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Sample records for human granulocyte colony-stimulating

  1. Granulocyte and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors as therapy in human and veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varón, Emilio; Villamayor, Lucía

    2007-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSFs) are endogenous cytokines that regulate granulocyte colonies and play a major role in the stimulation of granulopoiesis (neutrophils, basophils and eosinophils) and in the regulation of microbicidal functions. There are numerous pathological conditions in which neutrophils are decreased, the most common being neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, which increases the risk of serious microbial infections developing with the potential for high morbidity and mortality. New methods in molecular biology have led to the identification and cloning of CSF genes and biopharmaceutical production. Since then, CSFs have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, for mobilising haematopoietic cell precursors, and for other neutropenia-related pathologies. This review focuses on the use of CSFs within both human and veterinary medicine. Clinical applications, pharmacology, tolerability and the potential role of these factors in veterinary medicine are considered.

  2. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor ameliorate the proinflammatory response in human meningococcal septic shock?

    PubMed

    Rojahn, Astrid; Brusletto, Berit; Øvstebø, Reidun; Haug, Kari B F; Kierulf, Peter; Brandtzaeg, Petter

    2008-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor acts cooperatively with interleukin-10 in down-regulating monocyte function in severe meningococcal septic shock. 1) We quantified the plasma levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide and the number of N. meningitidis DNA copies in 28 patients with systemic meningococcal disease. 2) We studied the inhibitory effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on normal human monocytes stimulated with purified meningococcal lipopolysaccaride. 3) We monitored the inhibitory effects of endogenously produced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-10 in meningococcal shock plasmas on monocytes. Comparative, experimental study. University Hospital and laboratory. Twenty-eight patients with systemic meningococcal disease, 13 with persistent shock, 7 died, and 15 without shock. The median levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in shock and nonshock patients were 1.7 x 10(6) and 8.1 x 10(2) pg/mL; interleukin-10, 2.1 x 10(4) and 4 x 10(1) pg/mL; number of N. meningitidis DNA copies, 2.9 x 10(7) and <10(3)/mL; and lipopolysaccharide, 105 and <0.04 endotoxin units/mL, respectively. The plasma levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were reduced by 50% within 4 to 6 hrs after initiation of antibiotic treatment. In model experiments with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-10 reduced the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by mean 30% and 92%, respectively. When plasmas from three shock patients were depleted of native granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-10 by immunoprecipitation, no increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha release occurred after removal of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, whereas removal of interleukin-10 increased the tumor necrosis factor-alpha release eight-fold. Although

  3. Toxoplasma gondii Induces Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Secretion by Human Fibroblasts: Implications for Neutrophil Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Channon, Jacqueline Y.; Miselis, Kristin A.; Minns, Laurie A.; Dutta, Chaitali; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2002-01-01

    Human neutrophils are rescued from apoptosis following incubation with once-washed, fibroblast-derived Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. Both infected and uninfected neutrophils are rescued, implicating a soluble mediator. In this study we investigated the origin and identity of this soluble mediator. Neutrophils were incubated either with purified tachyzoites or with conditioned medium derived from T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. Conditioned medium was found to be a potent stimulus that delayed neutrophil apoptosis up to 72 h, whereas purified and extensively washed tachyzoites had no effect. Delayed apoptosis correlated with up-regulation of the neutrophil antiapoptotic protein, Mcl-1, and the neutrophil interleukin 3 receptor α subunit (IL-3Rα), suggesting a role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were measurable in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF and G-CSF were additive in abrogating delayed neutrophil apoptosis induced by conditioned medium. Inhibitors of Src family tyrosine kinases, Gi proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p44erk1 and p42erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Jak2 kinases partially attenuated the effect of conditioned medium, consistent with a role for G-CSF and/or GM-CSF. Hence, delayed neutrophil apoptosis is mediated by GM-CSF and G-CSF secreted by T. gondii-infected human fibroblasts. This enhanced neutrophil survival may contribute to the robust proinflammatory response elicited in the T. gondii-infected host. PMID:12379681

  4. In vivo stimulation of granulopoiesis by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.M.; Zsebo, K.M.; Inoue, H.; Hines, D.; Boone, T.C.; Chazin, V.R.; Tsai, L.; Ritch, T.; Souza, L.M.

    1987-04-01

    Osmotic pumps containing Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) were attached to indwelling jugular vein catheters and implanted subcutaneously into Golden Syrian hamsters. Within 3 days, peripheral granulocyte counts had increased > 10-fold with a concomitant 4-fold increase in total leukocytes. Microscopic examination of Wright-Giemsa-stained blood smears from rhG-CSF hamsters showed that only the neutrophil subpopulation of granulocytes had increased. After subcutaneous injection at /sup 35/S-labeled rhG-CSF doses of up to 10 ..mu..g x kg/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/ only granulocyte counts were affected. However, at higher dose levels, a transient thrombocytopenia was noted. Erythrocyte and lymphocyte/monocyte counts remained unaffected by rhG-CSF over the entire dose range studied. Total leukocyte counts increased 3-fold within 12 hr after a single s.c. injection of rhG-CSF. This early effect was associated with an increase in the total number of colony-forming cells and the percent of active cycling cells in the marrow. A sustained elevation of peripheral leukocyte and marrow progenitor counts was observed following seven daily s.c. injections of rhG-CSF. The ability of rhG-CSF to increase the production and release of granulocytes from the marrow may underlie the beneficial effect it produced on the restoration of peripheral leukocyte counts in hamsters made leukopenic by treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

  5. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-06-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGM-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet miniosmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated in this paper.

  6. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation-exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGm-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated.

  7. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as treatment for chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Borbolla-Escoboza, J R; María-Aceves, R; López-Hernández, M A; Collados-Larumbe, M T

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a single subcutaneous perilesional administration of 300 micrograms of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rHGM-CSF) for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers. Prospective, descriptive evaluation in an outpatient group. The Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE, Mexico City. 10 patients with chronic leg ulcers. Ulcer diameter and side effects. After 4 weeks observation, 8 of the 10 ulcers had healed; the other two had a mean diameter decrease of 21%. The only side effect was found in a 58 year old female who complained of moderate perilesional pain two days after having received treatment: it was successfully treated with paracetamol. We believe that a single perilesional subcutaneous administration of rhGM-CSF is safe and effective for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers.

  8. Stimulation of canine hematopoiesis by recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Schuening, F G; Storb, R; Goehle, S; Nash, R; Graham, T C; Appelbaum, F R; Hackman, R; Sandmaier, B M; Urdal, D L

    1989-09-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on canine hematopoiesis was evaluated. rhGM-CSF stimulated granulocyte-macrophage colony formation of canine marrow depleted of accessory cells up to tenfold. Stimulation of colony formation was abrogated by anti-rhGM-CSF antiserum or heat inactivation. rhGM-CSF also stimulated in vivo canine hematopoiesis both when given as continuous i.v. infusion and as intermittent s.c. injections. Neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte counts were increased three- to eightfold above controls, whereas values for eosinophils, reticulocytes, and hematocrits were not changed. Bone marrow histology after 2 weeks of treatment with rhGM-CSF showed hypercellularity with myeloid hyperplasia and left-shifted granulocytopoiesis. After discontinuation of rhGM-CSF, peripheral leukocyte counts returned to control level within 3-7 days. Platelet counts decreased rapidly after starting rhGM-CSF, to 5000-15,000 platelets/mm3, and increased within 24 h after stopping rhGM-CSF treatment, whereas marrow histology after 2 weeks of rhGM-CSF application showed the normal number and morphology of megakaryocytes.

  9. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF): cloning, overexpression, purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vanz, Ana LS; Renard, Gaby; Palma, Mario S; Chies, Jocelei M; Dalmora, Sérgio L; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biopharmaceutical drugs are mainly recombinant proteins produced by biotechnological tools. The patents of many biopharmaceuticals have expired, and biosimilars are thus currently being developed. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine that acts on cells of the neutrophil lineage causing proliferation and differentiation of committed precursor cells and activation of mature neutrophils. Recombinant hG-CSF has been produced in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (Filgrastim) and successfully used to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Filgrastim is a 175 amino acid protein, containing an extra N-terminal methionine, which is needed for expression in E. coli. Here we describe a simple and low-cost process that is amenable to scaling-up for the production and purification of homogeneous and active recombinant hG-CSF expressed in E. coli cells. Results Here we describe cloning of the human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor coding DNA sequence, protein expression in E. coli BL21(DE3) host cells in the absence of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, efficient isolation and solubilization of inclusion bodies by a multi-step washing procedure, and a purification protocol using a single cationic exchange column. Characterization of homogeneous rhG-CSF by size exclusion and reverse phase chromatography showed similar yields to the standard. The immunoassay and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the identity of rhG-CSF. The biological activity assay, in vivo, showed an equivalent biological effect (109.4%) to the standard reference rhG-CSF. The homogeneous rhG-CSF protein yield was 3.2 mg of bioactive protein per liter of cell culture. Conclusion The recombinant protein expression in the absence of IPTG induction is advantageous since cost is reduced, and the protein purification protocol using a single chromatographic step should reduce cost even further for large

  10. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. Results: hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. Conclusions: This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment. PMID:23748895

  11. Chronic neutropenia. A new canine model induced by human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, W P; Csiba, E; Canin, A; Hockman, H; Souza, L M; Layton, J E; Dale, D C

    1991-01-01

    Normal dogs were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) at 10 micrograms/kg/day for 30 d, which caused an initial neutrophilia, followed by a prolonged period of chronic neutropenia. A control dog treated with recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) showed persistent neutrophilia over 3 mo. Serum from dogs during neutropenia contained an antibody to rhG-CSF, which neutralized the stimulatory effects of both rhG-CSF and rcG-CSF on dog marrow neutrophilic progenitor cell growth and on NFS-60 cell proliferation. 4 mo after discontinuation of rhG-CSF, the dogs' neutrophil counts returned to the normal range. Rechallenge with the rhG-CSF re-induced severe neutropenia in 1 wk. Neutropenia was transferred by plasma infusion from a neutropenic dog to a previously normal dog. These data suggest that human rhG-CSF immunizes normal dogs and thereby induces neutralization of endogenous canine G-CSF and neutropenia. This model system should allow more precise definition of the in vivo role of G-CSF. PMID:1704019

  12. Enhanced and Secretory Expression of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor by Bacillus subtilis SCK6

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shaista; Sadaf, Saima; Ahmad, Sajjad; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for enhanced expression and secretion of a pharmaceutically important human cytokine, that is, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), in the culture supernatant of Bacillus subtilis SCK6 cells. Codon optimized GCSF and pNWPH vector containing SpymwC signal sequence were amplified by prolonged overlap extension PCR to generate multimeric plasmid DNA, which was used directly to transform B. subtilis SCK6 supercompetent cells. Expression of GCSF was monitored in the culture supernatant for 120 hours. The highest expression, which corresponded to 17% of the total secretory protein, was observed at 72 hours of growth. Following ammonium sulphate precipitation, GCSF was purified to near homogeneity by fast protein liquid chromatography on a QFF anion exchange column. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis showed that the secondary structure contents of the purified GCSF are similar to the commercially available GCSF. Biological activity, as revealed by the regeneration of neutrophils in mice treated with ifosfamine, was also similar to the commercial preparation of GCSF. This, to our knowledge, is the first study that reports secretory expression of human GCSF in B. subtilis SCK6 with final recovery of up to 96 mg/L of the culture supernatant, without involvement of any chemical inducer. PMID:26881203

  13. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  14. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-11-30

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics.

  15. Functional characterization of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hGMCSF) immobilized onto silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, Selvarajan; Goswami, Upashi; Chaubey, Nidhi; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Sanpui, Pallab

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), an important therapeutic cytokine, was immobilized onto silica nanoparticles. Maintenance of structural integrity and biological performance in immobilized cytokine was assessed to augment its applicability in possible biomedical implications. Following its cloning and expression in E. coli, the recombinant human GMCSF (hGMCSF) was purified as a GST-tagged protein corresponding to a 42 kDa band on SDS-PAGE. The purified cytokine was immobilized onto biocompatible silica nanoparticles (~129.4 nm) by adsorption and the binding was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and infrared spectroscopy. Maximum binding of hGMCSF was at 6.4 µg mg(-1) silica nanoparticles. Efficient release of the cytokine from the nanoparticles with its structural integrity intact was deduced from circular dichroism spectroscopy. hGMCSF-immobilized silica nanoparticles efficiently increased the proliferation of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells with 50 % increase in proliferation at 600 ng hGMCSF µg(-1) silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles successfully immobilized hGMCSF maintaining its structural integrity. The release of the immobilized cytokine from silica nanoparticles resulted in the increased proliferation of macrophages indicating the potential of the system in future applications.

  16. Recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in deep second-degree burn wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dexiong; Liu, Sha; Zhao, Xiaochun; Bian, Huijuan; Yao, Xingwei; Xing, Jiping; Sun, Weijing; Chen, Xiangjun

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on deep second-degree burn wound healing. In this study, 95 patients with a total of 190 burn wounds were treated with either rhGM-CSF or placebo, separated into 2 groups by treatment type. Wound healing rate, wound healing time, histopathological condition, and scar scale were all compared between the 2 groups. The healing rates in the rhGM-CSF group were remarkably higher than those in the placebo group (P < .01). The wound healing time in the rhGM-CSF group (18.8 ± 7.6 days) was significantly shorter than that in the placebo group (25.5 ± 4.6 days, P < .01). On the 14th day and 28th day, the average optical density of vascular endothelial factor (VEGF) in the rhGM-CSF group was larger than that in the placebo group. Meanwhile, the average optical density of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) in the rhGM-CSF group was also larger than that in the placebo group. Furthermore, the Vancouver scar scale scores of pigmentation, pliability, height, and vascularity were notable lower in the rhGM-CSF group than those in the placebo group (P < .01). The results suggest that rhGM-CSF can significantly accelerate deep second-degree burn wound healing.

  17. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor expression on human transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, M.; Miyakawa, A.; Uchida, A.; Murai, M.; Eguchi, K.; Nakamura, K.; Kubo, A.; Hata, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) have been confirmed on the cell surfaces of several non-haematopoietic cell types, including bladder cancer cells. This observation has naturally led to the hypothesis that the expression of G-CSFR on these cells may enhance their growth by G-CSF. In this study, the expression of G-CSFR was determined in both established human bladder cancer cell lines and primary bladder cancers. We studied five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KU-1, KU-7, T-24, NBT-2 and KK) and 26 newly diagnosed bladder tumours. G-CSFR mRNA expressions on cultured cell lines were determined using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Furthermore, the G-CSFR binding experiments on the cultured cell lines were conducted using the Na(125)I-labelled G-CSF ligand-binding assay method. Moreover, the G-CSFR mRNA expressions on primary bladder tumour specimens were assessed using the in situ RT-PCR method. Three out of the five cultured cell lines (KU-1, NBT-2 and KK) exhibited G-CSFR mRNA signals when the RT-PCR method was used. The G-CSFR binding experiments showed an equilibrium dissociation constant (K[d]) of 490 pM for KU-1, 340 pM for NBT-2 and 103 pM for KK cells. With in situ RT-PCR, the tumour cells of 6 out of 26 primary bladder tumour specimens (23.1%) presented positive G-CSFR mRNA signals. Thus, in this study, G-CSFR expression was frequently observed on bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the clinical use of G-CSF for patients with bladder cancer should be selected with great care. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9166942

  19. Expression and function of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Jubinsky, P T; Laurie, A S; Nathan, D G; Yetz-Aldepe, J; Sieff, C A

    1994-12-15

    To determine the expression and function of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha chain (GMR alpha) during hematopoiesis and on leukemic cells, monoclonal antibodies were raised by immunizing mice with cells expressing high levels of human GMR alpha. A pool of five antibodies isolated from three different mice was used to characterize GMR alpha. This antibody pool (anti-GMR alpha) immunoprecipitated a protein with the expected molecular weight of GMR alpha from COS cells transiently transfected with the GMR alpha gene. In factor-dependent cells, GMR alpha existed as a phosphoprotein. However, its phosphorylation was not stimulated by the presence of GM-CSF. Anti-GMR alpha inhibited the GM-CSF-dependent growth of cell lines and normal bone marrow cells and inhibited the binding of iodinated GM-CSF to its receptor. Cell surface expression of GMR alpha was examined using anti-GMR alpha and flow cytometry. GMR alpha was readily detectable on both blood monocytes and neutrophils. In adherence-depleted normal bone marrow, two separate populations expressed GMR alpha. The most positive cells were predominantly macrophages, whereas the cells that expressed less GMR alpha were largely myelocytes and metamyelocytes. A small population of lin-CD34+ or CD34+CD38- cells also expressed GMR alpha, but they were not capable of significant growth in colony-forming assays. In contrast, the majority of lin-CD34+ and CD34+CD38- cells were GMR alpha-, yet they produced large numbers of myeloid and erythroid colonies in the same assay. Malignant cells from patients with leukemia were also tested for GMR alpha expression. All of the myeloid leukemias and only rare lymphoid leukemias surveyed tested positive for GMR alpha. These results show that anti-GMR alpha is useful for the functional characterization of the GMR alpha and for the detection of myeloid leukemia and that GMR alpha is expressed on certain lineages throughout hematopoietic

  20. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  1. Production and secretion of biologically active human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic tomato suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Young-Sook; Lee, Jae-Hwa; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2003-09-01

    A complementary DNA encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) was cloned and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Seokwang) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic PCR and Northern blot analysis demonstrated the integration of the construction into the plant nuclear genome and expression of the hGM-CSF in transgenic tomato. The cell suspension culture was established from leaf-derived calli of the transgenic tomato plants transformed with the hGM-CSF gene. Recombinant hGM-CSF was synthesized by the transgenic cell culture and secreted into the growth medium at 45 microg l(-1) after 10 d' cultivation.

  2. In vivo effect of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on megakaryocytopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Monzeglio, C.; Sanavio, F.; Apra, F.; Morelli, S.; Stacchini, A.; Piacibello, W.; Bussolino, F.; Bagnara, G.; Zauli, G. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production was investigated in patients with normal hematopoiesis. Three findings indicated that GM-CSF plays a role in megakaryocytopoiesis. During treatment with GM-CSF (recombinant mammalian, glycosylated; Sandoz/Schering-Plough, 5.5 micrograms protein/kg/d, subcutaneously for 3 days) the percentage of megakaryocyte progenitors (megakaryocyte colony forming unit (CFU-Mk)) in S phase (evaluated by the suicide technique with high 3H-Tdr doses) increased from 31% +/- 16% to 88% +/- 11%; and the maturation profile of megakaryocytes was modified, with a relative increase in more immature stage I-III forms. Moreover, by autoradiography (after incubation of marrow cells with 125I-labeled GM-CSF) specific GM-CSF receptors were detectable on megakaryocytes. Nevertheless, the proliferative stimulus induced on the progenitors was not accompanied by enhanced platelet production (by contrast with the marked granulomonocytosis). It may be suggested that other cytokines are involved in the regulation of the intermediate and terminal stages of megakaryocytopoiesis in vivo and that their intervention is an essential prerequisite to turn the GM-CSF-induced proliferative stimulus into enhanced platelet production.

  3. Granulocyte, granulocyte–macrophage, and macrophage colony-stimulating factors can stimulate the invasive capacity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, X-H; Nakanishi, Y; Takayama, K; Bai, F; Hara, N

    1999-01-01

    We and other researchers have previously found that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), which generally include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), promote invasion by lung cancer cells. In the present study, we studied the effects of these CSFs on gelatinase production, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) production and their activity in human lung cancer cells. Gelatin zymographs of conditioned media derived from human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed two major bands of gelatinase activity at 68 and 92 kDa, which were characterized as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 respectively. Treatment with CSFs increased the 68- and 92-kDa activity and converted some of a 92-kDa proenzyme to an 82-kDa enzyme that was consistent with an active form of the MMP-9. Plasminogen activator zymographs of the conditioned media from the cancer cells showed that CSF treatment resulted in an increase in a 48–55 kDa plasminogen-dependent gelatinolytic activity that was characterized as human uPA. The conditioned medium from the cancer cells treated with CSFs stimulated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, providing a direct demonstration of the ability of enhanced uPA to increase plasmin-dependent proteolysis. The enhanced invasive behaviour of the cancer cells stimulated by CSFs was well correlated with the increase in MMPs and uPA activities. These data suggest that the enhanced production of extracellular matrix-degrading proteinases by the cancer cells in response to CSF treatment may represent a biochemical mechanism which promotes the invasive behaviour of the cancer cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408691

  4. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uzumaki, Hiroya; Okabe, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Norio; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takaku, Fumimaro; Tobita, Masahito; Yasukawa, Kaoru ); Ito, Seiga ); Umezawa, Yoshimi )

    1989-12-01

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, the authors synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the {sup 125}I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 to placental membranes was pH-dependent, with maximal specific binding at pH 7.8; it increased linearly with protein to 3.7 mg of protein per ml and was both time- and temperature-dependent, with maximal binding at 4{degree}C after a 24-hr incubation. When the authors examined the ability of hematopoietic growth factors to inhibit {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, they found that KW-2228 and intact human G-CSF ihibited {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, whereas erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not. Scatchard analysis revealed a single receptor type. The human G-CSF receptors on human placental membranes were shown to consist of two molecular species that could be specifically cross-linked to {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228. Human trophoblastic cells, T3M-3, also possessed a single receptor for G-CSF. They have identified the receptor for human G-CSF on human placental membranes and trophoblastic cells.

  5. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  6. Weekly CODE chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tsuchiya, S; Minato, K; Sunaga, N; Ishihara, S I; Makimoto, T; Naruse, I; Hoshino, H; Watanabe, S; Saitoh, R; Mori, M

    2000-01-01

    We used cisplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide (CODE) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) weekly for salvage chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We reviewed the medical charts of patients between January 1993 and December 1996 at the National Nishi-Gunma Hospital. Twenty patients were treated with salvage chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 55.0%. The median survival time of extensive disease patients from the start of CODE therapy was 23 weeks and the 1-year survival rate was 21.0%. Toxicities were severe, especially in myelosuppression. CODE could be selected as a salvage therapy for chemotherapy- relapsed SCLC cases.

  7. Construction of recombinant Escherichia coli strains for secretory expression of artificial genes for human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskaya, L.E.; Ruzin, A.V.; Shingarova, L.N.; Korobko, V.G.

    1995-11-01

    A number of recombinant plasmids for expression of artificial genes encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were constructed. A hybrid gene was obtained that contains a sequence encoding the leader peptide and a tandem of two IgG-binding domains of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus coupled, through an enteropepdidase linker, to a synthetic gmcsf gene. The construction enables Escherichia coli to carry out biosynthesis of the hybrid protein and its subsequent transport into the periplasmic space of bacteria. Another hybrid gene, combining sequences for the signal peptide of the E. coli outer membrane protein OmpA and GM-CSF, was obtained using polymerase chain reaction. The localization of the mature protein produced by the hybrid gene was found to depend on the strength of the promoter used. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  8. In vitro and in vivo activity of human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Werner, F J; Lam, C; Besemer, J

    1990-10-01

    Although it is well documented that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) controls the production and functional activity of human and nonhuman primate granulocytes and macrophages, relatively little is known about its effects on cells obtained from other species. The molecular cloning of the complementary DNA for human GM-CSF has made it possible to determine the cross-reactivity of the purified recombinant human material (rhGM-CSF) on cells of other species. The results presented herein show that specific receptors for human GM-CSF exist on dog bone marrow cells and mature circulating dog granulocytes. The number of the receptors and the apparent binding affinity of the rhGM-CSF to its receptors on granulocytes were similar to those observed either on human or monkey cells. In cultures of dog bone marrow cells, rhGM-CSF was capable of promoting colony formation in a dose-dependent manner. Human GM-CSF also primed dog granulocytes for increased production of reactive oxygen metabolites in response to either phorbolmyristic acetate-or zymosan-activated dog serum. In vivo, s.c. administration to healthy dogs of rhGM-CSF in daily doses of 15, 50, or 150 micrograms/kg body weight over a period of 7-20 days induced a dose-dependent rise of up to a maximum of a fourfold increase in peripheral WBC counts. The rise in WBC counts was mainly due to elevated neutrophil levels, but an increase in the numbers of monocytes and eosinophils was also observed. However, the rhGM-CSF-induced leukocytosis in dogs was not as dramatic as that observed in nonhuman primates. In all rhGM-CSF-treated dogs, circulating platelet counts dropped to nadir levels of about 20%-30% of normal numbers. Dogs that were treated with 150 micrograms/kg rhGM-CSF developed specific antibodies after about 10-12 days of treatment. These antibodies were able to neutralize the effect of rhGM-CSF in in vitro assays. In vivo WBC counts began to decline when specific antibodies developed

  9. Structure of the chromosomal gene for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: comparison of the mouse and human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, S; Otsuka, T; Yokota, T; Lee, F; Arai, K

    1985-01-01

    A cDNA clone that expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in COS-7 cells has been isolated from a pcD library prepared from mRNA derived from concanavalin A-activated mouse helper T cell clones. Based on homology with the mouse GM-CSF cDNA sequence, the mouse GM-CSF gene was isolated. The human GM-CSF gene was also isolated based on homology with the human GM-CSF cDNA sequence. The nucleotide sequences determined for the genes and their flanking regions revealed that both the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are composed of three introns and four exons. The organization of the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are highly homologous and strong sequence homology between the two genes is found both in the coding and non-coding regions. A 'TATA'-like sequence was found 20-25 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. In the 5'-flanking region, there is a highly homologous region extending 330 bp upstream of the putative TATA box. This sequence may play a role in regulation of expression of the GM-CSF gene. These structures are compared with those of different lymphokine genes and their regulatory regions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3876930

  10. Analytical characterization of in vitro refolding in the quality by design paradigm: Refolding of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Mili; Dixit, Shruti; Muthukumar, S; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-07-15

    Protein based therapeutics dominate most pharmaceutical pipelines today. For a therapeutic product to be effective, it is important that it is in its native form as slight modifications have been known to result in significantly different performance in the clinic. When expressed in hosts such as Escherichia coli, formation of inactive insoluble aggregates of proteins popularly known as inclusion bodies occurs in most cases. This necessitates the need for in vitro refolding to generate the native (and active) form of the therapeutic protein. This paper aims to provide an approach to generate a deeper understanding of refolding of a therapeutic protein and then to use it for its optimal production commercially. Recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor has been chosen as the model protein. Seven orthogonal analytical tools have been used to elucidate the refolding process. By strategically using these tools protein refolding has been segregated into a series of well-defined sequence of events, starting from the unfolded random coil and ending with the uniquely folded metastable state. The study also suggests the choice of tools that can be used to monitor each event. We believe that this paper successfully demonstrates an approach to generate deeper understanding of the protein refolding process as per the expectations laid out in the Quality by Design paradigm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypic features of first-generation transgenic goats for human granulocyte-colony stimulation factor production in milk.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ribrio I T P; Melo, Carlos H S; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna M G; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2014-11-01

    Human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor used in neutropenic patients. It is produced in transgenic bacteria or cultured mammalian cells. As an alternative, we now show that hG-CSF can be expressed in the mammary gland of first-generation (F1) transgenic goats during induced lactation. Despite lower milk production, transgenic females presented a similar milk composition (fat, protein and lactose) when compared to non-transgenic (p > 0.05) ones. The mean concentration (±SD) of recombinant hG-CSF in milk during lactation was 360 ± 178 µg ml(-1). All clinical parameters, as well as kidney and liver function, indicated that F1 transgenic goats were healthy. Additionally, no ectopic hG-CSF expression was detected in studied tissues of F1 transgenic males. Thus, F1 hG-CSF-transgenic goats can express the recombinant protein in milk at quantities compatible with their use as bioreactors in a commercial-scale protein-production program.

  12. Simplified Large-Scale Refolding, Purification, and Characterization of Recombinant Human Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Chi Ho; Lee, Seung-Bae; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that stimulates the development of committed hematopoietic progenitor cells and enhances the functional activity of mature cells. Here, we report a simplified method for fed-batch culture as well as the purification of recombinant human (rh) G-CSF. The new system for rhG-CSF purification was performed using not only temperature shift strategy without isopropyl-l-thio-β-d-galactoside (IPTG) induction but also the purification method by a single step of prep-HPLC after the pH precipitation of the refolded samples. Through these processes, the final cell density and overall yield of homogenous rhG-CSF were obtained 42.8 g as dry cell weights, 1.75 g as purified active proteins, from 1 L culture broth, respectively. The purity of rhG-CSF was finally 99% since the isoforms of rhG-CSF could be separated through the prep-HPLC step. The result of biological activity indicated that purified rhG-CSF has a similar profile to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2nd International Standard for G-CSF. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the simple purification through a single step of prep-HPLC may be valuable for the industrial-scale production of biologically active proteins. PMID:24224041

  13. Nuclear proteins interacting with the promoter region of the human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.F.; Gamble, J.R.; Vadas, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    The gene for human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is expressed in a tissue-specific as well as an activation-dependent manner. The interaction of nuclear proteins with the promoter region of the GM-CSF gene that is likely to be responsible for this pattern of GM-CSF expression was investigated. The authors show that nuclear proteins interact with DNA fragments from the GM-CSF promoter in a cell-specific manner. A region spanning two cytokine-specific sequences, cytokine 1 (CK-1, 5', GAGATTCCAC 3') and cytokine 2 (CK-2, 5' TCAGGTA 3') bound two nuclear proteins from GM-CSF-expressing cells in gel retardation assays. NF-GMb was inducible with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and accompanied induction of GM-CSF message. NF-GMb was absent in cell lines not producing GM-CSF, some of which had other distinct binding proteins. NF-GMa and NF-GMb eluted from a heparin-Sepharose column at 0.3 and 0.6 M KCl, respectively. They hypothesize that the sequences CK-1 and CK-2 bind specific proteins and regulate GM-CSF transcription.

  14. Induction of retinoic acid receptor-alpha by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Takeda, K

    2000-08-15

    We reported previously that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces differentiation of human myeloblastic leukemia ML-1 cells to granulocytes, whereas treatment with ATRA alone induces practically no differentiation of these cells. To investigate the mechanism of the synergistic effect of these factors, we examined the effect of GM-CSF on retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in ML-1 cells. We reveal that GM-CSF induces the expression of RAR alpha mRNA and protein and stimulates the binding of nuclear proteins to direct repeat 5, a consensus sequence with high affinity for RAR-RXR heterodimers. Furthermore, expression of CD38 mRNA mediated through RAR alpha is induced synergistically by treatment with ATRA + GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF stimulates transcriptional activity mediated via RAR alpha in ML-1 cells. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF may therefore be a mechanism for stimulation by GM-CSF. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF was also detected in other myeloid leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1) that showed a synergistic effect similar to that seen in ML-1 cells in response to ATRA + GM-CSF. We also found that GM-CSF induced the expression of RAR alpha in blood cells obtained from patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This activity of GM-CSF may serve as a useful adjunct to differentiation therapy for retinoic acid-nonresponsive leukemias.

  15. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  16. Notch signaling mediates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor priming-induced transendothelial migration of human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Liu, L Y; Wang, H; Xenakis, J J; Spencer, L A

    2015-07-01

    Priming with cytokines such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances eosinophil migration and exacerbates the excessive accumulation of eosinophils within the bronchial mucosa of asthmatics. However, mechanisms that drive GM-CSF priming are incompletely understood. Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that regulates cellular processes, including migration, by integrating exogenous and cell-intrinsic cues. This study investigates the hypothesis that the priming-induced enhanced migration of human eosinophils requires the Notch signaling pathway. Using pan Notch inhibitors and newly developed human antibodies that specifically neutralize Notch receptor 1 activation, we investigated a role for Notch signaling in GM-CSF-primed transmigration of human blood eosinophils in vitro and in the airway accumulation of mouse eosinophils in vivo. Notch receptor 1 was constitutively active in freshly isolated human blood eosinophils, and inhibition of Notch signaling or specific blockade of Notch receptor 1 activation during GM-CSF priming impaired priming-enhanced eosinophil transendothelial migration in vitro. Inclusion of Notch signaling inhibitors during priming was associated with diminished ERK phosphorylation, and ERK-MAPK activation was required for GM-CSF priming-induced transmigration. In vivo in mice, eosinophil accumulation within allergic airways was impaired following systemic treatment with Notch inhibitor, or adoptive transfer of eosinophils treated ex vivo with Notch inhibitor. These data identify Notch signaling as an intrinsic pathway central to GM-CSF priming-induced eosinophil tissue migration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Efficient Process Development of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (rh-GCSF) Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Khanchezar, Sirwan; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Pesaran Hagi Abbas, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The protein hormone granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) stimulates the production of white blood cells and plays an important role in medical treatment of cancer patients. Methods: An efficient process was developed for heterologous expression of the human GCSF in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The feeding rate was adjusted to achieve the maximum attainable specific growth rate under critical value. In this method, specific growth rate was maintained at the maximum value of 0.55 h-1 at the beginning of feeding to 0.4 h-1 at the induction time. Recombinant human GCSF (rh-GCSF) was produced as inclusion body. At first, inclusion bodies were released by cell disruption and then washed, solubilized and refolded. Finally, the rh-GCSF was purified by cation exchange chromatography. Results: Obviouly, higher specific growth rate decreases process time and consequently increases productivity. The final concentration of biomass and GCSF was achieved 126 g DCW.l-1 and 32.1 g.l-1. Also, the final specific yield (YP/X) and total productivity of rh-GCSF were obtained 254 mg.g-1 DCW and 1.83 g.l-1.h-1, respectively. According to the available data, this is one of the highest YP/X and productivity that has been reported for any human protein which is expressed in E. coli. Recovery yield of purification process was %40 and purity of recombinant protein was over than 99%. The circular dichroism spectra of purified rh-GCSF, Neupogen® and PD-Grastim showed that all proteins have a similar secondary structure. Conclusion: Modified exponential feeding strategy for fed-batch cultivation of recombinant E. coli, results in minimum fed-batch duration and maximum productivity. PMID:25864815

  18. Efficient process development of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh-GCSF) production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Khanchezar, Sirwan; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Pesaran Hagi Abbas, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    The protein hormone granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) stimulates the production of white blood cells and plays an important role in medical treatment of cancer patients. An efficient process was developed for heterologous expression of the human GCSF in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The feeding rate was adjusted to achieve the maximum attainable specific growth rate under critical value. In this method, specific growth rate was maintained at the maximum value of 0.55 h⁻¹ at the beginning of feeding to 0.4 h-1 at the induction time. Recombinant human GCSF (rh-GCSF) was produced as inclusion body. At first, inclusion bodies were released by cell disruption and then washed, solubilized and refolded. Finally, the rh-GCSF was purified by cation exchange chromatography. Obviouly, higher specific growth rate decreases process time and consequently increases productivity. The final concentration of biomass and GCSF was achieved 126 g DCW.l⁻¹ and 32.1 g.l⁻¹. Also, the final specific yield (YP/X) and total productivity of rh-GCSF were obtained 254 mg.g⁻¹ DCW and 1.83 g.l⁻¹.h⁻¹, respectively. According to the available data, this is one of the highest YP/X and productivity that has been reported for any human protein which is expressed in E. coli. Recovery yield of purification process was %40 and purity of recombinant protein was over than 99%. The circular dichroism spectra of purified rh-GCSF, Neupogen and PD-Grastim showed that all proteins have a similar secondary structure. Modified exponential feeding strategy for fed-batch cultivation of recombinant E. coli, results in minimum fed-batch duration and maximum productivity.

  19. Recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF): Possibility of nanoparticle-mediated delivery in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, Selvarajan; Chaubey, Nidhi; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Sanpui, Pallab

    2017-03-04

    Most of the cancer treatment strategies from chemotherapy to radiotherapy render cancer cells apoptotic and these apoptotic cancer cells accumulate at the tumor sites. The accumulation of apoptotic cancer cells often result in inflammation and autoimmune responses causing serious health implications. Macrophages, which are effective immune combatants, can help in the clearance of these deleterious occupants. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key cytokine, modulator of immune system and responsible for growth and differentiation of granulocytes and macrophages. In this regard, supply of recombinant GM-CSF can enhance the capability of macrophages for clearance of apoptotic cancer cells. However, delivery of the cytokine in vivo can suffer from certain disadvantages like faster depletion, less stability and low targeting efficiency. We believe that the stability and sustained release of GM-CSF can be improved through its encapsulation inside appropriately designed nanoparticles.

  20. Levels of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in serum are inversely correlated with circulating neutrophil counts.

    PubMed Central

    Takatani, H; Soda, H; Fukuda, M; Watanabe, M; Kinoshita, A; Nakamura, T; Oka, M

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is effective in countering chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, serum rhG-CSF levels cannot be maintained throughout the course of rhG-CSF therapy. The drop in serum rhG-CSF levels may vary with the duration of rhG-CSF administration or with the circulating neutrophil counts. We investigated the relationship between serum G-CSF levels and circulating neutrophil counts and the pharmacokinetics of rhG-CSF for patients with lung cancer who had been treated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy and then with subcutaneous rhG-CSF (lenograstim, 2 micrograms per kg of body weight per day). Twelve patients were randomly assigned to four groups with different rhG-CSF therapy schedules. Serum G-CSF levels were measured by an enzyme immunoassay method. Serum G-CSF levels during the rhG-CSF therapy greatly exceeded endogenous G-CSF levels and were mainly due to the presence of exogenous rhG-CSF rather than increased levels of endogenous G-CSF. Despite the duration of rhG-CSF administration, serum G-CSF levels during rhG-CSF therapy were inversely correlated with circulating neutrophil counts (r2 = 0.73, P < 0.0001). The value for the area under the concentration-time curve of rhG-CSF on the day of neutrophilia was lower than that on the day of neutropenia (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the fall in serum G-CSF levels during rhG-CSF therapy may result from increased clearance and/or decreased absorption of rhG-CSF, two processes related to circulating neutrophil counts. PMID:8849265

  1. Kinetics of human hemopoietic cells after in vivo administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Aglietta, M; Piacibello, W; Sanavio, F; Stacchini, A; Aprá, F; Schena, M; Mossetti, C; Carnino, F; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Gavosto, F

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic changes induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on hemopoietic cells were assessed in physiological conditions by administering GM-CSF (8 micrograms/kg per d) for 3 d to nine patients with solid tumors and normal bone marrow (BM), before chemotherapy. GM-CSF increased the number of circulating granulocytes and monocytes; platelets, erythrocytes, lymphocyte number, and subsets were unmodified. GM-CSF increased the percentage of BM S phase BFU-E (from 32 +/- 7 to 79 +/- 16%), day 14 colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (from 43 +/- 20 to 82 +/- 11%) and day 7 CFU-GM (from 41 +/- 14 to 56 +/- 20%). The percentage of BM myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and myelocytes in S phase increased from 26 +/- 14 to 41 +/- 6%, and that of erythroblasts increased from 25 +/- 12 to 30 +/- 12%. This suggests that GM-CSF activates both erythroid and granulomonopoietic progenitors but that, among the morphologically recognizable BM precursors, only the granulomonopoietic lineage is a direct target of the molecule. GM-CSF increased the birth rate of cycling cells from 1.3 to 3.4 cells %/h and decreased the duration of the S phase from 14.3 to 9.1 h and the cell cycle time from 86 to 26 h. After treatment discontinuation, the number of circulating granulocytes and monocytes rapidly fell. The proportion of S phase BM cells dropped to values lower than pretreatment levels, suggesting a period of relative refractoriness to cell cycle-active antineoplastic agents. PMID:2643633

  2. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  3. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for the intracranial hemorrhage in two dogs: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, M. H.; Park, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Two dogs with generalized seizures were evaluated. The dogs were diagnosed with traumatic intracranial hemorrhages based on the history, neurological examinations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Treatment was started with oxygen, prednisolone and anticonvulsant agents. No further seizure activity was observed after treatment in both dogs, however cushing reflex was detected in case 1 and a left-sided hemi-paresis was detected in case 2. Further supportive treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) was attempted. No abnormal signs were noted in either of the dogs and no recurrence was noted 16 and 14 months later, in case 1 and 2, respectively. These cases indicate that a combination of rhG-CSF treatment with previous therapy could be used in dogs with traumatic brain injury. PMID:27656233

  4. Effect of combination therapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) and antibiotics in neutropenic mice unresponsive to antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Matsubara, S; Yokota, T

    1991-09-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) in enhancing antimicrobial chemotherapy was investigated. Combined treatments of rG-CSF with cefotaxime, cefazolin, fosfomycin, gentamicin or amphotericin B were evaluated in systemic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans in leucopenic mice induced by pretreatment with cyclophosphamide. Administration of appropriate antibiotics afforded a dose-related inhibition of death from infection in normal mice and mice treated with rG-CSF after cyclophosphamide injection. In cyclophosphamide-treated mice, even larger doses of the antibiotics failed to provide protection against infection with the same inoculum size. These results suggest the possibility that rG-CSF could be of help in treatments with antimicrobial agents against infections in leucopenic patients.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor.

  6. Expression of murine and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors in S. cerevisiae: mutagenesis of the potential glycosylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Miyajima, A; Otsu, K; Schreurs, J; Bond, M W; Abrams, J S; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    Murine (m) and human (h) granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF) have been expressed in large quantities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a secretion vector containing the promoter and leader sequences of the mating pheromone alpha-factor. Functionally active mGM-CSF was identified by a proliferation assay with a factor-dependent cell line and by a granulocyte--macrophage colony formation assay using bone marrow cells. The activity of hGM-CSF was confirmed by stimulation of granulocyte--macrophage colony formation using human cord blood cells. Murine GM-CSF with various apparent mol. wts (13, 18, 24, 34 and 40 kd, as well as a smear of higher mol. wts) was detected in yeast culture medium by protein blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody specific for the mGM-CSF N-terminal region peptide. Protein blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody specific for the hGM-CSF N-terminal region demonstrated that a 15.6-kd and higher mol. wt heterogeneous species were secreted. Mutations introduced at each of the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in mGM-CSF showed that the 13-kd protein is not glycosylated and the major 18-kd protein is mainly glycosylated at the more C-terminal site, whereas the heterogeneous higher mol. wt species were not affected by the mutations. The N-terminal amino acid of the 13-kd protein was shown to be Ser which was four amino acids in the C-terminal direction from the fusion point. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3525148

  7. Cytokine regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production by human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crane, I J; Kuppner, M C; Mckillop-Smith, S; Wallace, C A; Forrester, J V

    1999-01-01

    GM-CSF is an important regulator of macrophage, granulocyte and dendritic cell behaviour and function. These cell types have been implicated in the retinal damage characteristic of endogenous posterior uveitis. Dendritic cells in the choroid have access to retinal antigens processed by the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the blood–retinal barrier and are thought to be candidates for the presentation of antigen in uveoretinitis. We therefore investigated the production of GM-CSF and its regulation in human RPE cells. IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) all stimulated GM-CSF production by RPE cells and a combination of these cytokines increased GM-CSF production over five-fold compared with that with the individual cytokines alone. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) rapidly down-regulated these responses. IFN-γ did not appear to be acting directly on IL-1β or via the synthesis of another protein. GM-CSF mRNA expression showed the same pattern of response to these cytokines, indicating transcriptional or pre-transcriptional regulation, and there was no evidence that IFN-γ was acting by destabilizing GM-CSF mRNA. These results are generally important in understanding the ways in which cytokine regulation differs between different cell types and also more specifically for determining ways in which a cytokine with a significant role in the development of autoimmune uveoretinitis may be manipulated. PMID:9933455

  8. Bovine alpha s1-casein gene sequences direct high level expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, M; Hyttinen, J M; Korhonen, V P; Västi, A; Alhonen, L; Jänne, O A; Jänne, J

    1997-01-01

    The generation is reported of transgenic mice expressing human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or human erythropoietin (EPO) under the control of bovine alpha s1-casein regulatory sequences. GM-CSF expression was specific to the mammary gland, and levels of human GM-CSF in transgenic mouse milk were in the range of mg ml-1. The specific activity of the milk GM-CSF was similar to that of the recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli, and the glycosylation-derived size heterogeneity corresponded to that of the native human protein. In spite of the identical bovine regulatory sequences of the fusion genes, the levels of human EPO in transgenic mouse milk were 10(3)-10(6) times lower than those of GM-CSF, ranging from 0.003 to 3 micrograms ml-1. There appeared to be a positive correlation between the amount of EPO in the milk of lactating females and blood haematocrit values. In view of this, other type of constructs should be used to achieve more efficient EPO expression and to circumvent concomitantly-occurring adverse effects. In contrast, the high-level production of recombinant GM-CSF, its resemblance to the native mammalian protein, and mild adverse consequences of transgene expression imply that the current construct could be used for generation of larger GM-CSF transgenic animals to produce this protein in quantities sufficient for therapeutic purposes.

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A saturated fatty acid-induced myokine with insulin-desensitizing properties in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ordelheide, Anna-Maria; Gommer, Nadja; Böhm, Anja; Hermann, Carina; Thielker, Inga; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) are important metabolic signals that acutely enhance fatty acid oxidation, thermogenesis, energy expenditure, and insulin secretion. However, if chronically elevated, they provoke inflammation, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure. Moreover, FFAs act via multiple signaling pathways as very potent regulators of gene expression. In human skeletal muscle cells differentiated in vitro (myotubes), we have shown in previous studies that the expression of CSF3, the gene encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), is markedly induced upon FFA treatment and exercise. Methods and results We now report that CSF3 is induced in human myotubes by saturated, but not unsaturated, FFAs via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent and -independent pathways including activation of Rel-A, AP-1, C/EBPα, Src, and stress kinases. Furthermore, we show that human adipocytes and myotubes treated with G-CSF become insulin-resistant. In line with this, a functional polymorphism in the CSF3 gene affects adipose tissue- and whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in human subjects with elevated plasma FFA concentrations. Conclusion G-CSF emerges as a new player in FFA-induced insulin resistance and thus may be of interest as a target for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27069870

  10. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  11. Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccination in the treatment of canine B-cell multicentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Turek, M M; Thamm, D H; Mitzey, A; Kurzman, I D; Huelsmeyer, M K; Dubielzig, R R; Vail, D M

    2007-12-01

    This study describes the development of an human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccine (hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV) and its implementation, following a chemotherapy treatment protocol, in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial in pet dogs with naturally occurring lymphoma. We hypothesized that the use of this vaccine would result in an antitumour immune response leading to improved first remission duration and overall survival in dogs with B-cell lymphoma when compared with chemotherapy alone. Immune stimulation generated by hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV was assessed by means of surrogate in vivo analysis (delayed-type hypersensitivity [DTH]) as well as an ex vivo cellular assay (lymphocyte proliferation assay). The vaccine approach considered in the current report did not result in clinically improved outcomes. A small measure of immunomodulation was documented by DTH and several modifications to the approach are suggested. This report illustrates the feasibility of clinical trials with vaccine strategies using companion animals with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  12. Development of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transfected tumor cell vaccines for the treatment of spontaneous canine cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogge, G S; Burkholder, J K; Culp, J; Albertini, M R; Dubielzig, R R; Keller, E T; Yang, N S; MacEwen, E G

    1998-09-01

    Cytokine gene-engineered tumor vaccines are currently an area of intense investigation in both basic research and clinical medicine. Our efforts to utilize tumor vaccines in an immunotherapeutic manner involve canines with spontaneous tumors. We hypothesized that canine tumor cells, transfected with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) cDNA in a plasmid vector, would prove nontoxic following intradermal administration, generate biologically relevant levels of protein, effect local histological changes at the sites of vaccination, and create a systemic antitumor response. Sixteen tumor-bearing dogs were admitted to a study of ex vivo gene therapy. Tumor tissue was surgically removed, enzymatically and mechanically dissociated, irradiated, transfected, and intradermally injected back into the patients. The dogs were vaccinated with primary autologous tumor cells transfected with hGM-CSF or a reporter control gene. hGM-CSF protein was detected (0.07 to 14.15 ng/vaccination site) at 24 hr postinjection and dramatic histological changes were observed, characterized by neutrophil and macrophage infiltration at the sites of injection of hGM-CSF-transfected tumor cells. This was in stark contrast to the lesser neutrophilic and eosinophilic infiltrates found at control vaccination sites. Objective evidence of an antitumor response was observed in three animals. These data, in a large animal translational model of spontaneous tumors, demonstrate in vivo biological activity of hGM-CSF-transfected autologous tumor cell vaccines.

  13. Evaluation of immunomodulatory effect of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on polymorphonuclear cell from dogs with cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Axiak-Bechtel, S; Friedman Cowan, C; Amorim, J; Tsuruta, K; DeClue, A E

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) function in dogs with cancer. PMNs were harvested from dogs with naturally developing cancer as a pre-clinical model to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of rhGM-CSF on PMN phagocytic and cytotoxic functions, cytokine production and receptor expression. Some aspects of cancer-related PMN dysfunction in dogs with cancer were restored following incubation with rhGM-CSF including PMN phagocytosis, respiratory burst and LPS-induced TNF-α production. In addition, rhGM-CSF increased surface HLA-DR expression on the PMNs of dogs with cancer. These data suggests that dysfunction of innate immune response in dogs with cancer may be improved by rhGM-CSF. The results of this study provided a pathophysiologic rationale for the initiation of clinical trials to continue evaluating rhGM-CSF as an immunomodulatory therapy in dogs with cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Protective effects of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on H1N1 influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai; Li, Hong; Zhou, Pei; Ju, Dianwen

    2010-08-01

    Protective effects of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (rHuGM-CSF) on H1N1 influenza virus infection was studied in vivo and in vitro. Mice were infected with H1N1 influenza A viruses and rHuGM-CSF at doses of 0.34, 0.67, and 1.34mgkg(-1)d(-1) was administrated for 7days before the mice were infected with influenza virus and continued for a further 3days. Compared with control mice, rHuGM-CSF was demonstrated to increase the survival rate of the infected mice by 50.0%, 55.6%, and 80.0% and increased the mean survival days by 25.7%, 30.0%, and 46.8%, respectively. Histopathological study of the lungs in pneumonia mice found that pre-treatment with rHuGM-CSF significantly ameliorated lung injury induced by influenza virus infection. In vitro study demonstrated that when rHuGM-CSF were co-incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the PBMCs culture supernatant induced a dose-dependent reduction of virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in vitro. These results suggested that rHuGM-CSF might be an effective and potential protection for H1N1 influenza virus-induced pneumonia. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Up-regulation of cluster of differentiation (CD) 11b expression on the surface of canine granulocytes with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Nunomura, Yuka; Uchida, Kanji; Nakata, Koh; Tazawa, Ryushi

    2014-08-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, sharing a common beta subunit (CDw131) with interleukins 3 and 5. GM-CSF is important for its direct and indirect involvement in host defense. In veterinary medicine, human (h) GM-CSF has been used as a substitute for canine GM-CSF to stimulate canine granulocytes and macrophages. In this study, we compared the effects of three distinct hGM-CSFs produced by bacteria, yeasts and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with those of Escherichia (E) coli-produced canine GM-CSF on the cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) expression in canine granulocytes. The median effective dose (ED50) of hGM-CSFs from bacteria, yeasts and CHO cells was 3.09, 4.09 and 4.27 ng/ml, respectively, with no significant difference among three. In contrast, a significant difference was observed between ED50 of canine GM-CSF (0.56 ng/ml) and three hGM-CSFs according to the paired t-test (P<0.05). We conclude that hGM-CSF can activate canine granulocytes, but the average activity of the three rhGM-CSFs was approximately 15% of that of canine GM-CSF.

