers were retained in complicated biological environment. Conclusion/Significance The selected aptamers could be used to identify specific glioblastoma biomarkers. Methods of molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery, ligand guided surgery can be further developed based on these ligands for early detection, targeted therapy, and guided surgery of glioblastoma leading to effective treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:23056171

  16. Integrin αvβ3-Targeted IRDye 800CW Near-Infrared Imaging of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruimin; Vider, Jelena; Kovar, Joy L.; Olive, D. Michael; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Kircher, Moritz F.; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis, growth and metastasis. We have tested a targeted probe to visualize integrin receptor expression in glioblastomas using near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging. Experimental design A transgenic glioblastoma mouse model (RCAS-PDGF-driven/tv-a glioblastoma, which mimics the infiltrative growth pattern of human glioblastomas), and two human orthotopic glioblastoma models, (U-87 MG with high integrin β3 expression and TS543 with low integrin β3 expression), were studied. An integrin-targeting NIRF probe, IRDye 800CW-cyclic-RGD peptide (IRDye 800CW-RGD), was tested by in vivo and ex vivo NIRF imaging. Results We demonstrate that the IRDye 800CW-RGD peptide: 1) specifically binds to integrin receptors, 2) is selectively localized to glioblastoma tissue with overexpressed integrin receptors and is retained over prolonged periods of time, 3) is associated with minimal autofluorescence and photobleaching due to imaging at 800 nm, 4) provides delineation of tumor tissue with high precision due to a high tumor-to-normal brain fluorescence ratio (79.7±6.9, 31.2±2.8, and 16.3±1.3) in the U-87 MG, RCAS-PDGF, and TS543 models, respectively; p<0.01) and 5) enables fluorescence-guided glioblastoma resection. Importantly, small foci of residual fluorescence were observed after resection was completed using white light imaging alone, and these fluorescent foci were shown to represent residual tumor tissue by histology. Conclusions NIRF imaging with the IRDye 800CW-RGD probe provides a simple, rapid, low-cost, non-radioactive and highly translatable approach for improved intraoperative glioblastoma visualization and resection. It also has the potential to serve as an imaging platform for noninvasive cancer detection and drug efficacy evaluation studies. PMID:22914772

  17. Increased intracellular Ca(2+) decreases cisplatin resistance by regulating iNOS expression in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xie, Qi; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Yuting; Xu, Na; Xu, Lu; Liu, Shibing; Li, Songyan; Xu, Ye; Sun, Liankun

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have reported that intracellular Ca(2+) signals and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are involved in cell apoptosis. However, the role of iNOS in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells were more resistant to cisplatin than were SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The expression of intracellular Ca(2+) and iNOS was more strongly induced by cisplatin in SKOV3 cells than in SKOV3/DDP cells. TAT-conjugated IP3R-derived peptide (TAT-IDP(S)) increased cisplatin-induced iNOS expression and apoptosis in SKOV3/DDP cells. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) decreased cisplatin-induced iNOS expression and apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. Thus, iNOS induction may be a valuable strategy for improving the anti-tumor efficacy of cisplatin in ovarian cancer.

  18. Coupling between inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and human transient receptor potential channel 1 when intracellular Ca2+ stores are depleted.

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, J A; Sage, S O

    2000-01-01

    In the present study we have investigated the role of inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), functional IP(3) receptors (IP(3)Rs) and the human homologue of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (Trp) channel, human Trp1 (hTrp1), in store-mediated Ca(2+) entry (SMCE) in human platelets. Inhibition of IP(3) recycling using Li(+), or the inhibition of IP(3)Rs using xestospongin C, both resulted in the inhibition of SMCE activation following Ca(2+) store depletion using thapsigargin. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that endogenously expressed hTrp1 couples with IP(3)R type II, but not types I or III, in platelets with depleted intracellular Ca(2+) stores, but not in control, undepleted cells. These results provide strong evidence for the activation of SMCE by conformational coupling involving de novo association between IP(3)Rs and a plasma membrane channel in normal human cells. PMID:10970773

  19. Identification of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in food products: induce intracellular oxidative stress mediated by TNF and CYP1A genes in human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Al-Hadi, Ahmed M; Juhaimi, Fahad Al; Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    Food grade TiO2 (E171) is a synthetic additive, and widely used as a coloring agent in many foods, pharmaceutical and personal care products. A few reports have highlighted that insoluble particulates (less than 200nm) of food grade TiO2 are found in many foods and confectionary products. However, information regarding the physico-chemical properties (i.e., size and shape)-based food grade TiO2 nanotoxicity related human health issues are limited. The main goal of this study is to examine the presence of nano-sized particulates and its structural characteristics of food grade- TiO2 materials and to assess the acute cellular uptake and metabolic stress induced by these particulates in human lung fibroblast (WI-38) cells. The results of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies indicated that about food grade TiO2 sample contains spherical shaped particulate forms in the nano-scale range, <100nm. The intracellular oxidative stress in human lung fibroblast cells (WI-38) was assessed through studies investigating the cellular uptake of the particles, changes in nuclear and cytoplasmic morphology, intracellular ROS, mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, the cell cycle and the expression of genes linked to metabolic stress markers. Altogether our data clearly indicate that primary metabolic stress indicators such as changes in the intracellular ROS, the dose-dependent loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, alterations in cell cycle progression (G2/M>S>G0/G1) and changes in the TNF and CYP1A gene expression pattern are linked to cellular stress. Thus, food grade TiO2 as nano-scaled contaminants could not only be potential human health risk factors, suggesting that safety considerations with special respect to a few crucial factors such as size, and shape should be considered and regulated by food regulators.

  20. Arbutin, an intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenger, protects radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Hua; Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Piao, Jin-Lan; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS have the potential to damage cellular macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids and eventually lead to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the potential of arbutin, a drug chosen from a series of traditional herbal medicine by measuring intracellular hydroxyl radical scavenging ability in X-irradiated U937 cells. Arbutin (hydroquinone-β-D-glucopyranoside), a naturally occurring glucoside of hydroquinone, has been traditionally used to treat pigmentary disorders. However, there are no reports describing the effect of arbutin on IR-induced apoptosis. We confirmed that arbutin can protect cells from apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. The combination of arbutin and X-irradiation could reduce intracellular hydroxyl radical production and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential loss. It also could down-regulate the expression of phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 in whole cell lysate and activate Bax in mitochondria. Arbutin also inhibits cytochrome C release from mitochondria to cytosol. To verify the role of JNK in X-irradiation-induced apoptosis, the cells were pretreated with a JNK inhibitor, and found that JNK inhibitor could reduce apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. Taken together, our data indicate that arbutin plays an anti-apoptotic role via decreasing intracellular hydroxyl radical production, inhibition of Bax-mitochondria pathway and activation of the JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  1. Quercetin and Ascorbic Acid Suppress Fructose-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Blocking Intracellular Shuttling of TXNIP in Human Macrophage Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2017-03-22

    The aim of this study was to identify the role of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and its interaction with antioxidants in the activation of the fructose-induced NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in human macrophages. The study was performed with U937 and THP-1 macrophage cell lines. Total reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-18, NLRP3, TXNIP, and caspase-1 protein expression was detected using western blotting. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect IL-1β, IL-18, and caspase-1 gene expression. Intracellular shuttling of TXNIP was assessed by immunofluorescent staining with MitoTracker Red. Increased production of ROS and expression of IL-1β, IL-18, and caspase-1 genes and proteins were observed in U937 and THP-1 cells incubated with fructose and were effectively inhibited by quercetin and ascorbic acid. Intracellular shuttling of TXNIP from the nucleus into the mitochondria was detected under stimulation with fructose, which was also attenuated by antioxidants quercetin and ascorbic acid but not butylated hydroxyanisole. Treatment of macrophages with fructose promoted the association between TXNIP and NLRP3 in the cytosol, sequentially resulting in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This study revealed that intracellular TXNIP protein is a critical regulator of activation of the fructose-induced NLRP3 inflammasome, which can be effectively blocked by the antioxidants quercetin and ascorbic acid.

  2. CXCL12 modulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 activity in human glioblastoma stem-like cells and regulation of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Würth, Roberto; Bajetto, Adriana; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain. GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g., CXCL12) causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4. This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include chemokine

  3. CXCL12 modulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 activity in human glioblastoma stem-like cells and regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Bajetto, Adriana; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem–like cells (CSCs) is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain. GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g., CXCL12) causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4. This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4–CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include chemokine

  4. PKM2 uses control of HuR localization to regulate p27 and cell cycle progression in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Joydeep; Ohba, Shigeo; See, Wendy L; Phillips, Joanna J; Molinaro, Annette M; Pieper, Russell O

    2016-07-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PK) is upregulated in most cancers including glioblastoma. Although PKM2 has been reported to use dual kinase activities to regulate cell growth, it also interacts with phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing peptides independently of its kinase activity. The potential for PKM2 to use the binding of pY-containing proteins to control tumor growth has not been fully examined. We here describe a novel mechanism by which PKM2 interacts in the nucleus with the RNA binding protein HuR to regulate HuR sub-cellular localization, p27 levels, cell cycle progression and glioma cell growth. Suppression of PKM2 in U87, T98G and LN319 glioma cells resulted in increased p27 levels, defects in entry into mitosis, increased centrosome number, and decreased cell growth. These effects could be reversed by shRNA targeting p27. The increased levels of p27 in PKM2 knock-down cells were caused by a loss of the nuclear interaction between PKM2 and HuR, and a subsequent cytoplasmic re-distribution of HuR, which in turn led to increased cap-independent p27 mRNA translation. Consistent with these results, the alterations in p27 mRNA translation, cell cycle progression and cell growth caused by PKM2 suppression could be reversed in vitro and in vivo by suppression of HuR or p27 levels, or by introduction of forms of PKM2 that could bind pY, regardless of their kinase activity. These results define a novel mechanism by which PKM2 regulates glioma cell growth, and also define a novel set of potential therapeutic targets along the PKM2-HuR-p27 pathway.

