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Sample records for human glomerular sage

  1. A human glomerular SAGE transcriptome database.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Jenny; Fierlbeck, Wolfgang; Granqvist, Anna; Kulak, Stephen C; Ballermann, Barbara J

    2009-06-05

    To facilitate in the identification of gene products important in regulating renal glomerular structure and function, we have produced an annotated transcriptome database for normal human glomeruli using the SAGE approach. The database contains 22,907 unique SAGE tag sequences, with a total tag count of 48,905. For each SAGE tag, the ratio of its frequency in glomeruli relative to that in 115 non-glomerular tissues or cells, a measure of transcript enrichment in glomeruli, was calculated. A total of 133 SAGE tags representing well-characterized transcripts were enriched 10-fold or more in glomeruli compared to other tissues. Comparison of data from this study with a previous human glomerular Sau3A-anchored SAGE library reveals that 47 of the highly enriched transcripts are common to both libraries. Among these are the SAGE tags representing many podocyte-predominant transcripts like WT-1, podocin and synaptopodin. Enrichment of podocyte transcript tags SAGE library indicates that other SAGE tags observed at much higher frequencies in this glomerular compared to non-glomerular SAGE libraries are likely to be glomerulus-predominant. A higher level of mRNA expression for 19 transcripts represented by glomerulus-enriched SAGE tags was verified by RT-PCR comparing glomeruli to lung, liver and spleen. The database can be retrieved from, or interrogated online at http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/SAGE. The annotated database is also provided as an additional file with gene identification for 9,022, and matches to the human genome or transcript homologs in other species for 1,433 tags. It should be a useful tool for in silico mining of glomerular gene expression.

  2. A human glomerular SAGE transcriptome database

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background To facilitate in the identification of gene products important in regulating renal glomerular structure and function, we have produced an annotated transcriptome database for normal human glomeruli using the SAGE approach. Description The database contains 22,907 unique SAGE tag sequences, with a total tag count of 48,905. For each SAGE tag, the ratio of its frequency in glomeruli relative to that in 115 non-glomerular tissues or cells, a measure of transcript enrichment in glomeruli, was calculated. A total of 133 SAGE tags representing well-characterized transcripts were enriched 10-fold or more in glomeruli compared to other tissues. Comparison of data from this study with a previous human glomerular Sau3A-anchored SAGE library reveals that 47 of the highly enriched transcripts are common to both libraries. Among these are the SAGE tags representing many podocyte-predominant transcripts like WT-1, podocin and synaptopodin. Enrichment of podocyte transcript tags SAGE library indicates that other SAGE tags observed at much higher frequencies in this glomerular compared to non-glomerular SAGE libraries are likely to be glomerulus-predominant. A higher level of mRNA expression for 19 transcripts represented by glomerulus-enriched SAGE tags was verified by RT-PCR comparing glomeruli to lung, liver and spleen. Conclusion The database can be retrieved from, or interrogated online at http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/SAGE. The annotated database is also provided as an additional file with gene identification for 9,022, and matches to the human genome or transcript homologs in other species for 1,433 tags. It should be a useful tool for in silico mining of glomerular gene expression. PMID:19500374

  3. A SAGE based approach to human glomerular endothelium: defining the transcriptome, finding a novel molecule and highlighting endothelial diversity.

    PubMed

    Sengoelge, Guerkan; Winnicki, Wolfgang; Kupczok, Anne; von Haeseler, Arndt; Schuster, Michael; Pfaller, Walter; Jennings, Paul; Weltermann, Ansgar; Blake, Sophia; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2014-08-27

    Large scale transcript analysis of human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (HGMEC) has never been accomplished. We designed this study to define the transcriptome of HGMEC and facilitate a better characterization of these endothelial cells with unique features. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was used for its unbiased approach to quantitative acquisition of transcripts. We generated a HGMEC SAGE library consisting of 68,987 transcript tags. Then taking advantage of large public databases and advanced bioinformatics we compared the HGMEC SAGE library with a SAGE library of non-cultured ex vivo human glomeruli (44,334 tags) which contained endothelial cells. The 823 tags common to both which would have the potential to be expressed in vivo were subsequently checked against 822,008 tags from 16 non-glomerular endothelial SAGE libraries. This resulted in 268 transcript tags differentially overexpressed in HGMEC compared to non-glomerular endothelia. These tags were filtered using a set of criteria: never before shown in kidney or any type of endothelial cell, absent in all nephron regions except the glomerulus, more highly expressed than statistically expected in HGMEC. Neurogranin, a direct target of thyroid hormone action which had been thought to be brain specific and never shown in endothelial cells before, fulfilled these criteria. Its expression in glomerular endothelium in vitro and in vivo was then verified by real-time-PCR, sequencing and immunohistochemistry. Our results represent an extensive molecular characterization of HGMEC beyond a mere database, underline the endothelial heterogeneity, and propose neurogranin as a potential link in the kidney-thyroid axis.

  4. Sage

    MedlinePlus

    ... to main content U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health NIH…Turning Discovery ... an endorsement by NCCIH. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Center for ...

  5. Definition of glomerular antigens by monoclonal antibodies produced against a human glomerular membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Neale, T J; Callus, M S; Donovan, L C; Baird, H

    1990-10-01

    Experimental animal models of glomerulonephritis (GN) produced by direct antibody binding to non-basement membrane glomerular capillary wall antigens do not to date have human parallels. To examine the potential for this form of humoral glomerular injury in man, we sought to define discrete human non-GBM glomerular antigenic targets using hybridoma technology. Mice were immunised intraperitoneally with 20-100 micrograms of a human glomerular membrane fraction (HGMF). Six fusions have yielded 12 stable reagents defined by positive glomerular indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and microELISA using HGMF as the screening antigen. Subclass analysis of ascitic McAbs indicated several IgG1, one IgG2b, and three IgM reagents. Distinctive IF patterns of reactivity with epithelial, endothelial or mesangial structures have been observed, with or without peritubular capillary, tubular basement membrane and vessel wall reactivity. Seven normal non-renal human organs and the kidneys of rat, rabbit and sheep have shown patterns characteristic of each individual McAb, restricted to human or with species cross reactivity. To partially characterise McAb-reactive antigens, detergent-solubilised renal cortex and collagenase-solubilised GBM (CS-GBM) extracts have been probed by immunoblot. A unique McAb 7-5Q, reactive with glomerular and tubular epithelial structures, binds major bands of approximately 107 KD and 93 KD in detergent solubilised cortex and a single band of similar size by immunoprecipitation (110 KD). 5-3A (a human-restricted linear-reacting McAb) binds bands of 20-200 KD (major band 58 KD) in CS-GBM. In conclusion, distinct species-restricted and more broadly disposed glomerular epitopes are definable in man by McAbs and are potential targets for humoral injury. Purification of these antigens will allow assay for circulating putative nephritogenic auto-antibody and potentially, McAbs may be useful in screening urine for evidence of occult structural renal disease.

  6. Structural basis for reduced glomerular filtration capacity in nephrotic humans.

    PubMed Central

    Drumond, M C; Kristal, B; Myers, B D; Deen, W M

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have established that in a variety of human glomerulopathies the reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is due to a marked lowering of the ultrafiltration coefficient (Kf). To identify the factors which lower Kf, we measured the filtering surface area per glomerulus, filtration slit frequency, basement membrane thickness, and GFR and its determinants in patients with minimal change and membraneous nephropathies and in age-matched healthy controls. Overall values of Kf for the two kidneys were calculated from GFR, renal plasma flow rate, systemic colloid osmotic pressure, and three assumed values for the transcapillary pressure difference. "Experimental" values of the glomerular hydraulic permeability (kexp) were then calculated from Kf, glomerular filtering surface area, and estimates of the total number of nephrons of the two kidneys. Independent estimates of the glomerular hydraulic permeability (kmodel) were obtained using a recent mathematical model that is based on analyses of viscous flow through the various structural components of the glomerular capillary wall. Individual values of basement membrane thickness and filtration slit frequency were used as inputs in this model. The results indicate that the reductions of Kf in both nephropathies can be attributed entirely to reduced glomerular hydraulic permeability. The mean values of kexp and kmodel were very similar in both disorders and much smaller in the nephrotic groups than in healthy controls. There was good agreement between kexp and kmodel for any given group of subjects. It was shown that, in both groups of nephrotics, filtration slit frequency was a more important determinant of the water flow resistance than was basement membrane thickness. The decrease in filtration slit frequency observed in both disorders caused the average path length for the filtrate to increase, thereby explaining the decreased hydraulic permeability. Images PMID:8083359

  7. WEBSAGE: a web tool for visual analysis of differentially expressed human SAGE tags.

    PubMed

    Pylouster, Jean; Sénamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2005-07-01

    The serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful method to compare gene expression of mRNA populations. To provide quantitative expression levels on a genome-wide scale, the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) uses SAGE. Over 7 million SAGE tags, from 171 human cell types have been assembled. The growing number of laboratories involved in SAGE research necessitates the use of software that provides statistical analysis of raw data, allowing the rapid visualization and interpretation of results. We have created the first simple tool that performs statistical analysis on SAGE data, identifies the tags differentially expressed and shows the results in a scatter plot. It is freely available and accessible at http://bioserv.rpbs.jussieu.fr/websage/index.php.

  8. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in normal human trabecular meshwork.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutao; Munro, Drew; Layfield, David; Dellinger, Andrew; Walter, Jeffrey; Peterson, Katherine; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Allingham, R Rand; Hauser, Michael A

    2011-04-08

    To identify the genes expressed in normal human trabecular meshwork tissue, a tissue critical to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Total RNA was extracted from human trabecular meshwork (HTM) harvested from 3 different donors. Extracted RNA was used to synthesize individual SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries using the I-SAGE Long kit from Invitrogen. Libraries were analyzed using SAGE 2000 software to extract the 17 base pair sequence tags. The extracted sequence tags were mapped to the genome using SAGE Genie map. A total of 298,834 SAGE tags were identified from all HTM libraries (96,842, 88,126, and 113,866 tags, respectively). Collectively, there were 107,325 unique tags. There were 10,329 unique tags with a minimum of 2 counts from a single library. These tags were mapped to known unique Unigene clusters. Approximately 29% of the tags (orphan tags) did not map to a known Unigene cluster. Thirteen percent of the tags mapped to at least 2 Unigene clusters. Sequence tags from many glaucoma-related genes, including myocilin, optineurin, and WD repeat domain 36, were identified. This is the first time SAGE analysis has been used to characterize the gene expression profile in normal HTM. SAGE analysis provides an unbiased sampling of gene expression of the target tissue. These data will provide new and valuable information to improve understanding of the biology of human aqueous outflow.

  9. Gene expression profiling of human breast tissue samples using SAGE-Seq.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua Jeremy; Meyer, Clifford A; Choudhury, Sibgat; Shipitsin, Michail; Maruyama, Reo; Bessarabova, Marina; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Sukumar, Saraswati; Schwartzman, Armin; Liu, Jun S; Polyak, Kornelia; Liu, X Shirley

    2010-12-01

    We present a powerful application of ultra high-throughput sequencing, SAGE-Seq, for the accurate quantification of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cell transcriptomes. We develop data analysis pipelines that allow the mapping of sense and antisense strands of mitochondrial and RefSeq genes, the normalization between libraries, and the identification of differentially expressed genes. We find that the diversity of cancer transcriptomes is significantly higher than that of normal cells. Our analysis indicates that transcript discovery plateaus at 10 million reads/sample, and suggests a minimum desired sequencing depth around five million reads. Comparison of SAGE-Seq and traditional SAGE on normal and cancerous breast tissues reveals higher sensitivity of SAGE-Seq to detect less-abundant genes, including those encoding for known breast cancer-related transcription factors and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). SAGE-Seq is able to identify genes and pathways abnormally activated in breast cancer that traditional SAGE failed to call. SAGE-Seq is a powerful method for the identification of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human disease.

  10. The SAGE Cross-Culture Matrix Approach to the Study of Global Environments and Human Inhabitants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Richard

    The Humans and Environment Learning Program (HELP) and the Student Awareness of Global Environments (SAGE) approach are designed to directly and vicariously expose students to natural and social environments and develop their awareness of the character and nature of the different environments in which each individual functions throughout a…

  11. Reverse serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) characterization of orphan SAGE tags from human embryonic stem cells identifies the presence of novel transcripts and antisense transcription of key pluripotency genes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark; Tan, Siew-Peng; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Bongso, Ariff

    2006-05-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful technique for the analysis of gene expression. A significant portion of SAGE tags, designated as orphan tags, however, cannot be reliably assigned to known transcripts. We used an improved reverse SAGE (rSAGE) strategy to convert human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-specific orphan SAGE tags into longer 3' cDNAs. We show that the systematic analysis of these 3' cDNAs permitted the discovery of hESC-specific novel transcripts and cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and improved the assignment of SAGE tags that resulted from splice variants, insertion/deletion, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. More importantly, this is the first description of cis-NATs for several key pluripotency markers in hESCs and mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that the formation of short interfering RNA could be an important regulatory mechanism. A systematic large-scale analysis of the remaining orphan SAGE tags in the hESC SAGE libraries by rSAGE or other 3' cDNA extension strategies should unravel additional novel transcripts and cis-NATs that are specifically expressed in hESCs. Besides contributing to the complete catalog of human transcripts, many of them should prove to be a valuable resource for the elucidation of the molecular pathways involved in the self-renewal and lineage commitment of hESCs.

  12. Comparison of microarray and sage techniques in gene expression analysis of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kavsan, V M; Dmitrenko, V V; Shostak, K O; Bukreieva, T V; Vitak, N Y; Simirenko, O E; Malisheva, T A; Shamayev, M I; Rozumenko, V D; Zozulya, Y A

    2007-01-01

    To enhance glioblastoma (GB) marker discovery we compared gene expression in GB with human normal brain (NB) by accessing SAGE Genie web site and compared obtained results with published data. Nine GB and five NB SAGE-libraries were analyzed using the Digital Gene Expression Displayer (DGED), the results of DGED were tested by Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR of arbitrary selected genes. Review of available data from the articles on gene expression profiling by microarray-based hybridization showed as few as 35 overlapped genes with increased expression in GB. Some of them were identified in four articles, but most genes in three or even in two investigations. There was found also some differences between SAGE results of GB analysis. Digital Gene Expression Displayer approach revealed 676 genes differentially expressed in GB vs. NB with cut-off ratio: twofold change and P < or = 0.05. Differential expression of selectedgenes obtained by DGED was confirmed by Northern analysis and RT-PCR. Altogether, only 105 of 955 genes presented in published investigations were among the genes obtained by DGED. Comparison of the results obtained by microarrays and SAGE is very complicated because authors present only the most prominent differentially expressed genes. However, even available data give quite poor overlapping of genes revealed by microarrays. Some differences between results obtained by SAGE in different investigations can be explained by high dependence on the statistical methods used. As for now, the best solution to search for molecular tumor markers is to compare all available results and to select only those genes, which significant expression in tumor combined with very low expression in normal tissues was reproduced in several articles. 105 differentially expressed genes, common to both methods, can be included in the list of candidates for the molecular typing of GBs. Some genes, encoded cell surface or extra-cellular proteins may be useful for targeting

  13. Short-term, low-dose cadmium exposure induces hyperpermeability in human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqun; Dong, Fengyun; Xu, Dongmei; Du, Linna; Yan, Suhua; Hu, Hesheng; Lobe, Corrinne G; Yi, Fan; Kapron, Carolyn M; Liu, Ju

    2016-02-01

    The kidney is the principal organ targeted by exposure to cadmium (Cd), a well-known toxic metal. Even at a low level, Cd damages glomerular filtration. However, little is known about the effects of Cd on the glomerular endothelium, which performs the filtration function and directly interacts with Cd in blood plasma. In this study, we cultured human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) in the presence of serum with treatment of a short term (1 h) and low concentration (1 μm) of Cd, which mimics the pattern of glomerular endothelium exposure to Cd in vivo. We found that this short-term, low-dose Cd exposure does not induce cytotoxicity, but increases permeability in HRGECs monolayers and redistributes adherens junction proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin. Though short-term, low-dose Cd exposure activates all three major mitogen activated protein kinases, only the inhibitor of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase partially prevents Cd-induced hyperpermeability in HRGECs. Our data indicate that the presence of Cd in blood circulation might directly disrupt the glomerular endothelial cell barrier and contribute to the development of clinical symptoms of glomerular diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Effect of cyclosporin and the prostacyclin analogue iloprost on human glomerular vasoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, E; Morel, D; L'Azou, B; Cambar, J; Potaux, L

    1994-01-01

    Cyclosporin is known to cause a decrease in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate in both humans and animals. These acute modifications are reversible if the drug is withdrawn, and seem to be caused by a local hormonal imbalance between vasoconstricting and vasodilating substances. We studied human glomeruli incubated with either CsA alone, iloprost alone, or CsA + iloprost. Photomicrographs of glomeruli were taken at t0, t1, t2 and t5 min and glomerular areas were measured with a videoanalyser linked to a computer. Results show a significant vasoconstriction with CsA alone, and no significant modification of glomerular areas with iloprost or CsA + iloprost. We conclude that iloprost prevents CsA-induced vasoconstriction in human glomeruli in vitro.

  15. MRI-based glomerular morphology and pathology in whole human kidneys.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Scott C; Cullen-McEwen, Luise A; Puelles, Victor G; Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Dowling, John; Charlton, Jennifer R; Forbes, Michael S; Ng, Amanda; Wu, Qi-zhu; Armitage, James A; Egan, Gary F; Bertram, John F; Bennett, Kevin M

    2014-06-01

    Nephron number (N(glom)) and size (V(glom)) are correlated with risk for chronic cardiovascular and kidney disease and may be predictive of renal allograft viability. Unfortunately, there are no techniques to assess N(glom) and V(glom) in intact kidneys. This work demonstrates the use of cationized ferritin (CF) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent to measure N(glom) and V(glom) in viable human kidneys donated to science. The kidneys were obtained from patients with varying levels of cardiovascular and renal disease. CF was intravenously injected into three viable human kidneys. A fourth control kidney was perfused with saline. After fixation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed binding of CF to the glomerulus. The intact kidneys were imaged with three-dimensional MRI and CF-labeled glomeruli appeared as punctate spots. Custom software identified, counted, and measured the apparent volumes of CF-labeled glomeruli, with an ~6% false positive rate. These measurements were comparable to stereological estimates. The MRI-based technique yielded a novel whole kidney distribution of glomerular volumes. Histopathology demonstrated that the distribution of CF-labeled glomeruli may be predictive of glomerular and vascular disease. Variations in CF distribution were quantified using image texture analyses, which be a useful marker of glomerular sclerosis. This is the first report of direct measurement of glomerular number and volume in intact human kidneys.

  16. SAGE I

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-12

    SAGE I Data and Information Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment ( SAGE ) I gathered data concerning the spatial distribution of stratospheric aerosols, ozone and nitrogen dioxide on a global scale. SAGE I used a Sun Photometer. Guide Documents:  Project ...

  17. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    SAGE II Data and Information The goals of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment ( SAGE ) II are to determine the spatial distributions of stratospheric ... profiles and calculating monthly averages of each. The SAGE II sensor (a Sun Photometer) was launched into a 57-degree inclination ...

  18. Scaling down SAGE: from miniSAGE to microSAGE.

    PubMed

    Datson, N A

    2008-10-01

    Since Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) was introduced more than a decade ago, it has been widely applied to characterise gene expression profiles in various tissues, cell types and cell lines of diverse origin including human, mouse, rat, yeast, plant and parasites. Throughout the past years many modifications to the original SAGE protocol have been developed, which address several aspects of SAGE, including an increase in sequencing efficiency (deepSAGE), improved tag-to-transcript mapping of SAGE tags (LongSAGE) and a reduction of the amount of required input RNA (microSAGE). Furthermore, the applications of SAGE have expanded from exclusively transcriptome analysis to now also include genome analysis, identifying genome signature tags that pinpoint transcription factor binding sites throughout the genome (Serial Analysis of Chromatin Occupancy or SACO). The review gives an overview of the main modifications to the SAGE technology that have been developed in the last decade, with a particular focus on the large reduction in the amount of required input RNA that has been achieved in the many SAGE modifications for downscaling or miniaturisation of SAGE (including microSAGE, PCR-SAGE and small amplified RNA-SAGE). The available methods for downscaling or miniaturisation of SAGE and their specific features will be discussed, illustrated by some examples of their application. This reduction in required quantity of input RNA has greatly expanded the possible applications of SAGE, allowing characterisation of global gene expression in material obtained from needle biopsies, small anatomical structures and specific cell types isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting or laser microdissection.

  19. Simultaneous gene expression profiling in human macrophages infected with Leishmania major parasites using SAGE

    PubMed Central

    Guerfali, Fatma Z; Laouini, Dhafer; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia; Ottones, Florence; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Benkahla, Alia; Manchon, Laurent; Piquemal, David; Smandi, Sondos; Mghirbi, Ons; Commes, Thérèse; Marti, Jacques; Dellagi, Koussay

    2008-01-01

    Background Leishmania (L) are intracellular protozoan parasites that are able to survive and replicate within the harsh and potentially hostile phagolysosomal environment of mammalian mononuclear phagocytes. A complex interplay then takes place between the macrophage (MΦ) striving to eliminate the pathogen and the parasite struggling for its own survival. To investigate this host-parasite conflict at the transcriptional level, in the context of monocyte-derived human MΦs (MDM) infection by L. major metacyclic promastigotes, the quantitative technique of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was used. Results After extracting mRNA from resting human MΦs, Leishmania-infected human MΦs and L. major parasites, three SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced generating up to 28,173; 57,514 and 33,906 tags respectively (corresponding to 12,946; 23,442 and 9,530 unique tags). Using computational data analysis and direct comparison to 357,888 publicly available experimental human tags, the parasite and the host cell transcriptomes were then simultaneously characterized from the mixed cellular extract, confidently discriminating host from parasite transcripts. This procedure led us to reliably assign 3,814 tags to MΦs' and 3,666 tags to L. major parasites transcripts. We focused on these, showing significant changes in their expression that are likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of parasite infection: (i) human MΦs genes, belonging to key immune response proteins (e.g., IFNγ pathway, S100 and chemokine families) and (ii) a group of Leishmania genes showing a preferential expression at the parasite's intra-cellular developing stage. Conclusion Dual SAGE transcriptome analysis provided a useful, powerful and accurate approach to discriminating genes of human or parasitic origin in Leishmania-infected human MΦs. The findings presented in this work suggest that the Leishmania parasite modulates key transcripts in human MΦs that may be beneficial for its

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of extracellular matrix components in human diabetic glomerular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, A.; Schleicher, E.

    1991-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of the extracellular matrix was examined in 31 cases with different degrees of human diabetic nephropathy using antisera to human collagen types I, III, IV, V, fibronectin, laminin, and basement-membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG). In normal glomeruli, HSPG was predominantly localized in the glomerular basement membrane and in the mesangium, and to minor extent in the basement membranes of tubules and Bowman's capsule. Collagen IV and laminin were distributed in glomerular basement membrane and mesangium in minor amounts. Interstitial collagens usually do not occur within glomeruli except for collagen V which has a light microscopic glomerular distribution similar to collagen IV. In diabetic diffuse glomerulosclerosis, the enlarged mesangial matrix showed an increased staining reaction for collagen IV, V, laminin, and fibronectin whereas the staining pattern of HSPG was markedly reduced. Early, small nodular lesions in diabetic glomeruli were similarly positive for most of the basement membrane components, whereas HSPG remained absent. With an increase in the diameter of the noduli, however, the staining reaction for all basement membrane components diminished, whereas interstitial collagens V and III, but not collagen I, were present in these noduli in substantial amounts. These initial studies provide evidence that the changes in the glomerular matrix in diabetic nephropathy may be divided into distinct and progressing stages of lesions. The reduced amount of HSPG even in slight, early lesions may represent the morphologic correlate to the impaired filter function of the glomerular basement membrane. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1928305

  1. Urinary soluble CD163 level reflects glomerular inflammation in human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Nobuhide; Tsuboi, Naotake; Furuhashi, Kazuhiro; Shi, Yiqin; Du, Qiuna; Abe, Tomoko; Hori, Mayuko; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Kim, Hangsoo; Katsuno, Takayuki; Ozaki, Takenori; Kosugi, Tomoki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2016-12-01

    In addition to classically activated macrophages that have effector roles in tissue injury, alternatively activated M2 macrophages are involved in the resolution of inflammation in animal models of kidney disease. To clarify the clinical relevance of macrophage phenotypes in human glomerular diseases, we evaluated the renal accumulation of macrophages and plasma and urine levels of CD163, an M2 marker, in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. Kidney biopsies and plasma and urine samples were obtained from LN patients who underwent renal biopsy between 2008 and 2012. CD163(+), CD68(+) and CD204(+) cells were counted in paraffin-embedded and frozen sections. LN histological activity was evaluated semiquantitatively using the biopsy activity index. Plasma and urinary soluble CD163 (sCD163) concentrations were also measured and evaluated for their significance as potential LN biomarkers. Immunohistological analysis of glomeruli from LN patients revealed that >60% of CD68(+) macrophages had merged with CD163(+) cells. The increased number of glomerular CD163(+) macrophages was correlated with LN severity, as determined by the biopsy active index (r = 0.635). Urinary (u-) sCD163 level was strongly correlated with glomerular CD163(+) cell counts and histological disease score as well as urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels (r = 0.638 and 0.592, respectively). Furthermore, the u-sCD163 level was higher in patients with active LN than in those with other diseases. Glomerular CD163(+) macrophages are the predominant phenotype in the kidneys of lupus patients. These findings indicate that the u-sCD163 level can serve as a biomarker for macrophage-dependent glomerular inflammation in human LN. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. SAGE and LongSAGE.

    PubMed

    Høgh, Annabeth Laursen; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    2008-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a high-throughput method for global gene expression analysis that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. SAGE is a digital method and its sensitivity depends only on the number of tags sequenced. Furthermore, SAGE is a powerful tool for finding novel genes that are expressed under certain conditions or in certain tissues. SAGE has been widely used in fields as diverse as cancer research and the development and study of microorganisms. The SAGE method is a series of routine molecular biology procedure and can, at least in principle, be carried out in any laboratory. However, the number of consecutive steps is quite large and in practice, SAGE has been difficult to carry out on a routine basis.

  3. Caveolae may enable albumin to enter human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Takahito; Takei, Takashi; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Uchida, Keiko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-06-01

    Caveolae on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) are increased in glomerular disease and correlate with the degree of albuminuria. To assess the mechanism by which caveolae contribute to albuminuria, we investigated whether albumin enters into HRGECs through caveolae. HRGECs were incubated with Alexa Fluor 488 labeled BSA or transferrin, followed by immunofluorescence localization with antibody to caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the main structural protein of caveolae, or clathrin, the major structural protein of clathrin coated pits, to assess whether BSA colocalized with Cav-1. HRGECs were also incubated with albumin and caveolae disrupting agents, including methyl beta cyclodextrin (MBCD) and nystatin, to determine whether disrupting caveolae interfered with albumin endocytosis into HRGECs. HRGECs were also incubated with albumin after transfection with Cav-1 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Labeled BSA colocalized with Cav-1, but not with clathrin. In contrast, labeled transferrin colocalized with clathrin, but not with Cav-1. Incubation of HRGECs with MBCD or nystatin, or transfection with Cav-1 siRNA, significantly reduced the intracellular amounts of albumin and Cav-1, relative to normal HRGECs, as shown by western blotting and immunofluorescence. These findings indicate that albumin enters HRGECs through the caveolae, suggesting that caveolae play an important role in the pathogenesis of albuminuria by providing a pathway through which albumin can enter glomerular endothelial cells.

  4. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-13

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Additional Info:  Data Format: HDF-EOS or Big Endian/IEEE Binary SCAR-B Block:  ...

  5. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  6. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis.

  7. hSAGEing: an improved SAGE-based software for identification of human tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Shih, Tsung-Mu; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2010-12-17

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) is a powerful method of analyzing gene expression for the entire transcriptome. There are currently many well-developed SAGE tools. However, the cross-comparison of different tissues is seldom addressed, thus limiting the identification of common- and tissue-specific tumor markers. To improve the SAGE mining methods, we propose a novel function for cross-tissue comparison of SAGE data by combining the mathematical set theory and logic with a unique "multi-pool method" that analyzes multiple pools of pair-wise case controls individually. When all the settings are in "inclusion", the common SAGE tag sequences are mined. When one tissue type is in "inclusion" and the other types of tissues are not in "inclusion", the selected tissue-specific SAGE tag sequences are generated. They are displayed in tags-per-million (TPM) and fold values, as well as visually displayed in four kinds of scales in a color gradient pattern. In the fold visualization display, the top scores of the SAGE tag sequences are provided, along with cluster plots. A user-defined matrix file is designed for cross-tissue comparison by selecting libraries from publically available databases or user-defined libraries. The hSAGEing tool provides a combination of friendly cross-tissue analysis and an interface for comparing SAGE libraries for the first time. Some up- or down-regulated genes with tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors are identified computationally. The tool is useful and convenient for in silico cancer transcriptomic studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/hSAGEing.

  8. hSAGEing: An Improved SAGE-Based Software for Identification of Human Tissue-Specific or Common Tumor Markers and Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Shih, Tsung-Mu; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) is a powerful method of analyzing gene expression for the entire transcriptome. There are currently many well-developed SAGE tools. However, the cross-comparison of different tissues is seldom addressed, thus limiting the identification of common- and tissue-specific tumor markers. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve the SAGE mining methods, we propose a novel function for cross-tissue comparison of SAGE data by combining the mathematical set theory and logic with a unique “multi-pool method” that analyzes multiple pools of pair-wise case controls individually. When all the settings are in “inclusion”, the common SAGE tag sequences are mined. When one tissue type is in “inclusion” and the other types of tissues are not in “inclusion”, the selected tissue-specific SAGE tag sequences are generated. They are displayed in tags-per-million (TPM) and fold values, as well as visually displayed in four kinds of scales in a color gradient pattern. In the fold visualization display, the top scores of the SAGE tag sequences are provided, along with cluster plots. A user-defined matrix file is designed for cross-tissue comparison by selecting libraries from publically available databases or user-defined libraries. Conclusions/Significance The hSAGEing tool provides a combination of friendly cross-tissue analysis and an interface for comparing SAGE libraries for the first time. Some up- or down-regulated genes with tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors are identified computationally. The tool is useful and convenient for in silico cancer transcriptomic studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/hSAGEing PMID:21179408

  9. Zika Virus Infection of the Human Glomerular Cells: Implications for Viral Reservoirs and Renal Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-07-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the human renal compartment has not been reported. Several clinical reports have describe high-level persistent viral shedding in the urine of infected patients, but the associated mechanisms have not been explored until now. The current study examined cellular components of the glomerulus of the human kidney for ZIKV infectivity. I infected primary human podocytes, renal glomerular endothelial cells (GECs), and mesangial cells with ZIKV. Viral infectivity was analyzed by means of microscopy, immunofluorescence, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES (regulated on activation of normal T cells expressed and secreted) were assessed using qRT-PCR. I show that glomerular podocytes, renal GECs, and mesangial cells are permissive for ZIKV infection. ZIKV infectivity was confirmed in all 3 cell types by means of immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, and qRT-PCR, and qRT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcriptional induction of interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES in ZIKV-infected podocytes at 72 hours, compared with renal GECs and mesangial cells. The findings of this study support the notion that the glomerulus may serve as an amplification reservoir for ZIKV in the renal compartment. The impact of ZIKV infection in the human renal compartment is unknown and will require further study.

  10. Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    To a greater extent than any other species, human beings create the environments that, in turn, shape their own development. This book endeavors to demonstrate that human beings can also develop those environments to optimize their most constructive genetic potentials. What makes human beings human, therefore, is both the potential to shape their…

  11. Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    To a greater extent than any other species, human beings create the environments that, in turn, shape their own development. This book endeavors to demonstrate that human beings can also develop those environments to optimize their most constructive genetic potentials. What makes human beings human, therefore, is both the potential to shape their…

  12. Glomerular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the body. Fluid can accumulate outside the circulatory system in the face, hands, feet, or ankles and cause swelling. What are the symptoms of glomerular disease? The signs and symptoms of glomerular disease include ...

  13. Detection of Goodpasture antigen in fractions prepared from collagenase digests of human glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, A J; Lockwood, M C; Wong, M; Price, R G

    1984-01-01

    Preparations of human glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were digested with collagenase, and a Goodpasture (GP) antigen rich pool from gel filtration column runs was identified by antibody inhibition radioimmunoassay. The components of the GP antigen pool were separated on polyacrylamide gels, and transferred to nitrocellulose sheets by the 'western' blotting technique. The blots were separately reacted with thirteen GP sera as primary antibody, followed by peroxidase labelled goat anti-human IgG and revealed 45-50K (two bands) and 25-28K (one-three bands) components. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP sera or other control sera (normal human serum, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary haemorrhage, and lupus erythematosus) as primary antibody. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6319059

  14. Anemia lessens and its prevention with recombinant human erythropoietin worsens glomerular injury and hypertension in rats with reduced renal mass.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, D L; Anderson, S; Rennke, H G; Brenner, B M

    1988-01-01

    Chronic renal disease is frequently characterized by anemia, which may modify systemic and renal hemodynamics. In adult Munich-Wistar rats, the mild anemia (hematocrit, approximately equal to 42 vol/dl) that accompanies five-sixths nephrectomy was either made more severe (approximately equal to 30 vol/dl) by feeding a low iron diet or prevented (approximately equal to 50 vol/dl) by administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEpo). In functional studies performed 4 weeks after renal ablation, untreated rats exhibited mild anemia with systemic hypertension and elevation of the single nephron glomerular filtration rate due to glomerular capillary hyperperfusion and hypertension. Preventing anemia with r-HuEpo worsened systemic and glomerular hypertension, effects largely obviated by induction of more marked anemia with the low iron diet. Untreated rats followed for 6 weeks postablation exhibited progressive proteinuria and sclerosis involving 12% of glomeruli, contrasted with 33% in rats given r-HuEpo. Even after 12 weeks, sclerosis involved only 6% of glomeruli in rats with more severe anemia but progressed to 30% in untreated rats. Thus, anemia limits systemic and glomerular hypertension and glomerular injury, whereas its prevention by r-HuEpo severely accelerates hemodynamically mediated glomerular injury in this model. These results suggest that anemia is a hemodynamically favorable adaptation to chronic renal disease and that its overly vigorous correction may have adverse renal hemodynamic and structural consequences. PMID:3413082

  15. Hyperosmolarity induced by high glucose promotes senescence in human glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    del Nogal, Maria; Troyano, Nuria; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Ruiz-Torres, María P

    2014-09-01

    Hyperglycemia is involved in the diabetic complication of different organs and can elevate serum osmolarity. Here, we tested whether hyperosmolarity promoted by high glucose levels induces cellular senescence in renal cells. We treated Wistar rats with streptozotocin to induce diabetes or with consecutive daily injections of mannitol to increase serum osmolarity and analyzed p53 and p16 genes in renal cortex by immunohistochemistry. Both diabetic and mannitol treated rats showed a significant increase in serum osmolarity, without significant signs of renal dysfunction, but associated with increased staining for p53 and p16 in the renal cortex. An increase in p53 and p16 expression was also found in renal cortex slices and glomeruli isolated from healthy rats, which were later treated with 30 mM glucose or mannitol. Intracellular mechanisms involved were analyzed in cultured human glomerular mesangial cells treated with 30 mM glucose or mannitol. After treatments, cells showed increased p53, p21 and p16 expression and elevated senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Senescence was prevented when myo-inositol was added before treatment. High glucose or mannitol induced constitutive activation of Ras and ERK pathways which, in turn, were activated by oxidative stress. In summary, hyperosmolarity induced renal senescence, particularly in glomerular mesangial cells, increasing oxidative stress, which constitutively activated Ras-ERK 1/2 pathway. Cellular senescence could contribute to the organ dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  16. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo: α-Enolase and Annexin AI

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D’Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino

    2014-01-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti–α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti–α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti–α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti–α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum. PMID:24790181

  17. Glomerular autoimmune multicomponents of human lupus nephritis in vivo: α-enolase and annexin AI.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-11-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti-α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti-α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti-α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti-α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum.

  18. Comparison of blastocyst and Sage media for in vitro maturation of human immature oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pongsuthirak, Pallop; Songveeratham, Sorramon; Vutyavanich, Teraporn

    2015-03-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) of human oocytes is an attractive alternative to conventional assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment, as it involves no or minimal ovarian stimulation. Currently, commercialized media specifically designed for IVM are often used. These media are expensive, have limited shelf life, and must be ordered in advance. If standard culture media can be used in place of the specialized IVM media, it would simplify management and make IVM more feasible and more widely employed in ART centers around the world, especially in developing countries where resources are scarce. This study was, therefore, conducted to test the hypothesis that blastocyst medium was as good as commercial IVM medium to support maturation and developmental competence of human immature oocytes as previously shown in the mouse system. Immature oocytes were obtained by needle aspiration from 89 pregnant women during cesarean deliveries between April 2012 and February 2013. Sibling oocytes were allocated to Sage IVM media (512 oocytes) or blastocyst medium (520 oocytes) and assessed for maturation 36 hours later. Mature oocytes were inseminated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and cultured up to 144 hours. There was no difference in maturation rate (65.0% vs 68.7%; P = .218) or fertilization rate (66.9% vs 66.4%; P = .872) of oocytes matured in vitro in both media. There was also no difference in the formation of good-quality blastocysts (46.6% vs 45.9%; P = .889) in the 2 groups. Further study should be done to ascertain implantation and pregnancy potential of these embryos.

  19. Expression of glomerular heparan sulphate domains in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Rops, Angelique L; van den Hoven, Mabel J; Bakker, Marinka A; Lensen, Joost F; Wijnhoven, Tessa J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2007-07-01

    Recently, we identified specific N- and 6-O-sulphated heparan sulphate (HS) domains on activated glomerular endothelial cells. In this study, we evaluated in lupus nephritis the expression of different HS domains on glomerular endothelium and in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The expression of specific glomerular HS domains and the presence of immunoglobulins (Ig) were determined by immunofluorescence staining of kidney sections of patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and MRL/lpr lupus mice. The expression/presence of glomerular HS domains and Ig was also evaluated after eluting Ig from renal sections of lupus mice using two elution methods, and in renal sections of lupus mice treated with heparinoids. Both MRL/lpr mice and patients with lupus nephritis showed a decreased expression of HS in the GBM. The expression of N- and 6-O-sulphated HS domains on glomerular endothelium was decreased in MRL/lpr mice, but increased in SLE patients. MRL/lpr mice had more extensive glomerular Ig deposits than SLE patients. After elution of Ig, the glomerular endothelial expression of N- and 6-O-sulphated HS domains in MRL/lpr mice was recovered and even increased above normal levels, while the expression of HS in the GBM was restored to normal levels. Treatment with heparinoids prevented Ig deposition and preserved the expression of glomerular HS domains at normal levels in lupus mice. The expression of specific HS domains on glomerular endothelium and in the GBM is changed during lupus nephritis due to masking by Ig deposits and induction of inflammatory N- and 6-O-sulphated HS domains.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  1. Subfractionation, characterization, and in-depth proteomic analysis of glomerular membrane vesicles in human urine.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marie C; Johnson, Kenneth L; Zenka, Roman M; Charlesworth, M Cristine; Madden, Benjamin J; Mahoney, Doug W; Oberg, Ann L; Huang, Bing Q; Leontovich, Alexey A; Nesbitt, Lisa L; Bakeberg, Jason L; McCormick, Daniel J; Bergen, H Robert; Ward, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    Urinary exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a heterogenous mixture (diameter 40-200 nm) containing vesicles shed from all segments of the nephron including glomerular podocytes. Contamination with Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) oligomers has hampered their isolation and proteomic analysis. Here we improved ELV isolation protocols employing density centrifugation to remove THP and albumin, and isolated a glomerular membranous vesicle (GMV)-enriched subfraction from 7 individuals identifying 1830 proteins and in 3 patients with glomerular disease identifying 5657 unique proteins. The GMV fraction was composed of podocin/podocalyxin-positive irregularly shaped membranous vesicles and podocin/podocalyxin-negative classical exosomes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified integrin, actin cytoskeleton, and Rho GDI signaling in the top three canonical represented signaling pathways and 19 other proteins associated with inherited glomerular diseases. The GMVs are of podocyte origin and the density gradient technique allowed isolation in a reproducible manner. We show many nephrotic syndrome proteins, proteases, and complement proteins involved in glomerular disease are in GMVs and some were only shed in the disease state (nephrin, TRPC6, INF2 and phospholipase A2 receptor). We calculated sample sizes required to identify new glomerular disease biomarkers, expand the ELV proteome, and provide a reference proteome in a database that may prove useful in the search for biomarkers of glomerular disease.

  2. Subfractionation, characterization and in-depth proteomic analysis of glomerular membrane vesicles in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Zenka, Roman M.; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Madden, Benjamin J.; Mahoney, Doug W.; Oberg, Ann L.; Huang, Bing Q.; Nesbitt, Lisa L.; Bakeberg, Jason L.; Bergen, H. Robert; Ward, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a heterogenous mixture (diameter 40–200nm) containing vesicles shed from all segments of the nephron including glomerular podocytes. Contamination with Tamm Horsfall protein (THP) oligomers has hampered their isolation and proteomic analysis. Here we improved ELV isolation protocols employing density centrifugation to remove THP and albumin, and isolated a glomerular membranous vesicle (GMV) enriched subfraction from 7 individuals identifying 1830 proteins and in 3 patients with glomerular disease identifying 5657 unique proteins. The GMV fraction was composed of podocin/podocalyxin positive irregularly shaped membranous vesicles and podocin/podocalyxin negative classical exosomes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified integrin, actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling in the top three canonical represented signaling pathways and 19 other proteins associated with inherited glomerular diseases. The GMVs are of podocyte origin and the density gradient technique allowed isolation in a reproducible manner. We show many nephrotic syndrome proteins, proteases and complement proteins involved in glomerular disease are in GMVs and some were shed in the disease state (nephrin, TRPC6 and INF2 and PLA2R). We calculated sample sizes required to identify new glomerular disease biomarkers, expand the ELV proteome and provide a reference proteome in a database that may prove useful in the search for biomarkers of glomerular disease. PMID:24196483

  3. ADAM10 is expressed in human podocytes and found in urinary vesicles of patients with glomerular kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The importance of the Notch signaling in the development of glomerular diseases has been recently described. Therefore we analyzed in podocytes the expression and activity of ADAM10, one important component of the Notch signaling complex. Methods By Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analysis we characterized the expression of ADAM10 in human podocytes, human urine and human renal tissue. Results We present evidence, that differentiated human podocytes possessed increased amounts of mature ADAM10 and released elevated levels of L1 adhesion molecule, one well known substrate of ADAM10. By using specific siRNA and metalloproteinase inhibitors we demonstrate that ADAM10 is involved in the cleavage of L1 in human podocytes. Injury of podocytes enhanced the ADAM10 mediated cleavage of L1. In addition, we detected ADAM10 in urinary podocytes from patients with kidney diseases and in tissue sections of normal human kidney. Finally, we found elevated levels of ADAM10 in urinary vesicles of patients with glomerular kidney diseases. Conclusions The activity of ADAM10 in human podocytes may play an important role in the development of glomerular kidney diseases. PMID:20070888

  4. NF-κB signaling maintains the survival of cadmium-exposed human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Liqun; Wang, Yifan; Dong, Fengyun; Chen, Xiaocui; Liu, Fuhong; Xu, Dongmei; Yi, Fan; Kapron, Carolyn M; Liu, Ju

    2016-08-01

    The kidney is one of the primary organs targeted by cadmium (Cd), a widely distributed environmental pollutant. The glomerular endothelium is the major component of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, the effects of Cd on glomerular endothelial cells remain largely unknown. For this purpose, we aimed to determine the effects of low dose Cd on the survival of human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). Cultured HRGECs were exposed to 4 µM cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and examined at different time-points. We found that Cd activates the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway without inducing the apoptosis of HRGECs. Pre-treating the cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a potent NF-κB inhibitor, prior to Cd exposure triggered extensive cell death (73.5%). In addition, Cd activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway significantly elevates Cd-induced JNK phosphorylation in HRGECs (p<0.01). The combination treatment of PDTC and SP600125, a JNK pathway inhibitor, increased the survival of Cd-stimulated HRGECs compared with those cells treated with PDTC alone (p<0.05). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the NF-κB pathway plays an essential role in maintaining the survival of Cd-exposed HRGECs.

  5. Understanding SAGE data.

    PubMed

    Wang, San Ming

    2007-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a method for identifying and quantifying transcripts from eukaryotic genomes. Since its invention, SAGE has been widely applied to analyzing gene expression in many biological and medical studies. Vast amounts of SAGE data have been collected and more than a thousand SAGE-related studies have been published since the mid-1990s. The principle of SAGE has been developed to address specific issues such as determination of normal gene structure and identification of abnormal genome structural changes. This review focuses on the general features of SAGE data, including the specificity of SAGE tags with respect to their original transcripts, the quantitative nature of SAGE data for differentially expressed genes, the reproducibility, the comparability of SAGE with microarray and the future potential of SAGE. Understanding these basic features should aid the proper interpretation of SAGE data to address biological and medical questions.

  6. Identifying and Prioritizing Greater Sage-Grouse Nesting and Brood-Rearing Habitat for Conservation in Human-Modified Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Dzialak, Matthew R.; Olson, Chad V.; Harju, Seth M.; Webb, Stephen L.; Mudd, James P.; Winstead, Jeffrey B.; Hayden-Wing, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Balancing animal conservation and human use of the landscape is an ongoing scientific and practical challenge throughout the world. We investigated reproductive success in female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) relative to seasonal patterns of resource selection, with the larger goal of developing a spatially-explicit framework for managing human activity and sage-grouse conservation at the landscape level. Methodology/Principal Findings We integrated field-observation, Global Positioning Systems telemetry, and statistical modeling to quantify the spatial pattern of occurrence and risk during nesting and brood-rearing. We linked occurrence and risk models to provide spatially-explicit indices of habitat-performance relationships. As part of the analysis, we offer novel biological information on resource selection during egg-laying, incubation, and night. The spatial pattern of occurrence during all reproductive phases was driven largely by selection or avoidance of terrain features and vegetation, with little variation explained by anthropogenic features. Specifically, sage-grouse consistently avoided rough terrain, selected for moderate shrub cover at the patch level (within 90 m2), and selected for mesic habitat in mid and late brood-rearing phases. In contrast, risk of nest and brood failure was structured by proximity to anthropogenic features including natural gas wells and human-created mesic areas, as well as vegetation features such as shrub cover. Conclusions/Significance Risk in this and perhaps other human-modified landscapes is a top-down (i.e., human-mediated) process that would most effectively be minimized by developing a better understanding of specific mechanisms (e.g., predator subsidization) driving observed patterns, and using habitat-performance indices such as those developed herein for spatially-explicit guidance of conservation intervention. Working under the hypothesis that industrial activity structures risk by

  7. Identifying and prioritizing greater sage-grouse nesting and brood-rearing habitat for conservation in human-modified landscapes.

    PubMed

    Dzialak, Matthew R; Olson, Chad V; Harju, Seth M; Webb, Stephen L; Mudd, James P; Winstead, Jeffrey B; Hayden-Wing, L D

    2011-01-01

    Balancing animal conservation and human use of the landscape is an ongoing scientific and practical challenge throughout the world. We investigated reproductive success in female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) relative to seasonal patterns of resource selection, with the larger goal of developing a spatially-explicit framework for managing human activity and sage-grouse conservation at the landscape level. We integrated field-observation, Global Positioning Systems telemetry, and statistical modeling to quantify the spatial pattern of occurrence and risk during nesting and brood-rearing. We linked occurrence and risk models to provide spatially-explicit indices of habitat-performance relationships. As part of the analysis, we offer novel biological information on resource selection during egg-laying, incubation, and night. The spatial pattern of occurrence during all reproductive phases was driven largely by selection or avoidance of terrain features and vegetation, with little variation explained by anthropogenic features. Specifically, sage-grouse consistently avoided rough terrain, selected for moderate shrub cover at the patch level (within 90 m(2)), and selected for mesic habitat in mid and late brood-rearing phases. In contrast, risk of nest and brood failure was structured by proximity to anthropogenic features including natural gas wells and human-created mesic areas, as well as vegetation features such as shrub cover. Risk in this and perhaps other human-modified landscapes is a top-down (i.e., human-mediated) process that would most effectively be minimized by developing a better understanding of specific mechanisms (e.g., predator subsidization) driving observed patterns, and using habitat-performance indices such as those developed herein for spatially-explicit guidance of conservation intervention. Working under the hypothesis that industrial activity structures risk by enhancing predator abundance or effectiveness, we offer specific

  8. HPLC estimation of iothalamate to measure glomerular filtration rate in humans.

    PubMed

    Shah, Iltaf; Barker, James; Naughton, Declan P; Barton, Stephen J; Ashraf, Syed Salman

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is usually determined by estimation of iothalamate (IOT) clearance. We have developed and validated an accurate and robust method for the analysis of IOT in human plasma and urine. The mobile phase consisted of methanol and 50 mM sodium phosphate (10:90; v/v). Flow rate was 1.2 mL/min on a C18 reverse phase column, Synergi-hydro (250 × 4.6 mm) 4 µm 80 Å, with an ultraviolet detector set to 254 nm. Acetonitrile was used for the deproteination and extraction of IOT from human plasma and urine. Precision and accuracy were within 15% for IOT in both plasma and urine. The recoveries of IOT in urine and plasma ranged between 93.14% and 114.74 and 96.04-118.38%, respectively. The linear range for urine and plasma assays were 25-1500 and 1-150 µg/mL respectively. The lower limits of detection were 0.5 µg/mL for both urine and plasma, with no interference from plasma and urine matices. This method has been fully validated according to FDA guidelines and the new HPLC assay has been applied to a new formulation of IOT (Conray™ 43), to calculate GFR in healthy volunteers. The new method is simple, less expensive and it would be instrumental in future clinical and pharmacokinetic studies of iothalamate in kidney patients.

  9. Gamma G globulin subgroup composition of the glomerular deposits in human renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Edmund J.; Busch, George J.; Schur, Peter H.

    1970-01-01

    36 renal biopsies from patients with nephritis were studied for glomerular localization of the heavy chain subgroups of immunoglobulin G (IgG or γG). The deposition pattern of these subgroups was selective and did not reflect the normal serum concentration of these proteins. γG2, which comprises 18% of normal serum γG, was the predominant or unique subgroup deposited in five cases of lupus nephritis and four biopsies with other forms of nephritis associated with granular γG deposits. γG3, which normally makes up only 8% of the serum γG, was the dominant subgroup seen in one biopsy of lobular glomerulonephritis. Patients with linear γG deposits generally had a selective absence of γG3 and often had large amounts of γG4 (normally 3% of the serum γG) deposited. The deposition of complement components C1q, C4, and C3 was variable. One biopsy had only γG2 and no complement components in the deposits and had no neutrophile leukocyte infiltration. This latter observation correlates well with the poor ability of γG2 to fix complement in vitro. Similarly, deposits containing large amounts of γG4, which does not fix complement, also tended to have less inflammatory infiltrate than deposits devoid of this subgroup. The selective deposition of monotypic or restricted γG subgroups on the glomerulus supports the likelihood that the γG represents antibody. The nature of the subgroup involved in the deposit may represent one variable in the determination of the inflammatory and morphological picture that evolves in human glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:4987169

  10. Charge selectivity of the glomerular filtration barrier in healthy and nephrotic humans.

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, A; Deen, W M; Myers, B D

    1993-01-01

    We used dextran sulfate (DS) to evaluate barrier charge selectivity in 11 nonproteinuric subjects and in 11 patients with the nephrotic syndrome due to either membranous nephropathy or minimal change nephropathy. The 3H-DS preparation spanned a molecular radius interval of 10-24 A and exhibited size-dependent protein binding in vitro. Urine and ultrafiltrates of plasma were separated by size into narrow fractions using gel permeation chromatography. The sieving coefficient (theta) for ultrafilterable DS of 15A radius averaged 0.68 +/- 0.03 in nonproteinuric vs. 0.95 +/- 0.05 in nephrotic subjects (P < 0.001). Uncharged dextrans of broad size distribution were used to evaluate barrier size-selectivity in separate groups of nonproteinuric subjects (n = 19) and nephrotic patients with either minimal change (n = 20) or membranous nephropathy (n = 27). The value of theta for an uncharged dextran of similarly small radius (approximately 18 A) was significantly larger than that observed for DS in nonproteinuric subjects, but was similar in nephrotic individuals. Further, impaired barrier size-selectivity, as assessed by the sieving profile for uncharged dextrans (18-60 A radius), failed to account fully for the observed level of albuminuria in almost half of the patients with either minimal change (9/20) or membranous nephropathy (12/27). Together these findings suggest that the human glomerular capillary wall normally provides an electrostatic barrier to filtration of negatively charged macromolecules such as albumin, and that impairment of this electrostatic barrier contributes to the magnitude of albuminuria in the nephrotic syndrome. Images PMID:8227342

  11. Preliminary study of Huai Qi Huang granules delay the development of primary glomerular diseases in human.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shao-Bin; Pan, Peng; Xu, Qian; Li, Xiejia; Liu, Na; Xu, Jun

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of Huai Qi Huang (HQH) granules on primary glomerulonephritis patients, and to discuss its possible mechanisms. Sixteen patients diagnosed with primary glomerular disease between December 2011 and December 2012 were enrolled. Their blood and urine samples were collected at day 0 (the baseline levels), 30, and 90 of receiving HQH granules orally. Levels of creatinine and cystatin C (Cys-C) in serum and urine, and total protein and albumin in urine were measured by automatic biochemical analyzer. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in serum and urine was tested by ELISA; serum malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured by thiobarbituric acid method, the erythrocyte count in urine was calculated under light microscope. Serum levels of creatinine, MDA, Cys-C and NGAL at day 30 and 90 were significantly lower than the baseline levels. Urinary levels of Cys-C, NGAL, total protein, albumin and erythrocyte counts were also decreased; level of estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) was increased. HQH granules have certain effect on delaying the development of primary glomerular disease with mild proteinuria and hematuresis in patients. This study may supply a new treatment for primary glomerular diseases.

  12. Determination of Single-Kidney Glomerular Filtration Rate in Human Subjects by Using CT

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Saad, Ahmed; Herrmann, Sandra M.; Textor, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)–derived measurements of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) obtained in human subjects with 64-section CT agree with those obtained with iothalamate clearance, a rigorous reference standard. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study, and written informed consent was obtained. Ninety-six patients (age range, 51–73 years; 46 men, 50 women) with essential (n = 56) or renovascular (n = 40) hypertension were prospectively studied in controlled conditions (involving sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade). Single-kidney perfusion, volume, and GFR were measured by using multidetector CT time-attenuation curves and were compared with GFR measured by using iothalamate clearance, as assigned to the right and left kidney according to relative volumes. The reproducibility of CT GFR over a 3-month period (n = 21) was assessed in patients with renal artery stenosis who were undergoing stable medical treatment. Statistical analysis included the t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, linear regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results CT GFR values were similar to those of iothalamate clearance (mean ± standard deviation, 38.2 mL/min ± 18 vs 41.6 mL/min ± 17; P = .062). Stenotic kidney CT GFR in patients with renal artery stenosis was lower than contralateral kidney GFR or essential hypertension single-kidney GFR (mean, 23.1 mL/min ± 13 vs 36.9 mL/min ± 17 [P = .0008] and 45.2 mL/min ± 16 [P = .019], respectively), as was iothalamate clearance (mean, 26.9 mL/min ± 14 vs 38.5 mL/min ± 15 [P = .0004] and 49.0 mL/min ± 14 [P = .001], respectively). CT GFR correlated well with iothalamate GFR (linear regression, CT GFR = 0.88*iothalamate GFR, r2 = 0.89, P < .0001), and Bland-Altman analysis was used to confirm the agreement. CT GFR was also moderately reproducible in medically treated patients with renal artery stenosis (concordance coefficient

  13. Annotating nonspecific SAGE tags with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Jung, Yong-Chul; Wu, Qingfa; Kibbe, Warren A; Wang, San Ming

    2006-01-01

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) detects transcripts by extracting short tags from the transcripts. Because of the limited length, many SAGE tags are shared by transcripts from different genes. Relying on sequence information in the general gene expression database has limited power to solve this problem due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the deposited sequences. Considering that the complexity of gene expression at a single tissue level should be much simpler than that in the general expression database, we reasoned that by restricting gene expression to tissue level, the accuracy of gene annotation for the nonspecific SAGE tags should be significantly improved. To test the idea, we developed a tissue-specific SAGE annotation database based on microarray data (). This database contains microarray expression information represented as UniGene clusters for 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The nonspecific SAGE tag is first matched to the database by the same tissue type used by both SAGE and microarray analysis; then the multiple UniGene clusters assigned to the nonspecific SAGE tag are searched in the database under the matched tissue type. The UniGene cluster presented solely or at higher expression levels in the database is annotated to represent the specific gene for the nonspecific SAGE tags. The accuracy of gene annotation by this database was largely confirmed by experimental data. Our study shows that microarray data provide a useful source for annotating the nonspecific SAGE tags.

  14. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings

    Treesearch

    Nancy L. Shaw; Mike Pellant; Stephen B. Monsen

    2005-01-01

    Declines in habitat of greater sage-grouse and Gunnison sage-grouse across the western United States are related to degradation, loss, and fragmentation of sagebrush ecosystems resulting from development of agricultural lands, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil development, and other human impacts. These...