  16. Up-Regulation of Cluster of Differentiation (CD) 11b Expression on the Surface of Canine Granulocytes with Human Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF)

    PubMed Central

    NAKAGAKI, Kazuhide; NUNOMURA, Yuka; UCHIDA, Kanji; NAKATA, Koh; TAZAWA, Ryushi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, sharing a common beta subunit (CDw131) with interleukins 3 and 5. GM-CSF is important for its direct and indirect involvement in host defense. In veterinary medicine, human (h) GM-CSF has been used as a substitute for canine GM-CSF to stimulate canine granulocytes and macrophages. In this study, we compared the effects of three distinct hGM-CSFs produced by bacteria, yeasts and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with those of Escherichia (E) coli-produced canine GM-CSF on the cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) expression in canine granulocytes. The median effective dose (ED50) of hGM-CSFs from bacteria, yeasts and CHO cells was 3.09, 4.09 and 4.27 ng/ml, respectively, with no significant difference among three. In contrast, a significant difference was observed between ED50 of canine GM-CSF (0.56 ng/ml) and three hGM-CSFs according to the paired t-test (P<0.05). We conclude that hGM-CSF can activate canine granulocytes, but the average activity of the three rhGM-CSFs was approximately 15% of that of canine GM-CSF. PMID:24829080

  17. Characterization of platelet-activating factor synthesized by normal and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-primed human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, M; Schleimer, R P; Tomioka, K; Hubbard, W C; Chilton, F H

    1992-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine) is a mediator involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases associated with tissue eosinophil infiltration. Previous studies utilizing bioassay or assaying enzymes associated with PAF biosynthesis have suggested that human eosinophils produce PAF. The present study has extended these initial studies by identifying and quantifying the different PAF molecular species and analogues synthesized by human eosinophils in response to A23187 and f-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis indicated that A23187-stimulated eosinophils produce at least three molecular species of PAF. The predominant species is 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (16:0) followed by 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:0) and 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:1). Eosinophils stimulated with FMLP produce approximately 100-fold smaller quantities of PAF relative to those produced in response to A23187 and only the 16:0 molecular species could be measured. A small percentage (comprising between 2 and 5%) of the 2-acetylated phospholipids produced by eosinophils was the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. Long-term (72 hr) incubation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in PAF synthesis from eosinophils stimulated with FMLP, without changes in the profile of PAF molecular species or in the percentage of the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. These data indicate that human eosinophils can produce various molecular species of PAF and that this process can be quantitatively enhanced by GM-CSF. PMID:1493922

  18. G(AnH)MTetra, a naturally occurring 1,6-anhydro muramyl dipeptide, induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor expression in human monocytes: a molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Dokter, W H; Dijkstra, A J; Koopmans, S B; Mulder, A B; Stulp, B K; Halie, M R; Keck, W; Vellenga, E

    1994-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutam yl-m- diaminopimelyl-D-alanine [G (Anh)MTetra], a naturally occurring breakdown product of peptidoglycan from bacterial cell walls, was studied for its ability to induce granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mRNA and protein expression in human adherent monocytes. Resting monocytes did not express G-CSF mRNA or secrete G-CSF protein. In contrast, monocytes exposed to G(Anh)MTetra showed a dose-dependent increase in G-CSF mRNA accumulation, which correlates with the secretion of G-CSF protein. Maximal levels of G-CSF mRNA were reached within 2 h of activation. Expression of G-CSF was mediated by an increase in the stability of G-CSF transcripts rather than by an increase in the transcription rate of the G-CSF gene. Experiments with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide revealed that G(Anh)MTetra-induced G-CSF mRNA expression was independent of new protein synthesis. Furthermore, it was shown that the effect of G(Anh)MTetra was regulated by a protein kinase C-dependent pathway, whereas protein kinase A and tyrosine kinases were not involved. Finally, it was shown that G(Anh)MTetra also induced G-CSF mRNA expression in human endothelial cells. The data indicate that, besides lipopolysaccharide, other naturally occurring bacterial cell wall components are able to induce G-CSF expression in different hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:7516314

  19. Urban particulate matter suppresses priming of T helper type 1 cells by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Nick C; Faith, Alex; Pfeffer, Paul; Lu, Haw; Kelly, Frank J; Hawrylowicz, Catherine M; Lee, Tak H

    2014-02-01

    Urban particulate matter (UPM) exacerbates asthmatic lung inflammation and depresses lung immunity. Lung dendritic cells (DCs) react to airway particulates, and have a critical role in linking innate and adaptive immunity, but the direct effects of UPM on DCs, that have been activated by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a product of stimulated normal human bronchial epithelial cells, has not been investigated. Human blood CD1c(+) DCs were purified and activated with UPM in the presence or absence of GM-CSF with and without LPS, and DC maturation was assessed by flow cytometry. DC stimulatory capacity and priming of 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled naive CD4 T cells was investigated using the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. T cell proliferation and effector function were assessed using flow cytometry and secreted cytokines were measured by combined bead array. UPM enhanced DC maturation in an LPS-independent manner. DCs activated by UPM plus GM-CSF (UPM + GM-CSF DCs) induced higher naive CD4 T cell proliferation in the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction than DCs pretreated by GM-CSF alone (GM-CSF DCs), and elicited both substantially lower levels of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-5 secretion, and lower frequencies of alloantigen-specific T helper (Th) type 1 effector cells than naive CD4 T cells primed by GM-CSF DCs. UPM-stimulated DCs produced IL-6 and TNF-α. Neutralization of IL-6 decreased naive CD4 T cell proliferation stimulated by UPM + GM-CSF DCs, and significantly increased the frequency of alloantigen-specific Th1 effector cells, but did not reverse UPM-induced inhibition of IFN-γ secretion. We conclude that UPM enhances GM-CSF-induced DC maturation and stimulatory capacity, but inhibits the generation of Th1 cells. Thus, UPM exposure may impair Th1 responses to pulmonary pathogens.

  20. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor: More Than a Hemopoietin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Clark, S., and Donahue, R. E., Stimulation of hematopoiesis in canines by in vivo administration of human GM - CSF (rhGM- CSF ). J. Cell. Biochem. Suppl...Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20814-5145 INTRODUCTION Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor ( GM - CSF ) is a...concentration of GM - CSF is below levels detectable by existing techniques (6). It has been shown to be produced in variety of cell types (T-lymphocytes

  1. Expression cloning of a human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor: a structural mosaic of hematopoietin receptor, immunoglobulin, and fibronectin domains

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation from a placental library, of two cDNAs that can encode high affinity receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) when expressed in COS-7 cells. The cDNAs are predicted to encode integral membrane proteins of 759 and 812 amino acids in length. The predicted extracellular and membrane spanning sequences of the two clones are identical, as are the first 96 amino acids of their respective cytoplasmic regions. Different COOH termini of 34 or 87 residues are predicted for the two cDNAs, due apparently to alternate splicing. The receptor with the longer cytoplasmic domain is the closest human homologue of the murine G-CSF receptor recently described by Fukunaga et al. (Fukunaga, R., E. Ishizaka-Ikeda, Y. Seto, and S. Nagata. 1990. Cell. 61:341). A hybridization probe derived from the placental G-CSF receptor cDNA detects a approximately 3-kb transcript in RNAs isolated from placenta and a number of lymphoid and myeloid cells. The extracellular region of the G-CSF receptors is composed of four distinct types of structural domains, previously recognized in other cell surface proteins. In addition to the two domains of the HP receptor family-defining region (Patthy, L. 1990. Cell. 61:13) it incorporates one NH2-terminal Ig-like domain, and three additional repeats of fibronectin type III-like domains. The presence of both an NH2-terminal Ig-like domain and multiple membrane-proximal FN3-like domains suggests that the G-CSF receptor may be derived from an ancestral NCAM-like molecule and that the G-CSF receptor may function in some adhesion or recognition events at the cell surface in addition to the binding of G-CSF. PMID:2147944

  2. Platelet lysate and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor serve safe and accelerated expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Autologous human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) should be expanded in the animal serum-free condition within clinically relevant periods in order to secure safe and effective cell therapy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to assess whether the hBMSCs enhance their proliferation capacity and provide beneficial effect in the infarct brain when cultured with platelet lysate (PL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The hBMSCs were cultured in the fetal calf serum (FCS)-, PL-, or PL/G-CSF-containing medium. Cell growth kinetics was analyzed. The hBMSCs-PL, hBMSC-PL/G-CSF, or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum of the rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion 7 days after the insult. Motor function was assessed for 8 weeks, and the fate of transplanted hBMSCs was examined using immunohistochemistry. As the results, the hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF showed more enhanced proliferation than the hBMSCs-FCS and hBMSCs-PL. Transplantation of hBMSCs expanded with the PL- or PL/G-CSF-containing medium equally promoted functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. Histological analysis revealed that there were no significant differences in their migration, survival, and neural differentiation in the infarct brain between the hBMSCs-PL and hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF. These findings strongly suggest that the combination of PL and G-CSF may accelerate hBMSC expansion and serve safe cell therapy for patients with ischemic stroke at clinically relevant timing.

  3. Identification of an antigenic domain near the C terminus of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its spatial localization.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Riccardo; Moran, Oscar; Revoltella, Roberto P

    2004-09-03

    The goal of this study was to map an epitope on the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) at its C terminus, a region whose integrity is fundamental in maintaining the normal function of this molecule. Residues including the fourth alpha-helix (D, 103-116) were analyzed for their role in the interaction with antibodies (Abs) raised against the protein. Five peptides homologous to different segments of the C terminus of hGM-CSF were synthesized. Peptide-(102-121) included the same residues of the alpha-helix D and the next five amino acids toward the C terminus; peptide-[E108A]-(102-121) introduced the mutation E108A in order to verify the role of acidic residues; peptide-[C96A](93-110) encompassed the beta-sheet 2 and half of the alpha-helix D; peptide-[C121A]-(110-127) included the second half of the alpha-helix D and the C terminus of hGMCSF; peptide-(13-31)-Gly-Pro-Gly-(103-116) included both the alpha-helices A and D connected by the tripeptide Gly-Pro-Gly, which allows the original antiparallel orientation of the two alpha-helices to be maintained. Both anti-protein and anti-peptide-(102-121) antibodies, capable of neutralizing the stimulatory activity of hGMCSF in the bone marrow colony-forming assays, recognized a specific epitope in the C terminus of hGM-CSF. Molecular modeling estimated the surface accessibility of hGM-CSF and the stability of the synthetic peptides in aqueous solution. Altogether, our results showed that the immunogenic region includes part of the alpha-helix D and the residues 116-120, which are external to this helix and particularly exposed on the protein surface, confirming the feasible participation of this region in antibody binding.

  4. Enhancing toxic protein expression in Escherichia coli fed-batch culture using kinetic parameters: Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as a model system.

    PubMed

    Khasa, Yogender Pal; Khushoo, Amardeep; Mukherjee, Krishna Jyoti

    2013-03-01

    The kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) expression was studied under the strong T7 promoter in continuous culture of Escherichia coli using complex medium to design an optimum feeding strategy for high cell density cultivation. Continuous culture studies were done at different dilution rates and the growth and product formation profiles were monitored post-induction. Recombinant protein expression was in the form of inclusion bodies with a maximum specific product formation rate (q(p)) of 63.5 mg g(-1) DCW h(-1) at a dilution rate (D) of 0.3 h(-1). The maximum volumetric product concentration achieved at this dilution rate was 474 mg l(-1), which translated a ~1.4 and ~1.75 folds increase than the values obtained at dilution rates of 0.2 h(-1) and 0.4 h(-1) respectively. The specific product yield (Y(P/x)) peaked at 138 mg g(-1) DCW, demonstrating a ~1.6 folds increase in the values obtained at other dilution rates. A drop in q(p) was observed within 5-6 h of induction at all the dilution rates, possibly due to protein toxicity and metabolic stress associated with protein expression. The data from the continuous culture studies allowed us to design an optimal feeding strategy and induction time in fed-batch cultures which resulted in a maximum product concentration of 3.95 g l(-1) with a specific hGM-CSF yield (Y(P/x)) of 107 mg g(-1) DCW.

  5. Close Association between Clearance of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and G-CSF Receptor on Neutrophils in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Terashi, Kenji; Oka, Mikio; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Furukubo, Taku; Ikeda, Chizuko; Fukuda, Minoru; Soda, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Shun; Kohno, Shigeru

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is used to counter chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Our previous study showed an inverse correlation between serum rhG-CSF levels and the number of circulating neutrophils in cancer patients (H. Takatani, H. Soda, M. Fukuda, M. Watanabe, A. Kinoshita, T. Nakamura, and M. Oka, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 40:988–991, 1996). The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between rhG-CSF clearance and G-CSF receptors on circulating neutrophils. In five cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, a bolus dose of rhG-CSF (5 μg/kg) was injected intravenously during defined phases of posttreatment neutropenia and neutrophilia. Serum rhG-CSF levels were measured by a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay and analyzed by moment analysis. G-CSF receptors on neutrophils were detected by flow cytometry with biotinylated rhG-CSF. rhG-CSF clearance was significantly higher at neutrophilia than at neutropenia (1,497 ± 132 versus 995 ± 266 ml/h; P < 0.01). The percentage of G-CSF receptor-positive neutrophils, reflecting the number of G-CSF receptors per cell, was low at neutropenia without rhG-CSF therapy (44.5% ± 22.1%) and high at neutrophilia with rhG-CSF therapy (73.0% ± 11.4%; P < 0.01). rhG-CSF clearance closely correlated with the percentage of G-CSF receptor-positive neutrophils (r2 = 0.91; P < 0.0001) and neutrophil count (r2 = 0.72; P < 0.005). Our results indicate that, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, rhG-CSF increases the number of G-CSF receptors per cell as well as circulating neutrophil counts, resulting in modulation of its own clearance. PMID:9869559

  6. Preclinical development of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transfected melanoma cell vaccine using established canine cell lines and normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hogge, G S; Burkholder, J K; Culp, J; Albertini, M R; Dubielzig, R R; Yang, N S; MacEwen, E G

    1999-01-01

    Tumor vaccines and gene therapy have received significant attention as means of increasing cellular and humoral immune responses to cancer. We conducted a pilot study of seven research dogs to determine whether intradermal injection of canine tumor cells transfected via the Accell particle-mediated gene transfer device with the cDNA for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) would generate biologically relevant levels of protein and result in demonstrable histological changes at sites of vaccination. Tumor cell vaccines of 10(7) irradiated canine melanoma cells were nontoxic, safe, and well tolerated. No significant alterations in blood chemistry values or hematological profiles were detected. A histological review of control vaccine sites revealed inflammatory responses predominated by eosinophils, whereas vaccine sites with hGM-CSF-transfected tumor cells had an influx of neutrophils and macrophages. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of skin biopsies from vaccine sites had local hGM-CSF production (8.68-16.82 ng/site of injection) at 24 hours after injection and detectable levels (0.014-0.081 ng/site) for < or =2 weeks following vaccination. Flow cytometric analysis of hGM-CSF-transfected cells demonstrated < or =25% transfection efficiency, and hGM-CSF levels obtained during time-course assays demonstrated biologically relevant levels for both irradiated and nonirradiated samples. These data demonstrate the in vivo biological activity of irradiated hGM-CSF-transfected canine tumor cells and help provide evidence for a valid translational research model of spontaneous tumors.

  7. Pichia pastoris versus Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a case study on the recombinant production of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh-Minh; Nguyen, Thanh-Thao; Nguyen, Cong-Thuan; Huynh-Thi, Xuan-Mai; Nguyen, Cao-Tri; Trinh, Minh-Thuong; Tran, Linh-Thuoc; Cartwright, Stephanie P; Bill, Roslyn M; Tran-Van, Hieu

    2017-04-04

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) is a glycoprotein that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of neutropenia and leukemia in combination with chemotherapies. Recombinant hGM-CSF is produced industrially using the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by large-scale fermentation. The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, has emerged as an alternative host cell system due to its shorter and less immunogenic glycosylation pattern together with higher cell density growth and higher secreted protein yield than S. cerevisiae. In this study, we compared the pipeline from gene to recombinant protein in these two yeasts. Codon optimization in silico for both yeast species showed no difference in frequent codon usage. However, rhGM-CSF expressed from S. cerevisiae BY4742 showed a significant discrepancy in molecular weight from those of P. pastoris X33. Analysis showed purified rhGM-CSF species with molecular weights ranging from 30 to more than 60 kDa. Fed-batch fermentation over 72 h showed that rhGM-CSF was more highly secreted from P. pastoris than S. cerevisiae (285 and 64 mg total secreted protein/L, respectively). Ion exchange chromatography gave higher purity and recovery than hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Purified rhGM-CSF from P. pastoris was 327 times more potent than rhGM-CSF from S. cerevisiae in terms of proliferative stimulating capacity on the hGM-CSF-dependent cell line, TF-1. Our data support a view that the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is an effective recombinant host for heterologous rhGM-CSF production.

  8. Four-Week Repeated Intravenous Dose Toxicity and Toxicokinetic Study of TS-DP2, a Novel Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JooBuom; Lee, Kyungsun; Choe, Keunbum; Jung, Hyunseob; Cho, Hyunseok; Choi, Kiseok; Kim, Taegon; Kim, Seojin; Lee, Hyeong-Seok; Cha, Mi-Jin; Song, Si-Whan; Lee, Chul Kyu; Chun, Gie-Taek

    2015-01-01

    TS-DP2 is a recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) manufactured by TS Corporation. We conducted a four-week study of TS-DP2 (test article) in repeated intravenous doses in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Lenograstim was used as a reference article and was administered intravenously at a dose of 1000 μg/kg/day. Rats received TS-DP2 intravenously at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 μg/kg/day once daily for 4 weeks, and evaluated following a 2-week recovery period. Edema in the hind limbs and loss of mean body weight and body weight gain were observed in both the highest dose group of TS-DP2 and the lenograstim group in male rats. Fibro-osseous lesions were observed in the lenograstim group in both sexes, and at all groups of TS-DP2 in males, and at doses of TS-DP2 500 μg/kg/day and higher in females. The lesion was considered a toxicological change. Therefore, bone is the primary toxicological target of TS-DP2. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) in males was 250 μg/kg/day, and no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) in females was 250 μg/kg/day in this study. In the toxicokinetic study, the serum concentrations of G-CSF were maintained until 8 hr after administration. The systemic exposures (AUC0-24h and C0) were not markedly different between male and female rats, between the administration periods, or between TS-DP2 and lenograstim. In conclusion, TS-DP2 shows toxicological similarity to lenograstim over 4-weeks of repeated doses in rats. PMID:26877840

  9. Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promotes Preinvasive and Invasive Estrogen Receptor-Positive Tumor Development in MMTV-erbB2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun Ling; Zhang, Guang Ping; Xiao, Zheng Zheng; Ma, Zhi Kun; Lei, Cai Peng; Song, Shi Yuan; Feng, Ying Ying; Zhao, Ya Chao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) could promote the development of preinvasive and invasive breast cancer in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-erbB2) mice with estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Methods MMTV-erbB2 mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups with 20 mice in each group. MMTV-erbB2 mice were treated with daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or rhG-CSF (low-rhG-CSF group, rhG-CSF 0.125 µg; vehicle-rhG-CSF group, normal saline 0.25 µg; and high-rhG-CSF group, rhG-CSF 0.25 µg) at 3 months of age. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of G-CSF action in mammary glands were investigated via immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Low, but not high, rhG-CSF doses significantly accelerated mammary tumorigenesis in MMTV-erbB2 mice. Short-term treatment with rhG-CSF could significantly promote the development of preinvasive mammary lesions. The cancer prevention effect was associated with reduced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cluster of differentiation 34, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in mammary glands by >80%. Conclusion We found that G-CSF was regulated by rhG-CSF both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of G-CSF genes helped us further understand the mechanism by which G-CSF promotes cancer. Low doses of rhG-CSF could significantly increase tumor latency and increase tumor multiplicity and burden. Moreover, rhG-CSF effectively promotes development of both malignant and premalignant mammary lesions in MMTV-erbB2 mice. PMID:26155288

  10. Relationship between native-state solubility and non-native aggregation of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor: practical implications for protein therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Banks, Douglas D; Zhang, Jun; Siska, Christine C

    2014-10-06

    Prescreening methods are needed in the biotechnology industry for rapid selection of protein therapeutic candidates and formulations of low aggregation propensity. In recent reports solubility measurements have shown promise as one such method, although the connection between protein solubility and non-native aggregation is not well understood. In the present investigation, recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhGCSF) was used to explore this relationship since it was previously shown to rapidly undergo non-native aggregation/precipitation under physiological conditions in a reaction attenuated by the addition of sucrose [Krishnan, S.; et al. Biochemistry 2002, 41, 6422-6431]. Strong correlations were found between rhGCSF non-native aggregation and both solubility and thermal stability as a function of sucrose concentration. We believe these results make sense in the context of an rhGCSF aggregation mechanism where loss of monomer to insoluble aggregate is limited by association to an observable dimer from a less soluble (and aggregation competent) intermediate species that exists in a temperature sensitive pre-equilibrium with the native monomer. Both solubility and measures of conformational stability report on the position of this equilibrium and therefore the concentration of reactive intermediate. Interestingly, aggregation also correlated with rhGCSF solubility as a function of salting-in concentrations of phosphate since both are dependent on the colloidal stability of the reactive intermediate but not with conformational stability. In lieu of a complete understanding of the aggregation processes that limit protein therapeutic shelf life, these results highlight the potential of using simple solubility measurements as an additional tool in the biotechnology prescreening repertoire.

  11. Assessing blood granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as a potential biomarker of acute traumatic brain injury in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Dohi, Kenji; Hansen, Kim; Thompson, Hilaire J

    2016-02-01

    Previous work has found that serum G-CSF was acutely elevated in mice 24h but not one week after controlled cortical impact (CCI). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether blood G-CSF correlates with the elevated brain cytokines in mice after CCI and also if it correlates with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Here, we found in mice undergoing CCI, a procedure that induces direct injury to the brain, that serum G-CSF correlated directly or indirectly with several brain cytokines, indicating it is a useful marker for the neuroinflammation of TBI. A pilot study in humans (phase I, n=19) confirmed that plasma G-CSF is acutely elevated on day 1 (p<0.001) of TBI and has returned to baseline by one week. In a second human sample (phase II) (n=80), we found plasma G-CSF peaks about 12h after arriving in the emergency department (41.6+/-5.4 pg/ml). Aging was weakly associated (p<0.05) with a less robust elevation in serum G-CSF, but there was no difference with gender. ISS, a measure of total severity of injury, correlated with the degree of elevation in serum G-CSF (r=.419; p<0.05), but severity of head injury (via AIS) did not. The latter may have been because of the statistically narrow range of head injuries among our cases and the high number of cases diagnosed with closed head injury (a non-codable diagnosis). In conclusion, plasma G-CSF may be a useful biomarker of TBI, correlating with neuroinflammation in the animal model and in the human studies with time since injury and total severity of injury. As such, it may be useful in determining whether TBI has occurred within the last 24h.

  12. Effect of endotoxin on serum granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dale, D C; Lau, S; Nash, R; Boone, T; Osborne, W

    1992-04-01

    The biologic effects of endotoxin are attributed to the release of several cytokines, including interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor, and the colony-stimulating factors. To investigate the mechanism of endotoxin-induced neutrophilia in dogs, several cell lines known to proliferate selectively in response to recombinant human colony-stimulating factors were examined to determine their responses to recombinant canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rcG-CSF) or recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF). The murine cell line NFS-60 was found to respond well to rcG-CSF and the human cell line TALL-101 to rcGM-CSF, and these responses were neutralized by antibodies to these recombinant proteins. These bioassays were then used to determine G-CSF and GM-CSF levels in dogs after intravenous endotoxin administration. G-CSF levels increased by 2 h, peaked at 4 h, and had not returned to normal by 24 h after endotoxin. In contrast, GM-CSF was not detectible before or after endotoxin administration.

  13. Regulation of the class II MHC pathway in primary human monocytes by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hornell, Tara M C; Beresford, Guy W; Bushey, Alyssa; Boss, Jeremy M; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2003-09-01

    GM-CSF stimulates the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and also affects mature cell function. These effects have led to the use of GM-CSF as a vaccine adjuvant with promising results; however, the mechanisms underlying GM-CSF-mediated immune potentiation are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that the immune stimulatory role of GM-CSF is in part due to effects on class II MHC Ag presentation. We find that, in primary human monocytes treated for 24-48 h, GM-CSF increases surface class II MHC expression and decreases the relative level of the invariant chain-derived peptide, CLIP, bound to surface class II molecules. GM-CSF also increases expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, but not the differentiation marker CD1a or CD16. Furthermore, GM-CSF-treated monocytes are better stimulators in a mixed leukocyte reaction. Additional analyses of the class II pathway revealed that GM-CSF increases total protein and RNA levels of HLA-DR, DM, and DOalpha. Expression of class II transactivator (CIITA) types I and III, but not IV, transcripts increases in response to GM-CSF. Furthermore, GM-CSF increases the amount of CIITA associated with the DR promoter. Thus, our data argue that the proinflammatory role of GM-CSF is mediated in part through increased expression of key molecules involved in the class II MHC pathway via induction of CIITA.

  14. Glycosylated and non-glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF)--what is the difference?

    PubMed

    Höglund, M

    1998-12-01

    Two forms of recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) are available for clinical use: filgrastim is expressed in E coli and non-glycosylated, whereas lenograstim is derived from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and glycosylated. The function of the sugar chain, accounting for approximately 4% of the molecular weight of lenograstim (and native G-CSF), is not known. Glycosylation of the G-CSF molecule does not prolong its circulation half life. Lenograstim is more active than filgrastim (and research-use deglycosylated G-CSF) on a weight-by-weight basis in in vitro colony-forming and cell line assays. An international potency standard assigns a specific activity of 100,000 IU/microgram to filgrastim and 127,760 IU/microgram to lenograstim. Correspondingly, two randomised crossover studies in normal subjects, comparing mass equivalent doses of the two rhG-CSFs, have demonstrated a 25-30% higher concentration of blood stem cells (CD34+, CFU-GM) during lenograstim administration. No difference in side effects was observed. Results from a prospective, randomised, non-crossover trial in breast cancer patients suggest that bioequivalent doses of filgrastim and lenograstim have a similar effect on mobilisation of CD34+ cells and immature CD34+ cell subsets, respectively. Although comparisons outside the setting of stem cell mobilisation are lacking, the clinical relevance of the greater specific activity of lenograstim may thus be limited. The difference in potency between microgram identical doses of the two rhG-CSFs makes dosing in biological units (IU) rather than mass units (microgram) more appropriate.

  15. Therapeutic administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor accelerates hemopoietic regeneration and enhances survival in a murine model of radiation-induced myelosuppression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The primary cause of death after radiation exposure is infection resulting from myelosuppression. Because granulocytes play a critical role in host defense against infection and because granulocyte proliferation and differentiation are enhanced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), this agent was evaluated for the ability to accelerate hemopoietic regeneration and to enhance survival in irradiated mice. C3H/HeN mice were irradiated and G-CSF or saline was administered on days 3-12, 1-12 or 0-12 post-irradiation. Bone marrow, splenic and peripheral blood cellularity and bone marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell recoveries were evaluated in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy. Mice exposed to 8 Gy were evaluated for multipotent hemopoietic stem cell recovery (using endogenous spleen colony-forming units) and enhanced survival. Results demonstrated that therapeutic G-CSF (1) accelerates hemopoietic regeneration after radiation-induced myelosuppression, (2) enhances survival after potentially lethal irradiation and (3) is most effective when initiated 1 h following exposure.

  16. Therapeutic administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor accelerates hemopoietic regeneration and enhances survival in a murine model of radiation-induced myelosuppression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M. )

    1990-03-01

    The primary cause of death after radiation exposure is infection resulting from myelosuppression. Because granulocytes play a critical role in host defense against infection and because granulocyte proliferation and differentiation are enhanced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), this agent was evaluated for the ability to accelerate hemopoietic regeneration and to enhance survival in irradiated mice. C3H/HeN mice were irradiated and G-CSF (2.5 micrograms/day, s.c.) or saline was administered on days 3-12, 1-12 or 0-12 post-irradiation. Bone marrow, splenic and peripheral blood cellularity, and bone marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell recoveries were evaluated in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy. Mice exposed to 8 Gy were evaluated for multipotent hemopoietic stem cell recovery (using endogenous spleen colony-forming units) and enhanced survival. Results demonstrated that therapeutic G-CSF (1) accelerates hemopoietic regeneration after radiation-induced myelosuppression, (2) enhances survival after potentially lethal irradiation and (3) is most effective when initiated 1 h following exposure.

  17. Modulation of colony stimulating factor release and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, S; Warner, T D; Mitchell, J A

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of the immune response against tumour cells is emerging as a valuable approach for cancer treatment. Some experimental studies have shown that secretion of colony stimulating factors by cancer cells reduces their tumorigenicity and increases their immunogenicity probably by promoting the cytolitic and antigen presenting activities of leukocytes. We have observed that human colon cancer cells (HT-29) are able to secrete granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor when stimulated with cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α). In this study we assessed, for the first time, the effects of several anticancer drugs on colony stimulating factor release or apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Cytokine-induced release of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and macrophage-colony stimulating factor was significantly increased by cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine. Taxol only increased macrophage-colony stimulating factor release while reduced that of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. No changes in colony stimulating factor secretion were observed after treatment with methotrexate. Only cisplatin and taxol induced apoptosis in these cells. Secretion of colony stimulating factors by colon cancer cells may contribute to the immune host response against them. Anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and 6-mercaptopurine increase colony stimulating factor secretion by cytokine stimulated cancer cells probably through mechanisms different to those leading to cell apoptosis, an effect that may contribute to their anti-neoplasic action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1316–1321. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600240 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953891

  18. The structure of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and its relationship to other growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C P; Osslund, T D; Eisenberg, D

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor by x-ray crystallography. Phases were initially obtained at 3.0-A resolution by multiple isomorphous replacement and were refined by solvent flattening and by averaging of the electron density of the three molecules in the asymmetric unit. The current R factor is 21.5% for all data between 6.0- and 2.2-A resolution. The structure is predominantly helical, with 104 of the 175 residues forming a four-alpha-helix bundle. The only other secondary structure is also helical. In the loop between the first two long helices a four-residue 3(10)-helix is immediately followed by a 6-residue alpha-helix. Three residues in the short connection between the second and third bundle helices form almost one turn of left-handed helix. The up-up-down-down connectivity with two long crossover connections has been reported previously for five other proteins, which like granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor are all signaling ligands: growth hormone, granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, interferon beta, interleukin 2, and interleukin 4. Structural similarity among these growth factors occurs despite the absence of similarity in their amino acid sequences. Conservation of this tertiary structure suggests that these different growth factors might all bind to their respective sequence-related receptors in an equivalent manner. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7685117

  19. Combination Therapy of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Reduces Histopathological and Motor Impairments in an Experimental Model of Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A.; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Sanberg, Paul R.; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Song, Shijie; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neuro-inflammation, debilitating sensory-motor deficits, and learning and memory impairments. Cell-based therapies are currently being investigated in treating neurotrauma due to their ability to secrete neurotrophic factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines that can regulate the hostile milieu associated with chronic neuroinflammation found in TBI. In tandem, the stimulation and mobilization of endogenous stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow through granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) poses as an attractive therapeutic intervention for chronic TBI. Here, we tested the potential of a combined therapy of human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCB) and G-CSF at the acute stage of TBI to counteract the progressive secondary effects of chronic TBI using the controlled cortical impact model. Four different groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats were treated with saline alone, G-CSF+saline, hUCB+saline or hUCB+G-CSF, 7-days post CCI moderate TBI. Eight weeks after TBI, brains were harvested to analyze hippocampal cell loss, neuroinflammatory response, and neurogenesis by using immunohistochemical techniques. Results revealed that the rats exposed to TBI treated with saline exhibited widespread neuroinflammation, impaired endogenous neurogenesis in DG and SVZ, and severe hippocampal cell loss. hUCB monotherapy suppressed neuroinflammation, nearly normalized the neurogenesis, and reduced hippocampal cell loss compared to saline alone. G-CSF monotherapy produced partial and short-lived benefits characterized by low levels of neuroinflammation in striatum, DG, SVZ, and corpus callosum and fornix, a modest neurogenesis, and a moderate reduction of hippocampal cells loss. On the other hand, combined therapy of hUCB+G-CSF displayed synergistic effects that robustly dampened neuroinflammation, while enhancing endogenous neurogenesis and reducing hippocampal cell loss. Vigorous and long-lasting recovery of motor function

  20. Soluble prokaryotic overexpression and purification of bioactive human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor by maltose binding protein and protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Do, Bich Hang; Ryu, Han-Bong; Hoang, Phuong; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Choe, Han

    2014-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hGCSF), a neutrophil-promoting cytokine, is an effective therapeutic agent for neutropenia patients who have undergone several cancer treatments. Efficient production of hGCSF using E. coli is challenging because the hormone tends to aggregate and forms inclusion bodies. This study examined the ability of seven different N-terminal fusion tags to increase expression of soluble hGCSF in E. coli. Four tag proteins, namely maltose-binding protein (MBP), N-utilization substance protein A, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a'), increased the solubility of hGCSF under normal conditions. Lowering the expression temperature from 30°C to 18°C also increased the solubility of thioredoxin-tagged and glutathione S-transferase-tagged hGCSF. By contrast, hexahistidine-tagged hGCSF was insoluble at both temperatures. Simple conventional chromatographic methods were used to purify hGCSF from the overexpressed PDIb'a'-hGCSF and MBP-hGCSF proteins. In total, 11.3 mg or 10.2 mg of pure hGCSF were obtained from 500 mL cultures of E. coli expressing PDIb'a'-hGCSF or MBP-hGCSF, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis and silver staining confirmed high purity of the isolated hGCSF proteins, and the endotoxin levels were less than 0.05 EU/µg of protein. Subsequently, the bioactivity of the purified hGCSF proteins similar to that of the commercially available hGCSF was confirmed using the mouse M-NFS-60 myelogenous leukemia cell line. The EC50s of the cell proliferation dose-response curves for hGCSF proteins purified from MBP-hGCSF and PDIb'a'-hGCSF were 2.83±0.31 pM, and 3.38±0.41 pM, respectively. In summary, this study describes an efficient method for the soluble overexpression and purification of bioactive hGCSF in E. coli.

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Fischmeister, G; Gadner, H

    2000-05-01

    The harvesting of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulation instead of bone marrow in healthy donors has become increasingly popular. Donors, given the choice between bone marrow and PBPC donation, often prefer cytapheresis because of the easier access, no necessity for general anesthesia, and no multiple bone marrow punctures. In addition, accelerated engraftment and immunomodulation by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized PBPCs are advantageous for the recipient. However, because of donor inconvenience and poor mobilization, there is a need to develop improved procedures. Aspects such as durability of hematopoietic engraftment, characterization of the earliest stem cell, and composition of PBPCs are not yet well defined, and international donor registration and follow-up must be considered when evaluating long-term safety profiles in healthy donors. This review concentrates on the most significant developments on mobilization of PBPCs published during the past year.

  2. Identification and in vitro characterization of novel nanobodies against human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor to provide inhibition of G-CSF function.

    PubMed

    Bakherad, Hamid; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Aghamollaei, Hossein; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Torshabi, Maryam; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Setayesh, Neda

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a higher expression in malignant tumors, and anti-G-CSF therapy considerably decreases tumor growth, tumor vascularization and metastasis. Thus, blocking the signaling pathway of G-CSF could be beneficial in cancer therapy. This study is aimed at designing and producing a monoclonal nanobody that could act as an antagonist of G-CSF receptor. Nanobodies are the antigen binding fragments of camelid single-chain antibodies, also known as VHH. These fragments have exceptional properties which makes them ideal for tumor imaging and therapeutic applications. We have used our previously built nanobody phage libraries to isolate specific nanobodies to the G-CSF receptor. After a series of cross-reactivity and affinity experiments, two unique nanobodies were selected for functional analysis. Proliferation assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize these nanobodies. Finally, VHH26 nanobody that was able to specifically bind G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) on the surface of NFS60 cells and efficiently block G-CSF-R downstream signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner was selected. This nanobody could be further developed into a valuable tool in tumor therapy and it forms a basis for additional studies in preclinical animal models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. [Immunosuppressive therapy using antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin A with or without human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in children with acquired severe aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zou, Yao; Wang, Shuchun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Wenyu; Zhang, Jiayuan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Tianfeng; Chen, Xiaojuan; Ruan, Min; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cai, Xiaojin; Qi, Benquan; Chang, Lixian; An, Wenbin; Guo, Ye; Chen, Yumei; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2014-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of four different regimens for pediatric severe aplastic anemia (SAA) with immuno-suppressive therapy (IST) with or without combined human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The authors retrospectively analyzed 105 children with SAA treated with IST with or without G-CSF in the hospital from February 2000 to September 2010. Regimen A, without G-CSF in the whole treatment, was used to treat Group A patients, n = 27; Regimen B, G-CSF, was initiated in Group B, n = 24, before the IST until hematologic recovery; Regimen C, G-CSF, was used together with the IST for Group C patients, n = 24, until hematologic recovery; Regimen D,G-CSF was used for Group D, n = 30, after the end of IST until hematologic recovery. The response rate, relapse rate, mortality, infection rate, infection-related death rate, risk of evolving into MDS/AML, survival rate, factors affecting the time of event-free survival and so on. (1) The response (CR+PR) rates 4, 6, 12 and 24 months after IST of the whole series of 105 SAA children were 50.5% (7.6%+42.9%) , 60.0% (21.9%+38.1%) , 67.6% (38.1%+29.5%) and 69.5% (40.0%+29.5%) respectively. The 2-year survival rate was 90.5%; the follow-up of the patients for 13 years showed that the whole survival rate was 87.6%. (2) The differences of the response rates 4, 6, 12 and 24 months after IST of the 4 groups were not significant (P > 0.05). (3) No significant differences were found in the mortalities 4, 6, 12 and 24 months among the 4 groups (P > 0.05). (4) Of the 105 patients, 4 children had relapsed disease in the period of time from 6 to 24 months after IST. All the four patients belonged to the groups with G-CSF. (5) The use of G-CSF could not decrease the infection period before IST (day) (P = 0.273), and it had no impact on the infection rate after IST (P = 0.066). It did not reduce the rates of septicemia and infectious shock. And to the infection-related death rate no significant conclusion can be

  4. Production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by carcinomas in a dog and a cat with paraneoplastic leukocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, L C; Rosol, T J; Gröne, A; Ward, H; Steinmeyer, C

    1996-01-01

    A dog with a pulmonary papillary carcinoma and a cat with a dermal tubular adenocarcinoma had profound paraneoplastic neutrophilic leukocytosis with no clinically detectable inflammatory foci. To investigate the mechanism of the leukocytosis, oligonucleotide primers were designed from the cDNA sequences of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) of dogs. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed on tumor tissues, and specific amplification of G-CSF and GM-CSF was obtained with the tumor RNA in the dog. The tumor RNA in the cat demonstrated specific amplification of G-CSF but not GM-CSF. These findings are consistent with the production of G-CSF and/or GM-CSF by neoplasms as a mechanism for paraneoplastic leukocytosis in small animals.

  5. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on central and peripheral T lymphocyte reconstitution after sublethal irradiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Guo, Mei; Sun, Xuedong; Sun, Wanjun; Hu, Hailan; Wei, Li; Ai, Huisheng

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 μg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4 − CD8 − , CD4 + CD8 + , CD4 + CD8− and CD4 − CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3 + , CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4 + CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3 + , CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. PMID:23001765

  6. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  7. A comparison of treatment of canine cyclic hematopoiesis with recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), G-CSF interleukin-3, and canine G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Hammond, W P; Boone, T C; Donahue, R E; Souza, L M; Dale, D C

    1990-08-01

    Cyclic hematopoiesis in gray collie dogs is a stem cell disease in which abnormal regulation of cell production in the bone marrow causes cyclic fluctuations of blood cell counts. In vitro studies demonstrated that recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) all stimulated increases in colony formation by canine bone marrow progenitor cells. Based on these results, gray collie dogs were then treated with recombinant human (rh) GM-CSF, IL-3, or G-CSF subcutaneously to test the hypothesis that pharmacologic doses of one of these hematopoietic growth factors could alter cyclic production of cells. When recombinant canine G-CSF became available, it was tested over a range of doses. In vivo rhIL-3 had no effect on the recurrent neutropenia but was associated with eosinophilia, rhGM-CSF caused neutrophilia and eosinophilia but cycling of hematopoiesis persisted. However, rhG-CSF caused neutrophilia, prevented the recurrent neutropenia and, in the two animals not developing antibodies to rhG-CSF, obliterated periodic fluctuation of monocyte, eosinophil, reticulocyte, and platelet counts. Recombinant canine G-CSF increased the nadir neutrophil counts and amplitude of fluctuations at low doses (1 micrograms/kg/d) and eliminated all cycling of cell counts at high doses (5 and 10 micrograms/kg/d). These data suggest significant differences in the actions of these growth factors and imply a critical role for G-CSF in the homeostatic regulation of hematopoiesis.

  8. Effect of Corynebacterium parvum on colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation.

    PubMed

    Foster, R S; MacPherson, B R; Browdie, D A

    1977-05-01

    Because Corynebacterium parvum has tumor-inhibitory properties and stimulates granulocyte-macrophage production, it may have clinical value in combination with chemotherapy. The leukopoietic effect of killed suspensions of C. parvum was studied in mice using the technique of in vitro clonal culture of hematopoietic cells. After C. parvum injection, there was a prompt, sustained elevation of serum colony-stimulating factor followed by an increase in granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and increases in blood mononuclear and granulocyte cells. Colony-stimulating factor production is suggested as a major mechanism of stimulation of granulocyte-macrophage proliferation by C. parvum. Since rapidly proliferating hematopoietic cells may have increased sensititity to cytotoxic agents, the details of hematopoietic stimulation by C. parvum may be critical in the sequential timing of combined C. parvum and chemotherapy treatment to obtain maximal tumor inhibition and minimal hematopoietic toxicity.

  9. Immunostimulation using granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Schefold, Joerg C

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with failure of multiple organs, including failure of the immune system. The resulting 'sepsis-associated immunosuppression' resembles a state of immunological anergy that is characterized by repeated 'infectious hits', prolonged multiple-organ failure, and death. As a consequence, adjunctive treatment approaches using measures of immunostimulation with colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) were tested in animal experiments and clinical trials. Herein, data from randomized clinical trials will be discussed in the context of a recently published meta-analysis investigating the effects of granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  10. A neuroprotective function for the hematopoietic protein granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Krüger, Carola; Pitzer, Claudia; Weber, Daniela; Laage, Rico; Gassler, Nikolaus; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Mier, Walter; Kirsch, Friederike; Dittgen, Tanjew; Bach, Alfred; Sommer, Clemens; Schneider, Armin

    2008-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of cells of the myeloid lineage, which was cloned more than 20 years ago. Here we uncovered a novel function of GM-CSF in the central nervous system (CNS). We identified the GM-CSF alpha-receptor as an upregulated gene in a screen for ischemia-induced genes in the cortex. This receptor is broadly expressed on neurons throughout the brain together with its ligand and induced by ischemic insults. In primary cortical neurons and human neuroblastoma cells, GM-CSF counteracts programmed cell death and induces BCL-2 and BCL-Xl expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Of the signaling pathways studied, GM-CSF most prominently induced the PI3K-Akt pathway, and inhibition of Akt strongly decreased antiapoptotic activity. Intravenously given GM-CSF passes the blood-brain barrier, and decreases infarct damage in two different experimental stroke models (middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and combined common carotid/distal MCA occlusion) concomitant with induction of BCL-Xl expression. Thus, GM-CSF acts as a neuroprotective protein in the CNS. This finding is remarkably reminiscent of the recently discovered functionality of two other hematopoietic factors, erythropoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the CNS. The identification of a third hematopoietic factor acting as a neurotrophic factor in the CNS suggests a common principle in the functional evolution of these factors. Clinically, GM-CSF now broadens the repertoire of hematopoietic factors available as novel drug candidates for stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor ameliorates DSS induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sainathan, Satheesh K.; Hanna, Eyad M.; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S.; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V.; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sargramostim, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that Sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Methods Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or PBS. To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examine the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. Results GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis; resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes including TNFα and IL1β; results further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1−/− mice, demonstrating activity independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-β administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial CpG DNA. Conclusions GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c+ plasmacytoid DC population. PMID:17932977

  12. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Y; Kizaki, M; Kinjo, K; Awaya, N; Muto, A; Ito, M; Kawai, Y; Umezawa, A; Hata, J; Ueyama, Y; Ikeda, Y

    1998-10-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL.

  13. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  14. In vitro modulation of canine polymorphonuclear leukocyte function by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    D'Alesandro, M M; Gruber, D F; O'Halloran, K P; MacVittie, T J

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) promotes the growth of granulocytes and macrophages from undifferentiated bone marrow cells and modulates the oxidative responses of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to endogenous chemoattractants. We found that, in vitro, naturally occurring glycolsylated human GMCSF does not disturb the resting canine PMN membrane potential, may attentuate PMN oxidative responses to PMA, and is, to a small degree, chemotaxigenic. GMCSF, however, inhibits PMN chemotaxis to zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP). Compared to temperature controls, GMCSF (1-100 U/ml) produced up to 1.5-fold increases in H2O2 production after 15 minutes, while phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treated cells increased H2O2 production 8-12-fold after 15 minutes. Preincubation of cells with GMCSF (1-100 U/ml) prior to PMA stimulation significantly reduced the H2O2 levels induced by PMA. H2O2 production was inhibited up to 15% after 15 minutes of GMCSF preincubation and up to 40% after 60 minutes of preincubation. As a chemotaxigenic agent, GMCSF (10-1000 U/ml) was able to elicit 49%-102% increases in quantitative cellular migration, compared to random migration. Total cellular chemotaxis to GMCSF was less than 30% of the response to ZAP. Preincubation of PMNs with GMCSF for 15 minutes significantly inhibited ZAP-induced cellular migration. Human GMCSF does not appear to activate canine PMN in vitro and may actually down-regulate PMN inflammatory responses.

  15. Treatment of leg ischemia with biodegradable gelatin hydrogel microspheres incorporating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Itta; Takemura, Genzou; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Watanabe, Takatomo; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Esaki, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Toshiaki; Kawaguchi, Tomonori; Goto, Kazuko; Maruyama, Rumi; Fujiwara, Takako; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2011-04-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent angiogenic factor. We hypothesized that G-CSF-immersed gelatin hydrogel microspheres (G-CSF-GHMs) injected into the ischemic legs might continuously release a small amount of G-CSF to locally stimulate angiogenesis without unfavorable systemic effects. Just after ligation of the right femoral artery of BALB/c mice, recombinant human G-CSF (100-μg/kg)-immersed GHM was injected into the right hindlimb muscles; the controls included a saline-injected group, an intramuscularly injected G-CSF group, a subcutaneously injected G-CSG group, and an empty GHM-injected group. Eight weeks later, improvement of blood perfusion to the ischemic limb was significantly augmented in the G-CSF-GHM group compared with any of the control groups. Despite there being no increase in the serum concentration of G-CSF, in peripheral granulocytes, or in circulating endothelial progenitor cells, not only capillary but also arteriolar density was significantly increased in this group. Next, we started treatment with G-CSF-GHM 4 weeks after ligation to examine whether the treatment is effective if performed during the chronic stage of ischemia. The late treatment was also found to effectively improve blood flow in the ischemic leg. In conclusion, G-CSF-GHM administration is suggested to be a promising and readily usable approach to treating peripheral artery disease, applicable even during the chronic stage.

  16. Molecular cloning and in vivo evaluation of canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Nash, R A; Schuening, F; Appelbaum, F; Hammond, W P; Boone, T; Morris, C F; Slichter, S J; Storb, R

    1991-08-15

    Canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (caGM-CSF) was cloned and expressed to allow further investigation of GM-CSF in a large animal model. The cDNA is 850 base pairs (bp) long and encodes a peptide of 144 amino acids. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology between caGM-CSF and human GM-CSF (hGM-CSF) is 80% and 70%, respectively. A mammalian expression vector pCMV/CAGM was constructed and used to transfect COS cells for expression of caGM-CSF. Supernatant from transfected COS cells enriched with caGM-CSF was shown to have significant stimulating activity in granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (CFU-GM) assays of canine marrow. caGM-CSF, expressed from bacteria, was used to treat seven dogs at varying doses twice daily subcutaneously (sc) for 14 to 16 days. Circulating blood neutrophils and monocytes increased significantly. The increase in circulating eosinophils was variable. Thrombocytopenia developed during administration of caGM-CSF but corrected rapidly after cessation of treatment. Evaluation of survival times of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets suggested increased consumption as the primary reason for thrombocytopenia. A species-specific GM-CSF will be a useful tool for hematologic or immunologic studies in dogs.

  17. Enhancement of tendon-bone osteointegration of anterior cruciate ligament graft using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubo, Seiji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Tei, Katsumasa; Akisue, Toshihiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    Whereas anterior cruciate ligament rupture usually requires reconstruction, the attachment between the tendon and the bone is the weakest region in the early posttransplantation period. In this process, the acquisition of appropriate vascularity is a key for early bone-tendon healing. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has an effect on the maturation of bone-tendon integration of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-eight healthy adult beagle dogs underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the ipsilateral flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and were divided into 2 groups. A granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-incorporated gelatin surrounded the graft in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group, and the same gelatin without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was used as the control group. Assessment was done at 2 and 4 weeks. Histological analysis at week 2 demonstrated that, in addition to more Sharpey fibers, microvessels were significantly enhanced in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group's grafts. Computed tomography at week 4 showed a significantly smaller tibial bone tunnel in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed significantly elevated messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and osteocalcin in the tibial bone tunnel and graft compared with controls. Furthermore, biomechanical testing of force during loading to ultimate failure at week 4 demonstrated a significant increase in strength in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor group. This study demonstrated that a local application of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-incorporated gelatin significantly accelerates bone-tendon interface strength via enhanced angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has therapeutic potential in promoting an environment conductive to angiogenesis and

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based stem cell mobilization in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Cara; Peace, David; Rich, Elizabeth; Van Besien, Koen

    2008-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to exacerbate vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. It has been recommended to avoid its use for stem cell mobilization in this population, yet autologous transplant is the standard of care and at times a life-saving treatment for patients with various hematologic malignancies such as relapsed aggressive lymphoma or multiple myeloma. We report 5 cases of patients with sickle cell disease and related hemoglobinopathies who underwent granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Three of them developed manageable vaso-occlusive pain symptoms requiring parenteral narcotics alone. The 2 others had no complications. These cases demonstrate that stem cell mobilization using G-CSF, although complicated and not without risk, is feasible in patients with sickle cell syndromes.