  5. MIR517C inhibits autophagy and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition phenotype in human glioblastoma through KPNA2-dependent disruption of TP53 nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuntao; Xiao, Limin; Liu, Yawei; Wang, Hai; Li, Hong; Zhou, Qiang; Pan, Jun; Lei, Bingxi; Huang, Annie; Qi, Songtao

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition (EMT), a crucial embryonic development program, has been linked to the regulation of glioblastoma (GBM) progression and invasion. Here, we investigated the role of MIR517C/miR-517c, which belongs to the C19MC microRNA cluster identified in our preliminary studies, in the pathogenesis of GBM. We found that MIR517C was associated with improved prognosis in patients with GBM. Furthermore, following treatment with the autophagy inducer temozolomide (TMZ) and low glucose (LG), MIR517C degraded KPNA2 (karyopherin alpha 2 [RAG cohort 1, importin alpha 1]) and subsequently disturbed the nuclear translocation of TP53 in the GBM cell line U87 in vitro. Interestingly, this microRNA could inhibit autophagy and reduce cell migration and infiltration in U87 cells harboring wild-type (WT) TP53, but not in U251 cells harboring mutant (MU) TP53. Moreover, the expression of epithelial markers (i.e., CDH13/T-cadherin and CLDN1 [claudin 1]) increased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers (i.e., CDH2/N-cadherin, SNAI1/Snail, and VIM [vimentin]) decreased, indicating that the EMT status was blocked by MIR517C in U87 cells. Compared with MIR517C overexpression, MIR517C knockdown promoted infiltration of U87 cells to the surrounding structures in nude mice in vivo. The above phenotypic changes were also observed in TP53+/+ and TP53-/- HCT116 colon cancer cells. In summary, our study provided support for a link between autophagy and EMT status in WT TP53 GBM cells and provided evidence for the signaling pathway (MIR517C-KPNA2-cytoplasmic TP53) involved in attenuating autophagy and eliminating the increased migration and invasion during the EMT. PMID:26553592

  6. MIR517C inhibits autophagy and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition phenotype in human glioblastoma through KPNA2-dependent disruption of TP53 nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuntao; Xiao, Limin; Liu, Yawei; Wang, Hai; Li, Hong; Zhou, Qiang; Pan, Jun; Lei, Bingxi; Huang, Annie; Qi, Songtao

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition (EMT), a crucial embryonic development program, has been linked to the regulation of glioblastoma (GBM) progression and invasion. Here, we investigated the role of MIR517C/miR-517c, which belongs to the C19MC microRNA cluster identified in our preliminary studies, in the pathogenesis of GBM. We found that MIR517C was associated with improved prognosis in patients with GBM. Furthermore, following treatment with the autophagy inducer temozolomide (TMZ) and low glucose (LG), MIR517C degraded KPNA2 (karyopherin alpha 2 [RAG cohort 1, importin alpha 1]) and subsequently disturbed the nuclear translocation of TP53 in the GBM cell line U87 in vitro. Interestingly, this microRNA could inhibit autophagy and reduce cell migration and infiltration in U87 cells harboring wild-type (WT) TP53, but not in U251 cells harboring mutant (MU) TP53. Moreover, the expression of epithelial markers (i.e., CDH13/T-cadherin and CLDN1 [claudin 1]) increased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers (i.e., CDH2/N-cadherin, SNAI1/Snail, and VIM [vimentin]) decreased, indicating that the EMT status was blocked by MIR517C in U87 cells. Compared with MIR517C overexpression, MIR517C knockdown promoted infiltration of U87 cells to the surrounding structures in nude mice in vivo. The above phenotypic changes were also observed in TP53(+/+) and TP53(-/-) HCT116 colon cancer cells. In summary, our study provided support for a link between autophagy and EMT status in WT TP53 GBM cells and provided evidence for the signaling pathway (MIR517C-KPNA2-cytoplasmic TP53) involved in attenuating autophagy and eliminating the increased migration and invasion during the EMT.

  7. Nonsurgical treatment of recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, O.

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme is surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, generally with temozolomide. However, disease recurs in almost all patients. Diagnosis of progression is complex given the possibility of pseudoprogression. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria increase the sensitivity for detecting progression. Most patients will not be candidates for new surgery or re-irradiation, and anticancer drugs are the most common approach for second-line treatment, if the patient’s condition allows. Antiangiogenics, inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor, nitrosoureas, and re-treatment with temozolomide have been studied in the second line, but a standard therapy has not yet been established. This review considers currently available medical treatment options for patients with glioblastoma recurrence. PMID:26300678

  8. Linkage of protein kinase C-beta activation and intracellular interleukin-2 accumulation in human naive CD4 T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J; Rainsford, E; Reen, D J

    1997-01-01

    A critical role for protein kinase C (PKC) in signal transduction events has been well established. Moreover, studies of regulation in PKC levels suggest participation in mediating long-term cellular functions. Protein kinase C-beta (PKC-beta) has been reported to be involved in interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis in T lymphocytes. In this study, the role of PKC-beta in intracellular accumulation of IL-2 was investigated using specific inhibitors. Preincubation with two different PKC inhibitors, one specific for classical isotypes (alpha and beta I) Go6976, and one which inhibits both classical and non-classical isotypes, GF109203X, caused a complete block in cytoplasmic IL-2 accumulation when naive CD4 T cells were stimulated in the presence of CD2+CD28+phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). In contrast, preincubation with up to 1000 ng/ml of cyclosporin A (CsA) resulted in a reduction in the intracellular IL-2 detected, as observed by a decrease in the proportion of positive cells as well as a fall in the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). CsA did not influence PKC-beta translocation. Flow cytometric assessments of PKC-beta and its isoforms beta I and beta II correlated with Western blotting analysis and these results were further supported by the use of PKC-beta-positive (HUT 78) and -negative (BW5147) T-cell lines. Using the specific inhibitors, Go6976 and GF109203X, the findings in this study suggest that activation and translocation of PKC-beta is critical for accumulation of intracellular IL-2. The influence of CsA in reducing but not blocking IL-2 synthesis is discussed. PMA-induced down-regulation of the CD4 antigen was observed in the presence of Go6976 and but not GF109203X, suggesting regulation by non-classical PKC isoforms. Images Figure 4 PMID:9497487

  9. Computational Trials: Unraveling Motility Phenotypes, Progression Patterns, and Treatment Options for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Fabio; Scribner, Elizabeth; Saut, Olivier; Wenger, Cornelia; Colin, Thierry; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis and high morbidity due to its invasiveness. Hypoxia-driven motility and concentration-driven motility are two mechanisms of glioblastoma multiforme invasion in the brain. The use of anti-angiogenic drugs has uncovered new progression patterns of glioblastoma multiforme associated with significant differences in overall survival. Here, we apply a mathematical model of glioblastoma multiforme growth and invasion in humans and design computational trials using agents that target angiogenesis, tumor replication rates, or motility. The findings link highly-dispersive, moderately-dispersive, and hypoxia-driven tumors to the patterns observed in glioblastoma multiforme treated by anti-angiogenesis, consisting of progression by Expanding FLAIR, Expanding FLAIR + Necrosis, and Expanding Necrosis, respectively. Furthermore, replication rate-reducing strategies (e.g. Tumor Treating Fields) appear to be effective in highly-dispersive and moderately-dispersive tumors but not in hypoxia-driven tumors. The latter may respond to motility-reducing agents. In a population computational trial, with all three phenotypes, a correlation was observed between the efficacy of the rate-reducing agent and the prolongation of overall survival times. This research highlights the potential applications of computational trials and supports new hypotheses on glioblastoma multiforme phenotypes and treatment options. PMID:26756205

  10. Gene expressions of TRP channels in glioblastoma multiforme and relation with survival.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, M; Eroglu, S; Tutar, E; Sencan, S; Geyik, M A; Ulasli, M; Demiryurek, A T; Camci, C

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer in humans, with a median survival of 10 to 12 months. Glioblastoma is highly malignant since the cells are supported by a great number of blood vessels. Although new treatments have been developed by increasing knowledge of molecular nature of the disease, surgical operation remains the standard of care. The TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily consists of cation-selective channels that have roles in sensory physiology such as thermo- and osmosensation and in several complex diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, and neuronal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of TRP channel genes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme and to evaluate the relationship between TRP gene expressions and survival of the patients. Thirty-three patients diagnosed with glioblastoma were enrolled to the study. The expression levels of 21 TRP genes were quantified by using qRT-PCR with dynamic array 48 × 48 chip (BioMark HD System, Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). TRPC1, TRPC6, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, and TRPV2 were found significantly higher in glioblastoma patients. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the overexpression of TRP genes and the survival of the patients. These results demonstrate for the first time that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients.