  15. Characterization of proteoglycans synthesized by human adult glomerular mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G J; Mason, R M; Davies, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The newly synthesized proteoglycans from human adult glomerular mesangial cells labelled in vitro for 24 h with [35S]sulphate have been characterized using biochemical and immunological techniques. 2. The following proteoglycans were identified (% of total synthesized). (i) A large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, CSPG-I, Mr approximately 1 x 10(6) (10.6%). This proteoglycan consisted of a protein core of Mr approximately 4 x 10(5) and glycosaminoglycan chains of Mr 2.5 x 10(4), and was present in both the cell layer and the culture medium. (ii) A major small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan, DSPG-I, Mr 3.5 x 10(5) (46%), which was mainly located in the culture medium. (iii) A second minor small dermatan sulphate, DSPG-II, Mr approximately 2 x 10(5) (9.8%). This molecule was exclusively located in the culture medium. (iv) A large heparan sulphate proteoglycan, HSPG-I, Mr 8 x 10(5) (3.3%). (v) A second large heparan sulphate proteoglycan HSPG-II, Mr approximately 6 x 10(5) (23%). HSPG-I and HSPG-II were extracted from both the culture medium and the cell layer. 3. Western blot analysis of the core proteins released by chondroitin ABC lyase treatment of DSPG-I and DSPG-II identified these dermatan sulphate proteoglycans as biglycan and decorin respectively. Both DSPG-I and DSPG-II had core proteins of Mr 45,000. 4. The cell-layer-associated forms of CSPG-I, HSPG-I and HSPG-II were accessible to limited trypsin treatment, bound to octyl-Sepharose and could be inserted into liposomes, indicating a possible cell membrane location. 5. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the cell-layer-associated [35S]proteoglycans undergo limited metabolism to inorganic [35S]sulphate, the majority of which is accounted for by the degradation of HSPG-II and to a lesser extent DSPG-I. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1854350

  16. Molecular configuration and glomerular size selectivity in healthy and nephrotic humans.

    PubMed

    Blouch, K; Deen, W M; Fauvel, J P; Bialek, J; Derby, G; Myers, B D

    1997-09-01

    We studied eight healthy volunteers and eight nephrotic subjects to compare the glomerular sieving coefficients (theta) of dextran, a linear polymer of glucopyranose, with those of Ficoll, a spherical polysucrose. Over a molecular radius (rs) interval of 20-70 A, theta for a given Ficoll was uniformly lower than corresponding theta for a dextran of equivalent rs. For each macromolecular species, the theta of molecules with rs > 50 A was selectively enhanced in nephrotic vs. healthy subjects. Analysis of either dextran or Ficoll sieving curves with pore theory revealed the glomerular barrier to have a bimodal pore size distribution: a lower mode of restrictive pores with a lognormal distribution of radii and an upper mode of large shuntlike pores. Nephrotics differed from controls in that the lower mode was broadened and shifted to pores of smaller mean size, but the prominence of shuntlike pores was enhanced by an order of magnitude. Both the mean radius of restrictive pores and the magnitude of the shunt pathway were substantially smaller when estimated from Ficoll than dextran sieving. We interpret the more realistic values for pore parameters derived from Ficoll than dextran sieving to indicate 1) that the normal glomerular barrier prevents albuminuria by virtue of a combination of both charge- and size-selective properties and 2) that a combined impairment of both barrier charge selectivity and size selectively are required to account for the observed level and composition of proteinuria in our nephrotic subjects.

  17. Human glomerular mesangial IP15 cell line as a suitable model for in vitro cadmium cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Dubus, I; Ohayon-Courtès, C; Cambar, J

    2007-07-01

    Cadmium represents a major environmental pollutant that may induce severe damage, especially in the kidney where cadmium accumulates. While cadmium is known to severely impair renal tubular functions, glomerular structures are also potential targets. Owing to their contractile properties, glomerular mesangial cells play a major role in the control of glomerular hemodynamics and influence the ultrafiltration coefficient. Cell cultures provide alternative and fruitful models for study of in vitro toxicology. However, the use of primary human mesangial cell cultures is hampered by their limited survival span and their rapid dedifferentiation during passages. This study presents a human stable immortalized mesangial cell line, designated IP15. Cell characteristics were investigated by the detection of known mesangial markers, as well as their ability to contract in response to angiotensin II. IP15 cells were used to investigate cadmium uptake and morphological changes such as cell contraction and cytoskeleton protein expression. The IC(50) cytotoxicity index was obtained with 3.55 micromol/L using neutral red assay for 24 h. After cadmium exposure (1 micromol/L, determined as nonlethal concentration), 0.38 microg Cd/mg protein was internalized by the cells as evaluated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES). Cadmium induced a significant cell surface reduction that correlated with smooth-muscle alpha-actin disorganization. Thus, the IP15 cell line is a suitable model for study of in vitro cadmium cytotoxicity in mesangial cells and allows sufficient material to be obtained for future studies of the intracellular effects of cadmium exposure.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress participates in inflammation-accelerated, lipid-mediated injury of human glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiping; Cui, Jingjing; Shi, Jing; Yang, Baohui; Wang, Mo; Wu, Daoqi; Zhang, Gaofu; Liu, Wei; Li, Qiu

    2017-03-01

    The mechanism of lipid-mediated injury of human glomerular mesangial cells (HMCs) remains unclear. We investigated the association between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid-mediated injury in HMCs in vitro and the potential efficacy of a therapeutic approach targeting ER stress. Human glomerular mesangial cells were exposed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and/or interleukin-1β (IL-1β). For evaluation of whether ER stress participates in lipid-mediated injury to HMCs, HMCs were pretreated with tunicamycin or treated with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA). Incubation of HMCs with LDL + IL-1β significantly increased lipid accumulation and induced phenotypic changes. ER stress was induced in lipid-loaded HMCs, as indicated by upregulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) proteins. Moreover, persistent ER stress increased expression of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 protein, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNA partly through the PERK - eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α) pathway. Preconditioning with ER stress by tunicamycin and inhibition of ER stress by 4-PBA both reversed the phenotypic changes and decreased lipid accumulation and inflammatory cytokine secretion by the PERK - eIF2α pathway. These data provide evidence that ER stress participates in inflammation associated with lipid-induced injury of HMCs. Modulation of ER stress may be a novel therapeutic approach for combating lipid-induced injury of HMCs. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  19. Identifying nonspecific SAGE tags by context of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Wang, San Ming

    2008-01-01

    Many serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) tags can be matched to multiple genes, leading to difficulty in SAGE data interpretation and analysis. As only a subset of genes in the human genome are transcribed in a certain type of tissue/cell, we used microarray expression data from different tissue types to define contexts of gene expression and to annotate SAGE tags collected from the same or similar tissue sources. To predict the original transcript contributing a nonspecific SAGE tag collected from a particular tissue, we ranked the corresponding genes by their expression levels determined by microarray. We developed a tissue-specific SAGE tag annotation database based on microarray data collected from 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The database can be queried online at: http://www.basic.northwestern.edu/SAGE/. The accuracy of this database was confirmed by experimental data.

  20. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  1. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  2. Non-productive HIV-1 infection of human glomerular and urinary podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Khatua, Atanu K.; Taylor, Harry E.; Hildreth, James E. K.; Popik, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    Podocyte damage induced by HIV-1 is critical to the pathogenesis of HIV-1 associated nephropathy (HIVAN) and is believed to result from productive replication of the virus. Here we demonstrate that HIV-1 readily enters human podocytes by a dynamin-mediated endocytosis but does not establish productive infection. We provide evidence suggesting that viral nucleic acids and proteins detected in podocytes are delivered by viral particles internalized by the cells. Endocytosed HIV-1 is only transiently harbored by podocytes and is subsequently released to the extracellular milieu as fully infectious virus. Similarly, primary podocytes established from normal human urine do not support productive infection by HIV-1 but sustain replication of VSV-G pseudotyped virus that bypasses HIV-1 entry receptors. Moreover, transfected podocytes expressing CD4 and CXCR4 receptors support productive replication of HIV-1. This further confirms that lack of HIV-1 entry receptors is the major barrier preventing productive infection of podocytes in vitro. PMID:20937511

  3. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  4. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    PubMed

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  5. Results from SAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.

    1996-04-01

    The Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. Beginning in September 1992, SAGE II data were taken with 55 tons of Ga and with significantly reduced backgrounds. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10 +5/{minus}7 SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU.

  6. Losartan inhibits STAT1 activation and protects human glomerular mesangial cells from angiotensin II induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Sumin; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Yang, Xue; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Lining

    2012-01-01

    Human glomerular mesangial cells (HMCs) have a finite lifespan, and eventually enter irreversible growth arrest known as cellular senescence, which is thought to contribute to kidney ageing and age-related kidney disorders, such as chronic kidney disease. The signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a latent transcription factor involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, but whether it could regulate HMC senescence still remains to be explored. In our study, the induction of angiotensin II (Ang II)-accelerated HMC senescence, as judged by increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal)-positive staining cells, morphological changes, and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. STAT1 activity and the expression of p53 and p21(Cip1) were increased after Ang II treatment. STAT1 knockdown using RNA interference significantly inhibited the progression of HMC senescence and decreased the elevated expression of p53 and p21(Cip1). Pretreating HMCs with Ang II receptor blocker losartan also inhibited the progression of HMC senescence and STAT1 activity. Our results indicate that STAT1 is implicated in the mediation of Ang II-induced HMC senescence through p53/ p21(Cip1) pathway, and that losartan could attenuate HMC senescence by regulating STAT1. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduced ROS production and STAT1 activity induced by Ang II, indicating that Ang II uses ROS as a second messenger to regulate STAT1 activity.

  7. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  8. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus.

  9. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. SAGE to examine Earth's stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The SAGE mission is discussed along with the role of the Nimbus 7 experiment. Other topics discussed include: ground truth measurements, data collection and processing, SAGE instrumentation, and launch sequence.

  11. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE): 13 years of application in research.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Sergey V

    2008-10-01

    A number of molecular methods of gene expression analysis can approach genomic level. Among those, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) stands out. Unlike many other techniques, SAGE allows both qualitative and quantitative analysis of previously unknown transcripts. Over the course of the last 13 years, SAGE has became a recognized tool of large-scale gene expression profiling, being used extensively in human, animal, yeast and plant studies of various nature. A number of important adaptations was introduced both to the protocol of SAGE library construction and to the analytical algorithm employed. Moreover, some variations of the original protocol (MAGE, SADE, microSAGE, miniSAGE, longSAGE, superSAGE, deepSAGE, etc.) were derived to improve the utility of SAGE in certain conditions. Current review aims comparing the benefits and drawbacks of the techniques for high-throughput gene expression analysis (including SAGE) in a realistic, balanced manner. Issues related to modifications to the original protocol and further development of the SAGE are discussed.

  12. Anti-glomerular basement membrane blood test

    MedlinePlus

    GBM antibody test; Antibody to human glomerular basement membrane; Anti-GBM antibodies ... none of these antibodies in the blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  13. Salvia L.: sage

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer

    2008-01-01

    The sage genus - Salvia contains about 700 species of annual and perennial herbs and shrubs and is worldwide in distribution. There are perhaps 20 woody species in the United States, principally in the Southwest and California (table 1) (Correll and Johnson 1970; Munz and Keck 1959). They are intricately branched, rounded or sprawling shrubs or subshrubs with often...

  14. Recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), but not rat HGF, elicits glomerular injury and albuminuria in normal rats via an immune complex-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Shinya; Ikebuchi, Fumie; Fukuta, Kazuhiro; Kato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kunio; Adachi, Kiichi; Abe, Tetsushi; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2011-03-01

    1. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has the therapeutic potential to improve renal fibrosis and proteinuria in rodents with chronic kidney disease. In contrast, long-term administration of human HGF to normal rats reportedly elicits proteinuria. Thus, the role of HGF during proteinuria remains contentious. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that human HGF is antigenic to rodents and that immune complex formation causes proteinuria. 2. We administered either human or rat HGF to normal rats for 28 days. Albuminuria was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The renal phenotypes of the two HGF treatments were examined using histological techniques. 3. Administration of human HGF (1 mg/kg per day, i.v.) to rats led to severe albuminuria and glomerular hypertrophy in association with increased blood levels of anti-human HGF IgG and IgG deposition in mesangial areas. Furthermore, an immune complex between human HGF and anti-human HGF IgG stimulated the production of proteinuric cytokines (including transforming growth factor-β) in rat cultured mesangial cells. In contrast, treatment of healthy rats with rat HGF for 4 weeks caused neither mesangial IgG deposition nor elevated anti-HGF IgG in the blood. Overall, rat HGF did not provoke albuminuria. 4. We conclude that human HGF produces pseudotoxic effects in normal rat kidneys via an immune complex-mediated pathway, whereas syngenic HGF is safe due to less deposition of glomerular IgG. Our results affirm the safety of the repeated use of syngenic HGF for the treatment of chronic organ diseases, such as renal fibrosis and liver cirrhosis.

  15. Structural determinants of glomerular permeability.

    PubMed

    Deen, W M; Lazzara, M J; Myers, B D

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in relating the functional properties of the glomerular capillary wall to its unique structure is reviewed. The fenestrated endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and epithelial filtration slits form a series arrangement in which the flow diverges as it enters the GBM from the fenestrae and converges again at the filtration slits. A hydrodynamic model that combines morphometric findings with water flow data in isolated GBM has predicted overall hydraulic permeabilities that are consistent with measurements in vivo. The resistance of the GBM to water flow, which accounts for roughly half that of the capillary wall, is strongly dependent on the extent to which the GBM surfaces are blocked by cells. The spatial frequency of filtration slits is predicted to be a very important determinant of the overall hydraulic permeability, in keeping with observations in several glomerular diseases in humans. Whereas the hydraulic resistances of the cell layers and GBM are additive, the overall sieving coefficient for a macromolecule (its concentration in Bowman's space divided by that in plasma) is the product of the sieving coefficients for the individual layers. Models for macromolecule filtration reveal that the individual sieving coefficients are influenced by one another and by the filtrate velocity, requiring great care in extrapolating in vitro observations to the living animal. The size selectivity of the glomerular capillary has been shown to be determined largely by the cellular layers, rather than the GBM. Controversial findings concerning glomerular charge selectivity are reviewed, and it is concluded that there is good evidence for a role of charge in restricting the transmural movement of albumin. Also discussed is an effect of albumin that has received little attention, namely, its tendency to increase the sieving coefficients of test macromolecules via steric interactions. Among the unresolved issues are the specific contributions of the

  16. SAGE Version 7.0 Algorithm: Application to SAGE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damadeo, R. P; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.; Iyer, N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) version 7.0 algorithm and how it is applied to SAGE II. Changes made between the previous (v6.2) and current (v7.0) versions are described and their impacts on the data products explained for both coincident event comparisons and time-series analysis. Users of the data will notice a general improvement in all of the SAGE II data products, which are now in better agreement with more modern data sets (e.g. SAGE III) and more robust for use with trend studies.

  17. Technology evaluation: SAGE, Genzyme molecular oncology.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J

    2001-02-01

    collection of gene expression profiles utilizing all methods including high-density microarrays [315329]. Ontogeny (now Curis Inc) and GMO have entered into a collaboration to study genes for the potential discovery of therapeutic products. GMO will use its SAGE technology to produce libraries of RNA supplied by Ontogeny. The libraries will be put through Ontogeny's screening program [279417]. Under an agreement made in August 1998, Bayer will use SAGE technology to identify genes and thus potential therapeutics [317452]. GMO and Hexagen signed an agreement in March 1998 on the use of SAGE technology in Hexagen's disease gene discovery programs. The first phase of the collaboration will focus on the use of SAGE in studies within Hexagen's type II diabetes gene discovery program. Hexagen has designed these studies to discover susceptibility genes for diabetes and to provide gene expression information for genes associated with type II diabetes [280012]. GMO signed a five-year agreement with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHU) in July 1997 for research leading to the identification of cancer-related genes. Under the terms of the agreement, JHU researchers will use the SAGE technology to identify and analyze gene expression in cancer. The power of SAGE in finding rare genes was confirmed in a study of gastrointestinal cancer by JHU researchers published in the May 27, 1997 issue of Science. The study showed that of almost 50,000 genes expressed in normal gastrointestinal cells and gastrointestinal tumor cells, 86% of the genes were present at five or fewer copies per cell. Only 51% of those low-abundancy genes were recorded in the GenBank database of known genes in the human genome [257128].

  18. Ultrastructural study of human glomerular capillary loops with IgA nephropathy using quick-freezing and deep-etching method.

    PubMed

    Sawanobori, E; Terada, N; Fujii, Y; Higashida, K; Nakazawa, S; Ohno, S

    2008-03-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy shows great variability regarding the histological features of the lesions of human renal glomeruli. In the present study, the quick-freezing and deep-etching (QF-DE) method was used to analyze the glomerular ultrastructure of biopsied kidney tissues from children with IgA nephropathy. Biopsied renal tissues were routinely prepared for light microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, conventional electron microscopy, and replica electron microscopy. The three-dimensional ultrastructure of glomeruli of the kidney was clearly observed by using the QF-DE method. Three layers of glomerular basement membranes, i.e., middle, inner and outer layers, were clearly detected in the replica electron micrographs. The middle layer was 343.0+/-24.2 nm (n=20) in width and formed polygonal meshwork structures. We also observed slit diaphragms, electron-dense mesangial deposits, and increased amounts of mesangial matrix and foot process effacement. Many delicate filaments were found to be distributed from the apical to the bottom portions between neighboring foot processes. The ultrastructural difference between the replica electron micrographs and conventional electron micrographs was found to be especially marked in the appearance of foot processes and connecting filaments between the neighboring foot processes. The examination of extracellular matrix changes, as revealed at high resolution by the QF-DE method, gave us some morphofunctional information relevant to the mechanism of proteinuria with IgA nephropathy.

  19. Protective effect of photodegradation product of nifedipine against tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced oxidative stress in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Yayoi; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Horinouchi, Yuya; Tajima, Soichiro; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Hamano, Shuichi; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tomita, Shuhei; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-01

    Recently, increasing evidence suggests that the antihypertensive drug nifedipine acts as a protective agent for endothelial cells, and that the activity is unrelated to its calcium channel blocking. Nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF) is metabolically and photochemically produced from nifedipine, and NO-NIF has been recognized as a contaminant of nifedipine because it has no antihypertensive effect. Treatment of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) suppressed the cell viability and facilitated the expression of Inter-Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1(ICAM-1) in human glomerular endothelial cells (HGECs) though, pretreatment of NO-NIF significantly recovered the TNF-α-induced cell damage to the same extent as Trolox-C did, and suppressed the ICAM-1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, NO-NIF inhibited the cell toxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide, which hampers the integrity of cell membrane through oxidative stress, as effective as Trolox-c. These data suggest that NO-NIF is a candidate for a new class of antioxidative drug that protect cells against oxidative stress in glomerular endothelial cells.

  20. Sage grouse on the Yakima Training Center: A summary of studies conducted during 1989 and 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, L.E. ); Hofmann, L.A. . Coe-Truman Technologies)

    1991-03-01

    A two-year study, sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Army and conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, was initiated in 1989 to study sage grouse on the Yakima Training Center (YTC). The specific objectives of this study were (1) to obtain detailed information on the distribution and relative density of sage grouse on the YTC, (2) to identify movement and habitat use patterns of sage grouse on the YTC, (3) to identify crucial habitat for sage grouse on the YTC, and (4) to provide management recommendations. Sage grouse were selected for study because they are a US Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list in Washington, and because the YTC probably contains the largest population of sage grouse left on federally owned lands in this state. The locations of 11 sage grouse leks, or breeding grounds, were determined on the YTC during extensive spring helicopter surveys. The maximum number of sage grouse observed during ground surveys of these leks varied from 2 to 55 birds. One lek, located near Range 19, was probably used by 40 to 50% of the YTC sage grouse population. Fifteen years of counts of males on leks indicate that the YTC sage grouse population was most numerous during the early to mid 1980s. Since the mid-1980s, sage grouse numbers appear to have declined on the YTC and in other locations in Washington. Forty-six sage grouse (17 females and 29 males) were captured and fitted with radio transmitters during 1989 and 1990. Movements by these sage grouse were both erratic and large when compared with other studies. We believe that many of the atypical movements were in response to military training activities. Sage grouse appeared to seek out areas on the YTC where human disturbance was low. Recommendations are made for improving the management of grouse habitat.

  1. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.

    1994-07-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sub {minus}18}{sup +21} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sub {minus}12}{sup +13} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  2. Identification of membrane-bound CR1 (CD35) in human urine: evidence for its release by glomerular podocytes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is present on erythrocytes (E-CR1), various leucocytes, and renal glomerular epithelial cells (podocytes). In addition, plasma contains a soluble form of CR1 (sCR1). By using a specific ELISA, CR1 was detected in the urine (uCR1) of normal individuals (excretion rate in 12 subjects, 3.12 +/- 1.15 micrograms/24 h). Contrary to sCR1, uCR1 was pelleted by centrifugation at 200,000 g for 60 min. Analysis by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation showed that uCR1 was sedimenting in fractions larger than 19 S, whereas sCR1 was found as expected in fractions smaller than 19 S. The addition of detergents reduced the apparent size of uCR1 to that of sCR1. After gel filtration on Sephacryl-300 of normal urine, the fractions containing uCR1 were found to be enriched in cholesterol and phospholipids. The membrane-association of uCR1 was demonstrated by analyzing immunoaffinity purified uCR1 by electron microscopy which revealed membrane-bound vesicles. The apparent molecular mass of uCR1 was 15 kD larger than E-CR1 and sCR1 when assessed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. This difference in size could not be explained on the basis of glycosylation only, since pretreatment with N-glycosidase F reduced the size of all forms of CR1; however, the difference in regular molecular mass was not abrogated. The structural alleles described for E-CR1 were also found for uCR1. The urine of patients who had undergone renal transplantation contained alleles of uCR1 which were discordant with E-CR1 in 7 of 11 individuals, indicating that uCR1 originated from the kidney. uCR1 was shown to bind C3b-coated immune complexes, suggesting that the function of CR1 was not destroyed in urine. A decrease in uCR1 excretion was observed in 3 of 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, corresponding to the three who had severe proliferative nephritis, and in three of three patients with focal sclerosis, but not in six other patients with proteinuria. Taken together

  3. Glomerular Lipidosis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kohnken, Rebecca A; Amerman, Hayley; Brown, Cathy A; Furrow, Eva; Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E

    2017-09-01

    Glomerular lipidosis (GL) is characterized by dilated glomerular capillary loops containing lipid-laden cells (foam cells). Previously, GL was considered to be an incidental finding because affected dogs were typically not azotemic. However, the International Renal Interest Society staging system for canine chronic kidney disease has increased the awareness of other clinical parameters (eg, proteinuria and hypertension) that should be included in the assessment of renal function. As such, the aim of this study was to determine clinical abnormalities and concurrent renal lesions in dogs with GL. GL was identified in renal biopsies from 46 dogs evaluated by the International Veterinary Renal Pathology Service. GL was the sole diagnosis in 5 of 46 cases (11%), all of which were proteinuric. All 5 dogs had at least 1 additional clinicopathologic abnormality consistent with renal disease, including hypertension (4), azotemia (3), and/or hypoalbuminemia (2). The remaining 41 dogs had GL in combination with other glomerular lesions, the most common being focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (16, 35%), lesions consistent with juvenile nephropathy (8, 17%), and glomerular amyloidosis (5, 11%). Overall, dogs with severe GL were younger than were those with mild GL ( P < .001). The percentage of glomeruli affected by GL differed by concurrent diagnoses ( P = .034), with the highest percentage of affected glomeruli in dogs with GL alone or those with concurrent juvenile nephropathy. These findings suggest that GL should be a recognized histologic phenotype of glomerular injury associated with clinical renal dysfunction and/or juvenile nephropathies.

  4. Glomerular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2007-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics worldwide in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides induce nephrotoxicity in 10-20% of therapeutic courses. Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by slow rises in serum creatinine, tubular necrosis and marked decreases in glomerular filtration rate and in the ultrafiltration coefficient. Regulation of the ultrafiltration coefficient depends on the activity of intraglomerular mesangial cells. The mechanisms responsible for tubular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides have been intensively reviewed previously, but glomerular toxicity has received less attention. The purpose of this review is to critically assess the published literature regarding the toxic mechanisms of action of aminoglycosides on renal glomeruli and mesangial cells. The main goal of this review is to provide an actualized and mechanistic vision of pathways involved in glomerular toxic effects of aminoglycosides.

  5. Sage-grouse habitat selection during winter in Alberta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.; Aldridge, C.; Boyce, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are dependent on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) for food and shelter during winter, yet few studies have assessed winter habitat selection, particularly at scales applicable to conservation planning. Small changes to availability of winter habitats have caused drastic reductions in some sage-grouse populations. We modeled winter habitat selection by sage-grouse in Alberta, Canada, by using a resource selection function. Our purpose was to 1) generate a robust winter habitat-selection model for Alberta sage-grouse; 2) spatially depict habitat suitability in a Geographic Information System to identify areas with a high probability of selection and thus, conservation importance; and 3) assess the relative influence of human development, including oil and gas wells, in landscape models of winter habitat selection. Terrain and vegetation characteristics, sagebrush cover, anthropogenic landscape features, and energy development were important in top Akaike's Information Criterionselected models. During winter, sage-grouse selected dense sagebrush cover and homogenous less rugged areas, and avoided energy development and 2-track truck trails. Sage-grouse avoidance of energy development highlights the need for comprehensive management strategies that maintain suitable habitats across all seasons. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  6. Antimutagenic effect of sage tea in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Patenkovic, Aleksandra; Stamenkovic-Radak, Marina; Banjanac, Tijana; Andjelkovic, Marko

    2009-01-01

    The present study assayed the antimutagenic potential of Salvia officinalis (sage) in the form of tea infusion, by the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila melanogaster. The use of herbal infusions is much common in the human diet, so the aim of the present study was to estimate the antimutagenic effects of the S. officinalis tea rather than essential oils. Methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was used as the mutagen and positive control. Several types of treatment were performed: short acute treatment with sage infusion or MMS, longer (chronic) treatment with sage solution or MMS, and two combined treatments, i.e. short treatment with sage followed by a longer treatment with MMS and vice versa. Sage infusion used in our experiments showed a clear antimutagenic effect, reducing the frequency of mutations induced by MMS. The inhibition effect of sage tea is obtained and confirmed when pre- or post-treatments with mutagen were used. The results indicate that although sage in this regime decreases the number of mutation events, it is not efficient enough in case of the 2 h sage pre-treatment. Antioxidant activity, suppression of metabolic activation, could be mechanisms through which sage or some of its components act as desmutagen.

  7. Sage-Grouse on the edge: understanding and managing western landscapes for their survival

    Treesearch

    Noreen Parks; Michael J. Wisdom

    2012-01-01

    Populations of greater sage-grouse have declined dramatically across their North American range for many decades in response to harmful effects of a plethora of human activities and land uses, prompting legal actions to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). To evaluate the impacts of land-uses and habitat changes on sage-grouse, Michael Wisdom, a...

  8. Results of the first-in-human clinical trial for MB-102, a novel fluorescent tracer agent for real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Debreczeny, Martin P.; Dowling, Thomas C.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent tracer agent 2,5-bis[N-(1-carboxy-2-hydroxy)]carbamoyl-3,6-diaminopyrazine, designated MB-102, has been developed with properties and attributes necessary for use as a direct measure of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Comparison to known standard exogenous GFR agents in animal models has demonstrated an excellent correlation. A clinical trial to demonstrate this same correlation in humans is in progress. This clinical trial is the first in a series of trials necessary to obtain regulatory clearance from the FDA. We report herein the comparison of plasma pharmacokinetics between MB-102 and the known standard exogenous GFR agent Iohexol in healthy subjects with normal renal function. Post simultaneous administration of both agents, blood samples over a period of 12 hours were collected from each subject to assess pharmacokinetic parameters including GFR. Urine samples were collected over this same period to assess percent injected dose recovered in the urine. Results indicate MB-102 is a GFR agent in humans from the comparison to the standard agent.

  9. Safety in glomerular numbers.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Michiel F

    2012-10-01

    A low nephron number is, according to Brenner's hyperfiltration hypothesis, associated with hypertension, glomerular damage and proteinuria, and starts a vicious cycle that ends in renal failure over the long term. Nephron endowment is set during foetal life, and there is no formation of nephrons after 34-36 weeks of gestation, indicating that many factors before that time-point may have an impact on kidney development and reduce nephron numbers. Such factors include maternal malnutrition, stress, diseases, such as diabetes, uteroplacental insufficiency, maternal and neonatal drugs and premature birth. However, other congenital anomalies, such as renal hypoplasia, unilateral renal agenesis or multicystic dysplastic kidney, may also lead to a reduced nephron endowment, with an increased risk for hypertension, renal dysfunction and the need for renal replacement therapy. This review focuses on the causes and consequences of a low nephron endowment and will illustrate why there is safety in glomerular numbers.

  10. The Gly(972)Arg Variant of Human IRS1 Gene Is Associated With Variation in Glomerular Filtration Rate Likely Through Impaired Insulin Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Thameem, Farook; Puppala, Sobha; Schneider, Jennifer; Bhandari, Basant; Arya, Rector; Arar, Nedal H.; Vasylyeva, Tetyana L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Fowler, Sharon; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Abboud, Hanna E.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify and characterize the genetic variants related to the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) linkage on 2q37. Of the positional candidate genes, we selected IRS1 and resequenced its 2-kb promoter region and exons for sequence variants in 32 subjects. A total of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. To comprehensively cover the 59-kb-long intron-1, eight additional tagging SNPs were selected from the HapMap. All the 19 SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan Assay in the entire data set (N = 670; 39 families). Association analyses between the SNPs and GFR and type 2 diabetes–related traits were performed using the measured genotype approach. Of the SNPs examined for association, only the Gly(972)Arg variant of IRS1 exhibited a significant association with GFR (P = 0.0006) and serum triglycerides levels (P = 0.003), after accounting for trait-specific covariate effects. Carriers of Arg972 had significantly decreased GFR values. Gly(972)Arg contributed to 26% of the linkage signal on 2q. Expression of IRS1 mutant Arg972 in human mesangial cells significantly reduced the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS1 and Akt kinase. Taken together, the data provide the first evidence that genetic variation in IRS1 may influence variation in GFR probably through impaired insulin receptor signaling. PMID:22617042

  11. Glomerular expression of myxovirus resistance protein 1 in human mesangial cells: possible activation of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa, Tomomi; Ito, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Yoshida, Hidemi; Joh, Kensuke; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Since viral infections activate type I interferon (IFN) pathways and cause subsequent release of IFN-dependent proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, the innate immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). It has been reported that human myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1), a type I IFN-dependent transcript, acts against a wide range of RNA viruses. Although the expression of Mx1 in biopsy specimens obtained from patients with dermatomyositis and cutaneous lupus has been described, the expression of Mx1 in human mesangial cells (MCs) has remained largely unknown. We treated normal human MCs in culture with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic double-stranded RNA, and analyzed the expression of Mx1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To elucidate the poly IC-signalling pathway, we subjected the cells to RNA interference against IFN-β. We also conducted an immunofluorescence study to examine mesangial Mx1 expression in biopsy specimens from patients with LN. Poly IC-induced Mx1 expression in MCs are shown both time- and dose-dependently, and RNA interference against IFN-β inhibited poly IC-induced Mx1 expression. Intense glomerular Mx1 expression was observed in biopsy specimens from patients with LN, whereas negative staining occurred in specimens from patients with IgA nephropathy or purpura nephritis. These preliminary observations support, at least in part, the theory of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of LN. © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  12. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  13. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  14. SAGE III capabilities and global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the satellite-borne SAGE III are presented as they pertain to detecting global change. SAGE III is the proposed follow on and improved version of SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II which have measured stratospheric and, in some cases, tropospheric species since late 1978. Specifically, SAGE III will measure profiles of aerosols, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide and trioxide, neutral density, temperature, clouds, and chlorine dioxide using the solar and lunar occultation techniques. These techniques are inherently self-calibrating, provide high vertical resolution, and use well-behaved data retrievals making them ideal for trend detection and global change studies. The potential capabilities of SAGE III are illustrated by using data and results from SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II.

  15. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium

    Treesearch

    Nancy L. Shaw; Mike Pellant; Stephen B. Monsen

    2005-01-01

    Sage-grouse (greater sage-grouse [Centrocercus urophasianus] and Gunnison sage-grouse [C. minimus]) were once abundant over a range that approximated that of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) in 16 Western States and three Canadian Provinces (Aldrich 1963; Connelly and others 2000; Johnsgard 1973). Although their...

  16. SAGE II Version 7.00 Release

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-10

    ... algorithms from SAGE III v4.00 Ceased removal of the water vapor extinction in the 600nm channel due to uncertainty in the H2O ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs   Details are in the SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes . The ...

  17. Multiphoton Imaging of the Glomerular Permeability of Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Burford, James L.; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Seidel, Saskia; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients and animals with renal injury exhibit increased urinary excretion of angiotensinogen. Although increased tubular synthesis of angiotensinogen contributes to the increased excretion, we do not know to what degree glomerular filtration of systemic angiotensinogen, especially through an abnormal glomerular filtration barrier, contributes to the increase in urinary levels. Here, we used multiphoton microscopy to visualize and quantify the glomerular permeability of angiotensinogen in the intact mouse and rat kidney. In healthy mice and Munich-Wistar-Frömter rats at the early stage of glomerulosclerosis, the glomerular sieving coefficient of systemically infused Atto565-labeled human angiotensinogen (Atto565-hAGT), which rodent renin cannot cleave, was only 25% of the glomerular sieving coefficient of albumin, and its urinary excretion was undetectable. In a more advanced phase of kidney disease, the glomerular permeability of Atto565-hAGT was slightly higher but still very low. Furthermore, unlike urinary albumin, the significantly higher urinary excretion of endogenous rat angiotensinogen did not correlate with either the Atto565-hAGT or Atto565-albumin glomerular sieving coefficients. These results strongly suggest that the vast majority of urinary angiotensinogen originates from the tubules rather than glomerular filtration. PMID:22997258

  18. Multiphoton imaging of the glomerular permeability of angiotensinogen.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Burford, James L; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Seidel, Saskia; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2012-11-01

    Patients and animals with renal injury exhibit increased urinary excretion of angiotensinogen. Although increased tubular synthesis of angiotensinogen contributes to the increased excretion, we do not know to what degree glomerular filtration of systemic angiotensinogen, especially through an abnormal glomerular filtration barrier, contributes to the increase in urinary levels. Here, we used multiphoton microscopy to visualize and quantify the glomerular permeability of angiotensinogen in the intact mouse and rat kidney. In healthy mice and Munich-Wistar-Frömter rats at the early stage of glomerulosclerosis, the glomerular sieving coefficient of systemically infused Atto565-labeled human angiotensinogen (Atto565-hAGT), which rodent renin cannot cleave, was only 25% of the glomerular sieving coefficient of albumin, and its urinary excretion was undetectable. In a more advanced phase of kidney disease, the glomerular permeability of Atto565-hAGT was slightly higher but still very low. Furthermore, unlike urinary albumin, the significantly higher urinary excretion of endogenous rat angiotensinogen did not correlate with either the Atto565-hAGT or Atto565-albumin glomerular sieving coefficients. These results strongly suggest that the vast majority of urinary angiotensinogen originates from the tubules rather than glomerular filtration.

  19. Evaluation of the measurement of serum cystatin C by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for humans as a marker of the glomerular filtration rate in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yuichi; Takemura, Naoyuki; Hirose, Hisashi

    2009-09-01

    The serum cystatin C (Cys-C) concentration is a better filtration marker than plasma creatinine (Cre) concentration in humans. In veterinary medicine, a few studies have shown that the serum Cys-C concentration in dogs is also a better marker than the plasma Cre concentration. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of measuring the serum Cys-C concentration by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a marker of the glomerular filtration rate in dogs with various renal dysfunctions. The serum Cys-C concentration in dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was significantly higher (1.23 +/- 0.21 mg/L) than that in 76 control dogs (0.85 +/- 0.15) (P<0.001). The reference range of the serum Cys-C concentrations in samples from the 76 control dogs was 0.55-1.15 mg/l. Serum Cys-C concentration was more strongly correlated with plasma iohexol clearance (r=-0.704, P<0.001) than plasma Cre concentration in dogs (r=-0.598, P<0.001). In a receiver operating characteristics analysis, significant differences between the serum Cys-C and plasma Cre concentrations were found with regard to their AUC (0.949, [SE, 0.019] and 0.849 [SE, 0.029]) and diagnostic sensitivity (90.3% and 73.6%) for detecting decreased PCio (P<0.05). Therefore, the measurement of serum Cys-C concentration by ELISA is more useful for the detection of early CKD than measuring the plasma Cre concentration.

  20. SAGE 1 data user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmaster, Leonard R.; Chu, William P.; Rowland, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    A guide for using the data products from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 1 (SAGE 1) for scientific investigations of stratospheric chemistry related to aerosol, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, dynamics, and climate change is presented. A detailed description of the aerosol profile tape, the ozone profile tape, and the nitrogen dioxide profile tape is included. These tapes are the SAGE 1 data products containing aerosol extinction data and ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentration data for use in the different scientific investigations. Brief descriptions of the instrument operation, data collection, processing, and validation, and some of the scientific analyses that were conducted are also included.

  1. Robust-LongSAGE (RL-SAGE): an improved LongSAGE method for high-throughput transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Malali; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful technique for large-scale transcriptome analysis in eukaryotes. However, technical difficulties in the SAGE library construction, such as low concatemer cloning efficiency, small concatemer size, and a high level of empty clones, has prohibited its widespread use as a routine technique for expression profiling in many laboratories. We recently improved the LongSAGE library construction method considerably and developed a modified version called Robust-LongSAGE, or RL-SAGE. In RL-SAGE, concatemer cloning efficiency and clone insert size were increased significantly. About 20 PCR reactions are sufficient to make a library with more than 150,000 clones. Using RL-SAGE, we have made 10 libraries of rice, maize, and the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

  2. Greater sage-grouse nest predators in the Virginia Mountains of northwestern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockyer, Zachary B.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Espinosa, Shawn; Delehanty, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter sage-grouse, populations have declined across their range due to the loss, degradation, and fragmentation of habitat. Habitat alterations can lead not only to vegetative changes but also to shifts in animal behavior and predator composition that may influence population vital rates, such as nest success. For example, common ravens Corvus corax are sage-grouse nest predators, and common raven abundance is positively associated with human-caused habitat alterations. Because nest success is a central component to sage-grouse population persistence, research that identifies factors influencing nest success will better inform conservation efforts. We used videography to unequivocally identify sage-grouse nest predators within the Virginia Mountains of northwestern Nevada, USA, from 2009 to 2011 and used maximum likelihood to calculate daily probability of nest survival. In the Virginia Mountains, fires, energy exploration, and other anthropogenic activities have altered historic sage-grouse habitat. We monitored 71 sage-grouse nests during the study, placing video cameras at 39 nests. Cumulative nest survival for all nests was 22.4% (95% CI, 13.0–33.4%), a survival rate that was significantly lower than other published results for sage-grouse in the Great Basin. Depredation was the primary cause for nest failure in our study (82.5%), and common ravens were the most frequent sage-grouse nest predator, accounting for 46.7% of nest depredations. We also successfully documented a suite of mammalian and reptilian species depredating sage-grouse nests, including some predators never previously confirmed in the literature to be sage-grouse nest predators (i.e., bobcats Lynx rufus and long-tailed weasels Mephitis frenata). Within the high elevation, disturbed habitat of the Virginia Mountains, low sage-grouse nest success may be limiting sage-grouse population growth. These results suggest that management actions that

  3. The Sage for the Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses two approaches to teaching: "a guide on the side" and "a sage on the stage." He juxtaposes Alison King's heavy-handed characterization of the traditional college lecturer, and offers his own characterization of self-styled stage-hog professors to offset King's caricature. He also presents a composite picture…

  4. The Sage for the Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses two approaches to teaching: "a guide on the side" and "a sage on the stage." He juxtaposes Alison King's heavy-handed characterization of the traditional college lecturer, and offers his own characterization of self-styled stage-hog professors to offset King's caricature. He also presents a composite picture…

  5. SAGE application in hematological research.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Matsushima, Kouji

    2008-10-01

    Blood cells perform many important functions within the body, including homeostasis and host defense against various invading stimuli such as viral infection, cancer and autoimmune diseases. The subsets of leukocytes interact with each other through various surface molecules such as cytokine receptors, co-stimulation molecules and adhesion molecules. Over the last several years, accumulation of cDNA and genome databases has led to the accelerated identification of the molecules responsible for cell-cell interaction, cell activation and cell differentiation. In addition, technologies used in functional genomics, such as DNA microarray and serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), have allowed us to analyze the expression of thousands of genes. The comprehensive analysis of gene expression is very useful to elucidate the function of cells, because characteristics of each cell type depend on the genes selectively expressed at various stages. The SAGE method, which is very quantitative, can cover the number of expressed genes that are unequaled by any other mammalian DNA microarray systems yet available. In order to molecularly define the subset and function of blood cells, we and other groups have performed SAGE in various types of hematipoietic cells. Here, we review the SAGE data obtained from the gene expression libraries made from various differentiation and activation stages of a broad range of blood cells, including phagocytes, T cells, B cells, platelets, reticulocytes and NK cells.

  6. Polymorphisms of the UCP2 Gene Are Associated with Glomerular Filtration Rate in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and with Decreased UCP2 Gene Expression in Human Kidney

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Bianca Marmontel; Michels, Marcus; Sortica, Denise Alves; Bouças, Ana Paula; Rheinheimer, Jakeline; Buffon, Marjoriê Piuco; Bauer, Andrea Carla; Canani, Luís Henrique; Crispim, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) reduces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria. ROS overproduction is one of the major contributors to the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Thus, deleterious polymorphisms in the UCP2 gene are candidate risk factors for DKD. In this study, we investigated whether UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and Ins/Del polymorphisms were associated with DKD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and whether they had an effect on UCP2 gene expression in human kidney tissue biopsies. Materials and Methods In a case-control study, frequencies of the UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and Ins/Del polymorphisms as well as frequencies of the haplotypes constituted by them were analyzed in 287 T2DM patients with DKD and 281 T2DM patients without this complication. In a cross-sectional study, UCP2 gene expression was evaluated in 42 kidney biopsy samples stratified according to the presence of the UCP2 mutated -866A/55Val/Ins haplotype. Results In the T2DM group, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the -866A/55Val/Ins haplotype was an independent risk factor for DKD (OR = 2.136, 95% CI 1.036–4.404), although neither genotype nor allele frequencies of the individual polymorphisms differed between case and control groups. Interestingly, T2DM patients carrying the mutated haplotype showed decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) when compared to subjects with the reference haplotype (adjusted P= 0.035). In kidney biopsy samples, UCP2 expression was significantly decreased in UCP2 mutated haplotype carriers when compared to kidneys from patients with the reference haplotype (0.32 ± 1.20 vs. 1.85 ± 1.16 n fold change; adjusted P< 0.000001). Discussion Data reported here suggest that the UCP2 -866A/55Val/Ins haplotype is associated with an increased risk for DKD and with a lower eGFR in T2DM patients. Furthermore, this mutated haplotype was associated

  7. Reactivity of human anti-alpha-galactosyl IgG antibody with alpha(1-->3)-linked galactosyl epitopes exposed on basement membranes and on glomerular epithelial cells: an in vitro and in vivo study in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, M L; Davin, J C; Castronovo, V; Foidart, J M; Malaise, M; Foidart, J B; Dechene, C; Sangiorgi, G B; Mahieu, P

    1989-01-01

    Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (a-Gal Ab) is a human natural antibody belonging to the IgG class, found in high titres in all normal sera regardless of blood group, and specifically recognizing alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues. We have observed by radioimmunoassay, ELISA, passive haemagglutination and immunofluorescence blocking studies that affinity-purified a-Gal Ab reacted with mouse laminin, but not with the other mouse basement membrane proteins tested; it was able to fix complement in vitro. When injected intravenously into mice, the a-Gal Ab was found to mainly accumulate in kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs. No acute respiratory distress syndrome was observed shortly after the i.v. injection of 100 or 200 microg of antibodies. These doses of a-Gal Ab were also unable to induce acute glomerular injury. However, in primary cultures, the a-Gal Ab (100 or 200 microg per ml of medium) was shown to impair the attachment of mouse glomerular epithelial cells to mouse laminin and to elicit complement-dependent cell damage. The data indicate that the a-Gal Ab can interact in vitro and/or in vivo with alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues exposed on murine laminin or on murine cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Although this antibody fails to be pathogenic when administered at low doses in the intact animal, similar doses can alter some metabolic properties of these cells in vitro. PMID:12412761

  8. Automatic computational labeling of glomerular textural boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginley, Brandon; Tomaszewski, John E.; Sarder, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    The glomerulus, a specialized bundle of capillaries, is the blood filtering unit of the kidney. Each human kidney contains about 1 million glomeruli. Structural damages in the glomerular micro-compartments give rise to several renal conditions; most severe of which is proteinuria, where excessive blood proteins flow freely to the urine. The sole way to confirm glomerular structural damage in renal pathology is by examining histopathological or immunofluorescence stained needle biopsies under a light microscope. However, this method is extremely tedious and time consuming, and requires manual scoring on the number and volume of structures. Computational quantification of equivalent features promises to greatly ease this manual burden. The largest obstacle to computational quantification of renal tissue is the ability to recognize complex glomerular textural boundaries automatically. Here we present a computational pipeline to accurately identify glomerular boundaries with high precision and accuracy. The computational pipeline employs an integrated approach composed of Gabor filtering, Gaussian blurring, statistical F-testing, and distance transform, and performs significantly better than standard Gabor based textural segmentation method. Our integrated approach provides mean accuracy/precision of 0.89/0.97 on n = 200Hematoxylin and Eosin (HE) glomerulus images, and mean 0.88/0.94 accuracy/precision on n = 200 Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) glomerulus images. Respective accuracy/precision of the Gabor filter bank based method is 0.83/0.84 for HE and 0.78/0.8 for PAS. Our method will simplify computational partitioning of glomerular micro-compartments hidden within dense textural boundaries. Automatic quantification of glomeruli will streamline structural analysis in clinic, and can help realize real time diagnoses and interventions.

  9. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  10. Effectiveness of Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Influences on Energy Development and Male Lek Attendance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamo, R. Scott; Beck, Jeffrey L.

    2017-02-01

    Greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus) populations have declined across their range due to human-assisted factors driving large-scale habitat change. In response, the state of Wyoming implemented the Sage-grouse Executive Order protection policy in 2008 as a voluntary regulatory mechanism to minimize anthropogenic disturbance within defined sage-grouse core population areas. Our objectives were to evaluate areas designated as Sage-grouse Executive Order Core Areas on: (1) oil and gas well pad development, and (2) peak male lek attendance in core and non-core sage-grouse populations. We conducted our evaluations at statewide and Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies management zone (MZ I and MZ II) scales. We used Analysis of Covariance modeling to evaluate change in well pad development from 1986-2014 and peak male lek attendance from 958 leks with consistent lek counts within increasing (1996-2006) and decreasing (2006-2013) timeframes for Core and non-core sage-grouse populations. Oil and gas well pad development was restricted in Core Areas. Trends in peak male sage-grouse lek attendance were greater in Core Areas compared to non-core areas at the statewide scale and in MZ II, but not in MZ I, during population increase. Trends in peak male lek attendance did not differ statistically between Core and non-core population areas statewide, in MZ I, or MZ II during population decrease. Our results provide support for the effectiveness of Core Areas in maintaining sage-grouse populations in Wyoming, but also indicate the need for increased conservation actions to improve sage-grouse population response in MZ.

  11. Effectiveness of Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Influences on Energy Development and Male Lek Attendance.

    PubMed

    Gamo, R Scott; Beck, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations have declined across their range due to human-assisted factors driving large-scale habitat change. In response, the state of Wyoming implemented the Sage-grouse Executive Order protection policy in 2008 as a voluntary regulatory mechanism to minimize anthropogenic disturbance within defined sage-grouse core population areas. Our objectives were to evaluate areas designated as Sage-grouse Executive Order Core Areas on: (1) oil and gas well pad development, and (2) peak male lek attendance in core and non-core sage-grouse populations. We conducted our evaluations at statewide and Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies management zone (MZ I and MZ II) scales. We used Analysis of Covariance modeling to evaluate change in well pad development from 1986-2014 and peak male lek attendance from 958 leks with consistent lek counts within increasing (1996-2006) and decreasing (2006-2013) timeframes for Core and non-core sage-grouse populations. Oil and gas well pad development was restricted in Core Areas. Trends in peak male sage-grouse lek attendance were greater in Core Areas compared to non-core areas at the statewide scale and in MZ II, but not in MZ I, during population increase. Trends in peak male lek attendance did not differ statistically between Core and non-core population areas statewide, in MZ I, or MZ II during population decrease. Our results provide support for the effectiveness of Core Areas in maintaining sage-grouse populations in Wyoming, but also indicate the need for increased conservation actions to improve sage-grouse population response in MZ.

  12. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  13. Range-wide patterns of greater sage-grouse persistence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, C.L.; Nielsen, S.E.; Beyer, H.L.; Boyce, M.S.; Connelly, J.W.; Knick, S.T.; Schroeder, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a shrub-steppe obligate species of western North America, currently occupies only half its historical range. Here we examine how broad-scale, long-term trends in landscape condition have affected range contraction. Location: Sagebrush biome of the western USA. Methods: Logistic regression was used to assess persistence and extirpation of greater sage-grouse range based on landscape conditions measured by human population (density and population change), vegetation (percentage of sagebrush habitat), roads (density of and distance to roads), agriculture (cropland, farmland and cattle density), climate (number of severe and extreme droughts) and range periphery. Model predictions were used to identify areas where future extirpations can be expected, while also explaining possible causes of past extirpations. Results: Greater sage-grouse persistence and extirpation were significantly related to sagebrush habitat, cultivated cropland, human population density in 1950, prevalence of severe droughts and historical range periphery. Extirpation of sage-grouse was most likely in areas having at least four persons per square kilometre in 1950, 25% cultivated cropland in 2002 or the presence of three or more severe droughts per decade. In contrast, persistence of sage-grouse was expected when at least 30 km from historical range edge and in habitats containing at least 25% sagebrush cover within 30 km. Extirpation was most often explained (35%) by the combined effects of peripherality (within 30 km of range edge) and lack of sagebrush cover (less than 25% within 30 km). Based on patterns of prior extirpation and model predictions, we predict that 29% of remaining range may be at risk. Main Conclusions: Spatial patterns in greater sage-grouse range contraction can be explained by widely available landscape variables that describe patterns of remaining sagebrush habitat and loss due to cultivation, climatic trends, human

  14. Technology Tips: Building Interactive Demonstrations with Sage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Sage is an open-source software package that can be used in many different areas of mathematics, ranging from algebra to calculus and beyond. One of the most exciting pedagogical features of Sage (http://www.sagemath.org) is its ability to create interacts--interactive examples that can be used in a classroom demonstration or by students in a…

  15. Technology Tips: Building Interactive Demonstrations with Sage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Sage is an open-source software package that can be used in many different areas of mathematics, ranging from algebra to calculus and beyond. One of the most exciting pedagogical features of Sage (http://www.sagemath.org) is its ability to create interacts--interactive examples that can be used in a classroom demonstration or by students in a…

  16. Validation of SAGE II NO2 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Zawodny, J. M.; Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.

    1991-01-01

    The validity of NO2 measurements from the stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment (SAGE) II is examined by comparing the data with climatological distributions of NO2 and by examining the consistency of the observations themselves. The precision at high altitudes is found to be 5 percent, which is also the case at specific low altitudes for certain latitudes where the mixing ratio is 4 ppbv, and the precision is 0.2 ppbv at low altitudes. The autocorrelation distance of the smoothed profile measurement noise is 3-5 km and 10 km for 1-km and 5-km smoothing, respectively. The SAGE II measurements agree with spectroscopic measurements to within 10 percent, and the SAGE measurements are about 20 percent smaller than average limb monitor measurements at the mixing ratio peak. SAGE I and SAGE II measurements are slightly different, but the difference is not attributed to changes in atmospheric NO2.

  17. Glomerular Disease: Looking beyond Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Roger C.; Alpers, Charles E.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; He, John C.; Salant, David J.; Chugh, Sumant S.; Natarajan, Rama; Trachtman, Howard; Brasile, Lauren; Star, Robert A.; Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E.; Moxey-Mims, Marva M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases–supported Kidney Research National Dialogue asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives aimed at improved understanding of kidney function and disease progression. Over the past 2 years, 1600 participants posted almost 300 ideas covering all areas of kidney disease. An overriding theme that evolved through these discussions is the need to move beyond pathology to take advantage of basic science and clinical research opportunities to improve diagnostic classification and therapeutic options for people with primary glomerular disease. High-priority research areas included focus on therapeutic targets in glomerular endothelium and podocytes, regenerating podocytes through developmental pathways, use of longitudinal phenotypically defined disease cohorts to improve classification schemes, identifying biomarkers, disease-specific therapeutics, autoantibody triggers, and changing the clinical research culture to promote participation in clinical trials. Together, these objectives provide a path forward for improving clinical outcomes of glomerular disease. PMID:24700796

  18. Neonatal Fc Receptor Promotes Immune Complex–Mediated Glomerular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Suleiman, Hani; St. John, Patricia L.; Ge, Linna; Mezo, Adam R.; Shaw, Andrey S.; Abrahamson, Dale R.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a major regulator of IgG and albumin homeostasis systemically and in the kidneys. We investigated the role of FcRn in the development of immune complex–mediated glomerular disease in mice. C57Bl/6 mice immunized with the noncollagenous domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3NC1) developed albuminuria associated with granular capillary loop deposition of exogenous antigen, mouse IgG, C3 and C5b-9, and podocyte injury. High-resolution imaging showed abundant IgG deposition in the expanded glomerular basement membrane, especially in regions corresponding to subepithelial electron dense deposits. FcRn-null and -humanized mice immunized with α3NC1 developed no albuminuria and had lower levels of serum IgG anti-α3NC1 antibodies and reduced glomerular deposition of IgG, antigen, and complement. Our results show that FcRn promotes the formation of subepithelial immune complexes and subsequent glomerular pathology leading to proteinuria, potentially by maintaining higher serum levels of pathogenic IgG antibodies. Therefore, reducing pathogenic IgG levels by pharmacologic inhibition of FcRn may provide a novel approach for the treatment of immune complex–mediated glomerular diseases. As proof of concept, we showed that a peptide inhibiting the interaction between human FcRn and human IgG accelerated the degradation of human IgG anti-α3NC1 autoantibodies injected into FCRN-humanized mice as effectively as genetic ablation of FcRn, thus preventing the glomerular deposition of immune complexes containing human IgG. PMID:24357670

  19. U.S. Geological Survey sage-grouse and sagebrush ecosystem research annual report for 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.

    2017-09-08

    The sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem extends across a large portion of the Western United States, and the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is one of the iconic species of this ecosystem. Greater sage-grouse populations occur in 11 States and are dependent on relatively large expanses of sagebrush-dominated habitat. Sage-grouse populations have been experiencing long-term declines owing to multiple stressors, including interactions among fire, exotic plant invasions, and human land uses, which have resulted in significant loss, fragmentation, and degradation of landscapes once dominated by sagebrush. In addition to the sage-grouse, over 350 species of plants and animals are dependent on the sagebrush ecosystem.Increasing knowledge about how these species and the sagebrush ecosystem respond to these stressors and to management actions can inform and improve strategies to maintain existing areas of intact sagebrush and restore degraded landscapes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a broad research program focused on providing the science needed to inform these strate-gies and to help land and resource managers at the Federal, State, Tribal, and local levels as they work towards sustainable sage-grouse populations and restored landscapes for the broad range of uses critical to stakeholders in the Western United States.USGS science has provided a foundation for major land and resource management decisions including those that precluded the need to list the greater sage-grouse under the Endangered Species Act. The USGS is continuing to build on that foundation to inform science-based decisions to help support local economies and the continued conservation, management, and restoration of the sagebrush ecosystem.This report contains descriptions of USGS sage-grouse and sagebrush ecosystem research projects that are ongoing or were active during 2017 and is organized into five thematic areas: Fire, Invasive Species, Restoration, Sagebrush and Sage

  20. Use of Cationized Ferritin Nanoparticles to Measure Renal Glomerular Microstructure with MRI.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kevin M; Beeman, Scott C; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Hann, Bradley D; Bertram, John F; Charlton, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming important for whole-kidney assessment of glomerular morphology, both in vivo and ex vivo. MRI-based renal morphological measurements can be made in intact organs and allow direct measurements of every perfused glomerulus. Cationic ferritin (CF) is used as a superparamagnetic contrast agent for MRI. CF binds to the glomerular basement membrane after intravenous injection, allowing direct, whole-kidney measurements of glomerular number, volume, and volume distribution. Here we describe the production, testing, and use of CF as an MRI contrast agent for quantitative glomerular morphology in intact mouse, rat, and human kidneys.

  1. Autoantibodies to myeloperoxidase aggravate mild anti-glomerular-basement-membrane-mediated glomerular injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, P.; Brouwer, E.; Klok, P. A.; Huitema, M. G.; van den Born, J.; Weening, J. J.; Kallenberg, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    Autoantibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) are present in sera from patients with various forms of vasculitis-associated glomerulonephritis. Evidence for a pathogenic role of anti-MPO antibodies has been provided mainly by in vitro studies. We studied the pathogenic role of autoantibodies to MPO in a rat model of mild immune-mediated glomerular injury. Brown Norway rats were immunized with human MPO in complete Freund's adjuvant or with complete Freund's adjuvant alone. At 2 weeks after immunization, rats had developed antibodies to human and rat MPO as detected by indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunoprecipitation. At this time point, rats were intravenously injected with a subnephritogenic dose of 150 micrograms of rabbit anti-rat GBM. Rats were sacrificed at 4 hours, 24 hours, 4 days, and 10 days after antibody administration. Control immunized rats developed mild glomerulonephritis characterized by slight proteinuria at day 10 (14.8 +/- 8.1 mg/24 hours) and moderate intraglomerular accumulation of ED1+ macrophages. Crescent formation, tuft necrosis, and tubular atrophy were not observed in those rats. In contrast, rats immunized with MPO developed severe glomerulonephritis characterized by the early occurrence of severe hematuria, marked proteinuria at day 10 (76.2 +/- 18.2 mg/24 hours), and massive glomerular deposition of fibrin. Complement and rat IgG were present in insudative lesions, but no linear pattern along the glomerular capillary wall was observed. By light microscopy, severe glomerular lesions were found at day 10 consisting of crescent formation and fibrinoid necrosis of capillary loops. In the interstitium, tubular necrosis and atrophy and marked interstitial mononuclear infiltration were found in conclusion, autoantibodies to MPO severely aggravate subclinical anti-GBM disease demonstrating their in vivo pathogenic potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:8909258

  2. Glomerular actions of endothelin in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kon, V; Yoshioka, T; Fogo, A; Ichikawa, I

    1989-01-01

    In Munich-Wistar rats, a micropipette was inserted into a first-order branch of the left main renal artery and continuously infused with human/porcine endothelin (0.4 ng/min). Micropuncture measurements revealed substantial differences within the cortical microcirculation of the same left kidney: SNGFR was some 35% lower in glomeruli exposed to endothelin compared with non-endothelin-perfused glomeruli (P less than 0.005). Similarly, glomerular plasma flow rate was some 38% lower in the endothelin-exposed glomeruli (P less than 0.001). The hypoperfusion and hypofiltration in the endothelin-exposed glomeruli reflected an increase in resistances in the afferent and efferent arterioles. There was no difference in the value of the glomerular capillary ultrafiltration coefficient between the two populations of glomeruli. We also studied kidneys that underwent 25 min of renal artery clamping 48 h before study. Antiendothelin antibody infused into one of the branches of the main renal artery ameliorated the vasoconstriction characteristic of postischemic nephrons: within the cortical microcirculation, the SNGFR in glomeruli exposed to antiendothelin antibody was 27.0 +/- 3.1 nl/min as compared with 17.4 +/- 1.7 measured in glomeruli not perfused with the antibody (P less than 0.001). Similarly, glomerular plasma flow rate was higher in the glomeruli exposed to antiendothelin antibody (128.7 +/- 14.4 nl/min vs. 66.6 +/- 5.6, P less than 0.005). Resistances in both the afferent and efferent arterioles were substantially lower in the antibody-exposed glomeruli. It is, therefore, suggested that endothelin, presumably released from damaged endothelium, may play an important intermediary role in the hypoperfusion and hypofiltration observed in postischemic kidneys. Images PMID:2651481

  3. Landscape characteristics and livestock presence influence common ravens: Relevance to greater sage-grouse conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Howe, Kristy; Gustafson, K. Ben; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Common raven (Corvus corax; hereafter, raven) population abundance in the sagebrush steppe of the American West has increased threefold during the previous four decades, largely as a result of unintended resource subsidies from human land-use practices. This is concerning because ravens frequently depredate nests of species of conservation concern, such as greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse). Grazing by livestock in sagebrush ecosystems is common practice on most public lands, but associations between livestock and ravens are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study was to identify the effects of livestock on raven occurrence while accounting for landscape characteristics within human-altered sagebrush steppe habitat, particularly in areas occupied by breeding sage-grouse. Using data from southeastern Idaho collected during spring and summer across 3 yr, we modeled raven occurrence as a function of the presence of livestock while accounting for multiple landscape covariates, including land cover features, topographical features, and proximity to sage-grouse lek sites (breeding grounds), as well as site-level anthropogenic features. While accounting for landscape characteristics, we found that the odds of raven occurrence increased 45.8% in areas where livestock were present. In addition, ravens selected areas near sage-grouse leks, with the odds of occurrence decreasing 8.9% for every 1-km distance, increase away from the lek. We did not find an association between livestock use and distance to lek. We also found that ravens selected sites with relatively lower elevation containing increased amounts of cropland, wet meadow, and urbanization. Limiting raven access to key anthropogenic subsidies and spatially segregating livestock from sage-grouse breeding areas would likely reduce exposure of predatory ravens to sage-grouse nests and chicks.