  19. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  20. Enhanced ceramide generation and induction of apoptosis in human leukemia cells exposed to DT(388)-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a truncated diphtheria toxin fused to human GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Senchenkov, A; Han, T Y; Wang, H; Frankel, A E; Kottke, T J; Kaufmann, S H; Cabot, M C

    2001-09-15

    DT(388)-GM-CSF, a targeted fusion toxin constructed by conjugation of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin, is presently in phase I trials for patients with resistant acute myeloid leukemia. HL-60/VCR, a multidrug-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell line, and wild-type HL-60 cells were used to study the impact of DT(388)-GM-CSF on metabolism of ceramide, a modulator of apoptosis. After 48 hours with DT(388)-GM-CSF (10 nM), ceramide levels in HL-60/VCR cells rose 6-fold and viability fell to 10%, whereas GM-CSF alone was without influence. Similar results were obtained in HL-60 cells. Examination of the time course revealed that protein synthesis decreased by about 50% and cellular ceramide levels increased by about 80% between 4 and 6 hours after addition of DT(388)-GM-CSF. By 6 hours this was accompanied by activation of caspase-9, followed by activation of caspase-3, cleavage of caspase substrates, and chromatin fragmentation. Hygromycin B and emetine failed to elevate ceramide levels or induce apoptosis at concentrations that inhibited protein synthesis by 50%. Exposure to C(6)-ceramide inhibited protein synthesis (EC(50) approximately 5 microM) and decreased viability (EC(50) approximately 6 microM). Sphingomyelinase treatment depleted sphingomyelin by about 10%, while increasing ceramide levels and inhibiting protein synthesis. Diphtheria toxin increased ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin in U-937 cells, a cell line extremely sensitive to diphtheria toxin; exposure to DT(388)-GM-CSF showed sensitivity at less than 1.0 pM. Diphtheria toxin and conjugate trigger ceramide formation that contributes to apoptosis in human leukemia cells through caspase activation and inhibition of protein synthesis.

  1. A glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor produced in a novel protein production system (AVI-014) in healthy subjects: a first-in human, single dose, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Varki, Roslyn; Pequignot, Ed; Leavitt, Mark C; Ferber, Andres; Kraft, Walter K

    2009-01-28

    AVI-014 is an egg white-derived, recombinant, human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). This healthy volunteer study is the first human investigation of AVI-014. 24 male and female subjects received a single subcutaneous injection of AVI-014 at 4 or 8 mcg/kg. 16 control subjects received 4 or 8 mcg/kg of filgrastim (Neupogen, Amgen) in a partially blinded, parallel fashion. The Geometric Mean Ratio (GMR) (90% CI) of 4 mcg/kg AVI-014/filgrastim AUC(0-72 hr) was 1.00 (0.76, 1.31) and Cmax was 0.86 (0.66, 1.13). At the 8 mcg/kg dose, the AUC(0-72) GMR was 0.89 (0.69, 1.14) and Cmax was 0.76 (0.58, 0.98). A priori pharmacokinetic bioequivalence was defined as the 90% CI of the GMR bounded by 0.8-1.25. Both the white blood cell and absolute neutrophil count area under the % increase curve AUC(0-9 days) and Cmax (maximal % increase from baseline)GMR at 4 and 8 mcg/kg fell within the 0.5-2.0 a priori bound set for pharmacodynamic bioequivalence. The CD 34+ % increase curve AUC(0-9 days) and Cmax GMR for both doses was approximately 1, but 90% confidence intervals were large due to inherent variance, and this measure did not meet pharmacodynamic bioequivalence. AVI-014 demonstrated a side effect profile similar to that of filgrastim. AVI-014 has safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties comparable to filgrastim at an equal dose in healthy volunteers. These findings support further investigation in AVI-014.

  2. A glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor produced in a novel protein production system (AVI-014) in healthy subjects: a first-in human, single dose, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Roslyn; Pequignot, Ed; Leavitt, Mark C; Ferber, Andres; Kraft, Walter K

    2009-01-01

    Background AVI-014 is an egg white-derived, recombinant, human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). This healthy volunteer study is the first human investigation of AVI-014. Methods 24 male and female subjects received a single subcutaneous injection of AVI-014 at 4 or 8 mcg/kg. 16 control subjects received 4 or 8 mcg/kg of filgrastim (Neupogen, Amgen) in a partially blinded, parallel fashion. Results The Geometric Mean Ratio (GMR) (90% CI) of 4 mcg/kg AVI-014/filgrastim AUC(0–72 hr) was 1.00 (0.76, 1.31) and Cmax was 0.86 (0.66, 1.13). At the 8 mcg/kg dose, the AUC(0–72) GMR was 0.89 (0.69, 1.14) and Cmax was 0.76 (0.58, 0.98). A priori pharmacokinetic bioequivalence was defined as the 90% CI of the GMR bounded by 0.8–1.25. Both the white blood cell and absolute neutrophil count area under the % increase curve AUC(0–9 days) and Cmax (maximal % increase from baseline)GMR at 4 and 8 mcg/kg fell within the 0.5–2.0 a priori bound set for pharmacodynamic bioequivalence. The CD 34+ % increase curve AUC(0–9 days) and Cmax GMR for both doses was ~1, but 90% confidence intervals were large due to inherent variance, and this measure did not meet pharmacodynamic bioequivalence. AVI-014 demonstrated a side effect profile similar to that of filgrastim. Conclusion AVI-014 has safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties comparable to filgrastim at an equal dose in healthy volunteers. These findings support further investigation in AVI-014. PMID:19175929

  3. [Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), preclinical and phase I clinical investigations].

    PubMed

    Shen, B; Yang, Z; Xu, J

    1996-09-01

    To conduct preclinical studies and phase I trial of the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF). Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetic and toxicology of the rhGM-CSF were studied in animal models, and the safety was also evaluated in humans. The human bone marrow cells could be stimulated by purified rhGM-CSF to form multilineage colonies (CFU-GM and BFU-E). The rhGM-CSF administered for 7 days to Beagle dogs and monkeys subjected to 60Co r-ray irradiation was shown to induce both rapid and sustained increase in circulating leukocyte counts. Toxicology testing showed that the LD50 (i.v) was over 5000 micrograms/kg, and LD50 (i.p) over 10000 micrograms/kg in mice. Administration of the rhGM-CSF in excess of four times as much as clinical dosages was not associated with severe chronic toxicities. Most injected rhGM-CSF was excreted from urine, and did not accumulate in the body. In the phase I clinical trial, injecting 2.5-7.5 micrograms/day of rhGM-CSF was safe. It is effective and safe to use rhGM-CSF in the treatment of leukocytopenia.

  4. Anticandidal effects of voriconazole and caspofungin, singly and in combination, against Candida glabrata, extracellularly and intracellularly in granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-activated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baltch, Aldona L; Bopp, Lawrence H; Smith, Raymond P; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B

    2008-12-01

    The antifungal effects of voriconazole and caspofungin, singly and in combination, were determined against Candida glabrata in time-kill curves in broth, in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in MDMs activated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Three strains of fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata were evaluated. For intracellular studies, MDM monolayers, with or without GM-CSF activation, were infected with C. glabrata and treated with voriconazole and caspofungin at 2.5x and 5x MIC, respectively, or at 1x MIC. Extracellular studies in broth were performed using drug concentrations from 0.1 to 10x MIC. Viable yeast were enumerated at 0, 24 and 48 h. Significantly greater killing of C. glabrata occurred with the drug combination than with either single drug, both intracellularly and extracellularly (P < 0.01). For voriconazole, the antifungal activity in MDM activated by GM-CSF was greater than that in unactivated MDM, regardless of antibiotic concentration or time of exposure. However, for caspofungin and for the two-drug combination, enhanced activity in GM-CSF-activated MDM depended on the drug concentration and time of exposure. Our data suggest that combinations of voriconazole and caspofungin may be efficacious for the treatment of serious C. glabrata infections. With single-drug therapy, especially voriconazole, GM-CSF activation of monocytes could be considered.

  5. An immunodominant epitope in a functional domain near the N-terminus of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor identified by cross-reaction of synthetic peptides with neutralizing anti-protein and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Beffy, P; Rovero, P; Di Bartolo, V; Laricchia Robbio, L; Dané, A; Pegoraro, S; Bertolero, F; Revoltella, R P

    1994-12-01

    We produced polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and performed studies of epitope mapping by ELISA, using five synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences along this molecule. Additionally, anti-peptide MAbs were generated. The antibody ability to inhibit rhGM-CSF activity was determined using as bioassay the MO7e cell line, which is dependent on hGM-CSF for growth in vitro. An immunodominant epitope able to induce the highest neutralization antibody titers was identified near the N terminus of hGM-CSF. A synthetic peptide 14-24, homologous to a sequence including part of the first alpha-helix of the molecule, was recognized by neutralizing anti-protein antibodies. Similarly, MAbs anti- 14-24 cross-reacted with rhGM-CSF and specifically blocked its function. Replacement of Val16 or Asn17 with alanine greatly reduced the antibody-binding capacity to peptide 14-24, whereas substitution of Gln20 or Glu21 was less critical. Monoclonal antibodies generated against residues 30-41 (corresponding to an intrahelical loop) and 79-91 (homologous to a sequence including part of the third alpha-helix) or its analog [Ala88](79-91)beta Ala-Cys, were conformation dependent and nonneutralizing: they failed to react or bound poorly to rhGM-CSF in ELISA, but readily recognized the homologous sequence in the denatured protein, by Western blotting.

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of woodchuck granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, H L; Chen, P J; Lin, H K; Lee, R S; Lin, H L; Liu, C J; Lee, P J; Lee, J J; Chen, D S

    2001-11-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has immunoregulatory and antiviral effects, and may thus be promising for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Using woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)-infected woodchuck as an animal model to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF on the therapy of chronic hepatitis B, woodchuck GM-CSF will be required due to the apparent species-specific activity of GM-CSF. The cDNA of woodchuck GM-CSF was cloned using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers deriving from highly conserved regions of GM-CSF genes from other species. The deduced amino acids, including the signal peptide, is 138 in length and its identities to human, murine, canine and bovine GM-CSFs are 63, 49, 63, and 63% respectively. The genomic DNA of woodchuck GM-CSF was also cloned by PCR. Its organization is highly homologous to that of human and murine GM-CSF genes, consisting of four exons and three introns. Cloned woodchuck GM-CSF was expressed transiently in 293T cells. The recombinant protein expressed was found to stimulate the growth and differentiation of woodchuck bone marrow cells, indicating the protein expressed by the cloned gene is functional. These results pave the way for future studies on the potential role of GM-CSF for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B by using this animal model. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Acetylation impacts Fli-1-driven regulation of granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Lennard Richard, Mara L; Brandon, Danielle; Lou, Ning; Sato, Shuzo; Caldwell, Tomika; Nowling, Tamara K; Gilkeson, Gary; Zhang, Xian K

    2016-10-01

    Fli-1 has emerged as a critical regulator of inflammatory mediators, including MCP-1, CCL5, and IL-6. The cytokine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) regulates neutrophil precursor maturation and survival, and activates mature neutrophils. Previously, a significant decrease in neutrophil infiltration into the kidneys of Fli-1(+/-) lupus-prone mice was observed. In this study, a significant decrease in G-CSF protein expression was detected in stimulated murine and human endothelial cells when expression of Fli-1 was inhibited. The murine G-CSF promoter contains numerous putative Fli-1 binding sites and several regions within the proximal promoter are significantly enriched for Fli-1 binding. Transient transfection assays indicate that Fli-1 drives transcription from the G-CSF promoter and mutation of the Fli-1 DNA binding domain resulted in a 94% loss of transcriptional activation. Mutation of a known acetylation site, led to a significant increase in G-CSF promoter activation. The histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP and p300/CBP associated factor (PCAF) significantly decrease Fli-1 specific activation of the G-CSF promoter. Thus, acetylation appears to be an important mechanism behind Fli-1 driven activation of the G-CSF promoter. These results further support the theory that Fli-1 plays a major role in the regulation of several inflammatory mediators, ultimately affecting inflammatory disease pathogenesis.

  8. Requirement of Src kinase Lyn for induction of DNA synthesis by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Corey, S J; Dombrosky-Ferlan, P M; Zuo, S; Krohn, E; Donnenberg, A D; Zorich, P; Romero, G; Takata, M; Kurosaki, T

    1998-02-06

    Treatment of cells with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins. G-CSF stimulates both the activation of protein tyrosine kinases Lyn, Jak1, and Jak2 and the association of these enzymes with the G-CSF receptor. Wild-type, lyn-deficient, and syk-deficient chicken B lymphocyte cell lines were transfected with the human G-CSF receptor, and stable transfectants were studied. G-CSF-dependent tyrosyl phosphorylation of Jak1 and Jak2 occurred in all three cell lines. Wild-type and syk-deficient transfectants responded to G-CSF in a dose-responsive fashion with increased thymidine incorporation, but none of the clones of lyn-deficient transfectants did. Ectopic expression of Lyn, but not that of c-Src, in the lyn-deficient cells restored their mitogenic responsiveness to G-CSF. Ectopic expression in wild-type cells of the kinase-inactive form of Lyn, but not of the kinase-inactive form of Jak2, inhibited thymidine incorporation in response to G-CSF. These studies show that the absence of Lyn results in the loss of mitogenic signaling in the G-CSF signaling pathway and that activation of Jak1 or Jak2 is not sufficient to cause mitogenesis.

  9. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  10. Cross talk between inflammatory cytokines and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in transplant vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sterpetti, Antonio V; Borrelli, Valeria; Ventura, Marco; Cucina, Alessandra

    2017-05-15

    Transplant vasculopathy limits the clinical results of solid organ transplantation. Thirty-three arterial grafts were implanted in the abdominal aorta of Lewis rats. The animals were humanely sacrificed 4 wk after surgery. The study groups had 15 arterial isografts and 18 arterial allografts. Growth factors and inflammatory cytokines, released by the removed grafts, were studied in organ culture. The released growth factors were analyzed in vitro to assess their effect on the proliferation of endothelial, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. In arterial isogenic and allogenic grafts, platelet-derived growth factor and basic fibroblastic growth factor release was minimal (P < 0.01). There was a significant release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; P < 0.001) in allografts. GM-CSF and TNF-α, at concentrations in the allograft organ cultures, stimulated significantly the growth of smooth muscle cells. The simultaneous action of TNF-α and GM-CSF had an exponential growth effect on endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, and IL-9 were released in high quantities by allografts. In vitro, IL-1, IL-2, and IL-9 facilitated the growth effect of GM-CSF and TNF-α. Transplant vasculopathy depends on the simultaneous and complementary additive effects of several growth factors and cytokines, which have a continuous "cross talk." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces CCL17 production via IRF4 to mediate inflammation.

    PubMed

    Achuthan, Adrian; Cook, Andrew D; Lee, Ming-Chin; Saleh, Reem; Khiew, Hsu-Wei; Chang, Melody W N; Louis, Cynthia; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Lacey, Derek C; Christensen, Anne D; Frye, Ashlee T; Lam, Pui Yeng; Kusano, Hitoshi; Nomura, Koji; Steiner, Nancy; Förster, Irmgard; Nutt, Stephen L; Olshansky, Moshe; Turner, Stephen J; Hamilton, John A

    2016-09-01

    Data from preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can function as a key proinflammatory cytokine. However, therapies that directly target GM-CSF function could lead to undesirable side effects, creating a need to delineate downstream pathways and mediators. In this work, we provide evidence that GM-CSF drives CCL17 production by acting through an IFN regulatory factor 4-dependent (IRF4-dependent) pathway in human monocytes, murine macrophages, and mice in vivo. In murine models of arthritis and pain, IRF4 regulated the formation of CCL17, which mediated the proinflammatory and algesic actions of GM-CSF. Mechanistically, GM-CSF upregulated IRF4 expression by enhancing JMJD3 demethylase activity. We also determined that CCL17 has chemokine-independent functions in inflammatory arthritis and pain. These findings indicate that GM-CSF can mediate inflammation and pain by regulating IRF4-induced CCL17 production, providing insights into a pathway with potential therapeutic avenues for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and their associated pain.

  12. Cytokine refacing effect reduces granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor susceptibility to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Carlson, Sharon J; Cox, George N

    2015-10-01

    Crohn's Disease (CD) afflicts over half a million Americans with an annual economic impact exceeding $10 billion. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can increase patient immune responses against intestinal microbes that promote CD and has been effective for some patients in clinical trials. We have made important progress toward developing GM-CSF variants that could be more effective CD therapeutics by virtue of being less prone to neutralization by the endogenous GM-CSF autoantibodies that are highly expressed in CD patients. Yeast display engineering revealed mutations that increase GM-CSF variant binding affinity by up to ∼3-fold toward both GM-CSF receptor alpha and beta subunits in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Increased binding affinity did not reduce GM-CSF half-maximum effective concentration (EC50) values in conventional in vitro human leukocyte proliferation assays. Affinity-enhancing mutations did, however, promote a 'refacing effect' that imparted all five evaluated GM-CSF variants with increased in vitro bioactivity in the presence of GM-CSF-neutralizing polyclonal antisera. The most improved variant, H15L/R23L, was 6-fold more active than wild-type GM-CSF. Incorporation of additional known affinity-increasing mutations could augment the refacing effect and concomitant bioactivity improvements described here. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Monocyte activation following systemic administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, A; Oratz, R; Hoogmoed, R; Caron, D; Peace, D; Liebes, L; Blum, R H; Vilcek, J

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-four patients with solid malignancies were treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on a Phase 1b trial. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of GM-CSF on peripheral blood monocyte activation. GM-CSF was administered by subcutaneous injection daily for 14 days. Immune parameters measured were monocyte cytotoxicity against the human colon carcinoma (HT29) cell line, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta, and in vitro TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta induction. All patients were evaluable for toxicity. Fifteen patients were evaluable for immunologic response. Treatment with GM-CSF led to a statistically significant enhancement in direct monocyte cytotoxicity against HT29 cells. There was no increase in serum TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta and no consistent in vitro induction of TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta from monocytes posttreatment. Treatment was well tolerated overall. We conclude that treatment with GM-CSF can lead to enhanced monocyte cytotoxicity. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of GM-CSF on other parameters of monocyte functions.

  14. Protective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on endotoxin shock in mice with retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toki, S; Hiromatsu, K; Aoki, Y; Makino, M; Yoshikai, Y

    1997-10-01

    Mice with retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) were hypersensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethal shock accompanied by marked elevations of systematic interleukin 1beta (IL-beta) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) after LPS challenge. Pretreatment with 10 microg of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) protected MAIDS mice from hypersensitivity to LPS-induced lethal shock and this protection was concomitant with suppression of IFN-gamma production. Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  15. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi ); Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi )

    1990-12-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of {sup 125}I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively.

  16. Delivery of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in bioadhesive hydrogel stimulates migration of dendritic cells in models of human papillomavirus-associated (pre)neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Pascale; Evrard, Brigitte; Maillard, Catherine; Franzen-Detrooz, Elizabeth; Delattre, Luc; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnes; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    Because of the central role of dendritic cells and/or Langerhans cells(DC/LC) in the induction of cellular immune responses, pharmacological agents that modulate the recruitment of these cells might have a clinical interest. The present study was designed to evaluate the capacity of several pharmaceutical formulations to topically deliver granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated genital (pre)neoplastic lesions. The formulations were evaluated for their bioactivity and for their potential to recruit DC in organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes. We found that a bioadhesive polycarbophil gel (Noveon) at pH 5.5 is able to maintain the bioactivity of GM-CSF at 4 or 37 degrees C for at least 7 days, whereas a decreased activity of GM-CSF was observed when the molecule is included in other polymer gels. GM-CSF incorporated in the polycarbophil gel was also a potent factor in enhancing the colonization of DC into organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes since the infiltration of DC in the in vitro-formed (pre)neoplastic epithelium was very low under basal conditions and dramatically increased in the presence of GM-CSF gel. We next demonstrated that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel induces the recruitment of human DC in a human (pre)neoplastic epithelium grafted into NOD/SCID mice. The efficacy of GM-CSF in this formulation was equivalent to that observed with liquid GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel could play an important role in the recruitment of DC/LC in mucosal surfaces and be useful as a new immunotherapeutic approach for genital HPV-associated (pre)neoplastic lesions.

  17. DT388-GM-CSF, a novel fusion toxin consisting of a truncated diphtheria toxin fused to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prolongs host survival in a SCID mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hall, P D; Willingham, M C; Kreitman, R J; Frankel, A E

    1999-04-01

    Despite significant advances in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients will succumb to drug-resistant AML. To overcome this resistance, we have developed a novel fusion toxin consisting of the catalytic and translocation subunits of diphtheria toxin (DT388) linked to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro, DT388-GM-CSF demonstrated significant activity against numerous AML cell lines and fresh AML blasts. To determine its in vivo efficacy, we developed an in vivo model of human AML in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice injected intravenously with 1 x 10(7) HL-60 cells (AML-M2 cell line). The SCID mice developed abdominal masses, infiltration of the liver and bone marrow, and peripheral blasts with a median survival of 42.5 days. We tested DT388-GM-CSF, ara-C, human GM-CSF, and DAB389IL-2, which were injected intraperitoneally on days 2-6 in this model. DT3-GM-CSF significantly improved survival of the SCID mice over Ara-C, DAB389IL-2, or control (P < 0.001). DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice who developed leukemia exhibited no difference in the number of GM-CSF receptors (P = 0.39), ligand affinity (P = 0.77), or sensitivity (P = 0.56) to DT388-GM-CSF as compared to the controls. Frank leukemia in DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice may be due to incomplete penetration of drug into tissues rather than cellular resistance. DT388-GM-CSF is an active therapeutic agent in our SCID mouse model of AML with a unique mechanism of action and differing toxicities than current cytotoxic agents.

  18. Effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on glial scar formation after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joonho; Kim, Moon Hang; Yoon, Yong Je; Kim, Kil Hwan; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on glial scar formation after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats and compared the therapeutic effects between G-CSF and granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to evaluate G-CSF as a potential substitute for GM-CSF in clinical application. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: a sham-operated group (Group 1), an SCI group without treatment (Group 2), an SCI group treated with G-CSF (Group 3), and an SCI group treated with GM-CSF (Group 4). G-CSF and GM-CSF were administered via intraperitoneal injection immediately after SCI. The effects of G-CSF and GM-CSF on functional recovery, glial scar formation, and axonal regeneration were evaluated and compared. The rats in Groups 3 and 4 showed better functional recovery and more decreased cavity sizes than those in Group 2 (p < 0.05). Both G-CSF and GM-CSF suppressed intensive expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein around the cavity at 4 weeks and reduced the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05). Also, early administration of G-CSF and GM-CSF protected axon fibers from destructive injury and facilitated axonal regeneration. There were no significant differences in comparisons of functional recovery, glial scar formation, and axonal regeneration between G-CSF and GM-CSF. G-CSF suppressed glial scar formation after SCI in rats, possibly by restricting the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, which might facilitate functional recovery from SCI. GM-CSF and G-CSF had similar effects on glial scar formation and functional recovery after SCI, suggesting that G-CSF can potentially be substituted for GM-CSF in the treatment of SCI.

  19. Recurrent spleen enlargement during cyclic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delmer, A.; Karmochkine, M.; Cadiou, M.; Gerhartz, H.; Zittoun, R. )

    1990-05-01

    A 65-year-old woman with refractory anemia with excess of blasts received sequential courses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy (GM-CSF) and low-dose cytosine arabinoside. Each course of GM-CSF induced a rapid and tremendous increase in leukocyte count as well as in spleen size, 111-indium chloride scanning suggested a myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. This observation suggests that in some patients the granulopoietic response to the myeloid growth factor stimulation may be predominant in the spleen.

  20. Potentiation of photodynamic therapy by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krosl, Gorazd; Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Jana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    1995-03-01

    The murine squamous carcinoma cell line (SCCVII) was genetically engineered to produce high levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Lethally irradiated GM-CSF producing cells were injected under the subcutaneously growing parental SCCVII tumor at various times before and/or after PDT. Even a single treatment with GM- CSF producing cells injected two days before PDT markedly enhanced the tumor cure rate when compared to the PDT treatment alone. Effective potentiation was observed with PDT mediated either by Photofrin or by benzoporphyrin derivative.

  1. Neuroprotective Activities of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Following Controlled Cortical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Matthew L.; Elliott, Bret R.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is facilitated by innate and adaptive immunity and can be harnessed to effect brain repair. In mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) we show that treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) affects regulatory T cell numbers coincident with decreased lesion volumes and increased cortical tissue sparing. This paralleled increases in neurofilament and diminished reactive microglial staining. Transcriptomic analysis showed that GM-CSF induces robust immune neuroprotective responses seven days following CCI. Together, these results support the therapeutic potential of GM-CSF for TBI. PMID:25468272

  2. Tumor Progression of Skin Carcinoma Cells in Vivo Promoted by Clonal Selection, Mutagenesis, and Autocrine Growth Regulation by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Margareta M.; Peter, Wolfgang; Mappes, Marion; Huelsen, Andrea; Steinbauer, Heinrich; Boukamp, Petra; Vaccariello, Michael; Garlick, Jonathan; Fusenig, Norbert E.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is crucial for cancer growth and progression as evidenced by reports on the significance of tumor angiogenesis and stromal cells. Using the HaCaT/HaCaT-ras human skin carcinogenesis model, we studied tumor progression from benign tumors to highly malignant squamous cell carcinomas. Progression of tumorigenic HaCaT-ras clones to more aggressive and eventually metastatic phenotypes was reproducibly achieved by their in vivo growth as subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Their enhanced malignant phenotype was stably maintained in recultured tumor cells that represented, identified by chromosomal analysis, a distinct subpopulation of the parental line. Additional mutagenic effects were apparent in genetic alterations involving chromosomes 11 and 2, and in amplification and overexpression of the H-ras oncogene. Importantly, in vitro clonal selection of benign and malignant cell lines never resulted in late-stage malignant clones, indicating the importance of the in vivo environment in promoting an enhanced malignant phenotype. Independently of their H-ras status, all in vivo-progressed tumor cell lines (five of five) exhibited a constitutive and stable expression of the hematopoietic growth factors granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which may function as autocrine/paracrine mediators of tumor progression in vivo. Thus, malignant progression favored by the in vivo microenvironment requires both clonal selection of subpopulations adapted to in vivo growth and mutational events leading to stable functional alterations. PMID:11583982

  3. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for sepsis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the effects of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy in non-neutropenic patients with sepsis. Methods A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted using specific search terms. A manual review of references was also performed. Eligible studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) that compared granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy with placebo for the treatment of sepsis in adults. Main outcome measures were all-cause mortality at 14 days and 28 days after initiation of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy, in-hospital mortality, reversal rate from infection, and adverse events. Results Twelve RCTs with 2,380 patients were identified. In regard to 14-day mortality, a total of 9 death events occurred among 71 patients (12.7%) in the treatment group compared with 13 events among 67 patients (19.4%) in the placebo groups. Meta-analysis showed there was no significant difference in 28-day mortality when G-CSF or GM-CSF were compared with placebo (relative risks (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.11, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.31, I2 = 15%). Compared with placebo, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.36, P = 0.86; P for heterogeneity = 0.80, I2 = 0%). However, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy significantly increased the reversal rate from infection (RR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.62, P = 0.002; P for heterogeneity = 0.47, I2 = 0%). No significant difference was observed in adverse events between groups (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.23, P = 0.62; P for heterogeneity = 0.03, I2 = 58%). Sensitivity analysis by excluding one trial did not significantly change the results of adverse events (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.32, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.17, I2 = 36%). Conclusions There is no current evidence supporting the routine use of G-CSF or

  4. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for sepsis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bo, Lulong; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Jiali; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy in non-neutropenic patients with sepsis. A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was conducted using specific search terms. A manual review of references was also performed. Eligible studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) that compared granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy with placebo for the treatment of sepsis in adults. Main outcome measures were all-cause mortality at 14 days and 28 days after initiation of G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy, in-hospital mortality, reversal rate from infection, and adverse events. Twelve RCTs with 2,380 patients were identified. In regard to 14-day mortality, a total of 9 death events occurred among 71 patients (12.7%) in the treatment group compared with 13 events among 67 patients (19.4%) in the placebo groups. Meta-analysis showed there was no significant difference in 28-day mortality when G-CSF or GM-CSF were compared with placebo (relative risks (RR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.11, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.31, I2 = 15%). Compared with placebo, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.36, P = 0.86; P for heterogeneity = 0.80, I2 = 0%). However, G-CSF or GM-CSF therapy significantly increased the reversal rate from infection (RR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.62, P = 0.002; P for heterogeneity = 0.47, I2 = 0%). No significant difference was observed in adverse events between groups (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.23, P = 0.62; P for heterogeneity = 0.03, I2 = 58%). Sensitivity analysis by excluding one trial did not significantly change the results of adverse events (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.32, P = 0.44; P for heterogeneity = 0.17, I2 = 36%). There is no current evidence supporting the routine use of G-CSF or GM-CSF in patients with sepsis. Large

  5. Tumor-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prolong the Survival of Neutrophils Infiltrating Bronchoalveolar Subtype Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wislez, Marie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Rabbe, Nathalie; Moreau, Joelle; Cesari, Danielle; Milleron, Bernard; Mayaud, Charles; Antoine, Martine; Soler, Paul; Cadranel, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the role of the tumor environment in the regulation of apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils, the number of which correlates negatively with outcome, in patients with adenocarcinoma of the bronchioloalveolar (BAC) subtype. We examined three different parameters of apoptosis, namely morphological aspect, annexin-V expression, and DNA fragmentation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) supernatants from patients with BAC significantly inhibited the 24-hour spontaneous apoptosis of normal peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro compared to BALF supernatants from control patients (64 ± 4% versus 90 ± 2% measured by annexin-V flow cytometry, P = 0.04). The alveolar neutrophil count correlated positively with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) concentrations in the patient’s BALF. Furthermore, neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against GM-CSF and G-CSF significantly inhibited BALF anti-apoptotic activity (15 to 40% and 34 to 63% inhibition, respectively), whereas neutralizing Abs against interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α had no significant effect. In an attempt to identify the cell origin of anti-apoptotic cytokines, we tested in vitro the effect of BAC cells (A549 cell line and primary culture derived from a patient’s BAC tumor) on the apoptosis of peripheral blood neutrophils. Cell-free supernatants from tumor cells did not inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, cell-free supernatants from tumor cells previously exposed to conditioned media from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages significantly inhibited spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis. This inhibition was partially lifted when conditioned media from mononuclear cells were previously treated with Abs against IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. As in vivo, neutralizing Abs against GM-CSF significantly inhibited the anti-apoptotic activity of cell culture supernatants

  6. Proteolytic enzyme levels are increased during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization in human donors but do not predict the number of mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    van Os, R; van Schie, M L J; Willemze, R; Fibbe, W E

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicate that functional, mature neutrophils are essential for interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced stem cell mobilization. To study a possible role of neutrophils in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced hematopoietic mobilization, we assessed the number of circulating CD34+ cells in healthy allogeneic stem cell donors on days 3, 4, and 5 of mobilization for comparison with the number of peripheral blood neutrophils and the plasma levels of IL-8, Flt3 ligand (FL), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). Thirty-seven of 45 donors required 1 day of apheresis to obtain 5 x 10(6) CD34+/kg recipient body weight (high responders), the remaining 8 donors required 1 extra day of apheresis on day 6 (low responders). On day 5, CD34+ numbers in the blood were significantly highe in high responders (116 x 10(3) +/- 10.4/ml) than in low responders (54.1 x 10(3) +/- 10.3, p < 0.001). In all donors, MMP-9 and HNE levels were increased compared to nonmobilized individuals, but in high responders, plasma MMP-9 levels on days 3-5 of mobilization were substantially higher than in low responders (p < or = 0.02 for MMP-9 and p = 0.89, p = 0.05 and p = 0.52 for HNE on days 3, 4, and 5, respectively). These results are in accordance with the hypothesis that neutrophils play a role in G-CSF-induced mobilization through the release of proteases such as MMP-9 and elastase. No change in plasma levels of IL-8 or Flt3 ligand was observed, suggesting that these cytokines do not play a role in stem cell mobilization. However, because stem cell numbers could not be predicted by proteolytic enzyme levels and/or neutrophil numbers, other undefined factors may be more important.

  7. Efficacy of a new formulation of lenograstim (recombinant glycosylated human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) containing gelatin for the treatment of neutropenia after consolidation chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Saito, H; Toyama, K; Horiuchi, A; Kuriya, S; Furusawa, S; Tsuruoka, N; Takiguchi, T; Matsuda, T; Utsumi, M; Shiku, H; Matsui, T; Egami, K; Tamura, K; Ohno, R

    2000-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of a new formulation of lenograstim (recombinant glycosylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) prepared by switching the stabilizer from human serum albumin (HSA) to gelatin was investigated for the treatment of neutropenia after consolidation chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The results obtained in the study using the gelatin-containing formulation (gelatin-lenograstim) were retrospectively compared to those obtained from a placebo-controlled double-blind randomized study (AML-DBT) using the HSA-containing formulation (HSA-lenograstim). The median time of neutrophil recovery to > or = 1000/mm3 was significantly shorter in the gelatin-lenograstim group (14 days) than in the placebo group (21 days, P = .0001), and there was no significant difference between the gelatin-lenograstim group and the HSA-lenograstim group (14.5 days of AML-DBT, P = .5462). The incidences of febrile neutropenia were significantly reduced in the gelatin-lenograstim group (24/43, 55.8%) compared to the placebo group (58/64, 90.6%, P < .0001). The incidence of fever and antibiotic use was also significantly lower in the gelatin-lenograstim group (69.8% and 83.7%, respectively) than in the placebo group (92.2%, P = .0034, and 96.9%, P = .0285, respectively). However, between the 2 groups there were no differences in the number of patients who had infectious episodes. No serious adverse drug reactions ascribed to gelatin-lenograstim were encountered. These results demonstrate that gelatin-lenograstim exerted beneficial effects in the acceleration of neutrophil recovery and in the reduction of fever, febrile neutropenia, and antibiotic use, and its efficacy was equivalent to HSA-lenograstim. Therefore, we concluded that the gelatin-lenograstim formulation, which offers no risk of virus contamination and can be stored at room temperature, is more beneficial than the HSA-lenograstim formulation.

  8. Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a MAR element in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Burkov, I A; Serova, I A; Battulin, N R; Smirnov, A V; Babkin, I V; Andreeva, L E; Dvoryanchikov, G A; Serov, O L

    2013-10-01

    Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under the control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a matrix attachment region (MAR) element from the Drosophila histone 1 gene was studied in four and eight transgenic mouse lines, respectively. Of the four transgenic lines carrying the transgene without MAR, three had correct tissues-specific expression of the hGM-CSF gene in the mammary gland only and no signs of cell mosaicism. The concentration of hGM-CSF in the milk of transgenic females varied from 1.9 to 14 μg/ml. One line presented hGM-CSF in the blood serum, indicating ectopic expression. The values of secretion of hGM-CSF in milk of 6 transgenic lines carrying the transgene with MAR varied from 0.05 to 0.7 μg/ml, and two of these did not express hGM-CSF. Three of the four examined animals from lines of this group showed ectopic expression of the hGM-CSF gene, as determined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses, as well as the presence of hGM-CSF in the blood serum. Mosaic expression of the hGM-CSF gene in mammary epithelial cells was specific to all examined transgenic mice carrying the transgene with MAR but was never observed in the transgenic mice without MAR. The mosaic expression was not dependent on transgene copy number. Thus, the expected "protective or enhancer effect" from the MAR element on the hGM-CSF gene expression was not observed.

  9. trans activation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the interleukin-2 receptor in transgenic mice carrying the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene.

    PubMed

    Green, J E; Begley, C G; Wagner, D K; Waldmann, T A; Jay, G

    1989-11-01

    Three lines of transgenic mice carrying the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene have previously been reported to develop neurofibromas composed of perineural fibroblasts (S. H. Hinrichs, M. Nerenberg, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1340-1343, 1987; M. Nerenberg, S. H. Hinrichs, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1324-1329, 1987). Tumors from these mice and tumor cell lines derived from them expressed high levels of tax RNA and protein. They also expressed high levels of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene as measured by proliferative responses of FD-CP1 target cells using conditioned media from tumor cells and by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from tumors and tumor cell lines. Although other tissues, such as salivary glands and muscles, in the transgenic mice also expressed high levels of tax, they did not express the gene for GM-CSF. This indicates that tissue-specific cellular factors, in addition to tax, are required for GM-CSF gene expression. Systemic effects of excessive GM-CSF production were demonstrated by infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into tumor tissues which are not necrotic, by peripheral granulocytosis, and by splenomegaly resulting from myeloid hyperplasia. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor was also found to be expressed by the tumors and tumor cell lines as measured by IL-2-binding and cross-linking studies. This is the first demonstration that the IL-2 receptor can be activated by tax in a nonlymphoid cell type. These in vivo findings are consistent with other reports which have demonstrated in vitro cis-regulatory elements within the 5'-flanking regions of the genes for GM-CSF and the IL-2 receptor which are responsive to trans activation by the tax gene.

  10. PyNTTTTGT and CpG Immunostimulatory Oligonucleotides: Effect on Granulocyte/Monocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Secretion by Human CD56+ (NK and NKT) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Juan M.; Marchicio, José; López, Mariela; Ziblat, Andrea; Elias, Fernanda; Fló, Juan; López, Ricardo A.; Horn, David; Zorzopulos, Jorge; Montaner, Alejandro D.

    2015-01-01

    CD56+ cells have been recognized as being involved in bridging the innate and acquired immune systems. Herein, we assessed the effect of two major classes of immunostimulatory oligonucleotides (ODNs), PyNTTTTGT and CpG, on CD56+ cells. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) with some of these ODNs led to secretion of significant amounts of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but only if interleukin 2 (IL2) was present. IMT504, the prototype of the PyNTTTTGT ODN class, was the most active. GM-CSF secretion was very efficient when non-CpG ODNs with high T content and PyNTTTTGT motifs lacking CpGs were used. On the other hand, CpG ODNs and IFNα inhibited this GM-CSF secretion. Selective cell type removal from hPBMC indicated that CD56+ cells were responsible for GM-CSF secretion and that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) regulate this process. In addition, PyNTTTTGT ODNs inhibited the IFNα secretion induced by CpG ODNs in PDCs by interference with the TLR9 signaling pathway. Since IFNα is essential for CD56+ stimulation by CpG ODNs, there is a reciprocal interference of CpG and PyNTTTTGT ODNs when acting on this cell population. This suggests that these synthetic ODNs mimic different natural alarm signals for activation of the immune system. PMID:25706946

  11. The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) upregulates metalloproteinase-2 and VEGF through PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 activation in human trophoblast Swan 71 cells.

    PubMed

    Furmento, V A; Marino, J; Blank, V C; Roguin, L P

    2014-11-01

    Although the expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and its receptor (G-CSFR) in placental tissues suggests that the cytokine could play a role in placental development, the relevance of G-CSF:G-CSFR interaction in trophoblast cells remains to be studied. Thus, the possible functional role of G-CSF was examined in a human trophoblast cell line (Swan 71 cells). The expression of G-CSFR was detected by immunocytochemistry and Western blot assays. G-CSF treatment exerted neither a proliferative nor a protective effect on H2O2-mediated cell death in trophoblast cells. Gelatin zymography of supernatants collected from G-CSF-treated cells showed an increment of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. We also found higher MMP-2 and VEGF expression levels in conditioned medium from cells exposed to G-CSF. In addition, it was demonstrated that G-CSF induced the activation of PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways, which in turn activated NF-kB. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors, it was showed that these pathways are mediating the biological effects produced by G-CSF in Swan 71 cells. We have demonstrated for the first time that G-CSF increases MMP-2 activity and VEGF secretion in Swan 71 cells through activation of PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling pathways, both contributing to the translocation of NF-kB to the nucleus. These data suggest that G-CSF is involved in the regulation of trophoblast function, and should be considered as a locally produced cytokine probably contributing to embryo implantation and the development of a functional placenta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Regulation of MTA1 Expression by Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arathy S.; Jagadeeshan, Sankar; Subramanian, Anirudh; Chidambaram, Saravana Babu; Surabhi, Rohan Prasad; Singhal, Mahak; Bhoopalan, Hemadev; Sekar, Sathiya; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Duvuru, Prathiba; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons of the brain, which results in insufficient synthesis and action of dopamine. Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is an upstream modulator of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, and hence MTA1 plays a significant role in PD pathogenesis. To impart functional and clinical significance to MTA1, we analyzed MTA1 and TH levels in the substantia nigra region of a large cohort of human brain tissue samples by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MTA1 and TH levels were significantly down-regulated in PD samples as compared with normal brain tissue. Correspondingly, immunohistochemistry analysis for MTA1 in substantia nigra sections revealed that 74.1% of the samples had a staining intensity of <6 in the PD samples as compared with controls, 25.9%, with an odds ratio of 8.54. Because of the clinical importance of MTA1 established in PD, we looked at agents to modulate MTA1 expression in neuronal cells, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was chosen, due to its clinically proven neurogenic effects. Treatment of the human neuronal cell line KELLY and acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model with G-CSF showed significant induction of MTA1 and TH with rescue of phenotype in the mouse model. Interestingly, the observed induction of TH was compromised on silencing of MTA1. The underlying molecular mechanism of MTA1 induction by G-CSF was proved to be through induction of c-Fos and its recruitment to the MTA1 promoter. PMID:27044752

  13. Review of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in the treatment of established febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Pérez Velasco, Román

    2011-09-01

    To assess the value of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) in promoting recovery from established episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN) after chemotherapy in cancer patients. The literature was searched using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and IPA databases. Reference lists from the retrieved papers and hand searches of relevant journals complemented the search. Eleven randomized controlled trials were selected for review. G-CSF use in established FN appears to be limited to a small reduction in neutropenia duration, length of hospitalization, and duration of antibiotic use. Overall, there are no significant reductions in time to neutrophil recovery and fever resolution. The cost analyses performed do not show significant cost savings. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) are biological agents typically used for prevention of febrile neutropenia (FN) or as adjunctive treatment with antibiotics of established FN. Most clinical guidelines discourage the general use of G-CSF for adjunctive treatment of ongoing neutropenic fever; however, its use in special situations, such as high-risk for infectious complications or adverse prognostic factors, is advised. G-CSF should be reserved for high-risk cancer patients, in accordance with the results of this review. This recommendation needs to be taken with caution in view of the disparities and methodological flaws found among trials. It is necessary to design further trials appropriately, well-powered and focused on high-risk patients. Moreover, it is necessary to perform an appropriate economic evaluation for this setting.

  14. GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (G-CSF) UPREGULATES β1 INTEGRIN AND INCREASES MIGRATION OF HUMAN TROPHOBLAST SWAN 71 CELLS VIA PI3K AND MAPK ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Furmento, Verónica A.; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C.; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A.; Aguilar, Rubén C.; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development. PMID:26992288

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) upregulates β1 integrin and increases migration of human trophoblast Swan 71 cells via PI3K and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Furmento, Verónica A; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Aguilar, Rubén C; Roguin, Leonor P

    2016-03-15

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development.

  16. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1) ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS. PMID:21711557

  17. The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in preclinical models of infection and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John C

    2005-12-01

    The cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent endogenous trigger for the release of neutrophils from bone marrow stores and for their activation for enhanced antimicrobial activity. G-CSF has been widely evaluated in preclinical models of acute illness, with generally promising though divergent results. A recombinant G-CSF molecule has recently undergone clinical trials to assess its efficacy as an adjuvant therapy in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, however, these studies failed to provide convincing evidence of benefit. We undertook a systematic review of the published literature reporting the effects of modulation of G-CSF in preclinical in vivo models to determine whether evidence of differential efficacy might explain the disappointing results of human studies and point to disease states that might be more likely to benefit from G-CSF therapy. G-CSF has been evaluated in 86 such studies involving a variety of different models. The strongest evidence of benefit was seen in studies involving intraperitoneal challenge with live organisms; benefit was evident whether the agent was given before or after challenge. G-CSF demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity in models of systemic challenge with viable organisms or endotoxin, but only when the agent is given before challenge; evidence of benefit after challenge was minimal. Preclinical models of intrapulmonary challenge only show efficacy when the cytokine is administered before the infectious challenge, and suggested harm in gram-negative pneumonia resulting from challenge with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella. There is little evidence for therapeutic efficacy in noninfectious models of acute illness. We conclude that the most promising populations for evaluation of G-CSF are neutropenic patients with invasive infection and patients with intra-abdominal infection, particularly those with the syndrome of tertiary, or recurrent, peritonitis. Significant variability in the design

  18. N- and O-linked carbohydrates and glycosylation site occupancy in recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor secreted by a Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed

    Forno, Guillermina; Bollati Fogolin, Mariela; Oggero, Marcos; Kratje, Ricardo; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Conradt, Harald S; Nimtz, Manfred

    2004-03-01

    GM-CSF is one of several naturally occurring glycoproteins that regulate leukocyte production, migration and function. It has been produced in different cell types, with different properties that depend on the production process used. The purpose of this work was to characterize the recombinant human GM-CSF from an engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell line grown in suspension and as adherent culture for the identification of the glycosylation sites and the definition of the glycosidic moiety, including the degree of site occupancy. Both preparations exhibited size heterogeneity in SDS/PAGE with multiple bands containing glycoprotein forms with either two or one N-glycosylation sites occupied. Minor low molecular mass forms completely lacked N-linked oligosaccharides but contained 1-3 O-linked glycans. Twelve differently charged isoforms were detected in isoelectric focusing gels. At least 16 glycoforms, differing in the number of Hex-HexNAc units (Deltam 365 Da), were detected in MALDI-TOF MS spectra of the desialylated GM-CSFs. MALDI-TOF MS and HPAEC-PAD analysis indicated the presence of predominantly tri- and tetraantennary N-linked oligosaccharide chains with and without N-acetyllactosamine repeat units and some 10% of biantennary oligosaccharides, all containing more than 90% proximal alpha1-6-linked fucose. The oligosaccharide patterns of both GM-CSF preparations were found to be very similar. More than 90% of terminal galactose residues of the N-glycans were found alpha2-3 sialylated with NeuNAc (93%) or NeuNGc (7%). Site specific glycosylation was analysed by electrospray ionization MS and it was found that in the mono glycosylated GM-CSF form more than 90% of the Asn37 were occupied by N-glycans. O-glycosylation at the N-terminus of the polypeptide was detected at Ser7 and Ser9 or Thr10, in the predominantly doubly O-glycosylated glycoprotein form. In the triply modified GM-CSF molecules, Ser5 was additionally O-glycosylated. The major difference between

  19. Optimization of gene transfer into primitive human hematopoietic cells of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood using low-dose cytokines and comparison of a gibbon ape leukemia virus versus an RD114-pseudotyped retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Johannes C M; Liu, B L; Goldman, A I; Buckley, S M; Chrudimsky, K S

    2002-07-20

    Primitive human hematopoietic cells in granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood (MPB) are more difficult to transduce compared to cells from umbilical cord blood. Based on the hypothesis that MPB cells may require different stimulation for efficient retroviral infection, we compared several culture conditions known to induce cycling of primitive hematopoietic cells. MPB-derived CD34(+) cells were stimulated in the presence or absence of the murine fetal liver cell line AFT024 in trans-wells with G-CSF, stem cell factor (SCF), and thrombopoietin (TPO) (G/S/T; 100 ng/ml) or Flt3-L, SCF, interleukin (IL)-7, and TPO (F/S/7/T; 10-20 ng/ml), and transduced using a GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Compared to cultures without stroma, the presence of AFT024 increased the number of transduced colony-forming cells (CFC) by 3.5-fold (with G/S/T), long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) by 4.6-fold (with F/S/7/T), and nonobese diabetic/severe immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID)-repopulating cells (SRC) by 6.8-fold (with F/S/7/T). Similar numbers of long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) and SRC could be transduced using AFT024-conditioned medium (AFT-CM) or a defined medium that had been supplemented with factors identified in AFT-CM. Finally, using our best condition based on transduction with the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV)-pseudotyped vector, we demonstrate a 33-fold higher level of gene transfer (p < 0.001) in SRC using an RD114-pseudotyped vector. In summary, using an optimized protocol with low doses of cytokines, and transduction with an RD114 compared to a GaLV-pseudotyped retroviral vector, the overall number of transduced cells in NOD/SCID mice could be improved 144-fold, with a gene-transfer efficiency in SRC of 16.3% (13.3-19.9; n = 6).

  20. Treatment of clozapine- and molindone-induced agranulocytosis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Geibig, C B; Marks, L W

    1993-10-01

    To report a case of clozapine- and molindone-induced agranulocytosis and to discuss treatment using filgrastim, a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. A 64-year-old woman who had been on long-term clozapine therapy for schizophrenia was hospitalized with presumed drug-induced agranulocytosis. She had also been on short-term molindone therapy. A bone marrow biopsy and the initial white blood cell (WBC) count were consistent with drug-induced agranulocytosis. Following seven days of treatment with subcutaneous filgrastim 300 micrograms/d, her absolute neutrophil count was above 500 x 10(6)/L. Reports in the literature discussing antipsychotic drug-induced agranulocytosis are reviewed. A relationship between treatment with filgrastim and WBC response is postulated. Filgrastim may be useful in ameliorating the effects of clozapine- and molindone-induced agranulocytosis.