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of lipid droplet formation enhances the effectiveness of curcumin in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Issan; Cui, Yiming; Amiri, Abdolali; Ding, Yidan; Campbell, Robert E; Maysinger, Dusica

    2016-03-01

    Increased lipid droplet number and fatty acid synthesis allow glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer, to withstand accelerated metabolic rates and resist therapeutic treatments. Lipid droplets are postulated to sequester hydrophobic therapeutic agents, thereby reducing drug effectiveness. We hypothesized that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation in glioblastoma cells using pyrrolidine-2, a cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 alpha inhibitor, can sensitize cancer cells to the killing effect of curcumin, a promising anticancer agent isolated from the turmeric spice. We observed that curcumin localized in the lipid droplets of human U251N glioblastoma cells. Reduction of lipid droplet number using pyrrolidine-2 drastically enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin in both 2D and 3D glioblastoma cell models. The mode of cell death involved was found to be mediated by caspase-3. Comparatively, the current clinical chemotherapeutic standard, temozolomide, was significantly less effective in inducing glioblastoma cell death. Together, our results suggest that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation is an effective way to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin against glioblastoma multiforme.

  12. Loss of MYC and E-box3 binding contributes to defective MYC-mediated transcriptional suppression of human MC-let-7a-1~let-7d in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zifeng; Lin, Sheng; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Zhenhua; Xiang, Yu; Yao, Hong; Ge, Lei; Xie, Dan; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Lu, Gang; Poon, Wai Sang; Liu, Quentin; Lin, Marie Chia-mi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported that MYC oncoprotein down-regulates the transcription of human MC-let-7a-1~let-7d microRNA cluster in hepatocarcinoma (HCC). Surprisingly, in silico analysis indicated that let-7 miRNA expression levels are not reduced in glioblastoma (GBM). Here we investigated the molecular basis of this differential expression. Using human GBM U87 and U251 cells, we first demonstrated that forced over-expression of MYC indeed could not down-regulate the expression of human MC-let-7a-1~let-7d microRNA cluster in GBM. Furthermore, analysis of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d promoter in GBM indicated that MYC failed to inhibit the promoter activity. Pearson's correlation and Linear Regression analysis using the expression data from GSE55092 (HCC) and GSE4290 (GBM) demonstrated a converse relationship of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d and MYC only in HCC but not in GBM. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we examined whether MYC could bind to the non-canonical E-box 3 located in the promoter of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d. Results from both chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) and super-shift assays clearly demonstrated the loss of MYC and E-box 3 binding in GBM, suggesting for the first time that a defective MYC and E-box3 binding in GBM is responsible for the differential MYC mediated transcriptional inhibition of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d and potentially other tumor suppressors. MYC and let-7 are key oncoprotein and tumor suppressor, respectively. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of their regulations will provide new insight and have important implications in the therapeutics of GBM as well as other cancers. PMID:27409345

  13. Loss of MYC and E-box3 binding contributes to defective MYC-mediated transcriptional suppression of human MC-let-7a-1~let-7d in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Lin, Sheng; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Zhenhua; Xiang, Yu; Yao, Hong; Ge, Lei; Xie, Dan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lu, Gang; Poon, Wai Sang; Liu, Quentin; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi

    2016-08-30

    Previously, we reported that MYC oncoprotein down-regulates the transcription of human MC-let-7a-1~let-7d microRNA cluster in hepatocarcinoma (HCC). Surprisingly, in silico analysis indicated that let-7 miRNA expression levels are not reduced in glioblastoma (GBM). Here we investigated the molecular basis of this differential expression. Using human GBM U87 and U251 cells, we first demonstrated that forced over-expression of MYC indeed could not down-regulate the expression of human MC-let-7a-1~let-7d microRNA cluster in GBM. Furthermore, analysis of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d promoter in GBM indicated that MYC failed to inhibit the promoter activity. Pearson's correlation and Linear Regression analysis using the expression data from GSE55092 (HCC) and GSE4290 (GBM) demonstrated a converse relationship of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d and MYC only in HCC but not in GBM. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we examined whether MYC could bind to the non-canonical E-box 3 located in the promoter of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d. Results from both chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) and super-shift assays clearly demonstrated the loss of MYC and E-box 3 binding in GBM, suggesting for the first time that a defective MYC and E-box3 binding in GBM is responsible for the differential MYC mediated transcriptional inhibition of MC-let-7a-1~let-7d and potentially other tumor suppressors. MYC and let-7 are key oncoprotein and tumor suppressor, respectively. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of their regulations will provide new insight and have important implications in the therapeutics of GBM as well as other cancers.

  14. Hypoxia induces H19 expression through direct and indirect Hif-1α activity, promoting oncogenic effects in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weining; Hu, Qi; Nie, Er; Yu, Tianfu; Wu, Youzhi; Zhi, Tongle; Jiang, Kuan; Shen, Feng; Wang, Yingyi; Zhang, Junxia; You, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    H19 expression is elevated in many human tumors including glioblastomas, suggesting an oncogenic role for the long noncoding RNA; yet the upregulation of H19 in glioblastomas remains unclear. Here we report that hypoxia significantly stimulated H19 expression in glioblastoma cell lines, which was related to hypoxia-inducible factors 1α (Hif-1α). Hif-1α promoted H19 expression in U87 and U251 cells. Meanwhile PTEN is an advantageous factor to affect H19 expression, through attenuating Hif-1α stability. Hif-1α also positively correlates with H19 in human glioblastoma samples depending on PTEN status. ChIP and luciferase reporter assays showed that Hif-1α induced H19 transcription through directly binding to the H19 promoter. Furthermore, Hif-1α upregulated specific protein 1 (SP1) expression in glioblastomas cells in vitro and in vivo, and SP1 also strongly interacted with the H19 promoter to promote H19 expression under hypoxia. We also showed that H19 acts as a molecular sponge that binds miR-181d, relieving inhibition of β-catenin expression. Therefore, H19 participates in hypoxia-driven migration and invasion in glioblastoma cells. In summary, our results uncover the mechanisms that stimulate H19 expression under hypoxia to promote malignant effects in glioblastomas and suggest H19 might be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:28327666

  15. Detection of cell surface and intracellular antigens by human monoclonal antibodies. Hybrid cell lines derived from lymphocytes of patients with malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    This study represents an initial attempt to analyze the humoral immune reactions of patients with malignant melanoma by hybridoma methodology. Using lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes, peripheral blood and tumor infiltrates, 158 fusions were performed with SKO-007 (human myeloma line), LICR-LON-HMy2 (LICR-2), GM 4672 (human lymphoblastoid lines), or NS-1 (mouse myeloma line). Fusion of lymph node lymphocytes with NS-1 resulted in a 3-4 times higher frequency of clones than fusion with LICR-2, and a 10 times higher frequency than fusion with SKO-007 or GM 4672. In the case of peripheral blood lymphocytes, fusion with NS-1 gave greater than 25 times higher frequency of clones than fusion with LICR-2 or SKO-007. Production of human mu, gamma, or alpha heavy chains was detected in 50-80% of wells containing growing clones, and the levels of immunoglobulin ranged from 0.3 micrograms to 40 micrograms/ml. NS-1-derived clones could be easily subcultured, while LICR-2 and SKO-007 clones grew more slowly on subculturing. In this study, Ig secretion appeared to be a more stable property of LICR-2- derived clones than NS-1-derived clones. A panel of 20 human cancer cell lines was used to screen 771 Ig-secreting cultures for antibody to cell surface or intracellular antigens. Reactivity with cell surface antigens was found infrequently (6 cultures), whereas reactivity with intracellular antigens was more common (27 cultures). A new cell surface antigen with properties of a glycolipid was defined with an IgM monoclonal antibody secreted by a tetraploid cell derived from a fusion of LICR-2 with lymphocytes from the axillary lymph node of a patient with melanoma. The hybrid cell line has been subcloned four times and secretes 5 micrograms IgM/ml. The antigen detected by this IgM antibody was found on 5 of 23 melanoma cell lines and 12 of 30 epithelial cancer cell lines. No reactions were found with 11 cultures derived from normal cells. Stable cell lines secreting human

  16. Alisertib induces G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy via PI3K/Akt/mTOR- and p38 MAPK-mediated pathways in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Xia, He-Chun; Wang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Sun, Tao; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common brain tumor with poor response to current therapeutics. Alisertib (ALS), a second-generation selective Aurora kinase A (AURKA) inhibitor, has shown potent anticancer effects on solid tumors in animal studies. This study aimed to investigate the killing effect of ALS on GBM cell line DAOY and the possible underlying mechanisms using both bioinformatic and cell-based approaches. Our molecular docking showed that ALS preferentially bound AURKA over AURKB via hydrogen bond formation, charge interaction, and π-π stacking. ALS also bound key regulating proteins of cell cycle, apoptosis and autophagy, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1/CDC2), CDK2, cyclin B1, p27 Kip1, p53, cytochrome C, cleaved caspase 3, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), 5’-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), beclin 1, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). ALS exhibited potent growth-inhibitory, pro-apoptotic, and pro-autophagic effects on DAOY cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, ALS remarkably induced G2/M arrest mainlyvia regulating the expression of CDK1/CDC2, CDK2, cyclin B1, p27 Kip1, and p53 in DAOY cells. ALS significantly induced the expression of mitochondria-mediated pro-apoptotic proteins such as Baxbut inhibited the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, with a significant increase in the release of cytochrome C and the activation of caspases 3 and 9. ALS also induced PI3K/Akt/mTOR and p38 MAPK signaling pathways while activating the AMPK signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that ALS exerts a potent inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy with the involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR- and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathways in

  17. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  18. Astrocyte-elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) induction by hypoxia and glucose deprivation in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Noch, Evan; Bookland, Markus; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastomas continue to carry poor prognoses for patients despite advances in surgical, chemotherapeutic, and radiation regimens. One feature of glioblastoma associated with poor prognosis is the degree of hypoxia and expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α). HIF-1α expression allows metabolic adaptation to low oxygen availability, partly through upregulation of VEGF and increased tumor angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate an induced level of astrocyte-elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) by hypoxia in glioblastoma cells. AEG-1 has the capacity to promote anchorage-independent growth and cooperates with Ha-ras in malignant transformation. In addition, AEG-1 was recently demonstrated to serve as an oncogene and can induce angiogenesis in glioblastoma. Results from in vitro studies show that hypoxic induction of AEG-1 is dependent on HIF-1α stabilization during hypoxia and that PI3K inhibition abrogates AEG-1 induction during hypoxia through loss of HIF-1α stability. Furthermore, we show that AEG-1 is induced by glucose deprivation and that prevention of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents this induction. Additionally, AEG-1 knockdown results in increased ROS production and increased glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity. On the other hand, AEG-1 overexpression prevents ROS production and decreases glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity, indicating that AEG-1 induction is necessary for cells to survive this type of cell stress. These observations link AEG-1 overexpression in glioblastoma with hypoxia and glucose deprivation, and targeting these physiological pathways may lead to therapeutic advances in the treatment of glioblastoma in the future.