  4. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left to right: Richard Rawls, Chip Holloway, and Art Hayhurst standing next to the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  5. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmaster, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    Design features and the performance envelope of the SAGE II stratospheric aerosol monitoring instrument on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite are described. SAGE II was designed to obtain vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosols, monitor global seasonal changes in aerosols, provide data on stratospheric circulation and the behavior of transient events such as volcanic particulate injections, and to investigate atmospheric chemistry. The mmeasurements are centered on extinctions due to aerosols, NO2, O3 and water vapor.

  6. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  7. Glomerular haematuria, renal interstitial haemorrhage and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Martín Cleary, Catalina; Moreno, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto; Parra, Emilio G; Gracia, Carolina; Blanco-Colio, Luis M; Barat, Antonio; Egido, Jesús

    2010-12-01

    Macroscopic haematuria of glomerular origin has been associated with acute kidney injury. We report a patient with IgA nephropathy, macroscopic haematuria and acute kidney injury. Systemic anticoagulation may have aggravated haematuria. There was extensive interstitial and intratubular red blood cell extravasation, and interstitial haemosiderin deposits. The abundant presence of macrophages expressing the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and of cells stained for oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) in areas of interstitial haemorrhage and red blood cell cast-containing tubules provided evidence for a role for free haemoglobin in tubulointerstitial renal injury in human glomerular disease.

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    The proposed SAGE III instrument would be the principal source of data for global changes of stratospheric aerosols, stratospheric water vapor, and ozone profiles, and a contributing source of data for upper tropospheric water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. The ability to obtain such data has been demonstrated by the predecessor instrument, SAGE II, but SAGE III will be substantially more capable, as discussed below. The capabilities for monitoring the profiles of atmospheric constituents have been verified in detail, including ground-based validations, for aerosol, ozone, and water vapor. Indeed, because of its self-calibrating characteristics, SAGE II was an essential component of the international ozone trend assessments, and SAGE II is now proving to be invaluable in tracking the aerosols from Mt. Pinatubo. Although SAGE profiles generally terminate at the height of the first tropospheric cloud layer, it has been found that the measurements extend down to 3 km altitude more than 40 percent of the time at most latitudes. Thus, useful information can also be obtained on upper tropospheric aerosols, water vapor, and ozone.

  9. Glomerular basement membrane composition and the filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey H

    2011-09-01

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is an especially thick basement membrane that contributes importantly to the kidney's filtration barrier. The GBM derives from the fusion of separate podocyte and endothelial cell basement membranes during glomerulogenesis and consists primarily of laminin-521 (α5β2γ1), collagen α3α4α5(IV), nidogens-1 and -2, and agrin. Of these nine proteins, mutations in the genes encoding four of them (LAMB2, COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5) cause glomerular disease in humans as well as in mice. Furthermore, mutation of a fifth (Lama5) gene in podocytes in mice causes proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome, and progression to renal failure. These results highlight the importance of the GBM for establishing and maintaining a properly functioning glomerular filtration barrier.

  10. Unraveling the immunopathogenesis of glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Bonny L

    2016-08-01

    Immune-mediated damage to glomerular structures is largely responsible for the pathology associated with the majority of glomerular diseases. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the basic immune mechanisms responsible for glomerular damage is needed to inform the design of novel intervention strategies. Glomerular injury of immune origin is complex and involves both inflammatory and non-inflammatory processes driven by elements of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review summarizes the basic immune mechanisms that cause glomerular injury leading to the nephritic and nephrotic syndromes. A major focus of the review is to highlight the mechanisms by which antibodies cause glomerular injury through their interactions with glomerular cells, complement proteins, phagocytes bearing complement and Fcγ receptors, and dendritic cells expressing the neonatal receptor for IgG, FcRn.

  11. Pathology of glomerular deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Joh, Kensuke

    2007-09-01

    In routine diagnosis on renal biopsy, one of the confusing fields for pathological diagnoses is the glomerulopathies with fibrillary structure. The primary glomerulopathies with a deposit of ultrastructural fibrillary structure, which are negative for Congo-red stain but positive for immunoglobulins, include fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Several paraproteinemias including cryoglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy, and light chain deposition disease as well as hematopoietic disorders including plasmacytoma, plasma cell dyscrasia, and B cell lymphoproliferative disorders involve glomerulopathy with an ultrastructural fibrillary structure. A rare glomerulopathy with fibrillary structure that stains negative for Congo-red as well as for immunoglobulins has been also reported. The pathological diagnoses of these glomerulopathies can include either glomerular diseases, or paraproteinemic diseases, or hematopoietic diseases. The terminology is still confusing when glomerular diseases can be combined with paraproteinemic diseases and/or hematopoietic diseases. Therefore, the generic term, 'glomerular deposition disease' (GDD), has been proposed by pathologists with a requirement for clinicians to detect autoantibodies, paraproteins as well as to carry out a bone marrow check. An attempt has been made to rearrange the diseases with related disorders of fibrillary deposits, based on detailed clinical and pathological finding and to elucidate the correlation between GDD, paraproteinemia, and hematopoietic disorder.

  12. Multisectoral Approaches in Advancing Girls' Education: Lessons Learned in Five SAGE Countries. SAGE Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugh, Andrea

    Strategies for Advancing Girls' Education (SAGE) is a project of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture and Trade/Office of Women in Development (EGAT/WID). Five countries participated in SAGE: Guinea, Mali, Ghana, El Salvador; and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The project started in…

  13. Patterns in Greater Sage-grouse population dynamics correspond with public grazing records at broad scales.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Adrian P; Aldridge, Cameron L; Assal, Timothy J; Veblen, Kari E; Pyke, David A; Casazza, Michael L

    2017-03-22

    Human land use, such as livestock grazing, can have profound yet varied effects on wildlife interacting within common ecosystems, yet our understanding of land-use effects is often generalized from short-term, local studies that may not correspond with trends at broader scales. Here we used public land records to characterize livestock grazing across Wyoming, USA, and we used Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as a model organism to evaluate responses to livestock management. With annual counts of male Sage-grouse from 743 leks (breeding display sites) during 2004-2014, we modeled population trends in response to grazing level (represented by a relative grazing index) and timing across a gradient in vegetation productivity as measured by the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index (NDVI). We found grazing can have both positive and negative effects on Sage-grouse populations depending on the timing and level of grazing. Sage-grouse populations responded positively to higher grazing levels after peak vegetation productivity, but populations declined when similar grazing levels occurred earlier, likely reflecting the sensitivity of cool-season grasses to grazing during peak growth periods. We also found support for the hypothesis that effects of grazing management vary with local vegetation productivity. These results illustrate the importance of broad-scale analyses by revealing patterns in Sage-grouse population trends that may not be inferred from studies at finer scales, and could inform sustainable grazing management in these ecosystems.

  14. Patterns in Greater Sage-grouse population dynamics correspond with public grazing records at broad scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monroe, Adrian; Aldridge, Cameron; Assal, Timothy J.; Veblen, Kari E.; Pyke, David A.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Human land use, such as livestock grazing, can have profound yet varied effects on wildlife interacting within common ecosystems, yet our understanding of land-use effects is often generalized from short-term, local studies that may not correspond with trends at broader scales. Here we used public land records to characterize livestock grazing across Wyoming, USA, and we used Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as a model organism to evaluate responses to livestock management. With annual counts of male Sage-grouse from 743 leks (breeding display sites) during 2004–2014, we modeled population trends in response to grazing level (represented by a relative grazing index) and timing across a gradient in vegetation productivity as measured by the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index (NDVI). We found grazing can have both positive and negative effects on Sage-grouse populations depending on the timing and level of grazing. Sage-grouse populations responded positively to higher grazing levels after peak vegetation productivity, but populations declined when similar grazing levels occurred earlier, likely reflecting the sensitivity of cool-season grasses to grazing during peak growth periods. We also found support for the hypothesis that effects of grazing management vary with local vegetation productivity. These results illustrate the importance of broad-scale analyses by revealing patterns in Sage-grouse population trends that may not be inferred from studies at finer scales, and could inform sustainable grazing management in these ecosystems.

  15. Mesospheric ozone measurements by SAGE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE II observations of ozone at sunrise and sunset (solar zenith angle = 90 deg) at approximately the same tropical latitude and on the same day exhibit larger concentrations at sunrise than at sunset between 55 and 65 km. Because of the rapid conversion between atomic oxygen and ozone, the onion-peeling scheme used in SAGE II retrievals, which is based on an assumption of constant ozone, is invalid. A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to simulate the diurnal variation of ozone particularly within the solar zenith angle of 80 deg - 100 deg. This model indicates that the retrieved SAGE II sunrise and sunset ozone values are both overestimated. The Chapman reactions produce an adequate simulation of the ozone sunrise/sunset ratio only below 60 km, while above 60 km this ratio is highly affected by the odd oxygen loss due to odd hydrogen reactions, particularly OH. The SAGE II ozone measurements are in excellent agreement with model results to which an onion peeling procedure is applied. The SAGE II ozone observations provide information on the mesospheric chemistry not only through the ozone profile averages but also from the sunrise/sunset ratio.

  16. SAGE: String-overlap Assembly of GEnomes.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Lucian; Haider, Bahlul; Molnar, Michael; Solis-Oba, Roberto

    2014-09-15

    De novo genome assembly of next-generation sequencing data is one of the most important current problems in bioinformatics, essential in many biological applications. In spite of significant amount of work in this area, better solutions are still very much needed. We present a new program, SAGE, for de novo genome assembly. As opposed to most assemblers, which are de Bruijn graph based, SAGE uses the string-overlap graph. SAGE builds upon great existing work on string-overlap graph and maximum likelihood assembly, bringing an important number of new ideas, such as the efficient computation of the transitive reduction of the string overlap graph, the use of (generalized) edge multiplicity statistics for more accurate estimation of read copy counts, and the improved use of mate pairs and min-cost flow for supporting edge merging. The assemblies produced by SAGE for several short and medium-size genomes compared favourably with those of existing leading assemblers. SAGE benefits from innovations in almost every aspect of the assembly process: error correction of input reads, string-overlap graph construction, read copy counts estimation, overlap graph analysis and reduction, contig extraction, and scaffolding. We hope that these new ideas will help advance the current state-of-the-art in an essential area of research in genomics.

  17. Clustering-based approaches to SAGE data mining

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is one of the most powerful tools for global gene expression profiling. It has led to several biological discoveries and biomedical applications, such as the prediction of new gene functions and the identification of biomarkers in human cancer research. Clustering techniques have become fundamental approaches in these applications. This paper reviews relevant clustering techniques specifically designed for this type of data. It places an emphasis on current limitations and opportunities in this area for supporting biologically-meaningful data mining and visualisation. PMID:18822151

  18. Dark Sage: Semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.; Sinha, Manodeep

    2017-06-01

    DARK SAGE is a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation that focuses on detailing the structure and evolution of galaxies' discs. The code-base, written in C, is an extension of SAGE (ascl:1601.006) and maintains the modularity of SAGE. DARK SAGE runs on any N-body simulation with trees organized in a supported format and containing a minimum set of basic halo properties.

  19. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittner, David; Pitts, Michael; Zawodny, Joe; Hill, Charles; Damadeo, Robert; Moore, Randy; Cisewski, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Avaiation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M (M3M) platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the International Space Station (ISS) in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observations in the second half of this decade. This exciting mission utilizes contributions from both the Science Mission Directorate and the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency to enable scientific measurements that will provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. A related paper by Anderson et al. discusses the. Presented here is an overview of the mission architecture, its implementation and the data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of glomerular and non glomerular red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fassett, R G; Horgan, B; Gove, D; Mathew, T H

    1983-07-01

    Phase contrast microscopic examination of the urine has been recently shown to be of value in predicting whether hematuria is due to glomerulonephritis or lesions of the lower urinary tract. Glomerular red cells show variations in size and shape and have distorted surfaces. Non glomerular red cells are uniform in size and shape and have smooth surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on urine sediment containing either glomerular or non glomerular red cells to better define their surface characteristics. Glomerular red cells exhibited a variety of forms, most cells having lumpy projections from the surface, some showing fragmentation of the membrane and others showing gross distortion. In contrast non glomerular red cells show smooth surfaces and usually maintain the normal biconcave disc shape of peripheral red blood cells. Scanning electron microscopy can better define surface structural abnormalities of urinary glomerular and non glomerular red blood cells.

  1. Extract-SAGE: an integrated platform for cross-analysis and GA-based selection of SAGE data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Shihl, Tsung-Mu; Hung, Yu-Chen; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2009-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful quantification technique for gene expression data. The huge amount of tag data in SAGE libraries of samples is difficult to analyze with current SAGE analysis tools. Data is often not provided in a biologically significant way for cross-analysis and -comparison, thus limiting its application. Hence, an integrated software platform that can perform such a complex task is required. Here, we implement set theory for cross-analyzing gene expression data among different SAGE libraries of tissue sources; up- or down-regulated tissue-specific tags can be identified computationally. Extract-SAGE employs a genetic algorithm (GA) to reduce the number of genes among the SAGE libraries. Its representative tag mining will facilitate the discovery of the candidate genes with discriminating gene expression. This software and user manual are freely available at ftp://sage@bio.kuas.edu.tw/Extract-SAGE.zip.

  2. Glomerular diseases: genetic causes and future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Inagi, Reiko

    2010-09-01

    The glomerulus consists of capillary tufts, a mesangial cell component and the Bowman capsule. The glomerular filtration barrier is composed of glomerular endothelial cells, a basement membrane, and podocytes. Particular components of the slit diaphragm and the glomerular basement membrane strictly orchestrate the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. The basement membrane is made of a highly crosslinked macromolecular meshwork of type IV collagen, proteoglycans, and laminin. Genetic forms of glomerular disease are predominantly caused by genetic defects in these molecular structures or in factors that regulate the glomerular filtration barrier. In addition, abnormal IgA1 glycosylation can increase susceptibility to IgA nephropathy. Dysregulation of the complement system or of platelet activation can lead to the development of endocapillary lesions, which manifest as thrombotic microangiopathy. Glomerular dysfunction is also encountered in several genetic metabolic and mitochondrial disorders. Discoveries of mutations in a range of genes have provided new insights into the mechanisms of glomerular disease. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the genetics and therapeutics of a number of glomerular diseases.

  3. Leukotriene D4 is a mediator of proteinuria and glomerular hemodynamic abnormalities in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, T; Lianos, E A; Fukunaga, M; Takahashi, K; Badr, K F

    1993-01-01

    We assessed the role of leukotrienes (LTs) in Munich-Wistar rats with passive Heymann nephritis (PHN), an animal model of human membranous nephropathy. 10 d after injection of anti-Fx1A antibody, urinary protein excretion rate (Upr) in PHN was significantly higher than that of control. Micropuncture studies demonstrated reduced single nephron plasma flow and glomerular filtration rates, increased transcapillary hydraulic pressure difference, pre- and postglomerular resistances, and decreased ultrafiltration coefficient in PHN rats. Glomerular LTB4 generation from PHN rats was increased. Administration of the 5-LO activating protein inhibitor MK886 for 10 d markedly blunted proteinuria and normalized glomerular hemodynamic abnormalities in PHN rats. An LTD4 receptor antagonist SK&F 104353 led to an immediate reduction in Upr and to reversal of glomerular hemodynamic impairment. Ia(+) cells/glomerulus were increased in PHN rats. In x-irradiated PHN rats, which developed glomerular macrophage depletion, augmented glomerular LT synthesis was abolished. Thus, in the autologous phase of PHN, LTD4 mediates glomerular hemodynamic abnormalities and a hemodynamic component of the accompanying proteinuria. The synthesis of LTD4 likely occurs directly from macrophages or from macrophage-derived LTA4, through LTC4 synthase in glomerular cells. Images PMID:8386188

  4. Validation of SAM 2 and SAGE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P.-H.; Farrukh, U. O.; Yue, G. K.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of a validation study of data obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I (SAGE I) and Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) satellite experiments. The study includes the entire SAGE I data set (February 1979 - November 1981) and the first four and one-half years of SAM II data (October 1978 - February 1983). These data sets have been validated by their use in the analysis of dynamical, physical and chemical processes in the stratosphere. They have been compared with other existing data sets and the SAGE I and SAM II data sets intercompared where possible. The study has shown the data to be of great value in the study of the climatological behavior of stratospheric aerosols and ozone. Several scientific publications and user-oriented data summaries have appeared as a result of the work carried out under this contract.

  5. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-11-23

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples.

  6. Hematozoa in sage grouse from colorado.

    PubMed

    Stabler, R M; Braun, C E; Beck, T D

    1977-10-01

    Blood films from 361 sage grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) from North Park, Colorado, were examined for hematozoa. Parasites found were: Plasmodium pedioecetii , Haemoproteus canachites , Leucocytozoon bonasae , Trypanosoma avium , and microfilariae. The sage grouse represents a new host record for Plasmodium . Prevalence of parasitism was not age or sex related, with no significant (P > 0.05) differences between age or sex class. Parasite burdens increased significantly (P < 0.05) from January through May. As these burdens rose prior to the emergence of potential vectors, probably it was a true relapse associated with the resumption of the hosts' sexual activity.

  7. Validation of SAGE II ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Veiga, R. E.; Barnes, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Five ozone profiles from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with coincident ozonesonde measurements obtained at Natal, Brazil, and Wallops Island, Virginia. It is shown that the mean difference between all of the measurements is about 1 percent and that the agreement is within 7 percent at altitudes between 20 and 53 km. Good agreement is also found for ozone mixing ratios on pressure surfaces. It is concluded that the SAGE II profiles provide useful ozone information up to about 60 km altitude.

  8. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Three SAGE III instruments are being built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado (USA). SAGE III is a fourth generation instrument that incorporates robust elements of its predecessors [SAM II, SAGE, SAGE II] while incorporating new design elements. The first of these will be launched aboard a Russian Meteor/3M platform in May 1999. SAGE III will add measurements of O2-A band from which density and temperature profiles are retrieved. This feature should improve refraction and Rayleigh computations over earlier. Additionally, the linear array of detectors will permit on-orbit wavelength calibration from observations of the exo-atmospheric solar Fraunhofer spectrum.

  9. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Three SAGE III instruments are being built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado (USA). SAGE III is a fourth generation instrument that incorporates robust elements of its predecessors [SAM II, SAGE, SAGE II] while incorporating new design elements. The first of these will be launched aboard a Russian Meteor/3M platform in May 1999. SAGE III will add measurements of O2-A band from which density and temperature profiles are retrieved. This feature should improve refraction and Rayleigh computations over earlier. Additionally, the linear array of detectors will permit on-orbit wavelength calibration from observations of the exo-atmospheric solar Fraunhofer spectrum.

  10. Chemical and genetic relationships among sage ( Salvia officinalis L.) cultivars and Judean sage ( Salvia judaica Boiss.).

    PubMed

    Böszörményi, Andrea; Héthelyi, Eva; Farkas, Agnes; Horváth, Györgyi; Papp, Nóra; Lemberkovics, Eva; Szoke, Eva

    2009-06-10

    The essential oil composition and genetic variability of common sage ( Salvia officinalis L.) and its three ornamental cultivars ('Purpurascens', 'Tricolor', and 'Kew Gold') as well as Judean sage ( Salvia judaica Boiss.) were analyzed by GC-FID, GC-MS, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Common sage and its cultivars contained the same volatile compounds; only the ratio of compounds differed. The main compounds were the sesquiterpene alpha-humulene and the monoterpenes beta-pinene, eucalyptol, and camphor. Judean sage contained mainly the sesquiterpenes beta-cubebene and ledol. All of the samples exhibited characteristic RAPD patterns that allowed their identification. Cluster analyses based on oil composition and RAPD markers corresponded very well to each other, suggesting that there is a strong relationship between the chemical profile and the genetic variability.

  11. Schistosomal glomerular disease (a review).

    PubMed

    Andrade, Z A; Van Marck, E

    1984-01-01

    In this review paper schistosomal glomerulopathy is defined as an immune-complex disease. The disease appears in 12-15 per cent of the individuals with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. Portal hypertension with collateral circulation helps the by pass of the hepatic clearance process and the parasite antigens can bind to antibodies in the circulation and be trapped in the renal glomerulus. Chronic membranous-proliferative glomerulonephritis is the most common lesion present and the nephrotic syndrome is the usual form of clinical presentation. The disease can be experimentally produced, and schistosomal antigens and antibodies, as well as complement, can be demonstrated in the glomerular lesions. Specific treatment of schistosomiasis does not seem to alter the clinical course of schistosomal nephropathy.

  12. The assessment of glomerular function: creatinine clearance or plasma creatinine?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D. B.; Dillon, S.; Payne, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Plasma creatinine concentration is superior to creatinine clearance for the detection of abnormal glomerular function, of changes of glomerular function in patients with chronic renal disease. Creatinine clearance should be abandoned as the routine assessment of glomerular function. PMID:673986

  13. Monoterpenoid content of sage grouse ingesta.

    PubMed

    Welch, B L; Pederson, J C; Rodriguez, R L

    1989-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the monoterpenoid levels in the ingesta from various digestive organs of sage grouse are less than that expected from the big sagebrush leaves ingested. Results supported the hypothesis. Dramatic reductions occurred between the gizzard and duodenum. Monoterpenoid levels in the ceca were nil; thus adverse effects of monoterpenoids on ceca microbes would also be nil.

  14. An analysis of glomerular dynamics in rat, dog, and man.

    PubMed

    Oken, D E

    1982-08-01

    A network thermodynamic model was utilized to assess similarities and dissimilarities in the predicted response of human, rat, and dog glomeruli to change in the independent variables regulating glomerular filtration. The analysis in rat and dog employed basal values reported in the micropuncture literature. The analysis in man was based on a calculated total nephron vascular resistance (Rt) of 1.2 X 10(10) dyne sec cm-5 with a range of pre- (Ra) and postglomerular (Re) resistances and capillary hydraulic conductivities (Kf) that would provide a nephron blood flow (GBF) of approximately 550 nl/min and single nephron filtration rate (SNGFR) of approximately 65 nl/min. The maximal putative value for Ra/Re in man was approximately 1.1, a ratio demanding a Kf greater than 20 nl/min mm Hg to obtain the required SNGFR. Solitary changes in Ra and Re, glomerular capillary resistance, proximal tubule pressure, serum protein concentration, total vascular resistance, and Kf were induced and the resultant effect on SNGFR was examined in the three species. The relationship between changes in individual resistances, glomerular blood flow, glomerular filtration, and glomerular capillary pressure also was assessed. The patterns of response in man and dog, determined by the model, were remarkably similar and distinct from those of the rat in many regards. Except when the maximal possible Ra/Re ratio is assumed for man, filtration pressure equilibrium was not found; plasma flow dependence of SNGFR was not evident in rat, dog, or man. The differences in SNGFR control predicted for the rat, on the one hand, and dog and man on the other may have distinct physiologic significance.

  15. Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 coordinates dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase/PPAR-γ/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways that enhance nitric oxide generation in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine, which inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that binds to antioxidant response elements and transcribes many antioxidant genes. Because the promoters of the human DDAH-1 and DDAH-2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and PPAR-γ genes contain 2 to 3 putative antioxidant response elements, we hypothesized that they were regulated by Nrf2/antioxidant response element. Incubation of human renal glomerular endothelial cells with the Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone (20 μmol·L(-1)) significantly (P<0.05) increased NO and activities of NOS and DDAH and decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine. It upregulated genes for hemoxygenase-1, eNOS, DDAH-1, DDAH-2, and PPAR-γ and partitioned Nrf2 into the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished these effects. Nrf2 bound to one antioxidant response element on DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 and PPAR-γ promoters but not to the eNOS promoter. An increased eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (P-eNOSser-1177) expression with tert-butylhydroquinone was prevented by knockdown of PPAR-γ. Expression of Nrf2 was reduced by knockdown of PPAR-γ, whereas PPAR-γ was reduced by knockdown of Nrf2, thereby demonstrating 2-way positive interactions. Thus, Nrf2 transcribes HO-1 and other genes to reduce reactive oxygen species, and DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 to reduce asymmetric dimethylarginine and PPAR-γ to increase eNOS and its phosphorylation and activity thereby coordinating 3 pathways that enhance endothelial NO generation.

  16. Greater Sage-Grouse National Research Strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Manier, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The condition of the sagebrush ecosystem has been declining in the Western United States, and greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a sagebrush-obligate species, has experienced concurrent decreases in distribution and population numbers. This has prompted substantial research and management over the past two decades to improve the understanding of sage-grouse and its habitats and to address the observed decreases in distribution and population numbers. The amount of research and management has increased as the year 2015 approaches, which is when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is expected to make a final decision about whether or not to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act. In 2012, the Sage-Grouse Executive Oversight Committee (EOC) of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) lead the development of a Greater Sage-Grouse National Research Strategy (hereafter Research Strategy). This request was motivated by a practical need to systematically connect existing research and conservation plans with persisting or emerging information needs. Managers and researchers also wanted to reduce redundancy and help focus limited funds on the highest priority research and management issues. The USGS undertook the development of this Research Strategy, which addresses information and science relating to the greater sage-grouse and its habitat across portions of 11 Western States. This Research Strategy provides an outline of important research topics to ensure that science information gaps are identified and documented in a comprehensive manner. Further, by identifying priority topics and critical information needed for planning, research, and resource management, it provides a structure to help coordinate members of an expansive research and management community in their efforts to conduct priority research.

  17. Conserving migratory mule deer through the umbrella of sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Copeland, H. E.; Sawyer, H.; Monteith, K. L.; Naugle, D.E.; Pocewicz, Amy; Graf, N.; Kauffman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Conserving migratory ungulates in increasingly human-dominated landscapes presents a difficult challenge to land managers and conservation practitioners. Nevertheless, ungulates may receive ancillary benefits from conservation actions designed to protect species of greater conservation priority where their ranges are sympatric. Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocerus urophasianus), for example, have been proposed as an umbrella species for other sagebrush (Artemesia spp.)-dependent fauna. We examined a landscape where conservation efforts for sage-grouse overlap spatially with mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) to determine whether sage-grouse conservation measures also might protect important mule deer migration routes and seasonal ranges. We conducted a spatial analysis to determine what proportion of migration routes, stopover areas, and winter ranges used by mule deer were located in areas managed for sage-grouse conservation. Conservation measures overlapped with 66–70% of migration corridors, 74–75% of stopovers, and 52–91% of wintering areas for two mule deer populations in the upper Green River Basin of Wyoming. Of those proportions, conservation actions targeted towards sage-grouse accounted for approximately half of the overlap in corridors and stopover areas, and nearly all overlap on winter ranges, indicating that sage-grouse conservation efforts represent an important step in conserving migratory mule deer. Conservation of migratory species presents unique challenges because although overlap with conserved lands may be high, connectivity of the entire route must be maintained as barriers to movement anywhere within the migration corridor could render it unviable. Where mule deer habitats overlap with sage-grouse core areas, our results indicate that increased protection is afforded to winter ranges and migration routes within the umbrella of sage-grouse conservation, but this protection is contingent on concentrated developments within core areas not

  18. Probucol inhibits JAK2-STAT pathway activation and protects human glomerular mesangial cells from tert-butyl hydroperoxide induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongli; Huang, Bo; Han, Yarong; Jin, Ruixia; Chen, Shuo

    2013-09-01

    Human mesangial cells (HMCs) have a finite lifespan and eventually enter irreversible growth arrest known as cellular senescence, which is thought to contribute to kidney ageing and age-related kidney disorders such as chronic kidney disease. The JAK2-STAT pathway plays a pivotal role in transmitting cytokine signals, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, but whether it could regulate HMC senescence still remains to be explored. In our study, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP)-induced cells accelerated HMC senescence, as judged by increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase stained positive cells, morphological changes, and G0-G1 cell cycle arrest. STAT1 and STAT3 activity were increased in tBHP-induced cells. After tBHP treatment, Bcl-2 protein expression decreased and Bax protein expression increased. Blocking the JAK2-STAT pathway with AG490 and using probucol significantly inhibited the progression of HMC senescence. Bax protein expression decreased, but Bcl-2 protein expression increased after AG490 and probucol treatment. Our results indicated that the JAK2-STAT pathway might mediate tBHP-induced HMC senescence through the Bcl-2-Bax pathway, and that probucol could attenuate HMC senescence by regulating STATs.

  19. Coexistence of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibodies and Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies in a Child With Human Leukocyte Antigen Susceptibility and Detailed Antibody Description: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-jun; Cui, Zhao; Jia, Xiao-yu; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xiao-rong; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2015-07-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis both could cause rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The coexistence of ANCAs and anti-GBM antibodies was known as "double positive," which was extremely rare in children. We report a pediatric case with coexistence of ANCAs and anti-GBM antibodies. A 6-year-old girl presented with acute renal failure, hematuria, proteinuria, and oliguria. She was double positive of ANCAs specific to myeloperoxidase, and anti-GBM antibodies. Kidney biopsy confirmed linear immunoglobulin (Ig)G deposit along GBM and 100% of crescent formation in glomeruli; among them 83.3% were cellular crescents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene typing showed DRB1*1501, an allele strongly associated with anti-GBM disease, and DRB1*0405, an independent risk factor for renal failure in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. The titer of anti-GBM antibodies was 1:800, and the predominant IgG subclass was IgG1, which was closely related with severe kidney injury and worse outcome. The target antigen of anti-GBM antibodies was restricted on the noncollagen domain 1 of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3[IV]NC1), with recognitions to both epitopes, EA (α317-31) and EB (α3127-141). This is the first reported pediatric case with coexistence of ANCAs and anti-GBM antibodies, in which the HLA typing and immunologic characters of autoantibodies were identified. The findings on this early-onset patient are meaningful for understanding the mechanisms of both anti-GBM disease and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  20. SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer

    SAGE Collaboration

    SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

  1. Course of preeclamptic glomerular injury after delivery.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, M A; Myers, B D; Derby, G C; Blouch, K L; Druzin, M L; Deen, W M; Naimark, D M; Lafayette, R A

    2008-03-01

    We evaluated the early postpartum recovery of glomerular function over 4 wk in 57 women with preeclampsia. We used physiological techniques to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow, and oncotic pressure (pi(A)) and computed a value for the two-kidney ultrafiltration coefficient (K(f)). Compared with healthy, postpartum controls, GFR was depressed by 40% on postpartum day 1, but by only 19% and 8% in the second and fourth postpartum weeks, respectively. Hypofiltration was attributable solely to depression, at corresponding postpartum times, of K(f) by 55%, 30%, and 18%, respectively. Improvement in glomerular filtration capacity was accompanied by recovery of hypertension to near-normal levels and significant improvement in albuminuria. We conclude that the functional manifestations of the glomerular endothelial injury of preeclampsia largely resolve within the first postpartum month.

  2. Innate Immune Activity in Glomerular Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong; Bao, Wenduona; Shi, Shaolin

    2017-01-01

    Glomerular podocytes are specialized in structure and play an essential role in glomerular filtration. In addition, podocyte stress can initiate glomerular damage by inducing the injury of other glomerular cell types. Studies have shown that podocytes possess the property of immune cells and may be involved in adaptive immunity. Emerging studies have also shown that podocytes possess signaling pathways of innate immune responses and that innate immune responses often result in podocyte injury. More recently, mitochondrial-derived damage-associated molecular patterns (mtDAMPs) have been shown to play a critical role in a variety of pathological processes in cells. In the present mini-review, we summarize the recent advances in the studies of innate immunity and its pathogenic role in podocytes, particularly, from the perspective of mtDAMPs. PMID:28228761

  3. The Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    It is a great pleasure for me to have been asked by Louis Rosen to tell you about the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE). This undertaking is a multi-institutional collaboration among scientists from the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (INR), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and several US universities. Its purpose is to measure the number of low-energy electron neutrinos emitted from the Sun that arrive at this planet. As such, it is an extremely important experiment, touching on fundamental physics issues as well as solar dynamics. In contrast to the strategic overviews, plans, and hopes for international collaboration presented earlier today, SAGE is an ongoing working effort with high hopes of producing the first measurement of the Sun's low-energy neutrino flux. This paper reviews this experiment. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Lidar conversion parameters derived from SAGE II extinction measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Osborn, M. T.

    1992-01-01

    SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinction measurements are used to estimate mass- and extinction-to-backscatter conversion parameters. The basis of the analysis is the principal component analysis of the SAGE II extinction kernels to estimate both total aerosol mass and aerosol backscatter at a variety of wavelengths. Comparisons of coincident SAGE II extinction profiles with 0.694-micron aerosol backscatter profiles demonstrate the validity of the method.

  5. Lidar conversion parameters derived from SAGE II extinction measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Osborn, M. T.

    1992-01-01

    SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinction measurements are used to estimate mass- and extinction-to-backscatter conversion parameters. The basis of the analysis is the principal component analysis of the SAGE II extinction kernels to estimate both total aerosol mass and aerosol backscatter at a variety of wavelengths. Comparisons of coincident SAGE II extinction profiles with 0.694-micron aerosol backscatter profiles demonstrate the validity of the method.

  6. An observation of Clostridium perfringens in Greater Sage-Grouse.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christian A; Bildfell, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Mortality due to infectious diseases is seldom reported in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). A case of necrotic enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens type A is described in a free-ranging adult male sage-grouse in eastern Oregon. Clostridial enteritis is known to cause outbreaks of mortality in various domestic and wild birds, and should be considered as a potential cause of mortality in sage-grouse populations.

  7. Podocyte energy metabolism and glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Imasawa, Toshiyuki; Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2013-09-01

    Mitochondria are crucial organelles that produce and deliver adenosine triphosphate (ATP), by which all cellular processes are driven. Although the mechanisms that control mitochondrial biogenesis, function and dynamics are complex process and vary among different cell types, recent studies provided many new discoveries in this field. Podocyte injury is a crucial step in the development of a large number of glomerular diseases. Glomerular podocytes are unique cells with complex foot processes that cover the outer layer of the glomerular basement membrane, and are the principle cells composing filtration barriers of glomerular capillaries. Little is known on the modalities and the regulation of podocyte's energetics as well as the type of energy substrate primarily used for their activity, recent studies revealed that dysfunction of energy transduction in podocytes may underlie the podocyte injury associated with numerous glomerular diseases. We herein review and discuss the importance of a fine regulation of energy metabolism in podocytes for maintaining their cellular structure and related kidney function. In the future, understanding these mechanisms will open up new areas of treatment for glomerular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SAGE observations of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The global distribution of nitrogen dioxide in the middle to upper stratosphere (25-45 km altitude) for the period February 1979 to November 1981 has been determined from observations of attenuated solar radiation in the visible region 0.385-0.45 micron by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite instrument. The SAGE-derived NO2 vertical profiles compare well with observations by balloon- and aircraft-borne sensors. The global SAGE NO2 distributions generally show a maximum in mixing ratio of 8 parts per billion by volume at about 35 km altitude near the equatorial latitudes at local sunset. The location of the mixing ratio peak moves synchronously with the overhead sun for the four different seasons. High-latitude NO2 column content shows strong seasonal variation, with a maximum in local summer and a minimum in local winter. Selected data at high-latitude winter seasons are presented, suggesting that the large variation shown could be explained by the coupling of both dynamics and photochemistry of the NO(x) species. Finally, profiles of the ratio of sunset to sunrise NO2 mixing ratios, peaking at about a factor of two at 30 km, are shown.

  9. TAGmapper: a web-based tool for mapping SAGE tags.

    PubMed

    Bala, P; Georgantas, Robert W; Sudhir, D; Suresh, M; Shanker, K; Vrushabendra, B M; Civin, Curt I; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2005-12-30

    Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) is an important means of obtaining quantitative information about expression of genes in different samples. Short SAGE tags are 10 nucleotides long and often contain enough information to uniquely identify the gene(s) corresponding to the tag. We have observed, however, that the currently available resources are not adequate for accurate mapping of all SAGE tags to genes. Here, we describe development of a web-based tool called TAGmapper (http://tagmapper.ibioinformatics.org), which provides a comprehensive and accurate mapping of SAGE tags to genes. We were able to map SAGE tags accurately in several instances where two other popular resources, SAGEmap (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/SAGE/) and SAGE Genie (http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/SAGE), provided incorrect or no assignment of tags to genes. Finally, we experimentally determined the expression of a subset of genes assigned by TAGmapper using DNA microarrays and/or quantitative PCR to confirm the reliability of the gene mappings. We anticipate that TAGmapper will be a useful tool in functional genomic approaches by providing accurate identification of genes in SAGE experiments.

  10. Modeling ecological minimum requirements for distribution of greater sage-grouse leks: implications for population connectivity across their western range, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Knick, Steven T; Hanser, Steven E; Preston, Kristine L

    2013-06-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte) currently occupy approximately half of their historical distribution across western North America. Sage-grouse are a candidate for endangered species listing due to habitat and population fragmentation coupled with inadequate regulation to control development in critical areas. Conservation planning would benefit from accurate maps delineating required habitats and movement corridors. However, developing a species distribution model that incorporates the diversity of habitats used by sage-grouse across their widespread distribution has statistical and logistical challenges. We first identified the ecological minimums limiting sage-grouse, mapped similarity to the multivariate set of minimums, and delineated connectivity across a 920,000 km(2) region. We partitioned a Mahalanobis D (2) model of habitat use into k separate additive components each representing independent combinations of species-habitat relationships to identify the ecological minimums required by sage-grouse. We constructed the model from abiotic, land cover, and anthropogenic variables measured at leks (breeding) and surrounding areas within 5 km. We evaluated model partitions using a random subset of leks and historic locations and selected D (2) (k = 10) for mapping a habitat similarity index (HSI). Finally, we delineated connectivity by converting the mapped HSI to a resistance surface. Sage-grouse required sagebrush-dominated landscapes containing minimal levels of human land use. Sage-grouse used relatively arid regions characterized by shallow slopes, even terrain, and low amounts of forest, grassland, and agriculture in the surrounding landscape. Most populations were interconnected although several outlying populations were isolated because of distance or lack of habitat corridors for exchange. Land management agencies currently are revising land-use plans and designating critical habitat to conserve sage-grouse and avoid endangered

  11. Modeling ecological minimum requirements for distribution of greater sage-grouse leks: implications for population connectivity across their western range, U.S.A

    PubMed Central

    Knick, Steven T; Hanser, Steven E; Preston, Kristine L

    2013-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte) currently occupy approximately half of their historical distribution across western North America. Sage-grouse are a candidate for endangered species listing due to habitat and population fragmentation coupled with inadequate regulation to control development in critical areas. Conservation planning would benefit from accurate maps delineating required habitats and movement corridors. However, developing a species distribution model that incorporates the diversity of habitats used by sage-grouse across their widespread distribution has statistical and logistical challenges. We first identified the ecological minimums limiting sage-grouse, mapped similarity to the multivariate set of minimums, and delineated connectivity across a 920,000 km2 region. We partitioned a Mahalanobis D2 model of habitat use into k separate additive components each representing independent combinations of species–habitat relationships to identify the ecological minimums required by sage-grouse. We constructed the model from abiotic, land cover, and anthropogenic variables measured at leks (breeding) and surrounding areas within 5 km. We evaluated model partitions using a random subset of leks and historic locations and selected D2 (k = 10) for mapping a habitat similarity index (HSI). Finally, we delineated connectivity by converting the mapped HSI to a resistance surface. Sage-grouse required sagebrush-dominated landscapes containing minimal levels of human land use. Sage-grouse used relatively arid regions characterized by shallow slopes, even terrain, and low amounts of forest, grassland, and agriculture in the surrounding landscape. Most populations were interconnected although several outlying populations were isolated because of distance or lack of habitat corridors for exchange. Land management agencies currently are revising land-use plans and designating critical habitat to conserve sage-grouse and avoid endangered

  12. Modeling ecological minimum requirements for distribution of greater sage-grouse leks: implications for population connectivity across their western range, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, Steven T.; Hanser, Steven E.; Preston, Kristine L.

    2013-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte) currently occupy approximately half of their historical distribution across western North America. Sage-grouse are a candidate for endangered species listing due to habitat and population fragmentation coupled with inadequate regulation to control development in critical areas. Conservation planning would benefit from accurate maps delineating required habitats and movement corridors. However, developing a species distribution model that incorporates the diversity of habitats used by sage-grouse across their widespread distribution has statistical and logistical challenges. We first identified the ecological minimums limiting sage-grouse, mapped similarity to the multivariate set of minimums, and delineated connectivity across a 920,000 km2 region. We partitioned a Mahalanobis D2 model of habitat use into k separate additive components each representing independent combinations of species–habitat relationships to identify the ecological minimums required by sage-grouse. We constructed the model from abiotic, land cover, and anthropogenic variables measured at leks (breeding) and surrounding areas within 5 km. We evaluated model partitions using a random subset of leks and historic locations and selected D2 (k = 10) for mapping a habitat similarity index (HSI). Finally, we delineated connectivity by converting the mapped HSI to a resistance surface. Sage-grouse required sagebrush-dominated landscapes containing minimal levels of human land use. Sage-grouse used relatively arid regions characterized by shallow slopes, even terrain, and low amounts of forest, grassland, and agriculture in the surrounding landscape. Most populations were interconnected although several outlying populations were isolated because of distance or lack of habitat corridors for exchange. Land management agencies currently are revising land-use plans and designating critical habitat to conserve sage-grouse and avoid endangered

  13. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success.

    PubMed

    Dinkins, Jonathan B; Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Kirol, Christopher P; Pratt, Aaron C; Conover, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming's Core Area Policy. Wyoming's Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008-2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and <1.0 m), while selecting for less bare ground and rock. With the exception of more small gaps between shrubs, we did not find any differences in availability of these microhabitat characteristics between locations within and outside of Core Areas. In addition, we found little supporting evidence that sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4-45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming's Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between areas within

  14. Measuring glomerular number from kidney MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Natesan Ramamurthy, Karthikeyan; Kanberoglu, Berkay; Frakes, David; Bennett, Kevin; Spanias, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the glomerular number in the entire, intact kidney using non-destructive techniques is of immense importance in studying several renal and systemic diseases. Commonly used approaches either require destruction of the entire kidney or perform extrapolation from measurements obtained from a few isolated sections. A recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, based on the injection of a contrast agent (cationic ferritin), has been used to effectively identify glomerular regions in the kidney. In this work, we propose a robust, accurate, and low-complexity method for estimating the number of glomeruli from such kidney MRI images. The proposed technique has a training phase and a low-complexity testing phase. In the training phase, organ segmentation is performed on a few expert-marked training images, and glomerular and non-glomerular image patches are extracted. Using non-local sparse coding to compute similarity and dissimilarity graphs between the patches, the subspace in which the glomerular regions can be discriminated from the rest are estimated. For novel test images, the image patches extracted after pre-processing are embedded using the discriminative subspace projections. The testing phase is of low computational complexity since it involves only matrix multiplications, clustering, and simple morphological operations. Preliminary results with MRI data obtained from five kidneys of rats show that the proposed non-invasive, low-complexity approach performs comparably to conventional approaches such as acid maceration and stereology.

  15. Leveraging melanocortin pathways to treat glomerular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rujun

    2013-01-01

    The melanocortin system is a neuroimmunoendocrine hormone system that constitutes the fulcrum in the homeostatic control of a diverse array of physiological functions, including melanogenesis, inflammation, immunomodulation, adrenocortical steroidogenesis, hemodynamics, natriuresis, energy homeostasis, sexual function and exocrine secretion. The kidney is a quintessential effector organ of the melanocortin hormone system with melanocortin receptors abundantly expressed by multiple renal paranchymal cells, including podocytes, mesangial cells, glomerular endothelial cells and renal tubular cells. Converging evidence unequivocally demonstrates that the melanocortin based therapy by using the melanocortin peptide adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is prominently effective in inducing remission of steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by a variety of glomerular diseases, including membranous nephropathy and podocytopathies such as minimal change disease and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suggesting a steroidogenic independent melanocortin mechanism. Mechanistically, ACTH and other melanocortin peptides as well as synthetic melanocortin analogues possess potent proteinuria reducing and renoprotective effects that could be attributable to both direct protection of glomerular cells and systemic immunomodulation. Thus, leveraging melanocortin signaling pathways by using either the existing U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved melanocorin peptide ACTH or novel synthetic melanocortin analogues represents a promising and pragmatic therapeutic strategy for glomerular diseases. This review article introduces the biophysiology of melanocortin hormone system with emphasis on the kidney as the target organ, discusses the existing clinical and experimental data on melanocortin treatments for glomerular diseases, elucidates the potential mechanisms of action, and describes the potential side effects of melanocortin based therapy. PMID:24602463

  16. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed.

  17. The tetraspanin CD37 protects against glomerular IgA deposition and renal pathology.

    PubMed

    Rops, Angelique L; Figdor, Carl G; van der Schaaf, Alie; Tamboer, Wim P; Bakker, Marinka A; Berden, Jo H; Dijkman, Henry B P M; Steenbergen, Eric J; van der Vlag, Johan; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2010-05-01

    The tetraspanin protein CD37 is a leukocyte-specific transmembrane protein that is highly expressed on B cells. CD37-deficient (CD37(-/-)) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in serum and elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we report that CD37(-/-) mice spontaneously develop renal pathology with characteristics of human IgA nephropathy. In young naïve CD37(-/-) mice, mild IgA deposition in glomeruli was observed. However, CD37(-/-) mice developed high titers of IgA immune complexes in serum during aging, which was associated with increased glomerular IgA deposition. Severe mesangial proliferation, fibrosis, and hyalinosis were apparent in aged CD37(-/-) mice, whereas albuminuria was mild. To further evaluate the role of CD37 in glomerular disease, we induced anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in mice. CD37(-/-) mice developed higher IgA serum levels and glomerular deposits of anti-GBM IgA compared with wild-type mice. Importantly, glomerular macrophage and neutrophil influx was significantly higher in CD37(-/-) mice during both the heterologous and autologous phase of anti-GBM nephritis. Taken together, tetraspanin CD37 controls the formation of IgA-containing immune complexes and glomerular IgA deposition, which induces influx of inflammatory myeloid cells. Therefore, CD37 may protect against the development of IgA nephropathy.

  18. 28. VIEW OF WHITE SAGE PRIOR TO BEING PAINTED COAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF WHITE SAGE PRIOR TO BEING PAINTED COAST GUARD COLORS OF BLACK AND WHITE. NOTE ALSO THE PHOTOGRAPH WAS TAKEN PRIOR TO THE INSTALLATION OF A-FRAME MAST AND BOOM AND TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF TURTLE DECK. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE SAGE, U.S. Coast Guard 1st District Base, 1 Thames Street, Bristol, Bristol County, RI

  19. Ecology of greater sage-grouse in the Dakotas

    Treesearch

    Christopher C. Swanson

    2009-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations and the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) communities that they rely on have dramatically declined from historic levels. Moreover, information regarding sage-grouse annual life-history requirements at the eastern-most extension of sagebrush steppe communities is lacking....

  20. The SAGE III's mission aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael; Thomason, Larry; Zawodny, Joseph; Flittner, David; Hill, Charles; Roell, Marilee; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) is being prepared for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2015. Constructed in the early 2000s, the instrument is undergoing extensive testing and refurbishment prior to delivery to ISS. In addition, ESA is refurbishing their Hexapod which is a high-accuracy pointing system developed to support ISS external payloads, particularly SAGE III. The SAGE III instrument refurbishment also includes the replacement of the neutral density filter that has been associated with some instrument performance degradation during the SAGE III mission aboard METEOR/3M mission (2002-2005). We are also exploring options for expanding the science targets to include additional gas species including IO, BrO, and other solar, lunar, and limb-scatter species. In this presentation, we will discuss SAGE III-ISS refurbishment including results from Sun-look testing. We also will discuss potential revisions to the science measurements and the expected measurement accuracies determined in part through examination of the SAGE III-METEOR/3M measurement data quality. In addition, we will discuss potential mission science goals enabled by the mid-inclination ISS orbit. No dedicated field campaign for SAGE III validation is anticipated. Instead, validation will primarily rely on a collaborative effort with international groups making in situ and ground-based measurements of aerosol, ozone, and other SAGE III data products. A limited balloon-based effort with a yet-to-be-determined validation partner is also in the planning stages.

  1. SAGE 2.1: SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives GuidE) software system, version 2.1. SAGE recommends solvent replacements in cleaning and degreasing operations. It leads the user through a question-and-answer session. The user's responses allow the system ...

  2. SAGE 2.1: SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE: USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives GuidE) software system, version 2.1. SAGE recommends solvent replacements in cleaning and degreasing operations. It leads the user through a question-and-answer session. The user's responses allow the system ...

  3. An Advanced SAGE III Instrument on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    An improved and more capable SAGE III instrument is scheduled to be launched in November 2016 to the International Space Station. It will combine the experience and capabilities of its successful predecessor satellite instruments SAM II, SAGE, SAGE II, and SAGE III-Meteor to measure aerosol, cloud, O3, H2O, and NO2 profiles from the upper troposphere through the stratosphere. In addition to solar and lunar occultation with vertical resolutions of about 1.0 km, SAGE III-ISS will make limb scattering measurements on the solar side of each orbit greatly expanding the measurement coverage per spacecraft orbit, and tying in the very high resolution and precise solar occultation measurements with the limb scattering measurements. The new design incorporates an array detector that enhances its measurement capability and should allow for experimental data products like BrO, and IO, and along with a single photodiode detector the measurement of larger aerosols. The wavelengths covered by SAGE III-ISS range from 280 to 1040 nm with 1 to 2 mm spectral resolution using a grating spectrometer. The single photodiode extends measurements to 1550 nm. This talk will describe the measurement capabilities of SAGE III, its additional modes and increased geographical coverage, its calibration and characterization, and data archival and validation approach. In addition, examples of past data products important to climate, and ozone recovery, will be discussed as will the expanded contributions from SAGE III-ISS.

  4. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE): application in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2004-06-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool that allows digital analysis of overall gene expression patterns. SAGE provides quantitative and comprehensive expression profiling in a given cell population. Because SAGE does not require a preexisting clone, it can be used to identify and quantitate new as well as known genes. It works by isolating short fragments of genetic information from the genes expressed in the cell being studied. These short sequences, called SAGE tags, are linked together for efficient sequencing. SAGE is particularly well suited for organisms whose genome is not completely sequenced, because it does not require a hybridization probe for each transcript and allows new genes to be discovered. New modifications of SAGE now permit the analysis of gene expression in cell sub-populations or micro-anatomic structures, providing access to unexplored transcriptomes of normal and disease biology. Data derived using the SAGE technology have been used to identify tumor markers for a variety of cancers, including gastrointestinal cancer, lung and thyroid cancer, breast and ovarian cancer, neuroblastoma and glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. In this review we present an outline of the method and updated information on the applications of SAGE technology to various cancers.

  5. Effects of organophosphorus insecticides on sage grouse in southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Staley, C.S.; Henny, C.J.; Pendleton, G.W.; Craig, T.H.; Craig, E.H.; Halford, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Unverified reports indicated die-offs of sage grouse have occurred since the 1970s in southeastern Idaho. Some verification that organophosphorus insecticides were involved was obtained in 1981 and 1983. A radio telemetry study indicated that dimethoate was responsible for most mortality. Methamidophos also acounted for mortality. Sage grouse populations may be adversely affected by organophosphorus insecticides.

  6. Nutrient disorders of 'Evolution' mealy-cup sage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To produce popular floriculture crops like mealy-cup sage (Salvia farinacea (Benth.)), growers must be equipped with cultural information including the ability to recognize and characterize disorders. Diagnostic criteria of nutrient disorders of mealy-cup sage are absent from the literature. Theref...

  7. Autophagy in glomerular health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hartleben, Björn; Wanner, Nicola; Huber, Tobias B

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular filtration coupled to tubular reabsorption was the prerequisite for one of the most important milestones in evolution, when animals made their way from water onto land. To fulfill the enormous filtration task the filter is composed of the most sophisticated postmitotic epithelial cells--the podocytes, which have only a very limited ability to regenerate. Podocyte injury and loss owing to genetic, toxic, immunologic, or metabolic insults underlie the most common glomerular diseases. Thus, the understanding of the factors and mechanisms that help to maintain podocytes are of major clinical importance. Recently, autophagy emerged as a key mechanism to eliminate unwanted cytoplasmic materials, thereby preventing cellular damage and stress to safeguard long-lived podocytes. Here, we highlight the accumulating evidence suggesting that autophagy plays a critical role in the homeostasis of podocytes during glomerular disease and aging. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Global distribution of SAGE II data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Russell, G.; Lerner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques employed to map the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols using SAGE II data at four wavelengths (385, 453, 525 and 1020 microns) are described. The methods were devised to integrate the 900 data points scanned by the instrument with account taken of the different times the vertical profiles were obtained. The data have been used to calculate the O3, H2O, NO2 and aerosol optical thicknesses. Sample details of data gathered during April 1985 are discussed, with emphasis on difficulties being encountered in analyzing the differences being observed in the dawn and dusk data.

  9. Global distribution of SAGE II data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Russell, G.; Lerner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques employed to map the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols using SAGE II data at four wavelengths (385, 453, 525 and 1020 microns) are described. The methods were devised to integrate the 900 data points scanned by the instrument with account taken of the different times the vertical profiles were obtained. The data have been used to calculate the O3, H2O, NO2 and aerosol optical thicknesses. Sample details of data gathered during April 1985 are discussed, with emphasis on difficulties being encountered in analyzing the differences being observed in the dawn and dusk data.

  10. Cystinosis (ctns) zebrafish mutant shows pronephric glomerular and tubular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Elmonem, Mohamed A.; Khalil, Ramzi; Khodaparast, Ladan; Khodaparast, Laleh; Arcolino, Fanny O.; Morgan, Joseph; Pastore, Anna; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Ny, Annelii; Lowe, Martin; de Witte, Peter A.; Baelde, Hans J.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Levtchenko, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The human ubiquitous protein cystinosin is responsible for transporting the disulphide amino acid cystine from the lysosomal compartment into the cytosol. In humans, Pathogenic mutations of CTNS lead to defective cystinosin function, intralysosomal cystine accumulation and the development of cystinosis. Kidneys are initially affected with generalized proximal tubular dysfunction (renal Fanconi syndrome), then the disease rapidly affects glomeruli and progresses towards end stage renal failure and multiple organ dysfunction. Animal models of cystinosis are limited, with only a Ctns knockout mouse reported, showing cystine accumulation and late signs of tubular dysfunction but lacking the glomerular phenotype. We established and characterized a mutant zebrafish model with a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.706 C > T; p.Q236X) in exon 8 of ctns. Cystinotic mutant larvae showed cystine accumulation, delayed development, and signs of pronephric glomerular and tubular dysfunction mimicking the early phenotype of human cystinotic patients. Furthermore, cystinotic larvae showed a significantly increased rate of apoptosis that could be ameliorated with cysteamine, the human cystine depleting therapy. Our data demonstrate that, ctns gene is essential for zebrafish pronephric podocyte and proximal tubular function and that the ctns-mutant can be used for studying the disease pathogenic mechanisms and for testing novel therapies for cystinosis. PMID:28198397

  11. Statistical evaluation of SAGE libraries: consequences for experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, Jan M; Van Kampen, Antoine H C; Baas, Frank

    2002-10-29

    Since the introduction of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) as a method to quantitatively analyze the differential expression of genes, several statistical tests have been published for the pairwise comparison of SAGE libraries. Testing the difference between the number of specific tags found in two SAGE libraries is hampered by the fact that each SAGE library is only one measurement: the necessary information on biological variation or experimental precision is not available. In the currently available tests, a measure of this variance is obtained from simulation or based on the properties of the tag distribution. To help the user of SAGE to decide between these tests, five different pairwise tests have been compared by determining the critical values, that is, the lowest number of tags that, given an observed number of tags in one library, needs to be found in the other library to result in a significant P value. The five tests included in this comparison are SAGE300, the tests described by Madden et al. (Oncogene 15: 1079-1085, 1997) and by Audic and Claverie (Genome Res 7: 986-995, 1997), Fisher's Exact test, and the Z test, which is equivalent to the chi-squared test. The comparison showed that, for SAGE libraries of equal as well as different size, SAGE300, Fisher's Exact test, Z test, and the Audic and Claverie test have critical values within 1.5% of each other. This indicates that these four tests will give essentially the same results when applied to SAGE libraries. The Madden test, which can only be used for libraries of similar size, is, with 25% higher critical values, more conservative, probably because the variance measure in its test statistic is not appropriate for hypothesis testing. The consequences for the choice of SAGE library sizes are discussed.

  12. Age-dependent glomerular damage in the rat. Dissociation between glomerular injury and both glomerular hypertension and hypertrophy. Male gender as a primary risk factor.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, C

    1994-01-01

    The glomerulus develops progressive injury with advancing age which is particularly pronounced in males and is not the result of any specific disease process. In the present studies conducted in rats, glomerular function and structure were examined in adult (8 mo), elderly (12 mo), and old (19 mo) Munich Wistar rats. Intact males and females and castrated rats of both sexes were studied to determine the role of the sex hormones in mediating age-dependent glomerular damage. Intact males developed glomerular injury and proteinuria whereas females, both intact and ovariectomized, and castrated males were protected from injury. Glomerular blood pressure did not increase with advancing age in any group and did not correlate with glomerular damage. Glomerular volume did increase with advancing age in all groups but did not correlate with glomerular damage. We found that the presence of the androgens rather than the absence of the estrogens provide the risk factor for development of age-dependent glomerular damage. Neither glomerular hypertension nor glomerular hypertrophy provide the primary mechanism by which age-dependent glomerular injury occurs in the intact male. PMID:7962527

  13. Revealing the Mind of the Sage: The Narrative Rhetoric of the "Chuang Tzu."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, William G.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the rhetoric used in "Chuang Tzu" to disclose the sage's theory of rhetoric. Shows that revealing the mind of the sage is the main task of "Chuang Tzu." Discusses why neither direct description nor firsthand encounters with sages are well suited to disclosing the sage's mind. Examines how "Chuang Tzu" uses invented narratives to achieve…

  14. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fangrui; Tan, Aidi; Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  15. Sage-Grouse Lek Guideline Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to support a Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) unofficial request to obtain Land Use Committee comments pertaining to the proposed Sage-Grouse Breeding Habitat Regulations. Two documents were provided from DOE-ID pertaining to the proposed regulations: “Guidelines for INL Site Activities within Sage-grouse Breeding Habitat” and “Guidelines for New Infrastructure Development and Future Activities on the INL Site.” The INL Land Use Committee agreed to conduct this unofficial review in the spirit of collaboration between DOE-ID and the INL Land Use Committee. However, through this cursory review, significant concerns were raised regarding the guidelines, INL financial obligations, and the draft Candidate Conservation Agreement, which was not part of the requested review but is referred to by the guideline. Therefore, it is the position of the INL Land Use Committee, based on the issues raised in its cursory review, that DOE-ID request INL (through contractual channels) to conduct a formal review of the draft Candidate Conservation Agreement and guidelines. A formal review would allow ample time to thoroughly review the extensive draft regulations, identify areas of concern, and establish impacts (e.g., cost and project delays).