  1. Expression and purification of canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (cG-CSF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akira; Iwata, Akira; Saito, Toshiki; Watanabe, Fumiko; Ueda, Susumu

    2009-08-15

    Canine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (cG-CSF) with modification of cysteine at position 17 to serine was expressed in Brevibacillus choshinensis HPD31. cG-CSF secreted into the culture medium was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and consecutive column chromatography, using butyl sepharose and DEAE sepharose. Biological activity of the recombinant cG-CSF was 8.0 x 10(6) U/mg protein, as determined by its stimulatory effect on NFS-60 cell proliferation. Purified cG-CSF was subcutaneously administered once a day for two successive days to dogs (1, 5, 25, or 125 microg). Neutrophil count increased the following day in all dogs except those administered the lowest dose (1 microg). No severe side effects were observed in dogs after administration of cG-CSF.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-04-16

    This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  3. Autopsy of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Haruna; Eguchi, Noriaki; Sumimoto, Kyoku; Matsumoto, Kenta; Azakami, Takahiro; Sumida, Tomonori; Tamura, Tadamasa; Sumii, Masaharu; Uraoka, Naohiro; Shimamoto, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to a nearby hospital with high fever and anorexia. An abdominal tumor was detected, and he was referred to our hospital. A pancreatic tumor was detected by computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography. He had high fever, leukocytosis, and high serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a tumor biopsy and histological examination revealed anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Based on the diagnosis, we initiated chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus S-1. However, the tumor rapidly progressed and he deteriorated and died 123 days after admission. As immunohistochemical study showed positive staining for G-CSF in the tumor cell, we diagnosed the tumor producing G-CSF during autopsy. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas producing G-CSF is very rare, with 10 cases, including ours, reported in the literature.

  4. Effects of priming with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on conditioning regimen for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a multicenter randomized controlled study in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wen, Qin; Chen, Xinghua; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Li; Kong, Peiyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Li, Yunlong; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qingyu; Su, Yi; Wang, Chunsen; Wang, Sanbin; Zeng, Yun; Sun, Aihua; Du, Xin; Zeng, Dongfeng; Liu, Hong; Peng, Xiangui; Zhang, Xi

    2014-12-01

    HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) is an effective and immediate treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (HR-AML) patients lacking matched donors. Relapse remains the leading cause of death for HR-AML patients after haplo-HSCT. Accordingly, the prevention of relapse remains a challenge in the treatment of HR-AML. In a multicenter randomized controlled trial in southwestern China, 178 HR-AML patients received haplo-HSCT with conditioning regimens involving recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) or non-rhG-CSF. The cumulative incidences of relapse and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), 2-year leukemia-free survival (LFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. HR-AML patients who underwent the priming conditioning regimen with rhG-CSF had a lower relapse rate than those who were treated with non-rhG-CSF (38.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 28.1% to 48.3% versus 60.7%, 95% CI, 50.5% to 70.8%; P < .01). The cumulative incidences of acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, transplantation-related toxicity, and infectious complications appeared to be equivalent. In total, 53 patients in the rhG-CSF-priming group and 31 patients in the non-rhG-CSF-priming group were still alive at the median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 24 to 80 months). The 2-year probabilities of LFS and OS in the rhG-CSF-priming and non-rhG-CSF-priming groups were 55.1% (95% CI, 44.7% to 65.4%) versus 32.6% (95% CI, 22.8% to 42.3%) (P < .01) and 59.6% (95% CI, 49.4% to 69.7%) versus 34.8% (95% CI, 24.9% to 44.7%) (P < .01), respectively. Multivariate analyses indicated that the 2-year probability of LFS of patients who achieved complete remission (CR) before transplantation was better than that of patients who did not achieve CR. The 2-year probability of LFS of patients with no M4/M5/M6 subtype was better than that of patients with the M4/M5/M6 subtype in the G-CSF-priming group (67.4%; 95% CI, 53.8% to 80.9% versus 41.9%; 95% CI, 27

  5. Endothelin receptor B protects granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA from degradation.

    PubMed

    Jungck, David; Knobloch, Jürgen; Körber, Sandra; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Yanik, Sarah; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is lacking on the differential effects of the two therapeutic concepts of endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs): the blockade of only the endothelin receptor A (ETAR; selective antagonism) versus both ETAR and endothelin receptor B (ETBR; dual blockade). Ambrisentan, a selective ERA, and bosentan, a dual blocker, are both available for therapy. We hypothesized that there are differences in the potential of ERAs to ameliorate inflammatory processes in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and aimed to unravel underlying mechanisms. We used HASMC culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced transcription and expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 3 (CXCL3), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) in HASMCs. In concentration-response experiments, bosentan led to a significantly greater reduction of GM-CSF and MMP12 protein release than ambrisentan, whereas there was no significant difference in their effect on GM-CSF and MMP12 mRNA. Both ERAs reduced CXCL3 protein and mRNA equally but had no effect on CXCL2. Blocking mitogen-activated protein kinases revealed that both ETAR and ETBR signal through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but ETBR also signals through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 to induce GM-CSF expression. In the presence of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, bosentan, but not ambrisentan, reduced GM-CSF but not MMP12 or CXCL3 mRNA. In conclusion, blockade of each endothelin receptor subtype reduces GM-CSF transcription, but blocking ETBR additionally protects GM-CSF mRNA from degradation via ERK-1/2. Accordingly, blocking both ETAR and ETBR leads to a stronger reduction of TNFα-induced GM-CSF protein expression. This mechanism might be specific to GM-CSF. Our data stress the anti-inflammatory potential

  6. Regulation of Wound Healing by Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor after Vocal Fold Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-Yol; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Songyi; Jang, Yun Ho; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Young-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Vocal fold (VF) scarring remains a therapeutic challenge. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) facilitates epithelial wound healing, and recently, growth factor therapy has been applied to promote tissue repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of GM-CSF on VF wound healing in vivo and in vitro. Methods VF scarring was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by direct injury. Immediately thereafter, either GM-CSF or PBS was injected into the VFs of rabbits. Endoscopic, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical evaluations of VFs were performed at 3 months post-injury. Human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFFs) were cultured with GM-CSF. Production of type I and III collagen was examined immunocytochemically, and the synthesis of elastin and hyaluronic acids was evaluated by ELISA. The mRNA levels of genes related to ECM components and ECM production-related growth factors, such as HGF and TGF-ß1, were examined by real time RT-PCR. Results The GM-CSF-treated VFs showed reduced collagen deposition in comparison to the PBS-injected controls (P<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining revealed lower amounts of type I collagen and fibronectin in the GM-CSF-treated VFs (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Viscous and elastic shear moduli of VF samples were significantly lower in the GM-CSF group than in the PBS-injected group (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). Mucosal waves in the GM-CSF group showed significant improvement when compared to the PBS group (P = 0.0446). GM-CSF inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by hVFFs (P<0.05) and the production of hyaluronic acids increased at 72 hours post-treatment (P<0.05). The expressions of HAS-2, tropoelastin, MMP-1, HGF, and c-Met mRNA were significantly increased by GM-CSF, although at different time points (P<0.05). Conclusion The present study shows that GM-CSF offers therapeutic potential for the remodeling of VF wounds and the promotion of VF regeneration

  7. [The plasma levels and diagnostic utility of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with I and II stage of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ławicki, Sławomir; Czygier, Małgorzata; Wojtukiewicz, Marek; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) belong to hematopoetic growth factors (HGFs). Few clinical investigation have shown their autologous production both in vitro by human cell lines and in vivo by tumors, for example in breast cancer. We have investigated the plasma levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and commonly accepted tumor marker (CA 15-3) before treatment of breast cancer patients in relation to the healthy controls. Additionally, the diagnostic criteria: sensitivity, specificity, the predictive value of positive and negative results were defined. Tested group--50 patients with breast cancer, control group--30 healthy women. G-CSF and GM-CSF were determined using ELISA method, CA 15-3--was measured by chemilumunescence immunoassay (CMIA) (ABBOTT). Median values of G-CSF, GM-CSF and CA 15-3 plasma levels were significantly higher in the II stage of breast cancer patients before surgery compared to the control group. The diagnostic sensitivity of G-CSF and GM-CSF was slightly lower than CA 15-3. The higher range of the diagnostic sensitivity of tested cytokines and CA 15-3 in more advanced breast stages was observed. The combined use of both cytokines and CA 15-3 analysis resulted also in the increased sensitivity range (69%). The diagnostic specificities of tested cytokines were high for both cytokines (equal 90%) and CA 15-3 (95%). The positive and negative predictive values were high for all tested parameters and were higher in more advanced tumor stage. This study suggests that tested cytokines, especially G-CSF, can be clinically useful in diagnostics of breast cancer patients, but further investigation and confirmation by a prospective study are necessary.

  8. Plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in critical illness including sepsis and septic shock: relation to disease severity, multiple organ dysfunction, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Presneill, J J; Waring, P M; Layton, J E; Maher, D W; Cebon, J; Harley, N S; Wilson, J W; Cade, J F

    2000-07-01

    To define the circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) during critical illness and to determine their relationship to the severity of illness as measured by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, the development of multiple organ dysfunction, or mortality. Prospective cohort study. University hospital intensive care unit. A total of 82 critically ill adult patients in four clinically defined groups, namely septic shock (n = 29), sepsis without shock (n = 17), shock without sepsis (n = 22), and nonseptic, nonshock controls (n = 14). None. During day 1 of septic shock, peak plasma levels of G-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), but not GM-CSF, were greater than in sepsis or shock alone (p < .001), and were correlated among themselves (rs = 0.44-0.77; p < .02) and with the APACHE II score (rs = 0.25-0.40; p = .03 to .18). G-CSF, IL-6, and UF, and sepsis, shock, septic shock, and APACHE II scores were strongly associated with organ dysfunction or 5-day mortality by univariate analysis. However, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only septic shock remained significantly associated with organ dysfunction and only APACHE II scores and shock with 5-day mortality. Similarly, peak G-CSF, IL-6, and LIF were poorly predictive of 30-day mortality. Plasma levels of G-CSF, IL-6, and LIF are greatly elevated in critical illness, including septic shock, and are correlated with one another and with the severity of illness. However, they are not independently predictive of mortality, or the development of multiple organ dysfunction. GM-CSF was rarely elevated, suggesting different roles for G-CSF and GM-CSF in human septic shock.

  9. Survival enhancement and hemopoietic regeneration following radiation exposure: therapeutic approach using glucan and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to whole-body cobalt-60 radiation and administered soluble glucan (5 mg i.v. at 1 h following exposure), recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or both agents. Treatments were evaluated for their ability to enhance hemopoietic regeneration, and to increase survival after radiation-induced myelosuppression. Both glucan and G-CSF enhanced hemopoietic regeneration alone; however, greater effects were observed in mice receiving both agents. For example, on day 17 following a sublethal 6.5-Gy radiation exposure, mice treated with saline, G-CSF, glucan, or both agents, respectively, exhibited 36%, 65%, 50%, and 78% of normal bone marrow cellularity, and 84%, 175%, 152%, and 212% of normal splenic cellularity.

  10. Enhanced activation of B cells in a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell graft.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, H; Lapierre, V; Saas, P; Lienard, A; Sutton, L; Milpied, N; Attal, M; Cahn, J Y; Kuentz, M; Blaise, D; Hervé, P; Tiberghien, P; Robinet, E

    2001-09-01

    In a randomized study that compared human leucocyte antigen-identical allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) versus bone marrow (BM) transplantation, the expression of activation markers, CD23, CD25 and CD45RO by B cells, was compared in blood before and after G-CSF mobilization and in PBSC versus BM grafts. The fractions of CD23+ and CD25+ B cells were higher in PBSC than in BM grafts. Moreover, we observed a G-CSF-induced increase in B-cell fractions in blood as well as in PBSC grafts when compared with BM grafts. Such an enhanced B-cell activation could contribute to the accelerated kinetics of immuno-haematological reconstitution, the occurrence of acute haemolysis in the ABO minor incompatibility setting, as well as the increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease observed after PBSC transplantation.

  11. Sulfasalazine-induced DRESS and severe agranulocytosis successfully treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Rached, Salaheddine; Hachfi, Wissem; Letaief, Amel; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2015-08-01

    A drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) is a severe and rare adverse-drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The evolution of DRESS is unpredictable and haematological abnormalities may occur in 50 % of cases. Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is rarely associated with DRESS. Agranulocytosis is a rare but recognized side-effect to SSZ. Both DRESS and agranulocytosis were not reported previously with SSZ. We report a case of SSZ-induced DRESS followed by severe agranulocytosis occurring in a 25-year-old man. The patient's general condition and laboratory tests gradually improved after the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF). In our patient, the co-occurrence of DRESS and agranulocytosis is unlikely to be coincidental. Immunological mechanisms may play an important role in drug associated agranulocytosis in patients presenting DRESS. According to the Naranjo's algorithm the likelihood that our patient's DRESS and agranulocytosis occurred as a result of therapy with SSZ is probable. G-CSF was found to be useful in shortening the duration of granulocyte recovery in drug-induced agranulocytosis. Careful monitoring of neutrophil counts is required on SSZ therapy as well as in the course of DRESS.

  12. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production and Tissue Eosinophilia in Chronic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Peric, Aleksandar; Spadijer-Mirkovic, Cveta; Matkovic-Jozin, Svjetlana; Jovancevic, Ljiljana; Vojvodic, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a strong proinflammatory cytokine that takes part in allergic nasal inflammation as an eosinophil colony-stimulating factor. However, the role of GM-CSF in non-allergic rhinitis has not been fully explored. Objectives The aim of this investigation was to assess the concentration of GM-CSF in nasal secretions of patients with non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome (NARES) in comparison to patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) and healthy subjects, as well as to assess the relationship with the degree of eosinophilic inflammation and clinical characteristics of the patients. Methods Fourteen patients with diagnosis of NARES, 14 PAR patients, and 14 healthy subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. All patients underwent symptom score assessment, nasal endoscopy, allergy testing, and cytological evaluation. The concentration of GM-CSF in nasal secretions of all participants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results We found significantly higher levels of GM-CSF in patients with NARES than in the control group (p = 0.035). The percent of eosinophils in nasal mucosa was higher in NARES patients in comparison to patients with PAR (p < 0.001) and control patients (p < 0.0001). We found positive correlations between GM-CSF levels and eosinophil counts only in NARES patients. Conclusion The concentrations of GM-CSF in nasal secretions correlate well with eosinophil counts in the nasal mucosa of NARES patients. These facts indicate a possible role of GM-CSF as a favorable marker for assessment of nasal disease severity and the degree of chronic eosinophilic inflammation in the nasal mucosa. PMID:27746841

  13. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor Producing Anaplastic Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Vinzens, Sarah; Zindel, Joel; Zweifel, Martin; Rau, Tilman; Gloor, Beat; Wochner, Annette

    2017-01-01

    We report on the case of a 67-year-old man with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas. Preoperative routine tests revealed an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count of 25.2 G/l, consisting almost exclusively of neutrophilic granulocytes (23.31 G/l) with a predominance of segmented neutrophils (78% of all neutrophilic granulocytes), and elevated levels of C-reactive protein at 87 mg/l. Upon surgery, local tumour infiltration was more extensive than expected from preoperative imaging. However, no peritoneal dissemination was found and curative resection was attempted. Only seven days after the operation, signs of relapse were seen upon computed tomograpy. Histology revealed an undifferentiated anaplastic carcinoma, on the basis of a poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated G-CSF and G-CSF-Receptor expression in some CD68-positive syncytial macrophages. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in serum was elevated at 5.6 pg/ml, which further raised to 43 pg/ml one week after FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy (oxaliplatin, irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil), while WBC decreased from 103.3 G/l to 59.3 G/l. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in serum was normal (<0.5 pg/ml). The patient died on postoperative day 34.

  14. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, sargramostim) administered for 3 years as adjuvant therapy of stages II(T4), III, and IV melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Lynn E; Weber, Robert W; Allen, Robert E; Meyer, John; Cruickshank, Scott; Garbe, Edeltraut; Lin, Hui-Yi; Soong, Seng-jaw

    2009-01-01

    A hypothesis generating study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of prolonged (3 y) administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, sargramostim) as surgical adjuvant therapy in patients with melanoma at high risk of recurrence. Ninety-eight evaluable patients with stages II(T4), III, or IV melanoma were given prolonged treatment with GM-CSF after surgical resection of disease. The GM-CSF was administered subcutaneously in 28-day cycles, such that a dose of 125 microg/m2 was delivered daily for 14 days followed by 14 days rest. Treatment cycles continued for 3 years or until disease recurrence, which could not be surgically excised. Patients were evaluated for toxicity, disease-free survival, and melanoma-specific survival. Prolonged administration of GM-CSF was well tolerated; grade 1 or 2 side effects occurred in 82% of the patients. There were no grade 3 or 4 treatment-related side effects. Two patients developed acute myelogenous leukemia after completion of 3 years of GM-CSF administration. With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the median melanoma-specific survival has not yet been reached. The 5-year melanoma-specific survival rate was 60%. The current study has expanded the preliminary evidence on GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy of patients with melanoma who are at high risk for recurrence.

  15. Stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis method for the assessment of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its correlation with reversed-phase liquid chromatography method and bioassay.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Sergio Luiz; Butzge, Cairo dos Santos; Machado, Francine Trevisan; Walter, Maurício Elesbão; Dalmora, Maria Elisabeth de Ávila; Souto, Ricardo Bizogne

    2012-05-30

    A stability-indicating capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was validated for the analysis of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using leuprorelin acetate (LA), as internal standard (IS). A fused-silica capillary (75 μm i.d.; effective length, 72 cm) was used at 25 °C; the applied voltage was 12 kV. The background electrolyte solution consisted of 50mM di-sodium hydrogen phosphate solution at pH 8.8. Injections were performed using a pressure mode at 50 mbar for 9s, with detection by photodiode array detector set at 200 nm. Specificity and stability-indicating capability were established in degradation studies, which also showed that there was no interference of the excipients. The method was linear over the concentration range of 2.5-200 μg mL(-1) (r(2)=0.9995) and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.79 μg mL(-1) and 2.5 μg mL(-1), respectively. The accuracy was 99.14% with bias lower than 1.40%. The method was applied to the quantitative analysis of biopharmaceutical formulations, and the results were correlated to those of a validated reversed-phase LC method (RP-LC), and an in vitro bioassay, showing non-significant differences (p>0.05).

  16. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Chen, Lei; Shu, Bin; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular hyperpermeability followed by burn injury is the main cause of shock, and cardiovascular collapse can result if the condition is treated improperly. Our previous studies demonstrated that granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) clearly reduces microvascular permeability and protects microvessels against burn injury. However, the mechanism underlying the protective function of GM-CSF on burn-injured microvessels remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect and mechanism of GM-CSF on endothelial cells after exposure to burn serum. We demonstrated that GM-CSF reduced post-burn endothelial "capillary leak" by inhibiting the activity of RhoA and maintaining the membrane localization of VE-cadherin. Membranous VE-cadherin enhances adherens junctions between endothelial cells and co-localizes with and activates VEGFR2, which protect cells from burn serum-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the protective mechanism of GM-CSF on burn serum-injured endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability is achieved by strengthening cell adherens junctions and improving cell viability.

  17. Adjunctive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for treatment of septic shock due to melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Stephens, Dianne P; Anstey, Nicholas M; Currie, Bart J

    2004-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Risk factors for this infection have also been associated with functional neutrophil defects. Because of this, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was adopted for use in patients with septic shock due to melioidosis in December 1998. We compared the mortality rates from before and after the introduction of G-CSF therapy at the Royal Darwin Hospital (Darwin, Australia) during the period of 1989-2002. The mortality rate decreased from 95% to 10% after the introduction of G-CSF. Risk factors, the duration of illness before presentation, and the severity of illness were similar in both groups. A smaller decrease in mortality among patients in the intensive care unit who did not have melioidosis was observed, suggesting that other changes in management did not account for the magnitude of the benefit seen. We conclude that G-CSF may have contributed to the reduction in the mortality rate among patients with septic shock due to melioidosis.

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases the platelet volume in peripheral stem cell apheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Akihiro; Matsui, Keiko; Minami, Ryouta; Uchida, Shuzou; Ueda, Shuji; Nishiura, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the short-term influence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration on platelet counts and platelet indices in 12 donors (8 males and 4 females; median age 34 years, range 16-49) for peripheral stem cell transplantation using an automated blood cell analyzer. On day 3 (D3) compared with D0, 11 donors with normal laboratory and physical findings showed increases in platelet indices (chi(2) = 12.0, p = 0.0025). Furthermore, mean platelet volume (MPV) was significantly increased (p = 0.04). Also, platelet count decreased, and platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio were increased, but these were not significant. On the contrary, 1 donor with abnormal laboratory findings who had large platelets (MPV 11.4 fl) before G-CSF administration showed decreases in platelet indices (MPV 10.3 fl) on D3, although platelet count (18.2 x 10(4)/microl) decreased after G-CSF administration. G-CSF administration induces an inflammatory process with endothelial cell activation. This is probably the reason why platelet volume increases after G-CSF use. This is the first report showing that G-CSF administration immediately induces increases in large platelets in peripheral stem cell transplant donors before harvest.

  19. Biosimilar granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor for healthy donor stem cell mobilization: need we be afraid?

    PubMed

    Bonig, Halvard; Becker, Petra S; Schwebig, Arnd; Turner, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Biosimilars are approved biologics with comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to a reference product. Unlike generics, which are chemically manufactured copies of small-molecule drugs with relatively simple chemical structures, the biosimilar designation is applied to drugs that are produced by living organisms, implying much more difficult to control manufacturing and purification procedures. To account for these complexities, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the US Food and Drug Administration, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration, and other regulatory authorities have devised and implemented specific, markedly more demanding pathways for the evaluation and approval of biosimilars. To date, several biosimilars have been approved, including versions of somatropin, erythropoietin, and granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and several biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are currently in development. The reference G-CSF product (Neupogen, Amgen) has been used for many years for prevention and treatment of neutropenia and also for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). However, concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of biosimilar G-CSF during PBSC mobilization procedures, especially in healthy donors. This article reviews the available evidence on the use of biosimilar G-CSF in this setting. Aggregate clinical evidence supports the assessment by the EMA of biosimilar and originator G-CSF as highly biologically similar, with respect to desired and undesired effects.

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor ameliorates irradiation-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Jang, Hyosun; Oui, Heejin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Seung-Sook; Moon, Changjong

    2010-12-03

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-csf) is a member of the hematopoietic growth factor family and demonstrates neuroprotective functions in neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluated the radioprotective effects of G-csf in the suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice undergoing irradiation. The radioprotective effects were assessed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, including the proliferating cell marker Ki-67 and the immature progenitor neuron marker doublecortin (DCX). Acute exposure to cranial irradiation (5Gy γ-rays) induced neural apoptosis and inhibited neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment with G-csf (100μg/kg every 12h subcutaneously on three consecutive days) attenuated neural apoptosis and decreased the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in the DG of the irradiated mouse hippocampus. Therefore, G-csf inhibited the detrimental effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that G-csf administration has potential therapeutic utility in brain irradiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on neutrophil function in idiopathic bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Ruchaud-Sparagano, Marie-Hélène; Gertig, Helen; Hester, Katy L M; Macfarlane, James G; Corris, Paul A; Simpson, A John; De Soyza, Anthony

    2013-11-01

    Neutrophils are consistently found in inflamed and infected airways in idiopathic bronchiectasis, but relatively little is known about the function of blood neutrophils in this condition. We hypothesized that peripheral blood neutrophil (PBN) phagocytosis and superoxide generation are impaired in bronchiectasis, and that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is capable of improving neutrophil function. Neutrophils were isolated from the peripheral blood of patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis who were free of exacerbation, and from healthy controls of similar age (n = 21 in both groups). Ingestion of serum-opsonized zymosan by neutrophils was used to quantify phagocytic capacity. Superoxide generation in neutrophils was measured in response to addition of platelet activating factor and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Experiments were performed in the presence or absence of GM-CSF. No differences were observed in either phagocytic capacity (P = 0.99) or superoxide generation (P = 0.81) when comparing patients and controls. However, a significant increase in phagocytic capacity above baseline levels in both patients (P < 0.005) and controls (P < 0.005) was induced by GM-CSF. Similarly, the superoxide generation in patients (P < 0.005) and controls (P = 0.001) was significantly increased by GM-CSF. PBN function was preserved in idiopathic bronchiectasis. Enhancement of neutrophil phagocytosis and superoxide generation by GM-CSF requires further study. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S; Crocker, Paul R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-07-21

    The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is neuroprotective in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie J; Semple, Bridgette D; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-05-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF(-/-) mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF(-/-) mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted.

  4. Local delivery of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor protects mice from lethal pneumococcal pneumonia1

    PubMed Central

    Steinwede, Kathrin; Tempelhof, Ole; Bolte, Kristine; Maus, Regina; Bohling, Jennifer; Ueberberg, Bianca; Länger, Florian; Christman, John W.; Paton, James C.; Ask, Kjetil; Maharaj, Shyam; Kolb, Martin; Gauldie, Jack; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A.

    2013-01-01

    The growth factor granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has an important role in pulmonary surfactant metabolism and the regulation of antibacterial activities of lung sentinel cells. However, the potential of intra-alveolar GM-CSF to augment lung protective immunity against inhaled bacterial pathogens has not been defined in preclinical infection models. We hypothesized that transient overexpression of GM-CSF in the lungs of mice by adenoviral gene transfer (Ad-GM-CSF) would protect mice from subsequent lethal pneumococcal pneumonia. Our data show that intra-alveolar delivery of Ad-GM-CSF led to sustained increased pSTAT5 expression and PU.1 protein expression in alveolar macrophages during a 28 day observation period. Pulmonary Ad-GM-CSF delivery two or four weeks prior to infection of mice with S. pneumoniae significantly reduced mortality rates relative to control vector treated mice. This increased survival was accompanied by increased iNOS expression, antibacterial activity and a significant reduction in caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and secondary necrosis of lung sentinel cells. Importantly, therapeutic treatment of mice with recombinant GM-CSF improved lung protective immunity and accelerated bacterial clearance after pneumococcal challenge. We conclude that prophylactic delivery of GM-CSF triggers long-lasting immunostimulatory effects in the lung in vivo and rescues mice from lethal pneumococcal pneumonia by improving antibacterial immunity. These data support use of novel antibiotic-independent immunostimulatory therapies to protect patients against bacterial pneumonias. PMID:22003204

  5. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Bo-Kyung; Sawaki, Daigo; Tomida, Shota; Fujita, Daishi; Aizawa, Kenichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Akishita, Masahiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Komuro, Issei; Friedman, Scott L; Nagai, Ryozo; Suzuki, Toru

    2015-04-29

    Aortic dissection and intramural haematoma comprise an aortopathy involving separation of the aortic wall. Underlying mechanisms of the condition remain unclear. Here we show that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a triggering molecule for this condition. Transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6)-myeloid-specific conditional deficient mice exhibit this aortic phenotype when subjected to aortic inflammation. Mechanistically, KLF6 downregulates expression and secretion of GM-CSF. Administration of neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF prevents the condition in these mice. Conversely, administration of GM-CSF in combination with aortic inflammation to wild-type mice is sufficient to induce the phenotype, suggesting the general nature of effects. Moreover, patients with this condition show highly increased circulating levels of GM-CSF, which is also locally expressed in the dissected aorta. GM-CSF is therefore a key regulatory molecule causative of this aortopathy, and modulation of this cytokine might be an exploitable treatment strategy for the condition.

  6. Neuroprotection of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Tzung; Chu, Sung-Chao; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Hou, Ting-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Shin-Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease. Both medical and surgical choices provide symptomatic treatment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a conventional treatment for hematological diseases, has demonstrated its effectiveness in acute and chronic neurological diseases through its anti-inflammatory and antiapoptosis mechanisms. Based on previous in vitro and in vivo studies, we administered a lower dose (3.3 μg/kg) G-CSF injection for 5 days and six courses for 1 year in early-stage PD patients as a phase I trial. The four PD patient's mean unified PD rating scale motor scores in medication off status remained stable from 23 before the first G-CSF injection to 22 during the 2-year follow-up. 3,4-Dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (18F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) studies also revealed an annual 3.5% decrease in radiotracer uptake over the caudate nucleus and 7% in the putamen, both slower than those of previous reports of PD. Adverse effects included transient muscular-skeletal pain, nausea, vomiting, and elevated liver enzymes. Based on this preliminary report, G-CSF seems to alleviate disease deterioration for early stage PD patients. The effectiveness of G-CSF was possibly due to its amelioration of progressive dopaminergic neuron degeneration.

  7. The use of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in volunteer unrelated hemopoietic stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Pamphilon, Derwood; Nacheva, Elisabeth; Navarrete, Cristina; Madrigal, Alejandro; Goldman, John

    2008-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for the mobilization of hemopoietic stem cells in healthy donors. It has a number of common side effects such as bone pain, which resolve rapidly after administration is discontinued. Recent publications have raised concern that it might act as a trigger for the development of hematologic malignancy in susceptible individuals, possibly by causing genomic instability, but to date there is no evidence that healthy volunteer donors who receive G-CSF are at any increased risk. Ongoing studies aim to confirm whether or not G-CSF can cause chromosomal abnormalities in healthy donors. In the UK, the British Bone Marrow Registry and Anthony Nolan Trust give G-CSF to donors who have agreed to donate peripheral blood stem cells. It is recommended by the UK Registries at present that all stem cell donors are given updated information explaining the current uncertainties with regard to the use of G-CSF before they give informed consent to its administration. This information is based on a statement agreed by the World Marrow Donor Association for use by individual donor registries. Further, it is our current practice that all donors who have received G-CSF, as well as marrow donors who do not, should be under regular review for at least 10 years to allow the occurrence of any long-term adverse events to be documented.

  8. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  9. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xin L.; Wright, David K.; Liu, Shijie J.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C.; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF-/-) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF-/- mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF-/- mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted. PMID:24392832

  10. Prophylactic use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor after consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Mazyar; Estey, Elihu H

    2013-04-01

    Prophylactic use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor after chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia patients has become part of the supportive care strategy in some institutions. Despite shortening the neutropenia period and lowering the hospitalization rate, randomized studies have not shown any improvement in the clinical outcomes with this intervention. In their single-institution retrospective study, Bradley et al. reported that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration following consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine is associated with decreased hospitalization rate and improved survival. This finding is not consistent with the prior knowledge from the randomized studies. Herein, we review some of the explanations for the findings and re-emphasize the limitations of nonrandomized studies in assessing acute myeloid leukemia outcomes, as appreciated by the authors.

  11. Targeting granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in epithelial and vascular remodeling in experimental eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    McNamee, E N; Biette, K A; Hammer, J; Harris, R; Miyazawa, H; Lee, J J; Furuta, G T; Masterson, J C

    2017-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen-mediated clinicopathologic disease of the esophagus characterized by an eosinophil-predominant inflammatory infiltrate. A clinical hallmark is extensive tissue remodeling including basal zone hyperplasia, fibrosis, and angiogenesis. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for these processes are not fully defined. We hypothesized that targeting granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; an agonist cytokine linked with eosinophil survival and activation) would be protective in a preclinical model of EoE. Eosinophilic esophagitis-like esophageal inflammation was induced in the L2-IL5(OXA) EoE mouse model, and GM-CSF production was assessed by mRNA and protein analyses. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-receptor-alpha expression patterns were examined by flow cytometric and immunofluorescence analysis. L2-IL5(OXA) EoE mice were treated with anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibody or isotype control and assessed for histopathological indices of eosinophilia, epithelial hyperplasia, and angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of esophageal GM-CSF expression was detected in the L2-IL5(OXA) mouse EoE model during active inflammation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-receptor-alpha was predominantly expressed on esophageal eosinophils during EoE, in addition to select cells within the lamina propria. Anti-GM-CSF neutralization in L2-IL5(OXA) EoE mice resulted in a significant diminution of epithelial eosinophilia in addition to basal cell hyperplasia and vascular remodeling. This treatment response was independent of effects on esophageal eosinophil maturation or activation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is a potential therapeutic target to reduce esophageal eosinophilia and remodeling. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Production of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) during infection: separate determinations of macrophage-, granulocyte-, granulocyte-macrophage-, and multi-CSFs.

    PubMed Central

    Cheers, C; Haigh, A M; Kelso, A; Metcalf, D; Stanley, E R; Young, A M

    1988-01-01

    After infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes, elevated levels of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) in the serum were quantitated by six different assays: ability to stimulate colony formation, the proliferation of 2 suspension of bone marrow cells (both measuring total colony-stimulating activity), a radioimmunoassay for macrophage-CSF (CSF-1), the WEHI-3B differentiation assay for granulocyte-CSF, and proliferation of 32D-c1-3 and FDC-P1 cell lines (specific for multi-CSF and either multi- or granulocyte-macrophage-CSFs, respectively). The great bulk of serum colony-stimulating activity represented macrophage- and granulocyte-CSFs, with small but measurable amounts of granulocyte-macrophage-CSF. The degree of elevation of serum CSF depended on the infecting dose used and the numbers of bacteria growing in the spleens and livers of the two mouse strains compared, i.e., L. monocytogenes-resistant C57BL/10 and susceptible BALB/cJ. The increase in serum CSFs occurred before the peak in bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors and before the reduction in bacterial numbers which follows the onset of specific cell-mediated immunity. PMID:3257205

  13. Expression of CD163 prevents apoptosis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Hiromi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Lei; Yuzawa, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Masumi; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Background CD163 is a 130-kDa transmembrane protein expressed in human monocytes and macrophages, and the aberrant expression of CD163 in breast and colorectal cancer associated with patients' poor prognosis was reported. Here, we analyzed the expression of CD163 in meningioma, a common intracranial tumor, and its molecular mechanism in association with meningioma progression. Methods First, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using 50 human meningioma specimens. Next, we established CD163-overexpressing human meningioma cell lines and investigated its roles in tumor progression in vitro and in vivo. Results Immunohistochemically, 26 of 50 human meningioma specimens (52.0%) were positive for CD163 in tumor cells, including benign grade I (48.5%) and grade II (71.4%) cases. Furthermore, CD163 expression was correlated with histological atypical parameters that directly predict the prognosis of meningioma. CD163-overexpressing meningioma cells showed significant suppression of apoptosis and accelerated tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, unexpected splenomegaly affiliated with the xenograft predicted tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production, which was confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates CD163 expression in meningioma not only by immunohistochemistry but also by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, using primary culture cells, and provides the novel molecular function of CD163 to prevent apoptosis through the production of G-CSF in meningioma. PMID:23539121

  14. Expression of CD163 prevents apoptosis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hiromi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Lei; Yuzawa, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Masumi; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-07-01

    CD163 is a 130-kDa transmembrane protein expressed in human monocytes and macrophages, and the aberrant expression of CD163 in breast and colorectal cancer associated with patients' poor prognosis was reported. Here, we analyzed the expression of CD163 in meningioma, a common intracranial tumor, and its molecular mechanism in association with meningioma progression. First, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using 50 human meningioma specimens. Next, we established CD163-overexpressing human meningioma cell lines and investigated its roles in tumor progression in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemically, 26 of 50 human meningioma specimens (52.0%) were positive for CD163 in tumor cells, including benign grade I (48.5%) and grade II (71.4%) cases. Furthermore, CD163 expression was correlated with histological atypical parameters that directly predict the prognosis of meningioma. CD163-overexpressing meningioma cells showed significant suppression of apoptosis and accelerated tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, unexpected splenomegaly affiliated with the xenograft predicted tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production, which was confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates CD163 expression in meningioma not only by immunohistochemistry but also by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, using primary culture cells, and provides the novel molecular function of CD163 to prevent apoptosis through the production of G-CSF in meningioma.

  15. Effect of thrombopoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Schattner, M; Pozner, R G; Gorostizaga, A B; Lazzari, M A

    2000-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be administered together in aplastic patients. We evaluated the effect of both cytokines alone or combined on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional responses. TPO, G-CSF, or the combination of both cytokines, induced neither platelet nor PMN activation. TPO but not G-CSF synergized with threshold ADP concentrations to induce maximal aggregation and ATP release. The synergistic effect of TPO with ADP was not modified by the presence of G-CSF. Flow cytometry studies have shown that thrombin-induced loss of GPIb from platelet surface was significantly increased by pretreatment of platelets with TPO, G-CSF, or both cytokines. P-selectin expression induced by thrombin was augmented by TPO, but not by G-CSF. Coincubation of the cells with TPO and G-CSF did not modify the values obtained with TPO alone. Expression of CD11b on PMN surface was augmented by G-CSF or fMLP. G-CSF-treated PMN increased the effect of fMLP on CD11b expression. TPO did not modify either basal levels of CD11b or the increased expression induced by G-CSF or fMLP. Incubation of PMN with both cytokines showed no differences compared to G-CSF alone. Platelet-PMN aggregates induced by thrombin in whole blood were augmented by TPO. G-CSF alone neither synergized with thrombin nor changed the results observed with TPO. These data show that in vitro functional responses of platelets, or PMN induced by TPO or G-CSF alone, were neither further increased nor inhibited by treatment of the cells with both cytokines.

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure.

  17. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during pregnancy in women with chronic neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Boxer, Laurence A; Bolyard, Audrey Anna; Kelley, Merideth L; Marrero, Tracy M; Phan, Lan; Bond, Jordan M; Newburger, Peter E; Dale, David C

    2015-01-01

    To report outcomes associated with the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to women with chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. We conducted an observational study of women of childbearing potential with congenital, cyclic, idiopathic, or autoimmune neutropenia enrolled in the Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry to determine outcomes of pregnancies, without and with chronic G-CSF therapy, 1999-2014. Treatment decisions were made by the patients' personal physicians. A research nurse conducted telephone interviews of all enrolled U.S. women of childbearing potential using a standard questionnaire. Comparisons used Fisher's exact test analysis and Student's t test. One hundred seven women reported 224 pregnancies, 124 without G-CSF therapy and 100 on chronic G-CSF therapy (median dose 1.0 micrograms/kg per day, range 0.02-8.6 micrograms/kg per day). There were no significant differences in adverse events between the groups considering all pregnancies or individual mothers, for example, spontaneous terminations (all pregnancies: no G-CSF in 27/124, G-CSF in 13/100; P=.11, Fisher's exact test), preterm labors (all pregnancies, no G-CSF in 9/124, G-CSF in 2/100, P=.12). A study with at least 300 per group would be needed to detect a difference in these events with 80% statistical power (α=0.05). Four newborns of mothers with idiopathic or autoimmune neutropenia not on G-CSF (4/101) had life-threatening infections, whereas there were no similar events (0/90) in the treated group, but this difference was also not statistically significant (P=.124). Adverse events in the neonates were similar for the two groups. This observational study showed no significant adverse effects of administration of G-CSF to women with severe chronic neutropenia during pregnancy. III.

  18. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor auto-antibodies and disease relapse in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan; Bonkowski, Erin; Chalk, Claudia; Trapnell, Bruce C; Langhorst, Jost; Denson, Lee A; Foell, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Along with others, we have reported that neutralization of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation, and reduces neutrophil bacterial killing and anti-microbial seroreactivity. The objective was to investigate the utility of serum GM-CSF auto-antibody (Ab) as a marker for confirmation of stable remission and prediction of relapses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We consecutively included 181 adults and children with Crohn's disease (CD, n=61) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n=120). Over a 3-year period, we collected 861 serum samples and 610 stool samples during regular follow-up visits. GM-CSF Abs and fecal S100 proteins were measured by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Serum GM-CSF Ab levels correlated with disease activity, location, and extent. Time course analysis before and after relapse showed a clear increase of GM-CSF Ab concentrations up to 6 months before clinical relapse. At 1.7 μg/ml (CD) and 0.5 μg/ml (UC), the sensitivity and specificity of GM-CSF Ab for predicting relapse already 2-6 months earlier were 88% and 95% in CD and 62% and 68% in UC, respectively. A baseline GM-CSF Ab level of >1.7 μg/ml was significantly associated with relapse of CD within 18 months. As GM-CSF is required for myeloid cell antimicrobial functions and homeostatic responses to tissue injury, serum GM-CSF Ab levels might reflect the degree of bowel permeability and bacterial translocation. Therefore, GM-CSF Ab might identify IBD patients at risk of disease relapse at an early stage, which makes the test a potential tool for monitoring disease activity and optimizing therapy.

  19. Granulocyte macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) significantly enhances articular cartilage repair potential by microfracture.

    PubMed

    Truong, M-D; Choi, B H; Kim, Y J; Kim, M S; Min, B-H

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be used to increase the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in blood clots formed by microfracture arthroplasty (MFX) and whether it can improve the therapeutic outcome for cartilage repair. Thirty-six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) GM-CSF, (3) MFX, and (4) GM-CSF + MFX. GM-CSF was administrated intravenously (IV) at 10 μg/kg body weight 20 min before the MFX surgery. The repaired tissues were retrieved and examined by histological observation, quantitative assessment, and biochemical assays at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of MSCs was measured in the blood clots by the colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. The kinetic profile and distribution of GM-CSF in vivo was also evaluated by near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. In the histological observations and chemical assays examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the MFX after GM-CSF administration showed better cartilage repair than the one without GM-CSF. The CFU-F assay showed a significantly larger amount of MSCs present in the blood clots of the GM-CSF + MFX group than in the blood clots of the other groups. The blood concentration of GM-CSF peaked at 10 min and decreased back to almost the initial level after a couple of hours. GM-CSF was distributed in many organs including the bone marrow but was not observed clearly in the joint cavity. Intravenous administration of GM-CSF together with MFX could be a promising therapeutic protocol to enhance the repair of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor ameliorates DSS-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Sainathan, Satheesh K; Hanna, Eyad M; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K

    2008-01-01

    Sargramostim, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examined the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis, resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of proinflammatory genes including TNF-alpha and IL1-beta; the results were further confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1(-/-) mice, demonstrating activity-independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-beta administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c(+) pDC population.

  1. Current status of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the immunotherapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Howard L; Ruby, Carl E; Hughes, Tasha; Slingluff, Craig L

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, it was estimated that 9180 people in the United States would die from melanoma and that more than 76,000 new cases would be diagnosed. Surgical resection is effective for early-stage melanoma, but outcomes are poor for patients with advanced disease. Expression of tumor-associated antigens by melanoma cells makes the disease a promising candidate for immunotherapy. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a variety of effects on the immune system including activation of T cells and maturation of dendritic cells, as well as an ability to promote humoral and cell-mediated responses. Given its immunobiology, there has been interest in strategies incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical studies with GM-CSF have suggested that it has antitumor activity against melanoma and can enhance the activity of anti-melanoma vaccines. Numerous clinical studies have evaluated recombinant GM-CSF as a monotherapy, as adjuvant with or without cancer vaccines, or in combination with chemotherapy. Although there have been suggestions of clinical benefit in some studies, results have been inconsistent. More recently, novel approaches incorporating GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma have been evaluated. These have included oncolytic immunotherapy with the GM-CSF-expressing engineered herpes simplex virus talimogene laherparepvec and administration of GM-CSF in combination with ipilimumab, both of which have improved patient outcomes in phase 3 studies. This review describes the diverse body of preclinical and clinical evidence regarding use of GM-CSF in the treatment of melanoma.

  2. Interleukin 1 stimulates fibroblasts to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed Central

    Zucali, J R; Dinarello, C A; Oblon, D J; Gross, M A; Anderson, L; Weiner, R S

    1986-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity (GM-CSA) can be produced by a variety of normal cell types including mononuclear phagocytes, activated T lymphocytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Recent evidence shows that a major role of the monocyte-macrophage is the recruitment of environmental cells, i.e., fibroblasts, to produce GM-CSA. In this study we have identified interleukin 1 (IL-1) as a monokine that stimulates fibroblasts to produce and release GM-CSA and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Both purified human monocyte-derived IL-1 and human recombinant IL-1 (10(-10) M) can be substituted for monocyte-conditioned medium in stimulating fibroblast GM-CSA and PGE2 production. Both forms of IL-1 stimulate fibroblasts to produce GM-CSA and PGE2 in a dose-dependent fashion. The fibroblast-stimulating activity found in monocyte-conditioned medium was completely blocked by anti-IL-1. We conclude that monocytes produce IL-1, and that monocyte-derived IL-1 induces fibroblasts to produce GM-CSA and PGE2. PMID:3486886

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen embryo transfer program.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Pan, Ping; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Lin; Li, Yi; Yang, Dongzi

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen embryo transfer program. Among 59 infertile patients with thin endometrium (≤7 mm), 34 patients received uterine infusion of recombinant human G-CSF (100 μg/0.6 mL) on the day of ovulation or administration of progesterone or human chorionic gonadotropin, with 40 cycles defined as G-CSF group and 49 previous cycles as self-controlled group, and 25 patients refused, with 80 cycles defined as the control group. Higher proportion of induced cycles and lower proportion of natural cycles were observed in the G-CSF group, when compared to the self-controlled group or control group (P < .05). The cycle cancellation rate was, in descending order, 69.39% in self-controlled group, 48.75% in control group, and 17.50% in G-CSF group, with significant difference (P < .05). The implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer were similar in all the groups (P > .05). Our study fails to demonstrate that G-CSF has the potential to improve embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rate of the infertile women with thin endometrium.

  4. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Supplementation in Culture Media for Subfertile Women Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Technologies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Salamalekis, George; Creatsa, Maria; Vrachnis, Nikos; Glujovsky, Demián; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Chrelias, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine/growth factor produced by epithelial cells that exerts embryotrophic effects during the early stages of embryo development. We performed a systematic review, and six studies that were performed in humans undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) were located. We wanted to evaluate if embryo culture media supplementation with GM-CSF could improve success rates. As the type of studies and the outcome parameters investigated were heterogeneous, we decided not to perform a meta-analysis. Most of them had a trend favoring the supplementation with GM-CSF, when outcomes were measured in terms of increased percentage of good-quality embryos reaching the blastocyst stage, improved hatching initiation and number of cells in the blastocyst, and reduction of cell death. However, no statistically significant differences were found in implantation and pregnancy rates in all apart from one large multicenter trial, which reported favorable outcomes, in terms of implantation and live birth rates. We propose properly conducted and adequately powered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to further validate and extrapolate the current findings with the live birth rate to be the primary outcome measure. PMID:23509457

  5. Survival enhancement and hemopoietic regeneration following radiation exposure: Therapeutic approach using glucan and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Solberg, B.D.; Souza, L.M. )

    1990-10-01

    C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to whole-body cobalt-60 radiation and administered soluble glucan (5 mg i.v. at 1 h following exposure), recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; 2.5 micrograms/day s.c., days 3-12 following exposure), or both agents. Treatments were evaluated for their ability to enhance hemopoietic regeneration, and to increase survival after radiation-induced myelosuppression. Both glucan and G-CSF enhanced hemopoietic regeneration alone; however, greater effects were observed in mice receiving both agents. For example, on day 17 following a sublethal 6.5-Gy radiation exposure, mice treated with saline, G-CSF, glucan, or both agents, respectively, exhibited 36%, 65%, 50%, and 78% of normal bone marrow cellularity, and 84%, 175%, 152%, and 212% of normal splenic cellularity. At this same time, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) values in saline, G-CSF, glucan, or combination-treated mice, respectively, were 9%, 46%, 26%, and 57% of normal bone marrow values, and 57%, 937%, 364%, and 1477% of normal splenic values. Endogenous spleen colony formation was also increased in all treatment groups, with combination-treated mice exhibiting the greatest effects. Likewise, although both glucan and G-CSF alone enhanced survival following an 8-Gy radiation exposure, greatest survival was observed in mice treated with both agents. These studies suggest that glucan, a macrophage activator, can synergize with G-CSF to further accelerate hemopoietic regeneration and increase survival following radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  6. Nasal lavage levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chronic nasal hypereosinophilia.

    PubMed

    De Corso, Eugenio; Baroni, Silvia; Lucidi, Daniela; Battista, Mariapina; Romanello, Matteo; Autilio, Chiara; Morelli, Renato; Di Nardo, Walter; Passali, Giulio Cesare; Sergi, Bruno; Bussu, Francesco; Fetoni, Anna Rita; Zuppi, Cecilia; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in nasal lavage of patients affected by chronic eosinophilic sinonasal inflammation to clarify the relationship with eosinophilic tissue infiltration and clinical features. Between November 2012 and June 2013, we selected 70 patients with chronic eosinophilic inflammation (average age 41.8 years) who were classified into the following groups: persistent allergic rhinitis (group 1), noninfectious non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome (group 2) and chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps (group 3). Finally, we enrolled 20 healthy subjects as controls (group 4). All patients underwent symptoms score questionnaire based on a visual analogue scale, nasal endoscopy and/or computed tomography (CT) scan, and allergy testing. Nasal cytology by scraping of the mucosa and GM-CSF assays in nasal lavage were performed in all subjects. Detectable levels of GM-CSF were found in 34 of 70 (48.57%) patients, with an average concentration of 2.67 ± 0.8 pg/mL, whereas in controls only 1 of 20 individuals showed detectable GM-CSF levels. Eosinophil infiltration was significantly higher in patients with detectable GM-CSF compared to those with undetectable levels (49.4% vs 39.2%, respectively; p < 0.05). Furthermore, significant weakly-moderate correlation was found between GM-CSF levels and percentage of eosinophil infiltration in tissue (p < 0.05). Correlation between symptom scores and GM-CSF levels was significant only in group 2, which showed higher average concentrations of GM-CSF compared to groups 1 and 3 (2.9 pg/mL vs 1.6 pg/mL and 1.8 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.05). Our data confirm that GM-CSF is more frequently detectable in nasal lavages of patients affected by chronic sinonasal eosinophilic inflammation than in controls. Statistical analyses revealed a significant weakly-moderate correlation between GM-CSF levels in nasal lavage of all patients and

  7. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes released from the bone marrow by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: intravascular behavior.

    PubMed

    Mukae, H; Zamfir, D; English, D; Hogg, J C; van Eeden, S F

    2000-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment stimulates the bone marrow and releases polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) into the circulation. This study was designed to measure the intravascular margination, demargination and survival of PMN released from the marrow by G-CSF. To trace PMN in the circulation, dividing PMN in the bone marrow of rabbits were labeled with 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and the effects of a single dose of G-CSF (12.5 microg/kg) on the behavior of these labeled cells in the circulation were measured. The results show that G-CSF induced a granulocytosis that peaked 12 h after treatment. This granulocytosis was associated with stimulation of the bone marrow characterized by shortening of the transit time of PMN through the marrow (97.3+/-2.5 h n=4 control vs 78.9+/-3.6 h n=5 G-CSF) particularly in the post-mitotic pool (P<0.01). Morphometric studies of the lung show a reduced sequestration of BrdU-labeled PMN in lung microvessels in G-CSF-treated animals (P<0.05) and a approximately 14-fold (G-CSF-group) vs a approximately 65-fold (control-group) enrichment of BrdU-labeled PMN in lung tissue if compared to circulating blood. The effect of G-CSF on demargination of PMN was measured by transferring BrdU-labeled PMN from donor animals treated with G-CSF to recipients. G-CSF did not cause demargination of intravascular PMN but delayed the clearance of G-CSF-treated PMN in the circulation. This delayed clearance was associated with inhibition of apoptosis in circulating PMN when measured both by morphology (17.7+/-2.3 vs 7.5+/-1.4%, P<0.01) and flow cytometry (16.2+/-1.1 vs 5+/-1.9%, P<0.01) using a DNA end-labeling method (control vs G-CSF group). We conclude that PMN released from the bone marrow by G-CSF sequestered less in the lung microvessels and have a prolonged intravascular life span.