  19. Differential resistance of human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell types to hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity may be dependent on innate basal intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Vinoth, Kumar Jayaseelan; Manikandan, Jayapal; Sethu, Swaminathan; Balakrishnan, Lakshmidevi; Heng, Alexis; Lu, Kai; Poonepalli, Anuradha; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Cao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) displayed higher resistance to oxidative and genotoxic stress compared to somatic cells, but did not further probe the underlying mechanisms. Using H₂O₂-induced genotoxicity as a model, this study investigated whether higher resistance of hESC to oxidative and genotoxic stress could be due to lower innate basal intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as compared to their differentiated fibroblastic progenies (H1F) and two other somatic cell types - human embryonic palatal mesenchymal (HEPM) cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Comet assay demonstrated that undifferentiated hESC consistently sustained lower levels of DNA damage upon acute exposure to H₂O₂ for 30 min, compared to somatic cells. DCFDA and HE staining with flow cytometry showed that undifferentiated hESC had lower innate basal intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species compared to somatic cells, which could lead to their higher resistance to genotoxic stress upon acute exposure to H₂O₂.

  20. Control of glioblastoma tumorigenesis by feed-forward cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jahani-Asl, Arezu; Yin, Hang; Soleimani, Vahab D; Haque, Takrima; Luchman, H Artee; Chang, Natasha C; Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Puram, Sidharth V; Scott, Andrew M; Lorimer, Ian A J; Perkins, Theodore J; Ligon, Keith L; Weiss, Samuel; Rudnicki, Michael A; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    EGFRvIII-STAT3 signaling is important in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Here, we identified the cytokine receptor OSMR as a direct target gene of the transcription factor STAT3 in mouse astrocytes and human brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). We found that OSMR functioned as an essential co-receptor for EGFRvIII. OSMR formed a physical complex with EGFRvIII, and depletion of OSMR impaired EGFRvIII-STAT3 signaling. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of EGFRvIII phosphorylation inhibited the EGFRvIII-OSMR interaction and activation of STAT3. EGFRvIII-OSMR signaling in tumors operated constitutively, whereas EGFR-OSMR signaling in nontumor cells was synergistically activated by the ligands EGF and OSM. Finally, knockdown of OSMR strongly suppressed cell proliferation and tumor growth of mouse glioblastoma cells and human BTSC xenografts in mice, and prolonged the lifespan of those mice. Our findings identify OSMR as a critical regulator of glioblastoma tumor growth that orchestrates a feed-forward signaling mechanism with EGFRvIII and STAT3 to drive tumorigenesis. PMID:27110918

  1. Opposing roles of glutaminase isoforms in determining glioblastoma cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) play pivotal roles in the malignant phenotype of brain tumors via multiple mechanisms. Glutaminase (GA, EC 3.5.1.2) metabolizes Gln to Glu and ammonia. Human GA isoforms are encoded by two genes: GLS gene codes for kidney-type isoforms, KGA and GAC, whereas GLS2 codes for liver-type isoforms, GAB and LGA. The expression pattern of both genes in different neoplastic cell lines and tissues implicated that the kidney-type isoforms are associated with cell proliferation, while the liver-type isoforms dominate in, and contribute to the phenotype of quiescent cells. GLS gene has been demonstrated to be regulated by oncogene c-Myc, whereas GLS2 gene was identified as a target gene of p53 tumor suppressor. In glioblastomas (GBM, WHO grade IV), the most aggressive brain tumors, high levels of GLS and only traces or lack of GLS2 transcripts were found. Ectopic overexpression of GLS2 in human glioblastoma T98G cells decreased their proliferation and migration and sensitized them to the alkylating agents often used in the chemotherapy of gliomas. GLS silencing reduced proliferation of glioblastoma T98G cells and strengthen the antiproliferative effect evoked by previous GLS2 overexpression.

  2. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  3. A novel intracellular antibody against the E6 oncoprotein impairs growth of human papillomavirus 16-positive tumor cells in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Amici, Carla; Visintin, Michela; Verachi, Francesca; Paolini, Francesca; Percario, Zulema; Di Bonito, Paola; Mandarino, Angela; Affabris, Elisabetta; Venuti, Aldo; Accardi, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) expressed as “intracellular antibodies” (intrabodies) can target intracellular antigens to hamper their function efficaciously and specifically. Here we use an intrabody targeting the E6 oncoprotein of Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) to address the issue of a non-invasive therapy for HPV cancer patients. A scFv against the HPV16 E6 was selected by Intracellular Antibody Capture Technology and expressed as I7nuc in the nucleus of HPV16-positive SiHa, HPV-negative C33A and 293T cells. Colocalization of I7nuc and recombinant E6 was observed in different cell compartments, obtaining evidence of E6 delocalization ascribable to I7nuc. In SiHa cells, I7nuc expressed by pLNCX retroviral vector was able to partially inhibit degradation of the main E6 target p53, and induced p53 accumulation in nucleus. When analyzing in vitro activity on cell proliferation and survival, I7nuc was able to decrease growth inducing late apoptosis and necrosis of SiHa cells. Finally, I7nuc antitumor activity was demonstrated in two pre-clinical models of HPV tumors. C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with HPV16-positive TC-1 or C3 tumor cells, infected with pLNCX retroviral vector expressing or non-expressing I7nuc. All the mice injected with I7nuc-expressing cells showed a clear delay in tumor onset; 60% and 40% of mice receiving TC-1 and C3 cells, respectively, remained tumor-free for 17 weeks of follow-up, whereas 100% of the controls were tumor-bearing 20 days post-inoculum. Our data support the therapeutic potential of E6-targeted I7nuc against HPV tumors. PMID:26788990

  4. The role of intracellular oxidation in death induction (apoptosis and necrosis) in human promonocytic cells treated with stress inducers (cadmium, heat, X-rays).

    PubMed

    Galán, A; García-Bermejo, L; Troyano, A; Vilaboa, N E; Fernández, C; de Blas, E; Aller, P

    2001-04-01

    Treatment of U-937 human promonocytic cells with the stress inducers cadmium chloride (2 h at 200 microM), heat (2 h at 42.5 C) or X-rays (20 Gy), followed by recovery, caused death by apoptosis and stimulated caspase-3 activity. In addition, all stress agents caused intracellular oxidation, as measured by peroxide and/or anion superoxide accumulation. However, while pre-incubation with antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine or butylated hydroxyanisole) inhibited the induction of apoptosis by cadmium and X-rays, it did not affect the induction by heat-shock. Pre-incubation for 24 h with the GSH-depleting agent L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) switched the mode of death from apoptosis to necrosis in cadmium-treated cells. By contrast, BSO only caused minor modifacions in the rate of apoptosis without affecting the mode of death in heat- and X-rays-treated cells. BSO potentiated peroxide accumulation in cells treated with both cadmium and X-rays. However, while the accumulation of peroxides was stable in the case of cadmium, it was transient in the case of X-rays. Moreover, the administration of antioxidants during the recovery period sufficed to prevent necrosis and restore apoptosis in BSO plus cadmium-treated cells. Cadmium and X-rays caused a decrease in intracellular ATP levels, but the decrease was similar in both apoptotic and necrotic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that (i) stress inducers cause intracellular oxidation, but oxidation is not a general requirement for apoptosis; and (ii) the duration of the oxidant state seems to be critical in determining the mode of death.

  5. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    James, Emma L.; Lane, James A. E.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Karoly, Edward D.; Parkinson, E. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease. PMID:27924925

  6. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism.

    PubMed

    James, Emma L; Lane, James A E; Michalek, Ryan D; Karoly, Edward D; Parkinson, E Kenneth

    2016-12-07

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease.