  16. Identification of intelectin overexpression in malignant pleural mesothelioma by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE).

    PubMed

    Wali, Anil; Morin, Patrice J; Hough, Colleen D; Lonardo, Fulvio; Seya, Tsukasa; Carbone, Michele; Pass, Harvey I

    2005-04-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a fatal neoplasm with no acceptable curative approaches. We used serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) to compare the gene expression pattern of a surgically resected MPM to the autologous normal mesothelium. Intelectin gene overexpression (>139-fold) was found in the tumor. Online SAGE datasets revealed intelectin to be consistently present in mesothelioma(s), ovarian cancer, and colon cancer. Intelectin mRNA expression was found by RT-PCR in 4 of 5 resected MPM tumors, and Intelectin protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 28 of 53 MPM tumors, and in 4 of 4 mesothelioma cell lines studied by Western blot. A marked induction in intelectin gene expression was observed among human primary mesothelial cells as a consequence of crocidolite asbestos exposure and simian virus 40 infection. Intelectin overexpression in mesothelioma could have potential screening, and therapeutic implications.

  17. Glomerular permeability to macromolecules in the Necturus kidney.

    PubMed

    Tanner, George A; Rippe, Catarina; Shao, Youzhi; Evan, Andrew P; Williams, James C

    2009-06-01

    Many aspects of the glomerular filtration of macromolecules remain controversial, including the location of the major filtration barrier, the effects of electrical charge, and the reason the filtration barrier does not clog. We examined these issues in anesthetized Necturus maculosus, using fluorescently labeled probes and a two-photon microscope. With the high resolution of this system and the extraordinary width ( approximately 3.5 mum) of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in this salamander, we were able to visualize fluorescent molecules in the GBM in vivo. GBM/plasma concentration ratios for myoglobin, ovalbumin, and serum albumin did not differ from that of inulin, indicating that the GBM does not discriminate among these molecules. The GBM/plasma concentration ratios for fluoresceinated dextran 500 and 2,000 kDa were significantly below that of inulin. Glomerular sieving coefficients (GSCs) for various macromolecules decreased as molecular mass increased, and the GSCs for bovine or human serum albumin were extremely low. The effect of electrical charge on filterability of a macromolecule was also examined. The GSCs for native (anionic) and neutral human serum albumin were not significantly different, nor did GSCs for anionic and neutral dextran 40 kDa differ, indicating that charge has no detectable effect on filterability of these macromolecules. These studies indicate that the main filtration barrier to albumin is the podocyte slit diaphragm. Electron microscopic studies revealed many cell processes within the GBM. Macromolecules that penetrated the GBM were taken up by mesangial cells and endothelial cells, suggesting that these cells help to prevent clogging of the filter.

  18. Small charged macromolecules for assessing glomerular disease

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.G.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.F.; Thomas, F.D.; Lyons, B.; Roskopf, M.; Zapf-Longo, C.

    1985-05-01

    Only about 50% of patients with biopsy-proven glomerular disease have shown significant depression of inulin or creatinine clearance. Previously discussed was a greater difference in clearance of unlabeled charged dextrans than with inulin or neutral dextrans between rats with glomerular damage and normal controls. The charged macromolecules reflected the early loss of the normal anionic charge of the glomerulus in disease. The authors have explored this principle for radionuclide studies. After limited coupling with the cyclic diahydride of DTPA, the In-111 labeled aminated dextran was injected IV simultaneously with Tc-99m DTPA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Glomerular damage was induced with IV puromycin aminonucleoside (5 mg/100g body wt) 9 days previously, for comparison with normal controls. Plasma clearance was determined from multiple blood samples over 2 hours. Urine and organs were assayed after sacrifice 2 hours after injection. The results are presented in this paper. If these results prove valid for man, radiolabeled charged small macromolecules should improve the assessment of spontaneous glomerulopathies compared to conventional ''glomerular'' agents.

  19. Epidemiology of Glomerular Disease in Southern Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Murugapandian, Sangeetha; Mansour, Iyad; Hudeeb, Mohammad; Hamed, Khaled; Hammode, Emad; Bijin, Babitha; Daheshpour, Sepehr; Thajudeen, Bijin; Kadambi, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glomerulonephritis stands third in terms of the etiologies for end-stage kidney disease in the USA. The aim of this study was to look at the patterns of biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis based on data from a single center. Kidney biopsy specimens of all patients above the age of 18 years, over a 10-year period, who had diagnosis of nondiabetic glomerular disease, were selected for the study. The most common histopathological diagnosis was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) (22.25%, 158/710) followed by membranous nephropathy (20.28%, 144/710) and immunoglobulin (Ig)A nephropathy (19.71%, 140/710). There was male preponderance in all histological variants except IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. The race distribution was uneven, and all histological variants, except minimal change disease and lupus nephritis, were more commonly seen in whites. In a separate analysis of the histological pattern in Hispanics, lupus nephritis was the most common pathology (28.70%, 62/216) followed by FSGS (18.05%, 39/216). In American Indian population, the most common pathology was IgA nephropathy (33.33%, 8/24) followed by FSGS (16.67%, 4/24). This study highlights the histopathological patterns of glomerular disease in southern Arizona. The data suggest regional and ethnic variations in glomerular disease that may point towards genetic or environmental influence in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. PMID:27149502

  20. Glomerular Latency Coding in Artificial Olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Yamani, Jaber Al; Boussaid, Farid; Bermak, Amine; Martinez, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Sensory perception results from the way sensory information is subsequently transformed in the brain. Olfaction is a typical example in which odor representations undergo considerable changes as they pass from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to second-order neurons. First, many ORNs expressing the same receptor protein yet presenting heterogeneous dose–response properties converge onto individually identifiable glomeruli. Second, onset latency of glomerular activation is believed to play a role in encoding odor quality and quantity in the context of fast information processing. Taking inspiration from the olfactory pathway, we designed a simple yet robust glomerular latency coding scheme for processing gas sensor data. The proposed bio-inspired approach was evaluated using an in-house SnO2 sensor array. Glomerular convergence was achieved by noting the possible analogy between receptor protein expressed in ORNs and metal catalyst used across the fabricated gas sensor array. Ion implantation was another technique used to account both for sensor heterogeneity and enhanced sensitivity. The response of the gas sensor array was mapped into glomerular latency patterns, whose rank order is concentration-invariant. Gas recognition was achieved by simply looking for a “match” within a library of spatio-temporal spike fingerprints. Because of its simplicity, this approach enables the integration of sensing and processing onto a single-chip. PMID:22319491

  1. Deodorant effects of a sage extract stick: Antibacterial activity and sensory evaluation of axillary deodorancy

    PubMed Central

    Shahtalebi, Mohammad Ali; Ghanadian, Mustafa; Farzan, Ali; Shiri, Niloufar; Shokri, Dariush; Fatemi, Syed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Deodorant products prevent the growth and activity of the degrading apocrine gland bacteria living in the armpit. Common antibacterial agents in the market like triclosan and aluminum salts, in spite of their suitable antibacterial effects, increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, breast and prostate cancers or induce contact dermatitis. Therefore, plant extracts possessing antibacterial effects are of interest. The aim of the present study was to verify the in vitro antimicrobial effects of different sage extracts against two major bacteria responsible for axillary odor, and to evaluate the deodorant effect of a silicon-based stick containing sage extracts in different densities in humans. Materials and Methods: Different fractions of methanolic extract of Salvia officinalis (sage) were evaluated on a culture of armpit skin surface of volunteers through agar microdilution antimicrobial assay. Then, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial with the best antibacterial fraction was conducted on 45 female healthy volunteers. Participants were treated with a single dose in four groups, each containing 15 individuals: Group 1 (200 μg/mL), 2 (400 μg/mL), 3 (600 μg/mL) of dichloromethane sage extract, and placebo (without extract). A standard sensory evaluation method for the evaluation of deodorant efficacy was used before, and two hours, four hours, and eight hours after single application of a deodorant or placebo (ASTM method E 1207-87 Standard Practice for the Sensory Evaluation of Axillary Deodorancy). Results: The data were analyzed with two factors relating to densities and time. In 45 participants with a mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age of 61.5±11.8 years, statistically significant within-group differences were observed before and two, four, and eight hours after deodorant treatment for groups 1, 2, and 3. Groups 1, 2, and 3 had a significantly smaller odor score than placebo after two, four, and eight hours (P < 0.001). In

  2. Deodorant effects of a sage extract stick: Antibacterial activity and sensory evaluation of axillary deodorancy.

    PubMed

    Shahtalebi, Mohammad Ali; Ghanadian, Mustafa; Farzan, Ali; Shiri, Niloufar; Shokri, Dariush; Fatemi, Syed Ali

    2013-10-01

    Deodorant products prevent the growth and activity of the degrading apocrine gland bacteria living in the armpit. Common antibacterial agents in the market like triclosan and aluminum salts, in spite of their suitable antibacterial effects, increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, breast and prostate cancers or induce contact dermatitis. Therefore, plant extracts possessing antibacterial effects are of interest. The aim of the present study was to verify the in vitro antimicrobial effects of different sage extracts against two major bacteria responsible for axillary odor, and to evaluate the deodorant effect of a silicon-based stick containing sage extracts in different densities in humans. Different fractions of methanolic extract of Salvia officinalis (sage) were evaluated on a culture of armpit skin surface of volunteers through agar microdilution antimicrobial assay. Then, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial with the best antibacterial fraction was conducted on 45 female healthy volunteers. Participants were treated with a single dose in four groups, each containing 15 individuals: Group 1 (200 μg/mL), 2 (400 μg/mL), 3 (600 μg/mL) of dichloromethane sage extract, and placebo (without extract). A standard sensory evaluation method for the evaluation of deodorant efficacy was used before, and two hours, four hours, and eight hours after single application of a deodorant or placebo (ASTM method E 1207-87 Standard Practice for the Sensory Evaluation of Axillary Deodorancy). The data were analyzed with two factors relating to densities and time. In 45 participants with a mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age of 61.5±11.8 years, statistically significant within-group differences were observed before and two, four, and eight hours after deodorant treatment for groups 1, 2, and 3. Groups 1, 2, and 3 had a significantly smaller odor score than placebo after two, four, and eight hours (P < 0.001). In a comparison of different deodorant

  3. SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by doing geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiracek, G.R.; Baldridge, W.S.; Sussman, A.J.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L.W.; Ferguson, J.F.; Gilpin, B.E.; McPhee, D.K.; Pellerin, L.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing world demand and record-high costs for energy and mineral resources, along with the attendant environmental and climate concerns, have escalated the need for trained geophysicists to unprecedented levels. This is not only a national need; it's a critical global need. As Earth scientists and educators we must seriously ask if our geophysics pipeline can adequately address this crisis. One program that has helped to answer this question in the affirmative for 25 years is SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience). SAGE continues to develop with new faculty, new collaborations, and additional ways to support student participation during and after SAGE. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Observations of atmospheric water vapor with the SAGE 2 instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jack C.; McCormick, M. P.; McMaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) is discussed. The SAGE 2 instrument was a multichannel spectrometer that inferred the vertical distribution of water vapor, aerosols, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone by measuring the extinction of solar radiation at spacecraft sunrise/sunset. At altitudes above 20 km, the SAGE 2 and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) data are in close agreement. The discrepancies below this altitude may be attributed to differences in the instruments' field of view and time of data acquisition.

  5. Observations of atmospheric water vapor with the SAGE 2 instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Jack C.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.

    1988-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) is discussed. The SAGE 2 instrument was a multichannel spectrometer that inferred the vertical distribution of water vapor, aerosols, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone by measuring the extinction of solar radiation at spacecraft sunrise/sunset. At altitudes above 20 km, the SAGE 2 and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) data are in close agreement. The discrepancies below this altitude may be attributed to differences in the instruments' field of view and time of data acquisition.

  6. SAM 2 and SAGE data management and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Trepte, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The data management and processing supplied by ST Systems Corporation (STX) for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement 2 (SAM 2) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) experiments for the years 1983 to 1986 are described. Included are discussions of data validation, documentation, and scientific analysis, as well as the archival schedule met by the operational reduction of SAM 2 and SAGE data. Work under this contract resulted in the archiving of the first seven years of SAM 2 data and all three years of SAGE data. A list of publications and presentations supported was also included.

  7. SAGE II aerosol validation - Selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Russell, Philip B.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Ferry, Guy V.; Livingston, John M.; Rosen, James N.; Osborn, Mary T.; Kritz, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements obtained during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II is tested. The SAGE II measurements are compared with correlative aerosol measurements taken during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986 with impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers on a U-2 aircraft, an upward pointing lidar on a P-3 aircraft, and balloon-borne optical particle counters. The data for July 29, 1986 are discussed in detail. The aerosol measurements taken on this day at an altitude of 20.5 km produce particulate extinction values which validate the SAGE II values for similar wavelengths.

  8. SAGETTARIUS: a program to reduce the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts and to plan SAGE sequencing stages

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Laurent; Wu, Yan; Guerin, Eric; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) experiments generate short nucleotide sequences called ‘tags’ which are assumed to map unambiguously to their original transcripts (1 tag to 1 transcript mapping). Nevertheless, many tags are generated that do not map to any transcript or map to multiple transcripts. Current bioinformatics resources, such as SAGEmap and TAGmapper, have focused on reducing the number of unmapped tags. Here, we describe SAGETTARIUS, a new high-throughput program that performs successive precise Nla3 and Sau3A tag to transcript mapping, based on specifically designed Virtual Tag (VT) libraries. First, SAGETTARIUS decreases the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts. Among the various mapping resources compared, SAGETTARIUS performed the best in this respect by decreasing up to 11% the number of multiply mapped tags. Second, SAGETTARIUS allows the establishment of a guideline for SAGE experiment sequencing efforts through efficient mapping of the CRT (Cytoplasmic Ribosomal protein Transcripts)-specific tags. Using all publicly available human and mouse Nla3 SAGE experiments, we show that sequencing 100 000 tags is sufficient to map almost all CRT-specific tags and that four sequencing stages can be identified when carrying out a human or mouse SAGE project. SAGETTARIUS is web interfaced and freely accessible to academic users. PMID:17884916

  9. Characterization of the global profile of genes expressed in cervical epithelium by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Riggins, Gregory; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Moreno, José; Arreola, Hugo; Hidalgo, Alfredo; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Background Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) is a new technique that allows a detailed and profound quantitative and qualitative knowledge of gene expression profile, without previous knowledge of sequence of analyzed genes. We carried out a modification of SAGE methodology (microSAGE), useful for the analysis of limited quantities of tissue samples, on normal human cervical tissue obtained from a donor without histopathological lesions. Cervical epithelium is constituted mainly by cervical keratinocytes which are the targets of human papilloma virus (HPV), where persistent HPV infection of cervical epithelium is associated with an increase risk for developing cervical carcinomas (CC). Results We report here a transcriptome analysis of cervical tissue by SAGE, derived from 30,418 sequenced tags that provide a wealth of information about the gene products involved in normal cervical epithelium physiology, as well as genes not previously found in uterine cervix tissue involved in the process of epidermal differentiation. Conclusion This first comprehensive and profound analysis of uterine cervix transcriptome, should be useful for the identification of genes involved in normal cervix uterine function, and candidate genes associated with cervical carcinoma. PMID:16171524

  10. SAGETTARIUS: a program to reduce the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts and to plan SAGE sequencing stages.

    PubMed

    Bianchetti, Laurent; Wu, Yan; Guerin, Eric; Plewniak, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    SAGE (Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) experiments generate short nucleotide sequences called 'tags' which are assumed to map unambiguously to their original transcripts (1 tag to 1 transcript mapping). Nevertheless, many tags are generated that do not map to any transcript or map to multiple transcripts. Current bioinformatics resources, such as SAGEmap and TAGmapper, have focused on reducing the number of unmapped tags. Here, we describe SAGETTARIUS, a new high-throughput program that performs successive precise Nla3 and Sau3A tag to transcript mapping, based on specifically designed Virtual Tag (VT) libraries. First, SAGETTARIUS decreases the number of tags mapped to multiple transcripts. Among the various mapping resources compared, SAGETTARIUS performed the best in this respect by decreasing up to 11% the number of multiply mapped tags. Second, SAGETTARIUS allows the establishment of a guideline for SAGE experiment sequencing efforts through efficient mapping of the CRT (Cytoplasmic Ribosomal protein Transcripts)-specific tags. Using all publicly available human and mouse Nla3 SAGE experiments, we show that sequencing 100,000 tags is sufficient to map almost all CRT-specific tags and that four sequencing stages can be identified when carrying out a human or mouse SAGE project. SAGETTARIUS is web interfaced and freely accessible to academic users.

  11. Linking occurrence and fitness to persistence: Habitat-based approach for endangered Greater Sage-Grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, C.L.; Boyce, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed empirical models predicting both species occurrence and fitness across a landscape are necessary to understand processes related to population persistence. Failure to consider both occurrence and fitness may result in incorrect assessments of habitat importance leading to inappropriate management strategies. We took a two-stage approach to identifying critical nesting and brood-rearing habitat for the endangered Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Alberta at a landscape scale. First, we used logistic regression to develop spatial models predicting the relative probability of use (occurrence) for Sage-Grouse nests and broods. Secondly, we used Cox proportional hazards survival models to identify the most risky habitats across the landscape. We combined these two approaches to identify Sage-Grouse habitats that pose minimal risk of failure (source habitats) and attractive sink habitats that pose increased risk (ecological traps). Our models showed that Sage-Grouse select for heterogeneous patches of moderate sagebrush cover (quadratic relationship) and avoid anthropogenic edge habitat for nesting. Nests were more successful in heterogeneous habitats, but nest success was independent of anthropogenic features. Similarly, broods selected heterogeneous high-productivity habitats with sagebrush while avoiding human developments, cultivated cropland, and high densities of oil wells. Chick mortalities tended to occur in proximity to oil and gas developments and along riparian habitats. For nests and broods, respectively, approximately 10% and 5% of the study area was considered source habitat, whereas 19% and 15% of habitat was attractive sink habitat. Limited source habitats appear to be the main reason for poor nest success (39%) and low chick survival (12%). Our habitat models identify areas of protection priority and areas that require immediate management attention to enhance recruitment to secure the viability of this population. This novel

  12. Linking occurrence and fitness to persistence: habitat-based approach for endangered greater sage-grouse.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Cameron L; Boyce, Mark S

    2007-03-01

    Detailed empirical models predicting both species occurrence and fitness across a landscape are necessary to understand processes related to population persistence. Failure to consider both occurrence and fitness may result in incorrect assessments of habitat importance leading to inappropriate management strategies. We took a two-stage approach to identifying critical nesting and brood-rearing habitat for the endangered Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Alberta at a landscape scale. First, we used logistic regression to develop spatial models predicting the relative probability of use (occurrence) for Sage-Grouse nests and broods. Secondly, we used Cox proportional hazards survival models to identify the most risky habitats across the landscape. We combined these two approaches to identify Sage-Grouse habitats that pose minimal risk of failure (source habitats) and attractive sink habitats that pose increased risk (ecological traps). Our models showed that Sage-Grouse select for heterogeneous patches of moderate sagebrush cover (quadratic relationship) and avoid anthropogenic edge habitat for nesting. Nests were more successful in heterogeneous habitats, but nest success was independent of anthropogenic features. Similarly, broods selected heterogeneous high-productivity habitats with sagebrush while avoiding human developments, cultivated cropland, and high densities of oil wells. Chick mortalities tended to occur in proximity to oil and gas developments and along riparian habitats. For nests and broods, respectively, approximately 10% and 5% of the study area was considered source habitat, whereas 19% and 15% of habitat was attractive sink habitat. Limited source habitats appear to be the main reason for poor nest success (39%) and low chick survival (12%). Our habitat models identify areas of protection priority and areas that require immediate management attention to enhance recruitment to secure the viability of this population. This novel

  13. Converting enzyme inhibition and the glomerular hemodynamic response to glycine in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, L A; Peterson, O W; Thomson, S C

    1999-07-01

    GFR normally increases during glycine infusion. This response is absent in humans and rats with established diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) restores the effect of glycine on GFR. To ascertain the glomerular hemodynamic basis for this effect of ACEI, micropuncture studies were performed in male Wistar-Froemter rats after 5 to 6 wk of insulin-treated streptozotocin diabetes. The determinants of single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) were assessed in each rat before and during glycine infusion. Studies were performed in diabetics, diabetics after 5 d of ACEI (enalapril in the drinking water), and weight-matched controls. Diabetic rats manifest renal hypertrophy and glomerular hyperfiltration but not glomerular capillary hypertension. ACEI reduced glomerular capillary pressure, increased glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, and did not mitigate hyperfiltration. In controls, glycine increased SNGFR by 30% due to increased nephron plasma flow. In diabetics, glycine had no effect on any determinant of SNGFR. In ACEI-treated diabetics, the SNGFR response to glycine was indistinguishable from nondiabetics, but the effect of glycine was mediated by greater ultrafiltration pressure rather than by greater plasma flow. These findings demonstrate that: (1) The absent response to glycine in established diabetes does not indicate that renal functional reserve is exhausted by hyperfiltration; and (2) ACEI restores the GFR response to glycine in established diabetes, but this response is mediated by increased ultrafiltration pressure rather than by increased nephron plasma flow.

  14. Heparan sulfate domains on cultured activated glomerular endothelial cells mediate leukocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Rops, A L; van den Hoven, M J; Baselmans, M M; Lensen, J F; Wijnhoven, T J; van den Heuvel, L P; van Kuppevelt, T H; Berden, J H; van der Vlag, J

    2008-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans by playing key roles in the leukocyte-endothelial interactions are thought to mediate inflammatory cell influx in proliferative glomerulonephritis. Here, we evaluated the specific features within glomerular endothelial HS that promote leukocyte adhesion. Mouse and human glomerular endothelial cells activated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or interleukin (IL)-1beta increased expression of inflammatory N- and 6-O-sulfated HS domains. In addition, altered expression of HS-modifying enzymes occurred, a feature also found in mouse kidneys with anti-glomerular basement membrane disease or lupus nephritis. Inhibition of the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway repressed cytokine-induced alterations in HS and gene expression of modifying enzymes. Firm adhesion of leukocytes to activated mouse glomerular endothelial cells decreased after removal of endothelial HS or addition of sulfated heparinoids. Specific antibodies that block N- and 6-O-sulfated HS domains on activated mouse endothelial cells reduced the number of rolling and firmly adhering leukocytes under dynamic flow conditions, while they increased the average leukocyte-rolling velocity. Our study shows that N- and 6-O-sulfated domains in HS on activated glomerular endothelium are crucial for leukocyte trafficking and are possible therapeutic targets.

  15. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  16. Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White Holly on right. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  17. Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage behind. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  18. 5. VIEW OF TRAIL WHERE IT PASSES THROUGH SAGE AREA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF TRAIL WHERE IT PASSES THROUGH SAGE AREA, OWL CREEK IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. VIEW LOOKING EAST - Hole-in-the-Rock Trail, Running From Bluff Vicinity to Escalante, Garfield County, Bluff, San Juan County, UT

  19. Russell Sage: Private Research for the Public Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Carl S.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the Russell Sage Foundation, devoted to social science research, is reviewed with emphasis on its outlook under the new president, Aaron Wildavsky, and his expertise in policy analysis. (LBH)

  20. [Design and application of medical knowledge model on SAGE].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Bin-fei; Ye, Feng; Lv, Xu-dong

    2009-01-01

    As an methodology for promoting the quality and efficiency of health care, clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) have gained much improvement. The knowledge base (KB) plays an important role in DSS. For CDSSs, the construction of KB means modeling the medical knowledge based on a suitable model. This study analyzes the SAGE model, then implements it on knowledge of diagnosis and treatment of Metabolic Syndrome (MS), and improves the SAGE to enhance its expression ability. The model is constructed as the KB in CDSS, and be applied in hospital. The evaluation result of CDSS reveals that the SAGE model should be useful in clinical application. Finally, this study propounds some points yet to be improved in the SAGE.

  1. Teaching and Research: The Vice of the Sages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ney, James W.

    1980-01-01

    Teachers may be hemmed in by the latest pedagogical fashions or they may be held by strict adherence to the latest research dogmas. Both of these can constitute an iron entrapment, the vice of the sages. (Author)

  2. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE, Self Adaptive Grid codE, is a flexible tool for adapting and restructuring both 2D and 3D grids. Solution-adaptive grid methods are useful tools for efficient and accurate flow predictions. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, strong gradient regions such as shocks, contact discontinuities, shear layers, etc., require careful distribution of grid points to minimize grid error and produce accurate flow-field predictions. SAGE helps the user obtain more accurate solutions by intelligently redistributing (i.e. adapting) the original grid points based on an initial or interim flow-field solution. The user then computes a new solution using the adapted grid as input to the flow solver. The adaptive-grid methodology poses the problem in an algebraic, unidirectional manner for multi-dimensional adaptations. The procedure is analogous to applying tension and torsion spring forces proportional to the local flow gradient at every grid point and finding the equilibrium position of the resulting system of grid points. The multi-dimensional problem of grid adaption is split into a series of one-dimensional problems along the computational coordinate lines. The reduced one dimensional problem then requires a tridiagonal solver to find the location of grid points along a coordinate line. Multi-directional adaption is achieved by the sequential application of the method in each coordinate direction. The tension forces direct the redistribution of points to the strong gradient region. To maintain smoothness and a measure of orthogonality of grid lines, torsional forces are introduced that relate information between the family of lines adjacent to one another. The smoothness and orthogonality constraints are direction-dependent, since they relate only the coordinate lines that are being adapted to the neighboring lines that have already been adapted. Therefore the solutions are non-unique and depend on the order and direction of adaption. Non-uniqueness of the adapted grid is

  3. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE, Self Adaptive Grid codE, is a flexible tool for adapting and restructuring both 2D and 3D grids. Solution-adaptive grid methods are useful tools for efficient and accurate flow predictions. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, strong gradient regions such as shocks, contact discontinuities, shear layers, etc., require careful distribution of grid points to minimize grid error and produce accurate flow-field predictions. SAGE helps the user obtain more accurate solutions by intelligently redistributing (i.e. adapting) the original grid points based on an initial or interim flow-field solution. The user then computes a new solution using the adapted grid as input to the flow solver. The adaptive-grid methodology poses the problem in an algebraic, unidirectional manner for multi-dimensional adaptations. The procedure is analogous to applying tension and torsion spring forces proportional to the local flow gradient at every grid point and finding the equilibrium position of the resulting system of grid points. The multi-dimensional problem of grid adaption is split into a series of one-dimensional problems along the computational coordinate lines. The reduced one dimensional problem then requires a tridiagonal solver to find the location of grid points along a coordinate line. Multi-directional adaption is achieved by the sequential application of the method in each coordinate direction. The tension forces direct the redistribution of points to the strong gradient region. To maintain smoothness and a measure of orthogonality of grid lines, torsional forces are introduced that relate information between the family of lines adjacent to one another. The smoothness and orthogonality constraints are direction-dependent, since they relate only the coordinate lines that are being adapted to the neighboring lines that have already been adapted. Therefore the solutions are non-unique and depend on the order and direction of adaption. Non-uniqueness of the adapted grid is

  4. Connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CTGF) in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; D'Ambrosio, Martin A.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.; Ren, Yilin; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2013-01-01

    In Dahl salt-sensitive rats (Dahl SS), glomerular capillary pressure (PGC) increases in response to high salt intake and this is accompanied by significant glomerular injury compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with similar blood pressure. PGC is controlled mainly by afferent arteriolar (Af-Art) resistance, which is regulated by the vasoconstrictor tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the vasodilator connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CTGF). We hypothesized that Dahl SS have a decreased TGF response and enhanced TGF resetting compared to SHR, and that these differences are due in part to an increase in CTGF. In vivo, using micropuncture we measured stop-flow pressure (PSF, a surrogate of PGC). TGF was calculated as the maximal decrease in PSF caused by increasing nephron perfusion, TGF resetting as the attenuation in TGF induced by high salt diet, and CTGF as the difference in TGF response before and during CTGF inhibition with benzamil. Compared to SHR, Dahl SS had 1) lower TGF responses in normal (6.6±0.1 vs. 11.0±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.001) and high-salt diets (3.3±0.1 vs. 10.1±0.3 mmHg; P<0.001), 2) greater TGF resetting (3.3±0.1 vs. 1.0±0.3 mmHg; P<0.001), and 3) greater CTGF (3.4±0.4 vs. 1.2±0.1 mmHg; P<0.001). We conclude that Dahl SS have lower TGF and greater CTGF than SHR, and that CTGF antagonizes TGF. Furthermore, CTGF is enhanced by a high-salt diet and contributes significantly to TGF resetting. Our findings may explain in part the increase in vasodilatation, PGC, and glomerular damage in salt-sensitive hypertension during high salt intake. PMID:23959547

  5. SAGE II stratospheric density and temperature retrieval experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Lenoble, J.; Nagatani, R. M.; Chanin, M. L.; Barnes, R. A.; Schmidlin, F.; Rowland, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a stratospheric density and temperature retrieval experiment based on the solar occultation measurement of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The entire retrieval analysis involves two inversion steps: the vertical structure inversion, which derives the profile of local atmospheric extinction from SAGE II limb optical depth data, and the species inversion, which inverts the concentration of air molecules, aerosols, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide from the derived atmospheric extinction at five SAGE II short wavelengths (0.385, 0.448, 0.453, 0.525, and 0.600 microns). The derived density profile is then used to infer the temperature distribution, assuming that the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and obeys the ideal gas law. The temperature profiles retrieved from the SAGE II observations are compared with near-coincident, in both time and space, French Rayleigh lidar and NASA Wallops Flight Facility rocket datasonde soundings as well as the National Meteorological Center (NMC) data analyses. The results indicate that the mean SAGE II temperature agrees with the mean lidar measurements to within 2 C at altitudes from 30.5 to 52.5 km. The SAGE II and datasonde observations agree to within about 4 C in approximately the same altitude region.

  6. SAGE ground truth plan: Correlative measurements for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) on the AEM-B satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B. (Editor); Cunnold, D. M.; Grams, G. W.; Laver, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Murcray, D. G.; Pepin, T. J.; Perry, T. W.; Planet, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The ground truth plan is outlined for correlative measurements to validate the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) sensor data. SAGE will fly aboard the Applications Explorer Mission-B satellite scheduled for launch in early 1979 and measure stratospheric vertical profiles of aerosol, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and molecular extinction between 79 N and 79 S. latitude. The plan gives details of the location and times for the simultaneous satellite/correlative measurements for the nominal launch time, the rationale and choice of the correlative sensors, their characteristics and expected accuracies, and the conversion of their data to extinction profiles. In addition, an overview of the SAGE expected instrument performance and data inversion results are presented. Various atmospheric models representative of stratospheric aerosols and ozone are used in the SAGE and correlative sensor analyses.

  7. Nanoscale protein architecture of the kidney glomerular basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Hani; Zhang, Lei; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Miner, Jeffrey H; Shaw, Andrey S; Dani, Adish

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play structural and functional roles in essentially all organs, so understanding ECM protein organization in health and disease remains an important goal. Here, we used sub-diffraction resolution stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) to resolve the in situ molecular organization of proteins within the kidney glomerular basement membrane (GBM), an essential mediator of glomerular ultrafiltration. Using multichannel STORM and STORM-electron microscopy correlation, we constructed a molecular reference frame that revealed a laminar organization of ECM proteins within the GBM. Separate analyses of domains near the N- and C-termini of agrin, laminin, and collagen IV in mouse and human GBM revealed a highly oriented macromolecular organization. Our analysis also revealed disruptions in this GBM architecture in a mouse model of Alport syndrome. These results provide the first nanoscopic glimpse into the organization of a complex ECM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01149.001 PMID:24137544

  8. DGKE Variants Cause a Glomerular Microangiopathy That Mimics Membranoproliferative GN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binghua; Rauhauser, Alysha; An, Sung-Wan; Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Taskiran, Ekim Z.; Ibsirlioglu, Tulin; Korkmaz, Emine; Bilginer, Yelda; Duzova, Ali; Ozen, Seza; Topaloglu, Rezan; Besbas, Nesrin; Ashraf, Shazia; Du, Yong; Liang, Chaoying; Chen, Phylip; Lu, Dongmei; Vadnagara, Komal; Arbuckle, Susan; Lewis, Deborah; Wakeland, Benjamin; Quigg, Richard J.; Ransom, Richard F.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Topham, Matthew K.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Mohan, Chandra; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Bakkaloglu, Aysin; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-01-01

    Renal microangiopathies and membranoproliferative GN (MPGN) can manifest similar clinical presentations and histology, suggesting the possibility of a common underlying mechanism in some cases. Here, we performed homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in a Turkish consanguineous family and identified DGKE gene variants as the cause of a membranoproliferative-like glomerular microangiopathy. Furthermore, we identified two additional DGKE variants in a cohort of 142 unrelated patients diagnosed with membranoproliferative GN. This gene encodes the diacylglycerol kinase DGKε, which is an intracellular lipid kinase that phosphorylates diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrated that mouse and rat Dgkε colocalizes with the podocyte marker WT1 but not with the endothelial marker CD31. Patch-clamp experiments in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells showed that DGKε variants affect the intracellular concentration of diacylglycerol. Taken together, these results not only identify a genetic cause of a glomerular microangiopathy but also suggest that the phosphatidylinositol cycle, which requires DGKE, is critical to the normal function of podocytes. PMID:23274426

  9. Summary of science, activities, programs, and policies that influence the rangewide conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manier, D.J.; Wood, David J.A.; Bowen, Z.H.; Donovan, R.M.; Holloran, M.J.; Juliusson, L.M.; Mayne, K.S.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.; Quamen, F.R.; Saher, D.J.; Titolo, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The Greater Sage-Grouse, has been observed, hunted, and counted for decades. The sagebrush biome, home to the Greater Sage-Grouse, includes sagebrush-steppe and Great Basin sagebrush communities, interspersed with grasslands, salt flats, badlands, mountain ranges, springs, intermittent creeks and washes, and major river systems, and is one of the most widespread and enigmatic components of Western U.S. landscapes. Over time, habitat conversion, degradation, and fragmentation have accumulated across the entire range such that local conditions as well as habitat distributions at local and regional scales are negatively affecting the long-term persistence of this species. Historic patterns of human use and settlement of the sagebrush ecosystem have contributed to the current condition and status of sage-grouse populations. The accumulation of habitat loss, persistent habitat degradation, and fragmentation by industry and urban infrastructure, as indicated by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) findings, presents a significant challenge for conservation of this species and sustainable management of the sagebrush ecosystem. Because of the wide variations in natural and human history across these landscapes, no single prescription for management of sagebrush ecosystems (including sage-grouse habitats) will suffice to guide the collective efforts of public and private entities to conserve the species and its habitat. This report documents and summarizes several decades of work on sage-grouse populations, sagebrush as habitat, and sagebrush community and ecosystem functions based on the recent assessment and findings of the USFWS under consideration of the Endangered Species Act. As reflected here, some of these topics receive a greater depth of discussion because of the perceived importance of the issue for sagebrush ecosystems and sage-grouse populations. Drawing connections between the direct effects on sagebrush ecosystems and the effect of ecosystem condition on

  10. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  11. Creatinine clearance as a substitute for the glomerular filtration rate in the assessment of glomerular hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Okada, N; Imanishi, M; Yoshioka, K; Konishi, Y; Okumura, M; Tanaka, S; Fujii, S

    1999-11-01

    A method for the clinical assessment of glomerular hemodynamics has been published previously. We here examined whether, when using this method, renal creatinine clearance (Ccr) can be substituted for the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The study subjects comprised 57 inpatients from Osaka City General Hospital: 30 with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 27 with chronic glomerulonephritis. During the 2-wk study, patients received a high-salt diet for 1 wk and a low-salt diet for 1 wk. Urinary sodium excretion and systemic blood pressure were measured daily. The renal plasma flow, Ccr, and plasma total protein concentration were also evaluated simultaneously on the last day of the high-salt diet. The GFR was also calculated from the fractional renal accumulation of 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Glomerular hemodynamics, represented by the glomerular capillary hydraulic pressure and the resistance of afferent and efferent arterioles, were calculated using the renal clearance, the plasma total protein concentration, and the pressure-natriuresis relationship. Values for renal hemodynamics with the Ccr-derived GFR were compared with those from the 99mTc-DTPA-derived GFR. Ccr values of 53 to 169 ml/min correlated with the 99mTc-DTPA-derived clearance of 39 to 179 ml/min (n=57, r=.71, p<.001). Values for the glomerular pressure and the resistances of afferent and efferent arterioles calculated using the Ccr-derived GFR correlated significantly with those calculated using the 99mTc-DTPA-derived GFR (r=.99, p<.001 and r=.99, p<.001, respectively). These results indicate that the Ccr is an accurate representation of the GFR for use in glomerular hemodynamic analysis of the pressure-natriuresis relationship.

  12. A hierarchical integrated population model for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Halstead, Brian J.; Blomberg, Erik J.; Brussee, Brianne; Howe, Kristy B.; Wiechman, Lief; Tebbenkamp, Joel; Reese, Kerry P.; Gardner, Scott C.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter referred to as “sage-grouse”) are endemic to sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems throughout Western North America. Populations of sage-grouse have declined in distribution and abundance across the range of the species (Schroeder and others, 2004; Knick and Connelly, 2011), largely as a result of human disruption of sagebrush communities (Knick and Connelly, 2011). The Bi-State Distinct Population Segment (DPS) represents sage-grouse populations that are geographically isolated and genetically distinct (Benedict and others, 2003; Oyler-McCance and others, 2005) and that are present at the extreme southwestern distribution of the sage-grouse range (Schroeder and others, 2004), straddling the border of California and Nevada. Subpopulations of sage-grouse in the DPS may be at increased risk of extirpation because of a substantial loss of sagebrush habitat and lack of connectivity (Oyler-McCance and others, 2005). Sage-grouse in the Bi-State DPS represent small, localized breeding populations distributed across 18,325 km2. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service currently (2014) is evaluating the Bi-State DPS as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, independent of other sage-grouse populations. This DPS was designated as a higher priority for listing than sage-grouse in other parts of the species’ range (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2010). Range-wide population analyses for sage-grouse have included portions of the Bi-State DPS (Sage and Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse Technical Committee 2008; Garton and others, 2011). Although these analyses are informative, the underlying data only represent a portion of the DPS and are comprised of lek count observations only. A thorough examination of population dynamics and persistence that includes multiple subpopulations and represents the majority of the DPS is largely lacking. Furthermore, fundamental information on population growth

  13. The Tetraspanin CD37 Protects Against Glomerular IgA Deposition and Renal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rops, Angelique L.; Figdor, Carl G.; van der Schaaf, Alie; Tamboer, Wim P.; Bakker, Marinka A.; Berden, Jo H.; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Steenbergen, Eric J.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Spriel, Annemiek B.

    2010-01-01

    The tetraspanin protein CD37 is a leukocyte-specific transmembrane protein that is highly expressed on B cells. CD37-deficient (CD37−/−) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in serum and elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we report that CD37−/− mice spontaneously develop renal pathology with characteristics of human IgA nephropathy. In young naïve CD37−/− mice, mild IgA deposition in glomeruli was observed. However, CD37−/− mice developed high titers of IgA immune complexes in serum during aging, which was associated with increased glomerular IgA deposition. Severe mesangial proliferation, fibrosis, and hyalinosis were apparent in aged CD37−/− mice, whereas albuminuria was mild. To further evaluate the role of CD37 in glomerular disease, we induced anti–glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in mice. CD37−/− mice developed higher IgA serum levels and glomerular deposits of anti-GBM IgA compared with wild-type mice. Importantly, glomerular macrophage and neutrophil influx was significantly higher in CD37−/− mice during both the heterologous and autologous phase of anti-GBM nephritis. Taken together, tetraspanin CD37 controls the formation of IgA-containing immune complexes and glomerular IgA deposition, which induces influx of inflammatory myeloid cells. Therefore, CD37 may protect against the development of IgA nephropathy. PMID:20348240

  14. Glomerular macrophage modulation affects mesangial expansion in the rat after renal ablation.

    PubMed

    van Goor, H; van der Horst, M L; Fidler, V; Grond, J

    1992-05-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for the involvement of macrophages (m phi) in various types of human and experimental glomerular disease. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of m phi depletion on glomerular injury after 3/4 renal ablation in the rat. This "remnant kidney" model is a widely used experimental model of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Sustained glomerular m phi depletion was induced in remnant kidney rats by a regimen of sublethal triple systemic X-irradiation with shielding of the kidney remnants. Groups of 8 X-irradiated and 8 non-irradiated rats were studied at 5, 9, and 13 weeks after renal ablation. X-irradiated rats showed severe peripheral blood leukopenia at 5 and 9 weeks which had normalized at 13 weeks. The number of remnant glomerular m phi (immunohistochemistry with the monoclonal antibody ED1) in X-irradiated rats at 5 weeks was significantly lower when compared to non-irradiated remnant kidney rats. A rebound effect occurred at 9 and 13 weeks with increased m phi in remnant glomeruli of X-irradiated rats. Light microscopic examination disclosed significantly lower semiquantitative scores for mesangial cellularity and mesangial matrix expansion in remnant glomeruli of X-irradiated rats at 5 weeks when compared to non-irradiated remnant kidney rats. Mesangial matrix expansion had increased in X-irradiated rats at 9 and 13 weeks after ablation coincident with elevated glomerular m phi at these intervals. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated a highly significant contribution of m phi to the best fitting regression model predicting mesangial matrix expansion (multiple r2 = 0.81). In conclusion, these data provide evidence for a contributory role of m phi in the evolution of glomerular injury in the rat after renal ablation.

  15. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming’s Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Jeffrey L.; Kirol, Christopher P.; Pratt, Aaron C.; Conover, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming’s Core Area Policy. Wyoming’s Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008–2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and <1.0 m), while selecting for less bare ground and rock. With the exception of more small gaps between shrubs, we did not find any differences in availability of these microhabitat characteristics between locations within and outside of Core Areas. In addition, we found little supporting evidence that sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4–45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming’s Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between

  16. Control of glomerular hypertension by insulin administration in diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Scholey, J W; Meyer, T W

    1989-01-01

    Micropuncture studies were performed in Munich Wistar rats made diabetic with streptozotocin and in normal control rats. Diabetic rats received daily ultralente insulin to maintain moderate hyperglycemia (approximately 300 mg/dl). Group 1 diabetic rats studied after routine micropuncture preparation exhibited elevation of the single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) due to increases in the glomerular transcapillary hydraulic pressure difference and glomerular plasma flow rate. In group 2 diabetic rats infusion of insulin to achieve acute blood glucose control normalized the glomerular transcapillary pressure gradient while increasing the glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient, so that SNGFR remained elevated. Persistent elevation of SNGFR despite normalization of the transcapillary pressure gradient was also observed in group 3 diabetic rats infused with insulin plus sufficient dextrose to maintain hyperglycemia. These studies indicate that glomerular capillary hypertension in diabetes is an acutely reversible consequence of insulin deficiency and not the result of renal hypertrophy. PMID:2649514

  17. Glomerular ultrafiltration in the pseudopregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Baylis, C

    1982-09-01

    Whole kidney and single nephron indices of glomerular ultrafiltration were measured by clearance and micropuncture techniques in anesthetized virgin, 9-day pregnant, and 9-day pseudopregnant Munich-Wistar rats. Whole kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) were elevated in pregnant and pseudopregnant rats compared with virgins (0.78 +/- 0.05, 0.75 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.57 +/- 0.03 ml/min, P less than 0.005 and P less than 0.001; 32.1 +/- 2.5, 30.0 +/- 2.8 vs. 22.1 +/- 2.0 nl/min, P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.05, respectively). Total renal plasma flow rate (RPF) and single glomerular plasma flow rate (QA) were also increased in pregnant and pseudopregnant rats compared to virgins (3.05 +/- 0.19, 2.90 +2- 0.24 vs. 2.28 +/- 0.21 ml/min, P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.05; 109.0 +/- 15.8, 100.4 +/- 12.8 vs. 68.0 +/- 6.9 nl/min, both P less thn 0.05). There was little difference in the other determinants of ultrafiltration among the three groups. Plasma volume was measured in separate experiments and was higher in pregnant and pseudopregnant rats compared with virgins (9.4 +/- 0.2, 9.8 +/- 0.4 vs. 8.4 +/- 0.3 ml, P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.05, respectively). The gestational increase in GFR in the rat occurs as the result of increased RPF, which is due to both plasma volume expansion and renal vasodilation. Since the changes in renal hemodynamics seen in pseudopregnancy were almost identical to those occurring in pregnant rats, the early stimulus to increased GFR must be maternal and not fetoplacental in origin.

  18. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  19. 78 FR 59368 - Notice of Public Meeting: Northeast California Resource Advisory Council Sage Grouse Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Grouse Conservation Subcommittee and Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... sage grouse conservation subcommittee and the full Resource Advisory Council will meet as follows... Resource Management Plans to incorporate regulatory mechanisms for conservation of sage grouse habitat....

  20. Assessing greater sage-grouse breeding habitat with aerial and ground imagery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthropogenic disturbances, wildfires, and weedy-plant invasions have destroyed and fragmented sagebrush (Artemisia L. spp.) habitats. Sagebrush-dependent species like greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse) are vulnerable to these changes, emphasizing the importance ...

  1. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  2. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  3. Glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I may contribute to increased renal sodium retention in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S N; Lapage, J; Hirschberg, R

    1999-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is found in plasma at relatively high levels (approximately 40 nmol/L) but <1% is present in the free form and >99% is bound to specific binding proteins to form high-molecular-weight complexes of approximately 50 and approximately 150 kd. We hypothesized that in rats with diabetic nephropathy but not in normal animals, IGF-I-containing binding protein complexes undergo glomerular ultrafiltration, allowing the peptide to interact with IGF-I receptors in apical tubular membranes. By this route, ultrafiltered IGF-I may increase tubular epithelial cell sodium absorption in overt diabetic nephropathy. In serum samples from diabetic rats, IGF-I levels (227 +/- 34 ng/mL) were reduced as compared with control levels (319 +/- 33 ng/mL, P = .05), and IGF-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is increased about 2-fold. In diabetic rats, IGF-I undergoes glomerular ultrafiltration and is present in proximal tubular fluid that was collected by nephron micropuncture at 2.54 +/- 0.54 nmol/L but is below the detection limit in tubular fluid from normal rats. IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-4 are all present in diabetic rat glomerular ultrafiltrate, but IGFBP-2 levels are greater than those of each of the other three IGFBPs. Neither recombinant human IGF-I (1 nmol/L) nor diabetic rat glomerular ultrafiltrate affect sodium transport in cultured mouse proximal tubular cells. In contrast, rhIGF-I and diabetic rat glomerular ultrafiltrate increase the apical-to-basolateral transport of 22Na+ in distal tubule-like A6 cells through mechanisms involving apical IGF-I receptors. In normal rats, luminal infusion with rhIGF-I or with diabetic rat glomerular ultrafiltrate into late proximal tubules increases distal tubular Na+ absorption. These findings indicate that diabetic glomerular sclerosis causes glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I, and they suggest that tubular fluid IGF-I may contribute to sodium (and fluid) retention that is commonly observed in

  4. Glomerular lesions induced in the rabbit by physicochemically altered homologous IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Cavalot, F.; Miyata, M.; Vladutiu, A.; Terranova, V.; Dubiski, S.; Burlingame, R.; Tan, E.; Brentjens, J.; Milgrom, F.; Andres, G.

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous or even autologous IgG induces formation of antibodies combining with IgG of rabbit and of foreign species. Cardiac but not renal lesions were reported in such animals. This study examined the nephritogenic potential of the immune response to cationized or heat-aggregated homologous IgG of b9 or b4 allotype in rabbits of the b4 allotype. Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 cationized IgG produced antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and with histones; they also developed abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 corresponding to alterations of the glomerular basement membranes (GBM). Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 aggregated IgG developed antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 in the GBM and in the mesangium with subendothelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits. Some rabbits in both groups had proliferative and exudative glomerulonephritis and proteinuria. The results showed that immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous IgG induces an immune response to rabbit and human IgG and to histones as well as glomerular deposits of autologous IgG and C3 and other glomerular lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:1546743

  5. Merging the SAGE II and OSIRIS Stratospheric Aerosol Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Landon; Bourassa, Adam; Degenstein, Doug

    2016-04-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite, launched in 2001 and currently operational, measures limb-scattered sunlight from which profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750nm are retrieved. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas (SAGE) II instrument was operational from 1985 to 2005, and provided aerosol extinction at several visible and near infrared wavelengths. This work compares the SAGE II and OSIRIS aerosol extinction measurements during the four years of instrument overlap by interpolating the SAGE II data to 750nm using the 525 and 1020nm channels. Agreement is generally favourable in the tropics and mid-latitudes with differences less than 10% for the majority of the aerosol layer. However, near the UTLS and outside of the tropics agreement is poorer and reasons for this are investigated. Comparisons between the OSIRIS and SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements at 750nm are used to develop a merged aerosol climatology as a function of time, latitude and altitude at the native SAGE II wavelength of 525nm. Error due to assumptions in the OSIRIS retrieval and wavelength conversion are explored through simulation studies over a range of particle size distributions and is found to be approximately 20% for the majority of low-to-moderate volcanic loading conditions and OSIRIS geometries. Other sources of error such as cloud contamination in the UTLS are also explored.

  6. Flavonoid pattern of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) unifloral honey.

    PubMed

    Kenjerić, Daniela; Mandić, Milena L; Primorac, Ljiljana; Čačić, Frane

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present paper was to determine the flavonoids in monofloral sage (Salvia officinalis L.) honey which is characteristic and specific for the area of Croatian coast and islands. For that purpose 38 sage honey samples from two production seasons were analysed. After specific pollen content determination, and analyses of selected physicochemical parameters which confirmed that samples are in compliance with national and international regulations and can be regarded as unifloral sage honeys, flavonoid fraction was isolated and analysed using RP-HPLC/DAD method. The HPLC analysis showed that all examined sage honey samples contain quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), kaempferol (3,4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone), chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), as well as p-coumaric (trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid). Total amount of identified flavonoids varied from 109.4μg/100g of honey to 589.9μg/100g of honey, with the average of 288.5μg/100g of honey. All analysed honey samples showed common and specific flavonoid profile which could be the basis for differentiating sage from other monofloral honeys.

  7. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  8. SAGE II aerosol data validation and initial data use - An introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    The process of validating data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the initial use of the validated data are reviewed. The instruments developed for the SAGE II, the influence of the eruption of El Chichon on the global stratospheric aerosol, and various data validation experiments are discussed. Consideration is given to methods for deriving aerosol physical and optical properties from SAGE II extinction data and for inferring particle size distribution moments from SAGE II spectral extinction values.

  9. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    PubMed Central

    Troxell, Megan L.; Houghton, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease classically presents with aggressive necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, often with pulmonary hemorrhage. The pathologic hallmark is linear staining of GBMs for deposited immunoglobulin G (IgG), usually accompanied by serum autoantibodies to the collagen IV alpha-3 constituents of GBMs. Methods Renal pathology files were searched for cases with linear anti-GBM to identify cases with atypical or indolent course. Histopathology, laboratory studies, treatment and outcome of those cases was reviewed in detail. Results Five anti-GBM cases with atypical clinicopathologic features were identified (accounting for ∼8% of anti-GBM cases in our laboratory). Kidney biopsies showed minimal glomerular changes by light microscopy; one patient had monoclonal IgG deposits in an allograft (likely recurrent). Three patients did not have detectable serum anti-GBM by conventional assays. Three patients had indolent clinical courses after immunosuppressive treatment. One patient, untreated after presenting with brief mild hematuria, re-presented after a short interval with necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. Conclusions Thorough clinicopathologic characterization and close follow-up of patients with findings of atypical anti-GBM on renal biopsy are needed. Review of the literature reveals only rare well-documented atypical anti-GBM cases to date, only one of which progressed to end-stage kidney disease. PMID:26985371

  10. Lek ecology of male greater sage-grouse in Carbon County, Wyoming

    Treesearch

    Aleshia Lynn Fremgen

    2014-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter "sage-grouse") have experienced range-wide population declines for several decades, and as a result they were considered warranted for listing under the Endangered Species Act in 2010. Therefore, wildlife managers need to understand how sage-grouse breeding behavior influences long-term reproductive...

  11. Nesting success and resource selection of Greater Sage-Grouse [chapter 8

    Treesearch

    Nicholas W. Kaczor; Kent C. Jensen; Robert W. Klaver; Mark A. Rumble; Katie M. Herman-Brunson; Christopher C. Swanson

    2011-01-01

    Declines of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in South Dakota are a concern because further population declines may lead to isolation from populations in Wyoming and Montana. Furthermore, little information exists about reproductive ecology and resource selection of sage grouse on the eastern edge of their distribution. We investigated Greater Sage-Grouse...

  12. 78 FR 65936 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Status for Gunnison Sage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Status for Gunnison Sage-Grouse and Proposed Designation of Critical Habitat for Gunnison Sage-Grouse AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Proposed..., proposed rules to list the Gunnison sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus) as endangered and to...

  13. A method for estimating vertical distibution of the SAGE II opaque cloud frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Kent, Geoffrey S.; Yue, Glenn K.; Skeens, Kristi M.

    1995-01-01

    A method is developed to infer the vertical distribution of the occurrence frequency of clouds that are opaque to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II instrument. An application of the method to the 1986 SAGE II observations is included in this paper. The 1986 SAGE II results are compared with the 1952-1981 cloud climatology of Warren et al. (1986, 1988)

  14. Modified PCR methods for 3' end amplification from serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) tags.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Jie; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Qiao, Zhong-Dong

    2009-05-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful technique to study gene expression at the genome level. However, a disadvantage of the shortness of SAGE tags is that it prevents further study of SAGE library data, thus limiting extensive application of the SAGE method in gene expression studies. However, this problem can be solved by extension of the SAGE tags to 3' cDNAs. Therefore, several methods based on PCR have been developed to generate a 3' longer fragment cDNA corresponding to a SAGE tag. The list of modified methods is extensive, and includes rapid RT-PCR analysis of unknown SAGE tags (RAST-PCR), generation of longer cDNA fragments from SAGE tags for gene identification (GLGI), a high-throughput GLGI procedure, reverse SAGE (rSAGE), two-step analysis of unknown SAGE tags (TSAT-PCR), etc. These procedures are constantly being updated because they have characteristics and advantages that can be shared. Development of these methods has promoted the widespread use of the SAGE technique, and has accelerated the speed of studies of large-scale gene expression.

  15. A method for estimating vertical distibution of the SAGE II opaque cloud frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Kent, Geoffrey S.; Yue, Glenn K.; Skeens, Kristi M.

    1995-01-01

    A method is developed to infer the vertical distribution of the occurrence frequency of clouds that are opaque to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II instrument. An application of the method to the 1986 SAGE II observations is included in this paper. The 1986 SAGE II results are compared with the 1952-1981 cloud climatology of Warren et al. (1986, 1988)

  16. Resource selection during brood-rearing by Greater Sage-Grouse [chapter 12

    Treesearch

    Nicholas W. Kaczor; Katie M. Herman-Brunson; Kent C. Jensen; Mark A. Rumble; Robert W. Klaver; Christopher C. Swanson

    2011-01-01

    Understanding population dynamics and resource selection is crucial in developing wildlife resource management plans for sensitive species such as Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Little is known about sage grouse habitats on the eastern edge of their range. We investigated resource selection of Greater Sage-Grouse during brood- rearing in North and...

  17. Seasonal habitat requirements for sage-grouse: spring, summer, fall, and winter

    Treesearch

    Clait E. Braun; John W. Connelly; Michael A. Schroeder

    2005-01-01

    Sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus, C. urophasianus) are dependent upon live sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) for all life processes across their entire range. This paper describes habitats used by sage-grouse as documented in the scientific literature. The leaves of sagebrush are eaten by sage-grouse throughout the...

  18. Sage grouse on the Yakima Training Center: A summary of studies conducted during 1991 and 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.; Downs, J.L.; Sveum, C.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Yakima Training Center (YTC) sage grouse population is one of only two remnant populations of sage grouse remaining in the state of Washington. Sage grouse are considered candidates for listing as a state threatened species. The purpose of the work was to identify sage grouse population characteristics, habitat preferences, and land areas used by sage grouse to assist YTC environmental management staff and military training personnel in both managing sage grouse and planning training activities. The ultimate objective is to protect sage grouse and sage grouse habitat without compromising military training objectives. The sage grouse population on the YTC is small but appears to have remained stable during the past few years. Two distinct subpopulations of grouse appear to exist, each occupying a distinct geographical region and using separate lek areas. Nesting and brooding hens select for long angle slopes and moderate elevations, which places the birds in preferred troop-training areas. The greatest potential impact of training activities on sage grouse seems to be related to habitat loss, although disturbance at leks during the breeding season also could have major impacts on breeding success. The creation of habitat maps for the YTC showing vegetation features most valued by sage grouse is recommended because it would provide habitat managers and military training planner`s with a means to protect grouse habitat while making training assignments. An analysis of sage grouse habitat quality, as impacted by training activity, would also assist habitat managers in making decisions regarding habitat restoration and protection.