  8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances cumulus cell expansion in bovine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objectives of the study were to characterize the expression of the α- and β-subunits of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor in bovine cumulus cells and oocytes and to determine the effect of exogenous GM-CSF on cumulus cells expansion, oocyte maturation, IGF-2 transcript expression and subsequent competence for embryonic development. Methods Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were obtained by aspirating follicles 3- to 8-mm in diameter with an 18 G needle connected to a vacuum pump at −50 mmHg. Samples of cumulus cells and oocytes were used to detect GM- CSF receptor by immunofluorescence. A dose–response experiment was performed to estimate the effect of GM-CSF on cumulus cell expansion and nuclear/cytoplasmic maturation. Also, the effect of GM-CSF on IGF-2 expression was evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells after in vitro maturation by Q-PCR. Finally, a batch of COC was randomly assigned to in vitro maturation media consisting of: 1) synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF, n = 212); 2) synthetic oviductal fluid supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF (SOF + GM-CSF, n = 224) or 3) tissue culture medium (TCM 199, n = 216) and then subsequently in vitro fertilized and cultured for 9 days. Results Immunoreactivity for both α and β GM-CSF receptors was localized in the cytoplasm of both cumulus cells and oocytes. Oocytes in vitro matured either with 10 or 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF presented a higher (P < 0.05) cumulus cells expansion than that of the control group (0 ng/ml of GM-CSF). GM-CSF did not affect the proportion of oocytes in metaphase II, cortical granules dispersion and IGF-2 expression. COC exposed to 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF during maturation did not display significant differences in terms of embryo cleavage rate (50.4% vs. 57.5%), blastocyst development at day 7 (31.9% vs. 28.7%) and at day 9 (17.4% vs. 17.9%) compared to untreated control (SOF alone, P = 0.2). Conclusions GM-CSF enhanced cumulus

  9. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances cumulus cell expansion in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Oscar A; Bucher, Danai; Fernandez, Ana; Berland, Marco; Strobel, Pablo; Ramirez, Alfredo; Ratto, Marcelo H; Concha, Ilona

    2013-06-24

    The objectives of the study were to characterize the expression of the α- and β-subunits of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor in bovine cumulus cells and oocytes and to determine the effect of exogenous GM-CSF on cumulus cells expansion, oocyte maturation, IGF-2 transcript expression and subsequent competence for embryonic development. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were obtained by aspirating follicles 3- to 8-mm in diameter with an 18 G needle connected to a vacuum pump at -50 mmHg. Samples of cumulus cells and oocytes were used to detect GM- CSF receptor by immunofluorescence. A dose-response experiment was performed to estimate the effect of GM-CSF on cumulus cell expansion and nuclear/cytoplasmic maturation. Also, the effect of GM-CSF on IGF-2 expression was evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells after in vitro maturation by Q-PCR. Finally, a batch of COC was randomly assigned to in vitro maturation media consisting of: 1) synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF, n = 212); 2) synthetic oviductal fluid supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF (SOF + GM-CSF, n = 224) or 3) tissue culture medium (TCM 199, n = 216) and then subsequently in vitro fertilized and cultured for 9 days. Immunoreactivity for both α and β GM-CSF receptors was localized in the cytoplasm of both cumulus cells and oocytes. Oocytes in vitro matured either with 10 or 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF presented a higher (P < 0.05) cumulus cells expansion than that of the control group (0 ng/ml of GM-CSF). GM-CSF did not affect the proportion of oocytes in metaphase II, cortical granules dispersion and IGF-2 expression. COC exposed to 100 ng/ml of GM-CSF during maturation did not display significant differences in terms of embryo cleavage rate (50.4% vs. 57.5%), blastocyst development at day 7 (31.9% vs. 28.7%) and at day 9 (17.4% vs. 17.9%) compared to untreated control (SOF alone, P = 0.2). GM-CSF enhanced cumulus cell expansion of in vitro matured bovine

  10. Combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin improves outcomes of patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kedarisetty, Chandan Kumar; Anand, Lovkesh; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Kumar, Guresh; Vyas, Ashish Kumar; David, Paul; Trehanpati, Nirupama; Rastogi, Archana; Bihari, Chhagan; Maiwall, Rakhi; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Vashishtha, Chitranshu; Kumar, Manoj; Bhatia, Vikram; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Patients with decompensated cirrhosis have significantly reduced survival without liver transplantation. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to increase survival in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, and erythropoietin promoted hepatic regeneration in animal studies. We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether co-administration of these growth factors improved outcomes for patients with advanced cirrhosis. In a prospective study, consecutive patients with decompensated cirrhosis seen at the Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi (from May 2011 through June 2012) were randomly assigned to groups given subcutaneous G-CSF (5 μg/kg/d) for 5 days and then every third day (12 total doses), along with subcutaneous darbopoietin α(40 mcg/wk) for 4 weeks (GDP group, n = 29), or only placebos (control group, n = 26). All patients also received standard medical therapy and were followed for 12 months. Histology was performed on liver biopsies. The primary end point was survival at 12 months. Baseline characteristics of patients were comparable; alcohol intake was the most common etiology of cirrhosis. A higher proportion of patients in the GDP group than controls survived until 12 months (68.6% vs 26.9%; P = .003). At 12 months, Child-Turcotte Pugh scores were reduced by 48.6% in the GDP group and 39.1% in the control group, from baseline (P = .001); Model for End Stage Liver Disease scores were reduced by 40.4% and 33%, respectively (P = .03). The need for large-volume paracentesis was significantly reduced in GDP group, compared with controls (P < .05). A lower proportion of patients in the GDP group developed septic shock (6.9%) during follow-up compared with controls (38.5%; P = .005). No major adverse events were observed in either group. In a single-center randomized trial, a significantly larger proportion of patients with decompensated cirrhosis given a combination of G-CSF and

  11. Follow-up of healthy donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization and collection. Results of the Spanish Donor Registry.

    PubMed

    de la Rubia, Javier; de Arriba, Felipe; Arbona, Cristina; Pascual, María J; Zamora, Concha; Insunza, Andrés; Martínez, Dorleta; Paniagua, Carmen; Díaz, Miguel A; Sanz, Miguel A

    2008-05-01

    Information about the long-term follow-up and safety of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to healthy donors is limited. The aims of this study were to analyze the side effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration in donors included in a Spanish Registry of hematopoietic stem cell donors and to determine the long-term outcome of these donors. The Spanish National Donor Registry was developed to record the short- and long-term results of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in normal donors. To date, 1436 donors (771 males, 665 females) with a median age of 37 years (range, 1 to 74 years) have been registered. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was the only cytokine administered. A baseline investigation was performed in every donor before granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration and follow-up investigations (controls) were planned at 4 weeks and annually thereafter for up to 5 years after the mobilization. At least one of the scheduled controls was performed in 736 donors, while 320 donors have been followed for 2 years or more. The peripheral white blood cell count decreased significantly from 6.8 x 10(9)/L at baseline to 5.9 x 10(9)/L at 4 weeks after leukapheresis (p<0.0001) and remained at values lower than those observed premobilization until 2 years after mobilization. In contrast, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count returned to normal values within 1 year after mobilization. Bone pain (90%) and headache (33%) were the most frequently reported granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-related side effects. Five patients (0.68%) were diagnosed as having solid tumors (lung cancer in two patients and thyroid carcinoma, choroid melanoma, and colon carcinoma in one patient each) between 10 and 64 months after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. No hematologic malignancies have been reported. The clinical side effects of

  12. CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) is required for degranulation of human eosinophils induced by human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Kita, H

    1994-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests adhesion molecules play an important role in the function of leukocytes. Because human eosinophils are known to express beta 2 integrins, we hypothesized that these adhesion molecules mediate the effector function of eosinophils. Normal human eosinophils incubated in albumin-coated polystyrene plates released granule protein and produced superoxide anion when stimulated with human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage CSF (rGM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), or PMA. Simultaneous monitoring of eosinophil adhesion and degranulation showed that degranulation was always preceded by cellular adhesion regardless of stimuli. Furthermore, eosinophil degranulation induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was abolished in suspension culture of the cells when the cell suspensions were gently stirred. To identify the molecules involved in this adhesion-dependent degranulation, we have investigated the effects of mAbs (mAb) against beta 2 integrins. mAb reactive with CD18 markedly inhibited the eosinophil adhesion and degranulation induced by PAF and human rGM-CSF. mAb reactive with CD11b also moderately inhibited the adhesion and degranulation. In contrast, mAb reactive with CD11a slightly enhanced or showed no effect on the adhesion and degranulation by human rGM-CSF or PAF. Superoxide production induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was also abolished by the treatment of cells with anti-CD18 mAb. mAb against CD11b and CD18 had little effect on degranulation and superoxide production induced by PMA. These results indicate that CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-dependent cellular adhesion plays an important role in the degranulation and superoxide production of eosinophils induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF, and that these mechanisms may be employed in vivo where eosinophils contact with stromal cells and/or proteins.

  13. Functional NF-IL6/CCAAT enhancer-binding protein is required for tumor necrosis factor alpha-inducible expression of the granulocyte colony- stimulating factor (CSF), but not the granulocyte/macrophage CSF or interleukin 6 gene in human fibroblasts [retracted by Adler G. In: J Exp Med 1997 Jul 7;186(1):171

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha participates in the regulation of the acute-phase, immune, and inflammatory responses. Target genes known to be transcriptionally activated by TNF-alpha include the granulocyte (G)- colony-stimulating factor (CSF) gene, the granulocyte/macrophage (GM)- CSF gene, as well as the interleukin (IL) 6 gene. Functional nuclear factor (NF)-IL6 recognition sites have been identified in regulatory regions of these genes by transient transfection studies using deleted promoter constructs. In addition, NF-IL6 is known to form heterodimeric complexes with the NF-kappa B transcription factor, which is also engaged in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The indispensable importance of NF-IL6 for regulating gene expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes in response to inflammatory stimuli in vivo remains, however, unclear. We here report, by using both antisense (AS) oligodesoxyribonucleotide (ODN) and ribozyme (RZ)-mediated specific elimination of NF-IL6 transcripts in human fibroblasts, that TNF-alpha-induced synthesis of G-CSF, but not of GM-CSF or IL-6, is abolished in the absence of functional NF-IL6 in vivo. Both AS ODN and RZ targeting of the NF-IL6 transcript eliminate NF-IL6 protein, as shown in Western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Similarly, fibroblasts exposed to either the AS NF-IL6 ODN or the NF-IL6 RZ, but not to the sense or nonsense ODN or a mutated ribozyme, also failed to respond with functional activation of NF-IL6 as assayed in transient transfection studies using heterologous promoter constructs harboring the NF-IL6 recognition site. In contrast, protein synthesis, DNA-binding activity, and transcriptional activation capacity of the NF-kappa B transcription factor is not impaired upon exposure to either ODN or RZ. Fibroblasts that had been cultured in the presence of the AS NF-IL6 ODN or the NF-IL6RZ failed to synthesize G- CSF protein in response to TNF-alpha, while TNF

  14. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of resistant thin endometrium in women with frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Michał; Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Liss, Joanna; Skowrońska, Patrycja; Szczyptańska, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) effect on unresponsive thin (<7 mm) endometrium in women undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer at the blastocyst stage. A total of 62 women with thin unresponsive endometrium were included in the study, of which, 29 received a G-CSF infusion and 33 who opted out of the study served as controls. Patients in both groups had similar endometrial thickness at the time of the initial evaluation: 6.50 mm (5.50-6.80) in the G-CSF and 6.40 mm (5.50-7.0) in the control group. However, after the infusion endometrial thickness increased significantly in the G-CSF group in comparison with the controls (p=0.01), (Δ) 0.5 (0.02-1.2) (p=0.005). In the G-CSF group endometrium expanded to 7.90 mm (6.58-8.70) while in the control group to 6.90 mm (6.0-7.75). Five women in each group conceived. The clinical pregnancy rate was 5/29 (17.24%) in the G-CSF treated group and 5/33 (15.15%) in the control group (p>0.05). The live birth rate was 2/29 (6.89%) in the G-CSF group and 2/33 (6.06%) in the control group (p>0.05). We concluded that G-CSF infusion leads to an improvement in endometrium thickness but not to any improvement in the clinical pregnancy and live birth rates. Until more data is available G-CSF treatment should be considered to be of limited value in increasing pregnancy rate. G-CSF: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; M-CSF: macrophagecolony-stimulating factor; GM-CSF: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; FET: frozen embryo transfer; IVF: in vitro fertilization.

  15. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sugumar, Thennarasu; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Harishankar, Murugesan; Dhinakar Raj, G

    2014-02-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Antibodies binding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor produced by cord blood-derived B cell lines immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, R P; Laricchia Robbio, L; Liberati, A M; Reato, G; Foa, R; Funaro, A; Vinante, F; Pizzolo, G

    2000-09-15

    We detected natural antibodies (auto-Abs) binding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in umbilical cord blood (CB) (23 of 94 samples screened) and peripheral blood of women at the end of pregnancy (6 of 42 samples tested). To demonstrate that Abs detected in CB were produced by the fetus, CB mononuclear cells were infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. Ten cell lines producing constitutively anti-recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) Abs were isolated and characterized. These cells displayed a male karyotype, an early activated B cell phenotype, coexpressed surface IgM and IgD, and secreted only IgM with prevailing lambda clonal restriction. Specific cell surface binding of biotinylated rhGM-CSF and high-level anti-rhGM-CSF IgM Ab production were typical features of early cell cultures. In late cell passages the frequency of more undifferentiated B cells increased. Serum Abs of either maternal or fetal origin or Abs produced in culture did not affect the granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating activity of rhGM-CSF from bone marrow progenitors in soft agar, suggesting that the Abs produced were nonneutralizing.

  17. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancement of Umbilical Cord Blood Cell Hematopoiesis by Maitake Beta-Glucan Is Mediated by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Cheung, Sandy W. Y.; Nesin, Mirjana; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Maitake beta-glucan (MBG) is an extract from the fruit body of the Grifola frondosa mushroom that is being widely used to treat cancer in Asia. We have previously reported that MBG enhances mouse bone marrow cell (BMC) hematopoiesis in vitro and protects BMC from doxorubicin (DOX) toxicity. In the current study, we investigated the ability of MBG to enhance hematopoiesis and to reduce the toxic effects of DOX on fresh human umbilical cord blood (CB) cells. MBG treatment significantly enhanced the colony formation unit (CFU) response of granulocytes-macrophages (CFU-GM response) over the whole dose range of 12.5 to 100 μg/ml (P < 0.05). The addition of MBG to DOX-treated CB cells significantly protected granulocyte-macrophage colony formation from the toxicity of DOX, which otherwise produced strong hematopoietic repression. MBG also partially replaced recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), as shown by a significant augmentation of the CFU-GM response in the absence of rhG-CSF. We found that MBG induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in CB CD33+ monocytes, as detected by intracellular cytokine flow cytometric assessment. In contrast, we found that adult peripheral blood monocytes did not produce a significant G-CSF response to MBG, whereas both adult and CB monocytes produced G-CSF in response to lipopolysaccharide. These studies provide the first evidence that MBG induces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation of CFU-GM in umbilical CB cells and acts directly to induce G-CSF. PMID:17093103

  19. Persistent Arthralgia Induced by Chikungunya Virus Infection is Associated with Interleukin-6 and Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Angela; Her, Zhisheng; Ong, Edward K. S.; Chen, Jin-miao; Dimatatac, Frederico; Kwek, Dyan J. C.; Barkham, Timothy; Yang, Henry; Rénia, Laurent; Leo, Yee-Sin

    2011-01-01

    Background. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection induces arthralgia. The involvement of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines has been suggested, but very little is known about their secretion profile in CHIKV-infected patients. Methods. A case-control longitudinal study was performed that involved 30 adult patients with laboratory-confirmed Chikungunya fever. Their profiles of clinical disease, viral load, and immune mediators were investigated. Results. When patients were segregated into high viral load and low viral load groups during the acute phase, those with high viremia had lymphopenia, lower levels of monocytes, neutrophilia, and signs of inflammation. The high viral load group was also characterized by a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-α and interleukin (IL)–6, during the acute phase. As the disease progressed to the chronic phase, IL-17 became detectable. However, persistent arthralgia was associated with higher levels of IL-6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, whereas patients who recovered fully had high levels of Eotaxin and hepatocyte growth factor. Conclusions. The level of CHIKV viremia during the acute phase determined specific patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which were associated with disease severity. At the chronic phase, levels of IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor found to be associated with persistent arthralgia provide a possible explanation for the etiology of arthralgia that plagues numerous CHIKV-infected patients. PMID:21288813

  20. The efficiency of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from methotrexate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Toptas, Tayfur; Calka, Omer; Akdeniz, Necmettin

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) remains one of the most frequently used anti-metabolite agents in dermatology. MTX is an analog of folate that competitively and irreversibly inhibits dihydrofolate reductase. Oral mucositis is a common side effect of chemotherapy drugs and is characterized by erythema, pain, poor oral intake, pseudomembranous destruction, open ulceration and hemorrhage of the oral mucosa. In this paper, we report a 32-year-old female with a case of mucositis due to MTX intoxication that resulted from an overdose for rheumatoid arthritis. The patient had abdominal pain, vomiting, and nausea. During follow-up, the patient's white blood cell count was found to be 0.9 × 10(9)/L (4-10 × 10(9)/L). The patient developed fever exceeding 40 °C. The patient was consulted to the hematology service. They suggested using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for febrile neutropenia. On the fifth day of treatment, the white blood cell count reached 5.3 × 10(9)/L and the patient's fever and mucositis started to resolve. Here, we presented a case of hemorrhagic mucositis and febrile neutropenia resulted from high-dose MTX that responded very well to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment and we reviewed the literature.

  1. Efficacy of LL-37 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in a neutropenic murine sepsis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Tomasinsig, Linda; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Riva, Alessandra; Rocchi, Marco; Saba, Vittorio; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    A promising therapeutic strategy for the management of severe Pseudomonas infection in neutropenic patients may result from the coadministration of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) that help maintain immune competence and antimicrobial peptides, a novel generation of adjunctive therapeutic agents with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. A promising peptide with these properties is LL-37, the only member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides found in humans. BALB/c male mice were rendered neutropenic by intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide on days -4 and -2 preinfection. Septic shock was induced at time 0 by intraperitoneal injection of 2x10 colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 27853. All animals were randomized to receive intravenously isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg of LL-37, 20 mg/kg of imipenem, 0.1 mg/kg of granulocyte CSF (G-CSF), 1 mg/kg of LL-37+0.1 mg/kg of G-CSF, or 20 mg/kg of imipenem+0.1 mg/kg of G-CSF. Lethality and bacterial growth in blood, peritoneum, spleen, liver, and kidney were evaluated. All regimens were significantly superior to controls at reducing the mouse lethality rate and bacterial burden in organs. Particularly, the combination between LL-37 and G-CSF was the most effective in protecting neutropenic mice from the onset of sepsis and in vitro significantly reduced the apoptosis of neutrophils. Combination therapy between LL-37 and G-CSF is a promising therapeutic strategy for the management of severe Pseudomonas infection complicated by neutropenia.

  2. Design Rationale and Development Approach for Pegfilgrastim as a Long-Acting Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    PubMed

    Arvedson, Tara; O'Kelly, James; Yang, Bing-Bing

    2015-06-01

    Filgrastim, a recombinant methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (r-metHuG-CSF), is efficacious in stimulating neutrophil production and maturation to prevent febrile neutropenia (FN) in response to chemotherapy. Because of its relatively short circulating half-life, daily filgrastim injections are required to stimulate neutrophil recovery. In an effort to develop a long-acting form of filgrastim that was as safe and efficacious as filgrastim but had a longer in vivo residence time, a number of strategies were considered. Ultimately, fusion of filgrastim to polyethylene glycol (PEG) was selected. Following extensive analysis of conjugation chemistries as well as in vitro and in vivo characterization of a panel of PEGylated proteins, a construct containing a 20 kDa PEG moiety covalently conjugated to the N-terminus of filgrastim was chosen for advancement as pegfilgrastim. Pegfilgrastim is primarily cleared by neutrophils and neutrophil precursors (rather than the kidneys), meaning that clearance from the circulation is self-regulating and pegfilgrastim is eliminated only after neutrophils start to recover. Importantly, addition of PEG did not alter the mechanism of action and safety profile compared to filgrastim. Clinical evaluation revealed that a single 6 mg dose effectively reduces the duration of neutropenia and risk of FN in patients receiving chemotherapy. This work demonstrates the benefit of using PEGylation to generate pegfilgrastim, which allows for once-per-chemotherapy cycle administration while maintaining similar safety and efficacy profiles as those for multiple daily administration of filgrastim. Approaches that may provide advances for therapeutic agonists of G-CSF receptor are also discussed.

  3. Stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exhibit therapeutic effects in a mouse model of CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Maria E; Fagan, Austin; Duan, Wei-Ming; Liu, Yanying; Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Bin; Piao, Chun-Shu; Nelson, Lila; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a Notch3 dominant mutation-induced cerebral small vascular disease, is characterized by progressive degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of small arteries in the brain, leading to recurrent ischemic stroke, vascular dementia and death. To date, no treatment can stop or delay the progression of this disease. Herein, we determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) in a mouse model of CADASIL carrying the human mutant Notch3 gene. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 5 days and repeated 4 times with 1-4 month intervals. We found through water maze testing that SCF+G-CSF treatment improved cognitive function. SCF+G-CSF also attenuated vSMC degeneration in small arteries, increased cerebral blood vascular density, and inhibited apoptosis in CADASIL mice. We also discovered that loss of cerebral capillary endothelial cells and neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) occurred in CADASIL mice. SCF+G-CSF treatment inhibited the CADASIL-induced cell loss in the endothelia and NSCs/NPCs and promoted neurogenesis. In an in vitro model of apoptosis, SCF+G-CSF prevented apoptotic cell death in vSMCs through AKT signaling and by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF restricts the pathological progression of CADASIL. This study offers new insights into developing therapeutic strategies for CADASIL.

  4. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity.

    PubMed

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Sanders, Rogier W

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF) chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF) proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF) should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  5. Stress response genes are suppressed in mouse preimplantation embryos by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Chin, Peck Y; Macpherson, Anne M; Thompson, Jeremy G; Lane, Michelle; Robertson, Sarah A

    2009-12-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is known to promote the development and survival of human and mouse preimplantation embryos; however, the mechanism of action of GM-CSF in embryos is not defined. Mouse blastocysts were cultured from zygote stage in vitro with and without recombinant mouse GM-CSF (rmGM-CSF), and in vivo developed blastocysts were flushed from Csf2 null mutant and wild-type mice. The effect of GM-CSF on blastocyst expression of stress response and apoptosis genes was evaluated by microarray, qPCR and immunochemistry. Microarray analysis of the gene transcription profile showed suppression of stress response and apoptosis gene pathways in blastocysts exposed to rmGM-CSF in vitro. qPCR analysis confirmed that rmGM-CSF inhibited expression of heat shock protein (HSP) and apoptosis pathway genes Cbl, Hspa5, Hsp90aa1, Hsp90ab1 and Gas5 in in vitro blastocysts. Immunocytochemical analysis of HSP 1 (HSPA1A/1B; HSP70), BAX, BCL2 and TRP53 (p53) in in vitro blastocysts showed that HSPA1A/1B and BCL2 proteins were less abundant when embryos were cultured with rmGM-CSF. BAX and TRP53 were unchanged at the protein level, but Bax mRNA expression was reduced after GM-CSF treatment. In in vivo developed blastocysts, Csf2 null mutation caused elevated expression of Hsph1 but not other stress response genes. We conclude that GM-CSF inhibits the cellular stress response and apoptosis pathways to facilitate embryo growth and survival, and the protective effects of GM-CSF are particularly evident in in vitro culture media, whereas in vivo other cytokines can partly compensate for absence of GM-CSF.

  6. Nocardia-induced granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is neutralized by autoantibodies in disseminated/extrapulmonary nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Lindsey B; Rocha Pereira, Nuno; Figueiredo, Cristóvão; Fiske, Lauren C; Ressner, Roseanne A; Hong, Julie C; Gregg, Kevin S; Henry, Tracey L; Pak, Kirk J; Baumgarten, Katherine L; Seoane, Leonardo; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; Olivier, Kenneth N; Zelazny, Adrian M; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K

    2015-04-01

    Nocardia species cause infections in both immunocompromised and otherwise immunocompetent patients, although the mechanisms defining susceptibility in the latter group are elusive. Anticytokine autoantibodies are an emerging cause of pathogen-specific susceptibility in previously healthy human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected adults, including anti-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies with cryptococcal meningitis. Plasma from patients with disseminated/extrapulmonary nocardiosis and healthy controls was screened for anticytokine autoantibodies using a particle-based approach. Autoantibody function was assessed by intranuclear staining for GM-CSF-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in normal cells incubated with either patient or normal plasma. GM-CSF-mediated cellular activation by Nocardia was assessed by staining for intracellular cytokine production and intranuclear STAT5 phosphorylation. We identified neutralizing anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in 5 of 7 patients studied with central nervous system nocardiosis and in no healthy controls (n = 14). GM-CSF production was induced by Nocardia in vitro, suggesting a causative role for anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in Nocardia susceptibility and dissemination. In previously healthy adults with otherwise unexplained disseminated/extrapulmonary Nocardia infections, anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies should be considered. Their presence may suggest that these patients may be at risk for later development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis or other opportunistic infections, and that patients may benefit from therapeutic GM-CSF administration. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  8. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S

    2002-07-01

    Macrophages have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. However, macrophages are heterogeneous and exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and function. When blood monocytes are cultured in medium alone in vitro, monocytes die, and colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as macrophage (M)-CSF or granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF are necessary for their survival and differentiation into macrophages. However, M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (M-Mphi) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (GM-Mphi) are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions, including Fcgamma receptor mediated-phagocytosis, H2O2 production, H2O2 sensitivity, catalase activity, susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and suppressor activity. The characteristics of GM-Mphi resemble those of human alveolar macrophages.

  9. MicroRNA126 contributes to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization by reducing the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Ombretta; Jiang, Kan; Gasperini, Paola; Maric, Dragan; Zhu, Jinfang; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Espigol-Frigole, Georgina; Wang, Shushang; Tosato, Giovanna

    2012-06-01

    Mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the primary means to acquire stem cell grafts for hematopoietic cell transplantation. Since hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells represent a minority of all blood cells mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the underlying mechanisms need to be understood in order to develop selective drugs. We analyzed phenotypic, biochemical and genetic changes in bone marrow cell populations from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized and control mice, and linked such changes to effective mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor indirectly reduces expression of surface vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 on bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, stromal cells and endothelial cells by promoting the accumulation of microRNA-126 (miR126)-containing microvescicles in the bone marrow extracellular compartment. We found that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, stromal cells and endothelial cells readily incorporate these miR126-loaded microvescicles, and that miR126 represses vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression on bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, stromal cells and endothelial cells. In line with this, miR126-null mice displayed a reduced mobilization response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Our results implicate miR126 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell trafficking between the bone marrow and peripheral sites, clarify the role of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mediated mobilization, and have important implications for improved approaches to selective mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

  10. Effect of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Immobilized by the Electron-Beam Synthesis Nanotechnology on Reparative Regeneration of Spermatogenous Tissue.

    PubMed

    Borovskaya, T G; Dygai, A M; Shchemerova, Yu A; Kamalova, S I; Mashanova, V A; Vychuzhanina, A V; Poluektova, M E; Madonov, P G; Kinsht, D N; Goldberg, V E

    2016-09-01

    Effectiveness of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor immobilized by using electronbeam synthesis nanotechnology was investigated on the model of experimental testicular failure caused by the toxic effect on stem spermatogonia. Administration of the drug to experimental paclitaxel-treated animals increased the number of sources of the proliferative pool of spermatogenesis and its productivity. The effectiveness of immobilized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was based on its ability to stimulate reparative regeneration of the spermatogenic tissue, which manifested in a decrease in spermatogenic layer maturity and increase in the number of microenvironment cells. Effectiveness of the immobilized form of the drug was superior to that of non-immobilized form.

  11. Characterization of buffy coat-derived granulocytes for clinical use: a comparison with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone-pretreated donor-derived products.

    PubMed

    van de Geer, A; Gazendam, R P; Tool, A T J; van Hamme, J L; de Korte, D; van den Berg, T K; Zeerleder, S S; Kuijpers, T W

    2017-02-01

    Buffy coat-derived granulocytes have been described as an alternative to the apheresis product from donors pretreated with dexamethasone and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The latter is - dependent on the local and national settings - obtained following a demanding and time-consuming procedure, which is undesirable in critically ill septic patients. In contrast, buffy coat-derived products have a large volume and are often heavily contaminated with red cells and platelets. We developed a new pooled buffy coat-derived product with high purity and small volume, and performed a comprehensive functional characterization of these granulocytes. We pooled ten buffy coats following the production of platelet concentrates. Saline 0·9% was added to decrease the viscosity and the product was split into plasma, red cells and a 'super' buffy coat. Functional data of the granulocytes were compared to those obtained with granulocytes from healthy controls and G-CSF/dexamethasone-pretreated donors. Buffy coat-derived granulocytes showed adhesion, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species production, degranulation, NETosis and in vitro killing of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus species comparable to control and G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Candida killing was superior compared to G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Immunophenotyping was normal; especially no signs of activation in the buffy coat-derived granulocytes were seen. Viability was reduced. Buffy coats are readily available in the regular blood production process and would take away the concerns around the apheresis product. The product described appears a promising alternative for transfusion purposes. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. Pharmacological properties of granulocytic colony-stimulating factor pegylated using electron beam synthesis nanotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Zyuz'kov, G N; Zhdanov, V V; Madonov, P G; Udut, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Khrichkova, T Yu; Simanina, E V; Stavrova, L A; Artamonov, A V; Bekarev, A A; Kinsht, D N; Chaikovskiy, A V; Markova, T S; Gurto, R V

    2011-11-01

    Granulocytic CSF pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology exhibits pronounced granulomonocytopoiesis-stimulating and SC-mobilizing activity. More potent stimulation of committed precursors against the background of less pronounced activation of polypotent hemopoietic cells is a peculiarity of hemostimulating action of pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology granulocytic CSF in comparison with its non-modified analog. The mobilizing effect of pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology granulocytic CSF on early progenitor elements surpasses that of non-conjugated cytokine.

  13. Successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells in children with cancer using plerixafor (Mozobil) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Boryana E; Yordanova, Maya N; Konstantinov, Dobrin N; Bobev, Dragan G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation in three children with malignant diseases by using plerixafor (Mozobil; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after failed previous mobilizations. A median sixfold increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after plerixafor treatment as compared with the baseline level was observed. An optimal CD34+ cell count for transplantation with one or two leukapheresis sessions was achieved. Mobilization using plerixafor was found to be safe with no adverse events. Therefore, the combination of G-CSF and plerixafor in children results in effective increases in peripheral CD34+ cell counts and reduces the risk of mobilization failure.

  14. Successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells in children with cancer using plerixafor (Mozobil™) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Avramova, Boryana E; Yordanova, Maya N; Konstantinov, Dobrin N; Bobev, Dragan G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation in three children with malignant diseases by using plerixafor (Mozobil™; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) after failed previous mobilizations. A median sixfold increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after plerixafor treatment as compared with the baseline level was observed. An optimal CD34+ cell count for transplantation with one or two leukapheresis sessions was achieved. Mobilization using plerixafor was found to be safe with no adverse events. Therefore, the combination of G-CSF and plerixafor in children results in effective increases in peripheral CD34+ cell counts and reduces the risk of mobilization failure. PMID:21966213

  15. Abscopal effect of metastatic pancreatic cancer after local radiotherapy and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Wang, Xin; Teng, Feifei; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2017-03-04

    The role of immunotherapy in combination with traditional treatment regime in improving the survival of cancer patients has attracted more and more attention. Especially the abscopal effect that describes the phenomenon of localized radiotherapy leading to regression of distant unirradiated tumors and the role of enhanced radiotherapy-induced immunogenic cell death and activation of immune system have become a focus of the studies. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is known a powerful stimulator of the generation, migration and activation of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. Here we report a case of a 67-year-old refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer patient who obtained evident abscopal effect and survival benefit from concurrent localized radiotherapy and GM-CSF.

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in the prevention of febrile neutropenia: review of cost-effectiveness models.

    PubMed

    Fust, Kelly; Parthan, Anju; Maschio, Michael; Gu, Qing; Li, Xiaoyan; Lyman, Gary H; Tzivelekis, Spiros; Villa, Guillermo; Weinstein, Milton C

    2017-02-01

    We reviewed the evolution of the methods used in cost-effectiveness analyses of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) in the primary and secondary prevention of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients receiving myelosuppressive cancer chemotherapy. Areas covered: FN is a side effect of myelosuppressive chemotherapy associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. The risk of FN may depend on the drugs used within a chemotherapy regimen, and an FN event may cause chemotherapy dose reductions or delays in subsequent cycles. Expert commentary: More recent pharmacoeconomic models have reflected these clinical observations by modeling sequential chemotherapy regimens to account for FN risk on a per-cycle basis, and by accounting for chemotherapy dose reductions and consequent survival losses.

  17. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab plus granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor as frontline treatment for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Lerner, Susan; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William; Keating, Michael J; Faderl, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (FCR), the standard of care for the frontline treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), is associated with a high rate of neutropenia and infectious complications. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reduces myelosuppression and can potentiate rituximab activity. We conducted a clinical trial combining GM-CSF with FCR for frontline treatment of 60 patients with CLL. Eighty-six percent completed all six courses and 18% discontinued GM-CSF for toxicity: grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 30% of cycles, and severe infections in 16% of cases. The overall response rate was 100%. Both median event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) have not been reached. Longer EFS was associated with favorable cytogenetics. GM-CSF led to a lower frequency of infectious complications than in the historical FCR group, albeit similar EFS and OS.

  18. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with Crohn's disease exacerbation and vasculitis after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Manners, P; Robbins, P

    2000-10-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), of unknown etiology, is characterized by recurring non-suppurative lesions of bone in multiple sites, and has been considered to be self-limiting. Reported therapies include prolonged antibiotics, corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory medications. This case is presented to illustrate the following: 1) CRMO may be severe, on-going, and unresponsive to treatment; 2) it may be associated with Crohns' disease; 3) the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be associated with severe gastrointestinal vasculitis. A male was treated from ages 11-20 years for CRMO (manifesting as multiple bone lesions), with therapies of variable efficacy (anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, corticosteroids, gammaglobulin and methotrexate). With increasing disruption to his life, a 10-day course of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given with benefit seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With exacerbation of symptoms one month later, G-CSF was re-commenced but ceased after 3 weeks because of abdominal pain, rectal blood loss, and progression of bone lesions with subsequent removal of portions of ileum, colon and appendix, which showed vasculitis. Months later, a colonoscopy revealed perianastomotic ulcers and continuing gastroenterological ulceration not unlike Crohn's disease. With azathioprine, gut and bone symptoms improved. We conclude that 1) CRMO may adversely affect life for years; 2) proven treatments are unavailable; 3) gastroenterological vasculitis/ Crohn's may be associated with CRMO; 4) MRI is useful for monitoring CRMO; 5) In this patient, G-CSF seemed beneficial initially, but later, vasculitis (possibly Crohn's) manifested, leading to bowel resection; 6) Crohn's disease may have been present for years, masked by corticosteroid, and unmasked by reduction of steroids and use of G-CSF.

  19. Cytokines in chronic inflammatory arthritis. II. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in rheumatoid synovial effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W D; Firestein, G S; Taetle, R; Kaushansky, K; Zvaifler, N J

    1989-01-01

    A liquid culture technique was used to study 23 synovial fluids (SF) (21 from inflammatory joint diseases and 2 noninflammatory SF) and supernatants of two cultured rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissues for colony-stimulating factor (CSF). The proliferative responses of human peripheral blood macrophage-depleted non-T cells treated with synovial fluids, supernatants of synovial tissue explants, and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage (rGM)-CSF were compared. Aggregates of cells that formed in long-term cultures (15 d) were similar for each applied agent and consisted of macrophages, eosinophils, and large blasts. Tritiated thymidine incorporation was proportional to the concentration of rGM-CSF and was accompanied by an increase in number and size of cellular aggregates formed in the cultures. CSF activity was observed in inflammatory SF, with tritiated thymidine uptake of 3,501 +/- 1,140 cpm in the presence of RA samples (n = 15) compared to 1,985 +/- 628 for non-RA inflammatory SF (n = 7) (P less than 0.05) and 583 +/- 525 for medium (n = 6) (P less than 0.01). The proliferative response to RA SF was often more apparent when the samples were diluted, because at higher concentrations the RA SF was inhibitory. Two RA SF were fractionated by Sephadex G100 column chromatography; low levels of CSF activity were detected in fractions corresponding to Mr of 70-100 kD, but the major CSF activity was found in the 20-24-kD fractions. A polyclonal rabbit anti-GM-CSF antibody eliminated the stimulating activity from both rGM-CSF and RA SF. Finally, a specific RIA identified significant levels of GM-CSF (40-140 U/ml) in the culture supernatants of 3 additional RA synovial tissues. These data document the local production of GM-CSF in rheumatoid synovitis and are the first description of this cytokine at a site of disease activity. Images PMID:2646320

  20. T cell expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in juvenile arthritis is contingent upon Th17 plasticity.

    PubMed

    Piper, Christopher; Pesenacker, Anne M; Bending, David; Thirugnanabalan, Balathas; Varsani, Hemlata; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Nistala, Kiran

    2014-07-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a potent inflammatory mediator that is responsible for recruitment and activation of innate immune cells. Recent data from murine studies have identified Th17 cells as a key source of GM-CSF and suggest that T cell-derived GM-CSF is instrumental in the induction of autoimmune disease. The present study was undertaken to analyze the expression of T cell-derived GM-CSF in the joints of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and to investigate the differentiation of Th17 cells and how this relates to GM-CSF+ T helper cells. Synovial fluid (SF) and peripheral blood (PB) samples from 24 patients with JIA were analyzed, by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, for expression of GM-CSF and the Th17 marker CD161. A cytokine capture assay was used to purify Th17 cells and test the plasticity of cytokine production in response to interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-23. The frequency of GM-CSF-producing T helper cells was significantly enriched in SF mononuclear cells compared to PB mononuclear cells from the patients with JIA (24.1% of CD4+ T cells versus 2.9%) and closely correlated with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r(2) = 0.91, P < 0.001). Synovial GM-CSF+ T cells were predominantly CD161+ and coexpressed interferon-γ (IFNγ), but not IL-17. Culture of Th17 cells in the presence of IL-12 led to rapid up-regulation of GM-CSF and IFNγ, recapitulating the phenotype of GM-CSF-expressing cells within the joint. Our results identify a novel outcome of Th17 plasticity in humans that may account for the enrichment of GM-CSF-expressing T cells in the joints of patients with JIA. The association of GM-CSF expression with systemic inflammation highlights the potential role of Th17-related cytokines in the pathology of JIA. © 2014 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Predicting erythroid response to recombinant erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy following a single subcutaneous bolus in patients with myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bowen, David; Hyslop, Ann; Keenan, Norene; Groves, Michael; Culligan, Dominic; Johnson, Peter; Shaw, Ann; Geddes, Fiona; Evans, Patricia; Porter, John; Cavill, Ivor

    2006-05-01

    We randomized 21 patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to receive a single subcutaneous bolus of recombinant erythropoietin (epoietin) +/- granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), or placebo and monitored erythropoietic response over 7 days. In this small study, the reticulocyte response at day 7 was highly predictive of subsequent response to a therapeutic trial of epoietin + G-CSF.

  2. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  3. [Signaling of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and its clinical application: host-defense and organ protection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kanji

    2013-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine with multipotent properties. It has not only an activity to generate both granulocyte and macrophage lineages in the bone marrow, but also is capable of inducing terminal maturation of alveolar macrophages that is central for pulmonary host defense and pulmonary surfactant homeostasis. GM-CSF can stimulate mature myeloid cells (i.e. neutrophils and monocytes) with a known mechanism called "priming" to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens. Several clinical trials to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of GM-CSF in patients with diseases related to functional impairment of mature myeloid cells were reported. Inhalation of GM-CSF improved clinical severity of pulmonary alveolar proteionosis. Administration of GM-CSF for patients with immune compromised situation such as sepsis showed marginal benefits so far. Several animal experiments indicated neuroprotective effect of GM-CSE In the clinical setting, establishing reliable biomarkers to distinguish patients who will have benefit by administering GM-CSF may maximize its clinical efficacy.

  4. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: Evaluation of biopharmaceutical formulations by stability-indicating RP-LC method and bioassay.

    PubMed

    Leal, Diogo Paim; Souto, Ricardo Bizogne; Schutkoski, Renato; Bergamo, Ana Cláudia; Dalmora, Sérgio Luiz

    2011-07-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that regulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells and activates granulocytes and macrophages. A reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) method was validated for the assessing of the stability of non-glycosylated recombinant rhGM-CSF (Molgramostim) in biopharmaceutical formulations. The RP-LC method was carried out on a Jupiter C(4) column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d.), maintained at 45 °C. The mobile phase A consisted of 0.1% TFA and the mobile phase B was acetonitrile with 0.1% TFA in acetonitrile, run at a flow rate of 1 mL/min, and using photodiode array (PDA) detection at 214 nm. Chromatographic separation was obtained with a retention time of 29.2 min, and was linear over the concentration range of 2-300 μg/mL (r(2) = 0.9992). Specificity was established in degradation studies. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxicity test of the degraded products showed significant differences (p < 0.05). The method was applied to the assessment of rhGM-CSF and related proteins in biopharmaceutical dosage forms, and the results were correlated to those of a bioassay. It is concluded that the employment of RP-LC in conjunction with current methods allows a great improvement in monitoring stability, quality control and thereby assures the therapeutic efficacy.

  5. A 3,387 bp 5'-flanking sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene provides correct tissue-specific expression of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serova, Irina A; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Andreeva, Ludmila E; Burkov, Ivan A; Dias, Luciene P B; Battulin, Nariman R; Smirnov, Alexander V; Serov, Oleg L

    2012-06-01

    A new expression vector containing the 1,944 bp 5'-flanking regulatory region together with exon 1 and intron 1 of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene (CSN1S1), the full-sized human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene (hGCSF) and the 3'-flanking sequence of the bovine CSN1S1, was created. The vector DNA was used for generation of four mouse transgenic lines. The transgene was integrated into chromosomes 8 and 12 of two founders as 2 and 5 copies, respectively. Tissue-specific secretion of hG-CSF into the milk of transgenic mice was in the range of 19-40 μg/ml. RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of the transgenic mice demonstrated that expression of hGCSF was detected in only the mammary gland in the progeny of all founders. Moreover, cells were shown to be positive for hG-CSF by immunofluorescent analysis in the mammary glands but not in any other tissues. There were no signs of mosaic expression in the mammary gland. Trace amounts of hG-CSF were detected in the serum of females of two transgenic lines during lactation only. However, no transgenic mice showed any changes in hematopoiesis based on the number of granulocytes in blood. Immunoblotting of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic mice revealed two forms, presumably the glycosylated and non-glycosylated forms. The hematopoietic activity of hG-CSF in the milk of transgenic females is comparable to that of recombinant G-CSF. In general, the data obtained in this study show that the new expression vector is able to provide correct tissue-specific expression of hG-CSF with high biological activity in transgenic mice.

  6. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis.

    PubMed

    Basso, Lilian; Lapointe, Tamia K; Iftinca, Mircea; Marsters, Candace; Hollenberg, Morley D; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Altier, Christophe

    2017-10-02

    Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators of tumor- and nerve injury-associated pain. Using a mouse model of colitis, we identify the proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF or Csf-3) as a key mediator of visceral sensitization. We report that G-CSF is specifically up-regulated in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of colitis-affected mice. Our results show that resident spinal microglia express the G-CSF receptor and that G-CSF signaling mediates microglial activation following colitis. Furthermore, healthy mice subjected to intrathecal injection of G-CSF exhibit pronounced visceral hypersensitivity, an effect that is abolished by microglial depletion. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that G-CSF injection increases Cathepsin S activity in spinal cord tissues. When cocultured with microglia BV-2 cells exposed to G-CSF, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptors become hyperexcitable. Blocking CX3CR1 or nitric oxide production during G-CSF treatment reduces excitability and G-CSF-induced visceral pain in vivo. Finally, administration of G-CSF-neutralizing antibody can prevent the establishment of persistent visceral pain postcolitis. Overall, our work uncovers a DRG neuron-microglia interaction that responds to G-CSF by engaging Cathepsin S-CX3CR1-inducible NOS signaling. This interaction represents a central step in visceral sensitization following colonic inflammation, thereby identifying spinal G-CSF as a target for treating chronic abdominal pain.

  7. Induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Koury, M J; Balmain, A; Pragnell, I B

    1983-01-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating activity (GM-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice which were topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting diterpene esters. Extremely large increases in GM-CSA were found in skin treated with the strongly tumor-promoting 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and the weakly promoting mezerein, while only a very slight increase was found with the non-promoting 4-O-methyl-TPA (4-OMe-TPA). Untreated areas of skin had very little GM-CSA. In the treated skins, the elevated GM-CSA was noted within a few hours and lasted for greater than 24 h after treatment. Although the levels of GM-CSA induced in the skin correspond to the degree of inflammation elicited by the respective treatments, the leukocytes in the acute inflammatory infiltrate did not appear to be responsible for the increased GM-CSA. Both epidermis and dermis had increased GM-CSA following TPA treatment of skin. Treatment of fibroblast and epithelial continuous cell lines with diterpene esters resulted in a similar pattern of GM-CSA induction in their supernatant media as that noted in the skin extracts. A large majority of the colonies stimulated by the diterpene-ester induced GM-CSA were composed of only macrophages. The results demonstrate that the topical administration of an inflammatory diterpene ester results in a rapid, marked yet local GM-CSA induction in the skin of treated mice. This indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells a growth regulatory factor for other types of cells may be an important element in carcinogenesis. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6605850

  8. The hematopoietic factor GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) promotes neuronal differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Carola; Laage, Rico; Pitzer, Claudia; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schneider, Armin

    2007-10-22

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in the generation of granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells from hematopoietic progenitor cells. We have recently demonstrated that GM-CSF has anti-apoptotic functions on neurons, and is neuroprotective in animal stroke models. The GM-CSF receptor alpha is expressed on adult neural stem cells in the rodent brain, and in culture. Addition of GM-CSF to NSCs in vitro increased neuronal differentiation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by quantitative PCR, reporter gene assays, and FACS analysis. Similar to the hematopoietic factor Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), GM-CSF stimulates neuronal differentiation of adult NSCs. These data highlight the astonishingly similar functions of major hematopoietic factors in the brain, and raise the clinical attractiveness of GM-CSF as a novel drug for neurological disorders.

  9. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S; Komuro, Iwao; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Toshio; Mochida, Keiko; Kishi, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages (Mphis) have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. Mphis exist in every tissue in the body, but Mphis from different tissues exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression and function, and are called by different names. However, the precise mechanism of the generation of macrophage heterogeneity is not known. In the present study, the authors examined the functional heterogeneity of Mphis generated from human monocytes under the influence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage-CSF (M-CSF). CD14 positive human monocytes (Mos) were incubated with M-CSF and GM-CSF for 6-7 days to stimulate the generation of M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived Mphis (M-Mphis) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived Mphis (GM-Mphis), respectively. The expression of cell surface antigens and several functions such as antigen presenting cell activity, susceptibility to oxidant stress, and the susceptibility to HIV-1 and mycobacterium tuberculosis infection were examined. GM-Mphis and M-Mphis are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions examined. The phenotype of GM-Mphis closely resembles that of human Alveolar-Mphis (A-Mphis), indicating that CSF-induced human monocyte-derived Mphis are useful to clarify the molecular mechanism of heterogeneity of human Mphis, and GM-Mphis will become a model of human A-Mphis.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in hemorrhagic shock requires both the ischemic and resuscitation phase.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, C; Kelly, E; Billiar, T R; Tweardy, D J

    1997-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the cytokine that is critical for polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocyte (PMN) production as well as being a potent agonist of PMN activation. We have recently reported that in the lung and the liver of rats resuscitated after hemorrhagic shock (HS) G-CSF mRNA expression is induced. It is not known if both phases of HS, the ischemic and the reperfusion phase, are required for G-CSF mRNA induction. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the upregulation of G-CSF mRNA expression is the consequence of HS followed by resuscitation and that ischemia alone is insufficient to induce G-CSF mRNA expression in the affected organs. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to resuscitated and unresuscitated shock protocols of varying severity. Control animals were subjected to anesthesia and all surgical preparations except for hemorrhage. Lungs and livers were isolated and their RNA extracted. Using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that G-CSF mRNA was induced in the lung and liver of shock animals above the level observed in control animals. Upregulation of G-CSF mRNA relative to controls occurred only in animals undergoing resuscitated HS and not in ones subjected to unresuscitated HS. These results indicate that G-CSF production specific for the hemorrhage component of shock is dependent on resuscitation. As a consequence, the production of this cytokine may be decreased through modifications in the resuscitation protocols.

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anne D; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant cell type in many chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their contribution to the pathology of RA has not been widely studied. A key cytokine involved in neutrophil development and function is granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In this study we used the K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model, mimicking the effector phase of RA, to investigate the importance of G-CSF in arthritis development and its relation to neutrophils. Here, we show for the first time in this model that G-CSF levels are increased both in the serum and in inflamed paws of arthritic mice and importantly that G-CSF blockade leads to a profound reduction in arthritis severity, as well as reduced numbers of neutrophils in blood. Moreover, CXCL1 and CXCL2 levels in the arthritic joints were also lowered. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF is a pivotal driver of the disease progression in the K/BxN STA model and possibly acts in part by regulating neutrophil numbers in the circulation. Therefore, our findings suggest that G-CSF might be a suitable target in RA, and perhaps in other immune complex-driven pathologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Radiation promotes invasiveness of non-small-cell lung cancer cells through granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y-H; Suh, Y; Lee, H-J; Yoo, K-C; Uddin, N; Jeong, Y-J; Lee, J-S; Hwang, S-G; Nam, S-Y; Kim, M-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-10-16

    Despite ionizing radiation (IR) is being widely used as a standard treatment for lung cancer, many evidences suggest that IR paradoxically promotes cancer malignancy. However, its molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cancer progression remain obscure. Here, we report that exposure to fractionated radiation (2 Gy per day for 3 days) induces the secretion of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that has been commonly used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. Intriguingly, radiation-induced G-CSF promoted the migratory and invasive properties by triggering the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in non-small-cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). By irradiation, G-CSF was upregulated transcriptionally by β-catenin/TCF4 complex that binds to the promoter region of G-CSF as a transcription factor. Importantly, irradiation increased the stability of β-catenin through the activation of PI3K/AKT (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT), thereby upregulating the expression of G-CSF. Radiation-induced G-CSF is recognized by G-CSFR and transduced its intracellular signaling JAK/STAT3 (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription), thereby triggering EMT program in NSCLCs. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of G-CSF in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia should be reconsidered owing to its effect on cancer progression, and G-CSF could be a novel therapeutic target to mitigate the harmful effect of radiotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC.