  7. Intracellular quantitative detection of human thymidylate synthase engagement with an unconventional inhibitor using tetracysteine-diarsenical-probe technology

    PubMed Central

    Ponterini, Glauco; Martello, Andrea; Pavesi, Giorgia; Lauriola, Angela; Luciani, Rosaria; Santucci, Matteo; Pelà, Michela; Gozzi, Gaia; Pacifico, Salvatore; Guerrini, Remo; Marverti, Gaetano; Costi, Maria Paola; D’Arca, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrating a candidate drug’s interaction with its target protein in live cells is of pivotal relevance to the successful outcome of the drug discovery process. Although thymidylate synthase (hTS) is an important anticancer target protein, the efficacy of the few anti-hTS drugs currently used in clinical practice is limited by the development of resistance. Hence, there is an intense search for new, unconventional anti-hTS drugs; there are approximately 1600 ongoing clinical trials involving hTS-targeting drugs, both alone and in combination protocols. We recently discovered new, unconventional peptidic inhibitors of hTS that are active against cancer cells and do not result in the overexpression of hTS, which is a known molecular source of resistance. Here, we propose an adaptation of the recently proposed tetracysteine-arsenic-binding-motif technology to detect and quantitatively characterize the engagement of hTS with one such peptidic inhibitor in cell lysates. This new model can be developed into a test for high-throughput screening studies of intracellular target-protein/small-molecule binding. PMID:27250901

  8. Mycobacterium bovis-mediated induction of human beta-defensin-2 in epithelial cells is controlled by intracellular calcium and p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Alba, Laura; Trejo, Artemisa

    2007-05-01

    Induction of human beta defensin-2 (HBD-2) by mycobacteria has been reported. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which mycobacteria up-regulates HBD-2 gene expression in epithelial cells remains poorly understood. In this work, we provide evidence that the induction of HBD-2 mRNA in response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by pretreatment with a cell-permeable BAPTA-AM, which chelates intracellular calcium. Our data also demonstrate that HBD-2 mRNA induction by M. bovis in A549 lung epithelial cells requires activation of calmodulin. Interestingly, HBD-2 mRNA expression in response to M. bovis BCG was attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK]), but not by an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK): PD98059. Furthermore, we found that a second p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190) significantly blocked M. bovis BCG-mediated HBD-2 induction in A549 lung epithelial cells. Together, these data suggest that M. bovis BCG induces HBD-2 mRNA expression in A549 lung epithelial cells at least in part mediated through intracellular calcium flux as well as activation of signaling protein of p38MAPK, but not ERK.

  9. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human Fe65-PTB2 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Beyreuther, Konrad; Sinning, Irmgard; Wild, Klemens

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which releases the aggregation-prone amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and liberates the intracellular domain (AICD) that interacts with various adaptor proteins. The crystallized AICD–Fe65-PTB2 complex is of central importance for APP translocation, nuclear signalling, processing and Aβ generation. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with typical brain deposits (senile plaques) that mainly contain the neurotoxic amyloid β peptide. This peptide results from proteolytic processing of the type I transmembrane protein amyloid precursor protein (APP). During this proteolytic pathway the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is released into the cytosol, where it associates with various adaptor proteins. The interaction of the AICD with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Fe65 (Fe65-PTB2) regulates APP translocation, signalling and processing. Human AICD and Fe65-PTB2 have been cloned, overproduced and purified in large amounts in Escherichia coli. A complex of Fe65-PTB2 with the C-terminal 32 amino acids of the AICD gave well diffracting hexagonal crystals and data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Initial phases obtained by the molecular-replacement method are of good quality and revealed well defined electron density for the substrate peptide.

  10. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Giannini, C; Sarkaria, J N; Schroeder, M; Rogers, J; Mastroeni, D; Scrable, H

    2013-06-27

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10 to 70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, some of which can modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry and reverse transcription-PCR. We found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared with tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions.

  11. Different efficacy of in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transduction and ganciclovir treatment on the inhibition of tumor growth of murine and human melanoma cells and rat glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, M; Adris, S; Ledda, F; Wolfmann, C; Medina, J; Bravo, A; Mordoh, J; Chernajovsky, Y; Podhajcer, O L

    1999-01-01

    Initial studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment of in vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. However, recent studies have questioned the validity of this approach. Using retroviral vector-producing cells (VPC) as a source for in vivo gene transfer, we evaluated the efficacy of in vivo transduction of malignant cells using three different tumor cell models: B16 murine and IIB-MEL-LES human melanomas and a C6 rat glioblastoma. In vitro studies showed a bystander effect only in C6 cells. In vivo studies showed an inhibition of tumor growth in the two melanoma models when tumor cells were coinjected with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, followed by GCV treatment; however, 100% of mice developed tumors in both models. Under similar experimental conditions, 70% (7 of 10) of syngeneic rats completely rejected stereotactically transferred C6 tumor cells; most of them (5 of 10) showed a prolonged survival. Treating established C6 tumors with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and GCV led to the cure of 33% (4 of 12) of the animals. Rats that rejected tumor growth developed an antitumor immune memory, leading to a rejection of a stereotactic contralateral challenge with parental cells. The immune infiltrate, which showed the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells at the site of the first injection and mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages at the site of tumor challenge, strengthened the importance of the immune system in achieving complete tumor rejection.

  12. Radiation-induced glioblastoma signaling cascade regulates viability, apoptosis and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC).

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2014-12-01

    Ionizing radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy is the main treatment modality for brain tumors including glioblastoma. Adult neurons and astrocytes demonstrate substantial radioresistance; in contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC) are highly sensitive to radiation via induction of apoptosis. Irradiation of tumor cells has the potential risk of affecting the viability and function of NSC. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of irradiated glioblastoma cells on viability, proliferation and differentiation potential of non-irradiated (bystander) NSC through radiation-induced signaling cascades. Using media transfer experiments, we demonstrated significant effects of the U87MG glioblastoma secretome after gamma-irradiation on apoptosis in non-irradiated NSC. Addition of anti-TRAIL antibody to the transferred media partially suppressed apoptosis in NSC. Furthermore, we observed a dramatic increase in the production and secretion of IL8, TGFβ1 and IL6 by irradiated glioblastoma cells, which could promote glioblastoma cell survival and modify the effects of death factors in bystander NSC. While differentiation of NSC into neurons and astrocytes occurred efficiently with the corresponding differentiation media, pretreatment of NSC for 8 h with medium from irradiated glioblastoma cells selectively suppressed the differentiation of NSC into neurons, but not into astrocytes. Exogenous IL8 and TGFβ1 increased NSC/NPC survival, but also suppressed neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, IL6 was known to positively affect survival and differentiation of astrocyte progenitors. We established a U87MG neurosphere culture that was substantially enriched by SOX2(+) and CD133(+) glioma stem-like cells (GSC). Gamma-irradiation up-regulated apoptotic death in GSC via the FasL/Fas pathway. Media transfer experiments from irradiated GSC to non-targeted NSC again demonstrated induction of apoptosis and suppression of neuronal differentiation of NSC. In

  13. Clinical Neuropathology mini-review 6-2015: PD-L1: emerging biomarker in glioblastoma?

    PubMed

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S; Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1, CD279) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1, CD274) are involved in generating tumor-associated immunosuppression by suppression of T-cell proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production and immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting these molecules are showing compelling activity against a variety of human cancers. PD-L1 expression has shown a positive association with response to PD-1 inhibition in noncentral nervous system (CNS) tumors, e.g., melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer, and is discussed as a potential predictive biomarker for patient selection in these tumor types. This review summarizes current knowledge and potential clinical implications of PD-L1 expression in glioblastoma. At present, the following conclusions are drawn: (a) functional data support a role for PD-1/PD-L1 in tumor-associated immunosuppression in glioblastoma; (b) the incidence of PD-L1-expressing glioblastomas seems to be relatively high in comparison to other tumor types, however, the reported rates of glioblastomas with PD-L1 protein expression vary and range from 61 to 88%; (c) there is considerable variability in the methodology of PD-L1 assessment in glioblastoma across studies with heterogeneity in utilized antibodies, tissue sampling strategies, immunohistochemical staining protocols, cut-off definitions, and evaluated staining patterns; (d) there are conflicting data on the prognostic role and so far no data on the predictive role of PD-L1 gene and protein expression in glioblastoma. In summary, the ongoing clinical studies evaluating the activity of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors in glioblastoma need to be complemented with well designed and stringently executed studies to understand the influence of PD-1/PD-L1 expression on therapy response or failure and to develop robust means of PD-L1 assessment for meaningful biomarker development.

  14. Cyclic AMP regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) release and phospholipid metabolism in human monocytes: modulation by intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffstein, S.T.; Manzi, R.M.; Godfrey, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Stimulation of inflammatory cells by specific ligands results in activation of phospholipase(s) and production of oxygenation products of AA. The authors have employed (/sup 3/H)AA labeled monocytes to examine the involvement of cAMP in regulating phospholipase activity as measured by percent of incorporated (/sup 3/H)AA released and TLC analysis of (/sup 3/H)AA cellular lipids. Maximum release of radiolabel (31 +/- 5%) occurred upon challenge with the calcium ionophore A23187/sup -/ (10..mu..M), while FMLP (1..mu..M) yielded 15 +/- 1% and untreated cells 8 +/- 1%. Pretreatment of monocytes with isobutyl methyl xanthine/sup -/(IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) inhibited FMLP stimulated release with IC/sub 50/'s of 2.5 x 10/sup -5/M and 8 x 10/sup -5/M respectively. Exposure of monocytes to maximal levels of IBMX (5 x 10/sup -4/M) or d-cAMP (10/sup -3/M) also reduced release from controls by 40%, while A23187 induced release was uneffected by either. Examination of (/sup 3/H) AA labeled phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol were the major pools labeled and that stimulation by FMLP or A23187 appeared to deplete the PC pool exclusively. Prior exposure to IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited the loss from the PC pool only in untreated or FMLP stimulated cells. The data suggests that a phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity, directly primarily towards PC, is regulated by cAMP possibly by inhibiting receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium levels.