  19. Large-scale control site selection for population monitoring: an example assessing Sage-grouse trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, Bradley C.; O'Donnell, Michael; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2015-01-01

    Human impacts on wildlife populations are widespread and prolific and understanding wildlife responses to human impacts is a fundamental component of wildlife management. The first step to understanding wildlife responses is the documentation of changes in wildlife population parameters, such as population size. Meaningful assessment of population changes in potentially impacted sites requires the establishment of monitoring at similar, nonimpacted, control sites. However, it is often difficult to identify appropriate control sites in wildlife populations. We demonstrated use of Geographic Information System (GIS) data across large spatial scales to select biologically relevant control sites for population monitoring. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hearafter, sage-grouse) are negatively affected by energy development, and monitoring of sage-grouse population within energy development areas is necessary to detect population-level responses. Weused population data (1995–2012) from an energy development area in Wyoming, USA, the Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA), and GIS data to identify control sites that were not impacted by energy development for population monitoring. Control sites were surrounded by similar habitat and were within similar climate areas to the ARPA. We developed nonlinear trend models for both the ARPA and control sites and compared long-term trends from the 2 areas. We found little difference between the ARPA and control sites trends over time. This research demonstrated an approach for control site selection across large landscapes and can be used as a template for similar impact-monitoring studies. It is important to note that identification of changes in population parameters between control and treatment sites is only the first step in understanding the mechanisms that underlie those changes. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. CorSage: A Critiquing System for Coronary Care

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Linda T.; Diamond, George A.; Shah, Prediman K.; Ferguson, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Although knowledge-based medical consultation systems perform their tasks well, few have been adopted for regular use by physicians. Several issues that appear to contribute to acceptance problems are addressed in the design of CorSage, a decision support system for ischemic heart disease. Features of the system include automatic generation of admission and transfer notes, management plan critiquing, statistical risk assessment, and detailed on-line help. CorSage has been in regular clinical use in the Cedars-Sinai Cardiac Intensive Care Unit since January 1988. Medical residents are required to use the system to enter data for all patients admitted to the unit. This paper describes CorSage's capabilities and presents the results of two pilot studies to evaluate its acceptance by physician-users.

  1. The multidimensional Self-Adaptive Grid code, SAGE, version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1995-01-01

    This new report on Version 2 of the SAGE code includes all the information in the original publication plus all upgrades and changes to the SAGE code since that time. The two most significant upgrades are the inclusion of a finite-volume option and the ability to adapt and manipulate zonal-matching multiple-grid files. In addition, the original SAGE code has been upgraded to Version 1.1 and includes all options mentioned in this report, with the exception of the multiple grid option and its associated features. Since Version 2 is a larger and more complex code, it is suggested (but not required) that Version 1.1 be used for single-grid applications. This document contains all the information required to run both versions of SAGE. The formulation of the adaption method is described in the first section of this document. The second section is presented in the form of a user guide that explains the input and execution of the code. The third section provides many examples. Successful application of the SAGE code in both two and three dimensions for the solution of various flow problems has proven the code to be robust, portable, and simple to use. Although the basic formulation follows the method of Nakahashi and Deiwert, many modifications have been made to facilitate the use of the self-adaptive grid method for complex grid structures. Modifications to the method and the simple but extensive input options make this a flexible and user-friendly code. The SAGE code can accommodate two-dimensional and three-dimensional, finite-difference and finite-volume, single grid, and zonal-matching multiple grid flow problems.

  2. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M.

    2008-01-15

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  3. SAGE: A tool for time-series analysis of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, R. E.; Gallaher, D. W.; Khalsa, S. S.; Lewis, S.

    2011-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has developed an operational tool for analysis. This production tool is known as "Services for the Analysis of the Greenland Environment" (SAGE). Using an integrated workspace approach, a researcher has the ability to find relevant data and perform various analysis functions on the data, as well as retrieve the data and analysis results. While there continues to be compelling observational evidence for increased surface melting and rapid thinning along the margins of the Greenland ice sheet, there are still uncertainties with respect to estimates of mass balance of Greenland's ice sheet as a whole. To better understand the dynamics of these issues, it is important for scientists to have access to a variety of datasets from multiple sources, and to be able to integrate and analyze the data. SAGE provides data from various sources, such as AMSR-E and AVHRR datasets, which can be analyzed individually through various time-series plots and aggregation functions; or they can be analyzed together with scatterplots or overlaid time-series plots to provide quick and useful results to support various research products. The application is available at http://nsidc.org/data/sage/. SAGE was built on top of NSIDC's existing Searchlight engine. The SAGE interface gives users access to much of NSIDC's relevant Greenland raster data holdings, as well as data from outside sources. Additionally, various web services provide access for other clients to utilize the functionality that the SAGE interface provides. Combined, these methods of accessing the tool allow scientists the ability to devote more of their time to their research, and less on trying to find and retrieve the data they need.

  4. Glomerular Collagen V Codeposition and Hepatic Perisinusoidal Collagen III Accumulation in Canine Collagen Type III Glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Rørtveit, R; Reiten, M R; Lingaas, F; Sveri, S B; Brech, A; Espenes, A; Jansen, J H

    2015-11-01

    Collagen type III glomerulopathy, also known as collagenofibrotic glomerulopathy, is a rare renal disease of unknown pathogenesis. The disease occurs in humans and animals and is characterized by massive glomerular accumulations of collagen type III. In the present study, we describe a Drever dog litter affected by an early onset variant of this glomerular disease, where 4 of 9 puppies developed renal failure within 50 days of age. Necropsy specimens of kidney from the 4 affected cases were studied by light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry, and characteristic lesions compatible with a diagnosis of collagen type III glomerulopathy were found. In addition, 2 cases showed atypical epithelium in the collecting ducts of the medulla, so-called adenomatoid change. Immunohistochemistry of renal specimens from collagen type III glomerulopathy-affected dogs (n = 10) originating from two different dog strains, the Drever dogs and a mixed-breed strain, demonstrated that the deposited glomerular collagen is composed of a mixture of collagen III and collagen V. The distribution of the collagen V corresponded to the localization of collagen III; however, differences in staining intensity showed that collagen type III is the dominating component. Immunohistochemistry for collagen III (n = 9) and a transmission electron microscopic study (n = 1) showed hepatic perisinusoidal collagen type III deposition in affected cases from both dog strains. This is the first report documenting glomerular accumulations of collagen type V and perisinusoidal liver collagen III deposition in canine collagen type III glomerulopathy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Role of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Joaquín; Cravedi, Paolo

    2014-05-21

    Non-specific immunosuppressants have represented for decades the only therapies for patients with immune-mediated glomerular diseases. These treatments, however, are associated with high rates of no-response and are burdened by toxicities that frequently offset the benefits of proteinuria reduction. Monoclonal antibodies targeting selective cell populations or mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of glomerular diseases have recently become available. Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the CD20 antigen on B cells, safely reduced proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome secondary to membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Its ability to reduce auto-antibody formation has been instrumental to treat also ANCA-associated vasculitis, lupus nephritis, and mixed cryoglobulinemia. Many reports have also documented the efficacy of the anti-C5 humanized monoclonal antibody Eculizumab to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 nephropathy, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Thanks to these encouraging findings, monoclonals are becoming very helpful tools to treat patients with glomerular diseases. Moreover, thanks to their specific mechanism of action, these and other monoclonal antibodies are important in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of glomerular diseases. Their still high costs, however, might represent a major hurdle for their widespread implementation for all patients in need.

  6. Quantifying restoration effectiveness using multi-scale habitat models: implications for sage-grouse in the Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkle, Robert S.; Pilliod, David S.; Hanser, Steven E.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Grace, James B.; Knutson, Kevin C.; Pyke, David A.; Welty, Justin L.

    2014-01-01

    A recurrent challenge in the conservation of wide-ranging, imperiled species is understanding which habitats to protect and whether we are capable of restoring degraded landscapes. For Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a species of conservation concern in the western United States, we approached this problem by developing multi-scale empirical models of occupancy in 211 randomly located plots within a 40 million ha portion of the species' range. We then used these models to predict sage-grouse habitat quality at 826 plots associated with 101 post-wildfire seeding projects implemented from 1990 to 2003. We also compared conditions at restoration sites to published habitat guidelines. Sage-grouse occupancy was positively related to plot- and landscape-level dwarf sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula, A. nova, A. tripartita) and big sagebrush steppe prevalence, and negatively associated with non-native plants and human development. The predicted probability of sage-grouse occupancy at treated plots was low on average (0.09) and not substantially different from burned areas that had not been treated. Restoration sites with quality habitat tended to occur at higher elevation locations with low annual temperatures, high spring precipitation, and high plant diversity. Of 313 plots seeded after fire, none met all sagebrush guidelines for breeding habitats, but approximately 50% met understory guidelines, particularly for perennial grasses. This pattern was similar for summer habitat. Less than 2% of treated plots met winter habitat guidelines. Restoration actions did not increase the probability of burned areas meeting most guideline criteria. The probability of meeting guidelines was influenced by a latitudinal gradient, climate, and topography. Our results suggest that sage-grouse are relatively unlikely to use many burned areas within 20 years of fire, regardless of treatment. Understory habitat conditions are more likely to be adequate than overstory

  7. Assessment of SAGE Version 6.1 Ozone Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang J.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Bodeker, Greg E.

    2002-01-01

    The SAGE-II V6.1 ozone retrievals are shown to be of better precision at all levels and to be much more accurate than previous retrievals in the lower stratosphere below 20 km altitude. A filtering procedure for removing anomalous ozone profiles associated with volcanic aerosol/cloud effects and other identified artifacts in V6.1 ozone is described. The agreement between SAGE and ozonesondes in the mean is shown to be approximately 10% down to the tropopause. Relative to the sondes SAGE tends to slightly overestimate ozone (less than 5%) between 15 and 20 km altitude, and systematically underestimates ozone in the troposphere by approximately 30% in the regions between 8 km altitude and 2 km below the tropopause. The precisions (random errors) of SAGE ozone retrievals above 25 km altitude are estimated to be 4% or better; they are a factor of ten worse below 16 km altitude. Linear trends in the differences between coincident SAGE and ozonesondes measurement are generally less than 0.3 %/year and not significantly different from zero in 95% confidence intervals. Compared to V5.96 retrievals, ozone trend differences between 20 and 50 km altitude are approximately 0. 1 %/year, below 20 km altitude the SAGE II trends are more positive by approximately 0.2 %/year. For the 1984-1999 period the SAGE-II shows a localized ozone loss of -0.4(+/- 0.25) %/year (2gigma) in the tropics at 20 km altitude. In the lower stratosphere between 16 and 22 km altitudes, the SAGE shows significant ozone losses in the mid-latitudes in both Hemispheres during the 1979-1999 periods. The ozone trends range from -0.24(+/- 0.18) to -0.77(+/- 0.46) (2sigma)%/year. However in the 1984-1999 period, the downward trends are smaller (-0.07 to - 0.25 %/year) in this altitude range, and the trends in the integrated column from 12 to 17 km altitude in mid-latitudes (35 deg - 60 deg) are not significantly different from zero (0.1 +?- 0.6 (2sigma)%/year). Averaged over the tropics (20 deg S to 20 deg N

  8. Assessment of SAGE Version 6.1 Ozone Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang J.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Bodeker, Greg E.

    2002-01-01

    The SAGE-II V6.1 ozone retrievals are shown to be of better precision at all levels and to be much more accurate than previous retrievals in the lower stratosphere below 20 km altitude. A filtering procedure for removing anomalous ozone profiles associated with volcanic aerosol/cloud effects and other identified artifacts in V6.1 ozone is described. The agreement between SAGE and ozonesondes in the mean is shown to be approximately 10% down to the tropopause. Relative to the sondes SAGE tends to slightly overestimate ozone (less than 5%) between 15 and 20 km altitude, and systematically underestimates ozone in the troposphere by approximately 30% in the regions between 8 km altitude and 2 km below the tropopause. The precisions (random errors) of SAGE ozone retrievals above 25 km altitude are estimated to be 4% or better; they are a factor of ten worse below 16 km altitude. Linear trends in the differences between coincident SAGE and ozonesondes measurement are generally less than 0.3 %/year and not significantly different from zero in 95% confidence intervals. Compared to V5.96 retrievals, ozone trend differences between 20 and 50 km altitude are approximately 0. 1 %/year, below 20 km altitude the SAGE II trends are more positive by approximately 0.2 %/year. For the 1984-1999 period the SAGE-II shows a localized ozone loss of -0.4(+/- 0.25) %/year (2gigma) in the tropics at 20 km altitude. In the lower stratosphere between 16 and 22 km altitudes, the SAGE shows significant ozone losses in the mid-latitudes in both Hemispheres during the 1979-1999 periods. The ozone trends range from -0.24(+/- 0.18) to -0.77(+/- 0.46) (2sigma)%/year. However in the 1984-1999 period, the downward trends are smaller (-0.07 to - 0.25 %/year) in this altitude range, and the trends in the integrated column from 12 to 17 km altitude in mid-latitudes (35 deg - 60 deg) are not significantly different from zero (0.1 +?- 0.6 (2sigma)%/year). Averaged over the tropics (20 deg S to 20 deg N

  9. Near Infrared Spectra of SAGE LMC AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Robert D.; Volk, K.; Srinivasan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present K-band spectra of a sample of Spitzer SAGE LMC sources obtained on the 4-m SOAR telescope in Chile. The near infrared spectral classifications are compared to classifications from Spitzer IRS spectra of the same sources and to the original SAGE IRAC and MIPS photometric classifications. The SOAR Telescope is a joint project of: Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas Cientficas e Tecnolgicas CNPq-Brazil, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Michigan State University, and NOAO (which is run by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy on behalf of the National Science Foundation).

  10. SAGE II - An overview. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite was launched from Shuttle in October 1984. SAGE II is a seven-channel sun-photometer measuring stratospheric aerosols, ozone, water vapor, and nitrogen dioxide during each spacecraft sunrise and sunset. In addition to stratospheric information, mid-tropospheric and higher water vapor, ozone, and aerosol data are being produced in cloud-free regions, and cloud data everywhere else. Aerosol information is being produced at three wavelengths and, together with water vapor data, is providing a global microphysical description of the aerosol.

  11. Fetal growth and maternal glomerular filtration rate: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vesterinen, Hanna M; Johnson, Paula I; Atchley, Dylan S; Sutton, Patrice; Lam, Juleen; Zlatnik, Marya G; Sen, Saunak; Woodruff, Tracey J

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) may influence concentrations of biomarkers of exposure and their etiologic significance in observational studies of associations between environmental contaminants and fetal growth. It is unknown whether the size of a developing fetus affects maternal GFR such that a small fetus leads to reduced plasma volume expansion (PVE), reduced GFR and subsequent higher concentrations of biomarkers in maternal serum. Our objective was to answer the question: "Is there an association between fetal growth and maternal GFR in humans?" We adapted and applied the Navigation Guide systematic review methodology to assess the evidence of an association between fetal growth and GFR, either directly or indirectly via reduction in PVE. We identified 35 relevant studies. We rated 31 human and two non-human observational studies as "low" quality and two experimental non-human studies as "very low" quality. We rated all three evidence streams as "inadequate". The association between fetal growth and GFR was "not classifiable" according to pre-specified definitions. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the plausibility of a reverse causality hypothesis for associations between exposure to environmental chemicals during pregnancy and fetal growth. Further research would be needed to confirm or disprove this hypothesis.

  12. SAGE II/Umkehr ozone comparisons and aerosols effects: An empirical and theoretical study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Newchurch, M.

    1997-09-15

    The objectives of this research were to: (1) examine empirically the aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles using SAGE II aerosol and ozone data; (2) examine theoretically the aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles; (3) examine the differences between SAGE II ozone profiles and both old- and new-format Umkehr ozone profiles for ozone-trend information; (4) reexamine SAGE I-Umkehr ozone differences with the most recent version of SAGE I data; and (5) contribute to the SAGE II science team.

  13. Glomerular cell proliferation and apoptosis in uninephrectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, A M; Flores, O; Arévalo, M A; López-Novoa, J M

    1998-12-01

    We studied renal function, glomerular cell proliferation and apoptosis for three months after uninephrectomy (UNX) in young, male, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Apoptosis was assessed by in situ dUTP biotin nick-end labeling method (TUNEL) and by propidium iodide staining. Proliferation rate was determined by immunohistochemistry to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Glomerular bcl-2 expression was assessed by Northern blot analysis. Our results indicate a parallel increase in proliferation and in apoptotic rates in glomerular cells from the first to the second month after UNX. In the third month after UNX, PCNA-labeled cell number continues increasing, whereas TUNEL-labeled cells did not increase. Bcl-2 expression was negative in the first and second months and increased in the third month. Glomerular size and proteinuria increased progressively along the three months of follow-up. Our observations demonstrate a different profile of cell proliferation and apoptosis during the genesis of early glomerular damage in UNX-SHR.

  14. B cell suppression in primary glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Hofstra, Julia M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2014-03-01

    Membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and minimal change disease (MCD) are the most common causes of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. For many years prednisone, alkylating agents, and calcineurin inhibitors have been the standard of therapy for these patients. More effective or better tolerated treatment modalities are needed. B cell targeted therapy was recently introduced in clinical practice. In this review, we briefly summarize the current standard therapy and discuss the efficacy of B cell targeted therapy in primary glomerular diseases. Observational, short-term studies suggest that rituximab is effective and comparable to standard therapy in maintaining remissions in patients with frequently relapsing or steroid-dependent MCD or FSGS. In contrast, response is limited in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Rituximab also induces remissions in patients with membranous nephropathy. Controlled clinical trials on kidney endpoints are urgently needed to position B cell targeted therapy in clinical practice.

  15. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans in glomerular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rops, Angelique L W M M; van der Vlag, Johan; Lensen, Joost F M; Wijnhoven, Tessa J M; van den Heuvel, Lambert P W J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Berden, Jo H M

    2004-03-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are glycoproteins consisting of a core protein to which linear heparan sulfate side chains are covalently attached. These heparan sulfate side chains can be modified at different positions by several enzymes, which include N-deacetylases, N- and O-sulfotransferases, and an epimerase. These heparan sulfate modifications give rise to an enormous structural diversity, which corresponds to the variety of biologic functions mediated by heparan sulfate, including its role in inflammation. The HSPGs in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), perlecan, agrin, and collagen XVIII, play an important role in the charge-selective permeability of the glomerular filter. In addition to these HSPGs, various cell types express HSPGs at their cell surface, which include syndecans, glypicans, CD44, and betaglycan. During inflammation, HSPGs, especially heparan sulfate, in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and at the surface of endothelial cells bind chemokines, which establishes a local concentration gradient recruiting leukocytes. Endothelial and leukocyte cell surface HSPGs also play a role in their direct adhesive interactions via other cell surface adhesion molecules, such as selectins and beta2 integrin. Activated leukocytes and endothelial cells exert heparanase activity, resulting in degradation of heparan sulfate moieties in the ECM, which facilitates leukocyte passage into tissues and the release of heparan sulfate-bound factors. In various renal inflammatory diseases the expression of agrin and GBM-associated heparan sulfate is decreased, while the expression of CD44 is increased. Heparan sulfate or heparin preparations affect inflammatory cell behavior and have promising therapeutic, anti-inflammatory properties by preventing leukocyte adhesion/influx and tissue damage.

  16. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  17. Muscarinic receptors modulate dendrodendritic inhibitory synapses to sculpt glomerular output.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaolin; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Wachowiak, Matt; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T

    2015-04-08

    Cholinergic [acetylcholine (ACh)] axons from the basal forebrain innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the initial site of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Both nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed in glomeruli. The activation of nAChRs directly excites both mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) and external tufted cells (ETCs), the two major excitatory neurons that transmit glomerular output. The functional roles of mAChRs in glomerular circuits are unknown. We show that the restricted glomerular application of ACh causes rapid, brief nAChR-mediated excitation of both MTCs and ETCs in the mouse olfactory bulb. This excitation is followed by mAChR-mediated inhibition, which is blocked by GABAA receptor antagonists, indicating the engagement of periglomerular cells (PGCs) and/or short axon cells (SACs), the two major glomerular inhibitory neurons. Indeed, selective activation of glomerular mAChRs, with ionotropic GluRs and nAChRs blocked, increased IPSCs in MTCs and ETCs, indicating that mAChRs recruit glomerular inhibitory circuits. Selective activation of glomerular mAChRs in the presence of tetrodotoxin increased IPSCs in all glomerular neurons, indicating action potential-independent enhancement of GABA release from PGC and/or SAC dendrodendritic synapses. mAChR-mediated enhancement of GABA release also presynaptically suppressed the first synapse of the olfactory system via GABAB receptors on sensory terminals. Together, these results indicate that cholinergic modulation of glomerular circuits is biphasic, involving an initial excitation of MTC/ETCs mediated by nAChRs followed by inhibition mediated directly by mAChRs on PGCs/SACs. This may phasically enhance the sensitivity of glomerular outputs to odorants, an action that is consistent with recent in vivo findings.

  18. High concentration of glucose inhibits glomerular endothelial eNOS through a PKC mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shaoyou; Bohlen, H Glenn

    2004-09-01

    Kidney glomeruli are important targets of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesized a high concentration of glucose could suppress glomerular endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by a protein kinase C (PKC) mechanism, as has been found in other tissues. Mouse kidney slices (150-200 microm) were bathed in Hanks' solution with 100 microM L-arginine and exposed to either 5 or 20-30 mM D-glucose. Immunofluorescence identified only eNOS in normal mouse glomeruli. Measurements of glomerular NO concentration with NO-sensitive fluorescent dye (4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate) using confocal microscopy and NO-sensitive microelectrodes verified that resting glomeruli had active production of NO that was inhibited by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. High-concentration (20-30 mM) D-glucose inhibited 60-70% of the NO production within 15-30 min; L-glucose at the same concentration did not have any effect. Inhibition of PKC-beta with 100 nM ruboxistaurin prevented eNOS suppression in high-glucose media. Activation of PKC with 100 nM phorbol ester also suppressed the glomerular NO concentration. We concluded that eNOS in the renal glomerular capillary endothelial cells is suppressed by activity of PKC at high-glucose concentrations comparable to those in diabetic animals and humans. The consequence is a rapid decline in the generation of NO in the glomerular endothelial cells in the presence of a high concentration of glucose.

  19. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M; Meehan, Daniel T; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  20. Laminin α2-Mediated Focal Adhesion Kinase Activation Triggers Alport Glomerular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M.; Meehan, Daniel T.; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages. PMID:24915008

  1. Deep SAGE analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Ruzanov, Peter; Riddle, Donald L

    2010-06-01

    We employed the Tag-seq technique to generate global transcription profiles for different strains and life stages of the nematode C. elegans. Tag-seq generates cDNA tags as does Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), but the method yields a much larger number of tags, generating much larger data sets than SAGE. We examined differences in the performance of SAGE and Tag-seq by comparing gene expression data for 13 pairs of libraries. We identified genes for which expression was consistently changed in long-lived worms. Additional genes emerged in the deeper Tag-seq profiles, including several 'signature' genes found among those zup-regulated in long-lived dauer larvae (cki-1, aak-2 and daf-16). Fifty to sixty percent of the genes differentially expressed in daf-2(-) versus daf-2(+) adults had fragmentary or no functional annotation, suggesting the involvement of as yet unstudied pathways in aging. We were able to distinguish between changes in gene expression associated with altered genotype or altered growth conditions. We found 62 cases of possible mRNA isoform switching in the 13 Tag-seq libraries, whereas the 13 SAGE libraries allowed detection of only 15 such occurrences. We observed strong expression of anti-sense transcripts for several mitochondrial genes, but nuclear anti-sense transcripts were neither abundant nor consistently expressed among the libraries.

  2. Eight Sages over Five Centuries Share Oxygen's Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinghaus, John W.

    2016-01-01

    During the last century, historians have discovered that between the 13th and 18th centuries, at least six sages discovered that the air we breathe contains something that we need and use. Ibn al-Nafis (1213-1288) in Cairo and Michael Servetus (1511-1553) in France accurately described the pulmonary circulation and its effect on blood color.…

  3. Composition of the essential oil of White sage, Salvia apiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Hochrein, James Michael; Irwin, Adriane Nadine; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2003-08-01

    The essential oil of white sage, Salvia apiana, was obtained by steam distillation and analysed by GC-MS. A total of 13 components were identified, accounting for >99.9% of the oil. The primary component was 1,8-cineole, accounting for 71.6% of the oil.

  4. Gibberellic acid breaks dormancy and hastens germination of creeping sage

    Treesearch

    Eamor C. Nord; Louis E. Gunter; Stuart A. Graham Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Creeping sage (Salvia sonomensis Greene), a semi-shrub, is useful for plantings to reduce fire hazard and to stabilize soil. The most effective, practical, and lasting technique to break seed dormancy was a soaking in gibberellic acid under constant agitation at 500 p.p.m. for 4 hours. Lesser concentrations of this acid and shorter soaking periods...

  5. Eight Sages over Five Centuries Share Oxygen's Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinghaus, John W.

    2016-01-01

    During the last century, historians have discovered that between the 13th and 18th centuries, at least six sages discovered that the air we breathe contains something that we need and use. Ibn al-Nafis (1213-1288) in Cairo and Michael Servetus (1511-1553) in France accurately described the pulmonary circulation and its effect on blood color.…

  6. Ozone Time Series From GOMOS and SAGE II Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrola, E. T.; Laine, M.; Tukiainen, S.; Sofieva, V.; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite measurements are essential for monitoring changes in the global stratospheric ozone distribution. Both the natural variation and anthropogenic change are strongly dependent on altitude. Stratospheric ozone has been measured from space with good vertical resolution since 1985 by the SAGE II solar occultation instrument. The advantage of the occultation measurement principle is the self-calibration, which is essential to ensuring stable time series. SAGE II measurements in 1985-2005 have been a valuable data set in investigations of trends in the vertical distribution of ozone. This time series can now be extended by the GOMOS measurements started in 2002. GOMOS is a stellar occultation instrument and offers, therefore, a natural continuation of SAGE II measurements. In this paper we study how well GOMOS and SAGE II measurements agree with each other in the period 2002-2005 when both instruments were measuring. We detail how the different spatial and temporal sampling of these two instruments affect the conformity of measurements. We study also how the retrieval specifics like absorption cross sections and assumed aerosol modeling affect the results. Various combined time series are constructed using different estimators and latitude-time grids. We also show preliminary results from a novel time series analysis based on Markov chain Monte Carlo approach.

  7. Livestock grazing and sage-grouse habitat: impacts and opportunities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sage-grouse obtain resources from sagebrush communities for breeding, summer, and winter life stages. Grazing changes the productivity, composition, and structure of herbaceous plants in sagebrush communities, thus directly influencing the productivity of nesting and early brood-rearing habitats. In...

  8. SAGE 2.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives Guide) software system, version 2.O. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a personal computer under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). AGE recommends solvent repl...

  9. SAGE 2.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instruction for using the SAGE (Solvent Alternatives Guide) software system, version 2.O. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a personal computer under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). AGE recommends solvent repl...

  10. SAGE Research Methods Datasets: A Data Analysis Educational Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    SAGE Research Methods Datasets (SRMD) is an educational tool designed to offer users the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience with data analysis. Users can search for and browse authentic datasets by method, discipline, and data type. Each of the datasets are supplemented with educational material on the research method and clear guidelines for how to approach data analysis.

  11. USDA Forest Service Sage-Grouse Conservation Science Strategy

    Treesearch

    Deborah Finch; Douglas Boyce; Jeanne Chambers; Chris Colt; Clint McCarthy; Stanley Kitchen; Bryce Richardson; Mary Rowland; Mark Rumble; Michael Schwartz; Monica Tomosy; Michael Wisdom

    2015-01-01

    Numerous federal and state agencies, research institutions and stakeholders have undertaken tremendous conservation and research efforts across 11 States in the western United States to reduce threats to Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and sagebrush (Artemisia spp) habitats. In 2010, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) determined that the Greater...

  12. Nitrogen deposition effects on coastal sage vegetation of southern California

    Treesearch

    Edith B. Allen; Pamela E. Padgett; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Richard Minnich

    1998-01-01

    The coastal sage scrub (CSS) vegetation of southern California has been declining in land area and in shrub density over the past 60 years or more, and is being replaced by Mediterranean annual grasses in many areas. Although much of this loss is attributable to agriculture, grazing, urbanization and frequent fire, even protected areas have experienced a loss in native...

  13. Male greater sage-grouse detectability on leks

    Treesearch

    Aleshia L. Fremgen; Christopher P. Hansen; Mark A. Rumble; R. Scott Gamo; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2016-01-01

    It is unlikely all male sage-grouse are detected during lek counts, which could complicate the use of lek counts as an index to population abundance. Understanding factors that influence detection probabilities will allow managers to more accurately estimate the number of males present on leks. We fitted 410 males with global positioning system and very high...

  14. Beyond Sages and Guides: A Postmodern Teacher's Typology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halonen, Jane S.

    The primary theme of this paper is that teaching at the college level has changed in the postmodern era in ways that make it necessary to consider a richer classification than the popular dichotomy of "sage on the stage" or "guide on the side." The career of G. Stanley Hall is discussed as an example of a teacher who would be…

  15. From Sages to Guides: A Professional Development Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cifuentes, Lauren; And Others

    This study examined teachers' transformations from "sages on the stage to guides on the side" through a survey of preservice secondary school teachers (N=73) over time to identify their envisioned preferred teaching methods; a survey of inservice master teachers (N=24) in professional development schools to identify their choices of…

  16. Field Geophysics at SAGE: Strategies for Effective Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Biehler, S.; Ferguson, J. F.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D. K.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Hasterok, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) is a unique program of education and research in geophysical field methods for undergraduate and graduate students from any university and for professionals. The core program is held for 4 weeks each summer in New Mexico and for an additional week in the following academic year in San Diego for U.S. undergraduates supported by the NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Since SAGE was initiated in 1983, 730 students have participated in the program. NSF REU funding for SAGE began in 1990 and 319 REU students have completed SAGE through 2011. The primary objectives of SAGE are to teach the major geophysical exploration methods (seismic, gravity, magnetics, electromagnetics); apply these methods to the solution of specific problems (environmental, archaeological, hydrologic, geologic structure and stratigraphy); gain experience in processing, modeling and interpretation of geophysical data; and integrate the geophysical models and interpretations with geology. Additional objectives of SAGE include conducting research on the Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico, and providing information on geophysics careers and professional development experiences to SAGE participants. Successful education, field and research strategies that we have implemented over the years include: 1. learn by doing; 2. mix lecture/discussion, field work, data processing and analysis, modeling and interpretation, and presentation of results; 3. a two-tier team approach - method/technique oriented teams and interpretation/integration teams (where each team includes persons representing different methods), provides focus, in-depth study, opportunity for innovation, and promotes teamwork and a multi-disciplinary approach; 4. emphasis on presentations/reports - each team (and all team members) make presentation, each student completes a written report; 5. experiment design discussion - students help design field program and consider

  17. Blood parasites in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Mike R; Tornquist, Susan; Giordano, Mark R

    2003-01-01

    Peripheral blood smears from 196 adult and yearling female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were examined for blood parasites (167 from the breeding and 29 from the brood-rearing season) to determine prevalence of blood parasites, to attempt to correlate infection with chick survival, and to establish base-line values of prevalence in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon (USA). Birds were captured and released on two study areas during 1999-2001; Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in northwestern Nevada, and Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR) in southeastern Oregon. Birds from a third study area, Beaty's Butte grazing allotment (BB) in southeastern Oregon, were sampled in 2000 and 2001. Overall, 19 birds (10%) were positive for Leucocytozoon lovati (= L. bonasae), 1 (0.5%) for Plasmodium pedioecetii, and 2 (1%) for microfilariae. Although prevalence of L. lovati on HMNAR was 39% during the breeding season in 1999 and 100% during the brood-rearing season in 2000, statistically, prevalence of L. lovati among study areas and years was not different. However, there were statistical differences between capture periods. Overall, 31% of the hens were positive for L. lovati during the brood-rearing season compared to 6% during the breeding season. There was no difference in packed cell volume between infected and non-infected birds and no difference between age-classes. However, mean sage-grouse productivity on HMNAR was higher (1.6 chicks/hen) for non-infected (n = 10) compared to infected hens (0.7 chicks/hen; n = 7), during 1999. Based on these limited observations on HMNAR in 1999, the possible effects that L. lovati may have on young sage-grouse could be detrimental to sage-grouse populations in Nevada and Oregon.

  18. Spatially explicit modeling of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat in Nevada and northeastern California: a decision-support tool for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Ricca, Mark A.; Gustafson, K. Benjamin; Overton, Cory T.; Sanchez-Chopitea, Erika; Kroger, Travis; Mauch, Kimberly; Niell, Lara; Howe, Kristy; Gardner, Scott; Espinosa, Shawn; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter referred to as “sage-grouse”) populations are declining throughout the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem, including millions of acres of potential habitat across the West. Habitat maps derived from empirical data are needed given impending listing decisions that will affect both sage-grouse population dynamics and human land-use restrictions. This report presents the process for developing spatially explicit maps describing relative habitat suitability for sage-grouse in Nevada and northeastern California. Maps depicting habitat suitability indices (HSI) values were generated based on model-averaged resource selection functions informed by more than 31,000 independent telemetry locations from more than 1,500 radio-marked sage-grouse across 12 project areas in Nevada and northeastern California collected during a 15-year period (1998–2013). Modeled habitat covariates included land cover composition, water resources, habitat configuration, elevation, and topography, each at multiple spatial scales that were relevant to empirically observed sage-grouse movement patterns. We then present an example of how the HSI can be delineated into categories. Specifically, we demonstrate that the deviation from the mean can be used to classify habitat suitability into three categories of habitat quality (high, moderate, and low) and one non-habitat category. The classification resulted in an agreement of 93–97 percent for habitat versus non-habitat across a suite of independent validation datasets. Lastly, we provide an example of how space use models can be integrated with habitat models to help inform conservation planning. In this example, we combined probabilistic breeding density with a non-linear probability of occurrence relative to distance to nearest lek (traditional breeding ground) using count data to calculate a composite space use index (SUI). The SUI was then classified into two categories of use

  19. Angiopoietins modulate endothelial adaptation, glomerular and podocyte hypertrophy after uninephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wen Chih; Lai, Chun Fu; Su, Chi Ting; Peng, Wei Hao; Wu, Ching Fang; Chang, Fan Chi; Chen, Yi Ting; Lin, Shuei Liong; Chen, Yung Ming; Wu, Kwan Dun; Lu, Kuo Shyan; Tsai, Tun Jun

    2013-01-01

    Glomerular capillary remodeling is an essential process in the development of glomerular hypertrophy. Angiopoietins, which are important regulators in angiogenesis, plays a role in the development of glomerulus during embryogenesis. Here, we evaluated the influence of angiopoietin on glomerular components and hypertrophy after uninephrectomy in adult male BALB/c mice. The actions of angiopoietin 1 or 2 were systemically antagonized by the subcutaneous administration of antagonists. We observed that the angiopoietin system was activated after uninephrectomy, and that the blockade of angiopoietin 1 or 2 decreased the activation of the angiopoietin receptor--tyrosine kinase with Ig and EGF homology domains-2--and attenuated the development of glomerular and podocyte hypertrophy. The increase in endothelial density staining (anti-CD31) following uninephrectomy was also reversed by angiopoietin 1 or 2 blockades. Glomerular basement thickness and foot process width were observed to decrease in the angiopoietin blockade groups. These changes were associated with the down regulation of the expression of genes for the glomerular matrix and basement membrane, including collagen type IV α1, collagen type IV α2, collagen type IV α5, and laminin α5. Thus, angiopoietin 1 or 2 may play an important role in the development of glomerular hypertrophy after uninephrectomy. A blockade of the angiopoietin system not only influenced the endothelium but also the podocyte, leading to diminished gene expression and morphological changes after uninephrectomy.

  20. Angiopoietins Modulate Endothelial Adaptation, Glomerular and Podocyte Hypertrophy after Uninephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wen Chih; Lai, Chun Fu; Su, Chi Ting; Peng, Wei Hao; Wu, Ching Fang; Chang, Fan Chi; Chen, Yi Ting; Lin, Shuei Liong; Chen, Yung Ming; Wu, Kwan Dun; Lu, Kuo Shyan; Tsai, Tun Jun

    2013-01-01

    Glomerular capillary remodeling is an essential process in the development of glomerular hypertrophy. Angiopoietins, which are important regulators in angiogenesis, plays a role in the development of glomerulus during embryogenesis. Here, we evaluated the influence of angiopoietin on glomerular components and hypertrophy after uninephrectomy in adult male BALB/c mice. The actions of angiopoietin 1 or 2 were systemically antagonized by the subcutaneous administration of antagonists. We observed that the angiopoietin system was activated after uninephrectomy, and that the blockade of angiopoietin 1 or 2 decreased the activation of the angiopoietin receptor—tyrosine kinase with Ig and EGF homology domains-2—and attenuated the development of glomerular and podocyte hypertrophy. The increase in endothelial density staining (anti-CD31) following uninephrectomy was also reversed by angiopoietin 1 or 2 blockades. Glomerular basement thickness and foot process width were observed to decrease in the angiopoietin blockade groups. These changes were associated with the down regulation of the expression of genes for the glomerular matrix and basement membrane, including collagen type IV α1, collagen type IV α2, collagen type IV α5, and laminin α5. Thus, angiopoietin 1 or 2 may play an important role in the development of glomerular hypertrophy after uninephrectomy. A blockade of the angiopoietin system not only influenced the endothelium but also the podocyte, leading to diminished gene expression and morphological changes after uninephrectomy. PMID:24367525

  1. Pathogenetic role of glomerular CXCL13 expression in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Worthmann, K; Gueler, F; von Vietinghoff, S; Davalos-Mißlitz, A; Wiehler, F; Davidson, A; Witte, T; Haller, H; Schiffer, M; Falk, C S; Schiffer, L

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes maintain the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, podocytes have recently been implicated in the innate immune response, and their function as non-haematopoietic antigen-presenting cells was highlighted. We have shown previously that excessive expression of the chemokine CXCL13 is a distinctive early event for nephritis in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Furthermore, we found that CXCL13 is elevated significantly in the serum of patients with SLE-nephritis. In this study, we were able to show for the first time that (i) CXCL13 is expressed locally in glomeruli in a model for SLE-nephritis in mice and that (ii) incubation of human podocytes with CXCL13 induces receptor stimulation of CXCR5 with activation of signalling pathways, resulting in (iii) secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in culture supernatant. This cytokine/chemokine cocktail can lead to (iv) a neutrophil respiratory burst in isolated human granulocytes. Taken together, our results provide further evidence that CXCL13 is involved in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis and that podocytes can play an active role in local proinflammatory immune responses. Thus, CXCL13 could be a direct target for the therapy of glomerulonephritis in general and for SLE-nephritis in particular. PMID:24827905

  2. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Loeven, Markus A; Rops, Angelique L; Lehtinen, Markus J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daha, Mohamed R; Smith, Richard J; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H; Rabelink, Ton J; Jokiranta, T Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-03-04

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19-20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19-20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19-20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19-20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19-20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19-20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19-20 mutants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  3. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Loeven, Markus A.; Rops, Angelique L.; Lehtinen, Markus J.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Smith, Richard J.; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19–20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19–20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19–20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19–20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19–20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19–20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19–20 mutants. PMID:26728463

  4. Phenotyping by magnetic resonance imaging nondestructively measures glomerular number and volume distribution in mice with and without nephron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Baldelomar, Edwin J.; Charlton, Jennifer R.; Beeman, Scott C.; Hann, Bradley D.; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Pearl, Valeria M.; Bertram, John F.; Wu, Teresa; Zhang, Min; Bennett, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced nephron mass is strongly linked to susceptibility to chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases. There are currently no tools to identify nephropenia in clinical or preclinical diagnostics. Such new methods could uncover novel mechanisms and therapies for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reveal how variation among traits can affect renal function and morphology. Here we used cationized ferritin (CF) enhanced-MRI (CFE-MRI) to investigate the relationship between glomerular number (Nglom) and volume (Vglom) in kidneys of healthy wild type mice and mice with oligosyndactylism (Os/+), a model of congenital nephron reduction. Mice were injected with cationic ferritin and perfused and the resected kidneys imaged with 7T MRI to detect CF-labeled glomeruli. CFE-MRI was used to measure the intrarenal distribution of individual glomerular volumes and revealed two major populations of glomeruli distinguished by size. Spatial mapping revealed that the largest glomeruli were located in the juxtamedullary region in both wild type and Os/+ mice and the smallest population located in the cortex. Os/+ mice had about a 50% reduction and 35% increase of Nglom and Vglom, respectively, in both glomerular populations compared to wild type, consistent with glomerular hypertrophy in the Os/+ mice. Thus, we provide a foundation for whole-kidney, MRI-based phenotyping of mouse renal glomerular morphology and provide new potential for quantitative human renal diagnostics. PMID:26535998

  5. Experimental evidence for the effects of chronic anthropogenic noise on abundance of Greater Sage-Grouse at leks.

    PubMed

    Blickley, Jessica L; Blackwood, Diane; Patricelli, Gail L

    2012-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that chronic noise from human activities negatively affects wild animals, but most studies have failed to separate the effects of chronic noise from confounding factors, such as habitat fragmentation. We played back recorded continuous and intermittent anthropogenic sounds associated with natural gas drilling and roads at leks of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). For 3 breeding seasons, we monitored sage grouse abundance at leks with and without noise. Peak male attendance (i.e., abundance) at leks experimentally treated with noise from natural gas drilling and roads decreased 29% and 73%, respectively, relative to paired controls. Decreases in abundance at leks treated with noise occurred in the first year of the study and continued throughout the experiment. Noise playback did not have a cumulative effect over time on peak male attendance. There was limited evidence for an effect of noise playback on peak female attendance at leks or male attendance the year after the experiment ended. Our results suggest that sage-grouse avoid leks with anthropogenic noise and that intermittent noise has a greater effect on attendance than continuous noise. Our results highlight the threat of anthropogenic noise to population viability for this and other sensitive species. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. Chemical composition and anticancer activity of essential oils of Mediterranean sage (Salvia officinalis L.) grown in different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandra; Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice; Delfine, Sebastiano; Cardile, Venera; Rosselli, Sergio; Bruno, Maurizio

    2013-05-01

    Salvia officinalis L. can be found worldwide and its leaves are commonly used as ingredient in food industry. Sage essential oil is applied in the treatment of a range of diseases and has been shown to possess different biological activities. The objectives of our research were to study the effects of environment on crop, chemical composition and anticancer activity on S. officinalis essential oil. Sage was cultivated at eighteen experimental sites in south-central Italy (Molise) in different growing environments. The essential oils (S1-S18), extracted by hydrodistillation, were analyzed by GC and CG/MS. Results show that the main components were α-thujone, camphor, borneol, γ-muurolene and sclareol for all the samples, but the percentages of these compounds varied depending on environmental factors such as altitude, water availability and pedo-climatic conditions. The growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of the eighteen sage essential oils were evaluated in three human melanoma cell lines, A375, M14, and A2058.

  7. OCT2, SSX and SAGE1 reveal the phenotypic heterogeneity of spermatocytic seminoma reflecting distinct subpopulations of spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jasmine; Goriely, Anne; Turner, Gareth DH; Ewen, Katherine A; Jacobsen, Grete Krag; Graem, Niels; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Spermatocytic seminoma (SS) is a rare testicular neoplasm that occurs predominantly in older men. In this study, we aimed to shed light on the histogenesis of SS by investigating the developmental expression of protein markers that identify distinct subpopulations of human spermatogonia in the normal adult testis. We analysed the expression pattern of OCT2, SSX2-4, and SAGE1 in 36 SS cases and four intratubular SS (ISS) as well as a series of normal testis samples throughout development. We describe for the first time two different types of SS characterized by OCT2 or SSX2-4 immunoexpression. These findings are consistent with the mutually exclusive antigenic profile of these markers during different stages of testicular development and in the normal adult testis. OCT2 was expressed predominantly in Adark spermatogonia, SSX2-4 was present in Apale and B spermatogonia and leptotene spermatocytes, whilst SAGE1 was exclusively present in a subset of post-pubertal germ cells, most likely B spermatogonia. The presence of OCT2 and SSX2-4 in distinct subsets of germ cells implies that these markers represent germ cells at different maturation stages. Analysis of SAGE1 and SSX2-4 in ISS showed spatial differences suggesting ongoing maturation of germ cells during progression of SS tumourigenesis. We conclude that the expression pattern of OCT2, SSX2-4, and SAGE1 supports the origin of SS from spermatogonia and provides new evidence for heterogeneity of this tumour, potentially linked either to the cellular origin of SS or to partial differentiation during tumour progression, including a hitherto unknown OCT2-positive variant of the tumour likely derived from Adark spermatogonia. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21706474

  8. Serum laminin, hydrocarbon exposure, and glomerular damage.

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, P; Thielemans, N; Bernard, A; Gutzwiller, F; Lauwerys, R

    1993-01-01

    It has been postulated that occupational exposure to hydrocarbons may damage the kidney and lead to glomerulonephritis and chronic renal failure. As laminin is a ubiquitous basement membrane component that seems to play a central part in the structure and function of basement membranes and as the normal renal filtration process is highly dependent on an intact glomerular basement membrane, the serum laminin concentration was examined in a population of workers exposed to hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon exposure was assessed by exposure surrogates (exposure duration and exposure score). An interaction between occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and hypertension increased the laminin concentration whereas the laminin concentration decreased in workers exposed for a long time probably because of a selection effect. In a subgroup of printers exposed to toluene whose hippuric acid excretion had been recorded for several years this interaction was confirmed when the hippuric acid excretion was substituted for the other exposure indices. In the exposed group, the age-related decline in creatinine clearance was accelerated. These results seem to confirm that occupational exposure to hydrocarbons is a non-specific factor that may promote a deterioration of renal function. PMID:8280641

  9. Radionuclide measurement of differential glomerular filtration rate

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.A.; Stone, W.J.; Grove, R.B.; Plunkett, J.M.; Kadir, S.; Patton, J.A.; Bowen, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether radionuclides could provide a reasonable estimate of differential renal function in five normal dogs and six dogs with unilateral segmental renal infarction. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of each kidney was measured by the standard technique using constant infusions of 99mTc-DTPA, iothalamate, and creatinine following ureteral catheterization. These results were correlated with total GFR estimated by bolus injection of 99mTc-DTPA and analysis of the plasma 99mTc-DTPA disappearance curve obtained by blood sampling. Differential GFR was then calculated by multiplying the total GFR from double exponential analysis of this curve (DTPA2) by each of three measures of differential function. These include the percent differential uptake of 99mTc-DTPA and 99mTc-DMSA in the posterior projection as well as the geometric mean of 99mTc-DMSA uptake. There were good correlations between differential GFR calculated from iothalamate clearances obtained at ureteral catheterization and all noninvasive methods involving radionuclides and DTPA2 (r = 0.85 - 0.99). Single exponential analysis of the 99mTc-DTPA plasma disappearance curve was less satisfactory. The authors suggest that measurement of total and differential GFR calculated from plasma clearance of 99mTc-DTPA and external counting may be a useful method with potential clinical applications.

  10. Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies.

    PubMed

    Silvariño, Ricardo; Noboa, Oscar; Cervera, Ricard

    2014-11-01

    Basement membranes form an anatomic barrier that contains connective tissue. They are composed of type IV collagen, laminin and proteoglycans. Anti-basement membrane antibodies bind to the non-collagen site of the α3 chain of type IV collagen. A group of renal diseases, pulmonary diseases and perhaps others affecting different organs have long been associated with the presence of antibodies directed against glomerular basement membrane (GBM), alveolar basement membrane and tubular basement membrane. Goodpasture disease has a frequency of 0.5 to 1 case by million/year, and is responsible for up to 20% of crescentic glomerulonephritis in renal biopsy. It has been associated with genetic and immune abnormalities and there are usually environmental triggers preceding clinical onset. Renal disease can occur isolated or in association with pulmonary hemorrhage. In general, renal disease has a rapid progression that determines severe compromise, with rare spontaneous resolution. The diagnosis of Goodpasture disease requires the presence of the anti-GBM antibody, either in circulation or in renal tissue. The prognosis of non-treated patients is poor. The standard of care is plasma exchange combined with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. Anti-GBM antibody levels must be monitored frequently until their disappearance, and then every 6 months to confirm sustained remission in the absence of clinical signs of recurrence. Prognosis of the disease is strongly associated with its initial presentation. Survival rates are related to the degree of renal compromise at onset of the disease. Recurrence of the disease post-transplantation is low.

  11. Glomerular lesions in experimental infections of Schistosoma mansoni in Cebus apella monkeys.

    PubMed

    De Brito, T; Gunji, J; Camargo, M E; Ceravolo, A; Da Silva, L C

    1971-01-01

    Three monkeys (Cebus apella) experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni studied for periods of 19, 14, and 11 months showed deposits containing gamma-globulin in subendothelial and subepithelial basal membranes and in basement membranes proper. The glomeruli showed mild reactivity characterized by local hypertrophy and hyperplasia of mesangial cells. Such findings were close to those observed by us in the kidney of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis patients without evidence of renal disease. The distribution of the deposits, both in human and experimental disease, are suggestive of preformed, non-glomerular antigen-antibody complexes that form in a zone of excess antigen and become trapped in the glomerular capillaries.The possibility exists, but has not yet been proved beyond doubt, that renal disease in schistosomiasis patients could be the end result of this pathogenetic mechanism.

  12. Renal phenotypic variability in HDR syndrome: glomerular nephropathy as a novel finding.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Alexis; Isidor, Bertrand; Allain-Launay, Emma; Moreau, Anne; Le Bideau, Marc; Roussey, Gwenaelle

    2013-01-01

    HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal abnormalities) (OMIM #146265) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the GATA-3 gene (OMIM 13120), a transcription factor coding for a protein involved in vertebrate embryonic development. More than a hundred cases with variable renal features have been described so far. Here, we report on a patient suffering from HDR syndrome with glomerular nephropathy. Hypoparathyroidism appeared early in childhood but the subsequent features of HDR occurred later in the form of bilateral sensorineural deafness and renal insufficiency associated with nephrocalcinosis. HDR was not initially diagnosed due to the appearance of a transitory cardiac involvement and atypical renal symptoms (diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis characterized by a self-limiting nephrotic syndrome). HDR syndrome with glomerular nephropathy has not yet been reported to our knowledge. Further studies of GATA-3 are needed to explore the involvement of this transcription factor in the development of HDR in humans, particularly in the kidneys.

  13. Development of 13 microsatellites for Gunnison Sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus) using next-generation shotgun sequencing and their utility in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fike, Jennifer A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Zimmerman, Shawna J; Castoe, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Gunnison Sage-grouse are an obligate sagebrush species that has experienced significant population declines and has been proposed for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. In order to examine levels of connectivity among Gunnison Sage-grouse leks, we identified 13 novel microsatellite loci though next-generation shotgun sequencing, and tested them on the closely related Greater Sage-grouse. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 12. No loci were found to be linked, although 2 loci revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium or evidence of null alleles. While these microsatellites were designed for Gunnison Sage-grouse, they also work well for Greater Sage-grouse and could be used for numerous genetic questions including landscape and population genetics.

  14. Effect of lithium therapy on glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Decina, P; Oliver, J A; Sciacca, R R; Colt, E; Fieve, R R

    1983-08-01

    Patients taking lithium had a slightly higher serum creatinine concentration than controls. Creatinine concentration was independent of lithium level or therapy length, suggesting that lithium decreases glomerular filtration but that this effect is small, noncumulative, and of marginal clinical significance.

  15. Mechanism of reduced glomerular filtration rate in chronic malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, I; Purkerson, M L; Klahr, S; Troy, J L; Martinez-Maldonado, M; Brenner, B M

    1980-05-01

    To determine the physiological basis for the low glomerular filtration rate in chronic malnutrition, micropuncture studies were performed in Munich-Wistar rats chronically pair-fed isocaloric diets of either low (group 1, nine rats) or high protein content (group 2, nine rats). Despite the absence of hypoalbuminemia, average values for single nephron and total kidney glomerular filtration rate were nearly 35% lower in group 1 than in group 2. Mean values for glomerular capillary and Bowman's space hydraulic pressures were essentially identical in the two groups, thereby excluding glomerular transcapillary hydraulic pressure difference as the cause for the low filtration rates in group 1 animals. On the other hand, average glomerular capillary plasma flow rate and glomerular capillary ultrafiltration coefficient were significantly lower (by approximately 25 and approximately 50%, respectively) in group 1 than in group 2. The fall in glomerular capillary plasma flow rate was the consequence of increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances. Plasma and erythrocyte volumes were found to be equal in five additional pairs of group 1 and group 2 rats. Thus, the substantial alterations in the ultrafiltration coefficient, glomerular capillary plasma flow rate, and renal arteriolar resistances responsible for the low filtration rate in group 1 animals were not merely a consequence of decreased circulating blood or plasma volumes. Mean values for glomerular cross sectional area were significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 despite similar values for kidney weight in the two groups. This reduction in glomerular cross sectional area in group 1 rats is presumed to reflect a decrease in effective filtration surface area and therefore likely accounts, at least in part, for the decline in ultrafiltration coefficient observed in this group.Finally, since the daily caloric intake of group 2 animals was restricted because of pair feeding requirements tied to the group 1

  16. Human Factors Engineering Evaluation of the CH-47F Horizontal Situation Display Hover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering Evaluation of the CH-47F Horizontal Situation Display Hover by Jared Sapp , Sage Jessee, Jonathan Crutcher, Mary...Hover Jared Sapp , Sage Jessee, Jonathan Crutcher, Mary Carolyn King, and Anthony Morris Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jared Sapp , Sage Jessee, Jonathan Crutcher, Mary Carolyn King, and Anthony Morris 5d

  17. Syndecan-1 deficiency aggravates anti-glomerular basement membrane nephritis.

    PubMed

    Rops, A L; Götte, M; Baselmans, M H; van den Hoven, M J; Steenbergen, E J; Lensen, J F; Wijnhoven, T J; Cevikbas, F; van den Heuvel, L P; van Kuppevelt, T H; Berden, J H; van der Vlag, J

    2007-11-01

    During the heterologous phase of experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) nephritis, leukocyte influx peaks within hours, whereas albuminuria occurs within 1 day. In the subsequent autologous phase, endogenous anti-GBM IgG develops and albuminuria persists. Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans like syndecan-1 play multiple roles during inflammation and we evaluate its role in experimental anti-GBM disease using syndecan-1 knockout (sdc-1-/-) mice. During the heterologous phase, glomerular leukocyte/macrophage influx was significantly higher in the sdc-1-/- mice and this was associated with higher glomerular endothelial expression of specific HS domains. In the autologous phase, glomerular influx of CD4+/CD8+ T cells was higher in the sdc-1-/- mice and these mice had persistently higher albuminuria and serum creatinine levels than wild-type mice. This resulted in a more sever glomerular injury and increased expression of extracellular matrix proteins. The sdc-1-/- mice developed higher plasma levels and glomerular deposits of total mouse Ig and IgG1 anti-rabbit IgG, whereas the levels of mouse IgG2a anti-rabbit IgG were lower. Furthermore, decreased Th1 and higher Th2 renal cytokine/chemokine expression were found in the sdc-1-/- mice. Our studies show that syndecan-1 deficiency exacerbates anti-GBM nephritis shifting the Th1/Th2 balance towards a Th2 response.

  18. USP40 gene knockdown disrupts glomerular permeability in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisashi; Nishibori, Yukino; Katayama, Kan; Katada, Tomohisa; Takahashi, Shohei; Kiuchi, Zentaro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kudo, Akihiko; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Takematsu, Hiromu; Yan, Kunimasa

    2017-02-01

    Unbiased transcriptome profiling and functional genomics approaches have identified ubiquitin specific protease 40 (USP40) as a highly specific glomerular transcript. This gene product remains uncharacterized, and its biological function is completely unknown. Here, we showed that mouse and rat glomeruli exhibit specific expression of the USP40 protein, which migrated at 150 kDa and was exclusively localized in the podocyte cytoplasm of the adult kidney. Double-labeling immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy analysis of fetal and neonate kidney samples revealed that USP40 was also expressed in the vasculature, including in glomerular endothelial cells at the premature stage. USP40 in cultured glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes was specifically localized to the intermediate filament protein: nestin. In glomerular endothelial cells, immunoprecipitation confirmed actual protein-protein binding of USP40 with nestin, and USP40-siRNA transfection revealed significant reduction of nestin. In rat model of minimal change nephrotic syndrome, apparent reduction of USP40 in the diseased podocytes at the proteinuric stage, which was also associated with the reduction of nestin. Morphants lacking USP40 in zebrafish exhibited disorganized glomeruli with the reduction of the cell junction in the endothelium and foot process effacement in the podocytes. Permeability studies in these zebrafish morphants demonstrated a disruption of the selective glomerular permeability filter. These data indicate that USP40 is a novel protein that might play a crucial role in glomerulogenesis and the glomerular integrity after birth through the modulation of intermediate filament protein homeostasis.

  19. Decreased glomerular filtration rate in solderers exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Järup, L; Persson, B; Elinder, C G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--to evaluate the degree of cadmium induced glomerular impairment and to assess the dose-response relation between cadmium dose and the prevalence of glomerular dysfunction. METHODS--A comparison of glomerular filtration rates (GFR) assessed by Cr-EDTA clearance was made in 42 solderers previously exposed to cadmium for at least five years. Blood and urine data were collected at health examinations in 1984, 1989, and 1993. Individual doses of cadmium were estimated by analysing cadmium in blood. RESULTS--Glomerular lesions induced by cadmium are irreversible and the GFR decreases with the degree of tubular damage. The GFR also decreases with cadmium dose and there is a dose-response relation between blood cadmium and prevalence of glomerular damage with 3.4% prevalence at blood cadmium concentrations below 50 nmol/l, 33% at blood cadmium concentrations between 50 and 75 nmol/l and 100% prevalence of glomerular damage when cadmium in blood exceeds 75 nmol/l. CONCLUSIONS--The kidney lesions induced by cadmium are irreversible and the prevalence of those lesions are dose dependent. There is also evidence of a dose related decrease in GFR even a long time after the end of exposure. Exposure to cadmium should therefore be minimised and workers exposed to cadmium should be examined regularly for many years after the end of exposure. PMID:8563845

  20. Incidence of "quasi-ditags" in catalogs generated by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Sergey V; Sharov, Alexei A

    2004-01-01

    Background Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) is a functional genomic technique that quantitatively analyzes the cellular transcriptome. The analysis of SAGE libraries relies on the identification of ditags from sequencing files; however, the software used to examine SAGE libraries cannot distinguish between authentic versus false ditags ("quasi-ditags"). Results We provide examples of quasi-ditags that originate from cloning and sequencing artifacts (i.e. genomic contamination or random combinations of nucleotides) that are included in SAGE libraries. We have employed a mathematical model to predict the frequency of quasi-ditags in random nucleotide sequences, and our data show that clones containing less than or equal to 2 ditags (which include chromosomal cloning artifacts) should be excluded from the analysis of SAGE catalogs. Conclusions Cloning and sequencing artifacts contaminating SAGE libraries could be eliminated using simple pre-screening procedure to increase the reliability of the data. PMID:15491492

  1. A Poisson-based adaptive affinity propagation clustering for SAGE data.

    PubMed

    Tang, DongMing; Zhu, QingXin; Yang, Fan

    2010-02-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool to obtain gene expression profiles. Clustering analysis is a valuable technique for analyzing SAGE data. In this paper, we propose an adaptive clustering method for SAGE data analysis, namely, PoissonAPS. The method incorporates a novel clustering algorithm, Affinity Propagation (AP). While AP algorithm has demonstrated good performance on many different data sets, it also faces several limitations. PoissonAPS overcomes the limitations of AP using the clustering validation measure as a cost function of merging and splitting, and as a result, it can automatically cluster SAGE data without user-specified parameters. We evaluated PoissonAPS and compared its performance with other methods on several real life SAGE datasets. The experimental results show that PoissonAPS can produce meaningful and interpretable clusters for SAGE data.