  13. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  14. Kinetics of Neutrophils in Mice Exposed to Radiation and/or Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A. L.; Wan, X. S.; Diffenderfer, E. S.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts have the potential to develop the hematopoietic syndrome as a result of exposure to radiation from a solar particle event (SPE) during exploration class missions. This syndrome is characterized by a reduction in the number of circulating blood cells (cytopenias). In the present study the effects of SPE-like proton and γ radiation on the kinetics of circulating neutrophils were evaluated during a one-month time period using mice as a model system. The results revealed that exposure to a 2 Gy dose of either SPE-like proton or γ radiation significantly decreased the number of circulating neutrophils, with two nadirs observed on day 4 and day 16 postirradiation. Low circulating neutrophil count (neutropenia) is particularly important because it can increase the risk of astronauts developing infections, which can compromise the success of the mission. Thus, two granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs), filgrastim and pegfilgrastim were evaluated as countermeasures for this endpoint. Both forms of G-CSF significantly increased neutrophil counts in irradiated mice, however, the effect of pegfilgrastim was more potent and lasted longer than filgrastim. Using the expression of CD11b, CD18 and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as markers of neutrophil activation, it was determined that the neutrophils in the irradiated mice treated with pegfilgrastim were physiologically active. Thus, these results suggest that pegfilgrastim could be a potential countermeasure for the reduced number of circulating neutrophils in irradiated animals. PMID:23829559

  15. Production of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by gateway technology and transgenic rice cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Li-Fen; Ho, Shin-Lon; Liao, Chun-Yu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ying-Hui; Yu, Su-May; Lu, Chung-An

    2012-05-01

    To establish a production platform for recombinant proteins in rice suspension cells, we first constructed a Gateway-compatible binary T-DNA destination vector. It provided a reliable and effective method for the rapid directional cloning of target genes into plant cells through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We used the approach to produce mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) in a rice suspension cell system. The promoter for the αAmy3 amylase gene, which is induced strongly by sugar depletion, drove the expression of mGM-CSF. The resulting recombinant protein was fused with the αAmy3 signal peptide and was secreted into the culture medium. The production of rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was scaled up successfully in a 2-L bioreactor, in which the highest yield of rmGM-CSF was 24.6 mg/L. Due to post-translational glycosylation, the molecular weight of rmGM-CSF was larger than that of recombinant mGM-CSF produced in Escherichia coli. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Efficacy of Intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor on patients with history of implantation failure: A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Miraj, Sepideh; Farid Mojtahedi, Maryam; Neghab, Nosrat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although pregnancy rate in in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles has been increased over the preceding years, but the majority of IVF-ET cycles still fail. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a glycoprotein that stimulates cytokine growth factor and induces immune system which may improve pregnancy rate in women with history of implantation failure. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate GCSF ability to improve pregnancy rate in women with history of implantation failure Materials and Methods: 0.5 ml (300 µg/ml) GCSF was infused intrauterine in intervention group. Pregnancy outcomes were assessed based on clinical pregnancy. Results: The mean age of participants was 31.95±4.71 years old. There were no significant differences between demographic characteristics in two groups (p>0.05). The pregnancy outcome in GCSF group was improved significantly (p=0.043). Conclusion: GCSF can improve pregnancy outcome in patients with history of implantation failure. PMID:27981253

  17. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and outcome in patients with non-chemotherapy agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, L; Sabaté, M; Ballarín, E; Puig, R; Vidal, X; Laporte, J-R

    2008-03-01

    The use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the treatment of non-chemotherapy drug- induced agranulocytosis is controversial. We aimed at assessing the effect of G-CSF on the duration of agranulocytosis. To assess the effect of G-CSF on the duration of agranulocytosis, a Cox proportional hazard model with an estimated propensity score covariate adjusting for several prognostic factors was used. One hundred and forty-five episodes of agranulocytosis were prospectively collected from January 1994 to December 2000 in Barcelona (Spain). No differences were found in the case-fatality rate between treated (9 of 101, 8.9%) and not treated (5 of 44, 11.4%) patients. The median time to reach a neutrophil count > or =1.0 x 10(9)/L was 5 days (95%CI 5-6) in patients treated with G-CSF compared to 7 days (95%CI 6-8) in those not treated, with a hazard ratio of 1.58 (95% CI 1.1-2.3). G-CSF shortens time to recovery in patients with agranulocytosis. However, as an effect on case-fatality has not been recorded, and data on cost-effectiveness are lacking, it would be wise to restrict its use to high-risk patients. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Study Conformational Changes in Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor upon PEGylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Ahn, Joomi; Yu, Ying Qing; Tymiak, Adrienne; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2012-03-01

    PEGylation is the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol to proteins, and it can be used to alter immunogenicity, circulating half life and other properties of therapeutic proteins. To determine the impact of PEGylation on protein conformation, we applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) to analyze granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) upon PEGylation as a model system. The combined use of HDX automation technology and data analysis software allowed reproducible and robust measurements of the deuterium incorporation levels for peptic peptides of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated G-CSF. The results indicated that significant differences in deuterium incorporation were induced by PEGylation of G-CSF, although the overall changes observed were quite small. PEGylation did not result in gross conformational rearrangement of G-CSF. The data complexity often encountered in HDX MS measurements was greatly reduced through a data processing and presentation format designed to facilitate the comparison process. This study demonstrates the practical utility of HDX MS for comparability studies, process monitoring, and protein therapeutic characterization in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  19. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) transiently suppresses mitogen-stimulated T-cell proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; García-Castro, I; Esquivel, F; Hornedo, J; Cortes-Funes, H; Solovera, J; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulation factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that selectively promotes growth and maturation of neutrophils and may modulate the cytokine response to inflammatory stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of G-CSF on ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) functions. Ten patients with breast cancer were included in a clinical trial in which r-metHuG-CSF was administrered daily for 5 days to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells. Ten healthy women were also included as controls. Our data show that G-CSF treatment induces an increase in peripheral blood leucocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. We have found a modulation in the percentages of CD19+, CD45+CD14+, CD4+CD45RA+ and CD4+CD45RO+ cells in PBMC fractions during G-CSF treatment. We have also found a significant reduction in the proliferative response of PBMC to mitogenic stimulation that reverted 14 days after the fifth and the last dose of G-CSF. Furthermore, it was not associated with significant changes in the pattern of cytokine production. The mechanism of this immunoregulatory effect is probably indirect since G-CSF receptor has not been found in T lymphocytes. This mechanism and its potential clinical applications remain to be elucidated. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390001

  1. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor administration among hemoglobin S trait donors: A single center experience from the Eastern Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Aslı; Tepebası, Songul; Aytan, Pelin; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoglu, Ilknur; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2017-07-12

    Assessment of Hemoglobin S trait donors has gained importance together with the increased allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplant activity for sickle cell disease in the regions where the disease is prevalent. Outcomes of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) administration are obscure for hemoglobin S trait donors. This study aims at investigating the incidence of hemoglobin S carrier status and outcomes of G-CSF administration among donors who live in Eastern Mediterranean region. The cross-sectional, single-center cohort study was performed with 147 donors between January 2013 and March 2017. Prevalence of hemoglobin S trait was estimated and subjects with or without Hemogobin S trait were compared with regard to stem cell characteristics, early and late clinical outcomes after G-CSF administration. Eleven out of 147 donors (7.48%) were found as hemoglobin S trait. G-CSF administration was successfully completed and yielded good harvesting results in hemoglobin S trait donors. No statistically significant difference was found between groups with regard to early and late side effects, stem cell characteristics. Blood pressures and QTc values were within normal ranges in both groups. Groups were similar with regard to CD34 values. G-CSF seems safe in hemoglobin S trait donors. Their being eligible as donors would increase the chance of the patients for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in high prevalence regions. Further studies are required to reveal the safety profile of G-SCF in hemoglobin S carriers in different regions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Elevated serum granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels during radiotherapy predict favorable outcomes in lung and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guodong; Hu, Pingping; Zhang, Jingxin; Liu, Qiqi; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Qiao, Lili; Luo, Hui; Xu, Deguo; Liu, Fengjun; Yu, Xinshuang; Liu, Zhen; Lv, Yajuan; Zhang, Jiandong

    2016-12-20

    The combination of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with radiotherapy (RT) has been demonstrated to strengthen the antitumor immune response. We hypothesized that the variation of GM-CSF during RT was correlated with cancer prognosis. We measured serum levels of GM-CSF and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) before and during RT in 126 unresectable lung and esophageal cancer patients and performed survival analyses. Upregulated GM-CSF levels during RT correlated with longer overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). On the other hand, no difference in OS or PFS was seen at different IFN-γ levels. However, the "integrated factor", computed as the combination of high pre-RT IFN-γ levels and upregulated GM-CSF, correlated with prolonged OS and PFS. Multivariate analyses revealed that GM-CSF levels and the integrated factor were both stronger independent prognostic factors than disease stage. These data demonstrate that GM-CSF levels during RT can be used as a prognostic biomarker for lung and esophageal cancer.

  3. Endobronchial allergen challenge in asthma. Demonstration of cellular source of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Broide, D H; Firestein, G S

    1991-01-01

    Airway inflammation is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. We have used in situ hybridization and an immunoassay to determine whether granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (a cytokine capable of eosinophil activation) is present in the airway of asthmatics (n = 6) who have 37.0 +/- 15.1% airway eosinophilia after endobronchial allergen challenge. Levels of immunoreactive GM-CSF (less than 4 pg/ml pre-allergen versus 180.5 +/- 46.9 pg/ml post-allergen) increased significantly 24 h after endobronchial allergen stimulation. The cellular source of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) GM-CSF, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase staining, was derived predominantly from UCHL-1 positive BAL lymphocytes, as well as from a smaller population of alveolar macrophages. Before local endobronchial allergen challenge, less than 1% of lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages recovered by BAL expressed GM-CSF mRNA, whereas after allergen stimulation 92.6 +/- 3.4% of lymphocytes and 17.5 +/- 22.7% of alveolar macrophages expressed GM-CSF mRNA. This study provides evidence that in an experimental model of allergen-induced asthma, activation of the immune and inflammatory response (BAL lymphocyte and alveolar macrophage production of GM-CSF) is temporally associated with an inflammatory cell influx of eosinophils into the airway. Images PMID:1885766

  4. Soluble complement receptor 1 is increased in patients with leukemia and after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Lach, E; Schwarz, S; Gratwohl, A; Spertini, O; Schifferli, J A

    1999-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 is expressed by erythrocytes and most leukocytes. A soluble form is shed from the leukocytes and found in plasma (sCR1). sCR1 is a powerful inhibitor of complement. We report an increased sCR1 in the plasma of leukemia patients, up to levels producing measurable complement inhibition. Half of the 180 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) had sCR1 levels above the normal range. The highest levels were observed in T-ALL (17 patients). The complement function of a T-ALL serum was improved by blocking sCR1 with a specific mAb (3D9). Measurements in 16 peripheral stein cell donors before and after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration showed an increase in sCR1 (before, 43.8+/-15.4; at day 5, 118.3+/-44.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). This increase paralleled the increase in total leukocyte counts and was concomitant with de novo leukocyte mRNA CR1 expression in all three individuals tested. Whether pharmacological intervention may be used to up-regulate sCR1 so as to inhibit complement in vivo should be further investigated.

  5. Role of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the pathogenesis of adult pulmonary histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, A; Bonay, M; Bergeron, A; Grandsaigne, M; Hance, A J; Soler, P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary histiocytosis X is a disorder characterised by the presence of destructive granulomas preferentially involving distal bronchioles, that contain numerous activated Langerhans' cells. Recent studies have shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which is produced by normal bronchiolar epithelium, may play an important part in the distribution and differentiation of Langerhans' cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of this factor in the pathogenesis of pulmonary histiocytosis X. METHODS: Four patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X were examined by immunohistochemical techniques for GM-CSF and CD1a surface molecules. RESULTS: In early lesions the epithelium of bronchioles affected by the disease was strongly positive for GM-CSF and infiltrated by numerous CD1a+ Langerhans' cells organised into granulomas. In contrast, the expression of GM-CSF was substantially lower in bronchioles not affected by the disease, and these bronchioles contained few Langerhans' cells. When destruction by histiocytosis X lesions was more advanced, only remnants of bronchiolar epithelium could occasionally be identified; these remained strongly reactive for GM-CSF. Langerhans' cells within granulomas also moderately expressed this cytokine. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the hypothesis that GM-CSF could be one of the factors responsible for the local accumulation of lymphostimulatory Langerhans' cells in early lesions of pulmonary histiocytosis X. Images PMID:8693443

  6. Effects of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (GCSF) on Persistent Thin Endometrium in Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET) Cycles.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vineet V; Choudhary, Sumesh; Sharma, Urmila; Aggarwal, Rohina; Agarwal, Ritu; Gandhi, Khushali; Goraniya, Nilesh

    2016-10-01

    To predict the effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in the treatment of persistent thin endometrium resistant to other treatments in frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. This is a hospital-based prospective study. Thirty-five women with persistent thin endometrium (<7 mm) resistant to standard treatments were involved in this study. Intrauterine infusion of GCSF (300 mcg/1 ml) was done in patients with thin endometrium on day 14 of FET cycles, and their endometrial thicknesses were measured after 48 h of infusion. The primary outcome was an increase in endometrial thickness and the secondary outcome measures were chemical and clinical pregnancies. The endometrial thickness increased from 5.86 ± 0.58 to 6.58 ± 0.84 mm after GCSF infusion. In 19 of the 35 participants (54.28 %) endometrial thickness increased to ≥7 mm and they subsequently underwent embryo transfer. Of these, 3 (15.78 %) patients had chemical pregnancy, but there was no clinical pregnancy. In 16 participants, embryo transfer was canceled in view of insufficient endometrial thickness (<7 mm). GCSF caused a small increase in endometrial thickness in women with persistent thin endometrium, but there was no improvement in their pregnancy rates.

  7. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-liang; He, Mei-qing; Han, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jing-yi; Yang, Ming-feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-lei; Li, Da-wei; Zhang, Zong-yong; Zheng, Cheng-bi; Yang, Xiao-yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  8. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Hosseinisadat, Robabe; Baradaran, Ramesh; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF), endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy). In G-CSF group (n=50), 300 µg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50) were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII), two pronuclei (2PN), total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27326420

  9. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  10. Elevations in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-5 levels precede posttreatment eosinophilia in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Hagan, J B; Bartemes, K R; Kita, H; Ottesen, E A; Awadzi, K; Nutman, T B; Gleich, G J

    1996-05-01

    The eosinophil survival assay was used to quantitate cytokines in 17 serial serum samples from 10 patients treated for onchocerciasis with diethylcarbamazine. Eosinophils isolated from normal donors were cultured for 4 days in the presence of patients' sera, and cell viability was determined. Serum specimens from 9 of 10 patients enhanced eosinophil survival from 4.8% +/- 2.2% (mean +/- SE) before treatment to 50.0% +/- 6.4% after treatment. Survival enhancement activity peaked before posttreatment eosinophilia. Antibodies to interleukin (IL)-5, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and IL-3 were used to block cytokine activity in 22 serum samples. Antibodies to IL-5 blocked survival in 5 samples, antibodies to GM-CSF blocked survival in 6 samples, and a combination of antibodies to IL-5 and GM-CSF blocked survival in 8 additional samples. Overall, posttreatment sera from patients treated for onchocerciasis enhanced eosinophil survival; both GM-CSF and IL-5 may promote the posttreatment eosinophilia in filarial infection.

  11. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  12. Characterization of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor expression by FT-IR spectroscopy: Studies on thermal induction and media formulation on the stability of the protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sandeep; Vemula, Sushma; Dedaniya, Akshay; Kante, Rajesh Kumar; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2016-08-17

    The Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic approach has been employed to understand the recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) protein accumulation, secondary structure, and thermal stability in Escherichia coli grown under a temperature shift strategy (37 and 28°C) in various media formulations. The choline + sodium pyruvate (37°C) and sodium pyruvate (28°C) formulations have shown the highest inclusion body (IB) accumulation of 0.41 and 0.46 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, insights on the structure of the rhG-CSF within IBs and intact cells have been investigated through secondary structure analysis. Thermal stability experiments were also carried out to explain the pattern of the second derivative structure of rhG-CSF. The studies showed that choline + sodium pyruvate formulation has preserved the protein secondary structure even at 82°C. Overall, the FT-IR spectroscopic technique can also be adopted to accelerate the characterization of other recombinant therapeutic proteins of E. coli origin.

  13. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor stimulates both association and activation of phosphoinositide 3OH-kinase and src-related tyrosine kinase(s) in human myeloid derived cells.

    PubMed Central

    Corey, S; Eguinoa, A; Puyana-Theall, K; Bolen, J B; Cantley, L; Mollinedo, F; Jackson, T R; Hawkins, P T; Stephens, L R

    1993-01-01

    The signalling pathways used by the GM-CSF receptor are currently unknown. Here we show that in human myeloid derived cells GM-CSF can stimulate; (i) the accumulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3; (ii) increases in p53/p56lyn and p62c-yes directed protein tyrosine kinase activities in anti-lyn and anti-c-yes antibody directed immunoprecipitates, respectively and; (iii) increases in phosphoinositide 3OH-kinase activity in antiphosphotyrosine, anti-p53/p56lyn and anti-p62c-yes antibody directed immunoprecipitates. These results suggest that GM-CSF can stimulate formation of protein tyrosine kinase co-ordinated signalling complexes, that contain p53/p56lyn, p62c-yes and an activated PtdInsP2 directed phosphoinositide 3OH-kinase, which can drive the accumulation of the putative second-messenger PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Images PMID:8392933

  14. The combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for chronic stroke treatment in aged animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke occurs more frequently in the elderly population and presents the number one leading cause of persistent disability worldwide. Lack of effective treatment to enhance brain repair and improve functional restoration in chronic stroke, the recovery phase of stroke, is a challenging medical problem to be solved in stroke research. Our early study has revealed the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (SCF+G-CSF) on chronic stroke in young animals. However, whether this treatment is effective and safe to the aged population remains to be determined. Methods Cortical brain ischemia was produced in aged C57BL mice or aged spontaneously hypertensive rats. SCF+G-CSF or equal volume of vehicle solution was subcutaneously injected for 7 days beginning at 3–4 months after induction of cortical brain ischemia. Using the approaches of biochemistry assays, flow cytometry, pathology, and evaluation of functional outcome, several doses of SCF+G-CSF have been examined for their safety and efficiency on chronic stroke in aged animals. Results All tested doses did not show acute or chronic toxicity in the aged animals. Additionally, SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke of aged animals mobilized bone marrow stem cells and improved functional outcome in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions SCF+G-CSF treatment is a safe and effective approach to chronic stroke in the aged condition. This study provides important information needed for developing a new therapeutic strategy to improve the health of older adults with chronic stroke. PMID:23254113

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves survival of patients with decompensated cirrhosis: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Ritesh; Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Singla, Vikas; Kumar, Ashish

    2017-04-01

    Liver transplantation is the only curative option for patients with decompensated cirrhosis; however, many patients die while awaiting transplantation. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) has shown promising results in improving outcomes in patients with advanced liver disease. We evaluated the efficacy of GCSF in patients with decompensated cirrhosis in an open-labeled randomized-controlled trial. Consecutive patients with decompensated cirrhosis were randomized to receive either GCSF 300 μg twice daily for 5 days plus standard medical therapy (SMT) (GCSF+SMT group) or SMT alone (SMT alone group). Outcomes were assessed at 6 months from randomization. A total of 126 patients [median age: 53 (range: 31-76) years, 85% men] received GCSF+SMT and 127 patients received SMT alone. Baseline characteristics were similar in both the groups. The 5-day GCSF therapy did not lead to any significant adverse effects. At 6 months, in the GCSF+SMT group, 17 patients had died and nine were lost to follow-up, whereas in the SMT-alone group, 30 patients had died and 11 were lost to follow-up. By intention-to-treat analysis, cumulative survival was significantly higher in the GCSF+SMT group (79 vs. 68%; P=0.025). Also, significantly more patients (66%) showed improvement or stability in the Child-Turcotte-Pugh score at 6 months in the GCSF+SMT group compared with the SMT-alone group (51%, P=0.021). GCSF therapy improves survival and clinical outcome in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. It may be useful in patients awaiting transplantation to prevent worsening during the waiting period. Further studies are needed to explore whether repeated periodic GCSF courses can further increase the survival and decrease the need for liver transplantation.Clinical trial registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov vide NCT02642003.

  16. Development and calibration of a standard for the protein content of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor products.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Rao, Chunming; Tao, Lei; Han, Chunmei; Shi, Xinchang; Wang, Lan; Fan, Wenhong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Junzhi

    2012-03-01

    This collaborative study characterizes a homogeneous standard for the protein content determination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) products with traceability of the measurement. The Kjeldahl method was used to determine the average protein content of G-CSF bulk as 2.505 mg/ml (95% C.I: 2.467-2.543 mg/ml, GCV 4.0%). Using G-CSF bulk as a traceability benchmark, the protein content of the final freeze-dried standard using reverse phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) was 215.4 μg protein per ampoule (95% C.I: 212.407-218.486 μg/ampoule, GCV 3.4%). A comparative study showed that there was no difference between using Filgrastim CRS (European Pharmacopeia G-CSF reference standard) and freeze-dried homogeneous standard when quantifying G-CSF protein content by RP-HPLC (P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences in the G-CSF protein content obtained using a serum albumin standard by Lowry assay and a G-CSF standard with RP-HPLC. Therefore, use of RP-HPLC with a freeze-dried homogeneous standard would eliminate the systematic errors introduced when using a serum albumin standard because of the differences in protein composition between the standard and the sample. It would also be helpful to use this method to compare the quality of G-CSF biosimilar products in situations where the protein content has been calibrated using various standards.

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for febrile neutropenia prophylaxis following chemotherapy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia (FN) occurs following myelosuppressive chemotherapy and is associated with morbidity, mortality, costs, and chemotherapy reductions and delays. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) stimulate neutrophil production and may reduce FN incidence when given prophylactically following chemotherapy. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim, filgrastim or lenograstim) in reducing FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. G-CSFs were compared with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis and with one another. Nine databases were searched in December 2009. Meta-analysis used a random effects model due to heterogeneity. Results Twenty studies compared primary G-CSF prophylaxis with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis: five studies of pegfilgrastim; ten of filgrastim; and five of lenograstim. All three G-CSFs significantly reduced FN incidence, with relative risks of 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.65) for pegfilgrastim, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.69) for filgrastim, and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.88) for lenograstim. Overall, the relative risk of FN for any primary G-CSF prophylaxis versus no primary G-CSF prophylaxis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.62). In terms of comparisons between different G-CSFs, five studies compared pegfilgrastim with filgrastim. FN incidence was significantly lower for pegfilgrastim than filgrastim, with a relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.98). Conclusions Primary prophylaxis with G-CSFs significantly reduces FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. Pegfilgrastim reduces FN incidence to a significantly greater extent than filgrastim. PMID:21943360

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  19. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  20. Annual patient and caregiver burden of oncology clinic visits for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy in the US.

    PubMed

    Stephens, J Mark; Li, Xiaoyan; Reiner, Maureen; Tzivelekis, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is indicated for chemotherapy patients with a significant risk of febrile neutropenia. This study estimates the annual economic burden on patients and caregivers of clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US. Annual clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections (all cancers) were estimated from national cancer incidence, chemotherapy treatment and G-CSF utilization data, and G-CSF sales and pricing information. Patient travel times, plus time spent in the clinic, were estimated from patient survey responses collected during a large prospective cohort study (the Prospective Study of the Relationship between Chemotherapy Dose Intensity and Mortality in Early-Stage (I-III) Breast Cancer Patients). Economic models were created to estimate travel costs, patient co-pays and the economic value of time spent by patients and caregivers in G-CSF clinic visits. Estimated total clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US were 1.713 million for 2015. Mean (SD) travel time per visit was 62 (50) min; mean (SD) time in the clinic was 41 (68) min. Total annual time for travel to and from the clinic, plus time at the clinic, is estimated at 4.9 million hours, with patient and caregiver time valued at $91.8 million ($228 per patient). The estimated cumulative annual travel distance for G-CSF visits is 60.2 million miles, with a total transportation cost of $28.9 million ($72 per patient). Estimated patient co-pays were $61.1 million, ∼$36 per visit, $152 per patient. The total yearly economic impact on patients and caregivers is $182 million, ∼$450 per patient. Data to support model parameters were limited. Study estimates are sensitive to the assumptions used. The burden of clinic visits for G-CSF therapy is a significant addition to the total economic burden borne by cancer patients and their families.

  1. Systematic review of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Christoph; Michielin, Olivier; Ascierto, Paolo A; Szabo, Zsolt; Blank, Christian U

    2016-09-01

    Several immunomodulatory checkpoint inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma, including ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic virus to gain regulatory approval in the USA; it is also approved in Europe. Talimogene laherparepvec expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and with other GM-CSF-expressing oncolytic viruses in development, understanding the clinical relevance of this cytokine in treating advanced melanoma is important. Results of trials of GM-CSF in melanoma have been mixed, and while GM-CSF has the potential to promote anti-tumor responses, some preclinical data suggest that GM-CSF may sometimes promote tumor growth. GM-CSF has not been approved as a melanoma treatment. We undertook a systematic literature review of studies of GM-CSF in patients with advanced melanoma (stage IIIB-IV). Of the 503 articles identified, 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. Most studies investigated the use of GM-CSF in combination with another treatment, such as peptide vaccines or chemotherapy, or as an adjuvant to surgery. Some clinical benefit was reported in patients who received GM-CSF as an adjuvant to surgery, or in combination with other treatments. In general, outcomes for patients receiving peptide vaccines were not improved with the addition of GM-CSF. GM-CSF may be a valuable therapeutic adjuvant; however, further studies are needed, particularly head-to-head comparisons, to confirm the optimal dosing regimen and clinical effectiveness in patients with advanced melanoma.

  2. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor treatment results in recovery of motor function after white matter damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Jennifer K; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Zhang, Min; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-01-01

    Clinical stroke usually results from a cerebral ischaemic event, and is frequently a debilitating condition with limited treatment options. A significant proportion of clinical strokes result from specific damage to the subcortical white matter (SWM), but currently there are few animal models available to investigate the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic strategies to promote recovery. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that has been previously shown to promote neuroprotective effects after brain damage; however, the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Here, it is reported that GM-CSF treatment results in dramatic functional improvement in a white matter model of stroke in mice. SWM stroke was induced in mice by unilateral injections of the vasoconstrictor, endothelin-1 (ET-1). The results reveal that ET-1-induced stroke impairs skilled motor function on the single pellet-reaching task and results in forelimb asymmetry, in adult mice. Treatment with GM-CSF, after stroke, restores motor function and abolishes forelimb asymmetry. The results also indicate that GM-CSF promotes its effects by activating mammalian target of rapamycin signalling mechanisms in the brain following stroke injury. Additionally, a significant increase in GM-CSF receptor expression was found in the ipsilateral hemisphere of the ET-1-injected brain. Taken together, the present study highlights the use of an under-utilized mouse model of stroke (using ET-1) and suggests that GM-CSF treatment can attenuate ET-1-induced functional deficits. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Disseminated Cryptococcosis Due to Anti-Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Autoantibodies in the Absence of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chen-Yen; Wang, Shang-Yu; Shih, Han-Po; Tu, Kun-Hua; Huang, Wen-Chi; Ding, Jing-Ya; Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Ho, Mao-Wang; Chang, Shi-Chuan; He, Chi-Ying; Chen, Hung-Kai; Ho, Chen-Hsuan; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Chi, Chih-Yu; Ku, Cheng-Lung

    2017-02-01

    Autoantibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can cause acquired pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Cases of acquired PAP susceptible to typical respiratory pathogens and opportunistic infections have been reported. Anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies have been reported in a few patients with cryptococcal meningitis. This study evaluated the presence of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in patients without known congenital or acquired immunodeficiency with severe pulmonary or extrapulmonary cryptococcal infection but without PAP. We took a clinical history and performed an immunologic evaluation and screening of anti-cytokine autoantibodies in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. The impact of autoantibodies to GM-CSF on immune function was assessed by intracellular staining of GM-CSF-induced STAT5 phosphorylation and MIP-1α production in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells incubated with plasma from patients or normal control subjects. Neutralizing anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies were identified in four patients with disseminated cryptococcosis, none of whom exhibited PAP. Plasma from patients blocked GM-CSF signaling and inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation and production of MIP-1α. One patient died of disseminated cryptococcosis involving the central nervous system, which was associated with defective GM-CSF activity. Anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies increase susceptibility to cryptococcal infection in adults without PAP. Cryptococcal central nervous system infection associated with anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies could result in neurological sequelae or be life-threatening. Therefore, timely detection of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies and development of an effective therapy are necessary to prevent deterioration of cryptococcal infection in these patients.

  4. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) augments acute lung injury via its neutrophil priming effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Chol; Jung, Jae Woo; Kwak, Hee Won; Song, Ju Han; Jeon, Eun Ju; Shin, Jong Wook; Park, In Won; Choi, Byoung Whui; Kim, Jae Yeol

    2008-04-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has immuno-stimulatory effects. We hypothesized that GM-CSF plays an important role both in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hemorrhage-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We also postulated that GM-CSF augments LPS-induced inflammation by priming neutrophils. ALI was induced in GM-CSF-/- or control C57BL mice either by LPS injection or by hemorrhage. Lung inflammation (by lung expression for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin- 6 (IL-6), and keratinocyte-derived chemokine) and lung injury (by myeloperoxidase and Evans blue dye assay) were evaluated after ALI. Incremental doses of LPS (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) and GM-CSF (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) were added to bone marrow neutrophils. The expression of TNF-alpha, MIP-2, and IL-1beta was evaluated with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA expression of three cytokines, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa-B) were evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. GM-CSF -/- mice showed decreased neutrophil infiltration, less leakage, and lower expression of cytokines in the lung after LPS or hemorrhage. GM-CSF augmented LPS-induced protein and mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, MIP-2 and IL-1beta, which was mediated by increased intra-nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. GM-CSF plays an important role in high-dose LPS and hemorrhage-induced ALI, which appears to be mediated by its priming effect on neutrophils.

  5. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is a key mediator in experimental osteoarthritis pain and disease development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to be important in the development of inflammatory models of rheumatoid arthritis and there is encouraging data that its blockade may have clinical relevance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aims of the current study were to determine whether GM-CSF may also be important for disease and pain development in a model of osteoarthritis. Methods The role of GM-CSF was investigated using the collagenase-induced instability model of osteoarthritis. We studied both GM-CSF-/- mice and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice treated prophylactically or therapeutically with a monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF. Disease development (both early and late) was evaluated by histology and knee pain development was measured by assessment of weight distribution. Results In the absence of GM-CSF, there was less synovitis and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated neoepitope expression at week 2 post disease induction, and less cartilage damage at week 6. GM-CSF was absolutely required for pain development. Therapeutic neutralization of GM-CSF not only abolished the pain within 3 days but also led to significantly reduced cartilage damage. Conclusions GM-CSF is key to the development of experimental osteoarthritis and its associated pain. Importantly, GM-CSF neutralization by a therapeutic monoclonal antibody-based protocol rapidly and completely abolished existing arthritic pain and suppressed the degree of arthritis development. Our results suggest that it would be worth exploring the importance of GM-CSF for pain and disease in other osteoarthritis models and perhaps clinically for this form of arthritis. PMID:22995428

  6. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with radiotherapy promotes tumor growth by stimulating vascularization in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Bae, Min Ji; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Chang Geun; Jo, Wol Soon; Kim, Sung Dae; Yang, Kwangmo

    2015-07-01

    Although granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used to support recovery from radiation-induced side-effects, the precise effects of G-CSF on colon cancer under radiotherapy remain poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effects of tumor growth following radiotherapy and G-CSF administration in a murine xenograft model of colon cancer, female BALB/c mice were injected with cells of a colon carcinoma cell line (CT26) with irradiation and G-CSF, alone or in combination. Mice received 2 Gy of focal radiation daily for 5 days and intraperitoneal injection of G-CSF (100 µg/kg/day) after irradiation for 7 days. Changes in the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase type 9 (MMP-9) and CD31 were assessed in the mouse cancer induced by injection of colon cancer cells. We observed that G-CSF increased the number of circulating neutrophils, but facilitated tumor growth. However, G-CSF treatment did not affect radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell viability in CT26 cells in vitro. Increased levels of myeloperoxidase, a neutrophil marker and those of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed in tumors with G-CSF supplementation. In addition, we found that increased levels of CD31 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were correlated with the enhanced tumor growth after G-CSF treatment. Therefore, these data suggest that G-CSF may contribute to tumor growth and decrease the antitumor effect of radiotherapy, possibly by promoting vascularization in cancer lesions.

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma in ascitic fluid at initial diagnosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Nao; Naito, Yoshiki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Taira, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Yoshida, Tomoko; Abe, Hideyuki; Takase, Yorihiko; Fukumitsu, Chihiro; Murata, Kazuya; Ishida, Yusuke; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Kimura, Yoshizo; Tanigawa, Masahiko; Mihara, Yutaro; Nakayama, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Akiba, Jun; Yano, Hirohisa

    2017-02-10

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing pancreatic tumors are extremely rare. These tumors have an aggressive clinical course and no established treatment. Here, we report an autopsy case of G-CSF-production in pancreatic anaplastic carcinoma (PAC). A 72-year-old woman presented with a large pancreatic head mass and multiple liver metastases. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis (leukocyte count 113.3 × 10(3) /µL) and high serum G-CSF levels (441 pg/mL; normal range: <39.0 pg/mL). The ascitic fluid was submitted to our pathology laboratory at initial diagnosis. Cytopathology showed that smears from the ascitic fluid were highly cellular and contained numerous malignant cells, mainly in loose groupings. Occasional pseudoglandular formations and giant cells were also present. The malignant cells were round, and no spindle-shaped cells were visible. The nuclei were round to ovoid with coarsely granular chromatin and large prominent nucleoli. Upon immunocytochemistry, tumor cells were positive for G-CSF and vimentin; there was no E-cadherin expression. Histopathological examination of the tumor showed a mixed composition of adenocarcinomatous and sarcomatous regions. Upon immunohistochemistry, both components were positive for G-CSF. Few CD34-positive myeloblasts were observed in the bone marrow. Thus, we diagnosed this as a case of G-CSF production in PAC with leukocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on G-CSF expression immunocytochemically confirmed in PAC. Diagn. Cytopathol. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) for stroke: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    England, Timothy J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Alasheev, Andrey M.; Belkin, Andrey A.; Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Kameshwar; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may enhance recovery from stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms if administered early, or neurorepair if given later. Several small trials suggest administration is safe but effects on efficacy are unclear. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) assessing G-CSF in patients with hyperacute, acute, subacute or chronic stroke, and asked Investigators to share individual patient data on baseline characteristics, stroke severity and type, end-of-trial modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Barthel Index, haematological parameters, serious adverse events and death. Multiple variable analyses were adjusted for age, sex, baseline severity and time-to-treatment. Individual patient data were obtained for 6 of 10 RCTs comprising 196 stroke patients (116 G-CSF, 80 placebo), mean age 67.1 (SD 12.9), 92% ischaemic, median NIHSS 10 (IQR 5–15), randomised 11 days (interquartile range IQR 4–238) post ictus; data from three commercial trials were not shared. G-CSF did not improve mRS (ordinal regression), odds ratio OR 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.96, p = 0.62). There were more patients with a serious adverse event in the G-CSF group (29.6% versus 7.5%, p = 0.07) with no significant difference in all-cause mortality (G-CSF 11.2%, placebo 7.6%, p = 0.4). Overall, G-CSF did not improve stroke outcome in this individual patient data meta-analysis. PMID:27845349

  9. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  10. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (<7 mm). Thirty patients with previously cancelled embryo transfers received intrauterine G-CSF in subsequent frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. Patients were divided into the G-CSF only and G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P < 0.001). Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P < 0.01; 48.1% versus 25.0%; P = 0.038, respectively). Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to the acute mobilization of endothelial precursor cells by vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yuval; Tang, Terence; Woloszynek, Jill; Daenen, Laura G; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Cai, Shi-Rong; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Voest, Emile E; Chaplin, David J; Smythe, Jon; Harris, Adrian; Nathan, Paul; Judson, Ian; Rustin, Gordon; Bertolini, Francesco; Link, Daniel C; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-10-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDA) cause acute shutdown of abnormal established tumor vasculature, followed by massive intratumoral hypoxia and necrosis. However, a viable rim of tumor tissue invariably remains from which tumor regrowth rapidly resumes. We have recently shown that an acute systemic mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial precursor (CEP) cells could promote tumor regrowth following treatment with either a VDA or certain chemotherapy drugs. The molecular mediators of this systemic reactive host process are unknown. Here, we show that following treatment of mice with OXi-4503, a second-generation potent prodrug derivative of combretastatin-A4 phosphate, rapid increases in circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels are detected. With the aim of determining whether G-CSF is involved in VDA-induced CEP mobilization, mutant G-CSF-R(-/-) mice were treated with OXi-4503. We found that as opposed to wild-type controls, G-CSF-R(-/-) mice failed to mobilize CEPs or show induction of SDF-1 plasma levels. Furthermore, Lewis lung carcinomas grown in such mice treated with OXi-4503 showed greater levels of necrosis compared with tumors treated in wild-type mice. Evidence for rapid elevations in circulating plasma G-CSF, vascular endothelial growth factor, and SDF-1 were also observed in patients with VDA (combretastatin-A4 phosphate)-treated cancer. These results highlight the possible effect of drug-induced G-CSF on tumor regrowth following certain cytotoxic drug therapies, in this case using a VDA, and hence G-CSF as a possible therapeutic target.

  12. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for acute-on-chronic liver failure: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Mendiola-Pastrana, Indira; Ornelas-Arroyo, Victoria J; Noreña-Herrera, Camilo; Vidaña-Perez, Desiree; Delgado-Sanchez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with increased short and long-term mortality. Animal models of liver failure have demonstrated that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) accelerates the liver regeneration process and improves survival. However, clinical evidence regarding the use of G-CSF in ACLF remains scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits and harms of G-CSF in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. An electronic search was made in The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS up to November 2013. Randomized clinical trials comparing the use of any regimen of G-CSF against placebo or no intervention in patients with ACLF were included. Primary outcomes included overal mortality, mortality due multi-organ failure, and adverse events. Relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) were used. Two trials involving 102 patients were included. A significant reduction in short-term overall mortality was observed in patients receiving G-CSF compared to controls (RR 0.56; 95%CI 0.39,0.80). G-CSF failed to reduce mortality secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding (RR 1.45; 95%CI 0.50, 4.27). Adverse effects reported included: fever, rash, herpes zoster, headache and nausea. In conclusion, the use of G-CSF for the treatment of patients with ACLF significantly reduced short-term mortality. While the evidence is still limited, the apparent benefit observed on short-term mortality, mild adverse effects and lack of an alternative therapy make the use of G-CSF in ACLF patients a reasonable alternative when liver transplantation is contraindicated or unavailable.

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing ascending colon cancer as indicated by histopathological findings: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yushi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Takatsuka, Satoshi; Kaizaki, Ryoji; Inoue, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Various types of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing malignant tumors have been reported. However, a G-CSF-producing colorectal cancer is rare. We present a case of G-CSF-producing ascending colon cancer. An 81-year-old man was referred to our hospital with right lower abdominal pain. A colon fiberscopy revealed an ascending colon tumor, and histological examination revealed tubular adenocarcinoma. He was admitted due to worsening abdominal pain. Although laboratory data showed an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count of 17000/mm3 with 77.8% neutrophils, elevated C-reaction protein (CRP) was insignificant (1.06 mg/dL), and he was afebrile. Because computed tomography indicated that the tumor penetrated into surrounding tissue, a semi-urgent ileocecal resection was performed. An abscess was not located. The tumor was staged as T3N2aM0 and as stage IIB according to the TNM classification. Microscopically, significant neutrophil infiltration between cancer cells was observed, suggesting the presence of a G-CSF-producing tumor. Immunohistochemical staining using a G-CSF antibody revealed cytoplasmic staining in cancer cells. The serum concentration of G-CSF upon admission was 334 pg/mL. After surgical resection, the WBC count decreased to within a normal range. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of G-CSF-producing ascending colon cancer. The prognosis of G-CSF-producing tumors is considered to be poor. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment are needed for patients with G-CSF-producing tumors, and continuous careful follow-up is required.

  14. Herbal medicine "sho-saiko-to" induces in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashiki, M; Asakawa, M; Kayaba, Y; Kosaka, Y; Nishimura, A

    1992-01-01

    The herbal medicine "Sho-saiko-to (Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang)" has been used in China for about 3000 years for the treatment of pyretic diseases. This medicine is now available as one of the prescribing drugs approved by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, and has also been widely used for patients with chronic viral liver disease as one of biological response modifiers in the field of Japan's Western Medicine. However, its mode of action has not been fully described. In the present in vitro study, we added "Sho-saiko-to" (TJ-9, Tsumura, Tokyo) to the culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from healthy volunteers, and observed a dose-dependent increase in the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The same experiment was conducted using other herbal medicines "Dai-saiko-to" (TJ-8) and "Saiko-keishi-to" (TJ-10) which showed similar effects, or "Sho-seiryu-to" (TJ-19) which consists of very different compounds and shows different efficacy. The increases of G-CSF production were similar when "Sho-saiko-to" (TJ-9) or one of the 2 reference drugs (TJ-8 and 10) was added, whereas the increase when the control drug "Sho-seiryu-to" (TJ-19) was added, was quite small. This result shows that G-CSF induction is not a common effect of herbal medicines, but a specific effect of TJ-8, 9, and 10. Among these 3 drugs the increase produced by "Sho-saiko-to" was the largest. Based on this result, we conclude that administration of "Sho-saiko-to" may be useful not only for the treatment of chronic liver disease, but also for malignant diseases and acute infectious diseases where G-CSF is efficacious.

  15. High-dosage granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment alters monocyte trafficking to the brain after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Weise, Gesa; Pösel, Claudia; Möller, Karoline; Kranz, Alexander; Didwischus, Nadine; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Ischemic stroke elicits a prompt inflammatory response that is characterized by a well-timed recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain. Among these, monocytes play a particularly important, but multifaceted role and have been increasingly recognized to affect stroke outcome. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is known for its immunosuppressive actions on mononuclear cells, but previous studies in the stroke field were mainly confined to its neuroprotective actions. Herein, we investigated whether GCSF affects post-stroke inflammation in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by modulating monocyte responses. Treatment with GCSF was controlled by vehicle injection, sham surgery and naive animals. Despite a significant monocytosis, high-dosage GCSF reduced the number of brain-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages four days after stroke. Lower numbers of mononuclear phagocytes in the brain were associated with smaller cerebral edema and improved motor outcome after stroke. GCSF treatment over 72h, but not 24h diminished integrin expression on circulating Ly6C+ inflammatory monocytes. In vitro experiments further revealed that GCSF strongly promotes interleukin (IL)-10 secretion by activated mononuclear cells. Blockade of the IL-10 receptor partly reversed GCSF-induced downregulation of integrin surface expression. Overall, our results suggest that high-dosage GCSF mitigates monocyte infiltration after stroke, likely by attenuating integrin-mediated adhesion to the brain endothelium in an IL-10-dependent manner. Lower amounts of mononuclear cells in the brain translate to less severe brain edema and functional impairment and thus support a harmful role of Ly6C+ inflammatory monocytes in the acute stage of stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phase II Trial of Intravenous Low-Dose Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Yamashita, Toru; Kono, Syoichiro; Nakayama, Taira; Baba, Yasuhiko; Itoh, Shinji; Asakura, Kunihiko; Niimi, Yoshiki; Asahi, Takashi; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Mutoh, Tatsuro; Kuroda, Satoshi; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Abe, Koji; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-06-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has shown neuroprotective and neurogenerative activities in experimental studies, and our previous phase I clinical study suggested the safety and potential efficacy of low-dose G-CSF in acute ischemic stroke patients. The present phase II trial is aimed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF administration on neurological function and infarct volume, compared with a placebo group. Forty-nine acute ischemic stroke patients (29 males, 20 females; 71 ± 10 years) within 24 hours after onset were recruited. Eligible patients were randomized 2:2:1 to receive G-CSF 150 µg/body/day, G-CSF 300 µg/body/day, and placebo, respectively. We evaluated clinical outcome in terms of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index at 90 days after onset, together with changes in infarct volume on magnetic resonance imaging. We found no serious adverse event, including change in leukocyte levels, which remained below 31,000/µL, at 150 and 300 µg G-CSF/body/day. Clinical outcome scores did not show any significant difference among the 3 groups. Chronological changes in infarct volume also showed no significant difference. G-CSF was well-tolerated at 150 and 300 µg/body/day in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, administration of G-CSF at both 150 and 300 µg/body/day neither contributed to functional recovery nor reduced infarct volume at 3 months after onset, compared with the control group. The apparent lack of effectiveness may have been due to the small sample size. A trial of combination therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and G-CSF is planned. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biweekly docetaxel and vinorelbine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support for patients with anthracycline-resistant metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bernal, Amalia; Cruz, Juan Jesús; Olaverri, Amaya; Arizcun, Alberto; Martín, Teresa; Rodríguez, Cesar A; Martín, Germán; Fonseca, Emilio; Sánchez, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    This phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 plus docetaxel 60 mg2/m administered on day 1, every 2 weeks with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support (G-CSF, 5 microg/kg/day, days 3-7) as primary prophylaxis in patients with histologically confirmed metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and previously treated with anthracyclines in the adjuvant or in the first-line setting. A total of 48 patients received 352 cycles (median 8, range 2-10). All patients were included in the efficacy and safety evaluation on an intent-to-treat analysis. Eight patients (17%) showed a complete response and 14 patients (29%) showed a partial response. Overall response rate was 46% [95% confidence interval (CI) 33-60]. The median duration of response was 10.0 months. With a median follow-up of 18.0 months, the median time to progression was 11.9 months and the median overall survival was 27.1 months. The most frequently reported grade 3/4 hematological toxicity was neutropenia (19% of patients, 4% of cycles). Febrile neutropenia was reported in six patients (13%) and 7 cycles (2%), but no toxic deaths were reported. The most common grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicity was asthenia (17% of patients, 6% of cycles) and nail toxicity (15% of patients, 3% of cycles). In conclusion, biweekly docetaxel plus vinorelbine with G-CSF support is active and well tolerated as chemotherapy for patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines. G-CSF support is recommended for lowering the incidence and severity of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia.