  15. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  16. Intracellular distribution and mechanisms of actions of photosensitizer Zinc(II)-phthalocyanine solubilized in Cremophor EL against human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingwei; Dai, Yongchao; Zhao, Wenna; Xie, Jingjing; Xue, Jinping; Ye, Jianhui; Jia, Lee

    2013-03-01

    Zinc(II)-phthalocyanine (ZnPc) is a metal photosensitizer. In the present study, we formulated the poorly-soluble ZnPc in Cremophor EL solution to enhance its solubility and determined its intracellular distribution and mechanisms of action on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. ZnPc uptake by the cells reached a plateau by 8h. ZnPc primarily located in mitochondria, lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum. The concentration-growth inhibition curves of ZnPc on the cell lines were pharmacodynamically enhanced by 10-50 folds by irradiation. Once irradiated, ZnPc produced significant amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activated caspase-3 and caspase-9, arrested cell cycle mainly at G2/M stage, and decreased membrane potential (ΔΨm) of HepG2 cells. In conclusion, the present study first elucidated cellular and molecular mechanisms of ZnPc on HepG2 cells.

  17. 5,5'-Dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification of cysteine improves the crystal quality of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mi Wei; Li Lanfen; Su Xiaodong

    2008-04-18

    Structural studies of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2 (CLIC2) had been hampered by the problem of generating suitable crystals primarily due to the protein containing exposed cysteines. Several chemical reagents were used to react with the cysteines on CLIC2 in order to modify the redox state of the protein. We have obtained high quality crystals that diffracted to better than 2.5 A at a home X-ray source by treating the protein with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). After solving the crystal structure of CLIC2, we found that the DTNB had reacted with the Cys{sup 114}, and made CLIC2 in a homogenous oxidized state. This study demonstrated that the DTNB modification drastically improved the crystallization of CLIC2, and it implied that this method may be useful for other proteins containing exposed cysteines in general.

  18. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  19. Lactoferrin inhibits or promotes Legionella pneumophila intracellular multiplication in nonactivated and interferon gamma-activated human monocytes depending upon its degree of iron saturation. Iron-lactoferrin and nonphysiologic iron chelates reverse monocyte activation against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1991-01-01

    We have been exploring the role of iron in the pathogenesis of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in human monocytes is iron dependent and that IFN gamma-activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication by limiting the availability of iron. In this study, we have investigated the effect on L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which is internalized via specific receptors on monocytes, and of nonphysiologic iron chelates which enter monocytes by a receptor-independent route. Apolactoferrin completely inhibited L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes, and enhanced the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. In contrast, iron-saturated lactoferrin had no effect on the already rapid rate of L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes. Moreover, it reversed the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron from the lactoferrin-lactoferrin receptor pathway. The capacity of iron-lactoferrin to reverse monocyte activation was dependent upon its percent iron saturation and not just its total iron content. Similarly, the nonphysiologic iron chelates ferric nitrilotriacetate and ferric ammonium citrate completely reverse and ferric pyrophosphate partially reversed the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron derived from nonphysiologic iron chelates internalized by monocytes independently of the transferrin and lactoferrin endocytic pathways. This study suggests that at sites of inflammation, lactoferrin may inhibit or promote L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in mononuclear phagocytes depending upon

  20. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field with Temozolomide Can Elicit an Epigenetic Pro-apoptotic Effect on Glioblastoma T98G Cells.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Francesca; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Lupo, Giuseppe; Corbella, Franco; Nano, Rosanna; Capelli, Enrica

    2016-11-01

    Treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) is emerging as an interesting therapeutic option for patients with cancer. The literature has demonstrated that low-frequency/low-energy electromagnetic fields do not cause predictable effects on DNA; however, they can epigenetically act on gene expression. The aim of the present work was to study a possible epigenetic effect of a PEMF, mediated by miRNAs, on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). We tested a PEMF (maximum magnetic induction, 2 mT; frequency, 75 Hz) that has been demonstrated to induce autophagy in glioblastoma cells. In particular, we studied the effect of PEMF on the expression of genes involved in cancer progression and a promising synergistic effect with temozolomide, a frequently used drug to treat glioblastoma multiforme. We found that electromagnetic stimulation in combination with temozolomide can elicit an epigenetic pro-apoptotic effect in the chemo- and radioresistant T98G glioblastoma cell line.

  1. Tamoxifen Induces Cytotoxic Autophagy in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, Christopher D; Kaza, Niroop; Klocke, Barbara J; Gillespie, G Yancey; Shevde, Lalita A; Carroll, Steven L; Roth, Kevin A

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are the most common and aggressive primary human malignant brain tumors. 4-Hydroxy tamoxifen (OHT) is an active metabolite of the tamoxifen (TMX) prodrug and a well-established estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen-related receptor antagonist. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated that OHT induced ER-independent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cell death by autophagic degradation of the prosurvival protein Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog. Because both MPNST and GBM are glial in cell origin, we hypothesized that OHT could mediate similar effects in GBM. OHT induced a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability that was largely independent of caspase activation in a human GBM cell line and 2 patient-derived xenolines. Further, OHT induced both cytotoxic autophagy and a concentration-dependent decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein levels. A GBM cell line expressing EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) was relatively resistant to OHT-induced death and EGFRvIII was refractory to OHT-induced degradation. Thus, OHT induces GBM cell death through a caspase-independent, autophagy-related mechanism and should be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in patients with GBM whose tumors express wild-type EGFR.

  2. Canine Butterfly Glioblastomas: A Neuroradiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John H.; Clapp, Kemba; Pancotto, Theresa E.; Emch, Samantha; Robertson, John L.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    In humans, high-grade gliomas may infiltrate across the corpus callosum resulting in bihemispheric lesions that may have symmetrical, winged-like appearances. This particular tumor manifestation has been coined a “butterfly” glioma (BG). While canine and human gliomas share many neuroradiological and pathological features, the BG morphology has not been previously reported in dogs. Here, we describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of BG in three dogs and review the potential differential diagnoses based on neuroimaging findings. All dogs presented for generalized seizures and interictal neurological deficits referable to multifocal or diffuse forebrain disease. MRI examinations revealed asymmetrical (2/3) or symmetrical (1/3), bihemispheric intra-axial mass lesions that predominantly affected the frontoparietal lobes that were associated with extensive perilesional edema, and involvement of the corpus callosum. The masses displayed heterogeneous T1, T2, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal intensities, variable contrast enhancement (2/3), and mass effect. All tumors demonstrated classical histopathological features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), including glial cell pseudopalisading, serpentine necrosis, microvascular proliferation as well as invasion of the corpus callosum by neoplastic astrocytes. Although rare, GBM should be considered a differential diagnosis in dogs with an MRI evidence of asymmetric or symmetric bilateral, intra-axial cerebral mass lesions with signal characteristics compatible with glioma. PMID:27458589

  3. High vancomycin MICs within the susceptible range in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia isolates are associated with increased cell wall thickness and reduced intracellular killing by human phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Rocío; Martínez, Alba; Albert, Eliseo; Madrid, Silvia; Oltra, Rosa; Giménez, Estela; Soriano, Mario; Vinuesa, Víctor; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María Luisa; Navarro, David

    2016-05-01

    Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) at the upper end of the susceptible range for Staphylococcus aureus have been associated with poor clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections. We tested the hypothesis that high vancomycin MICs in S. aureus bacteraemia isolates are associated with increased cell wall thickness and suboptimal bacterial internalisation or lysis by human phagocytes. In total, 95 isolates were evaluated. Original vancomycin MICs were determined by Etest. The susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to killing by phagocytes was assessed in a human whole blood assay. Internalisation of bacterial cells by phagocytes was investigated by flow cytometry. Cell wall thickness was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Genotypic analysis of S. aureus isolates was performed using a DNA microarray system. Vancomycin MICs were significantly higher (P=0.006) in isolates that were killed suboptimally (killing index <60%) compared with those killed efficiently (killing index >70%) and tended to correlate inversely (P=0.08) with the killing indices. Isolates in both killing groups were internalised by human neutrophils and monocytes with comparable efficiency. The cell wall was significantly thicker (P=0.03) in isolates in the low killing group. No genotypic differences were found between the isolates in both killing groups. In summary, high vancomycin MICs in S. aureus bacteraemia isolates were associated with increased cell wall thickness and reduced intracellular killing by phagocytes.

  4. Ion channel expression patterns in glioblastoma stem cells with functional and therapeutic implications for malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Julia; Rai, Karan G.; Funk, Cory C.; Arora, Sonali; Lee, Eunjee; Zhu, Jun; Price, Nathan D.; Paddison, Patrick J.; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Rostomily, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters have increasingly recognized roles in cancer progression through the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and death. Glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a source of tumor formation and recurrence in glioblastoma multiforme, a highly aggressive brain cancer, suggesting that ion channel expression may be perturbed in this population. However, little is known about the expression and functional relevance of ion channels that may contribute to GSC malignancy. Using RNA sequencing, we assessed the enrichment of ion channels in GSC isolates and non-tumor neural cell types. We identified a unique set of GSC-enriched ion channels using differential expression analysis that is also associated with distinct gene mutation signatures. In support of potential clinical relevance, expression of selected GSC-enriched ion channels evaluated in human glioblastoma databases of The Cancer Genome Atlas and Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project correlated with patient survival times. Finally, genetic knockdown as well as pharmacological inhibition of individual or classes of GSC-enriched ion channels constrained growth of GSCs compared to normal neural stem cells. This first-in-kind global examination characterizes ion channels enriched in GSCs and explores their potential clinical relevance to glioblastoma molecular subtypes, gene mutations, survival outcomes, regional tumor expression, and experimental responses to loss-of-function. Together, the data support the potential biological and therapeutic impact of ion channels on GSC malignancy and provide strong rationale for further examination of their mechanistic and therapeutic importance. PMID:28264064

  5. Targeting ROR1 inhibits the self-renewal and invasive ability of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun-Hwa; Lee, Han-Na; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant of brain tumours and is difficult to cure because of interruption of drug delivery by the blood-brain barrier system, its high metastatic capacity and the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Although CSCs are present as a small population in malignant tumours, CSCs have been studied as they are responsible for causing recurrence, metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer. CSCs have self-renewal characteristics like normal stem cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) is involved in stem cell maintenance and malignant properties in human glioblastoma. Knockdown of ROR1 caused reduction of stemness and sphere formation capacity. Moreover, down-regulation of ROR1 suppressed the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes and the tumour migratory and invasive abilities. The results of this study indicate that targeting ROR1 can induce differentiation of CSCs and inhibit metastasis in glioblastoma. In addition, ROR1 may be used as a potential marker for glioblastoma stem cells as well as a potential target for glioblastoma stem cell therapy.