  2. Rapid UHPLC determination of polyphenols in aqueous infusions of Salvia officinalis L. (sage tea).

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Benno F; Walch, Stephan G; Tinzoh, Laura Ngaba; Stühlinger, Wolf; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2011-08-15

    Sage tea, the aqueous infusion of dried sage leaves (Salvia officinalis L.), is used as a form of food as well as a form of traditional herbal medicine. Several in vivo and in vitro studies point to sage polyphenols as active principles that may inhibit lipid peroxidation and improve antioxidant defences. This study describes an UHPLC methodology with MS/MS and UV detection, which allows the separation, identification and quantification of the major phenolic constituents in sage tea within 34 min, and was used to characterize 16 commercial brands of sage tea.The quantitatively dominating compounds were either rosmarinic acid (12.2–296 mg/l) or luteolin-7-o-glucuronide (37.9–166 mg/l) [corrected].In general, considerable differences in polyphenolic composition between the brands were detected, leading to the demand for quality standardization and control, especially if these sage teas are to be used for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Single-Nephron Glomerular Filtration Rate in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Denic, Aleksandar; Mathew, Jerry; Lerman, Lilach O; Lieske, John C; Larson, Joseph J; Alexander, Mariam P; Poggio, Emilio; Glassock, Richard J; Rule, Andrew D

    2017-06-15

    The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) assesses the function of all nephrons, and the single-nephron GFR assesses the function of individual nephrons. How the single-nephron GFR relates to demographic and clinical characteristics and kidney-biopsy findings in humans is unknown. We identified 1388 living kidney donors at the Mayo Clinic and the Cleveland Clinic who underwent a computed tomographic (CT) scan of the kidney with the use of contrast material and an iothalamate-based measurement of the GFR during donor evaluation and who underwent a kidney biopsy at donation. The mean single-nephron GFR was calculated as the GFR divided by the number of nephrons (calculated as the cortical volume of both kidneys as assessed on CT times the biopsy-determined glomerular density). Demographic and clinical characteristics and biopsy findings were correlated with the single-nephron GFR. A total of 58% of the donors were women, and the mean (±SD) age of the donors was 44±12 years. The mean GFR was 115±24 ml per minute, the mean number of nephrons was 860,000±370,000 per kidney, and the mean single-nephron GFR was 80±40 nl per minute. The single-nephron GFR did not vary significantly according to age (among donors <70 years of age), sex, or height (among donors ≤190 cm tall). A higher single-nephron GFR was independently associated with larger nephrons on biopsy and more glomerulosclerosis and arteriosclerosis than would be expected for age. A higher single-nephron GFR was associated with a height of more than 190 cm, obesity, and a family history of end-stage renal disease. Among healthy adult kidney donors, the single-nephron GFR was fairly constant with regard to age, sex, and height (if ≤190 cm). A higher single-nephron GFR was associated with certain risk factors for chronic kidney disease and certain kidney-biopsy findings. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.).

  4. SAGE Aerosol Measurements. Volume 2: 1 January - 31 December 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite system, launched on February 18, 1979, provides profiles of aerosol extinction at wavelengths of 1.00 and 0.45 micron, ozone concentration, and nitrogen dioxide concentration. Data taken during sunset events in the form of zonal averages and seasonal averages of the aerosol extinction at 1.00 and 0.45 micron, ratios of the aerosol extinction to the molecular extinction at 1.00 micron, and ratios of the aerosol extinction at 0.45 micron to the aerosol extinction at 1.00 micron are presented. The averages for l980 are shown in tables and in profile and contour plots (as a function of altitude and latitude). In addition, temperature data provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the time and location of each SAGE measurement are averaged and shown in a similar format.

  5. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in rat liver regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cimica, Velasco . E-mail: vcimica@aecom.yu.edu; Batusic, Danko; Haralanova-Ilieva, Borislava; Chen, Yonglong; Hollemann, Thomas; Pieler, Tomas; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2007-08-31

    We have applied serial analysis of gene expression for studying the molecular mechanism of the rat liver regeneration in the model of 70% partial hepatectomy. We generated three SAGE libraries from a normal control liver (NL library: 52,343 tags), from a sham control operated liver (Sham library: 51,028 tags), and from a regenerating liver (PH library: 53,061 tags). By SAGE bioinformatics analysis we identified 40 induced genes and 20 repressed genes during the liver regeneration. We verified temporal expression of such genes by real time PCR during the regeneration process and we characterized 13 induced genes and 3 repressed genes. We found connective tissue growth factor transcript and protein induced very early at 4 h after PH operation before hepatocytes proliferation is triggered. Our study suggests CTGF as a growth factor signaling mediator that could be involved directly in the mechanism of liver regeneration induction.

  6. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  7. SAGE: The Self-Adaptive Grid Code. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1999-01-01

    The multi-dimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, is an important tool in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It provides an efficient method to improve the accuracy of flow solutions while simultaneously reducing computer processing time. Briefly, SAGE enhances an initial computational grid by redistributing the mesh points into more appropriate locations. The movement of these points is driven by an equal-error-distribution algorithm that utilizes the relationship between high flow gradients and excessive solution errors. The method also provides a balance between clustering points in the high gradient regions and maintaining the smoothness and continuity of the adapted grid, The latest version, Version 3, includes the ability to change the boundaries of a given grid to more efficiently enclose flow structures and provides alternative redistribution algorithms.

  8. A simplified self-adaptive grid method, SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C.; Venkatapathy, E.

    1989-01-01

    The formulation of the Self-Adaptive Grid Evolution (SAGE) code, based on the work of Nakahashi and Deiwert, is described in the first section of this document. The second section is presented in the form of a user guide which explains the input and execution of the code, and provides many examples. Application of the SAGE code, by Ames Research Center and by others, in the solution of various flow problems has been an indication of the code's general utility and success. Although the basic formulation follows the method of Nakahashi and Deiwert, many modifications have been made to facilitate the use of the self-adaptive grid method for single, zonal, and multiple grids. Modifications to the methodology and the simplified input options make this current version a flexible and user-friendly code.

  9. Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, James M.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-07-15

    Proposed development of domestic energy resources, including wind energy, is expected to impact the sagebrush steppe ecosystem in the western United States. The greater sage-grouse relies on habitats within this ecosystem for survival, yet very little is known about how wind energy development may affect sage-grouse. The purpose of this report is to inform organizations of the impacts wind energy development could have on greater sage-grouse populations and identify information needed to fill gaps in knowledge.

  10. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  11. The historical distribution of Gunnison Sage-Grouse in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braun, Clait E.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Nehring, Jennifer A.; Commons, Michelle L.; Young, Jessica R.; Potter, Kim M.

    2014-01-01

    The historical distribution of Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) in Colorado is described based on published literature, observations, museum specimens, and the known distribution of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.). Historically, Gunnison Sage-Grouse were widely but patchily distributed in up to 22 counties in south-central and southwestern Colorado. The historical distribution of this species was south of the Colorado-Eagle river drainages primarily west of the Continental Divide. Potential contact areas with Greater Sage-Grouse (C. urophasianus) were along the Colorado-Eagle river system in Mesa, Garfield, and Eagle counties, west of the Continental Divide. Gunnison Sage-Grouse historically occupied habitats that were naturally highly fragmented by forested mountains and plateaus/mesas, intermountain basins without robust species of sagebrush, and river systems. This species adapted to use areas with more deciduous shrubs (i.e., Quercus spp., Amelanchier spp., Prunus spp.) in conjunction with sagebrush. Most areas historically occupied were small, linear, and patchily distributed within the overall landscape matrix. The exception was the large intermountain basin in Gunnison, Hinsdale, and Saguache counties. The documented distribution east of the Continental Divide within the large expanse of the San Luis Valley (Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande counties) was minimal and mostly on the eastern, northern, and southern fringes. Many formerly occupied habitat patches were vacant by the mid 1940s with extirpations continuing to the late 1990s. Counties from which populations were recently extirpated include Archuleta and Pitkin (1960s), and Eagle, Garfield, Montezuma, and Ouray (1990s).

  12. Smart and Green Energy (SAGE) for Base Camps Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Matthias; Boyd, Paul A.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Goel, Supriya; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Hail, John C.

    2014-02-11

    The U.S. Army Logistics Innovation Agency’s (LIA’s) Smart and Green Energy (SAGE) for Base Camps project was to investigate how base camps’ fuel consumption can be reduced by 30% to 60% using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies for power generation, renewables, and energy efficient building systems. Field tests and calibrated energy models successfully demonstrated that the fuel reductions are achievable.

  13. Neo-clerodane diterpenes from the hallucinogenic sage Salvia divinorum.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Osamu; Nagamatsu, Kumi; Sekita, Setsuko

    2006-12-01

    Seven new neo-clerodane diterpenes, salvidivins A (2), B, (3), C (4), and D (5), salvinorins H (6) and I (7), and divinatorin [corrected] F (8), along with eight known neo-clerodane diterpenes, salvinorins A (1)-F, divinatorins A and B, and seven other constituents, were isolated from the hallucinogenic sage Salvia divinorum. The structures of 1-7 were elucidated on the basis of 2D NMR spectroscopic studies.

  14. Interspecific nest parasitism by chukar on greater sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fearon, Michelle L.; Coates, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Nest parasitism occurs when a female bird lays eggs in the nest of another and the host incubates the eggs and may provide some form of parental care for the offspring (Lyon and Eadie 1991). Precocial birds (e.g., Galliformes and Anseriformes) are typically facultative nest parasites of both their own and other species (Lyon and Eadie 1991). This behavior increases a female’s reproductive success when she parasitizes other nests while simultaneously raising her own offspring. Both interspecific and conspecific nest parasitism have been well documented in several families of the order Galliformes, particularly the Phasianidae (Lyon and Eadie 1991, Geffen and Yom-Tov 2001, Krakauer and Kimball 2009). The Chukar (Alectoris chukar) has been widely introduced as a game bird to western North America from Eurasia and is now well established within the Great Basin from northeastern California east to Utah and north to Idaho and Oregon (Christensen 1996). Over much of this range the Chukar occurs with other phasianids, including the native Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), within sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe (Christensen 1996, Schroeder et al. 1999, Connelly et al. 2000). Chukar typically exploit a broader range of habitats than do sage-grouse, but both species use the same species of sagebrush and other shrubs for nesting cover (Christensen 1996, Schroeder et al. 1999). Chukar are known to parasitize nests of other individuals of their own species (Geffen and Yom-Tov 2001), but we are unaware of reported evidence that Chukar may parasitize nests of sage-grouse. Here we describe a case of a Chukar parasitizing a sage-grouse nest in the sagebrush steppe of western Nevada.

  15. Merging the OSIRIS and SAGE II stratospheric aerosol records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, L. A.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite, launched in 2001 and currently operational, measures limb-scattered sunlight from which profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction are retrieved. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II was launched in 1984 and provided measurements of stratospheric aerosol extinction until mid-2005. This provides approximately 4 years of mission overlap which has allowed us to consistently extend the SAGE II version 7.00 record to the present using OSIRIS aerosol extinction retrievals. In this work we first compare coincident aerosol extinction observations during the overlap period by interpolating the SAGE II 525nm and 1020nm channels to the OSIRIS extinction wavelength of 750nm. In the tropics to midlatitudes mean differences are typically less than 10%, although larger biases are seen at higher latitudes and at altitudes outside the main aerosol layer. OSIRIS aerosol extinction retrievals at 750nm are used to create a monthly time series zonally averaged in 5°bins and qualitatively compared to SAGE II 525nm observations averaged in the same way. The OSIRIS time series is then translated to 525nm with an Ângström exponent relation and bias corrected. For most locations, this provides agreement during the overlap time period to better than 15%. Uncertainty in the resulting OSIRIS time series is estimated through a series of simulation studies over the range of aerosol particle size distributions observed by in situ balloon instruments and is found to be approximately 20% for background and moderately volcanic aerosol loading conditions for the majority of OSIRIS measurement conditions.

  16. The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the multidimensional self-adaptive grid code SAGE. A two-dimensional version of this code was described in an earlier report by the authors. The formulation of the multidimensional version is described in the first section of this document. The second section is presented in the form of a user guide that explains the input and execution of the code and provides many examples. Successful application of the SAGE code in both two and three dimensions for the solution of various flow problems has proven the code to be robust, portable, and simple to use. Although the basic formulation follows the method of Nakahashi and Deiwert, many modifications have been made to facilitate the use of the self-adaptive grid method for complex grid structures. Modifications to the method and the simplified input options make this a flexible and user-friendly code. The new SAGE code can accommodate both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow problems.

  17. SAGE II aerosol validation: selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, V R; Livingston, J M; Russell, P B; Pueschel, R F; Rosen, J N; Osborn, M T; Kritz, M A; Snetsinger, K G; Ferry, G V

    1989-06-20

    Correlative aerosol measurements taken at a limited number of altitudes during coordinated field experiments are used to test the validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements taken by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II Sun photometer. In particular, results are presented from correlative measurement missions that were conducted during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986. Correlative sensors included impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers aboard an U-2-airplane, an upward pointing lidar aboard a P-3 airplane, and balloon-borne optical particle counters (dustsondes). The main body of this paper focuses on the July 29, 1986, validation experiment, which minimized the many difficulties (e.g., spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, imperfect coincidences) that can complicate the validation process. On this day, correlative aerosol measurements taken at an altitude of 20.5 km agreed with each other within their respective uncertainties, and particulate extinction values calculated at SAGE II wavelengths from these measurements validated corresponding SAGE II values. Additional validation efforts on days when measurement and logistical conditions were much less favorable for validation are discussed in an appendix.

  18. SAGE measurements of Mount St. Helens volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The SAGE satellite system was used to make measurements on the optical extinction produced by stratospheric aerosols from the Mount St. Helens eruption. Two periods of observation were analyzed. In the first period (May 21 to 31, 1980), SAGE moved southward from latitude 60 N, and crossed the United States approximately one week after the May 18th eruption. Enhancements in stratospheric extinction were confined to latitudes between about 55 N and 25 N and longitudes between 10 W and 140 W. Individual layers were observed up to altitudes of 23 km. The geographical location of these layers corresponded closely to that expected on the basis of high-altitude meteorological data. During June and much of July, SAGE was, by reason of its geographical position and other orbital characteristics, unable to make further measurements on the northern hemisphere. Between July 19th and August 12th a second southward pass over the northern hemisphere occurred and further observations were made. The volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere was now found to be widely distributed over the hemisphere, the maximum concentrations being north of 50 N. The aerosol showed considerable inhomogeneity and had reached as far south as 15 N but little, if any, had crossed the equator into the southern hemisphere. Individual layers at different heights were still distinguishable. The total stratospheric aerosol loading on this occasion appeared to be greater than in May and corresponded to an increase in global stratospheric mass of between 50 and 100 percent.

  19. Processes governing the carbon chemistry during the SAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, K. I.; Macaskill, B.; Reid, M. R.; Law, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of pCO 2, pH and alkalinity in the surface waters of an iron fertilised patch of sub-Antarctic water were made during SAGE (SOLAS SAGE: Surface-Ocean Lower Atmosphere Studies Air-Sea Gas Experiment). The iron addition induced a minor phytoplankton bloom, however the patch dynamics were dominated by physical processes which suppressed and masked the biological effects. The Lagrangian nature of the experiment allowed the carbonate chemistry in the patch to be followed for 15.5 days, and the relative importance of the biological and physical factors influencing the surface water pCO 2 was estimated. The pCO 2 of the surface waters of the patch increased from 327 μatm prior to iron addition to 338 μatm on Day 14, effects of vertical and horizontal mixing offset the 15 μatm drawdown that would have occurred had the induced biological uptake been the sole factor to influence the pCO 2. The air-sea carbon flux calculated using the measured skin temperature and a piston velocity parameterisation determined during SAGE ( Ho et al., 2006) was 98.5% of the flux determined using conventional bulk temperature measurement and the Wanninkhof (1992) piston velocity parameterisation. The skin temperature alone contributed to an 8% increase in the flux compared with that determined using bulk temperature.

  20. Community Cognitive Screening Using the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination (SAGE).

    PubMed

    Scharre, Douglas W; Chang, Shu Ing; Nagaraja, Haikady N; Yager-Schweller, Jennifer; Murden, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the functionality of the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination (SAGE) for cognitive screening in community settings and examined its characteristics as a cognitive screening assessment tool. From 45 community events, 1,047 individuals over age 50 were screened with SAGE. Cognitive impairment was identified in 28%. Principal-component and correlation analysis indicate that SAGE is an internally-consistent test that is very well balanced, with language, cognition, visuospatial, executive, and memory domains. Community cognitive screening using SAGE was found to be feasible and efficient in diverse settings with both small and large groups.

  1. SAGES University MASTERS Program: a structured curriculum for deliberate, lifelong learning.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel B; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Korndorffer, James R; Dimick, Justin B; Jacob, Brian P; Schultz, Linda; Scott, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Postgraduate training has been haphazard to date. Surgeons have relied on attendance to annual meetings and multiple choice study guides to demonstrate maintenance of certification and continuing medical education. SAGES held a retreat to develop the concept and scope of the Masters Program. Surveys were sent to SAGES members to guide curriculum development and selection of anchoring operations. SAGES has developed an educational curriculum across eight domains (Acute Care, Biliary, Bariatric, Colorectal, Hernia, Foregut, Flex Endoscopy, and Robotic Surrey) incorporating SAGES educational materials and guidelines, social media, coaching and mentoring. Deliberate, lifelong learning should be a better way to teach and learn.

  2. Antarctic springtime measurements of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and aerosol extinction by SAM II, SAGE, and SAGE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Larsen, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous vertical profiles of O3, NO2, and aerosol extinction obtained with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE), and SAGE II satellite instruments across the southern polar vortex show that significant differences exist at all altitudes. Both gaseous species display lower concentrations within the vortex over measurement altitudes ranging from the tropopause to 60 km and 20 to 40 km for O3 and NO2, respectively. Aerosol extinction above 15-18 km and total aerosol stratospheric column are also lower inside the vortex than outside. Total column amounts of O3 and NO2 are found to be strongly coupled to spatial location within the vortex, with minimum total values located around the vortex center. Vertical profiles selected to emphasize the observed difference across the circumpolar vortex are presented for October 13, 1981, and October 13, 1985, near 70 and 68 deg S latitude, respectively.

  3. Plasma Gelsolin Induced Glomerular Fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads Signal Transduction Pathway in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Changsong; Ye, Fei; He, Yan; Jin, Yinji; Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Yiqi; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Fengmin; Jin, Xiaoming

    2017-02-12

    Glomerular fibrosis has been shown to be closely related to the progression and prognosis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, mechanism underlying IgAN glomerular fibrosis remains unclear. Recently, our study showed that plasma gelsolin (pGSN) was decreased in the serum of an IgAN mouse model and that pGSN deposition was found in the glomeruli. Another cytokine, TGF-β1, which is closely related to glomerular fibrosis, was also found to be highly expressed in the glomeruli. In the present study, we report that pGSN induces glomerular fibrosis through the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This is supported by the following findings: human mesangial cells (HMCs) show remarkable morphological changes and proliferation in response to co-stimulation with pGSN and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) from IgAN patients compared to other controls. Moreover, ELISA assays showed that more TGF-β1 secretion was found in HMCs supernatants in the co-stimulation group. Further experiments showed increased TGF-β1, Smad3, p-Smad2/3, Smad4, and collagen 1 and decreased Smad7 expression in the co-stimulation group. Our present study implied that the synergistic effect of pGSN and pIgA induced glomerular fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This might be a potential mechanism for the glomerular fibrosis observed in IgAN patients.

  4. Plasma Gelsolin Induced Glomerular Fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads Signal Transduction Pathway in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Changsong; Ye, Fei; He, Yan; Jin, Yinji; Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Yiqi; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Fengmin; Jin, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Glomerular fibrosis has been shown to be closely related to the progression and prognosis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, mechanism underlying IgAN glomerular fibrosis remains unclear. Recently, our study showed that plasma gelsolin (pGSN) was decreased in the serum of an IgAN mouse model and that pGSN deposition was found in the glomeruli. Another cytokine, TGF-β1, which is closely related to glomerular fibrosis, was also found to be highly expressed in the glomeruli. In the present study, we report that pGSN induces glomerular fibrosis through the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This is supported by the following findings: human mesangial cells (HMCs) show remarkable morphological changes and proliferation in response to co-stimulation with pGSN and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) from IgAN patients compared to other controls. Moreover, ELISA assays showed that more TGF-β1 secretion was found in HMCs supernatants in the co-stimulation group. Further experiments showed increased TGF-β1, Smad3, p-Smad2/3, Smad4, and collagen 1 and decreased Smad7 expression in the co-stimulation group. Our present study implied that the synergistic effect of pGSN and pIgA induced glomerular fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smads signal transduction pathway. This might be a potential mechanism for the glomerular fibrosis observed in IgAN patients. PMID:28208683

  5. Anthocyanin-Rich Purple Corn Extract Inhibit Diabetes-Associated Glomerular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Kyung; Lim, Soon Sung; Lee, Jae-Yong; Yeo, Kyung Mok; Kang, Young-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major diabetic complications and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Abnormal angiogenesis results in new vessels that are often immature and play a pathological role in DN, contributing to renal fibrosis and disrupting glomerular failure. Purple corn has been utilized as a daily food and exerts disease-preventive activities. This study was designed to investigate whether anthocyanin-rich purple corn extract (PCE) prevented glomerular angiogenesis under hyperglycemic conditions. Human endothelial cells were cultured in conditioned media of mesangial cells exposed to 33 mM high glucose (HG-HRMC-CM). PCE decreased endothelial expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α induced by HG-HRMC-CM. Additionally, PCE attenuated the induction of the endothelial marker of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 and integrin β3 enhanced in HG-HRMC-CM. Endothelial tube formation promoted by HG-HRMC-CM was disrupted in the presence of PCE. In the in vivo study employing db/db mice treated with 10 mg/kg PCE for 8 weeks, PCE alleviated glomerular angiogenesis of diabetic kidneys by attenuating the induction of VEGF and HIF-1α. Oral administration of PCE retarded the endothelial proliferation in db/db mouse kidneys, evidenced by its inhibition of the induction of vascular endothelium-cadherin, PECAM-1 and Ki-67. PCE diminished the mesangial and endothelial induction of angiopoietin (Angpt) proteins under hypeglycemic conditions. The induction and activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) were dampened by treating PCE to db/db mice. These results demonstrate that PCE antagonized glomerular angiogenesis due to chronic hyperglycemia and diabetes through disturbing the Angpt-Tie-2 ligand-receptor system linked to renal VEGFR2 signaling pathway. Therefore, PCE may be a potent therapeutic agent targeting abnormal angiogenesis in DN leading to kidney failure. PMID:24278186

  6. The effect of sage, sodium erythorbate and a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate on the quality of turkey meatballs stored under vacuum and modified atmosphere conditions.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Tymoszczyk, M

    2010-12-01

    1. The combined effect of sage (S), sodium erythorbate (SE), a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate (MIX) and vacuum packaging (VP) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the quality of cooked turkey meatballs stored at 4°C was investigated. The physicochemical properties (colour, MDA, AV, pH, water activity), microbiological quality characteristics (counts of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, fungi, coliforms and Clostridium sp.) and flavour attributes of meatballs were determined. 2. The values of the colour parameters L*, a* and b* were affected by the additives and packaging method. The colour of meatballs was better protected by sodium erythorbate than by sage or a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate. The additives effectively stabilised lipids against oxidation and slowed down hydrolytic changes in turkey meatballs. Sage and a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate showed stronger antioxidant properties than sodium erythorbate added alone. Products with additives were characterised by better sensory quality than control samples. Sage and MIX prevented the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria. All additives inhibited the growth of coliforms. 3. MAP was more effective than VP in maintaining the microbial and sensory quality stability of cooked turkey meatballs. However, VP appears to be a better method as regards the maintaining of lipid stability in turkey meatballs.

  7. Outcome of the acute glomerular injury in proliferative lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Chagnac, A.; Kiberd, B.A.; Farinas, M.C.; Strober, S.; Sibley, R.K.; Hoppe, R.; Myers, B.D. )

    1989-09-01

    Treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and corticosteroids markedly reduced activity of systemic lupus erythematosis in 10 patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) complicated by a nephrotic syndrome. Physiologic and morphometric techniques were used serially before, and 12 and 36 mo post-TLI to characterize the course of glomerular injury. Judged by a progressive reduction in the density of glomerular cells and immune deposits, glomerular inflammation subsided. A sustained reduction in the fractional clearance of albumin, IgG and uncharged dextrans of radius greater than 50 A, pointed to a parallel improvement in glomerular barrier size-selectivity. Corresponding changes in GFR were modest, however. A trend towards higher GFR at 12 mo was associated with a marked increase in the fraction of glomerular tuft area occupied by patent capillary loops as inflammatory changes receded. A late trend toward declining GFR beyond 12 mo was associated with progressive glomerulosclerosis, which affected 57% of all glomeruli globally by 36 mo post-TLI. Judged by a parallel increase in volume by 59%, remaining, patent glomeruli had undergone a process of adaptive enlargement. We propose that an increasing fraction of glomeruli continues to undergo progressive sclerosis after DPLN has become quiescent, and that the prevailing GFR depends on the extent to which hypertrophied remnant glomeruli can compensate for the ensuing loss of filtration surface area.

  8. Podometrics as a Potential Clinical Tool for Glomerular Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Wiggins, Roger C

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease culminating in end-stage kidney disease is a major public health problem costing in excess of $40 billion per year with high morbidity and mortality. Current tools for glomerular disease monitoring lack precision and contribute to poor outcome. The podocyte depletion hypothesis describes the major mechanisms underlying the progression of glomerular diseases, which are responsible for more than 80% of cases of end-stage kidney disease. The question arises of whether this new knowledge can be used to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Podocytes have unique characteristics that make them an attractive monitoring tool. Methodologies for estimating podocyte number, size, density, glomerular volume and other parameters in routine kidney biopsies, and the rate of podocyte detachment from glomeruli into urine (podometrics) now have been developed and validated. They potentially fill important gaps in the glomerular disease monitoring toolbox. The application of these tools to glomerular disease groups shows good correlation with outcome, although data validating their use for individual decision making is not yet available. Given the urgency of the clinical problem, we argue that the time has come to focus on testing these tools for application to individualized clinical decision making toward more effective progression prevention.

  9. [Glomerular IgA deposits in an autopsy study].

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T

    1994-07-01

    One hundred kidneys from 100 non-selected autopsy cases without any overt renal disease were examined by immunofluorescence to reveal the incidences and features of cases with clinically latent glomerular IgA deposits. Glomerular IgA deposits were found in 10 cases (10.0%), consisting of 4 with liver cirrhosis and 6 with other diseases. IgA deposition was observed in 4 of 13 cirrhotic patients (30.8%), 3 of 15 patients with gastrointestinal carcinoma (20.0%), one of 11 patients with cardiovascular disease (9.1%), one of 3 patients with fulminant hepatitis (33.3%), and one of 21 patients with broncho-pulmonary disease (4.8%). Light microscopy showed minor glomerular abnormalities in all non-cirrhotic cases with IgA deposits except in one case. By contrast, variable significant glomerular lesions were found in the cirrhotic cases with IgA deposits, for example mesangial proliferation and circumferential mesangial inter-position. Excluding 13 cases with liver cirrhosis, the results of urinalysis at the time of admission were available for the study in 55 of 87 cases. Forty-four of 55 cases showed normal urinalysis. Glomerular IgA deposition was found in 4 cases (9.1%) of 44 with normal urinalysis. It may be said that IgA deposition without clinical evidence of nephropathy occurred even in a normal population with an incidence of about 10%.

  10. Proteinuria and glomerular hypertrophy in extremely low-birthweight children.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Asako; Santo, Yoko; Satomura, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Of late, there is an increased awareness of the frequent occurrence of hypertension or proteinuria in adults born at low birthweight. We retrospectively studied five children born with extremely low birthweight (ELBW) who were first diagnosed with proteinuria in a school urinary screening program. These children were born at 23-25 weeks of gestation, and their birthweight was 532-732 g. Proteinuria was identified in all the subjects in a school urinary screening program when they were 6-15 years old. Renal biopsy showed diffuse increase in glomerular size, consistent with glomerular hypertrophy. There were no findings of mesangial proliferation or glomerular sclerosis. All the subjects had a marked decrease in proteinuria after angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) treatment. Reduced number of glomeruli associated with prematurity was speculated to have caused compensatory glomerular hyperfiltration, hypertrophy, and hypertension in children born with ELBW when they developed proteinuria. ARB could have been effective for proteinuria by reducing glomerular hypertension. Physicians should be aware of proteinuria in children born with ELBW because there is an increasing number of ELBW survivors as a result of advances in medical technology. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. J D Bernal: the sage of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew P.

    2007-02-01

    John Desmond Bernal (1901-1971) was one of the most influential and original scientists of the twentieth century. No less an authority than James Watson has stated that Bernal's genius inspired the birth of molecular biology. By examining Bernal's interactions with others, I attempt to illustrate his personality, brilliance, breadth, foibles and essential humanity.

  12. Optical, real-time monitoring of the glomerular filtration rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabito, Carlos A.; Chen, Yang; Schomacker, Kevin T.; Modell, Mark D.

    2005-10-01

    An easy and accurate assessment of the renal function is a critical requirement for detecting the initial functional decline of the kidney induced by acute or chronic renal disease. A method for measuring the glomerular filtration rate is developed with the accuracy of clearance techniques and the convenience of plasma creatinine. The renal function is measured in rats as the rate of clearance determined from time-resolved transcutaneous fluorescence measurements of a new fluorescent glomerular filtration agent. The agent has a large dose-safety coefficient and the same space distribution and clearance characteristics as iothalamate. This new approach is a convenient and accurate way to perform real-time measurements of the glomerular filtration rate to detect early kidney disease before the renal function becomes severely and irreversibly compromised.

  13. Using gas chromatography to determine winter diets of sage-grouse in Utah.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Federal and state agencies have recently intensified efforts to conserve existing sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat. Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) constitutes the majority (> 99%) of sage-grouse winter diets. The objective of our research was to determine if chemical analysis of fecal p...

  14. SAGE FOR MACINTOSH (MSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Macintosh, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a
    Macintosh personal computer under the System 7.0 (or higher) operating system. SAGE for ...

  15. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  16. Microhabitat selection of brood-rearing sites by greater sage-grouse in Carbon County, Wyoming

    Treesearch

    Leslie A. Schreiber; Christopher P. Hansen; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh; R. Scott Gamo; Jon W. Kehmeier; Nate Wojcik

    2015-01-01

    Declines in Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter sage-grouse) populations could be attributed to low chick survival, which may be influenced by the availability of food and cover at sites used by females rearing broods. Habitat attributes important to broods may vary regionally; thus, it is necessary to understand factors affecting...

  17. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat use on the eastern edge of their range

    Treesearch

    Christopher C. Swanson; Mark A. Rumble; Nicholas W. Kaczor; Robert W. Klaver; Katie M. Herman-Brunson; Jonathan A. Jenks; Kent C. Jensen

    2013-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) at the western edge of the Dakotas occur in the transition zone between sagebrush and grassland communities. These mixed sagebrush (Artemisia sp.) and grasslands differ from those habitats that comprise the central portions of the sage-grouse range; yet, no information is available on winter habitat selection within this...

  18. SAGE FOR MACINTOSH (MSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Macintosh, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a
    Macintosh personal computer under the System 7.0 (or higher) operating system. SAGE for ...

  19. Greater sage-grouse apparent nest productivity and chick survival in Carbon County, Wyoming

    Treesearch

    Leslie A. Schreiber; Christopher P. Hansen; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Frank R. Thompson; R. Scott Gamo; Jon W. Kehmeier; Nate Wojik

    2016-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations across North America have been declining due to degradation and fragmentation of sagebrush habitat. As part of a study quantifying greater sage-grouse demographics prior to construction of a wind energy facility, we estimated apparent net nest productivity and survival rate of chicks associated with...

  20. A comparison of two vegetation height measurement methods for applications to sage grouse habitat evaluations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat has become a serious management issue for U.S. federal land agencies given competing land uses and ecological change across the American West. This drives a need for data collection in Sage-Grouse habitat to assess habitat c...

  1. SAGE ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTOME RESPONSES IN ARABIDOPSIS ROOTS EXPOSED TO 2,4,6-TRINITROTOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) was used to profile transcript levels in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and assess their responses to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) exposure. SAGE libraries representing control and TNT-exposed seedling root transcripts were constructed, and ea...

  2. Evaluation Results of the Student Achievement Guarantee in Education (SAGE) Program, 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex; Smith, Philip; Zahorik, John

    The Student Achievement Guarantee in Education (SAGE) is a statewide effort in Wisconsin to increase the academic achievement of children living in poverty by reducing the student-teacher ratio in kindergarten through third grade to 15:1. Schools participating in SAGE are also required to implement a rigorous curriculum, provide before- and…

  3. SAGE ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTOME RESPONSES IN ARABIDOPSIS ROOTS EXPOSED TO 2,4,6-TRINITROTOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) was used to profile transcript levels in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and assess their responses to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) exposure. SAGE libraries representing control and TNT-exposed seedling root transcripts were constructed, and ea...

  4. Observations of territorial breeding common ravens caching eggs of greater sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, Kristy B.; Coates, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous investigations using continuous video monitoring of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus nests have unambiguously identified common ravens Corvus corax as an important egg predator within the western United States. The quantity of greater sage-grouse eggs an individual common raven consumes during the nesting period and the extent to which common ravens actively hunt greater sage-grouse nests are largely unknown. However, some evidence suggests that territorial breeding common ravens, rather than nonbreeding transients, are most likely responsible for nest depredations. We describe greater sage-grouse egg depredation observations obtained opportunistically from three common raven nests located in Idaho and Nevada where depredated greater sage-grouse eggs were found at or in the immediate vicinity of the nest site, including the caching of eggs in nearby rock crevices. We opportunistically monitored these nests by counting and removing depredated eggs and shell fragments from the nest sites during each visit to determine the extent to which the common raven pairs preyed on greater sage-grouse eggs. To our knowledge, our observations represent the first evidence that breeding, territorial pairs of common ravens cache greater sage-grouse eggs and are capable of depredating multiple greater sage-grouse nests.

  5. Greater sage-grouse of Grand Teton National Park: where do they roam?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chong, G.W.; Wetzel, W.C.; Holloran, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population declines may be caused by range-wide degradation of sagebrush (woody Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems. Understanding how greater sage-grouse use the landscape is essential for successful management. We assessed greater sage-grouse habitat selection on a landscape level in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. We used a Geographic Information System (GIS) and radio-collared sage-grouse to compare habitat used and the total available landscape. Greater sage-grouse selected mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata var. vaseyana) communities or mixed mountain big sagebrush–antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) communities and avoided low-sagebrush (A. arbuscula) dwarf shrubland. In spring and summer, sage-grouse primarily used sagebrush-dominated habitats on the valley floor and did not concentrate in mesic areas later in the summer as is typical of the species. The diversity of habitats used in winter exceeds that reported in the literature. In winter, Jackson Hole greater sage-grouse moved to hills, where they used various communities in proportion to their availability, including tall deciduous shrublands, cottonwood (Populus angustifolia) stands, exposed hillsides, and aspen (P. tremuloides) stands. Because seasonal habitat selection is not necessarily consistent across populations residing in different landscapes, habitat management should be specific to each population and landscape. This sage-grouse population provides an example that may offer insight into other species with seasonal habitat needs.

  6. 78 FR 59713 - Notice of Availability of the North Dakota Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Resource Management Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the North Dakota Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Resource... Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has prepared a North Dakota Greater Sage-Grouse (GRSG) Draft Resource....html . Email: blm_mt_nd_sage_grouse@blm.gov . Fax: 406-896-5293. Mail: BLM--North Dakota Greater...

  7. 78 FR 50088 - Notice of Availability of the Northwest Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Resource Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Northwest Colorado Greater Sage- Grouse Draft... Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Resource Management Plan (RMP) Amendment and Draft Environmental Impact... related to the Northwest Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Draft RMP Amendment/Draft EIS by any of the...

  8. 78 FR 65700 - Notice of Availability of the Utah Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan Amendments and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Utah Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan...) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) have prepared a Utah Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan (LUP... related to the Utah Greater Sage-Grouse Draft LUP Amendments/EIS by any of the following methods: Email...

  9. Functional principal component analysis of glomerular filtration rate curves after kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianghu J; Wang, Liangliang; Gill, Jagbir; Cao, Jiguo

    2017-01-01

    This article is motivated by some longitudinal clinical data of kidney transplant recipients, where kidney function progression is recorded as the estimated glomerular filtration rates at multiple time points post kidney transplantation. We propose to use the functional principal component analysis method to explore the major source of variations of glomerular filtration rate curves. We find that the estimated functional principal component scores can be used to cluster glomerular filtration rate curves. Ordering functional principal component scores can detect abnormal glomerular filtration rate curves. Finally, functional principal component analysis can effectively estimate missing glomerular filtration rate values and predict future glomerular filtration rate values.

  10. Comparison of SBUV and SAGE II ozone profiles: Implications for ozone trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Miles, T.; Flynn, L. E.; Wellemeyer, C. G.; Zawodny, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone profiles have been compared with Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II profiles over the period October 1984 through June 1990, when data are available from both instruments. SBUV measurements were selected to closely match the SAGE II latitude/longitude measurement pattern. There are significant differences between the SAGE II sunrise and the sunset zonal mean ozone profiles in the equatorial zone, particularly in the upper stratosphere, that may be connected with extreme SAGE II solar azimuth angles for tropical sunrise measurements. Calculation of the average sunset bias between SBUV and SAGE II ozone profiles shows that allowing for diurnal variation in Umkehr layer 10, SBUV and SAGE II agree to within +/- 5% for the entire stratosphere in the northern midlatitude zone. The worst agreement is seen at southern midlatitudes near the ozone peak (disagreements of +/- 10%), apparently the result of the SBUV ozone profile peaking at a lower altitude than SAGE. The integrated ozone columns (cumulative above 15 km) agree very well, to within +/- 2.3% in all zones for both sunset and sunrise measurements. A comparison of the time dependence of SBUV and SAGE II shows that there was less than +/- 5% relative drift over the 5.5 years for all altitudes except below 25 km, where the SBUV vertical resolution is poor. The best agreement with SAGE is seen in the integrated column ozone (cumulative above 15 km), where SAGE II has a 1% negative trend relative to SBUV over the comparison period. There is a persistent disagreement of the two instruments in Umkehr layers 9 and 10 of +/- 4% over the 5.5-year comparison period. In the equatorial zone this disagreement may be caused in part by a large positive trend (0.8 K per year) in the National Meteorologica Center temperatures used to convert the SAGE II measurement of ozone density versus altitude to a pressure scale for comparison with SBUV. In the middle stratosphere (30

  11. Comparison of SBUV and SAGE II ozone profiles: Implications for ozone trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Miles, T.; Flynn, L. E.; Wellemeyer, C. G.; Zawodny, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone profiles have been compared with Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II profiles over the period October 1984 through June 1990, when data are available from both instruments. SBUV measurements were selected to closely match the SAGE II latitude/longitude measurement pattern. There are significant differences between the SAGE II sunrise and the sunset zonal mean ozone profiles in the equatorial zone, particularly in the upper stratosphere, that may be connected with extreme SAGE II solar azimuth angles for tropical sunrise measurements. Calculation of the average sunset bias between SBUV and SAGE II ozone profiles shows that allowing for diurnal variation in Umkehr layer 10, SBUV and SAGE II agree to within +/- 5% for the entire stratosphere in the northern midlatitude zone. The worst agreement is seen at southern midlatitudes near the ozone peak (disagreements of +/- 10%), apparently the result of the SBUV ozone profile peaking at a lower altitude than SAGE. The integrated ozone columns (cumulative above 15 km) agree very well, to within +/- 2.3% in all zones for both sunset and sunrise measurements. A comparison of the time dependence of SBUV and SAGE II shows that there was less than +/- 5% relative drift over the 5.5 years for all altitudes except below 25 km, where the SBUV vertical resolution is poor. The best agreement with SAGE is seen in the integrated column ozone (cumulative above 15 km), where SAGE II has a 1% negative trend relative to SBUV over the comparison period. There is a persistent disagreement of the two instruments in Umkehr layers 9 and 10 of +/- 4% over the 5.5-year comparison period. In the equatorial zone this disagreement may be caused in part by a large positive trend (0.8 K per year) in the National Meteorologica Center temperatures used to convert the SAGE II measurement of ozone density versus altitude to a pressure scale for comparison with SBUV. In the middle stratosphere (30

  12. Visualisation studies and glomerular filtration in early diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-04

    The purpose of this mini-review is to show that more modern multi-photon microscopy approaches allow quantitative glomerular filtration experiments. Modern science has now entered a transition period from light microscopy to multi-photon confocal microscopy. Since the late 20th century, multi-photon microscopy has been applied in the study of organ function. In keeping with observations made in renal physiology and other representative studies throughout this transition period, and in the context of advancing microscopy techniques, this review has been presented as a comment on the glomerular filtration barrier, with a focus on the early aetiopathogenesis of diabetes.

  13. Headspace screening: A novel approach for fast quality assessment of the essential oil from culinary sage.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovikj, Ivana; Stefkov, Gjoshe; Acevska, Jelena; Karapandzova, Marija; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Kulevanova, Svetlana

    2016-07-01

    Quality assessment of essential oil (EO) from culinary sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is limited by the long pharmacopoeial procedure. The aim of this study was to employ headspace (HS) sampling in the quality assessment of sage EO. Different populations (30) of culinary sage were assessed using GC/FID/MS analysis of the hydrodistilled EO (pharmacopoeial method) and HS sampling directly from leaves. Compound profiles from both procedures were evaluated according to ISO 9909 and GDC standards for sage EO quality, revealing compliance for only 10 populations. Factors to convert HS values, for the target ISO and GDC components, into theoretical EO values were calculated. Statistical analysis revealed a significant relationship between HS and EO values for seven target components. Consequently, HS sampling could be used as a complementary extraction technique for rapid screening in quality assessment of sage EOs.

  14. Developing criteria for reclamation of sage grouse habitat on a surface coal mine in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Colenso, B.E.; Boyce, M.S.; Tate, J. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    The sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a Western game bird, known to depend heavily on big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata, hereafter called sagebrush) for both food and cover. It is generally acknowledged that sagebrush eradication programs have taken a toll on sage grouse populations throughout much of their range. It is conceivable that further population declines may result from surface mining and other land use changes, unless essential habitat components for this species are determined. A program can then be developed to restore habitat suitable to the sage grouse following mining. This study is designed to define seasonal changes in sage grouse habitat selection, and to identify the characteristics of crucial habitat. Special attention has been given to habitat use during critical periods, such as wintering and nesting times. This will allow one to suggest which habitat features should be emphasized during reclamation in order to benefit sage grouse.

  15. Services for the Analysis of the Greenland Environment (SAGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S.; Gallaher, D. W.; Khalsa, S. S.; Duerr, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    While there continues to be compelling observational evidence for increased surface melting and rapid thinning along the margins of the Greenland ice sheet, there are still uncertainties with respect to estimates of mass balance of Greenland's ice sheet as a whole. To better understand the dynamics of these issues, it is important for scientists to have access to a variety of datasets from multiple sources, and to be able to integrate and analyze the data. To address this need, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has the Services for the Analysis of the Greenland Environment (SAGE). Using an integrated workspace approach, a researcher has the ability to find relevant data and perform various analysis functions on the data, as well as retrieve the data and analysis results. Data from various sources, such as AMSR-E and AVHRR datasets, can be analyzed individually through various time-series plots and aggregation functions; or they can be analyzed together with scatterplots or overlaid time-series plots to provide quick and useful results to support various research products. Built on top of NSIDC's Searchlight engine, the SAGE interface gives users access to much of NSIDC's relevant Greenland raster data holdings, as well as data from several outside sources. Additionally, various web services provide access for other clients to utilize the functionality that the SAGE interface provides. Combined, these methods of accessing the tool allow scientists the ability to devote more of their time to their research, and less on trying to find and retrieve the data they need.

  16. OMPS Limb Profiler: Extending SAGE and CALIPSO Stratospheric Aerosol Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, G.; Bhartia, P. K.; Chen, Z.; Xu, P.; Loughman, R. P.; Jaross, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) was launched on October 28, 2011. It consist of three instruments: Nadir Mapper (NM), Nadir Profiler (NP) and Limb Profiler (LP). The OMPS LP instrument is designed to provide high vertical resolution ozone and aerosol profiles from measurements of the scattered solar radiation in the 290-1000 nm spectral range. It collected its first Earth limb measurement in January 10, 2012, and continues to provide daily global measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles from the cloud top up to 60 km and 40 km respectively. The relatively high vertical and spatial sampling allow detection and tracking periodic events when aerosol particles are injected into the stratosphere, such as volcanic eruptions or meteor explosions. OMPS LP extend the long-term records of stratospheric aerosol at high vertical resolution produced by variety of sensors, such as SAGE, GOMOS, OSIRIS and CALIPSO. Most of these instruments ceased to operate or well beyond their designed lifetime. ISS/SAGE-III is currently scheduled to launch in November 2016.In this study we will examine the suitability of using LP profiles to continue the stratospheric aerosol records beyond SAGE and CALIPSO. We will compare OMPS LP newly released V1.0 aerosol extinction measurements to OSIRIS and CALIPSO. Initial results shows good agreement with OSIRIS measurements to within 20%. In addition, results showing latitudinal, and temporal variability of stratospheric aerosol extinction and optical depth for the three instruments will also be presented and compared.We will also present OMPS LP aerosol observations of the dispersal of volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere following the eruptions of Kelut and Calbuco in 2014 and 2015 respectively.

  17. Trientine and renin-angiotensin system blockade ameliorate progression of glomerular morphology in hypertensive experimental diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Moya-Olano, Leire; Milne, Helen Marie; Robinson, Jillian Margaret; Hill, Jonathan Vernon; Frampton, Christopher Miles; Abbott, Helen Frances; Turner, Rufus; Kettle, Anthony James; Endre, Zoltán Huba

    2011-11-01

    A comparison of the efficacy of the copper chelator, trientine, with combined renin angiotensin system (RAS) blockade on the progression of glomerular pathology in the diabetic (mREN-2)27 rat is reported. Animals were treated for 2 months with trientine, combined RAS blockers, combined trientine plus RAS blockers or none. Treatments began after inducing diabetes with streptozotocin. Physiological data were recorded monthly and light microscopic glomerular features were scored. Plasma allantoin and both plasma and renal protein carbonyls were measured as markers of oxidative stress. Trientine and RAS blockade decreased proteinuria and albuminuria and prevented an increase in creatinine clearance and kidney weight. Both reduced the diabetes-related glomerular features of mesangiolysis and glomerular segmental hypocellularity and trientine prevented severe tuft-to-capsule adhesion and reduced tubularization. Hypertension-related severe mesangial matrix expansion and global hypercellularity were increased by both treatments, which may reflect repair of mesangiolysis. Trientine reduced plasma but not renal protein carbonyls or plasma allantoin. In this model, trientine prevented the development of many diabetes-specific features similarly to RAS blockade. Amelioration of oxidative stress and features commonly observed in human diabetic nephropathy (DN), support a diabetes-related defect in copper (Cu) metabolism. The addition of Cu(II) chelation may improve current DN therapy. © 2011 The Authors. Pathology International © 2011 Japanese Society of Pathology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Early-Onset Diabetic E1-DN Mice Develop Albuminuria and Glomerular Injury Typical of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyvönen, Mervi E.; Tienari, Jukka; Lehtonen, Eero; Ustinov, Jarkko; Jalanko, Hannu; Otonkoski, Timo; Miettinen, Päivi J.

    2015-01-01

    The transgenic E1-DN mice express a kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor in their pancreatic islets and are diabetic from two weeks of age due to impaired postnatal growth of β-cell mass. Here, we characterize the development of hyperglycaemia-induced renal injury in the E1-DN mice. Homozygous mice showed increased albumin excretion rate (AER) at the age of 10 weeks; the albuminuria increased over time and correlated with blood glucose. Morphometric analysis of PAS-stained histological sections and electron microscopy images revealed mesangial expansion in homozygous E1-DN mice, and glomerular sclerosis was observed in the most hyperglycaemic mice. The albuminuric homozygous mice developed also other structural changes in the glomeruli, including thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and widening of podocyte foot processes that are typical for diabetic nephropathy. Increased apoptosis of podocytes was identified as one mechanism contributing to glomerular injury. In addition, nephrin expression was reduced in the podocytes of albuminuric homozygous E1-DN mice. Tubular changes included altered epithelial cell morphology and increased proliferation. In conclusion, hyperglycaemic E1-DN mice develop albuminuria and glomerular and tubular injury typical of human diabetic nephropathy and can serve as a new model to study the mechanisms leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26000279

  19. Early-onset diabetic E1-DN mice develop albuminuria and glomerular injury typical of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, Mervi E; Dumont, Vincent; Tienari, Jukka; Lehtonen, Eero; Ustinov, Jarkko; Havana, Marika; Jalanko, Hannu; Otonkoski, Timo; Miettinen, Päivi J; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    The transgenic E1-DN mice express a kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor in their pancreatic islets and are diabetic from two weeks of age due to impaired postnatal growth of β-cell mass. Here, we characterize the development of hyperglycaemia-induced renal injury in the E1-DN mice. Homozygous mice showed increased albumin excretion rate (AER) at the age of 10 weeks; the albuminuria increased over time and correlated with blood glucose. Morphometric analysis of PAS-stained histological sections and electron microscopy images revealed mesangial expansion in homozygous E1-DN mice, and glomerular sclerosis was observed in the most hyperglycaemic mice. The albuminuric homozygous mice developed also other structural changes in the glomeruli, including thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and widening of podocyte foot processes that are typical for diabetic nephropathy. Increased apoptosis of podocytes was identified as one mechanism contributing to glomerular injury. In addition, nephrin expression was reduced in the podocytes of albuminuric homozygous E1-DN mice. Tubular changes included altered epithelial cell morphology and increased proliferation. In conclusion, hyperglycaemic E1-DN mice develop albuminuria and glomerular and tubular injury typical of human diabetic nephropathy and can serve as a new model to study the mechanisms leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Thermal Modeling Method Improvements for SAGE III on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; McLeod, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Many innovative analysis methods have been used in developing this model; these will be described in the paper. This paper builds on a paper presented at TFAWS 2013, which described some of the initial developments of efficient methods for SAGE III. The current paper describes additional improvements that have been made since that time. To expedite the correlation of the model to thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing, the chambers and GSE for both TVAC chambers at Langley used to test the payload were incorporated within the thermal model. This allowed the runs of TVAC predictions and correlations to be run within the flight model, thus eliminating the need for separate models for TVAC. In one TVAC test, radiant lamps were used which necessitated shooting rays from the lamps, and running in both solar and IR wavebands. A new Dragon model was incorporated which entailed a change in orientation; that change was made using an assembly, so that any potential additional new Dragon orbits could be added in the future without modification of the model. The Earth orbit parameters such as albedo and Earth infrared flux were incorporated as time-varying values that change over the course of the orbit; despite being required in one of the ISS documents, this had not been done before by any previous payload. All parameters such as initial temperature, heater voltage, and location of the payload are defined based on the case definition. For one component, testing was performed in both air and vacuum; incorporating the air convection in a submodel that was

  1. Value of the SAGES Learning Center in introducing new technology.

    PubMed

    Hanly, E J; Zand, J; Bachman, S L; Marohn, M R; Talamini, M A

    2005-04-01

    The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Learning Center is a group of educational "classrooms" designed to tutor meeting attendees on specific technology-intensive content areas. The objectives of the Robotics Station were to familiarize participants with basic laparoscopic skills as implemented with surgical robotic assistance and to help them explore the benefits and drawbacks of using robotics in their institutions. Sixty-six volunteer surgeon attendees of the 2003 SAGES meeting representing a diverse group of backgrounds and possessing varying levels of surgical experience were directed through a series of drills on two different surgical robots. Each participant was directed through a series of three drills that practiced surgically relevant skills. Participants were given feedback on their performance. They then completed a 12-question computer-based questionnaire that surveyed their personal demographic backgrounds, their impressions of robotic surgery, and their opinions regarding the learning center's utility in educating them about new technology. Sixty-eight percent of participants had never used a surgical robot, and 89% had never used a robot clinically. Eighty-eight percent of respondents found one or both robots easier to use than they had expected, and 91% found that one or both robots made simple surgical tasks easier compared to standard laparoscopy. Sixty-four percent of participants stated that they were more likely to pursue purchase of a robotic system for use in their practice as a result of their exposure to robotics in the Learning Center. After completing the Robotics Station, 80% of surgeons believed that current surgical robots are of clinical benefit. However, 71% of participants stated that surgical robotic systems priced above $500,000 would not be financially viable in their practices. The structured learning environment used in the SAGES Learning Center fostered among participants a positive attitude

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in response of male greater sage-grouse lek attendance to energy development.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Andrew J; Beck, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Landscape modification due to rapidly expanding energy development, in particular oil and gas, in the westernUSA, have prompted concerns over how such developments may impact wildlife. One species of conservation concern across much of the Intermountain West is the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercusurophasianus). Sage-grouse have been petitioned for listing under provisions of the Endangered Species Act 7 times and the state of Wyoming alone represents 64% of the extant sage-grouse population in the eastern portion of their range. Consequently, the relationship between sage-grouse populations and oil and gas development in Wyoming is an important component to managing the long-term viability of this species. We used 814 leks from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department's lek survey database and well pad data from the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to evaluate changes in sage-grouse lek counts as a function of oil and gas development since 1991.From 1991-2011 we found that oil and gas well-pad density increased 3.6-fold across the state and was associated with a 24% decline in the number of male sage-grouse. Using a spatial and temporally structured analysis via Geographically Weighted Regression, we found a 1-to-4 year time lag between development density and lek decline. Sage-grouse also responded to development densities at multiple spatial neighborhoods surrounding leks, including broad scales of 10 km. However, sage-grouse lek counts do not always decline as a result of oil and gas development. We found similar development densities resulting in different sage-grouse lek count responses, suggesting that development density alone is insufficient to predict the impacts that oil and gas development have on sage-grouse. Finally, our analysis suggests a maximum development density of 1 well-pad within 2 km of leks to avoid measurable impacts within 1 year, and <6 well-pads within 10 km of leks to avoid delayed impacts.

  3. The Chemotaxonomy of Common Sage (Salvia officinalis) Based on the Volatile Constituents.

    PubMed

    Craft, Jonathan D; Satyal, Prabodh; Setzer, William N

    2017-06-29

    Background: Common sage (Salvia officinalis) is a popular culinary and medicinal herb. A literature survey has revealed that sage oils can vary widely in their chemical compositions. The purpose of this study was to examine sage essential oil from different sources/origins and to define the possible chemotypes of sage oil. Methods: Three different samples of sage leaf essential oil have been obtained and analyzed by GC-MS and GC-FID. A hierarchical cluster analysis was carried out on 185 sage oil compositions reported in the literature as well as the three samples in this study. Results: The major components of the three sage oils were the oxygenated monoterpenoids α-thujone (17.2-27.4%), 1,8-cineole (11.9-26.9%), and camphor (12.8-21.4%). The cluster analysis revealed five major chemotypes of sage oil, with the most common being a α-thujone > camphor > 1,8-cineole chemotype, of which the three samples in this study belong. The other chemotypes are an α-humulene-rich chemotype, a β-thujone-rich chemotype, a 1,8-cineole/camphor chemotype, and a sclareol/α-thujone chemotype. Conclusions: Most sage oils belonged to the "typical", α-thujone > camphor > 1,8-cineole, chemotype, but the essential oil compositions do vary widely and may have a profound effect on flavor and fragrance profiles as well as biological activities. There are currently no studies correlating sage oil composition with fragrance descriptions or with biological activities.

  4. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) on the International Space Station (ISS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Gasbarre, Joseph; Eckman, Richard; Topiwala, Nandkishore; Rodriquez-Alvarez, Otilia; Cheek, Dianne; Hall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will provide the science community with high-vertical resolution and nearly global observations of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gas species in the stratosphere and upper-troposphere. SAGE III/ISS measurements will extend the long-term Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) and SAGE data record begun in the 1970s. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are considered the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Key objectives of the mission are to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to re-establish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The space station mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. The SAGE III instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring atmospheric constituents with high vertical resolution. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. Science data is collected in solar occultation mode, lunar occultation mode, and limb scatter measurement mode. A SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle will provide access to space. Mounted in the unpressurized section of the Dragon trunk, SAGE III will be robotically removed from the Dragon and installed on the space station. SAGE III/ISS will be mounted to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-4 (ELC-4) location on the starboard side of the station. To facilitate a nadir view from this location, a Nadir Viewing Platform (NVP) payload was developed which mounts between the carrier and the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP).

  5. Effect of alterations in glomerular charge on deposition of cationic and anionic antibodies to fixed glomerular antigens in the rat.

    PubMed

    Adler, S; Baker, P; Pritzl, P; Couser, W G

    1985-07-01

    Reduction of the negative charge of the glomerular capillary wall alters its charge- and size-selective properties. To investigate the effect of alteration in glomerular charge properties on antibody localization, we prepared cationic and anionic fractions of antibodies to subepithelial and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens, and compared their deposition in normal rats and rats treated with protamine sulfate or aminonucleoside of puromycin to reduce capillary wall charge. IgG antibodies were eluted from kidneys of rats with active Heymann's nephritis (AICN), passive Heymann's nephritis (PHN), or anti-GBM nephritis (NTN), separated into cationic and anionic fractions, and radiolabeled with iodine 125 or iodine 131. Relative antibody content of each fraction was determined by incubation with an excess of glomerular antigen. Varying amounts of cationic and anionic IgG eluted from kidneys of rats with AICN or PHN were injected into 24 normal or protamine sulfate-treated rats. Glomerular binding of all antibodies was highly correlated with IgG delivery to the kidney. The ratio of cationic to anionic antibody deposited in the glomeruli of normal rats after 4 hours was 1.08 +/- 0.07 for AICN eluate and 0.37 +/- 0.04 for PHN eluate. The ratios were not significantly different in animals pretreated with protamine sulfate (1.15 +/- 0.06 and 0.44 +/- 0.06, respectively; P greater than 0.05). Varying amounts of cationic and anionic IgG eluted from kidneys of rats with NTN were injected into 10 normal rats and four rats treated with aminonucleoside of puromycin. Glomerular binding of antibody was again highly correlated with IgG delivery to the kidney. The ratio of cationic to anionic antibody deposited in the glomeruli of normal rats after 1 hour was 1.03 +/- 0.06, and was not significantly altered in rats treated with aminonucleoside of puromycin (1.05 +/- 0.03, P greater than 0.5). Proteinuria in PHN rats was also unaffected by treatment with protamine sulfate for

  6. Novel routes of albumin passage across the glomerular filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Castrop, H; Schießl, I M

    2017-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney diseases of various aetiologies and an unambiguous symptom of the compromised integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that albuminuria per se aggravates the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. This review covers new aspects of the movement of large plasma proteins across the glomerular filtration barrier in health and disease. Specifically, this review focuses on the role of endocytosis and transcytosis of albumin by podocytes, which constitutes a new pathway of plasma proteins across the filtration barrier. Thus, we summarize what is known about the mechanisms of albumin endocytosis by podocytes and address the fate of the endocytosed albumin, which is directed to lysosomal degradation or transcellular movement with subsequent vesicular release into the urinary space. We also address the functional consequences of overt albumin endocytosis by podocytes, such as the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which might eventually result in a deterioration of podocyte function. Finally, we consider the diagnostic potential of podocyte-derived albumin-containing vesicles in the urine as an early marker of a compromised glomerular barrier function. In terms of new technical approaches, the review covers how our knowledge of the movement of albumin across the glomerular filtration barrier has expanded by the use of new intravital imaging techniques.