  18. A randomised trial of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for neonatal sepsis: outcomes at 2 years

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Neil; Morris, Timothy; Brocklehurst, Peter; Carr, Robert; Cowan, Frances M; Patel, Nishma; Petrou, Stavros; Redshaw, Maggie E; Modi, Neena; Dore, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Objective The authors performed a randomised trial in very preterm small-for-gestational age (SGA) babies to determine if prophylaxis with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) improves outcomes (the PROGRAMS trial). Despite increased neutrophil counts following GM-CSF, the authors reported no significant difference in neonatal sepsis-free survival. Patients and methods 280 babies born <31 weeks of gestation and SGA were entered into the trial. Outcome was determined at 2 years to determine neurodevelopmental and general health outcomes, including economic costs. Results The authors found no significant differences in health outcomes or health and social care costs between the trial groups. In the GM-CSF arm, 87 of 134 (65%) babies survived to 2 years without severe disability compared with 87 of 131 (66%) controls (RR: 1·0, 95% CI 0·8 to 1·2). Marginally, more children receiving GM-CSF were reported to have cough (RR 1·7, 95% CI 1·1 to 2·6) and had signs of chronic respiratory disease (Harrison's sulcus; RR 2·0, 95% CI 1·0 to 3·9) though this was not reflected in bronchodilator use or need for hospitalisation for respiratory disease. Overall, the rate of neurologic abnormality (7%–9%) was similar but mean overall developmental scores were lower than expected for gestational age. Conclusions The administration of GM-CSF to very preterm SGA babies is not associated with improved or more adverse outcomes at 2 years of age. The apparent excess of developmental impairment in the entire PROGRAMS cohort, without corresponding increase in neurological abnormality, may represent diffuse brain injury attributable to intrauterine growth restriction. PMID:22542709

  19. Use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in two children treated with cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vowels, M R; Tiedemann, K; Lam-Po-Tang, R; Tucker, D P

    1994-01-01

    Cord blood contains stem cells in amounts similar to or slightly less than those present in a bone marrow collection to be used for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Too few cord blood transplants (CBT) have yet been performed to define the ability to achieve engraftment and the rate of engraftment. Two cord blood transplants have been performed using granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to hasten engraftment. Two children, aged 5 and 6 years received a CBT using HLA-identical stem cells collected at the birth of a sibling. One child had X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), and the other, acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second complete remission. One had an ABO and one an Rh blood group mismatch. Conditioning therapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, melphalan, and antithymocyte globulin or busulphan and cyclophosphamide. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis was methotrexate and cyclosporine or cyclosporine. Both children were given GM-CSF at 5 micrograms/kg/day from day 1 until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) reached 1.0 x 10(9)/L for 3 consecutive days. If this level was not reached by day 14, the dose of GM-CSF was doubled. Both children engrafted rapidly, with ANCs reaching 0.5 x 10(9)/L in 12 and 16 days. Engraftment was confirmed by blood group in both and sex chromosome typing in one. Both children developed mild GVHD localized to skin, which resolved with steroid therapy. The child with XLP was cured and has survived for 34 months; the second child has survived 27 months with normal marrow function but has had a relapse of leukemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor improves Parkinson's disease associated with co-morbid depression: An experimental exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ajay; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Medhi, Bikash

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle and movement disorder, often associated with depression. PD is very difficult to treat. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF in PD associated with depression. Materials and Methods: Adult Wistar male rats weighing about 180-250 g were selected and divided into five groups in parallel designed method namely; control group (n = 5); sham operated group (n = 5); Vehicle group (n = 5); G-CSF group (70 μg/kg, s.c.) (n = 5) and L-DOPA group (n = 5). The rats were treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on day 0 and then treatment was continued for 14 day of L-DOPA/carbidopa, whereas G-CSF (70 μg/kg, s.c.) was given from day 1 to 6. Thereafter, adhesive removal and forced swim tests were conducted to evaluate the behavioral outcome of G-CSF treatment. The finding was correlated and analyzed with Nissl staining findings for the final conclusion. Results: The behavioral parameters were assessed and found to be ameliorate the symptoms of Parkinson's and reduced the depression like behavior in PD. The histological findings were supported the behavioral findings and showed pathological improvement. Conclusion: As a preliminary work, the present study first time suggested that G-CSF have a potential role in PD and associated depression. PMID:24347771

  1. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications. PMID:23761108

  2. Phase I study of intravenous low-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in acute and subacute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yusuke; Mizuma, Atsushi; Uesugi, Tsuyoshi; Ohnuki, Yoichi; Nagata, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Wakoh; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shigeharu; Takizawa, Shunya

    2013-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; filgrastim) may be useful for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke because of its neuroprotective and neurogenesis-promoting properties, but an excessive increase of neutrophils may lead to brain injury. We examined the safety and tolerability of low-dose G-CSF and investigated the effectiveness of G-CSF given intravenously in the acute phase (at 24 hours) or subacute phase (at 7 days) of ischemic stroke. Three intravenous dose regimens (150, 300, or 450 μg/body/day, divided into 2 doses for 5 days) of G-CSF were examined in 18 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-confirmed infarct in the territory of the middle cerebral artery. Nine patients received the first dose at 24 hours poststroke (acute group) and 9 patients received the first dose on day 7 poststroke (subacute group; n = 3 at each dose in each group). A scheduled administration of G-CSF was skipped if the patient's leukocyte count exceeded 40,000/μL. Patients received neurologic and MRI examinations. We found neither serious adverse event, drug-related platelet reduction nor splenomegaly. Leukocyte levels remained below 40,000/μL at 150 and 300 μg G-CSF/body/day, but rose above 40,000/μL at 450 μg G-CSF/body/day. Neurologic function improvement between baseline and day 90 was more marked after treatment in the acute phase versus the subacute phase (Barthel index 49.4 ± 28.1 v 15.0 ± 22.0; P < .01). Low-dose G-CSF (150 and 300 μg/body/day) was safe and well tolerated in ischemic stroke patients, and leukocyte levels remained below 40,000/μL. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following adjuvant chemotherapy with and without granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Calip, Gregory S.; Malmgren, Judith A.; Lee, Wan-Ju; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Kaplan, Henry G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post-breast cancer treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) is not fully characterized. Our objective was to estimate MDS/AML risk associated with specific breast cancer treatments. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women ages ≥66 years with stage I-III breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database. Women were classified as receiving treatment with radiation, chemotherapy and/or G-CSF. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for MDS/AML risk. Results Among 56,251 breast cancer cases, 1.2% developed MDS/AML during median follow-up of 3.2 years. 47.1% of women received radiation and 14.3% received chemotherapy. Compared to breast cancer cases treated with surgery alone, those treated with chemotherapy (HR=1.38, 95%-CI: 0.98–1.93) and chemotherapy/radiation (HR=1.77, 95%-CI: 1.25–2.51) had increased risk of MDS/AML; but not radiation alone (HR=1.08, 95% CI: 0.86–1.36). Among chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF, MDS/AML risk was differentially associated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-containing regimens (HR=1.86, 95%-CI: 1.33–2.61) and filgrastim (HR=1.47, 95%-CI: 1.05–2.06), but not pegfilgrastim (HR=1.10, 95%-CI: 0.73–1.66). Conclusions We observed increased MDS/AML risk among older breast cancer survivors treated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy that was enhanced by G-CSF. Although small, this risk warrants consideration when determining adjuvant chemotherapy and neutropenia prophylaxis for breast cancer patients. PMID:26450505

  4. Development of Aggressive Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Depends on Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Secretion in Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Owens, Philip; Gorska, Agnieszka E; Chytil, Anna; Ye, Fei; Shi, Chanjuan; Weaver, Valerie M; Kalluri, Raghu; Moses, Harold L; Novitskiy, Sergey V

    2017-09-01

    The survival rate for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains low. More therapeutic options to treat this disease are needed, for the current standard of care is ineffective. Using an animal model of aggressive PDAC (Kras/p48(TGFβRIIKO)), we discovered an effect of TGFβ signaling in regulation of G-CSF secretion in pancreatic epithelium. Elevated concentrations of G-CSF in PDAC promoted differentiation of Ly6G(+) cells from progenitors, stimulated IL10 secretion from myeloid cells, and decreased T-cell proliferation via upregulation of Arg, iNOS, VEGF, IL6, and IL1b from CD11b(+) cells. Deletion of csf3 in PDAC cells or use of a G-CSF-blocking antibody decreased tumor growth. Anti-G-CSF treatment in combination with the DNA synthesis inhibitor gemcitabine reduced tumor size, increased the number of infiltrating T cells, and decreased the number of Ly6G(+) cells more effectively than gemcitabine alone. Human analysis of human datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas and tissue microarrays correlated with observations from our mouse model experiments, especially in patients with grade 1, stage II disease. We propose that in aggressive PDAC, elevated G-CSF contributes to tumor progression through promoting increases in infiltration of neutrophil-like cells with high immunosuppressive activity. Such a mechanism provides an avenue for a neoadjuvant therapeutic approach for this devastating disease. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(9); 718-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  6. Expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in male germ cells: GM-CSF enhances sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Lourdes T; Rauch, M Cecilia; Mansilla, Alejandra; Zambrano, Angara; Brito, Mónica; Werner, Enrique; Alfaro, Víctor; Cox, José F; Concha, Ilona I

    2003-10-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine capable of stimulating proliferation, maturation and function of hematopoietic cells. Receptors for this cytokine are composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and are expressed on myeloid progenitors and mature mononuclear phagocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and neutrophils, as well as in other nonhematopietic cells. We have recently demonstrated that bull spermatozoa express functional GM-CSF receptors that signal for increased glucose and Vitamin C uptake. In this study, we analyzed the expression of GM-CSF in bovine and human germ cells and its influence in bovine sperm motility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that adult bovine and human testes expressed GM-CSF. In addition, immunolocalization studies confirmed the presence of GM-CSF in the germ cell line in bovine and human testes. Computer-assisted evaluation of patterns of sperm motility demonstrated that the addition of GM-CSF enhances several parameters of sperm motility in the presence of glucose or fructose substrates.

  7. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors from normal donors using the combination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor results in fewer plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the graft and enhanced donor T cell engraftment with Th1 polarization: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lonial, Sagar; Akhtari, Mojtaba; Kaufman, Jonathan; Torre, Claire; Lechowicz, Mary J; Flowers, Christopher; Sinha, Rajni; Khoury, Hanna J; Langston, Amelia A; Waller, Edmund K

    2013-03-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) both mobilize CD34(+) stem cells into the blood when administered before apheresis but have distinct effects on dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. We previously demonstrated that the combination of GM+G-CSF results in fewer plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) when used to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation. To test the hypothesis that the content of pDCs in an allograft can be modulated with the cytokines used for mobilization, we randomized the human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling donors of 50 patients with hematological malignancies to a mobilization regimen of either GM+G-CSF (n = 25) or G-CSF alone (n = 25). Primary and secondary endpoints included the cellular constituents of the mobilized grafts, the kinetics of posttransplantation immune reconstitution, and clinical outcomes of the transplantation recipients. Grafts from donors receiving GM+G-CSF contained equivalent numbers of CD34(+) cells with fewer pDCs and T cells, with a higher fraction of Th1-polarized donor T cells than G-CSF mobilized grafts. Immune recovery was enhanced among recipients of GM+G-CSF. Survival was not significantly different between transplantation recipients in the two arms. The use of GM+G-CSF modulates immune function and recovery after allogeneic transplantation and should be explored in larger studies powered to evaluate clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    PubMed

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  9. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration. PMID:26376304

  10. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Granulocyte-Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes CD34+ Cell Migration Via a Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Adriana López; Ribeiro-Fleury, Tatiana; Chabot, Valérie; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Langonné, Alain; Hérault, Olivier; Charbord, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) can be mobilized into the circulation using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), for graft collection in view of hematopoietic transplantation. This process has been related to bone marrow (BM) release of serine proteases and of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Yet, the role of these mediators in HSC egress from their niches remains questionable, because they are produced by nonstromal cells (mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) that are not a part of the niche. We show here that the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed by human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), and that G-CSF prestimulation of MSCs enhances the in vitro trans-stromal migration of CD34+ cells. Zymography analysis indicates that pro-MMP-2 (but not pro-MMP-9) is expressed in MSCs, and that G-CSF treatment increases its expression and induces its activation at the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that G-CSF-stimulated migration depends on G-CSFR expression and is mediated by a mechanism that involves MMPs. These results suggest a molecular model whereby G-CSF infusion may drive, by the direct action on MSCs, HSPC egress from BM niches via synthesis and activation of MMPs. In this model, MMP-2 instead of MMP-9 is implicated, which constitutes a major difference with mouse mobilization models. PMID:22651889

  12. Involvement of nuclear factor of activated T cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Sekido, Machiko; Iio, Aki; Chimura, Naoki; Shibata, Sanae; Kamishina, Harumi; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Maeda, Sadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the cysteine protease of Dermatophagoides farinae induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in a canine epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cell line (CPEK); however, the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Given that the transcription of GM-CSF mRNA in human lymphocytes is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), it is hypothesized that NFAT also contributes to GM-CSF production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease. Nuclear translocation of NFAT was evaluated in CPEK cells in the absence or presence of the cysteine protease papain. We also investigated whether blockade of NFAT could inhibit GM-CSF production. Papain-induced nuclear translocation of NFAT, producing GM-CSF, was partly inhibited by ciclosporin. The results suggest that GM-CSF production mediated by the cysteine protease is regulated not only by NFAT but also by unknown signalling pathways in canine keratinocytes. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  14. Oncostatin M is a member of a cytokine family that includes leukemia-inhibitory factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, T M; Bruce, A G

    1991-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a glycoprotein of Mr approximately 28,000 produced by activated monocyte and T-lymphocyte cell lines, was previously identified by its ability to inhibit the growth of cells from melanoma and other solid tumors. We have detected significant similarities in the primary amino acid sequences and predicted secondary structures of OSM, leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Analysis of the genes encoding these proteins revealed a shared exon organization, suggesting evolutionary descent from a common ancestral gene. Using a panel of DNAs from somatic cell hybrids, we have shown that OSM, like LIF, is located on human chromosome 22. We have also demonstrated that OSM has the ability to inhibit the proliferation of murine M1 myeloid leukemic cells and can induce their differentiation into macrophage-like cells, a function shared by LIF, G-CSF, and IL-6. We propose that OSM, LIF, G-CSF, and IL-6 are structurally related members of a cytokine family that have in common the ability to modulate differentiation of a variety of cell types. Images PMID:1717982

  15. Incorporation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Granulocyte- Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor or CD40 Ligand Enhances Immunogenicity of Chimeric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Like Particles▿

    PubMed Central

    Skountzou, Ioanna; Quan, Fu-Shi; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Ye, Ling; Vzorov, Andrei; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Jacob, Joshy; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2007-01-01

    The rapid worldwide spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mandates the development of successful vaccination strategies. Since live attenuated HIV is not accepted as a vaccine due to safety concerns, virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive safe alternative because they lack the viral genome yet they are perceived by the immune system as a virus particle. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this we generated chimeric simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) VLPs containing either glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity and ability to enhance immune responses in vivo. Immunization of mice with chimeric SIV VLPs containing GM-CSF induced SIV Env-specific antibodies as well as neutralizing activity at significantly higher levels than those induced by standard SIV VLPs, SIV VLPs containing CD40L, or standard VLPs mixed with soluble GM-CSF. In addition, mice immunized with chimeric SIV VLPs containing either GM-CSF or CD40L showed significantly increased CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell responses to SIV Env, compared to standard SIV VLPs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the incorporation of immunostimulatory molecules enhances humoral and cellular immune responses. We propose that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into SIV VLPs can be a promising approach to augmenting the efficacy of VLP antigens. PMID:17108046

  16. The use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor induced mobilization for isolation of dental pulp stem cells with high regenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masashi; Horibe, Hiroshi; Iohara, Koichiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Osako, Yohei; Takei, Yoshifumi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Motoyama, Noboru; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) contain subsets of progenitor/stem cells with high angiogenic, neurogenic and regenerative potential useful for cell therapy. It is essential to develop a safe and efficacious method to isolate the clinical-grade DPSCs subsets from a small amount of pulp tissue without using conventional flow cytometry. Thus, a method for isolation of DPSCs subsets based on their migratory response to optimized concentration of 100 ng/ml of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was determined in this study. The DPSCs mobilized by G-CSF (MDPSCs) were enriched for CD105, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) positive cells, demonstrating stem cell properties including high proliferation rate and stability. The absence of abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype and lack of tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse were demonstrated. The conditioned medium of MDPSCs exhibited anti-apoptotic activity, enhanced migration and immunomodulatory properties. Furthermore, transplantation of MDPSCs accelerated vasculogenesis in an ischemic hindlimb model and augmented regenerated pulp tissue in an ectopic tooth root model compared to that of colony-derived DPSCs, indicating higher regenerative potential of MDPSCs. In conclusion, this isolation method for DPSCs subsets is safe and efficacious, having utility for potential clinical applications to autologous cell transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-06-01

    To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. NCT01023256. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Phase II Study of Adjuvant Immunotherapy with the CSF-470 Vaccine Plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin Plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor vs Medium-Dose Interferon Alpha 2B in Stages IIB, IIC, and III Cutaneous Melanoma Patients: A Single Institution, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Mordoh, José; Pampena, María Betina; Aris, Mariana; Blanco, Paula Alejandra; Lombardo, Mónica; von Euw, Erika María; Mac Keon, Soledad; Yépez Crow, Michelle; Bravo, Alicia Inés; O’Connor, Juan Manuel; Orlando, Ana Gabriela; Ramello, Franco; Levy, Estrella Mariel; Barrio, María Marcela

    2017-01-01

    The irradiated, allogeneic, cellular CSF-470 vaccine plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) and recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) is being tested against medium-dose IFN-α2b in stages IIB–III cutaneous melanoma (CM) patients (pts) after surgery in an open, randomized, Phase II/III study. We present the results of the Phase II part of the ongoing CASVAC-0401 study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01729663). Thirty-one pts were randomized to the CSF-470 vaccine (n = 20) or to the IFN-α2b arm (n = 11). During the 2-year treatment, immunized pts should receive 13 vaccinations. On day 1 of each visit, 1.6 × 107 irradiated CSF-470 cells plus 106 colony-forming units BCG plus 100 µg rhGM-CSF were administered intradermally, followed on days 2–4 by 100 µg rhGM-CSF. IFN-α2b pts should receive 10 million units (MU)/day/5 days a week for 4 weeks; then 5 MU thrice weekly for 23 months. Toxicity and quality of life (QOL) were evaluated at each visit. With a mean and a maximum follow-up of 39.4 and 83 months, respectively, a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for CSF-470 was observed (p = 0.022). Immune monitoring showed an increase in antitumoral cellular and humoral response in vaccinated pts. CSF-470 was well tolerated; 20/20 pts presented grades 1–2 dermic reactions at the vaccination site; 3/20 pts presented grade 3 allergic reactions. Other adverse events (AEs) were grade 1. Pts in the IFN-α2b arm presented grades 2–3 hematological (7/11), hepatic (2/11), and cardiac (1/11) toxicity; AEs in 9/11 pts forced treatment interruptions. QOL was significantly superior in the vaccine arm (p < 0.0001). Our results suggest that CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF can significantly prolong, with lower toxicity, the DMFS of high-risk CM pts with respect to medium-dose IFN-α2b. The continuation of a Phase III part of the CASVAC-0401 study is encouraged. PMID:28620382

  19. [Effectiveness and safety of inhaled granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Ding, Jingjing; Xiao, Yonglong; Dai, Jinghong; Miao, Liyun; Qiu, Yuying; Chen, Lulu; Jiang, Hanyi; Cai, Hourong

    2015-09-08

    To investigate the effectiveness and safety of inhaled granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) therapy in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Ten PAP patients were enrolled, who were hospitalized in the Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School from January 2012 to January 2014.All the patients were treated with inhaled GM-CSF therapy, high-dose therapy for 12 weeks, GM-CSF 150 µg twice a day on days 1-7, none for days 8-14, 6 cycles, low-dose therapy for 12 weeks, GM-CSF 150 µg inhaled once a day on days 1-7, none for days 8-14, 6 cycles, and followed-up for one year. Physiologic, serologic and radiologic features of the patients were analyzed. After inhaled therapy, clinical symptoms, oxygenation indexes, pulmonary function of nine patients were improved, and high resolution CT (HRCT) showed ground-glass lesions reduced. After inhaled therapy for 6 months, the average level of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO₂) was significantly higher than that before therapy ((75.5 ± 7.0) vs (63.6 ± 8.9) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa)), while alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference (P(A-a)O₂) was lower than before ((25.1 ± 7.1) vs (41.2 ± 13.5) mmHg) (both P<0.01). Similarly, vital capacity (VC)% predicted, forced vital capacity (FVC)% predicted and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO)% predicted all improved after therapy ((77.3 ± 16.6)% vs (63.3 ± 16.6)%), (79.5 ± 17.6)% vs (64.9 ± 17.1)%), (69.4 ± 23.0)% vs (50.0 ± 19.9)%) (all P<0.01). The score of HRCT reduced after therapy for six months (P<0.05). While the levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CYFRA211 were unchanged. No serious adverse events occurred during observation. Inhaled GM-CSF therapy is safe and effective.

  20. Preclinical evaluation of herpes simplex virus armed with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Shou-Jun; Chen, Ying-Tai; Xie, Yi-Bin; Cui, Liang; Yang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, De-Xuan; Tian, Yan-Tao

    2013-08-21

    To investigate the therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms of action of oncolytic-herpes-simplex-virus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (HSV(GM-CSF)) in pancreatic carcinoma. Tumor blocks were homogenized in a sterile grinder in saline. The homogenate was injected into the right armpit of each mouse. After vaccination, the mice were randomly assigned into four groups: a control group, a high dose HSV(GM-CSF) group [1 × 10⁷ plaque forming units (pfu)/tumor], a medium dose HSV(GM-CSF) group (5 × 10⁶ pfu/tumor) and a low dose HSV(GM-CSF) group (5 × 10⁵ pfu/tumor). After initiation of drug administration, body weights and tumor diameters were measured every 3 d. Fifteen days later, after decapitation of the animal by cervical dislocation, each tumor was isolated, weighed and stored in 10% formaldehyde solution. The drug effectiveness was evaluated according to the weight, volume and relative volume change of each tumor. Furthermore, GM-CSF protein levels in serum were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 1, 2, 3 and 4 d after injection of HSV(GM-CSF). Injection of the recombinant mouse HSV encoding GM-CSF resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth compared to the control group, and dose-dependent effects were observed: the relative tumor proliferation rates of the low dose, medium dose and high dose groups on 15 d after injection were 45.5%, 55.2% and 65.5%, respectively. The inhibition rates of the tumor weights of the low, middle, and high dose groups were 41.4%, 46.7% and 50.5%, respectively. Furthermore, the production of GM-CSF was significantly increased in the mice infected with HSV(GM-CSF). The increase in the GM-CSF level was more pronounced in the high dose group compared to the other two dose groups. Our study provides the first evidence that HSV(GM-CSF) could inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer. The enhanced GM-CSF expression might be responsible for the phenomenon.

  1. Effect of recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on hematopoietic recovery after otherwise lethal total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nash, R A; Schuening, F G; Seidel, K; Appelbaum, F R; Boone, T; Deeg, H J; Graham, T C; Hackman, R; Sullivan-Pepe, M; Storb, R

    1994-04-01

    Recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) was studied in normal dogs and in dogs receiving otherwise lethal total body irradiation (TBI) without marrow transplant. Five normal dogs receiving 25 micrograms/kg of rcGM-CSF by subcutaneous (SC) injection twice daily (BID) for 14 days showed increases in peripheral blood neutrophil counts of three to five times the baseline. Platelet counts decreased during administration of rcGM-CSF to a mean nadir of 52,800. Ten dogs received 400 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min from two opposing 60Co sources and no marrow graft. Within 2 hours of TBI, rcGM-CSF was begun at a dose of 50 micrograms/kg SC BID for 5 doses and then continued at 25 micrograms/kg SC BID for 21 days. Only 1 of the 10 dogs receiving rcGM-CSF survived with complete and sustained recovery of hematopoiesis. One of 13 historical control dogs survived after 400 cGy with no hematopoietic growth factor or marrow infusion. Results with rcGM-CSF were compared with previous and concurrent data with G-CSF studied in the same model. Of 10 dogs receiving G-CSF, 8 survived with complete and sustained hematopoietic recovery, a significantly better survival than that seen with rcGM-CSF (P = .006). Neutrophil counts were sustained at higher levels after TBI for the first 18 days in the G-CSF group (P < .016) and the neutrophil nadirs were higher. No differences in neutrophil nadirs were noted between the rcGM-CSF and control groups. Dogs treated with rcGM-CSF experienced a more rapid decline of platelet counts than G-CSF-treated or control dogs over the first 18 days (P < .001). The nadir of the platelet count was higher in the control group than in either the G-CSF or rcGM-CSF group and no significant difference was observed between the G-CSF and rcGM-CSF groups. After otherwise lethal TBI (400 cGy) in dogs, rcGM-CSF was not effective in promoting hematopoietic recovery or improving survival.

  2. Sustained in vivo activity of recombinant bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rbG-CSF) using HEPES buffer.

    PubMed

    Kasraian, K; Kuzniar, A; Earley, D; Kamicker, B J; Wilson, G; Manion, T; Hong, J; Reiber, C; Canning, P

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a long-acting injectable formulation of bG-CSF for veterinary use. However, in order to achieve sustained in vivo activity it was first necessary to stabilize the protein at the injection site. Preformulation studies, as well as literature, suggest that bG-CSF aggregates at neutral pH ranges (i.e., pH 6-8) and at temperatures of approximately 40 degrees C. Therefore, bG-CSF will not retain its activity for an extended period of time at the injection site. During this study we determined that HEPES buffer has a very significant impact on protein stability as well as on biological performance. Recombinant bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rbG-CSF) was formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer for subcutaneous injection into cows. bG-CSF formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer resulted in sustained in vivo activity of bG-CSF compared to the "control" formulation (control formulation: 5% mannitol, 10 mM acetate buffer, 0.004% tween-80, pH 4). White blood cell (WBC) count was used as a marker to evaluate in vivo activity of the formulation. WBC numbers remained above a threshold value for only 24-30 h for the control formula. However, when bG-CSF was formulated in 1 M HEPES, the WBC remained above threshold for 3 days or 72 h. Formulating bG-CSF in 1 M HEPES at pH 7.5 also resulted in greater solution stability. This was surprising since bG-CSF is intrinsically not stable at neutral pH. The effect of 1 M HEPES on the T(M) (temperature at maximum heat flow on calorimetry scan) of bG-CSF was determined by microcalorimetry. In the absence of 1 M HEPES buffer the T(M) was 48 degrees C (onset approximately 40 degrees C), while bG-CSF formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer has a T(M) of 59 degrees C (onset approximately 50 degrees C). Similar organic buffers, such as MOPS, HEPPS, TES, and tricine, also resulted in improved solution stability as well as in sustained in vivo activity. The dramatic effect of these buffers on stability and biological

  3. The effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, G. G.; Kaboo, R.; deKernion, J. B.; Figlin, R.; Belldegrun, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce specific and non-specific anti-tumour cytotoxicity and also stimulates the proliferation and function of peripheral lymphocytes and thymocytes. GM-CSF and interleukin 2 (IL-2) act synergistically on peripheral lymphocytes for the induction of a highly effective cytotoxic cell population. Thus, the goal of our investigation was to study the effects of GM-CSF upon expansion, proliferation and in vitro killing activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). TILs from seven consecutive tumours were cultured with GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1) without IL-2 supplementation, with suboptimal doses of IL-2 (8 and 40 U ml-1) plus GM-CSF (1000 nmol ml-1), and with a dose of IL-2 (400 U ml-1) which sufficed alone to induce TIL development plus GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1). GM-CSF alone or together with suboptimal doses of IL-2 was not able to induce or facilitate TIL development in these cultures. When GM-CSF at both concentrations studied was added to optimal doses of IL-2 the resulting TIL populations proliferated significantly better and faster (+66%), resulting in a higher cell yield (+24%) at the time of maximal expansion of the TIL cultures. The length of the culture periods of TILs was not affected by GM-CSF when compared with the control cultures supplemented with IL-2 alone. In vitro killing activity of TIL populations stimulated with IL-2 and GM-CSF remained unspecific, but lysis of the autologous tumour targets as well as the allogeneic renal tumour targets was significantly enhanced (+138%) as compared with the corresponding control TILs stimulated with IL-2 alone. Lysis of the natural killer (NK)-sensitive control cell line K562 and the NK-resistant Daudi cell line remained unchanged even though FACS analysis of TILs cultured with IL-2 and 1000 nmol of GM-CSF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of cells expressing the CD56

  4. Anti-Obesity Effects of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Cheng-Hu; So, Byung-Im; Park, Jun-Young; Joo, Hyun-Woo; Park, In-Hwa; Shen, Guang-Yin; Shin, Jeong-Hun; Kim, Hyuck; Ahn, You-Heon; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has molecular structures and intracellular signaling pathways that are similar to those of leptin and ciliary neurotropic factor (CNTF). It also has immune-modulatory properties. Given that leptin and CNTF play important roles in energy homeostasis and that obesity is an inflammatory condition in adipose tissue, we hypothesized that G-CSF could also play a role in energy homeostasis. We treated 12 38-week-old male Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima fatty rats (OLETF, diabetic) and 12 age-matched male Long-Evans-Tokushima rats (LETO, healthy) with 200 µg/day G-CSF or saline for 5 consecutive days. Body weight reduction was greater in G-CSF-treated OLETF (G-CSF/OLETF) than saline-treated OLETF (saline/OLETF) following 8 weeks of treatment (−6.9±1.6% vs. −3.1±2.2%, p<0.05). G-CSF treatment had no effect on body weight in LETO or on food intake in either OLETF or LETO. Body fat in G-CSF/OLETF was more reduced than in saline/OLETF (−32.2±3.1% vs. −20.8±6.2%, p<0.05). Energy expenditure was higher in G-CSF/OLETF from 4 weeks after the treatments than in saline/OLETF. Serum levels of cholesterol, triglyceride, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were lower in G-CSF/OLETF than in saline/OLETF. Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was higher in G-CSF/OLETF than in saline/OLETF, but was unaffected in LETO. Immunofluorescence staining and PCR results revealed that G-CSF receptors were expressed in BAT. In vitro experiments using brown adipocyte primary culture revealed that G-CSF enhanced UCP-1 expression from mature brown adipocytes via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In conclusion, G-CSF treatment reduced body weight and increased energy expenditure in a diabetic model, and enhanced UCP-1 expression and decreased inflammatory cytokine levels may be associated with the effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:25144367

  5. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following adjuvant chemotherapy with and without granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Calip, Gregory S; Malmgren, Judith A; Lee, Wan-Ju; Schwartz, Stephen M; Kaplan, Henry G

    2015-11-01

    Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post-breast cancer treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) is not fully characterized. Our objective was to estimate MDS/AML risk associated with specific breast cancer treatments. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women aged ≥66 years with stage I-III breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Women were classified as receiving treatment with radiation, chemotherapy, and/or G-CSF. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for MDS/AML risk. Among 56,251 breast cancer cases, 1.2 % developed MDS/AML during median follow-up of 3.2 years. 47.1 % of women received radiation and 14.3 % received chemotherapy. Compared to breast cancer cases treated with surgery alone, those treated with chemotherapy (HR = 1.38, 95 %-CI 0.98-1.93) and chemotherapy/radiation (HR = 1.77, 95 %-CI 1.25-2.51) had increased risk of MDS/AML, but not radiation alone (HR = 1.08, 95 % CI 0.86-1.36). Among chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF, MDS/AML risk was differentially associated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-containing regimens (HR = 1.86, 95 %-CI 1.33-2.61) and filgrastim (HR = 1.47, 95 %-CI 1.05-2.06), but not pegfilgrastim (HR = 1.10, 95 %-CI 0.73-1.66). We observed increased MDS/AML risk among older breast cancer survivors treated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy that was enhanced by G-CSF. Although small, this risk warrants consideration when determining adjuvant chemotherapy and neutropenia prophylaxis for breast cancer patients.

  6. Interleukin-3/granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor promotes stem cell expansion, monocytosis, and atheroma macrophage burden in mice with hematopoietic ApoE deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mi; Subramanian, Manikandan; Abramowicz, Sandra; Murphy, Andrew J; Gonen, Ayelet; Witztum, Joseph; Welch, Carrie; Tabas, Ira; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R

    2014-05-01

    Coronary heart disease is associated with monocytosis. Studies using animal models of monocytosis and atherosclerosis such as ApoE(-/-) mice have shown bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion, associated with increased cell surface expression of the common β subunit of the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 receptor (CBS) on HSPCs. ApoE(-/-) mice also display increased granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent monocyte production in the spleen. We investigated the role of the CBS in cholesterol-driven HSPC expansion, monocytosis, and atherosclerosis. Ldlr(-/-) mice were transplanted with ApoE(-/-)Cbs(-/-) or ApoE(-/-) BM followed by Western-type diet feeding. Compared with ApoE(-/-) BM-transplanted controls, ApoE(-/-)Cbs(-/-) BM-transplanted mice had reduced BM and splenic HSPC proliferation, fewer blood monocytes and neutrophils, and reduced macrophage content and area of early atherosclerotic lesions. More advanced lesions showed diminished macrophage and collagen content; however, lesion size was unchanged, reflecting an increase in necrotic core area, associated with a marked decrease in Abcg1 expression and increased macrophage apoptosis. Compared with wild-type mice, Western-type diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice showed increased CBS expression on granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-producing innate response activator B cells and expansion of this population. ApoE(-/-)Cbs(-/-) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) mice showed a marked decrease in innate response activator B cells compared with ApoE(-/-) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) controls. Increased levels of CBS on HSPCs and splenic innate response activator B cells lead to expansion of these populations in ApoE(-/-) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) mice, contributing to monocytosis and increased lesional macrophage content. However, in more advanced lesions, the CBS also has a role in atherosclerotic plaque stabilization.

  7. Pegylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor conveys long-term neuroprotection and improves functional outcome in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Frank, Tobias; Klinker, Florian; Falkenburger, Björn H; Laage, Rico; Lühder, Fred; Göricke, Bettina; Schneider, Armin; Neurath, Hartmud; Desel, Herbert; Liebetanz, David; Bähr, Mathias; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2012-06-01

    Recent proof-of-principle data showed that the haematopoietic growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) mediates neuroprotection in rodent models of Parkinson's disease. In preparation for future clinical trials, we performed a preclinical characterization of a pegylated derivative of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (pegfilgrastim) in the mouse 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model of Parkinson's disease. We determined serum and cerebrospinal fluid drug levels after subcutaneous injection. A single injection of pegfilgrastim was shown to achieve stable levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid with substantially higher levels compared to repetitive filgrastim injections. Leucocyte blood counts were only transiently increased after repeated injections. We demonstrated substantial dose-dependent long-term neuroprotection by pegfilgrastim in both young and aged mice, using bodyweight-adjusted doses that are applicable in clinical settings. Importantly, we found evidence for the functionally relevant preservation of nigrostriatal projections by pegfilgrastim in our model of Parkinson's disease, which resulted in improved motor performance. The more stable levels of pegylated neuroprotective proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid may represent a general advantage in the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative diseases and the resulting longer injection intervals are likely to improve patient compliance. In summary, we found that pegylation of a neuroprotective growth factor improved its pharmacokinetic profile over its non-modified counterpart in an in vivo model of Parkinson's disease. As the clinical safety profile of pegfilgrastim is already established, these data suggest that evaluation of pegfilgrastim in further Parkinson's disease models and ultimately clinical feasibility studies are warranted.

  8. Bacillus cereus brain abscesses occurring in a severely neutropenic patient: successful treatment with antimicrobial agents, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and surgical drainage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, C; Iuchi, T; Ishii, A; Kumagai, K; Takagi, T

    2001-07-01

    Multiple brain and liver abscesses developed immediately after Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a neutropenic patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After even 8 weeks of antimicrobial chemotherapy together with administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, every infectious process disappeared but the patient's headache has still persisted. Because the wall of one brain abscess became thin and was in danger of rupturing into the ventricle, surgical drainage was performed, resulting in disappearance of headache and resolution of brain abscess. The present case indicates that a combined medical and surgical approach is mandatory to treat patients with brain abscesses.

  9. [The adjuvant effect of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in dengue virus and hepatitis C virus DNA vaccines].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Man; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Zi-Yang; Wang, Juan; Fan, Dong-Ying; Gao, Na; An, Jing

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the adjuvant effect of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in Flaviviridae virus DNA vaccines. After DNA immunization, the antibody levels of serum from mice were detected by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Co-immunization of GM-CSF suppressed the immune responses induced by DV1 and DV2 candidate vaccines whereas enhanced the immune response induced by HCV C and E1 DNA vaccines. As genetic adjuvant for DNA vaccines, GM-CSF might display complex diversity on the immune responses: an augmentation or suppression due to different immunogens. Therefore, GM-CSF should be used with some cautions in clinic.

  10. Enhancement of myeloperoxidase activity in WBCS in oral cancer patients treated with Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF)-A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ananth, N; Balaji, G B; Vasudevan, D M; D'Souza, V; Rao, A V; Nambiar, D

    1998-07-01

    In a pilot study with five oral cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) three were given Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) as a protective agent to reduce the mucosal inflammation during radiotherapy. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme activity in WBC was quantitated. The three patients showed a significant increase in the MPO activity when compared with two untreated controls indicating the efficacy of GM-CSF as a protective agent. It is suggested that further detailed studies with larger number of patients would be useful.

  11. Adherent cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture system are qualified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Gong-Bo; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2010-01-01

    A widely-used method for generating dendritic cell (DC) is to culture bone marrow cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-containing medium for 6-10 days. Usually, non-adherent cells are used as qualified dendritic cells while the adherent ones are discarded as "non-dendritic cells" or macrophages. In this study, we show that the adherent cells are nearly identical to the non-adherent cells in both dendritic cell surface markers expression and main dendritic cell-related functions, hence to prove that these "junk cells" are actually qualified dendritic cells.

  12. Identification of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Interleukin-6 as Candidate Biomarkers of CBLB502 Efficacy as a Medical Radiation Countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    Krivokrysenko, Vadim I.; Shakhov, Alexander N.; Singh, Vijay K.; Bone, Frederick; Kononov, Yevgeniy; Shyshynova, Inna; Cheney, Alec; Maitra, Ratan K.; Purmal, Andrei; Whitnall, Mark H.; Feinstein, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Given an ever-increasing risk of nuclear and radiological emergencies, there is a critical need for development of medical radiation countermeasures (MRCs) that are safe, easily administered, and effective in preventing and/or mitigating the potentially lethal tissue damage caused by acute high-dose radiation exposure. Because the efficacy of MRCs for this indication cannot be ethically tested in humans, development of such drugs is guided by the Food and Drug Administration's Animal Efficacy Rule. According to this rule, human efficacious doses can be projected from experimentally established animal efficacious doses based on the equivalence of the drug's effects on efficacy biomarkers in the respective species. Therefore, identification of efficacy biomarkers is critically important for drug development under the Animal Efficacy Rule. CBLB502 is a truncated derivative of the Salmonella flagellin protein that acts by triggering Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) signaling and is currently under development as a MRC. Here, we report identification of two cytokines, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), as candidate biomarkers of CBLB502's radioprotective/mitigative efficacy. Induction of both G-CSF and IL-6 by CBLB502 1) is strictly TLR5-dependent, 2) occurs in a CBLB502 dose-dependent manner within its efficacious dose range in both nonirradiated and irradiated mammals, including nonhuman primates, and 3) is critically important for the ability of CBLB502 to rescue irradiated animals from death. After evaluation of CBLB502 effects on G-CSF and IL-6 levels in humans, these biomarkers will be useful for accurate prediction of human efficacious CBLB502 doses, a key step in the development of this prospective radiation countermeasure. PMID:22837010

  13. A granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor gene promoter element responsive to inflammatory mediators is functionally distinct from an identical sequence in the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene.

    PubMed

    Kuczek, E S; Shannon, M F; Pell, L M; Vadas, M A

    1991-04-01

    A number of mesenchymal cells produce hemopoietic growth factors in response to inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo. Induced transcription from the hemopoietic growth factor genes is at least partially responsible for their increased expression. We have previously identified a sequence, cytokine (CK)-1, in the granulocyte (G)-CSF gene promoter that responds to TNF-alpha and binds a transcription factor, NF-GMa. We report here that the CK-1 sequence responds in a time- and dose-dependent manner to IL-1 beta and that the mutations which affect NF-GMa binding correlate with decreased transcriptional activity after stimulation with either TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. The CK-1 sequence also responds to the human T lymphotrophic virus-1 transactivator, tax, so that this promoter element may contribute to the overall response of the G-CSF gene to these various agents. Although NF-GMa binding is seen in a number of cell types, the ability of the G-CSF CK-1 sequence to act as a transcriptional enhancer is specific for fibroblasts and not T cells. Furthermore, we show that an identical sequence in the granulocyte macrophage CSF gene, although apparently binding the same protein in vitro, cannot respond to any of these stimuli in either fibroblasts or T cells. Modification interference experiments, using the CK-1 region in the context of the granulocyte macrophage-CSF and G-CSF genes, indicated that the contact points for NF-GMa differ in each case and suggest that differences in sequences flanking the 10-bp CK-1 region probably leads to an altered DNA:protein conformation, which may explain the differential response of this conserved promoter element.

  14. Rejuvenation of aged pig facial skin by transplanting allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced peripheral blood stem cells from a young pig.

    PubMed

    Harn, Horng-Jyh; Huang, Mao-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Ting; Lin, Po-Cheng; Yen, Ssu-Yin; Chou, Yi-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chu, Hen-Yi; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2013-01-01

    Following a stroke, the administration of stem cells that have been treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) can ameliorate functional deficits in both rats and humans. It is not known, however, whether the application of GCSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) to human skin can function as an antiaging treatment. We used a Lanyu pig (Sus scrofa) model, since compared with rodents, the structure of a pig's skin is very similar to human skin, to provide preliminary data on whether these cells can exert antiaging effects over a short time frame. GCSF-mobilized PBSCs from a young male Lanyu pig (5 months) were injected intradermally into the cheek skin of aged female Lanyu pigs, and tissues before and after the cell injections were compared to determine whether this treatment caused skin rejuvenation. Increased levels of collagen, elastin, hyaluronic acid, and the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 were observed in both dermal and subcutaneous layers following the injection of PBSCs. In addition, the treated skin tissue was tighter and more elastic than adjacent control regions of aged skin tissue. In the epidermal layer, PBSC injection altered the levels of both involucrin and integrin, indicating an increased rate of epidermal cell renewal as evidenced by reductions in both cornified cells and cells of the spinous layers and increases in the number of dividing cells within the basal layer. We found that the exogenous PBSCs, visualized using fluorescence in situ hybridization, were located primarily in hair follicles and adjacent tissues. In summary, PBSC injection restored young skin properties in the skin of aged (90 months) pigs. On the basis of our preliminary data, we conclude that intradermal injection of GCSF-mobilized PBSCs from a young pig can rejuvenate the skin in aged pigs.

  15. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  16. Thrombocytopenia in dogs induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor: increased destruction of circulating platelets.

    PubMed

    Nash, R A; Burstein, S A; Storb, R; Yang, W; Abrams, K; Appelbaum, F R; Boone, T; Deeg, H J; Durack, L D; Schuening, F G

    1995-09-01

    Administration of recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) to normal dogs in previous studies induced an increase in peripheral blood neutrophils and a dose-dependent decrease in platelet counts. In six dogs that received the highest tested dose of rcGM-CSF (50 micrograms/kg/d) for a minimum of 12 days, the mean nadir of the platelet count was 46,000/microL (range, 4,000 to 91,000/microL) on day 9 +/- 1.1 after starting therapy, compared with a mean baseline platelet count of 398,000/microL (range, 240,000 to 555,000/microL). In three dogs, survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets was reduced from a mean of 4.9 days to 1.3 days during the administration of rcGM-CSF. Biodistribution studies with gamma camera imaging indicated that there was an increase in mean hepatic uptake during the administration of rcGM-CSF, from 15% to 44% of the total injected 111In-labeled platelets at 2 hours, whereas splenic uptake was not significantly changed. In contrast, in two evaluable dogs who were recipients of 111In-labeled platelets from matched allogeneic donors receiving rcGM-CSF, platelet survival was not reduced and no increased hepatic uptake was noted. A third dog became alloimmunized to the matched donor platelets and was not evaluable. Immunohistologic studies of liver and spleen were performed with monoclonal antibodies specific for canine gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin in dogs treated with rcGM-CSF and compared with untreated controls. On treatment, a marked reduction of platelets in the red pulp of the spleen was evident, and in general, the presence of platelet antigen in the liver was unchanged. Therefore, platelets were not being sequestered, but destroyed in the liver and spleen. The platelet antigens, P-selectin and gpIIb/IIIa, were identified in association with Kupffer cells in the liver, but no difference in the number of distribution of these Kupffer cells was found between controls and rcGM-CSF-treated dogs. In the

  17. Efficacy of granulocyte colony stimulating factor as a secondary prophylaxis along with full-dose chemotherapy following a prior cycle of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Seema; Singh, Pankaj K; Bhatt, Madan L B; Pant, Mohan C; Gupta, Rajeev; Negi, Mahendra P S

    2010-10-01

    Secondary prophylaxis with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is recommended where patients have experienced febrile neutropenia in an earlier chemotherapy cycle and for whom the maintenance of chemotherapy dose intensity is important; or where febrile neutropenia has not occurred but prolonged neutropenia is causing excessive dose delay or reduction, where maintenance of dose intensity is important. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of G-CSF as secondary prophylaxis when used along with full dose moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy following a prior cycle with febrile-neutropenia. Fifty-two patients aged 22-75 years with febrile neutropenia that required intravenous antibiotics following moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy were included. These patients received the next cycle of the same chemotherapy regime without dose modification but with support of filgrastim 24 h after completion of chemotherapy (300 μg/day/subcutaneously (s.c.) for weight < 60 kg, 480 μg/day/s.c. for weight > 60 kg, for at least 10 consecutive days), patients in whom neutropenia was associated with a life-threatening infection and those who developed prolonged myelosuppression were excluded. The use of the hematopoietic growth factor G-CSF was shown to shorten the neutrophil recovery time, resulting in significant reduction of incidence of febrile neutropenia, hospitalization and use of broad spectrum antibiotics. There was no drug related death or adverse events associated with either cycle. In conclusion, recombinant human G-CSF is effective and relatively safe as a secondary prophylaxis with full dose chemotherapy in patients who develop febrile neutropenia following prior cycles of moderately myelotoxic chemotherapy.

  18. Engineering superactive granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor transferrin fusion proteins as orally-delivered candidate agents for treating neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Priebe, Molly C

    2015-01-01

    Intravenously injected granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown efficacy in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Parkinson's Disease (PD) animal studies and is undergoing clinical evaluation. The likely need for dosing of GM-CSF to patients over months or years motivates pursuit of avenues for delivering GM-CSF to circulation via oral administration. Flow cytometric screening of 37 yeast-displayed GM-CSF saturation mutant libraries revealed residues P12, H15, R23, R24, and K72 as key determinants of GM-CSF's CD116 and CD131 GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) subunit binding affinity. Screening combinatorial GM-CSF libraries mutated at positions P12, H15, and R23 yielded variants with increased affinities toward both CD116 and CD131. Genetic fusion of GM-CSF to human transferrin (Trf), a strategy that enables oral delivery of other biopharmaceuticals in animals, yielded bioactive wild type and variant cytokines upon secretion from cultured Human Embryonic Kidney cells. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements showed that all evaluated variants possess decreases in CD116 and CD131 binding KD values of up to 2.5-fold relative to wild type. Improved affinity led to increased in vitro bioactivity; the most bioactive variant, P12D/H15L/R23L, had a leukocyte proliferation assay EC50 value 3.5-fold lower than the wild type GM-CSF/Trf fusion. These outcomes are important first steps toward our goal of developing GM-CSF/Trf fusions as orally available AD and PD therapeutics. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. miR-155 Is Associated with the Leukemogenic Potential of the Class IV Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor in CD34+ Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HaiJiao; Goudeva, Lilia; Immenschuh, Stephan; Schambach, Axel; Skokowa, Julia; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer; Figueiredo, Constança

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a major regulator of granulopoiesis on engagement with the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR). The truncated, alternatively spliced, class IV G-CSFR (G-CSFRIV) has been associated with defective differentiation and relapse risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. However, the detailed biological properties of G-CSFRIV in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and the potential leukemogenic mechanism of this receptor remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that G-CSFRIV–overexpressing (G-CSFRIV+) HSPCs demonstrated an enhanced proliferative and survival capacity on G-CSF stimulation. Cell cycle analyses showed a higher frequency of G-CSFRIV+ cells in the S and G2/M phase. Also, apoptosis rates were significantly lower in G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. These findings were shown to be associated with a sustained Stat5 activation and elevated miR-155 expression. In addition, G-CSF showed to further induce G-CSFRIV and miR-155 expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from AML patients. A Stat5 pharmacological inhibitor or ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference–mediated silencing of the expression of miR-155 abrogated the aberrant proliferative capacity of the G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. Hence, the dysregulation of Stat5/miR-155 pathway in the G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs supports their leukemogenic potential. Specific miRNA silencing or the inhibition of Stat5-associated pathways might contribute to preventing the risk of leukemogenesis in G-CSFRIV+ HSPCs. This study may promote the development of a personalized effective antileukemia therapy, in particular for the patients exhibiting higher expression levels of G-CSFRIV, and further highlights the necessity of pre-screening the patients for G-CSFR isoforms expression patterns before G-CSF administration. PMID:25730818

  20. Toll-like receptor-mediated eosinophil-basophil differentiation: autocrine signalling by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in cord blood haematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Reece, Pia; Baatjes, Adrian J; Cyr, Michael M; Sehmi, Roma; Denburg, Judah A

    2013-06-01

    Eosinophils are multi-functional leucocytes that play a role in inflammatory processes including allergy and infection. Although bone marrow (BM) inflammatory cells are the main source of eosinophil-basophil (Eo/B) differentiation-inducing cytokines, a recent role has been demonstrated for cytokine induction through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signalling in BM progenitors. Having previously demonstrated that cord blood (CB) progenitors induce Eo/B colony-forming units (CFU) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, we sought to investigate the intracellular mechanisms by which LPS induces Eo/B differentiation. Freshly isolated CD34-enriched human CB cells were stimulated with LPS (and/or pharmacological inhibitors) and assessed for alterations in haematopoietic cytokine receptor expression and signalling pathways by flow cytometry, Eo/B CFU in methylcellulose cultures, and cytokine secretion using Luminex assays. The LPS stimulation resulted in a significant increase in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-responsive, as opposed to interleukin-5-responsive, Eo/B CFU, which also correlated with significant increases in CD34(+) cell GM-CSFRα expression. Functionally, CB CD34(+) cells secrete abundant amounts of GM-CSF following LPS stimulation, via a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism; this secretion was responsible for Eo/B CFU formation ex vivo, as shown by antibody blockade. We show for the first time that LPS stimulation of CB progenitor cells results in autocrine activation of p38 MAPK-dependent GM-CSF secretion facilitating Eo/B differentiation ex vivo. This work provides evidence that early life exposure to products of bacterial agents can modulate Eo/B differentiation, representing a novel mechanism by which progenitor cells can respond to microbial stimuli and so affect immune and inflammatory responses. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Neuroprotective and Angiogenic Effects of Bone Marrow Transplantation Combined With Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yasuyuki; Nagai, Makiko; Miyazaki, Kazunori; Tanaka, Nobuhito; Kawai, Hiromi; Mimoto, Takafumi; Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Kurata, Tomoko; Ikeda, Yoshio; Matsuura, Tohru; Abe, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients show significantly reduced expression of several neurotrophic factors. Monotherapy with either wild-type (WT) BM transplantation (BMT) or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) has only a small clinical therapeutic effect in an ALS mouse model, due to the phenomenon of neuroprotection. In this study, we investigated the clinical benefits of combination therapy using BMT with WT BM cells, plus GCSF after disease onset in ALS mice [transgenic mice expressing human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) bearing a G93A mutation]. Combined treatment with BMT and GCSF delayed disease progression and prolonged the survival of G93A mice, whereas BMT or GCSF treatment alone did not. Histological study of the ventral horns of lumbar cords from G93A mice treated with BMT and GCSF showed a reduction in motor neuron loss coupled with induced neuronal precursor cell proliferation, increased expression of neurotrophic factors (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenin), and neovascularization compared with controls (vehicle only). Compared with G93A microglial cells, most BM-derived WT cells differentiated into microglial cells and strongly expressed neurotrophic factors, combined BMT and GCSF treatment led to the replacement of G93A microglial cells with BM-derived WT cells. These results indicate combined treatment with BMT and GCSF has potential neuroprotective and angiogenic effects in ALS mice, induced by the replacement of G93A microglial cells with BM-derived WT cells. Furthermore, this is the first report showing the effects of combined BMT and GCSF treatment on blood vessels in ALS. PMID:26998403

  2. Temporal adaptation of neutrophil oxidative responsiveness to n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Acceleration by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    English, D; Broxmeyer, H E; Gabig, T G; Akard, L P; Williams, D E; Hoffman, R

    1988-10-01

    This investigation was undertaken to clarify the mechanism by which purified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) potentiates neutrophil oxidative responses triggered by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. Previous studies have shown that GM-CSF priming of neutrophil responses to FMLP is induced relatively slowly, requiring 90 to 120 min of incubation in vitro, is not associated with increased levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+, but is associated with up-regulation of cell-surface FMLP receptors. We have confirmed these findings and further characterized the process of GM-CSF priming. We found that the effect of GM-CSF on neutrophil oxidative responsiveness was induced in a temperature-dependent manner and was not reversed when the cells were washed extensively to remove the growth factor before stimulation with FMLP. Extracellular Ca2+ was not required for functional enhancement by GM-CSF and GM-CSF alone effected no detectable alteration in the 32P-labeled phospholipid content of neutrophils during incubation in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF exerts its influence on neutrophils by accelerating a process that occurs spontaneously and results in up-regulation of both cell-surface FMLP receptors and oxidative responsiveness to FMLP. Thus, the results demonstrate that, with respect to oxidative activation, circulating endstage polymorphonuclear leukocytes are nonresponsive or hyporesponsive to FMLP; functional responsiveness increases dramatically as surface FMLP receptors are gradually deployed after the cells leave the circulation. Thus, as neutrophils mature, their responsiveness to FMLP changes in a manner which may be crucial for efficient host defense. At 37 degrees C, this process is markedly potentiated by GM-CSF. We conclude that endogenous GM-CSF, released systemically or at sites of infection and inflammation, potentially plays an important role in host defense by accelerating functional maturation of responding

  3. Treatment of complete spinal cord injury patients by autologous bone marrow cell transplantation and administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Chun; Shim, Yoo Shik; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune; Park, Hyun Seon

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells into the injured spinal cord has been found to improve neurologic functions in experimental animal studies. However, it is unclear whether bone marrow cells can similarly improve the neurologic functions of complete spinal cord injury (SCI) in human patients. To address this issue, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow cell transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with the administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in six complete SCI patients. BMT in the injury site (1.1 x 10(6) cells/microL in a total of 1.8 mL) and subcutaneous GM-CSF administration were performed on five patients. One patient was treated with GM-CSF only. The follow-up periods were from 6 to 18 months, depending on the patients. Sensory improvements were noted immediately after the operations. Sensory recovery in the sacral segment was noted mainly 3 weeks to 7 months postoperatively. Significant motor improvements were noted 3 to 7 months postoperatively. Four patients showed neurologic improvements in their American Spiral Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades (from A to C). One patient improved to AIS grade B from A and the last patient remained in AIS grade A. No immediate worsening of neurologic symptoms was found. Side effects of GMCSF treatment such as a fever (>38 degrees C) and myalgia were noted. Serious complications increasing mortality and morbidity were not found. The follow-up study with magnetic resonance imaging 4-6 months after injury showed slight enhancement within the zone of BMT. Syrinx formation was not definitely found. BMT and GM-CSF administration represent a safe protocol to efficiently manage SCI patients, especially those with acute complete injury. To demonstrate the full therapeutic value of this protocol, long-term and more comprehensive case-control clinical studies are required.