  6. What next for newly diagnosed glioblastoma?

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Musibay, Evidio; Galanis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current multimodality treatment including surgical resection and temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy, median survival is only 14–16 months. Characterization of molecular alterations in glioblastoma has identified prognostic subgroups and therapeutic opportunities for clinical trials across glioblastoma subsets. Following a number of negative Phase III trials testing temozolomide dose intensification and angiogenesis inhibition, recent interim analysis data indicate survival prolongation with use of a device (Optune™) delivering alternating electrical field therapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. In this review, we present an overview of the data supporting the current standard of care and discuss novel experimental therapies in early and late phase clinical testing including devices, small molecule drugs, angiogenesis inhibitors, oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy. PMID:26558493

  7. [Nursing strategy in the face of glioblastoma].

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Stéphanie

    2017-02-01

    Hospitalisation forces patients with glioblastoma and their family to face a new life made up of numerous constraints and uncertainties. In this context of anxiety, nursing care is based on global support which combines technical, organisational and relational skills.

  8. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Novakova, Jana; Slaby, Ondrej; Vyzula, Rostislav; Michalek, Jaroslav

    2009-08-14

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  9. Cancer stem cells from human glioblastoma resemble but do not mimic original tumors after in vitro passaging in serum-free media

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Rubio, Susana; Rackov, Gorjana; Rodríguez-Fanjul, Vanessa; Cruz, Jorge Oliver-De La; Prat-Acín, Ricardo; Peris-Celda, María; Blesa, David; Ramírez-Jiménez, Laura; Sánchez-Gómez, Pilar; Perona, Rosario; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Human gliomas harbour cancer stem cells (CSCs) that evolve along the course of the disease, forming highly heterogeneous subpopulations within the tumour mass. These cells possess self-renewal properties and appear to contribute to tumour initiation, metastasis and resistance to therapy. CSC cultures isolated from surgical samples are considered the best preclinical in vitro model for primary human gliomas. However, it is not yet well characterized to which extent their biological and functional properties change during in vitro passaging in the serum-free culture conditions. Here, we demonstrate that our CSC-enriched cultures harboured from one to several CSC clones from the human glioma sample. When xenotransplanted into mouse brain, these cells generated tumours that reproduced at least three different dissemination patterns found in original tumours. Along the passages in culture, CSCs displayed increased expression of stem cell markers, different ratios of chromosomal instability events, and a varied response to drug treatment. Our findings highlight the need for better characterization of CSC-enriched cultures in the context of their evolution in vitro, in order to uncover their full potential as preclinical models in the studies aimed at identifying molecular biomarkers and developing new therapeutic approaches of human gliomas. PMID:27589567

  10. Enhancing radiation therapy for patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brian M; Ligon, Keith L; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-05-01

    Radiation therapy has been the foundation of therapy following maximal surgical resection in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma for decades and the primary therapy for unresected tumors. Using the standard approach with radiation and temozolomide, however, outcomes are poor, and glioblastoma remains an incurable disease with the majority of recurrences and progression within the radiation treatment field. As such, there is much interest in elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to radiation therapy and in developing novel approaches to overcoming this treatment resistance.

  11. Small-molecule inhibition of PTPRZ reduces tumor growth in a rat model of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Akihiro; Nagahira, Asako; Sugawara, Hajime; Ishii, Kentaro; Imajo, Seiichi; Matsumoto, Masahito; Kuboyama, Kazuya; Suzuki, Ryoko; Tanga, Naomi; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tomoo, Toshiyuki; Ogata, Atsuto; Masumura, Makoto; Noda, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type Z (PTPRZ) is aberrantly over-expressed in glioblastoma and a causative factor for its malignancy. However, small molecules that selectively inhibit the catalytic activity of PTPRZ have not been discovered. We herein performed an in vitro screening of a chemical library, and identified SCB4380 as the first potent inhibitor for PTPRZ. The stoichiometric binding of SCB4380 to the catalytic pocket was demonstrated by biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses. We determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of PTPRZ, and the structural basis of the binding of SCB4380 elucidated by a molecular docking method was validated by site-directed mutagenesis studies. The intracellular delivery of SCB4380 by liposome carriers inhibited PTPRZ activity in C6 glioblastoma cells, and thereby suppressed their migration and proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in a rat allograft model. Therefore, selective inhibition of PTPRZ represents a promising approach for glioma therapy. PMID:26857455

  12. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  13. Two open states and rate-limiting gating steps revealed by intracellular Na+ block of human KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Michael; Ferrera, Loretta; Friedrich, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    KCNQ1, the first member of a new K+ channel family, associates with the small KCNE1 subunit to form the slow cardiac delayed rectifier current, IKs. Mutations in both genes encoding these channels lead to cardiac arrhythmia. We studied the block by intracellular Na+ of human homomeric KCNQ1 (homomers) and heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 (heteromers) expressed in CHO cells (Chinese hamster ovary cell line) using whole-cell patch recording. In the nominal absence of extracellular K+ and with 65 mm intracellular K+, the replacement of 65 mm intracellular N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG+) by 65 mm Na+ induced a decay of outward (K+) currents through homomers after maximal activation reminiscent of an inactivation process. The decay had a time constant in the hundreds of milliseconds range. The inactivation process of homomers was, however, not directly dependent on [Na+]i, as evidenced by unaltered biphasic deactivation at negative voltages. An instantaneous voltage-dependent Na+ block of homomers was revealed using tail current protocols with activating prepulses that saturated the gating processes of the channel. The instantaneous block was partially relieved at very large positive voltages (≥ 60 mV) and in 20 mm extracellular K+. The instantaneous block of homomers was much less pronounced if the tail currents were measured after short activating prepulses, demonstrating the presence of (at least) two open states: a first, relatively [Na+]i-insensitive and a subsequent [Na+]i-sensitive open state; the current decay reflects the transition between the two open states. Heteromers exhibited a very similar instantaneous block by Nai+ independently of the prepulse duration. Heteromers did not show a Nai+-induced current decay. Our results demonstrate the presence of two open states of KCNQ1 channels with different [Na+]i sensitivities. The rate-limiting step of homomeric KCNQ1 gating at positive voltages is the transition between these two open states. The rate-limiting step of the

  14. Two open states and rate-limiting gating steps revealed by intracellular Na+ block of human KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Pusch, M; Ferrera, L; Friedrich, T

    2001-05-15

    KCNQ1, the first member of a new K+ channel family, associates with the small KCNE1 subunit to form the slow cardiac delayed rectifier current, IKs. Mutations in both genes encoding these channels lead to cardiac arrhythmia. We studied the block by intracellular Na+ of human homomeric KCNQ1 (homomers) and heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 (heteromers) expressed in CHO cells (Chinese hamster ovary cell line) using whole-cell patch recording. In the nominal absence of extracellular K+ and with 65 mM intracellular K+, the replacement of 65 mM intracellular N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG+) by 65 mM Na+ induced a decay of outward (K+) currents through homomers after maximal activation reminiscent of an inactivation process. The decay had a time constant in the hundreds of milliseconds range. The inactivation process of homomers was, however, not directly dependent on [Na+]i, as evidenced by unaltered biphasic deactivation at negative voltages. An instantaneous voltage-dependent Na+ block of homomers was revealed using tail current protocols with activating prepulses that saturated the gating processes of the channel. The instantaneous block was partially relieved at very large positive voltages (> or = 60 mV) and in 20 mM extracellular K+. The instantaneous block of homomers was much less pronounced if the tail currents were measured after short activating prepulses, demonstrating the presence of (at least) two open states: a first, relatively [Na+]i-insensitive and a subsequent [Na+]i-sensitive open state; the current decay reflects the transition between the two open states. Heteromers exhibited a very similar instantaneous block by Na+i independently of the prepulse duration. Heteromers did not show a Na+i-induced current decay. Our results demonstrate the presence of two open states of KCNQ1 channels with different [Na+]i sensitivities. The rate-limiting step of homomeric KCNQ1 gating at positive voltages is the transition between these two open states. The rate-limiting step of

  15. Epitope tags beside the N-terminal cytoplasmic tail of human BST-2 alter its intracellular trafficking and HIV-1 restriction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mingyu; Wang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingyao; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhu, Yingzi; Zuo, Tao; Liu, Donglai; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Zhao, Xinghong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    BST-2 blocks the particle release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1, and this antiviral activity is dependent on the topological arrangement of its four structural domains. Several functions of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BST-2 have been previously discussed, but the exact role of this domain remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncation and commonly-used tags addition into the CT region of human BST-2 on its intracellular trafficking and signaling as well as its anti-HIV-1 function. The CT-truncated BST-2 exhibited potent inhibition on Vpu-defective HIV-1 and even wild-type HIV-1. However, the N-terminal HA-tagged CT-truncated BST-2 retained little antiviral activity and dramatically differed from its original protein in the cell surface level and intracellular localization. Further, we showed that the replacement of the CT domain with a hydrophobic tag altered BST-2 function possibly by preventing its normal vesicular trafficking. Notably, we demonstrated that a positive charged motif "KRXK" in the conjunctive region between the cytotail and the transmembrane domain which is conserved in primate BST-2 is important for the protein trafficking and the antiviral function. These results suggest that although the CT of BST-2 is not essential for its antiviral activity, the composition of residues in this region may play important roles in its normal trafficking which subsequently affected its function. These observations provide additional implications for the structure-function model of BST-2.