  7. Renin lineage cells repopulate the glomerular mesangium after injury.

    PubMed

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Todorov, Vladimir T; Hugo, Christian P M

    2015-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein-reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of the enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive area in the glomerular tufts increased after mesangial injury. Furthermore, we generated a novel Tet-on inducible triple-transgenic LacZ reporter line that allowed selective labeling of renin cells along renal afferent arterioles of adult mice. Although no intraglomerular LacZ expression was detected in healthy mice, about two-thirds of the glomerular tufts became LacZ positive during the regenerative phase after severe mesangial injury. Intraglomerular renin descendant LacZ-expressing cells colocalized with mesangial cell markers α8-integrin and PDGF receptor-β but not with endothelial, podocyte, or parietal epithelial cell markers. In contrast with LacZ-positive cells in the afferent arterioles, LacZ-positive cells in the glomerular tuft did not express renin. These data demonstrate that extraglomerular renin lineage cells represent a major source of repopulating cells for reconstitution of the intraglomerular mesangium after injury.

  8. Renin Lineage Cells Repopulate the Glomerular Mesangium after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein–reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of the enhanced green fluorescent protein–positive area in the glomerular tufts increased after mesangial injury. Furthermore, we generated a novel Tet-on inducible triple-transgenic LacZ reporter line that allowed selective labeling of renin cells along renal afferent arterioles of adult mice. Although no intraglomerular LacZ expression was detected in healthy mice, about two-thirds of the glomerular tufts became LacZ positive during the regenerative phase after severe mesangial injury. Intraglomerular renin descendant LacZ-expressing cells colocalized with mesangial cell markers α8-integrin and PDGF receptor-β but not with endothelial, podocyte, or parietal epithelial cell markers. In contrast with LacZ-positive cells in the afferent arterioles, LacZ-positive cells in the glomerular tuft did not express renin. These data demonstrate that extraglomerular renin lineage cells represent a major source of repopulating cells for reconstitution of the intraglomerular mesangium after injury. PMID:24904091

  9. Podocytes and glomerular function with aging.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Jocelyn

    2009-11-01

    Kidney function declines with age in association with the development of age-associated glomerulosclerosis. The well-established structural and functional changes with age are reviewed briefly. The modification of aging pathology by calorie restriction is discussed. The role of the podocyte as a critical cell in the aging process is considered, using animal models and human biopsy material. Newer data on changes in gene expression and possible changes in biology in the glomerulus are discussed. There is speculation on the implications of this change in biology for human disease and progression.

  10. Changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine and cortisol plasma levels in menopausal women after inhalation of clary sage oil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Bok; Cho, Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the antidepressant-like effects of clary sage oil on human beings by comparing the neurotransmitter level change in plasma. The voluntary participants were 22 menopausal women in 50's. Subjects were classified into normal and depression tendency groups using each of Korean version of Beck Depression Inventory-I (KBDI-I), KBDI-II, and Korean version of Self-rating Depression Scale. Then, the changes in neurotransmitter concentrations were compared between two groups. After inhalation of clary sage oil, cortisol levels were significantly decreased while 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was significantly increased. Thyroid stimulating hormone was also reduced in all groups but not statistically significantly. The different change rate of 5-HT concentration between normal and depression tendency groups was variable according to the depression measurement inventory. When using KBDI-I and KBDI-II, 5-HT increased by 341% and 828% for the normal group and 484% and 257% for the depression tendency group, respectively. The change rate of cortisol was greater in depression tendency groups compared with normal groups, and this difference was statistically significant when using KBDI-II (31% vs. 16% reduction) and Self-rating Depression Scale inventory (36% vs. 8.3% reduction). Among three inventories, only KBDI-II differentiated normal and depression tendency groups with significantly different cortisol level. Finally, clary sage oil has antidepressant-like effect, and KBDI-II inventory may be the most sensitive and valid tool in screening for depression status or severity.

  11. Biochemical and Cellular Determinants of Renal Glomerular Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Embry, Addie E.; Mohammadi, Hamid; Niu, Xinying; Liu, Liping; Moe, Borren; Miller-Little, William A.; Lu, Christopher Y.; Bruggeman, Leslie A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.; Janmey, Paul A.; Miller, R. Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The elastic properties of renal glomeruli and their capillaries permit them to maintain structural integrity in the presence of variable hemodynamic forces. Measured by micro-indentation, glomeruli have an elastic modulus (E, Young’s modulus) of 2.1 kPa, and estimates from glomerular perfusion studies suggest that the E of glomeruli is between 2 and 4 kPa. F-actin depolymerization by latrunculin, inhibition of acto-myosin contractility by blebbistatin, reduction in ATP synthesis, and reduction of the affinity of adhesion proteins by EDTA reduced the glomerular E to 1.26, 1.7, 1.5, and 1.43 kPa, respectively. Actin filament stabilization with jasplakinolide and increasing integrin affinity with Mg2+ increased E to 2.65 and 2.87 kPa, respectively. Alterations in glomerular E are reflected in commensurate changes in F/G actin ratios. Disruption of vimentin intermediate filaments by withaferin A reduced E to 0.92 kPa. The E of decellularized glomeruli was 0.74 kPa, indicating that cellular components of glomeruli have dominant effects on their elasticity. The E of glomerular basement membranes measured by magnetic bead displacement was 2.4 kPa. Podocytes and mesangial cells grown on substrates with E values between 3 and 5 kPa had actin fibers and focal adhesions resembling those of podocytes in vivo. Renal ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion reduced the E of glomeruli to 1.58 kPa. These results show that the E of glomeruli is between 2 and 4 kPa. E of the GBM, 2.4 kPa, is consistent with this value, and is supported by the behavior of podocytes and mesangial cells grown on variable stiffness matrices. The podocyte cytoskeleton contributes the major component to the overall E of glomeruli, and a normal E requires ATP synthesis. The reduction in glomerular E following ischemia and in other diseases indicates that reduced glomerular E is a common feature of many forms of glomerular injury and indicative of an abnormal podocyte cytoskeleton. PMID:27942003

  12. Changes in glomerular heparan sulfate in puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Groggel, G. C.; Hovingh, P.; Border, W. A.; Linker, A.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in glomerular anionic sites in puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN) in the rat are controversial. The authors examined glomerular anionic sites in PAN by in vivo staining with polyethyleneimine (PEI). They also quantitated and characterized glomerular heparan sulfate (HS), which is known to be a major glomerular polyanion in PAN, using in vivo incorporation of 35S-sulfate. PAN rats had a mean protein excretion of 96 +/- 23 mg per 24 hours. Staining of anionic sites with PEI showed 15.3 +/- 2.8 sites per 1000-nm length of glomerular basement membrane in controls, 13.7 +/- 1.9 sites in PAN rats (P greater than 0.05), and 50% of rats with early PAN had absent staining. Total 35S-sulfate incorporation was similar in both the controls and established PAN rats (2900 +/- 150 dpm/mg dry wt of glomeruli versus 3005 +/- 260, P greater than 0.05) but decreased in early PAN rats (2025 +/- 148). The percentage of 35S-sulfate incorporated into chondroitin sulfate was similar in all three groups of animals. HS uronic acid was also similar (1.8 +/- 0.2 g/mg dry wt of glomeruli versus 1.7 +/- 0.3, P greater than 0.05) but decreased in early PAN (1.1 +/- 0.2). The distribution of 35S-sulfate activity within the HS subfractions was examined by ion-exchange chromatography and showed a shift in percent present from 1.0 M to 1.25 M fraction in established and early PAN animals (control 1.0 M 37% +/- 3.2% versus PAN 19% +/- 3.4%, P less than 0.01, and 1.25 M 36% +/- 2.9% versus 53% +/- 2.9%, P less than 0.01). These results demonstrate that glomerular heparan sulfate is unchanged in established PAN but decreased in early PAN. SO4 incorporation is unchanged in established PAN and diminished in early PAN. Thus, early in PAN HS synthesis is impaired, but in established PAN the HS is normal, and changes in glomerular HS cannot explain the increased permeability. Images Figure 1 PMID:2443012

  13. Liver metal concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Dailey, Rebecca N; Raisbeck, Merl F; Siemion, Roger S; Cornish, Todd E

    2008-04-01

    Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are a species of concern due to shrinking populations associated with habitat fragmentation and loss. Baseline health parameters for this species are limited or lacking, especially with regard to tissue metal concentrations. To obtain a range of tissue metal concentrations, livers were collected from 71 Greater Sage-grouse from Wyoming and Montana. Mean +/- SE metal concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in liver were determined for vanadium (V) (0.12 +/- 0.01), chromium (Cr) (0.50 +/- 0.02), manganese (Mn) (2.68 +/- 0.11), iron (Fe) (1,019 +/- 103), nickel (Ni) (0.40 +/- 0.04), cobalt (Co) (0.08 +/- 0.02), copper (Cu) (6.43 +/- 0.40), mercury (Hg) (0.30 +/- 0.09), selenium (Se) (1.45 +/- 0.64), zinc (Zn) (59.2 +/- 4.70), molybdenum (Mo) (0.93 +/- 0.07), cadmium (Cd) (1.44 +/- 0.14), barium (Ba) (0.20 +/- 0.03), and lead (Pb) (0.17 +/- 0.03). In addition to providing baseline data, metal concentrations were compared between sex, age (juvenile/adult), and West Nile virus (WNv) groups (positive/negative). Adult birds had higher concentrations of Ni and Cd compared to juveniles. In addition, Zn and Cu concentrations were significantly elevated in WNv-positive birds.

  14. Nest Success of Gunnison Sage-Grouse in Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Davis, Amy J; Phillips, Michael L; Doherty, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is a species of concern for which little demographic information exists. To help fill this information gap, we investigated factors affecting nest success in two populations of Gunnison Sage-Grouse. We assessed the relative effects of (1) vegetation characteristics (e.g., shrub height, shrub cover, grass cover, and grass height), (2) temporal factors (e.g., year, timing of incubation initiation, and nest age), (3) precipitation, and (4) age of the nesting female (yearling or adult) on nest success rates. We found 177 nests in the Gunnison Basin population (that contains 85-90% of the species) from 2005-2010 and 20 nests in the San Miguel population (that contains < 10% of the species) from 2007-2010. Temporal factors had the greatest impact on nest success compared to vegetation characteristics, precipitation, and female age. Nest success varied considerably among years ranging from 4.0%-60.2% in Gunnison Basin and from 12.9%- 51.9% in San Miguel. Nests that were initiated earlier in the breeding season had higher nest success (at least one egg hatches). Daily nest survival rates decreased during the course of incubation. None of the vegetation characteristics we examined were strongly related to nest success.

  15. Nest Success of Gunnison Sage-Grouse in Colorado, USA

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amy J.; Phillips, Michael L.; Doherty, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is a species of concern for which little demographic information exists. To help fill this information gap, we investigated factors affecting nest success in two populations of Gunnison Sage-Grouse. We assessed the relative effects of (1) vegetation characteristics (e.g., shrub height, shrub cover, grass cover, and grass height), (2) temporal factors (e.g., year, timing of incubation initiation, and nest age), (3) precipitation, and (4) age of the nesting female (yearling or adult) on nest success rates. We found 177 nests in the Gunnison Basin population (that contains 85–90% of the species) from 2005–2010 and 20 nests in the San Miguel population (that contains < 10% of the species) from 2007–2010. Temporal factors had the greatest impact on nest success compared to vegetation characteristics, precipitation, and female age. Nest success varied considerably among years ranging from 4.0%-60.2% in Gunnison Basin and from 12.9%- 51.9% in San Miguel. Nests that were initiated earlier in the breeding season had higher nest success (at least one egg hatches). Daily nest survival rates decreased during the course of incubation. None of the vegetation characteristics we examined were strongly related to nest success. PMID:26287996

  16. SAGE III on ISS Lessons Learned on Thermal Interface Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument - the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring vertical distribution of aerosols, ozone, and other trace gases in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere - is currently scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2016. The Instrument Adapter Module (IAM), one of many SAGE III subsystems, continuously dissipates a considerable amount of thermal energy during mission operations. Although a portion of this energy is transferred via its large radiator surface area, the majority must be conductively transferred to the ExPRESS Payload Adapter (ExPA) to satisfy thermal mitigation requirements. The baseline IAM-ExPA mechanical interface did not afford the thermal conductance necessary to prevent the IAM from overheating in hot on-orbit cases, and high interfacial conductance was difficult to achieve given the large span between mechanical fasteners, less than stringent flatness specifications, and material usage constraints due to strict contamination requirements. This paper will examine the evolution of the IAM-ExPA thermal interface over the course of three design iterations and will include discussion on design challenges, material selection, testing successes and failures, and lessons learned.

  17. Glomerular Aging and Focal Global Glomerulosclerosis: A Podometric Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Bitzer, Markus; Wickman, Larysa; Afshinnia, Farsad; Wang, Su Q; O'Connor, Christopher; Yang, Yan; Meadowbrooke, Chrysta; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Kikuchi, Masao; Wiggins, Jocelyn E; Wiggins, Roger C

    2015-12-01

    Kidney aging is associated with an increasing proportion of globally scarred glomeruli, decreasing renal function, and exponentially increasing ESRD prevalence. In model systems, podocyte depletion causes glomerulosclerosis, suggesting age-associated glomerulosclerosis could be caused by a similar mechanism. We measured podocyte number, size, density, and glomerular volume in 89 normal kidney samples from living and deceased kidney donors and normal poles of nephrectomies. Podocyte nuclear density decreased with age due to a combination of decreased podocyte number per glomerulus and increased glomerular volume. Compensatory podocyte cell hypertrophy prevented a change in the proportion of tuft volume occupied by podocytes. Young kidneys had high podocyte reserve (podocyte density >300 per 10(6) µm(3)), but by 70-80 years of age, average podocyte nuclear density decreased to, <100 per 10(6) µm(3), with corresponding podocyte hypertrophy. In older age podocyte detachment rate (urine podocin mRNA-to-creatinine ratio) was higher than at younger ages and podocytes were stressed (increased urine podocin-to-nephrin mRNA ratio). Moreover, in older kidneys, proteinaceous material accumulated in the Bowman space of glomeruli with low podocyte density. In a subset of these glomeruli, mass podocyte detachment events occurred in association with podocytes becoming binucleate (mitotic podocyte catastrophe) and subsequent wrinkling of glomerular capillaries, tuft collapse, and periglomerular fibrosis. In kidneys of young patients with underlying glomerular diseases similar pathologic events were identified in association with focal global glomerulosclerosis. Podocyte density reduction with age may therefore directly lead to focal global glomerulosclerosis, and all progressive glomerular diseases can be considered superimposed accelerators of this underlying process.

  18. Preliminary analysis of Greater Sage-grouse reproduction in the Virginia Mountains of northwestern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Lockyer, Zachary B.; Farinha, Melissa A.; Sweeney, Joelle M.; Johnson, Valerie M.; Meshriy, Matthew G.; Espinosa, Shawn P.; Delehanty, David J.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between habitat selection and population vital rates of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter sage-grouse), recently designated as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act, within the Great Basin are not well-understood. The growing development of renewable energy infrastructure within areas inhabited by sage-grouse is thought to influence predator and vegetation communities. For example, common ravens (Corvus corax), a synanthropic sage-grouse nest predator, are increasing range-wide and select transmission lines and other tall structures for nesting and perching. In the Virginia Mountains of northwestern Nevada, we collected preliminary information of space-use, habitat selection, and population vital rates during the nesting and brood-rearing period over two years on 56 sage-grouse. Additionally, videography at nest sites (n = 22) was used to identify sage-grouse nest predators. The study area is a potential site for renewable energy developments (i.e., wind and solar), and we plan to continue monitoring this population using a before-after-control-impact study design. The results reported here are preliminary and further data are required before conclusions can be drawn from this population of sage-grouse.

  19. Metformin-like effect of Salvia officinalis (common sage): is it useful in diabetes prevention?

    PubMed

    Lima, Cristovao F; Azevedo, Marisa F; Araujo, Rita; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2006-08-01

    Common sage (Salvia officinalis L.) is among the plants that are claimed to be beneficial to diabetic patients, and previous studies have suggested that some of its extracts have hypoglycaemic effects in normal and diabetic animals. In the present study, we aimed to verify the antidiabetic effects of an infusion (tea) of common sage, which is the most common form of this plant consumed. Replacing water with sage tea for 14 d lowered the fasting plasma glucose level in normal mice but had no effect on glucose clearance in response to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. This indicated effects on gluconeogenesis at the level of the liver. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from healthy, sage-tea-drinking rats showed, after stimulation, a high glucose uptake capacity and decreased gluconeogenesis in response to glucagon. Essential oil from sage further increased hepatocyte sensitivity to insulin and inhibited gluconeogenesis. Overall, these effects resemble those of the pharmaceutical drug metformin, a known inhibitor of gluconeogenesis used in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In primary cultures of rat hepatocytes isolated from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, none of these activities was observed. The present results seem to indicate that sage tea does not possess antidiabetic effects at this level. However, its effects on fasting glucose levels in normal animals and its metformin-like effects on rat hepatocytes suggest that sage may be useful as a food supplement in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by lowering the plasma glucose of individuals at risk.

  20. Disruption of glomerular basement membrane charge through podocyte-specific mutation of agrin does not alter glomerular permselectivity.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Scott J; Jarad, George; Cunningham, Jeanette; Rops, Angelique L; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H; Moeller, Marcus J; Holzman, Lawrence B; Burgess, Robert W; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2007-07-01

    Glomerular charge selectivity has been attributed to anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Agrin is the predominant GBM-HSPG, but evidence that it contributes to the charge barrier is lacking, because newborn agrin-deficient mice die from neuromuscular defects. To study agrin in adult kidney, a new conditional allele was used to generate podocyte-specific knockouts. Mutants were viable and displayed no renal histopathology up to 9 months of age. Perlecan, a HSPG normally confined to the mesangium in mature glomeruli, did not appear in the mutant GBM, which lacked heparan sulfate. Moreover, GBM agrin was found to be derived primarily from podocytes. Polyethyleneimine labeling of fetal kidneys revealed anionic sites along both laminae rarae of the GBM that became most prominent along the subepithelial aspect at maturity; labeling was greatly reduced along the subepithelial aspect in agrin-deficient and conditional knockout mice. Despite this severe charge disruption, the glomerular filtration barrier was not compromised, even when challenged with bovine serum albumin overload. We conclude that agrin is not required for establishment or maintenance of GBM architecture. Although agrin contributes significantly to the anionic charge to the GBM, both it and its charge are not needed for glomerular permselectivity. This calls into question whether charge selectivity is a feature of the GBM.

  1. Disruption of Glomerular Basement Membrane Charge through Podocyte-Specific Mutation of Agrin Does Not Alter Glomerular Permselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Scott J.; Jarad, George; Cunningham, Jeanette; Rops, Angelique L.; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H.; Moeller, Marcus J.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Burgess, Robert W.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2007-01-01

    Glomerular charge selectivity has been attributed to anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Agrin is the predominant GBM-HSPG, but evidence that it contributes to the charge barrier is lacking, because newborn agrin-deficient mice die from neuromuscular defects. To study agrin in adult kidney, a new conditional allele was used to generate podocyte-specific knockouts. Mutants were viable and displayed no renal histopathology up to 9 months of age. Perlecan, a HSPG normally confined to the mesangium in mature glomeruli, did not appear in the mutant GBM, which lacked heparan sulfate. Moreover, GBM agrin was found to be derived primarily from podocytes. Polyethyleneimine labeling of fetal kidneys revealed anionic sites along both laminae rarae of the GBM that became most prominent along the subepithelial aspect at maturity; labeling was greatly reduced along the subepithelial aspect in agrin-deficient and conditional knockout mice. Despite this severe charge disruption, the glomerular filtration barrier was not compromised, even when challenged with bovine serum albumin overload. We conclude that agrin is not required for establishment or maintenance of GBM architecture. Although agrin contributes significantly to the anionic charge to the GBM, both it and its charge are not needed for glomerular permselectivity. This calls into question whether charge selectivity is a feature of the GBM. PMID:17591961

  2. Habitat prioritization across large landscapes, multiple seasons, and novel areas: an example using greater sage-grouse in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, Bradley C.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; O'Donnell, Michael S.; Beck, Jeffrey L.; Bedrosian, Bryan; Gummer, David; Holloran, Matthew J.; Johnson, Gregory D.; Kaczor, Nicholas W.; Kirol, Christopher P.; Mandich, Cheryl A.; Marshall, David; McKee, Gwyn; Olson, Chad; Pratt, Aaron C.; Swanson, Christopher C.; Walker, Brett L.

    2014-01-01

    Animal habitat selection is an important and expansive area of research in ecology. In particular, the study of habitat selection is critical in habitat prioritization efforts for species of conservation concern. Landscape planning for species is happening at ever-increasing extents because of the appreciation for the role of landscape-scale patterns in species persistence coupled to improved datasets for species and habitats, and the expanding and intensifying footprint of human land uses on the landscape. We present a large-scale collaborative effort to develop habitat selection models across large landscapes and multiple seasons for prioritizing habitat for a species of conservation concern. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter sage-grouse) occur in western semi-arid landscapes in North America. Range-wide population declines of this species have been documented, and it is currently considered as “warranted but precluded” from listing under the United States Endangered Species Act. Wyoming is predicted to remain a stronghold for sage-grouse populations and contains approximately 37% of remaining birds. We compiled location data from 14 unique radiotelemetry studies (data collected 1994–2010) and habitat data from high-quality, biologically relevant, geographic information system (GIS) layers across Wyoming. We developed habitat selection models for greater sage-grouse across Wyoming for 3 distinct life stages: 1) nesting, 2) summer, and 3) winter. We developed patch and landscape models across 4 extents, producing statewide and regional (southwest, central, northeast) models for Wyoming. Habitat selection varied among regions and seasons, yet preferred habitat attributes generally matched the extensive literature on sage-grouse seasonal habitat requirements. Across seasons and regions, birds preferred areas with greater percentage sagebrush cover and avoided paved roads, agriculture, and forested areas. Birds consistently preferred

  3. Compound effects of aging and experimental FSGS on glomerular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kutz, J. Nathan; Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced age portends a poorer prognosis in FSGS. To understand the impact of age on glomerular podocytes and parietal epithelial cells (PECs), experimental FSGS was induced in 3m-old mice (20-year old human age) and 27m-old mice (78-year old human age) by abruptly depleting podocytes with a cytopathic anti-podocyte antibody. Despite similar binding of the disease-inducing antibody, podocyte density was lower in aged FSGS mice compared to young FSGS mice. Activated PEC density was higher in aged versus young FSGS mice, as was the percentage of total activated PECs. Additionally, the percentage of glomeruli containing PECs with evidence of phosphorylated ERK and EMT was higher in aged FSGS mice. Extracellular matrix, measured by collagen IV and silver staining, was higher in aged FSGS mice along Bowman's capsule. However, collagen IV accumulation in the glomerular tufts alone and in glomeruli with both tuft and Bowman's capsule accumulation were similar in young FSGS and aged FSGS mice. Thus, the major difference in collagen IV staining in FSGS was along Bowman's capsule in aged mice. The significant differences in podocytes, PECs and extracellular matrixaccumulation between young mice and old mice with FSGS might explain the differences in outcomes in FSGS based on age. PMID:28222042

  4. Insulin directly stimulates VEGF-A production in the glomerular podocyte.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Hurcombe, J; Lay, A; Santamaría, B; Valverde, A M; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Welsh, G I; Coward, R J

    2013-07-15

    Podocytes are critically important for maintaining the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier and preventing albuminuria. Recently, it has become clear that to achieve this, they need to be insulin sensitive and produce an optimal amount of VEGF-A. In other tissues, insulin has been shown to regulate VEGF-A release, but this has not been previously examined in the podocyte. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, in the present study, we now show that insulin regulates VEGF-A in the podocyte in both mice and humans via the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin directly increased VEGF-A mRNA levels and protein production in conditionally immortalized wild-type human and murine podocytes. Furthermore, when podocytes were rendered insulin resistant in vitro (using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown of the IR) or in vivo (using transgenic podocyte-specific IR knockout mice), podocyte VEGF-A production was impaired. Importantly, in vivo, this occurs before the development of any podocyte damage due to podocyte insulin resistance. Modulation of VEGF-A by insulin in the podocyte may be another important factor in the development of glomerular disease associated with conditions in which insulin signaling to the podocyte is deranged.

  5. Podocyte Number in Children and Adults: Associations with Glomerular Size and Numbers of Other Glomerular Resident Cells.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Victor G; Douglas-Denton, Rebecca N; Cullen-McEwen, Luise A; Li, Jinhua; Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Kerr, Peter G; Bertram, John F

    2015-09-01

    Increases in glomerular size occur with normal body growth and in many pathologic conditions. In this study, we determined associations between glomerular size and numbers of glomerular resident cells, with a particular focus on podocytes. Kidneys from 16 male Caucasian-Americans without overt renal disease, including 4 children (≤3 years old) to define baseline values of early life and 12 adults (≥18 years old), were collected at autopsy in Jackson, Mississippi. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and design-based stereology to estimate individual glomerular volume (IGV) and numbers of podocytes, nonepithelial cells (NECs; tuft cells other than podocytes), and parietal epithelial cells (PECs). Podocyte density was calculated. Data are reported as medians and interquartile ranges (IQRs). Glomeruli from children were small and contained 452 podocytes (IQR=335-502), 389 NECs (IQR=265-498), and 146 PECs (IQR=111-206). Adult glomeruli contained significantly more cells than glomeruli from children, including 558 podocytes (IQR=431-746; P<0.01), 1383 NECs (IQR=998-2042; P<0.001), and 367 PECs (IQR=309-673; P<0.001). However, large adult glomeruli showed markedly lower podocyte density (183 podocytes per 10(6) µm(3)) than small glomeruli from adults and children (932 podocytes per 10(6) µm(3); P<0.001). In conclusion, large adult glomeruli contained more podocytes than small glomeruli from children and adults, raising questions about the origin of these podocytes. The increased number of podocytes in large glomeruli does not match the increase in glomerular size observed in adults, resulting in relative podocyte depletion. This may render hypertrophic glomeruli susceptible to pathology.

  6. DeepSAGE--digital transcriptomics with high sensitivity, simple experimental protocol and multiplexing of samples.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kåre L; Høgh, Annabeth Laursen; Emmersen, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    Digital transcriptomics with pyrophosphatase based ultra-high throughput DNA sequencing of di-tags provides high sensitivity and cost-effective gene expression profiling. Sample preparation and handling are greatly simplified compared to Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). We compare DeepSAGE and LongSAGE data and demonstrate greater power of detection and multiplexing of samples derived from potato. The transcript analysis revealed a great abundance of up-regulated potato transcripts associated with stress in dormant potatoes compared to harvest. Importantly, many transcripts were detected that cannot be matched to known genes, but is likely to be part of the abiotic stress-response in potato.

  7. Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

  8. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  9. SuperSAGE evidence for CD14++CD16+ monocytes as a third monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Marell, Rolf-R; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2011-09-22

    Monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population with subset-specific functions and phenotypes. The differential expression of CD14 and CD16 distinguishes classical CD14(++)CD16(-), intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+), and nonclassical CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes. Current knowledge on human monocyte heterogeneity is still incomplete: while it is increasingly acknowledged that CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes are of outstanding significance in 2 global health issues, namely HIV-1 infection and atherosclerosis, CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes remain the most poorly characterized subset so far. We therefore developed a method to purify the 3 monocyte subsets from human blood and analyzed their transcriptomes using SuperSAGE in combination with high-throughput sequencing. Analysis of 5 487 603 tags revealed unique identifiers of CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes, delineating these cells from the 2 other monocyte subsets. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis suggests diverse immunologic functions, linking CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes to Ag processing and presentation (eg, CD74, HLA-DR, IFI30, CTSB), to inflammation and monocyte activation (eg, TGFB1, AIF1, PTPN6), and to angiogenesis (eg, TIE2, CD105). In conclusion, we provide genetic evidence for a distinct role of CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes in human immunity. After CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes have earlier been discussed as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases, we are hopeful that our data will spur further research in the field of monocyte heterogeneity.

  10. Role of the glomerular-tubular imbalance with tubular predominance in the arterial hypertension pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fox, María Ofelia Barber; Gutiérrez, Ernesto Barber

    2013-09-01

    In previous investigations we caused renal tubular reabsorption preponderance relating to the glomerular filtration (Glomerular-tubular imbalance) and we observed that this fact conducted to volume expansion and development of arterial hypertension, in rats that previously were normotens. We based on this evidence and other which are reflected in the literature arrived at the following hypothesis: a greater proportion of tubular reabsorption relating to the filtered volume is the base of the establishment of the glomerular-tubular imbalance with tubular predominance (GTI-T), which favors to the Na(+)-fluid retention and volume expansion. All of which conduced to arterial hypertension. These facts explain a primary hypertensive role of the kidney, consistent with the results of renal transplants performed in different lines of hypertensive rats and their respective controls and in humans: hypertension can be transferred with the kidney. GTI-T aims to be, a common phenomenon involved in the hypertension development in the multiple ways which is manifested the hypertensive syndrome. In secondary hypertension, GTI-T is caused by significant disruptions of hormone secretions that control renal function, or obvious vascular or parenchymal damage of these organs. In primary hypertension the GTI-T has less obvious causes inherently developed in the kidney, including humoral, cellular and subcellular mechanisms, which may insidiously manifest under environmental factors influence, resulting in insidious development of hypertension. This would explain the state of prehypertension that these individuals suffer. So it has great importance to study GTI-T before the hypertension is established, because when hypertensive state is established, other mechanisms are installed and they contribute to maintain the hypertension. Our hypothesis may explaining the inability of the kidneys to excrete salt and water in hypertension, as Guyton and colleagues have expressed and constitutes a

  11. Glomerular common gamma chain confers B- and T-cell-independent protection against glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Cathelin, Dominique; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Xu, Xiaoli; Sohier, Julie; Placier, Sandrine; Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Louis, Kevin; Hertig, Alexandre; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Vasseur, Florence; Campagne, Fabien; Di Santo, James P; Vosshenrich, Christian; Rondeau, Eric; Mesnard, Laurent

    2017-01-19

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis is a life-threatening renal disease that has been extensively studied by the experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis (anti-GBM-GN) model. Although T cells have a significant role in this model, athymic/nude mice and rats still develop severe renal disease. Here we further explored the contribution of intrinsic renal cells in the development of T-cell-independent GN lesions. Anti-GBM-GN was induced in three strains of immune-deficient mice (Rag2(-/-), Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-), and Rag2(-/-)Il2rb(-/-)) that are devoid of either T/B cells or T/B/NK cells. The Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) or Rag2(-/-)Il2rb(-/-) mice harbor an additional deletion of either the common gamma chain (γC) or the interleukin-2 receptor β subunit (IL-2Rβ), respectively, impairing IL-15 signaling in particular. As expected, all these strains developed severe anti-GBM-GN. Additionally, bone marrow replenishment experiments allowed us to deduce a protective role for the glomerular-expressed γC during anti-GBM-GN. Given that IL-15 has been found highly expressed in nephritic kidneys despite the absence of lymphocytes, we then studied this cytokine in vitro on primary cultured podocytes from immune-deficient mice (Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) and Rag2(-/-)Il2rb(-/-)) compared to controls. IL-15 induced downstream activation of JAK1/3 and SYK in primary cultured podocytes. IL-15-dependent JAK/SYK induction was impaired in the absence of γC or IL-2Rβ. We found γC largely induced on podocytes during human glomerulonephritis. Thus, renal lesions are indeed modulated by intrinsic glomerular cells through the γC/IL-2Rβ receptor response, to date classically described only in immune cells.

  12. Kidney diseases caused by glomerular basement membrane type IV collagen defects in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2013-01-01

    To review the pathogenesis, as well as the clinical and pathologic features of canine glomerular diseases caused by genetic type IV collagen defects. Original studies and review articles from human and veterinary medical fields. Presence in glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of a network composed of α3.α4.α5 heterotrimers of type IV collagen is required to maintain structure and function of glomerular capillary walls. Hereditary nephropathy (HN) is the most commonly used name for kidney diseases that occur in dogs due to genetic type IV collagen abnormalities. To date, 4 different collagen IV gene mutations have been identified in dogs with HN; 2 are COL4A5 mutations that cause X-linked HN (XL-HN), and 2 are COL4A4 mutations that cause autosomal recessive HN (AR-HN). Affected males with XL-HN and affected males and females with AR-HN develop juvenile-onset kidney disease manifested by proteinuria typically starting at 3-6 months of age and followed by progressive kidney disease leading to terminal failure usually at 6-24 months of age. Carrier female dogs with XL-HN also develop proteinuria starting at 3-6 months of age, but progressive disease causing kidney failure is uncommon until they are >5 years old. The distinctive pathologic lesions of HN are extensive multilaminar splitting and thickening of the GBM, as demonstrated by electron microscopy, and abnormal type IV collagen α-chain content of basement membranes, as demonstrated by immunolabeling. Identification of the underlying gene mutations has permitted genetic testing and selective breeding practices that currently are minimizing HN in breeds known to be at risk. Canine HN is a rare disease that should be considered whenever a dog exhibits a juvenile-onset kidney disease characterized partly by proteinuria, but highly specialized methods are required to pursue a definitive diagnosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  13. Changes in glomerular parietal epithelial cells in mouse kidneys with advanced age

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, Sebastian S.; Stefanska, Ania; Eng, Diana G.; Kaverina, Natalya; Sunseri, Maria W.; McNicholas, Bairbre A.; Rabinovitch, Peter; Engel, Felix B.; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Lichtnekert, Julia; Pippin, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Kidney aging is accompanied by characteristic changes in the glomerulus, but little is known about the effect of aging on glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs), nor if the characteristic glomerular changes in humans and rats also occur in very old mice. Accordingly, a descriptive analysis was undertaken in 27-mo-old C57B6 mice, considered advanced age. PEC density was significantly lower in older mice compared with young mice (aged 3 mo), and the decrease was more pronounced in juxtamedullary glomeruli compared with outer cortical glomeruli. In addition to segmental and global glomerulosclerosis in older mice, staining for matrix proteins collagen type IV and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were markedly increased in Bowman's capsules of older mouse glomeruli, consistent with increased extracellular matrix production by PECs. De novo staining for CD44, a marker of activated and profibrotic PECs, was significantly increased in aged glomeruli. CD44 staining was more pronounced in the juxtamedullary region and colocalized with phosphorylated ERK. Additionally, a subset of aged PECs de novo expressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers α-smooth muscle and vimentin, with no changes in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and β-catenin. The mural cell markers neural/glial antigen 2, PDGF receptor-β, and CD146 as well as Notch 3 were also substantially increased in aged PECs. These data show that mice can be used to better understand the aging kidney and that PECs undergo substantial changes, especially in juxtamedullary glomeruli, that may participate in the overall decline in glomerular structure and function with advancing age. PMID:26017974

  14. Evaluation of SAGE II and Balloon-Borne Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements: Evaluation of Aerosol Measurements from SAGE II, HALOE, and Balloonborne Optical Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark; Deshler, Terry; Moddrea, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements from the University of Wyoming balloonborne optical particle counters (OPCs), the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) were compared in the period 1982-2000, when measurements were available. The OPCs measure aerosol size distributions, and HALOE multiwavelength (2.45-5.26 micrometers) extinction measurements can be used to retrieve aerosol size distributions. Aerosol extinctions at the SAGE II wavelengths (0.386-1.02 micrometers) were computed from these size distributions and compared to SAGE II measurements. In addition, surface areas derived from all three experiments were compared. While the overall impression from these results is encouraging, the agreement can change with latitude, altitude, time, and parameter. In the broadest sense, these comparisons fall into two categories: high aerosol loading (volcanic periods) and low aerosol loading (background periods and altitudes above 25 km). When the aerosol amount was low, SAGE II and HALOE extinctions were higher than the OPC estimates, while the SAGE II surface areas were lower than HALOE and the OPCS. Under high loading conditions all three instruments mutually agree to within 50%.

  15. Experimental chronic noise is related to elevated fecal corticosteroid metabolites in lekking male greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Blickley, Jessica L; Word, Karen R; Krakauer, Alan H; Phillips, Jennifer L; Sells, Sarah N; Taff, Conor C; Wingfield, John C; Patricelli, Gail L

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that individuals in many species avoid areas exposed to chronic anthropogenic noise, but the impact of noise on those who remain in these habitats is unclear. One potential impact is chronic physiological stress, which can affect disease resistance, survival and reproductive success. Previous studies have found evidence of elevated stress-related hormones (glucocorticoids) in wildlife exposed to human activities, but the impacts of noise alone are difficult to separate from confounding factors. Here we used an experimental playback study to isolate the impacts of noise from industrial activity (natural gas drilling and road noise) on glucocorticoid levels in greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a species of conservation concern. We non-invasively measured immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites from fecal samples (FCMs) of males on both noise-treated and control leks (display grounds) in two breeding seasons. We found strong support for an impact of noise playback on stress levels, with 16.7% higher mean FCM levels in samples from noise leks compared with samples from paired control leks. Taken together with results from a previous study finding declines in male lek attendance in response to noise playbacks, these results suggest that chronic noise pollution can cause greater sage-grouse to avoid otherwise suitable habitat, and can cause elevated stress levels in the birds who remain in noisy areas.

  16. Experimental Chronic Noise Is Related to Elevated Fecal Corticosteroid Metabolites in Lekking Male Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

    PubMed Central

    Blickley, Jessica L.; Word, Karen R.; Krakauer, Alan H.; Phillips, Jennifer L.; Sells, Sarah N.; Taff, Conor C.; Wingfield, John C.; Patricelli, Gail L.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that individuals in many species avoid areas exposed to chronic anthropogenic noise, but the impact of noise on those who remain in these habitats is unclear. One potential impact is chronic physiological stress, which can affect disease resistance, survival and reproductive success. Previous studies have found evidence of elevated stress-related hormones (glucocorticoids) in wildlife exposed to human activities, but the impacts of noise alone are difficult to separate from confounding factors. Here we used an experimental playback study to isolate the impacts of noise from industrial activity (natural gas drilling and road noise) on glucocorticoid levels in greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a species of conservation concern. We non-invasively measured immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites from fecal samples (FCMs) of males on both noise-treated and control leks (display grounds) in two breeding seasons. We found strong support for an impact of noise playback on stress levels, with 16.7% higher mean FCM levels in samples from noise leks compared with samples from paired control leks. Taken together with results from a previous study finding declines in male lek attendance in response to noise playbacks, these results suggest that chronic noise pollution can cause greater sage-grouse to avoid otherwise suitable habitat, and can cause elevated stress levels in the birds who remain in noisy areas. PMID:23185627

  17. Monoterpenoid extract of sage (Salvia lavandulaefolia) with cholinesterase inhibiting properties improves cognitive performance and mood in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David O; Dodd, Fiona L; Robertson, Bernadette C; Okello, Edward J; Reay, Jonathon L; Scholey, Andrew B; Haskell, Crystal F

    2011-08-01

    Extracts of sage (Salvia officinalis/lavandulaefolia) with terpenoid constituents have previously been shown to inhibit cholinesterase and improve cognitive function. The current study combined an in vitro investigation of the cholinesterase inhibitory properties and phytochemical constituents of a S. lavandulaefolia essential oil, with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study assessing the effects of a single dose on cognitive performance and mood. In this latter investigation 36 healthy participants received capsules containing either 50 µL of the essential oil or placebo on separate occasions, 7 days apart. Cognitive function was assessed using a selection of computerized memory and attention tasks and the Cognitive Demand Battery before the treatment and 1-h and 4-h post-dose. The essential oil was a potent inhibitor of human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and consisted almost exclusively of monoterpenoids. Oral consumption lead to improved performance of secondary memory and attention tasks, most notably at the 1-h post-dose testing session, and reduced mental fatigue and increased alertness which were more pronounced 4-h post-dose. These results extend previous observations of improved cognitive performance and mood following AChE inhibitory sage extracts and suggest that the ability of well-tolerated terpenoid-containing extracts to beneficially modulate cholinergic function and cognitive performance deserves further attention.

  18. Dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs-(oregano and sage) modulates innate immunity parameters in Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Vattem, D A; Lester, Ce; Deleon, Rc; Jamison, By; Maitin, V

    2013-01-01

    Lamiaceae herbs have are well known for their immunomodulatory effects, however, the mechanism by which they effect innate immune system is not clearly understood. The effect of dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs (oregano and sage) modulation of on innate immunological parameters was investigated in Lumbricus terrestris. Animals were fed (ad libitum) on herbs supplemented diet [(0.1% (w/v) and 0.5% (w/v)] for 6 days. Changes in immune competent cell counts, viability, and relative neutrophil-like cell counts were determined in response to herb treatment. Changes in nitric oxide, phagocytic activity, and respiratory burst index were also determined in response to herb treatment relative to control. Additionally, effect of herb co-treatment cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg-BW) induced immunosuppression was also evaluated. Our results suggested abrogation of CP-induced immunosuppression in response to co-treatment with herbs. Significant increase in nitric oxide-mediated immune-competent cell counts, viability, and differentiation into neutrophil-like cells were observed in response to dietary supplementation with Lamiaceae herbs. Significantly higher phagocytic activity relative to control was also noted in response to dietary intake of oregano and sage. However, the respiratory burst index did not increase exponentially in response to herb treatments, suggesting a potential enhancement in pathogen recognition and antioxidant defenses. Lamiaceae herbs may have potential immune-modulatory properties important for human health and merits further investigation.

  19. Dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs-(oregano and sage) modulates innate immunity parameters in Lumbricus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Vattem, DA; Lester, CE; DeLeon, RC; Jamison, BY; Maitin, V

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Lamiaceae herbs have are well known for their immunomodulatory effects, however, the mechanism by which they effect innate immune system is not clearly understood. Objective: The effect of dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs (oregano and sage) modulation of on innate immunological parameters was investigated in Lumbricus terrestris. Materials and Methods: Animals were fed (ad libitum) on herbs supplemented diet [(0.1% (w/v) and 0.5% (w/v)] for 6 days. Changes in immune competent cell counts, viability, and relative neutrophil-like cell counts were determined in response to herb treatment. Changes in nitric oxide, phagocytic activity, and respiratory burst index were also determined in response to herb treatment relative to control. Additionally, effect of herb co-treatment cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg-BW) induced immunosuppression was also evaluated. Results: Our results suggested abrogation of CP-induced immunosuppression in response to co-treatment with herbs. Significant increase in nitric oxide-mediated immune-competent cell counts, viability, and differentiation into neutrophil-like cells were observed in response to dietary supplementation with Lamiaceae herbs. Significantly higher phagocytic activity relative to control was also noted in response to dietary intake of oregano and sage. However, the respiratory burst index did not increase exponentially in response to herb treatments, suggesting a potential enhancement in pathogen recognition and antioxidant defenses. Conclusion: Lamiaceae herbs may have potential immune-modulatory properties important for human health and merits further investigation. PMID:23598918

  20. Minor compensatory changes in SAGE Mdr1a (P-gp), Bcrp, and Mrp2 knockout rats do not detract from their utility in the study of transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J; Goldstein, Keith M; Paulman, April; Baker, Thomas K; Ryan, Timothy P

    2013-06-01

    Mdr1a-, Bcrp-, and Mrp2-knockout rats are a more practical species for absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies than murine models and previously demonstrated expected alterations in the pharmacokinetics of various probe substrates. At present, gene expression and pathology changes were systematically studied in the small intestine, liver, kidney, and brain tissue from male SAGE Mdr1a, Bcrp, and Mrp2 knockout rats versus wild-type Sprague-Dawley controls. Gene expression data supported the relevant knockout genotype. As expected, Mrp2 knockout rats were hyperbilirubinemic and exhibited upregulation of hepatic Mrp3. Overall, few alterations were observed within 112 ADME-relevant genes. The two potentially most consequential changes were upregulation of intestinal carboxylesterase in Mdr1a knockouts and catechol-O-methyltransferase in all tissues of Bcrp knockout rats. Previously reported upregulation of hepatic Mdr1b P-glycoprotein in proprietary Wistar Mdr1a knockout rats was not observed in the SAGE counterpart investigated herein. Relative liver and kidney weights were 22-53% higher in all three knockouts, with microscopic increases in hepatocyte size in Mdr1a and Mrp2 knockout rats and glomerular size in Bcrp and Mrp2 knockouts. Increased relative weight of clearing organs is quantitatively consistent with reported increases in the clearance of drugs that are not substrates of the knocked-out transporter. Overall, SAGE knockout rats demonstrated modest compensatory changes, which do not preclude their general application to study transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics. However, until future studies elucidate the magnitude of functional change, caution is warranted in rare instances of extensive metabolism by catechol-O-methyltransferase in Bcrp knockouts and intestinal carboxylesterase in Mdr1a knockout rats, specifically for molecules with free catechol groups and esters subject to gut-wall hydrolysis.

  1. Application of SAGE III inversion algorithm to SALOMON measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazureau, A.; Brogniez, Colette; Renard, J.-B.

    2001-01-01

    The SAGE II, whose first flight is planned to be launched in Winter 2000-2001 on the polar orbit spacecraft METEOR 3M, is a part of NASA's Earth Observing Systems (EOS). A preliminary outcome for the LOA inversion has been obtained for resolved channel for the retrieval of daytime and nighttime constituents such as O3, NO2, NO3, OCIO and aerosols, with good quality, from simulated transmission profiles. An opportunity for testing the inversion algorithm on real measurements is offered by the SALOMON team of the LPCE to validate the method. The purpose of this paper is to present the LOA inversion of SALOMON real measurements, performed in February 2000 from Kiruna, Sweden. The retrieved gas densities and aerosol extinction profiles are compared to the corresponding retrieved values by the SALOMON team.

  2. The SOLAS air-sea gas exchange experiment (SAGE) 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Mike J.; Law, Cliff S.; Smith, Murray J.; Hall, Julie A.; Abraham, Edward R.; Stevens, Craig L.; Hadfield, Mark G.; Ho, David T.; Ward, Brian; Archer, Stephen D.; Cainey, Jill M.; Currie, Kim I.; Devries, Dawn; Ellwood, Michael J.; Hill, Peter; Jones, Graham B.; Katz, Dave; Kuparinen, Jorma; Macaskill, Burns; Main, William; Marriner, Andrew; McGregor, John; McNeil, Craig; Minnett, Peter J.; Nodder, Scott D.; Peloquin, Jill; Pickmere, Stuart; Pinkerton, Matthew H.; Safi, Karl A.; Thompson, Rona; Walkington, Matthew; Wright, Simon W.; Ziolkowski, Lori A.

    2011-03-01

    The SOLAS air-sea gas exchange experiment (SAGE) was a multiple-objective study investigating gas-transfer processes and the influence of iron fertilisation on biologically driven gas exchange in high-nitrate low-silicic acid low-chlorophyll (HNLSiLC) Sub-Antarctic waters characteristic of the expansive subpolar zone of the southern oceans. This paper provides a general introduction and summary of the main experimental findings. The release site was selected from a pre-voyage desktop study of environmental parameters to be in the south-west Bounty Trough (46.5°S 172.5°E) to the south-east of New Zealand and the experiment was conducted between mid-March and mid-April 2004. In common with other mesoscale iron addition experiments (FeAX's), SAGE was designed as a Lagrangian study, quantifying key biological and physical drivers influencing the air-sea gas exchange processes of CO 2, DMS and other biogenic gases associated with an iron-induced phytoplankton bloom. A dual tracer SF 6/ 3He release enabled quantification of both the lateral evolution of a labelled volume (patch) of ocean and the air-sea tracer exchange at tenths of kilometer scale, in conjunction with the iron fertilisation. Estimates from the dual-tracer experiment found a quadratic dependency of the gas exchange coefficient on windspeed that is widely applicable and describe air-sea gas exchange in strong wind regimes. Within the patch, local and micrometeorological gas exchange process studies (100 m scale) and physical variables such as near-surface turbulence, temperature microstructure at the interface, wave properties and windspeed were quantified to further assist the development of gas exchange models for high-wind environments. There was a significant increase in the photosynthetic competence ( Fv/ Fm) of resident phytoplankton within the first day following iron addition, but in contrast to other FeAX's, rates of net primary production and column-integrated chlorophyll a concentrations had

  3. Precise DOA Estimation Using SAGE Algorithm with a Cylindrical Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Ohgane, Takeo

    A uniform circular array (UCA) is a well-known array configuration which can accomplish estimation of 360° field of view with identical accuracy. However, a UCA cannot estimate coherent signals because we cannot apply the SSP owing to the structure of UCA. Although a variety of studies on UCA in coherent multipath environments have been done, it is impossible to estimate the DOA of coherent signals with different incident polar angles. Then, we have proposed Root-MUSIC algorithm with a cylindrical array. However, the estimation performance is degraded when incident signals arrive with close polar angles. To solve this problem, in the letter, we propose to use SAGE algorithm with a cylindrical array. Here, we adopt a CLA Root-MUSIC for the initial estimation and decompose two-dimensional search to double one-dimensional search to reduce the calculation load. The results show that the proposal achieves high resolution with low complexity.

  4. Nephrin Preserves Podocyte Viability and Glomerular Structure and Function in Adult Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuezhu; Chuang, Peter Y; D'Agati, Vivette D; Dai, Yan; Yacoub, Rabi; Fu, Jia; Xu, Jin; Taku, Oltjon; Premsrirut, Prem K; Holzman, Lawrence B; He, John Cijiang

    2015-10-01

    Nephrin is required during kidney development for the maturation of podocytes and formation of the slit diaphragm junctional complex. Because nephrin expression is downregulated in acquired glomerular diseases, nephrin deficiency is considered a pathologic feature of glomerular injury. However, whether nephrin deficiency exacerbates glomerular injury in glomerular diseases has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we generated mice with inducible RNA interference-mediated nephrin knockdown. Short-term nephrin knockdown (6 weeks), starting after the completion of kidney development at 5 weeks of age, did not affect glomerular structure or function. In contrast, mice with long-term nephrin knockdown (20 weeks) developed mild proteinuria, foot process effacement, filtration slit narrowing, mesangial hypercellularity and sclerosis, glomerular basement membrane thickening, subendothelial zone widening, and podocyte apoptosis. When subjected to an acquired glomerular insult induced by unilateral nephrectomy or doxorubicin, mice with short-term nephrin knockdown developed more severe glomerular injury compared with mice without nephrin knockdown. Additionally, nephrin-knockdown mice developed more exaggerated glomerular enlargement when subjected to unilateral nephrectomy and more podocyte apoptosis and depletion after doxorubicin challenge. AKT phosphorylation, which is a slit diaphragm-mediated and nephrin-dependent pathway in the podocyte, was markedly reduced in mice with long-term or short-term nephrin knockdown challenged with uninephrectomy or doxorubicin. Taken together, our data establish that under the basal condition and in acquired glomerular diseases, nephrin is required to maintain slit diaphragm integrity and slit diaphragm-mediated signaling to preserve glomerular function and podocyte viability in adult mice.

  5. Laminations and microgranule formation in pediatric glomerular basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Craver, Randall; Crespo-Salgado, Janice; Aviles, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular basement membrane (GBM) splitting, laminations, and microgranular formation are classically encountered with Alport disease, but can be found in other glomerular diseases. We found moderate to marked GBM laminations/microgranular formations in 51 of 724 (7%) pediatric diagnostic renal biopsies. These included 12 Alport disease, 12 thin basement membrane disease (TBM), 13 mesangial hypercellularity (MH), 6 focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and 8 other diseases. Follow-up demonstrated progression in most of the Alport disease and FSGS, as expected, but also in 40% of TBM and 30% of MH. Basement membrane laminations/microgranular formations are not specific for Alport disease, may represent a non-specific injury, and may herald a progressive clinical course.

  6. Estimating glomerular number: why we do it and how.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F

    2013-11-01

    There is currently much interest in determining the number of glomeruli, and thereby nephrons, in the kidney. Researchers have been trying to count glomeruli since the 19th century and currently four general approaches are available: (i) acid maceration; (ii) counting glomerular profiles in histological sections; (iii) model-based stereology; and (iv) design-based stereology. Although design-based stereological methods are generally considered the gold-standard method, all current methods have limitations. A new approach using magnetic resonance imaging has recently been described and may ultimately enable glomerular imaging and quantification in vivo. This report considers the advantages and disadvantages of current methods for counting glomeruli and describes the new magnetic resonance approach. In addition, a method for counting glomeruli in developing kidneys is described.

  7. Glomerular Glucocorticoid Receptors Expression and Clinicopathological Types of Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Yasser; Badawy, Ahlam; Swelam, Salwa; Tawfeek, Mostafa S K; Gad, Eman Fathalla

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are primary therapy of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, not all children respond to steroid therapy. We assessed glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in fifty-one children with INS and its relation to response to steroid therapy and to histopathological type. Clinical, laboratory and glomerular expression of glucocorticoid receptors were compared between groups with different steroid response. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was slightly higher in controls than in minimal change early responders, which in turn was significantly higher than in minimal change late responders. There was significantly lower glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in steroid-resistance compared to early responders, late responders and controls. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was significantly higher in all minimal change disease (MCD) compared to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In INS, response to glucocorticoid is dependent on glomerular expression of receptors and peripheral expression. Evaluation of glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression at time of diagnosis of NS can predict response to steroid therapy.

  8. Cell biology of mesangial cells: the third cell that maintains the glomerular capillary.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2017-03-01

    The renal glomerulus consists of glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells, which cooperate with each other for glomerular filtration. We have produced monoclonal antibodies against glomerular cells in order to identify different types of glomerular cells. Among these antibodies, the E30 clone specifically recognizes the Thy1.1 molecule expressed on mesangial cells. An injection of this antibody into rats resulted in mesangial cell-specific injury within 15 min, and induced mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in a reproducible manner. We examined the role of mesangial cells in glomerular function using several experimental tools, including an E30-induced nephritis model, mesangial cell culture, and the deletion of specific genes. Herein, we describe the characterization of E30-induced nephritis, formation of the glomerular capillary network, mesangial matrix turnover, and intercellular signaling between glomerular cells. New molecules that are involved in a wide variety of mesangial cell functions are also introduced.

  9. Pottels Equation for Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate.

    PubMed

    Barman, Himesh; Bisai, Samiran; Das, Bipul Kumar; Nath, Chandan Kumar; Duwarah, Sourabh Gohain

    2017-01-15

    The retrospective study was carried out to examine performance of Pottels height- independent equation compared to Schwartzs height-dependent equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate in 115 children in Indian setting. The Pottels equation performed well compared to updated Schwartz equation (R2=0.94, mean bias 0.25, 95% LOA=20.4, -19.9). The precision was better at lower range of estimated GFR.

  10. The Kinetics of Glomerular Deposition of Nephritogenic IgA

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Kenji; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Satake, Kenji; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Novak, Jan; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Whether IgA nephropathy is attributable to mesangial IgA is unclear as there is no correlation between intensity of deposits and extent of glomerular injury and no clear mechanism explaining how these mesangial deposits induce hematuria and subsequent proteinuria. This hinders the development of a specific therapy. Thus, precise events during deposition still remain clinical challenge to clarify. Since no study assessed induction of IgA nephropathy by nephritogenic IgA, we analyzed sequential events involving nephritogenic IgA from IgA nephropathy-prone mice by real-time imaging systems. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed that serum IgA from susceptible mice had strong affinity to mesangial, subepithelial, and subendothelial lesions, with effacement/actin aggregation in podocytes and arcade formation in endothelial cells. The deposits disappeared 24-h after single IgA injection. The data were supported by a fluorescence molecular tomography system and real-time and 3D in vivo imaging. In vivo imaging showed that IgA from the susceptible mice began depositing along the glomerular capillary from 1 min and accumulated until 2-h on the first stick in a focal and segmental manner. The findings indicate that glomerular IgA depositions in IgAN may be expressed under the balance between deposition and clearance. Since nephritogenic IgA showed mesangial as well as focal and segmental deposition along the capillary with acute cellular activation, all glomerular cellular elements are a plausible target for injury such as hematuria. PMID:25409466

  11. Diabetes modulates the expression of glomerular kinin receptors.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Julie; Jaffa, Ayad A

    2002-12-01

    The localization of kinin receptors within the kidney implicates this system in the regulation of glomerular hemodynamics. We reported that diabetes alters the activity of the renal kallikrein-kinin system, and that these alterations contribute to the development of microvascular complications of diabetes. The present study examined the influence of diabetes on the expression of glomerular B1 and B2-kinin receptors, and assessed the cellular signaling of kinin receptor activation. Rats made diabetic with streptozocin (85 mg/kg), displayed plasma glucose levels in the range of 350-500 mg/dl. At 3, 7, and 21 days, B1 and B2-kinin receptor mRNA levels were measured in isolated glomeruli from control and diabetic rats by RT-PCR. Glomeruli revealed a differential pattern of expression between the two kinin receptors. The constitutively expressed B2-receptor was increased three-fold at day 3, but returned to normal levels at day 7; whereas, the inducible B1-receptor was maximally expressed (20-fold) at day 7 and remained elevated (10-fold) at day 21. To test whether the induction of kinin receptors by diabetes translates into increased responsiveness, we measured mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation (p42, p44) in glomeruli isolated from control and diabetic rats stimulated with B1-receptor agonist (des-Arg9-bradykinin, 10(-8) M). A three-fold increase in phosphorylation of MAPK was observed in response to B1-receptor agonist challenge in glomeruli isolated form diabetic rats compared to controls. These findings demonstrate for the first time that glomerular kinin receptors are induced by diabetes, and provide a rationale to study the contribution of these receptors to the development of glomerular injury in diabetes.

  12. Seasonal movements and environmental triggers to fall migration of Sage Sparrows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fesenmyer, K.A.; Knick, S.T.

    2011-01-01

    Post-breeding ecology of shrubland passerines prior to onset of migration is unknown relative to dynamics of breeding areas. We radiomarked and monitored 38 Sage Sparrows (Amphispiza belli ssp. nevadensis) at one site in Oregon and two in Nevada from September to mid-November 2007 to track local movements, estimate seasonal range sizes, and characterize weather patterns triggering onset of migration. Median area used by Sage Sparrows monitored between 3 and 18 days during or prior to migration was 14 ha; maximum daily movement was 15 km. Radio-marked Sage Sparrows at each location departed individually, rather than en masse, corresponding with passage of cold front weather systems. Conventional telemetry techniques limited our ability to monitor Sage Sparrows beyond pre-migratory periods and precluded detecting and tracking actual movements during migration. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  13. Validation of Ozone Profiles Retrieved from SAGE III Limb Scatter Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rault, Didier F.; Taha, Ghassan

    2007-01-01

    Ozone profiles retrieved from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) limb scatter measurements are compared with correlative measurements made by occultation instruments (SAGE II, SAGE III and HALOE [Halogen Occultation Experiment]), a limb scatter instrument (Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System [OSIRIS]) and a series of ozonesondes and lidars, in order to ascertain the accuracy and precision of the SAGE III instrument in limb scatter mode. The measurement relative accuracy is found to be 5-10% from the tropopause to about 45km whereas the relative precision is found to be less than 10% from 20 to 38km. The main source of error is height registration uncertainty, which is found to be Gaussian with a standard deviation of about 350m.