  16. Epitope Tags beside the N-Terminal Cytoplasmic Tail of Human BST-2 Alter Its Intracellular Trafficking and HIV-1 Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyao; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhu, Yingzi; Zuo, Tao; Liu, Donglai; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Zhao, Xinghong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    BST-2 blocks the particle release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1, and this antiviral activity is dependent on the topological arrangement of its four structural domains. Several functions of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BST-2 have been previously discussed, but the exact role of this domain remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncation and commonly-used tags addition into the CT region of human BST-2 on its intracellular trafficking and signaling as well as its anti-HIV-1 function. The CT-truncated BST-2 exhibited potent inhibition on Vpu-defective HIV-1 and even wild-type HIV-1. However, the N-terminal HA-tagged CT-truncated BST-2 retained little antiviral activity and dramatically differed from its original protein in the cell surface level and intracellular localization. Further, we showed that the replacement of the CT domain with a hydrophobic tag altered BST-2 function possibly by preventing its normal vesicular trafficking. Notably, we demonstrated that a positive charged motif “KRXK” in the conjunctive region between the cytotail and the transmembrane domain which is conserved in primate BST-2 is important for the protein trafficking and the antiviral function. These results suggest that although the CT of BST-2 is not essential for its antiviral activity, the composition of residues in this region may play important roles in its normal trafficking which subsequently affected its function. These observations provide additional implications for the structure-function model of BST-2. PMID:25347789

  17. Coinfection of hepatic cell lines with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus leads to an increase in intracellular hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Iser, David M; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter A; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Saleh, Suha; Crane, Megan; Cameron, Paul U; Bowden, Scott; Nguyen, Tin; Pereira, Cândida F; Desmond, Paul V; Locarnini, Stephen A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2010-06-01

    Liver-related mortality is increased in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. However, interactions between HIV and HBV to explain this observation have not been described. We hypothesized that HIV infection of hepatocytes directly affects the life cycle of HBV. We infected human hepatic cell lines expressing HBV (Hep3B and AD38 cells) or not expressing HBV (Huh7, HepG2, and AD43 cells) with laboratory strains of HIV (NL4-3 and AD8), as well as a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotyped HIV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Following HIV infection with NL4-3 or AD8 in hepatic cell lines, we observed a significant increase in HIV reverse transcriptase activity which was infectious. Despite no detection of surface CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 by flow cytometry, AD8 infection of AD38 cells was inhibited by maraviroc and NL4-3 was inhibited by AMD3100, demonstrating that HIV enters AD38 hepatic cell lines via CCR5 or CXCR4. High-level infection of AD38 cells (50%) was achieved using VSV-pseudotyped HIV. Coinfection of the AD38 cell line with HIV did not alter the HBV DNA amount or species as determined by Southern blotting or nucleic acid signal amplification. However, coinfection with HIV was associated with a significant increase in intracellular HBsAg when measured by Western blotting, quantitative HBsAg, and fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that HIV infection of HBV-infected hepatic cell lines significantly increased intracellular HBsAg but not HBV DNA synthesis and that increased intrahepatic HBsAg secondary to direct infection by HIV may contribute to accelerated liver disease in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals.

  18. Effects of 17 β-estradiol on lipopolysacharride-induced intracellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA expression and Ca2+ homeostasis alteration in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Thor, Der; Zhang, Rui; Anderson, Leigh; Bose, Diptiman; Dubé, Gregory P.; Rahimian, Roshanak

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that 17 β-estradiol (E2) decreased cytokine-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAM). Changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been shown to be associated with CAM expression in endothelial cells. Here, the effects of E2 (1 μM, 24 h) on the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and [Ca2+]i were investigated in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 ng/mL, 18 h)-stimulated human endothelial cell line, EA.hy926, using real-time PCR and spectrofluorometry, respectively. PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in ICAM-1 expression in calcium ionophore A23187 (1 nM)- or LPS-stimulated cells. Pretreatment of cells with E2 significantly inhibited LPS-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression. [Ca2+]i was monitored in Fura-2 AM-loaded cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+ with thapsigargin (TG, 1 μM), a sarco/endoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor or ATP (100 μM). The extent of TG- or ATP-induced [Ca2+]i increase was significantly higher in LPS-stimulated cells than in control cells. Pre-treatment of LPS-stimulated cells with E2 limited the Ca2+ response to the same level as in control cells. Furthermore, ICI 182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, attenuated the inhibitory actions of E2 on ICAM-1 mRNA expression and Ca2+ responses, suggesting that estrogen receptors mediate, at least in part, the effects of estrogen. These data suggest a potential underlying mechanism for the protective effect of E2 against atherosclerosis. PMID:20843480

  19. Synthesis of interleukin 6 (interferon-. beta. /sub 2//B cell stimulatory factor 2) in human fibroblasts is triggered by an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhange, Y.; Lin, J.X.; Vilcek, J.

    1988-05-05

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6; also referred to as interferon-..beta../sub 2/, 26-kDa protein, and B cell stimulatory factor 2) is a cytokine whose actions include a stimulation of immunoglobulin synthesis, enhancement of B cell growth, and modulation of acute phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Synthesis of IL-6 is stimulated by interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or platelet-derived growth factor. The authors examined the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signal transduction pathway in IL-6 gene expression. Several activators of adenylate cyclase, including prostaglandin E1, forskolin, and cholera toxin, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP, shared the ability to cause a dramatic and sustained increase in IL-6 mRNA levels in human FS-4 fibroblasts. Actinomycin D treatment abolished this enhancement. Treatments that increased intracellular cAMP also stimulated the secretion of the IL-6 protein in a biologically active form. Increased intracellular cAMP appears to enhance IL-6 gene expression by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism because down-regulation of protein kinase C by a chronic exposure of cells to a high dose of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not abolish the enhancement of IL-6 expression by treatments that increase cAMP. IL-1 and TNF too increased IL-6 mRNA levels by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism. The results suggest a role for the cAMP-dependent pathway(s) in IL-6 gene activation by TNF and IL-1.

  20. Effects of ethanol on the tonicity of corporal tissue and the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of human corporal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Sung Chul; Chae, Mee Ree; Kim, Ji Young; Choo, Seol Ho; Han, Deok Hyun; Lee, Sung Won

    2010-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of erectile dysfunction (ED); however, the acute effects of ethanol (EtOH) on penile tissue are not fully understood. We sought to investigate the effects of EtOH on corporal tissue tonicity, as well as the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and potassium channel activity of corporal smooth muscle. Strips of corpus cavernosum (CC) from rabbits were mounted in organ baths for isometric tension studies. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) was applied to strips precontracted with 10 μmol L−1 phenylephrine as a control. EtOH was then added to the organ bath and incubated before EFS. The [Ca2+]i levels were monitored by the ratio of fura-2 fluorescence intensities using the fura-2 loading method. Single-channel and whole-cell currents were recorded by the conventional patch-clamp technique in short-term cultured smooth muscle cells from human CC tissue. The corpus cavernosal relaxant response of EFS was decreased in proportion to the concentration of EtOH. EtOH induced a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner, Extracellular application of EtOH significantly increased whole-cell K+ currents in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). EtOH also increased the open probability in cell-attached patches; however, in inside-out patches, the application of EtOH to the intracellular aspect of the patches induced slight inhibition of Ca2+-activated potassium channel (KCa) activity. EtOH caused a dose-dependent increase in cavernosal tension by alterations to [Ca2+]i. Although EtOH did not affect KCa channels directly, it increased the channel activity by increasing [Ca2+]i. The increased corpus cavernosal tone caused by EtOH might be one of the mechanisms of ED after heavy drinking. PMID:20852651

  1. Functional properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: intracellular Ca2+ handling and the role of sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Katya; Shilkrut, Mark; Zeevi-Levin, Naama; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Amit, Michal; Danon, Asaf; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Binah, Ofer

    2006-02-01

    Since cardiac transplantation is limited by the small availability of donor organs, regeneration of the diseased myocardium by cell transplantation is an attractive therapeutic modality. To determine the compatibility of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) (7 to 55 days old) with the myocardium, we investigated their functional properties regarding intracellular Ca2+ handling and the role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction. The functional properties of hESC-CMs were investigated by recording simultaneously [Ca2+]i transients and contractions. Additionally, we performed Western blot analysis of the Ca2+-handling proteins SERCA2, calsequestrin, phospholamban, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX). Our major findings are, first, that hESC-CMs displayed temporally related [Ca2+]i transients and contractions, negative force-frequency relations, and lack of post-rest potentiation. Second, ryanodine, thapsigargin, and caffeine did not affect the [Ca2+]i transient and contraction, indicating that at this developmental stage, contraction depends on transsarcolemmal Ca2+ influx rather than on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. Third, in agreement with the notion that a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current is present in hESC-CMs and contributes to the mechanical function, verapamil completely blocked contraction. Fourth, whereas hESC-CMs expressed SERCA2 and NCX at levels comparable to those of the adult porcine myocardium, calsequestrin and phospholamban were not expressed. Our study shows for the first time that functional properties related to intracellular Ca2+ handling of hESC-CMs differ markedly from the adult myocardium, probably due to immature sarcoplasmic reticulum capacity.

  2. Heterologous expression of Streptococcu