  14. An analysis of preliminary SAGE II data on ozone and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Chu, D. A.

    Zonal mean mixing ratios of ozone and NO2 measured by SAGE II on several days in March and April, 1985 are compared against zonal means for this time of year previously measured by SAGE I, SBUV, and LIMS. After allowing for calculated diurnal variations of these gases, agreement within 15 percent is found for ozone and 20 percent for NO2. It is noted that the profile error bars given on the SAGE II data tapes need to be carefully interpreted and that the measured tropical variances suggest that these error bars are being somewhat overestimated. Planetary waves in both ozone and NO2 in the middle stratosphere should be derivable from the SAGE II measurements.

  15. IMPACT OF COSOLVENT FLUSHING ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AT THE FORMER SAGE'S DRY CLEANER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was evaluated at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL where an area of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination was identified. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site rest...

  16. Sage-grouse habitat assessment framework: multi-scale habitat assessment tool

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This document provides policymakers, resource managers, and specialists with a comprehensive framework for assessing sage-grouse habitat in the sagebrush ecosystem. Four pillars form the foundation for the success of this approach: science, effective conservation policy, implementation, and adapti...

  17. Fire Effects on Cover and Dietary Resources of Sage-grouse Habitat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prescribed fire in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) steppe to enhance habitat characteristics for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus Bonaparte), a sagebrush obligate species, has been a subject of increased research emphasis and management concern. We evaluated early successio...

  18. Sage in vitro cultures: a promising tool for the production of bioactive terpenes and phenolic substances.

    PubMed

    Marchev, Andrey; Haas, Christiane; Schulz, Sibylle; Georgiev, Vasil; Steingroewer, Juliane; Bley, Thomas; Pavlov, Atanas

    2014-02-01

    Extracts of Salvia species are used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases. The economic importance of this genus has increased in recent years due to evidence that some of its secondary metabolites have valuable pharmaceutical and nutraceutical properties.The bioactivity of sage extracts is mainly due to their content of terpenes and polyphenols. The increasing demand for sage products combined with environmental, ecological and climatic limitations on the production of sage metabolites from field-grown plants have led to extensive investigations into biotechnological approaches for the production of Salvia phytochemicals. The purpose of this review is to evaluate recent progress in investigations of sage in vitro systems as tools for producing important terpenoids and polyphenols and in development of methods for manipulating regulatory processes to enhance secondary metabolite production in such systems.

  19. IMPACT OF COSOLVENT FLUSHING ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AT THE FORMER SAGE'S DRY CLEANER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was evaluated at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL where an area of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination was identified. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site rest...

  20. A model for the separation of cloud and aerosol in SAGE II occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Winker, D. M.; Osborn, M. T.; Skeens, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite experiment measures the extinction due to aerosols and thin cloud, at wavelengths of 0.525 and 1.02 micrometers, down to an altitude of 6 km. The wavelength dependence of the extinction due to aerosols differs from that of the extinction due to cloud and is used as the basis of a model for separating these two components. The model is presented and its validation using airborne lidar data, obtained coincident with SAGE II observations, is described. This comparison shows that smaller SAGE II cloud extinction values correspond to the presence of subvisible cirrus cloud in the lidar record. Examples of aerosol and cloud data products obtained using this model to interpret SAGE II upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric data are also shown.

  1. Comparison of ozone profiles obtained with NIES DIAL and SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakane, Hideaki; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Hayashida-Amano, Sachiko; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Minato, Atsushi; Mccormick, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained with the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) (Tsukuba, Japan) were compared with data provided by the satellite sensor SAGE II. The SAGE II data were selected based on criteria of spatial and temporal differences between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements: five degrees in latitude and 15 degrees in longitude, within a latitudinal band from 31 deg to 41 deg N, and within one, three and five days after or before the DIAL measurements. Results show very good agreement for the individual and the zonal-mean profiles. The average mean difference between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements over the altitudes 15-50 km was about 10 percent.

  2. Differentiating organic and conventional sage by chromatographic and mass spectrometry flow-injection fingerprints

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and flow injection electrospray ionization with ion trap mass spectrometry (FIMS) fingerprints combined with the principal component analysis (PCA) were examined for their potential in differentiating commercial organic and conventional sage samples. The...

  3. An analysis of preliminary SAGE II data on ozone and NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Chu, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    Zonal mean mixing ratios of ozone and NO2 measured by SAGE II on several days in March and April, 1985 are compared against zonal means for this time of year previously measured by SAGE I, SBUV, and LIMS. After allowing for calculated diurnal variations of these gases, agreement within 15 percent is found for ozone and 20 percent for NO2. It is noted that the profile error bars given on the SAGE II data tapes need to be carefully interpreted and that the measured tropical variances suggest that these error bars are being somewhat overestimated. Planetary waves in both ozone and NO2 in the middle stratosphere should be derivable from the SAGE II measurements.

  4. Comparison of ozone profiles obtained with NIES DIAL and SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakane, Hideaki; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Hayashida-Amano, Sachiko; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Minato, Atsushi; Mccormick, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Ozone profiles obtained with the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) (Tsukuba, Japan) were compared with data provided by the satellite sensor SAGE II. The SAGE II data were selected based on criteria of spatial and temporal differences between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements: five degrees in latitude and 15 degrees in longitude, within a latitudinal band from 31 deg to 41 deg N, and within one, three and five days after or before the DIAL measurements. Results show very good agreement for the individual and the zonal-mean profiles. The average mean difference between the DIAL and the SAGE II measurements over the altitudes 15-50 km was about 10 percent.

  5. A model for the separation of cloud and aerosol in SAGE II occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Winker, D. M.; Osborn, M. T.; Skeens, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite experiment measures the extinction due to aerosols and thin cloud, at wavelengths of 0.525 and 1.02 micrometers, down to an altitude of 6 km. The wavelength dependence of the extinction due to aerosols differs from that of the extinction due to cloud and is used as the basis of a model for separating these two components. The model is presented and its validation using airborne lidar data, obtained coincident with SAGE II observations, is described. This comparison shows that smaller SAGE II cloud extinction values correspond to the presence of subvisible cirrus cloud in the lidar record. Examples of aerosol and cloud data products obtained using this model to interpret SAGE II upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric data are also shown.

  6. Sage (Salvia officinalis) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) improve cryopreserved boar epididymal semen quality study.

    PubMed

    Monton, A; Gil, L; Malo, C; Olaciregui, M; Gonzalez, N; de Blas, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fennel and sage extracts and the influence of the egg yolk source (fresh or pasteurized) on the success of freezing boar epididymal spermatozoa. In experiment 1, epididymal sperm was recovered by flushing and cryopreserved in a lactose-egg yolk solution supplemented with various concentrations (10, 5 and 2.5 g/L) of sage or fennel. Sperm quality was evaluated (motility, viability, HOST and acrosome integrity) at 0 h and 2 h after thawing. Fennel 10 g/L and sage 5 g/L and control (no extracts) were selected for experiment 2 which also compared fresh or pasteurized egg yolk in the freezing extender and measured DNA integrity of the frozen sperm. Results showed that the interaction between fennel and sage antioxidants with fresh egg yolk significantly improved post thaw sperm quality and protected boar epididymal spermatozoa from cryopreservation damage as a result of oxidative stress.

  7. The Use of Sage Water Vapor Data for Investigating Climate Change Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.

    2003-01-01

    SAGE water vapor data has proven valuable for addressing several of the important issues in climate change research. It has been used to investigate how the upper troposphere water vapor responds to warming and convection, a key question in understanding the water vapor feedback to anthropogenic global warming. In the case of summer versus winter differences, SAGE results showed that the upper tropospheric relative humidity remained approximately constant; this result was in general agreement with how a GCM handled the seasonal difference, and gave credence to the argument that the GCM was not overestimating the water vapor feedback associated with convection. In addition, the convection-water vapor relationship was investigated further using SAGE water vapor and ISCCP cloud data. The results showed that upper tropospheric drying did appear to occur simultaneously with deep convective events in the tropics, only to be replaced by moistening a few hours later, associated (most likely) with the reevaporation of moisture from anvil clouds. The total effect was, again, a moistening of the upper troposphere associated with convection. Calculation of the actual trends in upper tropospheric moisture is a potential goal for SAGE data usage; trends calculated with radiosonde data, or instruments calibrated with radiosonde data have the problem of the effect of changing radiosonde instruments. SAGE data have in effect been used to compare different radiosondes through comparisons, and could continue to do so. SAGE 3 should also help clarify the absolute accuracy of SAGE retrievals in the troposphere. and its consequences. Model results show that water vapor increases can help explain the observations of stratospheric cooling, along with increasing C02 and ozone reduction. SAGE has been shown to provide trends similar to those of some other satellite and in situ retrievals, with increasing water vapor over time. However, SAGE is impacted by aerosol contamination which must be

  8. Evaluation of SAGE II and Balloon-Borne Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal we evaluated measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosols from three platforms. Two were satellite platforms providing solar extinction measurements, the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II using wavelengths from 0.386 - 1.02 microns, and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) using wavelengths from 2.45 to 5.26 microns. The third set of measurements was from in situ sampling by balloonborne optical particle counters (OPCs). The goal was to determine the consistency among these data sets. This was accomplished through analysis of the existing measurement records, and through additional balloonborne OPC flights coinciding with new SAGE II observations over Laramie, Wyoming. All analyses used the SAGE II v 6.0 data. This project supported two balloon flights per year over Laramie dedicated to SAGE II coincidence. Because logistical factors, such as poor surface weather or unfavorable payload impact location, can make it difficult to routinely obtain close coincidences with SAGE II, we attempt to conduct nearly every Laramie flight (roughly one per month) in conjunction with a SAGE II overpass. The Laramie flight frequency has varied over the years depending on field commitments and funding sources. Current support for the Laramie measurements is from the National Science Foundation in addition to support from this NASA grant. We have also completed a variety of comparisons using aerosol measurements from SAGE II, OPCs, and HALOE. The instruments were compared for their various estimates of aerosol extinction at the SAGE II wavelengths and for aerosol surface area. Additional results, such as illustrated here, can be found in a recently accepted manuscript describing comparisons between SAGE II, HALOE, and OPCs for the period 1982 - 2000. While overall, the impression from these results is encouraging, the agreement of the measurements changes with latitude, altitude, time, and parameter. In the broadest sense

  9. The Use of Sage Water Vapor Data for Investigating Climate Change Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.

    2003-01-01

    SAGE water vapor data has proven valuable for addressing several of the important issues in climate change research. It has been used to investigate how the upper troposphere water vapor responds to warming and convection, a key question in understanding the water vapor feedback to anthropogenic global warming. In the case of summer versus winter differences, SAGE results showed that the upper tropospheric relative humidity remained approximately constant; this result was in general agreement with how a GCM handled the seasonal difference, and gave credence to the argument that the GCM was not overestimating the water vapor feedback associated with convection. In addition, the convection-water vapor relationship was investigated further using SAGE water vapor and ISCCP cloud data. The results showed that upper tropospheric drying did appear to occur simultaneously with deep convective events in the tropics, only to be replaced by moistening a few hours later, associated (most likely) with the reevaporation of moisture from anvil clouds. The total effect was, again, a moistening of the upper troposphere associated with convection. Calculation of the actual trends in upper tropospheric moisture is a potential goal for SAGE data usage; trends calculated with radiosonde data, or instruments calibrated with radiosonde data have the problem of the effect of changing radiosonde instruments. SAGE data have in effect been used to compare different radiosondes through comparisons, and could continue to do so. SAGE 3 should also help clarify the absolute accuracy of SAGE retrievals in the troposphere. and its consequences. Model results show that water vapor increases can help explain the observations of stratospheric cooling, along with increasing C02 and ozone reduction. SAGE has been shown to provide trends similar to those of some other satellite and in situ retrievals, with increasing water vapor over time. However, SAGE is impacted by aerosol contamination which must be

  10. Evaluation of SAGE II and Balloon-Borne Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal we evaluated measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosols from three platforms. Two were satellite platforms providing solar extinction measurements, the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II using wavelengths from 0.386 - 1.02 microns, and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) using wavelengths from 2.45 to 5.26 microns. The third set of measurements was from in situ sampling by balloonborne optical particle counters (OPCs). The goal was to determine the consistency among these data sets. This was accomplished through analysis of the existing measurement records, and through additional balloonborne OPC flights coinciding with new SAGE II observations over Laramie, Wyoming. All analyses used the SAGE II v 6.0 data. This project supported two balloon flights per year over Laramie dedicated to SAGE II coincidence. Because logistical factors, such as poor surface weather or unfavorable payload impact location, can make it difficult to routinely obtain close coincidences with SAGE II, we attempt to conduct nearly every Laramie flight (roughly one per month) in conjunction with a SAGE II overpass. The Laramie flight frequency has varied over the years depending on field commitments and funding sources. Current support for the Laramie measurements is from the National Science Foundation in addition to support from this NASA grant. We have also completed a variety of comparisons using aerosol measurements from SAGE II, OPCs, and HALOE. The instruments were compared for their various estimates of aerosol extinction at the SAGE II wavelengths and for aerosol surface area. Additional results, such as illustrated here, can be found in a recently accepted manuscript describing comparisons between SAGE II, HALOE, and OPCs for the period 1982 - 2000. While overall, the impression from these results is encouraging, the agreement of the measurements changes with latitude, altitude, time, and parameter. In the broadest sense

  11. Intravital imaging of podocyte calcium in glomerular injury and disease

    PubMed Central

    Burford, James L.; Villanueva, Karie; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Hackl, Matthias J.; Pippin, Jeffrey; Shankland, Stuart J.; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling mediates physiological and pathological processes in multiple organs, including the renal podocyte; however, in vivo podocyte [Ca2+]i dynamics are not fully understood. Here we developed an imaging approach that uses multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to directly visualize podocyte [Ca2+]i dynamics within the intact kidneys of live mice expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator only in these cells. [Ca2+]i was at a low steady-state level in control podocytes, while Ang II infusion caused a minor elevation. Experimental focal podocyte injury triggered a robust and sustained elevation of podocyte [Ca2+]i around the injury site and promoted cell-to-cell propagating podocyte [Ca2+]i waves along capillary loops. [Ca2+]i wave propagation was ameliorated by inhibitors of purinergic [Ca2+]i signaling as well as in animals lacking the P2Y2 purinergic receptor. Increased podocyte [Ca2+]i resulted in contraction of the glomerular tuft and increased capillary albumin permeability. In preclinical models of renal fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, high podocyte [Ca2+]i correlated with increased cell motility. Our findings provide a visual demonstration of the in vivo importance of podocyte [Ca2+]i in glomerular pathology and suggest that purinergic [Ca2+]i signaling is a robust and key pathogenic mechanism in podocyte injury. This in vivo imaging approach will allow future detailed investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glomerular disease in the intact living kidney. PMID:24713653

  12. Involvement of glomerular SREBP-1c in diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Naomi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Sone, Hirohito; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2007-12-21

    The role of glomerular SREBP-1c in diabetic nephropathy was investigated. PEPCK-promoter transgenic mice overexpressing nuclear SREBP-1c exhibited enhancement of proteinuria with mesangial proliferation and matrix accumulation, mimicking diabetic nephropathy, despite the absence of hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemia. Isolated transgenic glomeruli had higher expression of TGF{beta}-1, fibronectin, and SPARC in the absence of marked lipid accumulation. Gene expression of P47phox, p67phox, and PU.1 were also activated, accompanying increased 8-OHdG in urine and kidney, demonstrating that glomerular SREBP-1c could directly cause oxidative stress through induced NADPH oxidase. Similar changes were observed in STZ-treated diabetic mice with activation of endogenous SREBP-1c. Finally, diabetic proteinuria and oxidative stress were ameliorated in SREBP-1-null mice. Adenoviral overexpression of active and dominant-negative SREBP-1c caused consistent reciprocal changes in expression of both profibrotic and oxidative stress genes in MES13 mesangial cells. These data suggest that activation of glomerular SREBP-1c could contribute to emergence and/or progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. A single-injection method for measuring glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Farr, B M

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has been developed that is based on an analysis of the total area under the plasma radioactivity-time curve after a single intravenous injection of [125I]iothalamate. Glomerular filtration rates obtained by this method (method A) and those obtained with two widely used single-injection techniques, the slope-intercept method (method B), and the two-compartment method (method C), were compared with GFRs obtained by standard inulin clearance techniques in 14 dogs. Method B consistently over. estimated inulin clearances more than 30%. Method C also overestimated inulin clearance considerably in dogs with an increased extracellular fluid volume, but was fairly reliable in normal dogs. Glomerular filtration rates obtained by the new method (method A) were in excellent agreement with inulin clearances in all dogs, regardless of the state of body hydration. The mean inulin clearance for all 14 experiments was 72.7+/-6.0 SE ml/min, while GFRs obtained by method A averaged 75.1+/-6.0 ml/min. The data from this study suggest that method A is a reliable means for estimating GFR that is especially useful in chronic experiments.

  14. Is mesangial hypercellularity with glomerular immaturity a variant of glomerulosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Zachwieja, Jacek; Nowicki, Michal; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Witt, Martin

    2007-05-01

    Our aim was to correlate an immunohistochemical pattern of selected podocyte cytoskeleton-associated proteins in children diagnosed with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and diffuse mesangial proliferation accompanied by glomerular immaturity (Im-DMP) with the clinical courses of both diseases. The material included 33 renal biopsies obtained from children diagnosed with DMP with or without signs of glomerular immaturity (ten and 15 participants, respectively) or FSGS (eight patients). Ezrin, podocalyxin, synaptopodin and nephrin expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical assay. A positive reaction for ezrin, podocalyxin, synaptopodin and nephrin was observed in the most superficial, continuous 'layer' of podocytes in Im-DMP patients. This distribution closely mimicked the immunohistochemical pattern observed in FSGS. The severe initial course of Im-DMP was transient. Resistance to steroids (six children) and renal insufficiency (two patients) in these subjects subsided, whilst, in the FSGS patients, the resistance to steroids recognized in all the children and the renal insufficiency diagnosed in three of them were still present. Mimicry between the immunohistochemical pattern of glomerular immaturity in DMP and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis might explain the severe initial course of this nephrotic syndrome in children. The transient clinical character of the former may also indicate that it is not a variant of FSGS.

  15. Controversies on glomerular filtration from Ludwig to the present.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, M; Endlich, K

    1996-01-01

    Since Ludwig's theory of filtration in the glomerulus is generally accepted, current research interest has focussed on the regulation of this process. The main determinants of glomerular filtration rate are glomerular capillary pressure and glomerular blood flow, which are adjusted via resistance changes in the pre- and postglomerular vasculature. Overall pre- and postglomerular resistances were first determined by micropuncture in superficial glomeruli. While the predominant source of postglomerular resistance is the efferent arteriole, several results indicate that preglomerular resistance might be rather uniformly distributed among all preglomerular vessels (interlobar, arcuate and interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles). Over the last decade, several techniques have been used to visualize renal vessels and to study the action of various vasoactive hormones thereon. Results obtained with the split hydronephrotic kidney model, which permits in vivo microscopy of all renal vessels, provide evidence for a differential regulation of the various preglomerular vessels by vasoactive hormones. In particular, mediators of inflammation almost selectively constrict interlobar and arcuate arteries. We conclude that, given the renal vascular architecture, differential regulation of preglomerular vessels can alter haemodynamic parameters specifically for different nephron populations.

  16. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulate maturation of olfactory glomerular circuitry.

    PubMed

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Datta, Sandeep R; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-12-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (Shh(Ala/Ala)), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature Shh(Ala/Ala) mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry.

  17. Shh-Proteoglycan Interactions Regulate Maturation of Olfactory Glomerular Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M.; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L.; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Datta, Sandeep R.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (ShhAla/Ala), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature ShhAla/Ala mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry. PMID:24913191

  18. Post-Fire Recovery in Coastal Sage Scrub: Seed Rain and Community Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Conlisk, Erin; Swab, Rebecca; Martínez-Berdeja, Alejandra; Daugherty, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance is a primary mechanism structuring ecological communities. However, human activity has the potential to alter the frequency and intensity of natural disturbance regimes, with subsequent effects on ecosystem processes. In Southern California, human development has led to increased fire frequency close to urban areas that can form a positive feedback with invasive plant spread. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors structure post-fire plant communities is a critical component of post-fire management and restoration. In this study we considered a variety of mechanisms affecting post-fire vegetation recovery in Riversidean sage scrub. Comparing recently burned plots to unburned plots, we found that burning significantly reduced species richness and percent cover of exotic vegetation the first two years following a 100-hectare wildfire. Seed rain was higher in burned plots, with more native forb seeds, while unburned plots had more exotic grass seeds. Moreover, there were significant correlations between seed rain composition and plant cover composition the year prior and the year after. Collectively, this case study suggests that fire can alter community composition, but there was not compelling evidence of a vegetation-type conversion. Instead, the changes in the community composition were temporary and convergence in community composition was apparent within two years post-fire. PMID:27649564

  19. Greater sage-grouse as an umbrella species for sagebrush-associated vertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowland, M.M.; Wisdom, M.J.; Suring, L.H.; Meinke, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Widespread degradation of the sagebrush ecosystem in the western United States, including the invasion of cheatgrass, has prompted resource managers to consider a variety of approaches to restore and conserve habitats for sagebrush-associated species. One such approach involves the use of greater sage-grouse, a species of prominent conservation interest, as an umbrella species. This shortcut approach assumes that managing habitats to conserve sage-grouse will simultaneously benefit other species of conservation concern. The efficacy of using sage-grouse as an umbrella species for conservation management, however, has not been fully evaluated. We tested that concept by comparing: (1) commonality in land-cover associations, and (2) spatial overlap in habitats between sage-grouse and 39 other sagebrush-associated vertebrate species of conservation concern in the Great Basin ecoregion. Overlap in species' land-cover associations with those of sage-grouse, based on the ?? (phi) correlation coefficient, was substantially greater for sagebrush obligates (x??=0.40) than non-obligates (x??=0.21). Spatial overlap between habitats of target species and those associated with sage-grouse was low (mean ?? = 0.23), but somewhat greater for habitats at high risk of displacement by cheatgrass (mean ?? = 0.33). Based on our criteria, management of sage-grouse habitats likely would offer relatively high conservation coverage for sagebrush obligates such as pygmy rabbit (mean ?? = 0.84), but far less for other species we addressed, such as lark sparrow (mean ?? = 0.09), largely due to lack of commonality in land-cover affinity and geographic ranges of these species and sage-grouse.

  20. Importance of regional variation in conservation planning: A rangewide example of the Greater Sage-Grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, Kevin E; Evans, Jeffrey S.; Coates, Peter S.; Juliusson, Lara; Fedy, Bradley C.

    2016-01-01

    We developed rangewide population and habitat models for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) that account for regional variation in habitat selection and relative densities of birds for use in conservation planning and risk assessments. We developed a probabilistic model of occupied breeding habitat by statistically linking habitat characteristics within 4 miles of an occupied lek using a nonlinear machine learning technique (Random Forests). Habitat characteristics used were quantified in GIS and represent standard abiotic and biotic variables related to sage-grouse biology. Statistical model fit was high (mean correctly classified = 82.0%, range = 75.4–88.0%) as were cross-validation statistics (mean = 80.9%, range = 75.1–85.8%). We also developed a spatially explicit model to quantify the relative density of breeding birds across each Greater Sage-Grouse management zone. The models demonstrate distinct clustering of relative abundance of sage-grouse populations across all management zones. On average, approximately half of the breeding population is predicted to be within 10% of the occupied range. We also found that 80% of sage-grouse populations were contained in 25–34% of the occupied range within each management zone. Our rangewide population and habitat models account for regional variation in habitat selection and the relative densities of birds, and thus, they can serve as a consistent and common currency to assess how sage-grouse habitat and populations overlap with conservation actions or threats over the entire sage-grouse range. We also quantified differences in functional habitat responses and disturbance thresholds across the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) management zones using statistical relationships identified during habitat modeling. Even for a species as specialized as Greater Sage-Grouse, our results show that ecological context matters in both the strength of habitat selection (i

  1. Selected US building industry processes and characteristics. A Project SAGE report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Schoen, R.

    1978-01-01

    Selected multifamily processes were examined using a primarily graphic approach to clarify some of the operational modes into which Project SAGE (solar-assisted gas energy) must fit, both as a product and a process in the U.S. building industry. What SAGE must have or do in order to fit the building industry in the short term, that is, the multifamily submarket as it is presently configured, is delineated.

  2. Does Wyoming's Core Area Policy Protect Winter Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse?

    PubMed

    Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Pratt, Aaron C

    2016-10-01

    Conservation reserves established to protect important habitat for wildlife species are used world-wide as a wildlife conservation measure. Effective reserves must adequately protect year-round habitats to maintain wildlife populations. Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Area policy was established to protect breeding habitats for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Protecting only one important seasonal habitat could result in loss or degradation of other important habitats and potential declines in local populations. The purpose of our study was to identify the timing of winter habitat use, the extent which individuals breeding in Core Areas used winter habitats, and develop resource selection functions to assess effectiveness of Core Areas in conserving sage-grouse winter habitats in portions of 5 Core Areas in central and north-central Wyoming during winters 2011-2015. We found that use of winter habitats occured over a longer period than current Core Area winter timing stipulations and a substantial amount of winter habitat outside of Core Areas was used by individuals that bred in Core Areas, particularly in smaller Core Areas. Resource selection functions for each study area indicated that sage-grouse were selecting habitats in response to landscapes dominated by big sagebrush and flatter topography similar to other research on sage-grouse winter habitat selection. The substantial portion of sage-grouse locations and predicted probability of selection during winter outside small Core Areas illustrate that winter requirements for sage-grouse are not adequately met by existing Core Areas. Consequently, further considerations for identifying and managing important winter sage-grouse habitats under Wyoming's Core Area Policy are warranted.

  3. Utilization requirements. A southern California Gas Company project SAGE report: Utilization requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Schoen, R.; Hirshberg, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Utilization requirements are given and comparisons made of two phase III SAGE (solar assisted gas energy) installations in California: (1) a retrofit installation in an existing apartment building in El Toro, and (2) an installation in a new apartment building in Upland. Such testing in the field revealed the requirements to be met if SAGE-type installations are to become commercially practical on a widespread basis in electric and gas energy usage.

  4. Public policy issues. A Southern California Gas Company project SAGE report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Hirsberg, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The use of solar energy to stretch our supplies of fossil fuels was investigated. Project SAGE (semi-automated ground environment) addresses itself to one application of this goal, solar assistance in central water heating systems for multifamily projects. Public policy issues that affect the rate of adoption of solar energy systems were investigated and policy actions were offered to accelerate the adoption of SAGE and other solar energy systems.

  5. Does Wyoming's Core Area Policy Protect Winter Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kurt T.; Beck, Jeffrey L.; Pratt, Aaron C.

    2016-10-01

    Conservation reserves established to protect important habitat for wildlife species are used world-wide as a wildlife conservation measure. Effective reserves must adequately protect year-round habitats to maintain wildlife populations. Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Area policy was established to protect breeding habitats for greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus). Protecting only one important seasonal habitat could result in loss or degradation of other important habitats and potential declines in local populations. The purpose of our study was to identify the timing of winter habitat use, the extent which individuals breeding in Core Areas used winter habitats, and develop resource selection functions to assess effectiveness of Core Areas in conserving sage-grouse winter habitats in portions of 5 Core Areas in central and north-central Wyoming during winters 2011-2015. We found that use of winter habitats occured over a longer period than current Core Area winter timing stipulations and a substantial amount of winter habitat outside of Core Areas was used by individuals that bred in Core Areas, particularly in smaller Core Areas. Resource selection functions for each study area indicated that sage-grouse were selecting habitats in response to landscapes dominated by big sagebrush and flatter topography similar to other research on sage-grouse winter habitat selection. The substantial portion of sage-grouse locations and predicted probability of selection during winter outside small Core Areas illustrate that winter requirements for sage-grouse are not adequately met by existing Core Areas. Consequently, further considerations for identifying and managing important winter sage-grouse habitats under Wyoming's Core Area Policy are warranted.

  6. SAGE II aerosol extinction and scattering data from balloon-borne photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, M.; Lippens, G.; Chu, W.; De Muer, D.

    1987-01-01

    Earth limb radiance and extinction near sunset have been observed from a balloon-borne gondola nearly simultaneously and on air masses close to those probed by the SAGE II instrumentation on April 22, 1985. The results show the importance of accuracy of the altitude determination on the aerosol measurements. They indicate an important altitude dependence of the stratospheric aerosol granulometry in agreement with SAGE II results.

  7. SAGE III Educational Outreach and Student's On-Line Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Moore, S. W.; Walters, S. C.

    2002-05-01

    Students On-Line Atmospheric Research (SOLAR) is a NASA-sponsored educational outreach program aimed at raising the level of interest in science among elementary, middle, and high school students. SOLAR is supported by, and closely linked to, NASA's Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). SAGE III, launched on a Russian METEOR 3M spacecraft in December 2001, is a key component of NASA's Earth Observing System. It will monitor the quantity and distribution of aerosols, ozone, clouds, and other important trace gases in the upper atmosphere. Early data from SAGE III indicate that the instrument is performing as expected. SAGE III measurements will extend the long-term data record established by its predecessors, SAGE I and SAGE II, which spans from 1979 to the present. In addition, SAGE III's added measurement capabilities will provide more detailed data on certain atmospheric species. SOLAR selects interesting topics related to the science issues addressed by the SAGE III experiments, and develops educational materials and projects to enhance science teaching, and to help students realize the relevance of these issues to our lives on Earth. For example, SOLAR highlights some of the major questions regarding the health of the atmosphere such as possible influences of aerosols on global climate, and atmospheric processes related to ozone depletion. The program features projects to give students hands-on experience with scientific equipment and help develop skills in collecting, analyzing, and reporting science results. SOLAR focuses on helping teachers become familiar with current research in the atmospheric sciences, helping teachers integrate SOLAR developed educational materials into their curriculum. SOLAR gives special presentations at national and regional science teacher conferences and conducts a summer teacher workshop at the NASA Langley Research Center. This poster will highlight some of the key features of the SOLAR program and will present

  8. DeepSAGE: higher sensitivity and multiplexing of samples using a simpler experimental protocol.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    2008-01-01

    Combining serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) with pyrophosphatase-based ultra-high-throughput DNA sequencing provides increased sensitivity and cost-effective gene expression profiling. The combined techniques obviate the formation and cloning of concatemers and the tedious picking and preparation of sequence templates from bacterial clones that are necessary with SAGE alone. Furthermore, multiplexing of samples or replicates of analysis is included in the experimental design.

  9. Chronic Lyme borreliosis associated with minimal change glomerular disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Florens, N; Lemoine, S; Guebre-Egziabher, F; Valour, F; Kanitakis, J; Rabeyrin, M; Juillard, L

    2017-02-06

    There are only few cases of renal pathology induced by Lyme borreliosis in the literature, as this damage is rare and uncommon in humans. This patient is the first case of minimal change glomerular disease associated with chronic Lyme borreliosis. A 65-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted for an acute edematous syndrome related to a nephrotic syndrome. Clinical examination revealed violaceous skin lesions of the right calf and the gluteal region that occurred 2 years ago. Serological tests were positive for Lyme borreliosis and skin biopsy revealed lesions of chronic atrophic acrodermatitis. Renal biopsy showed minimal change glomerular disease. The skin lesions and the nephrotic syndrome resolved with a sequential treatment with first ceftriaxone and then corticosteroids. We report here the first case of minimal change disease associated with Lyme borreliosis. The pathogenesis of minimal change disease in the setting of Lyme disease is discussed but the association of Lyme and minimal change disease may imply a synergistic effect of phenotypic and bacterial factors. Regression of proteinuria after a sequential treatment with ceftriaxone and corticosteroids seems to strengthen this conceivable association.

  10. A reassessment of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Spinale, Joann M; Mariani, Laura H; Kapoor, Shiv; Zhang, Jidong; Weyant, Robert; Song, Peter X; Wong, Hetty N; Troost, Jonathan P; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Gipson, Debbie S; Kretzler, Matthias; Nihalani, Deepak; Holzman, Lawrence B

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) is a causative circulating factor for and a biomarker of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here we undertook validation of these assumptions in both mouse and human models. Injection of recombinant suPAR in wild-type mice did not induce proteinuria within 24 h. Moreover, a disease phenotype was not seen in an inducible transgenic mouse model that maintained elevated suPAR concentrations for 6 weeks. Plasma and urine suPAR concentrations were evaluated as clinical biomarkers in 241 patients with glomerular disease from the prospective, longitudinal multicenter observational NEPTUNE cohort. The serum suPAR concentration at baseline inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the urine suPAR/creatinine ratio positively correlated with the urine protein/creatinine ratio. After adjusting for eGFR and urine protein, neither the serum nor urine suPAR level was an independent predictor of FSGS histopathology. A multivariable mixed-effects model of longitudinal data evaluated the association between the change in serum suPAR concentration from baseline with eGFR. After adjusting for baseline suPAR concentration, age, gender, proteinuria, and time, the change in suPAR from baseline was associated with eGFR, but this association was not different for patients with FSGS as compared with other diagnoses. Thus these results do not support a pathological role for suPAR in FSGS.

  11. Glomerular nitrite synthesis in in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, H. T.; Sullivan, R.

    1991-01-01

    Nitrite (NO2-) is the major end product of nitric oxide (NO) production in cell culture. The authors have examined nitrite production by glomeruli in in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat. Glomerulonephritis was induced by unilateral renal perfusion of cationized human gamma G immunoglobulin (IgG) in preimmunized rats. NO2- was measured in culture supernatants of isolated glomeruli after 48 hours. NO2- was produced by nephritic glomeruli with a maximum 4 days after induction of glomerulonephritis (24.4 +/- 11.4 pmol/glomerulus/48 hours). Production was increased by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 micrograms/ml) (54 +/- 4.9 pmol/glomerulus; P less than 0.001). NO2- production was inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine demonstrating synthesis through NO. Dexamethasone (10(-7) mol/l [molar]) reduced LPS-stimulated production by peritoneal macrophages and nephritic glomeruli (P less than 0.01). Macrophages isolated from nephritic glomeruli produced NO2- (4.9 +/- 0.6 nmols/10(5) cells). The production of NO by nephritic glomeruli has implications for mechanisms of glomerular injury and glomerular hemodynamics. The effect of dexamethasone may explain in part the ameliorative effect of steroids in glomerulonephritis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1951626

  12. Correlation of disease activity in proliferative glomerulonephritis with glomerular spleen tyrosine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    McAdoo, Stephen P; Bhangal, Gurjeet; Page, Theresa; Cook, H Terence; Pusey, Charles D; Tam, Frederick W K

    2015-07-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is an important component of the intracellular signaling pathway for various immunoreceptors. Inhibition of SYK has shown promise in preclinical models of autoimmune and glomerular disease. However, the description of SYK expression in human renal tissue, which would be desirable ahead of clinical studies, is lacking. Here we conducted immunohistochemical analysis for total and phosphorylated SYK in biopsy specimens from >120 patients with a spectrum of renal pathologies, including thin basement membrane lesion, minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and acute tubular necrosis. We found significant SYK expression in proliferative glomerulonephritis and that glomerular expression levels correlated with presenting serum creatinine and histological features of disease activity that predict outcome in IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis, and antiglomerular basement membrane disease. SYK was phosphorylated within pathological lesions, such as areas of extracapillary and endocapillary proliferation, and appeared to localize to both infiltrating leucocytes and to resident renal cells within diseased glomeruli. Thus SYK is associated with the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritides, suggesting that these conditions may respond to SYK inhibitor treatment.

  13. Inter-Comparison of ILAS-II Version 1.4 Aerosol Extinction Coefficient at 780 nm with SAGE II, SAGE III, and POAM III Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saitoh, Naoko; Hayashida, S.; Sugita, T.; Nakajima, H.; Yokota, T.; Hayashi, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kanzawa, H.; Ejiri, M. K.; Irie, H.; Tanaka, T.; Terao, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Sasano, Y.; Bevilacqua, R.; Randall, C.; Thomason, L.; Taha, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) II on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) II observed stratospheric aerosol in visible/near-infrared/infrared spectra over high latitudes in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Observations were taken intermittently from January to March, and continuously from April through October, 2003. We assessed the data quality of ILAS-II version 1.4 aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm from comparisons with the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, SAGE III, and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III aerosol data. At heights below 20 km in the Northern Hemisphere, aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II agreed with those from SAGE II and SAGE III within 10%, and with those from POAM III within 15%. From 20 to 26 km, ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients were smaller than extinction coefficients from the other sensors; differences between ILAS-II and SAGE II ranged from 10% at 20 km to 34% at 26 km. ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients from 20 to 25 km in February over the Southern Hemisphere had a negative bias (12-66%) relative to SAGE II aerosol data. The bias increased with increasing altitude. Comparisons between ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol extinction coefficients from January to May in the Southern Hemisphere (defined as the non-Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) season ) yielded qualitatively similar results. From June to October (defined as the PSC season ), aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II were smaller than those from POAM III above 17 km, as in the case of the non-PSC season; however, ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol data were within 15% of each other from 12 to 17 km.

  14. Data resource profile: the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE).

    PubMed

    Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath; Naidoo, Nirmala; Biritwum, Richard; Fan, Wu; Lopez Ridaura, Ruy; Maximova, Tamara; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Williams, Sharon; Snodgrass, J Josh; Minicuci, Nadia; D'Este, Catherine; Peltzer, Karl; Boerma, J Ties

    2012-12-01

    Population ageing is rapidly becoming a global issue and will have a major impact on health policies and programmes. The World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) aims to address the gap in reliable data and scientific knowledge on ageing and health in low- and middle-income countries. SAGE is a longitudinal study with nationally representative samples of persons aged 50+ years in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, with a smaller sample of adults aged 18-49 years in each country for comparisons. Instruments are compatible with other large high-income country longitudinal ageing studies. Wave 1 was conducted during 2007-2010 and included a total of 34 124 respondents aged 50+ and 8340 aged 18-49. In four countries, a subsample consisting of 8160 respondents participated in Wave 1 and the 2002/04 World Health Survey (referred to as SAGE Wave 0). Wave 2 data collection will start in 2012/13, following up all Wave 1 respondents. Wave 3 is planned for 2014/15. SAGE is committed to the public release of study instruments, protocols and meta- and micro-data: access is provided upon completion of a Users Agreement available through WHO's SAGE website (www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/sage) and WHO's archive using the National Data Archive application (http://apps.who.int/healthinfo/systems/surveydata).

  15. Correleation of the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Models in Thermal Desktop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Davis, Warren T.; Liles, Kaitlin, A. K.; McLeod, Shawn C.

    2017-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III was launched on February 19, 2017 and mounted to the International Space Station (ISS) to begin its three-year mission. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Correlation of the thermal model is important since the payload will be expected to survive a three-year mission on ISS under varying thermal environments. Three major thermal vacuum (TVAC) tests were completed during the development of the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP); two subsystem-level tests and a payload-level test. Additionally, a characterization TVAC test was performed in order to verify performance of a system of heater plates that was designed to allow the IP to achieve the required temperatures during payload-level testing; model correlation was performed for this test configuration as well as those including the SAGE III flight hardware. This document presents the methods that were used to correlate the SAGE III models to TVAC at the subsystem and IP level, including the approach for modeling the parts of the payload in the thermal chamber, generating pre-test predictions, and making adjustments to the model to align predictions with temperatures observed during testing. Model correlation quality will be presented and discussed, and lessons learned during the correlation process will be shared.

  16. Data Resource Profile: The World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath; Naidoo, Nirmala; Biritwum, Richard; Fan, Wu; Lopez Ridaura, Ruy; Maximova, Tamara; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Williams, Sharon; Snodgrass, J Josh; Minicuci, Nadia; D'Este, Catherine; Peltzer, Karl; Boerma, J Ties; Yawson, A.; Mensah, G.; Yong, J.; Guo, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Parasuraman, P.; Lhungdim, H.; Sekher, TV.; Rosa, R.; Belov, VB.; Lushkina, NP; Peltzer, K.; Makiwane, M.; Zuma, K.; Ramlagan, S.; Davids, A.; Mbelle, N.; Matseke, G.; Schneider, M.; Tabane, C.; Tollman, S.; Kahn, K.; Ng, N.; Juvekar, S.; Sankoh, O.; Debpuur, CY.; Nguyen, TK Chuc; Gomez-Olive, FX.; Hakimi, M.; Hirve, S.; Abdullah, S.; Hodgson, A.; Kyobutungi, C.; Egondi, T.; Mayombana, C.; Minh, HV.; Mwanyangala, MA.; Razzaque, A.; Wilopo, S.; Streatfield, PK.; Byass, P.; Wall, S.; Scholten, F.; Mugisha, J.; Seeley, J.; Kinyanda, E.; Nyirenda, M.; Mutevedzi, P.; Newell, M-L.

    2012-01-01

    Population ageing is rapidly becoming a global issue and will have a major impact on health policies and programmes. The World Health Organization’s Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) aims to address the gap in reliable data and scientific knowledge on ageing and health in low- and middle-income countries. SAGE is a longitudinal study with nationally representative samples of persons aged 50+ years in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, with a smaller sample of adults aged 18–49 years in each country for comparisons. Instruments are compatible with other large high-income country longitudinal ageing studies. Wave 1 was conducted during 2007–2010 and included a total of 34 124 respondents aged 50+ and 8340 aged 18–49. In four countries, a subsample consisting of 8160 respondents participated in Wave 1 and the 2002/04 World Health Survey (referred to as SAGE Wave 0). Wave 2 data collection will start in 2012/13, following up all Wave 1 respondents. Wave 3 is planned for 2014/15. SAGE is committed to the public release of study instruments, protocols and meta- and micro-data: access is provided upon completion of a Users Agreement available through WHO’s SAGE website (www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/sage) and WHO’s archive using the National Data Archive application (http://apps.who.int/healthinfo/systems/surveydata). PMID:23283715

  17. Phenotypic divergence of secondary sexual traits among sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Jessica R.; Hupp, Jerry W.; Bradbury, Jack W.; Braun, Clait E.

    1994-01-01

    Sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, in an isolated montane basin near Gunnison, Colorado differ in several morphological and behavioural traits from conspecifics studied in other areas of the species' range. Both sexes in Gunnison are smaller than sage grouse elsewhere, and males possess differences in feather morphology as well. The mating behaviour of male sage grouse in three populations was examined to determine whether male strut displays of Gunnison sage grouse were behaviourally distinct. Behavioural analyses revealed Gunnison males perform strut displays at a slower rate than males in the two other sage grouse populations sampled. In addition, Gunnison males' strut displays contain unique visual and acoustical aspects. The most distinguishing attributes of Gunnison sage grouse were male secondary sexual characteristics including traits that correlate with mating success in other populations. Thus, phenotypic differences observed in the Gunnison population represent a divergence in expression of traits that are likely to be influenced by sexual selection. Recent models of speciation suggest that species characterized by intense sexual selection, such as those with lek mating systems, have the potential for rapid inter-populational divergence in male traits and female preferences leading to speciation.

  18. Role of glomerular ultrafiltration of growth factors in progressive interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S N; LaPage, J; Hirschberg, R

    2000-03-01

    The present in vivo and in vivo experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in rats with glomerular proteinuria, the bioactive growth factors transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are ultrafiltered into tubular fluid, can interact with respective receptors in apical tubular cell membranes, increase the expression and basolateral secretion of C-C-chemokines, which interact with cells in the renal interstitium and indirectly cause myofibroblasts to increase the expression of extracellular matrix proteins. HGF and TGF-beta were measured by Western blot and bioassay in glomerular ultrafiltrate that was collected by nephron micropuncture from rats with diabetic nephropathy and control rats. Proximal tubular and collecting duct cells were incubated with diluted proximal tubular fluid or recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) or rhTGF-beta and expression of C-C-chemokines was measured by RT-PCR and ELISA. Interactions of tubular cell chemokines with macrophages and indirectly with myofibroblasts were also examined using cell culture models. In rats with glomerular proteinuria due to diabetic nephropathy mature, bioactive HGF as well as active and latent TGF-beta were detected in early proximal tubular fluid. Specific HGF- and TGF-beta type II receptors were expressed in apical tubular membranes more in diabetic compared to control rats. Incubation of cultured mouse proximal tubular cells (mPTC) or medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3) with diabetic rat proximal tubular fluid increased MCP-1 and RANTES mRNA levels as well as secreted peptide up to threefold. In contrast, high glucose (450 mg/dL), bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rat albumin (each at 100 micrograms/mL) or 10 nmol/L insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I; which was also present in glomerular ultrafiltrate in rats with diabetic nephropathy) did not affect expression of these chemokines. Recombinant human TGF-beta as well as rhHGF each increased MCP-1 and RANTES mRNA as

  19. Glomerular membranopathy in children with IgA nephropathy and Henoch Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Vogler, C; Eliason, S C; Wood, E G

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated renal biopsies from 34 children with IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schönlein purpura to further characterize the ultrastructural features of the glomerular membranopathy that occurs in these disorders. Focal glomerular basement membrane damage was identified in 29 children and was severe in 4 of the children. Alterations included focal and segmental attenuation, splitting, duplications, and spike-like subepithelial protrusions of the lamina densa, along with saccular glomerular microaneurysms arising at the paramesangium. Those cases with extensive glomerular basement membrane lesions had either moderate or severe glomerular alterations apparent by light microscopy. Over half of the cases with glomerular membranopathy had immunohistological or ultrastructural evidence of focal peripheral glomerular capillary wall immune deposits and electron-dense deposits occurred at sites of glomerular basement membrane splitting. Despite the focal attenuation of the glomerular basement membrane, we did not identify any biopsy with findings of thin basement membrane disease. The glomerular basement membrane ultrastructural findings we describe are characteristic of IgA nephropathy and Henoch Schönlein purpura, are common in children with these disorders, and are similar to the ultrastructural alterations of the basement membrane that occur in other glomerulonephritides. These basement membrane injuries may be inflammatory cell or immune mediated but their pathogenesis requires further study.

  20. SAGES: A Suite of Freely-Available Software Tools for Electronic Disease Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular...concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility...the scope of reportable conditions and are intended to help prevent and respond to global public health threats. SAGES, an electronic biosurveillance

  1. Hierarchical spatial genetic structure in a distinct population segment of greater sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Coates, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    north–south gradient. This genetic subdivision within the Bi-State is likely the result of habitat loss and fragmentation that has been exacerbated by recent human activities and the encroachment of singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) trees. While genetic concerns may be only one of many priorities for the conservation and management of the Bi-State greater sage-grouse, we believe that they warrant attention along with other issues (e.g., quality of sagebrush habitat, preventing future loss of habitat). Management actions that promote genetic connectivity, especially with respect to WM and PNa, may be critical to the long-term viability of the Bi-State DPS.

  2. Spatial Heterogeneity in Response of Male Greater Sage-Grouse Lek Attendance to Energy Development

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Andrew J.; Beck, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Landscape modification due to rapidly expanding energy development, in particular oil and gas, in the westernUSA, have prompted concerns over how such developments may impact wildlife. One species of conservation concern across much of the Intermountain West is the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercusurophasianus). Sage-grouse have been petitioned for listing under provisions of the Endangered Species Act 7 times and the state of Wyoming alone represents 64% of the extant sage-grouse population in the eastern portion of their range. Consequently, the relationship between sage-grouse populations and oil and gas development in Wyoming is an important component to managing the long-term viability of this species. We used 814 leks from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department's lek survey database and well pad data from the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to evaluate changes in sage-grouse lek counts as a function of oil and gas development since 1991.From 1991–2011 we found that oil and gas well-pad density increased 3.6-fold across the state and was associated with a 24% decline in the number of male sage-grouse. Using a spatial and temporally structured analysis via Geographically Weighted Regression, we found a 1-to-4 year time lag between development density and lek decline. Sage-grouse also responded to development densities at multiple spatial neighborhoods surrounding leks, including broad scales of 10 km. However, sage-grouse lek counts do not always decline as a result of oil and gas development. We found similar development densities resulting in different sage-grouse lek count responses, suggesting that development density alone is insufficient to predict the impacts that oil and gas development have on sage-grouse. Finally, our analysis suggests a maximum development density of 1 well-pad within 2 km of leks to avoid measurable impacts within 1 year, and <6 well-pads within 10 km of leks to avoid delayed impacts. PMID:24918922

  3. SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience): Learning Geophysics by Doing Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Gilpin, B. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2005-12-01

    SAGE, a field-based educational program in applied geophysical methods has been an REU site for 16 years and completed its 23rd year of operation in July 2005. SAGE teaches the major geophysical exploration methods (including seismics, gravity, magnetics, and electromagnetics) and applies them to the solution of specific local and regional geologic problems. These include delineating buried hazardous material; mapping archaeological sites; and studying the structure, tectonics, and water resources of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico. Nearly 600 graduates, undergraduates, and professionals have attended SAGE since 1983. Since 1990 REU students have numbered 219 coming from dozens of different campuses. There have been 124 underrepresented REU students including 100 women, 14 Hispanics, 7 Native Americans, and 3 African Americans. Tracking of former REU students has revealed that 81% have gone on to graduate school. Keys to the success of SAGE are hands-on immersion in geophysics for one month and a partnership between academia, industry, and a federal laboratory. Successful approaches at SAGE include: 1) application of the latest equipment by all students; 2) continued updating of equipment, computers, and software by organizing universities and industry affiliates; 3) close ties with industry who provide supplemental instruction, furnish new equipment and software, and alert students to the current industry trends and job opportunities; 4) two-team, student data analysis structure that simultaneously addresses specific geophysical techniques and their integration; and 5) oral and written reports patterned after professional meetings and journals. An eight member, 'blue ribbon' advisory panel from academia, industry, and the federal government has been set up to maintain the vitality of SAGE by addressing such issues as funding, new faculty, organization, and vision. SAGE is open to students from any university (or organization) with backgrounds including

  4. Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE): results from two feasibility pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rebecca E; Parker, Nathan H; Soltero, Erica G; Ledoux, Tracey A; Mama, Scherezade K; McNeill, Lorna

    2017-03-10

    Low physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in early childhood are continued public health challenges. This manuscript describes outcomes from two pilot studies for Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE), a program designed to increase PA and F&V consumption among 3 to 5 year old children. SAGE was developed using community-based participatory research (CBPR) and delivered to children (N = 89) in early care and education centers (ECEC, N = 6) in two US cities. Children participated in 12 one-hour sessions that included songs, games, and interactive learning activities involving garden maintenance and taste tests. We evaluated reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation, and potential for maintenance of SAGE following the RE-AIM framework. Reach was evaluated by comparing demographic characteristics among SAGE participants and residents of target geographic areas. Efficacy was evaluated with accelerometer-measured PA, F&V consumption, and eating in the absence of hunger among children, parenting practices regarding PA, and home availability of F&V. Adoption was evaluated by the number of ECEC that participated relative to the number of ECEC that were recruited. Implementation was evaluated by completion rates of planned SAGE lessons and activities, and potential for maintenance was evaluated with a parent satisfaction survey. SAGE reached ECEC in neighborhoods representing a wide range of socioeconomic status, with participants' sociodemographic characteristics representing those of the intervention areas. Children significantly increased PA during SAGE lessons compared to usual lessons, but they also consumed more calories in the absence of hunger in post- vs. pre-intervention tests (both p < .05). Parent reports did not suggest changes in F&V consumption, parenting PA practices, or home F&V availability, possibly due to low parent engagement. ECEC had moderate-to-high implementation of SAGE lessons and curriculum

  5. Comparative modeling of combined transport of water and graded-size molecules across the glomerular capillary wall.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mageed, Samir M; Mohamed, Ehab I

    2016-04-07

    Chronic kidney disease is a common and growing problem worldwide that necessitates recognition of individual risk and appropriate laboratory testing before its progression to end-stage renal failure, requiring dialysis or transplantation for survival. Clearance studies using various graded-size probe molecules established that the passage of molecules/proteins across the glomerular capillary barrier of mammalian kidneys is increasingly restricted as their size increase. Few mathematical models were developed to describe the dynamics of the size-selective functions of macromolecules across membranes and gelatins. In the present study, we compare the behavior of three mathematical descriptions for the Fiber Matrix theory, an Extended Fiber Matrix theory, and an Alternative Statistical Physics analysis to describe the size-selective function of the glomerular capillary barrier; using mainly its hemodynamic, morphometric and hydrodynamic variables; in two experimental rat models. The glomerular basement membrane was represented as a homogeneous three-dimensional network of fibers of uniform length (Lf), radius (Rf), total fractional solid volume of fibers (Vf) and characteristic Darcy permeability. The models were appropriate for simulating in vivo fractional clearance data of neutral Dextran and Ficoll macromolecules from two experimental rat models. We believe that the Lf, Rf and Vf best-fit numerical values may signify new insights for the diagnosis of human nephropathies.

  6. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 deletion ameliorates glomerular injury in mice with ACTN4-associated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Read, Naomi C; Gutsol, Alex; Holterman, Chet E; Carter, Anthony; Coulombe, Josée; Gray, Douglas A; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2014-07-01

    Renal ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is upregulated in a subset of human glomerulopathies, including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), where it may serve to promote ubiquitin pools for degradation of cytotoxic proteins. In the present study, we tested whether UCHL1 is expressed in podocytes of a mouse model of ACTN4-associated FSGS. Podocyte UCHL1 protein was detected in glomeruli of K256E-ACTN4(pod+)/UCHL1+/+ mice. UCHL1+/- mice were intercrossed with K256E-ACTN4(pod+) mice and monitored for features of glomerular disease. 10-week-old K256E-ACTN4(pod+)/UCHL1-/- mice exhibited significantly ameliorated albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis, tubular pathology and blood pressure. Interestingly, while UCHL1 deletion diminished both tubular and glomerular apoptosis, WT1-positive nuclei were unchanged. Finally, UCHL1 levels correlated positively with poly-ubiquitinated proteins but negatively with K256E-α-actinin-4 levels, implying reduced K256E-α-actinin-4 proteolysis in the absence of UCHL1. Our data suggest that UCHL1 upregulation in ACTN4-associated FSGS fuels the proteasome and that UCHL1 deletion may impair proteolysis and thereby preserve K256E/wt-α-actinin-4 heterodimers, maintaining podocyte cytoskeletal integrity and protecting the glomerular filtration barrier.

  7. X-Linked Alport Dogs Demonstrate Mesangial Filopodial Invasion of the Capillary Tuft as an Early Event in Glomerular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sabrina D.; Nabity, Mary B.; Cianciolo, Rachel E.; Dufek, Brianna; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Background X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS), caused by mutations in the type IV collagen COL4A5 gene, accounts for approximately 80% of human Alport syndrome. Dogs with XLAS have a similar clinical progression. Prior studies in autosomal recessive Alport mice demonstrated early mesangial cell invasion as the source of laminin 211 in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), leading to proinflammatory signaling. The objective of this study was to verify this process in XLAS dogs. Methods XLAS dogs and WT littermates were monitored with serial clinicopathologic data and kidney biopsies. Biopsies were obtained at set milestones defined by the onset of microalbuminuria (MA), overt proteinuria, onset of azotemia, moderate azotemia, and euthanasia. Kidney biopsies were analyzed by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Results XLAS dogs showed progressive decrease in renal function and progressive increase in interstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis (based on light microscopy and immunostaining for fibronectin). The only identifiable structural abnormality at the time of microalbuminuria was ultrastructural evidence of mild segmental GBM multilamination, which was more extensive when overt proteinuria developed. Co-localization studies showed that mesangial laminin 211 and integrin α8β1 accumulated in the GBM at the onset of overt proteinuria and coincided with ultrastructural evidence of mild cellular interpositioning, consistent with invasion of the capillary loops by mesangial cell processes. Conclusion In a large animal model, the induction of mesangial filopodial invasion of the glomerular capillary loop leading to the irregular deposition of laminin 211 is an early initiating event in Alport glomerular pathology. PMID:27959966

  8. T cell infiltration is associated with kidney injury in patients with anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shui-Yi; Jia, Xiao-Yu; Li, Jian-Nan; Zheng, Xin; Ao, Jie; Liu, Gang; Cui, Zhao; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Cell-mediated autoimmunity, particularly that involving autoreactive T cells, participates in mediating anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease. However, direct kidney injury mediated by renal infiltrated T cells has not been clearly elucidated in humans. The T cell profile (CD3, CD4, CD8, IL-17, and foxp3) and macrophage (CD68) were examined by immunohistochemistry on renal biopsy tissues from 13 patients with anti-GBM disease. The correlation between cell infiltration and clinical data was also analyzed. We found that the distribution of T cell infiltration was predominant in the peri-glomerular and interstitial areas. CD(3+) T cell infiltratrion around the glomeruli with cellular crescent formations was significantly higher than that around the glomeruli with mild mesangial proliferation. CD(8+) T cells significantly accumulated around the glomeruli with cellular crescents without IgG deposits compared to those with IgG deposits. The prevalence of infiltrating CD(8+) T cells was correlated with the percentage of ruptured Bowman's capsules. In conclusion, cellular immunity may play a crucial role in the inflammatory kidney injury in anti-GBM patients. The periglomerular infiltration of T cells, especially CD(8+) T cells, may participate in the pathogenic mechanism of glomerular damage.

  9. Glomerular Protein Levels of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Are Lower in Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Toby C.; Bagnasco, Serena M.; Macgregor, Anne M.; Lu, Jie; Selvin, Elizabeth; Halushka, Marc K.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate extracellular matrix turnover throughout the body, including in renal glomeruli. We investigated protein levels of multiple MMPs (MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9) and TIMP-1 in glomeruli and investigated whether disease phenotypes were associated with levels of these proteins. Renal cortex was collected from 100 adult autopsy subjects arrayed across 17 tissue microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining intensity for each MMP and TIMP-1 was determined using quantitative color deconvolution techniques. We observed significantly decreased glomerular MMP-1 and TIMP-1 staining in subjects with diabetes, hypertension, and an estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m2 in univariate analyses. MMP-1 staining, but not TIMP-1 staining, was inversely correlated with increased glomerular fibrosis (r = −0.40). In multivariable analysis, diabetes was robustly associated with decreased staining intensity. This study indicates that in human subjects, the long-term sequelae of diseases such as diabetes that cause chronic renal failure result in decreased TIMP-1 and MMP-1 proteins in renal glomeruli. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:995–1001, 2009) PMID:19506087

  10. Exendin-4 Ameliorates Lipotoxicity-induced Glomerular Endothelial Cell Injury by Improving ABC Transporter A1-mediated Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetic apoE Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Wang, Yi-Ting; Liu, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Lin; Cheng, Jing-Qiu; Fu, Ping; Liu