  4. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B; Erb, Karin; Agerholm, Inge; Aasted, Michael; Gabrielsen, Anette; Hnida, Christina; Zobel, Dorit P; Munding, Bibi; Bendz, Susanne H; Robertson, Sarah A

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR). Multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded prospective design. Fourteen Scandinavian fertility clinics. A total of 1,332 women with indication for in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection; 1,149 received embryo transfer (GM-CSF: n = 564; control: n = 585). Oocytes were fertilized, and embryos cultured and transferred in control medium or test medium containing 2 ng/mL GM-CSF. OIR at gestational week 7, with follow-up at week 12 and birth. At week 7, OIRs were 23.5% (GM-CSF), and 20.0% (control) (odds ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.75). At week 12, OIRs were 23.0% (GM-CSF) and 18.7% (control) (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.06-1.72), and live birth rates were 28.9% and 24.1%, respectively (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.03-1.78). The effect of GM-CSF was influenced by the human serum albumin concentration in the medium. Birth weight and abnormality incidence were similar in both groups. Exploratory analyses showed that GM-CSF increased OIR in women with previous miscarriage, especially in women with more than one miscarriage. Addition of GM-CSF to embryo culture medium elicits a significant increase in survival of transferred embryos to week 12 and live birth. Our results are consistent with a protective effect of GM-CSF on culture-induced embryo stress. GM-CSF may be particularly efficacious in women with previous miscarriage. NCT00565747. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the microheterogeneities of PIXY321, a genetically engineered granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 fusion protein expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Balland, A; Krasts, D A; Hoch, K L; Gerhart, M J; Stremler, K E; Waugh, S M

    1998-02-01

    PIXY321, a human cytokine analog genetically engineered by the fusion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-3 (IL-3), was expressed in yeast under the control of the alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) promoter and the alpha-mating factor expression system. To provide the material necessary for the evaluation of PIXY321 in clinical trials, the production was scaled up to the 1200-1 scale and the PIXY321 molecule isolated by four successive steps of ion-exchange chromatography. Multiple heterogeneities, due to the presence of different patterns of glycosylation as well as multiple amino acid sequences at both N and C termini, were characterized on the purified molecule using complementary analytical techniques including electrophoresis, liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry. Four different N-terminal sequences were identified but simplified to a reproducible ratio of two sequences, the mature form and a form starting at Ala3, by adjustment of the process conditions. Molecules lacking 1-6 residues at the C-terminus were identified and their relative frequencies quantified. Amino acid modifications, such as three oxidized Met residues at positions 79, 141 and 187 and one deamidated Asn residue at position 176, were detected at low level. Microheterogeneities in glycosylation were characterized on four different sites, one located in the GM-CSF portion and three in the IL-3 portion of the molecule. The sites were shown to be differentially occupied and to carry 0-10 mannose residues according to their location in the sequence. Precise measurement of the heterogeneities at the molecular level were used to tune the process conditions and ensure reproducibility of the clinical product between lots.

  6. Granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor produced by recombinant avian poxviruses enriches the regional lymph nodes with antigen-presenting cells and acts as an immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kass, E; Panicali, D L; Mazzara, G; Schlom, J; Greiner, J W

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant avian poxviruses [fowlpox and canarypox (ALVAC)], restricted for replication in nonavian cell substrates and expressing granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (avipox-GM-CSF), were evaluated for their ability to enrich an immunization site with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and, in turn, function as biological vaccine adjuvants. Avipox-GM-CSF administered as a single s.c. injection significantly enhanced the percentage and absolute number of APCs in the regional lymph nodes that drain the injection site. Both the magnitude and duration of the cellular and phenotypic increases within the lymph nodes induced by the avipox-GM-CSF viruses were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those measured in mice treated with four daily injections of recombinant GM-CSF protein. Temporal studies revealed that the APC enrichment of regional lymph nodes was sustained for 21-28 days after injection of the recombinant avipox virus expressing GM-CSF and, moreover, three injections of the recombinant virus could be given without any appreciable loss of in vivo bioactivity. Mice expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene (CEA.Tg) developed CEA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity after being immunized with avipox-CEA. The coadministration of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF significantly enhanced CEA-specific host immunity with an accompanying immunotherapeutic response in tumor-bearing CEA.Tg mice. The optimal use of avipox-GM-CSF, in terms of dose and dose schedule, especially when used with different immunogens, remains to be determined. Nonetheless, the present findings demonstrate: (a) the effective delivery of GM-CSF to an immunization site using a recombinant avian poxvirus; (b) the compatibility of delivering an antigen and GM-CSF in replication-defective viruses to enhance antigen-specific immunity; and (c) the combined use of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF to generate antitumor

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) depresses angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro: implications for sourcing cells for vascular regeneration therapy.

    PubMed

    Tura, O; Crawford, J; Barclay, G R; Samuel, K; Hadoke, P W F; Roddie, H; Davies, J; Turner, M L

    2010-07-01

    The most common source of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) for hematopoietic reconstitution comprises granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). It has been proposed that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) share precursors with HPCs, and that EPC release may accompany HPC mobilization to the circulation following G-CSF administration. To investigate EPC activity following HPC mobilization, and the direct effects of exogenous G-CSF administration on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), using in vitro and in vivo correlates of angiogenesis. Heparinized venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and from cord blood at parturition. G-CSF-mobilized samples were collected before administration, at apheresis harvest, and at follow-up. PBSCs were phenotyped by flow cytometry, and cultured in standard colony-forming unit (CFU)-EPC and EOC assays. The effect of exogenous G-CSF was investigated by addition of it to HUVECs and EOCs in standard tubule formation and aortic ring assays, and in an in vivo sponge implantation model. Our data show that G-CSF mobilization of PBSCs produces a profound, reversible depression of circulating CFU-EPCs. Furthermore, G-CSF administration did not mobilize CD34+CD133- cells, which include precursors of EOCs. No EOCs were cultured from any mobilized PBSCs studied. Exogenous G-CSF inhibited CFU-EPC generation, HUVEC and EOC tubule formation, microvessel outgrowth, and implanted sponge vascularization in mice. G-CSF administration depresses both endothelial cell angiogenesis and monocyte proangiogenic activity, and we suggest that any angiogenic benefit observed following implantation of cells mobilized by G-CSF may come only from a paracrine effect from HPCs.

  8. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  9. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  10. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  11. Low concentrations of recombinant granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells augments long-term bioactivity with delayed clearance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takahiro; Itoh, Yuko; Yamagata, Akira; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Tazawa, Ryushi; Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Nakata, Koh

    2014-08-01

    To date, the biological activity of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been investigated by using mostly Escherichia coli- or yeast cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF (erhGM-CSF and yrhGM-CSF, respectively). However, Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF (crhGM-CSF), as well as natural human GM-CSF, is a distinct molecule that includes modifications by complicated oligosaccharide moieties. In the present study, we reevaluated the bioactivity of crhGM-CSF by comparing it with those of erhGM-CSF and yrhGM-CSF. The effect of short-term stimulation (0.5h) on the activation of neutrophils/monocytes or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by crhGM-CSF was lower than those with erhGM-CSF or yrhGM-CSF at low concentrations (under 60pM). Intermediate-term stimulation (24h) among the different rhGM-CSFs with respect to its effect on the activation of TF-1 cells, a GM-CSF-dependent cell line, or PBMCs was not significantly different. In contrast, the proliferation/survival of TF-1 cells or PBMCs after long-term stimulation (72-168h) was higher at low concentrations of crhGM-CSF (15-30pM) than that of cells treated with other GM-CSFs. The proportion of apoptotic TF-1 cells after incubation with crhGM-CSF for 72h was lower than that of cells incubated with other rhGM-CSFs. These effects were attenuated by desialylation of crhGM-CSF. Clearance of crhGM-CSF but not desialylated-crhGM-CSF by both TF-1 cells and PBMCs was delayed compared with that of erhGM-CSF or yrhGM-CSF. These results suggest that sialylation of oligosaccharide moieties delayed the clearance of GM-CSF, thus eliciting increased long-term bioactivity in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor signalling regulates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by airway epithelial cells and established allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Acciani, T H; Suzuki, T; Trapnell, B C; Le Cras, T D

    2016-02-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are increasingly recognized as a major signalling centre in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. A previous study demonstrated that epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in AEC regulated key features of allergic airway disease. However, it is unclear what mediators are regulated by EGFR signalling in AEC, although the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is EGFR dependent in keratinocytes. To determine whether EGFR signalling regulates GM-CSF production by human AEC downstream of the clinically relevant mediators house dust mite (HDM) and interleukin (IL)-17A and in a mouse model of established allergic asthma. EGFR inhibitors were used to determine whether EGFR signalling regulates GM-CSF production by cultured human AEC in response to HDM and IL-17A. The roles of EGFR ligands, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) converting enzyme (TACE) were also assessed. To determine whether EGFR regulates GM-CSF as well as key asthma characteristics in vivo, mice were chronically exposed to HDM to establish allergic airway disease and then treated with the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib. EGFR inhibition reduced HDM and IL-17A induced GM-CSF production in a dose-dependent manner in cultured human AEC. GM-CSF production also required amphiregulin, p38 MAPK signalling and protease/TACE activity. In mice with established allergic airway disease, EGFR inhibition reduced levels of GM-CSF and TNF-α, as well as airway hyperreactivity, cellular inflammation, smooth muscle thickening and goblet cell metaplasia without changes in IgE and Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines. Results link HDM, IL-17A, amphiregulin, EGFR and GM-CSF in a mechanistic pathway in AEC and demonstrate that EGFR regulates GM-CSF production and the severity of established disease in a clinically relevant asthma model. These results identify the EGFR→GM-CSF axis as a

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling regulates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by airway epithelial cells and established allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Acciani, Thomas H.; Suzuki, Takuji; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Cras, Timothy D. Le

    2015-01-01

    Background Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are increasingly recognized as a major signaling center in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. A previous study demonstrated that epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in AEC regulated key features of allergic airway disease. However, it is unclear what mediators are regulated by EGFR signaling in AEC, although the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is EGFR-dependent in keratinocytes. Objectives To determine if EGFR signaling regulates GM-CSF production by human AEC downstream of the clinically relevant mediators house dust mite (HDM) and interleukin (IL)-17A and in a mouse model of established allergic asthma. Methods EGFR inhibitors were used to determine whether EGFR signaling regulates GM-CSF production by cultured human AEC in response to HDM and IL-17A. The roles of EGFR ligands, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) converting enzyme (TACE) were also assessed. To determine if EGFR regulates GM-CSF as well as key asthma characteristics in vivo, mice were chronically exposed to HDM to establish allergic airway disease and then treated with the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib. Results EGFR inhibition reduced HDM and IL-17A induced GM-CSF production in a dose-dependent manner in cultured human AEC. GM-CSF production also required amphiregulin, p38 MAPK signaling, and protease/TACE activity. In mice with established allergic airway disease, EGFR inhibition reduced levels of GM-CSF and TNFα, as well as airway hyperreactivity, cellular inflammation, smooth muscle thickening, and goblet cell metaplasia without changes in IgE and Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results link HDM, IL-17A, amphiregulin, EGFR and GM-CSF in a mechanistic pathway in AEC, and demonstrate that EGFR regulates GM-CSF production and the severity of established disease in a clinically relevant asthma

  14. Optimal induction of hepatitis C virus envelope-specific immunity by bicistronic plasmid DNA inoculation with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Cho, J H; Sung, Y C

    1998-10-01

    In this study, we have constructed various DNA vaccine vectors that carried hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope genes without and with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene in several different ways. In Buffalo rats that received plasmids carrying the HCV envelope genes, which encode envelope proteins E1 and E2, both antibody and lymphoproliferative responses against these proteins were induced. These responses were greatly enhanced by the codelivery of the GM-CSF gene. In particular, inoculation with a bicistronic plasmid that independently expressed the GM-CSF gene and the envelope genes in the same construct generated the highest antibody titers and significantly increased lymphoproliferative responses against these proteins. Moreover, strong antibody responses to homologous and heterologous hypervariable region 1 peptides were elicited in the immunized rats.

  15. Dissociation of LPS-induced monocytic ex vivo production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and TNF-alpha in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M; Fischer, G; Barth, E; Boneberg, E; Schneider, E M; Georgieff, M; Hartung, T

    2001-01-07

    Over a 6 month period, in 192 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), a longitudinal analysis of whole blood lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ex vivo cytokine production was performed on a daily basis until discharge from the ICU or death. Twenty-one patients with proven infections were in septic shock for the first time and for at least 3 days' duration. Ex vivo LPS-inducible release of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was upregulated and that of TNF-alpha was downregulated in patients with septic shock, regardless whether they survived or died. In conclusion, LPS-induced ex vivo TNF-alpha and G-CSF cytokine release by monocytes is regulated differentially in patients with septic shock. Since upregulation of LPS-induced production of G-CSF occurred earlier in survivors than in non-survivors, rapidly elevated and sustained G-CSF responsiveness may contribute to survival in septic shock.

  16. [A case of bladder cancer producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-6 causing respiratory failure treated with neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy along with sivelestat].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kyosuke; Okumi, Masayoshi; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Yazawa, Koji; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Uchida, Kinya; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-07-01

    A 67-year-old man visited an urological clinic with a chief complaint of urination pain. Cystourethroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed a bladder tumor (cT3bN0M0). Marked leukocytosis and respiratory distress with pleural effusion appeared. Pulse steroid therapy improved the general condition partially. The patient was sent to our hospital for further examination. Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were high and the pathological findings of bladder tumor obtained by transurethral resection (TUR) revealed an urothelial carcinoma that produced G-CSF and IL-6. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy was performed along with use of steroid and sivelestat, which ameliorated the respiratory distress. After three courses of systemic chemotherapy, serum G-CSF and IL-6 normalized and cystoprostatectomy was performed. The patient has been in good health at 20 months after the surgery with no evidence of recurrence.

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): a mediator in endometrial receptivity for a patient with polycystic ovary (PCO) undergoing in vitro maturation (IVM).

    PubMed

    Lucena, Elkin; Moreno-Ortiz, Harold

    2013-04-18

    Proliferative and secretory changes at the endometrial lining are the result of a complex intrauterine environment where sex steroid hormones and different local factors play an important role for endometrial thickening. Optimal endometrial thickness reflects an adequate maturation which is a key factor for embryo implantation. Here, we present a case of a woman with polycystic ovary who was treated using in vitro maturation (IVM) techniques. In addition, this patient showed a dyssynchrony between the endometrial phase characterised by endometrial thinning and the embryo development which had a negative impact for embryo implantation. A protocol using uterine perfusion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was performed as an alternative treatment for the unresponsive endometrium. We found that uterine infusion of G-CSF quickly increased endometrial thickness resulting in a successful pregnancy and healthy born baby. These results suggest that G-CSF is a factor that participates during endometrial remodelling enhancing the synchronisation between uterine environment and embryo development.

  18. The effect of inhibition of leukotriene synthesis on the activity of interleukin-8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Pizzey, A. R.; Linch, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhanced the extracellular release of arachidonate metabolites from ionophore-stimulated neutrophils by 145 ± 10% (mean ± S.E.M., n = 13) and 182 ± 11% (n = 16), respectively. To determine whether enhanced leukotriene production mediates the effects of these cytokines on neutrophil activity, two different specific arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors, piriprost and MK-886, were used to inhibit leukotriene synthesis. Neither inhibitor affected the upregulation of CD11b β2-integrin expression or priming of superoxide generation stimulated by IL-8 and GM-CSF. It is concluded that leukotrienes do not mediate either the direct or priming effects of these cytokines and that these classes of anti-inflammatory drugs are therefore unlikely to inhibit the effects of IL-8 and GM-CSF on neutrophil activation. PMID:18475524

  19. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine.

  20. Differential Regulation of Macrophage Glucose Metabolism by Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor: Implications for (18)F FDG PET Imaging of Vessel Wall Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Sina; Short, John D; Downs, Kevin; Nguyen, Huynh Nga; Lai, Yanlai; Zhang, Wei; Jerabek, Paul; Goins, Beth; Sadeghi, Mehran M; Asmis, Reto

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To determine the divergence of immunometabolic phenotypes of macrophages stimulated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and granulocyte-M-CSF (GM-CSF) and its implications for fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the animal care committee. Uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and various indexes of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism were evaluated in nonactivated murine peritoneal macrophages (MΦ0) and macrophages stimulated with M-CSF (MΦM-CSF) or GM-CSF (MΦGM-CSF). Intracellular glucose flux was measured by using stable isotope tracing of glycolytic and tricyclic acid intermediary metabolites. (18)F-FDG uptake was evaluated in murine atherosclerotic aortas after stimulation with M-CSF or GM-CSF by using quantitative autoradiography. Results Despite inducing distinct activation states, GM-CSF and M-CSF stimulated progressive but similar levels of increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in macrophages that reached up to sixfold compared with MΦ0. The expression of glucose transporters, oxidative metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis were induced to similar levels in MΦM-CSF and MΦGM-CSF. Unexpectedly, there was a 1.7-fold increase in extracellular acidification rate, a 1.4-fold increase in lactate production, and overexpression of several critical glycolytic enzymes in MΦM-CSF compared with MΦGM-CSF with associated increased glucose flux through glycolytic pathway. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated a 1.6-fold induction of (18)F-FDG uptake in murine atherosclerotic plaques by both M-CSF and GM-CSF. Conclusion The proinflammatory and inflammation-resolving activation states of macrophages induced by GM-CSF and M-CSF in either cell culture or atherosclerotic plaques may not be distinguishable by the assessment of glucose uptake. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  1. T Cell–Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Contributes to Dry Eye Disease Pathogenesis by Promoting CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Maturation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Thomas H.; Ding, Julia; Dana, Reza; Chauhan, Sunil K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Growing evidence suggests that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to T helper 17 (Th17) cell–associated immunoinflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of T cell–derived GM-CSF on CD11b+ myeloid cell function in dry eye disease (DED). Methods In a murine model of DED, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure GM-CSF expression at the ocular surface, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate GM-CSF producing Th17 cells. A granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralizing antibody was used topically in vivo and in an in vitro culture system to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in recruiting and maturing CD11b+ cells. Clinical disease severity was evaluated after topical administration of GM-CSF neutralizing antibody. Results In dry eye disease, GM-CSF is significantly upregulated at the ocular surface and the frequency of GM-CSF producing Th17 cells is significantly increased in the draining lymph nodes. In vitro neutralization of GM-CSF from CD4+ T cells derived from DED mice suppresses major histocompatibility complex II expression by CD11b+ cells and CD11b+ cell migration. Topical neutralization of GM-CSF in a murine model of DED suppresses CD11b+ maturation and migration, as well as Th17 cell induction, yielding a reduction in clinical signs of disease. Conclusions T helper 17 cell–derived GM-CSF contributes to DED pathogenesis by promoting CD11b+ cell activation and migration to the ocular surface. PMID:28241321

  2. T Cell-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Contributes to Dry Eye Disease Pathogenesis by Promoting CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Maturation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Dohlman, Thomas H; Ding, Julia; Dana, Reza; Chauhan, Sunil K

    2017-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to T helper 17 (Th17) cell-associated immunoinflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of T cell-derived GM-CSF on CD11b+ myeloid cell function in dry eye disease (DED). In a murine model of DED, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure GM-CSF expression at the ocular surface, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate GM-CSF producing Th17 cells. A granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralizing antibody was used topically in vivo and in an in vitro culture system to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in recruiting and maturing CD11b+ cells. Clinical disease severity was evaluated after topical administration of GM-CSF neutralizing antibody. In dry eye disease, GM-CSF is significantly upregulated at the ocular surface and the frequency of GM-CSF producing Th17 cells is significantly increased in the draining lymph nodes. In vitro neutralization of GM-CSF from CD4+ T cells derived from DED mice suppresses major histocompatibility complex II expression by CD11b+ cells and CD11b+ cell migration. Topical neutralization of GM-CSF in a murine model of DED suppresses CD11b+ maturation and migration, as well as Th17 cell induction, yielding a reduction in clinical signs of disease. T helper 17 cell-derived GM-CSF contributes to DED pathogenesis by promoting CD11b+ cell activation and migration to the ocular surface.

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling and overcomes stromal-mediated drug resistance in the HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xianfu; Zhong, Hua; Wan, Haixia; Zhong, Jihua; Chen, Fangyuan

    2016-07-01

    Combining cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has demonstrated marked efficacy in the treatment of elderly and relapsed/refractory patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the role of G-CSF remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of G-CSF to overcome stromal-mediated drug resistance and the underlying molecular mechanism. Two types of co-culture models were established in the HS-5 human bone marrow/stromal and HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines, in order to imitate the interactions between stromal and leukemia cells in vitro, which is mediated by the stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α signaling axis. In the present study, HL-60 cells were attracted and adhered to HS-5 cells using migration assay and flow cytometry, respectively; however, these interactions were inhibited by treatment with G-CSF and/or the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, AMD3100. Co-culture with HS-5 cells, including direct and indirect contact, protected HL-60 cells against spontaneous apoptosis or drug-induced apoptosis; however, these protective effects were disrupted by treatment with G-CSF and/or AMD3100. Notably, G-CSF and/or AMD3100 did not alter cell viability or apoptosis when HL-60 cells were cultured with medium alone. In addition, G-CSF significantly reduced the expression levels of surface CXCR4 protein, total CXCR4 protein and CXCR4 mRNA, and significantly upregulated the expression of microRNA (miR)-146a. Conversely, AMD3100 significantly reduced surface CXCR4 expression levels, but not the total CXCR4, CXCR4 mRNA or miR-146a expression levels. The results of the present study suggested that interfering with the CXCR4/SDF-1α signaling axis via G-CSF inhibited the migration and adhesion of HL-60 cells to HS-5 cells and eliminated HS5 cell-mediated protective effects. Furthermore, G-CSF administration reduced CXCR4 expression levels by upregulating the expression of

  4. Clinical effects of a chimeric anti-EpCAM monoclonal antibody in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liljefors, Maria; Nilsson, Bo; Fagerberg, Jan; Ragnhammar, Peter; Mellstedt, Håkan; Frödin, Jan-Erik

    2005-06-01

    The EpCAM antigen is highly expressed on colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. Murine anti-EpCAM MAb (anti-EpCAM mMAb) alone or in combination with cytokines may induce clinical responses including long-lasting complete remissions (CR) in patients with metastatic disease. The chimeric variant of anti-EpCAM MAb (anti-EpCAM cMAb) interacts more efficiently with human effector cells (ADCC) than the murine counterpart in the killing of colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro, an important mechanism of action for antibody in vivo. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) augments immune effector cell functions in vivo and may enhance the therapeutic effect of MAbs. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of the combination of anti-EpCAM cMAb and GM-CSF was evaluated in 24 patients with metastatic CRC. GM-CSF was given s.c. once daily for 10 consecutive days and on day 3, anti-EpCAM cMAb was given i.v. A treatment cycle was repeated every 4th week. Five patients achieved stable disease > 3 months (overall response rate 21%). Responding patients survived significantly longer than non-responding patients (p = 0.030). The frequency of patients with an immediate-type allergic reaction (ITAR) against anti-EpCAM cMAb at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th treatment cycles was as 13%, 29%, 25% and 19% respectively. Compared to a previous study where anti-EpCAM mMAb was used in a similar treatment regimen, the present protocol did not augment the overall or progression-free survival. The overall response rate was also similar to anti-EpCAM mMAb treated patients (6/22, 27%), but the anti-EpCAM mMAb treatment protocol induced two CR, one MR and three SD. Further studies are warranted to establish the role of EpCAM as a target for antibody therapy, specifically the significance of chimeric or humanized anti-EpCAM MAbs.

  5. Calcineurin potentiates activation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene in T cells: involvement of the conserved lymphokine element 0.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, A; Masuda, E S; Naito, Y; Tokumitsu, H; Arai, K; Arai, N

    1994-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are produced by stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (A23187) in human T cell leukemia Jurkat cells. The expression of GM-CSF and IL-2 is inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Earlier studies on the IL-2 gene expression showed that overexpression of calcineurin (CN), a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, can stimulate transcription from the IL-2 promoter through the NF-AT-binding site. In this study, we obtained evidence that transfection of the cDNAs for CN A (catalytic) and CN B (regulatory) subunits also augments transcription from the GM-CSF promoter and recovers the transcription inhibited by CsA. The constitutively active type of the CN A subunit, which lacks the auto-inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains, acts in synergy with PMA to activate transcription from the GM-CSF promoter. We also found that the active CN partially replaces calcium ionophore in synergy with PMA to induce expression of endogenous GM-CSF and IL-2. By multimerizing the regulatory elements of the GM-CSF promoter, we found that one of the target sites for the CN action is the conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0), located at positions between -54 and -40. Mobility shift assays showed that the CLE0 sequence has an AP1-binding site and is associated with an NF-AT-like factor, termed NF-CLE0 gamma. NF-CLE0 gamma binding is induced by PMA/A23187 and is inhibited by treatment with CsA. These results suggest that CN is involved in the coordinated induction of the GM-CSF and IL-2 genes and that the CLE0 sequence of the GM-CSF gene is a functional analogue of the NF-AT-binding site in the IL-2 promoter, which mediates signals downstream of T cell activation. Images PMID:8186461

  6. Adjuvant therapy for melanoma in dogs: results of randomized clinical trials using surgery, liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    MacEwen, E G; Kurzman, I D; Vail, D M; Dubielzig, R R; Everlith, K; Madewell, B R; Rodriguez, C O; Phillips, B; Zwahlen, C H; Obradovich, J; Rosenthal, R C; Fox, L E; Rosenberg, M; Henry, C; Fidel, J

    1999-12-01

    Spontaneous canine oral melanoma (COM) is a highly metastatic cancer, resistant to chemotherapy, and can serve as a model for cancer immunotherapy. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide-phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE) can activate the tumoricidal activity of the monocyte-macrophage system following i.v. injection. The objective of these studies was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of L-MTP-PE administered alone and combined with recombinant canine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) in dogs undergoing surgery for oral melanoma. Ninety-eight dogs with histologically confirmed, clinically staged, oral melanoma were entered into two randomized, double-blind, surgical adjuvant trials. In trial 1, 50 dogs were stratified based on clinical stage and randomized to once a week L-MTP-PE or lipid equivalent (control). When all of the clinical stages were combined, no difference in disease-free survival or in survival time (ST) were detected. However, within stage I, dogs receiving L-MTP-PE had a significant increase in ST compared with control, with 80% of the dogs treated with L-MTP-PE still alive at >2 years. Within each stage II and stage III, there was no difference detected between the treatment groups. In trial 2, 48 dogs were stratified on the basis of clinical stage and extent of surgery (simple resection or radical excision), treated with L-MTP-PE two times a week, and randomized to rcGM-CSF or saline (placebo) given s.c. daily for 9 weeks. Within each stage and when all of the stages were combined, there was no difference between the treatment groups. In both studies, stage I COM is associated with a better prognosis. No effect on survival was observed with regard to tumor location in the oral cavity, sex, type/extent of surgery, or age. In a subset of dogs tested, pulmonary alveolar macrophage cytotoxicity was enhanced with combined rcGM-CSF and L-MTP-PE but not in dogs treated with L-MTP-PE alone. The present study

  7. Randomized Prospective Controlled Trial of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor as Adjunctive Therapy for Limb-Threatening Diabetic Foot Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, Fausto; Pellizzer, Giampietro; Strazzabosco, Marco; Martini, Zeno; Du Jardin, Giovanni; Lora, Luciano; Fabris, Paolo; Benedetti, Paolo; Erle, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Adult diabetic patients admitted to our Diabetes Center from September 1996 to January 1998 for severe, limb-threatening foot infection were consecutively enrolled in a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study aimed at assessing the safety and efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (lenograstim) as an adjunctive therapy for the standard treatment of diabetic foot infection. Forty patients, all of whom displayed evidence of osteomyelitis and long-standing ulcer infection, were randomized 1:1 to receive either conventional treatment (i.e., antimicrobial therapy plus local treatment) or conventional therapy plus 263 μg of G-CSF subcutaneously daily for 21 days. The empiric antibiotic treatment (a combination of ciprofloxacin plus clindamycin) was further adjusted, when necessary, according to the results of cultures and sensitivity testing. Microbiologic assessment of foot ulcers was performed by both deep-tissue biopsy and swab cultures, performed at enrollment and on days 7 and 21 thereafter. Patients were monitored for 6 months; the major endpoints (i.e., cure, improvement, failure, and amputation) were blindly assessed at weeks 3 and 9. At enrollment, both patient groups were comparable in terms of both demographic and clinical data. None of the G-CSF-treated patients experienced either local or systemic adverse effects. At the 3- and 9-week assessments, no significant differences between the two groups could be observed concerning the number of patients either cured or improved, the number of patients displaying therapeutic failure, or the species and number of microorganisms previously yielded from cultures at day 7 and day 21. Conversely, among this small series of patients the cumulative number of amputations observed after 9 weeks of treatment appeared to be lower in the G-CSF arm; in fact, only three patients (15%) in this group had required amputation, whereas nine patients (45%) in the other group had

  8. Phase Ib trial of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor combined with murine monoclonal antibody R24 in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, A; Oratz, R; Liebes, L; Alter, R S; Felice, A; Peace, D; Vilcek, J; Blum, R H

    1994-08-01

    R24, a murine monoclonal antibody, has been shown to mediate complement- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of melanoma tumor targets. We conducted a Phase Ib clinical trial using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and R24 in 20 patients with metastatic melanoma. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that treatment with GM-CSF could up-regulate monocyte and granulocyte ADCC and that the combination of GM-CSF plus R24, which mediates ADCC, would lead to enhanced anti-tumor activity in patients with melanoma. GM-CSF was administered by subcutaneous injection daily for 21 days at a dose of 150 micrograms/m2/day. R24 was administered by continuous intravenous infusion on days 8-15 at three dose levels: 0, 10, and 50 mg/m2/day. All 20 patients received one cycle of treatment only. Immune parameters measured were monocyte and granulocyte direct cytotoxicity and ADCC. All patients were evaluable for toxicity. Fifteen patients were evaluable for immune response. Treatment with GM-CSF alone was well tolerated. Toxicity from the combination of GM-CSF plus R24 included diffuse urticaria, nausea and vomiting, hypertension, and hypotension. Hypotension was the dose-limiting toxicity. Two patients on the 50-mg/m2/day dose level of R24 achieved a partial response lasting 2+ and 5+ months. Treatment with GM-CSF led to a statistically significant enhancement of monocyte and granulocyte direct cytotoxicity and ADCC. The maximally tolerated dose of R24 given at this schedule combined with GM-CSF is < 50 mg/m2/day. We conclude that GM-CSF given by subcutaneous injection at 150 micrograms/m2 x 21 days can enhance effector cell ADCC and direct cytotoxicity and that the combination of GM-CSF and R24 can be therapeutic.

  9. Plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for first-line steady-state autologous peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in lymphoma and multiple myeloma: results of the prospective PREDICT trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Nigel; Douglas, Kenny; Ho, Anthony D.; Mohty, Mohamad; Carlson, Kristina; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Milone, Giuseppe; Pareja, Macarena Ortiz; Shaheen, Daniel; Willemsen, Arnold; Whitaker, Nicky; Chabannon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, the combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is approved for the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation in patients with lymphoma and myeloma whose cells mobilize poorly. The purpose of this study was to further assess the safety and efficacy of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for front-line mobilization in European patients with lymphoma or myeloma. In this multicenter, open label, single-arm study, patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (10 μg/kg/day) subcutaneously for 4 days; on the evening of day 4 they were given plerixafor (0.24 mg/kg) subcutaneously. Patients underwent apheresis on day 5 after a morning dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. The primary study objective was to confirm the safety of mobilization with plerixafor. Secondary objectives included assessment of efficacy (apheresis yield, time to engraftment). The combination of plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells in 118 patients (90 with myeloma, 25 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 3 with Hodgkin's disease). Treatment-emergent plerixafor-related adverse events were reported in 24 patients. Most adverse events occurred within 1 hour after injection, were grade 1 or 2 in severity and included gastrointestinal disorders or injection-site reactions. The minimum cell yield (≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg) was harvested in 98% of patients with myeloma and in 80% of those with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a median of one apheresis. The optimum cell dose (≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or ≥6×106 CD34+ cells/kg for myeloma) was harvested in 89% of myeloma patients and 48% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients. In this prospective, multicenter European study, mobilization with plerixafor + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor allowed the majority of patients with myeloma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to undergo transplantation with

  10. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  11. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  12. Evaluation of a biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim XM02) for peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and transplantation: a single center experience in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Hideaki; Hotta, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Fujita, Shinya; Nakaya, Aya; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2017-01-01

    Background Biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has recently been introduced into clinical practice. G-CSFs are used to mobilize CD34+ cells and accelerate engraftment after transplantation. However, in Asia, particularly in Japan, data for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization by this biosimilar G-CSF are currently lacking. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and safety of biosimilar G-CSF for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation needs to be evaluated in a Japanese context. Materials and methods The subjects included two groups of patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. All patients received chemotherapy priming for the mobilization of PBSCs. All patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by the administration of either the biosimilar G-CSF, filgrastim XM02 (FBNK), or the originators, filgrastim, or lenograstim. Results There were no significant differences among FBNK, filgrastim, and lenograstim treatments in the numbers of CD34+ cells in harvested PBSCs, the scores for granulocyte/macrophage colony forming units, or for malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients evaluated as separate or combined cohorts. In addition, there were no significant differences in safety, side effects, complications, or the time to engraftment after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conclusion Biosimilar FBNK shows the same efficacy and safety as originator G-CSFs for facilitating bone marrow recovery in Japanese malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. In addition, it is less expensive than the originators, reducing hospitalization costs. PMID:28182150

  13. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors supports hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in sublethally irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Sefc, Ludek; Dusek, Ladislav; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Streitová, Denisa

    2010-08-01

    Research areas of 'post-exposure treatment' and 'cytokines and growth factors' have top priority among studies aimed at radiological nuclear threat countermeasures. The experiments were aimed at testing the ability of N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), an adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, to modulate hematopoiesis in sublethally irradiated mice, when administered alone or in a combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a two-day post-irradiation treatment regimen. A complete analysis of hematopoiesis including determination of numbers of bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and precursor cells, as well as of numbers of peripheral blood cells, was performed. The outcomes of the treatment were assessed at days 3 to 22 after irradiation. IB-MECA alone has been found to induce a significant elevation of numbers of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and peripheral blood neutrophils. IB-MECA given concomitantly with G-CSF increased significantly bone marrow GM-CFC and erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E) in comparison with the controls and with animals administered each of the drugs alone. The findings suggest the ability of IB-MECA to stimulate hematopoiesis and to support the hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in sublethally irradiated mice.

  14. An early granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment attenuates neuropathic pain through activation of mu opioid receptors on the injured nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yeh, Shin-Rung; Lo, Ai-Lun; Chao, Po-Kuan; Lee, Yun-Lin; Hung, Yu-Hui; Lu, Kwok-Tung; Ro, Long-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) located in the peripheral nerves can be activated after nerve injury and that it attenuates peripheral nociceptive signals to the spinal dorsal horn. Various cytokines and phosphorylated-p38 (p-p38) activation in the dorsal horn also play an important role in neuropathic pain development. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is a growth factor that can stimulate granulocyte formation and has been shown to exert an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through recruiting opioid-containing leukocytes to the injured nerve. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Herein, the results of behavior tests in addition to MOR levels in the injured sciatic nerve and the levels of p-p38 and various cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn were studied in vehicle-treated or GCSF-treated chronic constriction injured (CCI) rats at different time points (i.e., 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively) after nerve injury. The results showed that a single early systemic GCSF treatment after nerve injury can up-regulate MORs in the injured nerve, which can decrease peripheral nociceptive signals. Thereafter, those changes suppress the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 but enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, followed by decreases in p-p38 in the dorsal horn, and thus further attenuate neuropathic pain. PMID:27180600

  15. The potential role of recombinant hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors in preventing infections in the immunocompromised host

    PubMed Central

    Rusthoven, James

    1991-01-01

    Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors coordinate the proliferation and maturation of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells during normal hematopoiesis. Most of these factors are now available as recombinant human colony-stimulating factors, and preclinical and clinical testing is proceeding rapidly. Granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors have been the most extensively studied to date. In human clinical trials, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves neutrophil counts and function, reduces episodes of febrile neutropenia, improves neutrophil recovery after disease- or treatment-induced myelosuppression, and reduces the number of serious infections in several neutropenic disease states. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor has similar biological properties but may also improve eosinophil proliferation and function, and platelet cell recovery after myelotoxic bone marrow injury, Interleukin-1 boosts the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, but also may promote the resolution of established infections in conjunction with antibiotics. The therapeutic realities and future therapeutic implications of these agents for the therapy of infections, cancer and hemopoietic disorders are discussed. PMID:22529714

  16. Delayed granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment in rats attenuates mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Kato, Kei; Mannoji, Chikato; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    Animal experimental study with intervention. The aim of this study was to elucidate therapeutic effects of delayed granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment for mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically for patients with hematological disorders. Previous reports showed that immediate G-CSF attenuates neuropathic pain in CCI of the sciatic nerve. However, the acute treatment for neuropathic pain prior to accurate diagnosis is not realistic in clinical settings. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to the CCI model. This model induces mechanical allodynia on the ipsilateral hind paw within the first week after the injury. One week after CCI, rats received intraperitoneal G-CSF (15.0 μg/kg) for 5 consecutive days. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using the von Frey hair test. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p-p38MAPK) and OX-42 (a marker for activated microglia) on tissue slides from a subset of rats 2 weeks after surgery. Western blot analyses were carried out to determine protein expression level of p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1 β on spinal cord homogenates 2 weeks after CCI. Results of the von Frey filament test showed that G-CSF significantly attenuates mechanical allodynia induced by the CCI model. Immunohistochemistry revealed that G-CSF reduced the number of p-p38MAPK-positive cells in the ipsilateral dorsal horn compared with that in the vehicle group rats. Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that p-p38MAPK-expressing cells in the spinal cord dorsal horn are mainly microglia. Western blot analysis indicated that G-CSF decreased the expression levels of both p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1 β in the ipsilateral dorsal horn compared with that in the vehicle group rats. The present results indicate a beneficial effect of delayed G-CSF treatment in an animal model of peripheral nerve

  17. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in 66 Patients with Myeloid or Lymphoid Neoplasms and Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Invasive Fungal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Amar; Rodriguez, Gilhen; Zuniga, Jorge; Akhrass, Fadi Al; Georgescu, Georgia; Pande, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may improve the response to antifungal therapy in immunosuppressed patients with invasive fungal disease (IFD). Methods We retrospectively assessed 66 patients in whom GM-CSF was given during antifungal therapy. Results Severe neutropenia (77%) and refractory/relapsed cancer (65%) were common in the group. Prior to GM-CSF therapy, 15% of patients received high-dose corticosteroids for a median of 30 ± 16 days (median cumulative dose [c.d.], 1184 ± 1019 mg), and 9 received steroids during GM-CSF therapy for a median of 16 ± 12 days (median c.d., 230 ± 1314 mg). Mild toxic effects were noted in 9% of patients; there were no cases of cardiopulmonary toxicity. All cause deaths were observed in 68% and 48% of patients died of progressive IFD. High-dose corticosteroids prior to GM-CSF (OR, 24; 95% CI, 2.21–264.9; P ≤ 0.009), GM-CSF started in the intensive care unit (OR, 10; 95% CI, 1.66–63.8; P ≤ 0.01), concurrent granulocyte transfusions (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.27–16.8; P ≤ 0.02), and proven/probable IFD (OR, 4; 95% CI, 1–16.2; P ≤ 0.05) predicted antifungal treatment failure. Conclusions GM-CSF adjuvant therapy was tolerated without serous toxicity and antifungal treatment failure remained a challenge in patients treated with high-dose systemic corticosteroids. PMID:23038157

  18. Crystallization of a 2:2 complex of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) with the ligand-binding region of the GCSF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, Eijiro; Tamada, Taro; Maeda, Yoshitake; Koshiba, Takumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2005-08-01

    A 2:2 complex of highly purified GCSF receptor (Ig-CRH) with GCSF was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) receptor receives signals for regulating the maturation, proliferation and differentiation of the precursor cells of neutrophilic granulocytes. The signalling complex composed of two GCSFs (GCSF, 19 kDa) and two GCSF receptors (GCSFR, 34 kDa) consisting of an Ig-like domain and a cytokine-receptor homologous (CRH) domain was crystallized. A crystal of the complex was grown in 1.0 M sodium formate and 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 and belongs to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or its enantiomorph P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.1, c = 331.8 Å. Unfortunately, this crystal form did not diffract beyond 5 Å resolution. Since the heterogeneity of GCSF receptor appeared to prevent the growth of good-quality crystals, the GCSF receptor was fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the GCSF–fractionated GCSF receptor complex were grown as a new crystal form in 0.2 M ammonium phosphate. This new crystal form diffracted to beyond 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21 (or its enantiomorph P3{sub 2}21), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.8, c = 105.7 Å.

  19. A phase 1 study to address the safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, D; Rawstron, A; Richards, S; Isaacs, J; Bird, H; Jack, A; Morgan, G; Emery, P

    1997-10-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone for the mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with resistant active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five patients with resistant active RA were studied. A dose of 5 microg/kg of G-CSF (Filgrastim) was given subcutaneously each day for 5 days, and the number of stem cells mobilized into the peripheral blood was assessed by daily CD34 counts. RA disease activity was assessed by standard clinical methods. The absolute numbers of peripheral blood CD34+ cells peaked on day 4, with a mean value of 0.025 x 10(9)/liter (range 0.013-0.048 x 10(9)/liter). There was no significant change in disease activity during the study or in the month following therapy. Using G-CSF alone, CD34+ progenitor peripheral blood cells were mobilized in numbers suitable for leukopheresis. G-CSF therapy was well-tolerated in patients with active RA, and was not associated with a flare during treatment or in the month following treatment.

  20. Effects of tumor vaccine expressing Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor and interleukin-18 fusion on cancer cells and its possible application for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Rok; Park, Young Kyu; Shin, Boo Ahn; Park, Hae-Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    To access antitumor effects of a combined Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), cDNA fusion of murine GM-CSF and mature IL-18 (GMIL-18) was constructed and transfected in mammalian cells. GMIL-18 fusion protein was highly secreted and displayed bifunctional activities, possessing immune response initiation and cytokine roles, including IFN-γ induction in mouse splenocytes and increased proliferation of GM-CSF-dependent cells, M-NSF-60. The GMIL-18 secreting tumor vaccine was generated and it strongly stimulated differentiation of dendrite cells (DCs) and effusive CD8(+) and CD4(+) cell infiltration into tumor mice. Moreover, growth of CT26 mouse colon cancer cells was significantly retarded by GMIL-18 (CT26GMIL-18), but not by CT26GM-CSF- or CT26IL-18. The efficiency of prophylactic vaccination was greater than that of therapeutic vaccination in terms of tumor size and its inhibitory role in proliferation. In micrometastasis analysis of tumor models, γ-ray irradiated GMIL-18 tumor vaccine showed a smaller number of liver-meta tumor nodules in mouse liver cells. We concluded that bifunctional GMIL-18 fusion protein could be applied as an immune therapy for cancer treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pegfilgrastim and daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: patterns of use and neutropenia-related outcomes in cancer patients in Spain--results of the LEARN Study.

    PubMed

    Almenar, D; Mayans, J; Juan, O; Bueno, J M Garcia; Lopez, J I Jalon; Frau, A; Guinot, M; Cerezuela, P; Buscalla, E Garcia; Gasquet, J A; Sanchez, J

    2009-05-01

    Daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors [(G-CSFs); e.g. filgrastim, lenograstim] are frequently used to reduce the duration of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) and the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in cancer patients. A pegylated formulation of filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, which is administered once per cycle, was introduced in Spain in 2003. LEARN was a multi-centre, retrospective, observational study in Spain comparing patterns of use of daily G-CSF and pegfilgrastim, and CIN-related outcomes in adults with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Outcome measures were the percentage of patients receiving G-CSF for primary prophylaxis versus secondary prophylaxis/treatment, duration of treatment with G-CSF and incidence of CIN-related complications. Medical records from consecutive patients with documented pegfilgrastim (n = 75) or daily G-CSF (n = 111) use during 2003 were included. The proportion of patients receiving primary or secondary prophylaxis was comparable between the pegfilgrastim (39 and 48% respectively) and daily G-CSF (40 and 48% respectively) groups. However, there was a trend towards less frequent use to treat a neutropenic event such as FN or neutropenia in the pegfilgrastim group (17 versus 30% with daily G-CSF). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia-related complications were less frequent in patients receiving pegfilgrastim (e.g. FN 11 versus 24% with daily G-CSF). This is the first study to show the potential benefits of pegfilgrastim over daily G-CSF in Spanish clinical practice.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of on-demand plerixafor added to chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Leotta, Salvatore; Spadaro, Andrea; Zammit, Valentina; Cupri, Alessandra; Avola, Giuseppe; Camuglia, Maria Grazia; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Morelli, Mara; Olivieri, Attilio; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    We here report final results of a phase II/III prospective study that evaluated in Multiple Myeloma the use of on-demand plerixafor (PLX) added to mobilizing chemotherapy for patients showing predictive signs of mobilization failure. A total of 111 patients with MM were registered, all received cyclophosphamide 4 g/m(2) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Overall, a successful CD34+ cell mobilization was achieved in 97.2% (108/111) of patients. Minimum harvest (≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg) was achieved in 97.2% (108/111) and optimal harvest success (≥4.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg) was achieved in 84.6% (94/111). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who received on-demand PLX treatment had significantly higher likelihoods of successfully achieving both the minimal (p = .006) and optimal harvest (p = .05) in respect to a historical control group mobilized without any PLX. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, for each 1% increase in probability of achieving a successful minimal harvest, was €40.6 per patient.

  3. Pegfilgrastim and daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: patterns of use and neutropenia-related outcomes in cancer patients in Spain – results of the LEARN Study

    PubMed Central

    ALMENAR, D; MAYANS, J; JUAN, O; BUENO, JM GARCIA; LOPEZ, JI JALON; FRAU, A; GUINOT, M; CEREZUELA, P; BUSCALLA, E GARCIA; GASQUET, JA; SANCHEZ, J

    2009-01-01

    Daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors [(G-CSFs); e.g. filgrastim, lenograstim] are frequently used to reduce the duration of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) and the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in cancer patients. A pegylated formulation of filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, which is administered once per cycle, was introduced in Spain in 2003. LEARN was a multi-centre, retrospective, observational study in Spain comparing patterns of use of daily G-CSF and pegfilgrastim, and CIN-related outcomes in adults with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Outcome measures were the percentage of patients receiving G-CSF for primary prophylaxis versus secondary prophylaxis/treatment, duration of treatment with G-CSF and incidence of CIN-related complications. Medical records from consecutive patients with documented pegfilgrastim (n = 75) or daily G-CSF (n = 111) use during 2003 were included. The proportion of patients receiving primary or secondary prophylaxis was comparable between the pegfilgrastim (39 and 48% respectively) and daily G-CSF (40 and 48% respectively) groups. However, there was a trend towards less frequent use to treat a neutropenic event such as FN or neutropenia in the pegfilgrastim group (17 versus 30% with daily G-CSF). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia-related complications were less frequent in patients receiving pegfilgrastim (e.g. FN 11 versus 24% with daily G-CSF). This is the first study to show the potential benefits of pegfilgrastim over daily G-CSF in Spanish clinical practice. PMID:19076208

  4. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization on the expression patterns, clonality and signal transduction of TRAV and TRBV repertoire.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Li; Wu, Xiuli; Wu, Meiqing; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Hui; Fan, Zhiping; Sun, Jing; Liu, Qifa

    2012-08-01

    The immune modulatory effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on T cells resulted in an unexpected low incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT). Recently, αβ(+) T cells are identified as the primary effector cells for GVHD. However, whether G-CSF could influence the repertoire of αβ(+) T cells (TRAV and TRBV repertoire) and CD3 genes remains unclear. To further characterize this feature, we investigated the effect of G-CSF mobilization on the T cell receptors (TCR) of αβ(+) T cells (TRAV and TRBV repertoire) and CD3 genes, as well as the association between the changes of TCR repertoire and GVHD in patients undergoing G-CSF mobilized allo-PBSCT. We found that G-CSF mobilization had an effect on the expression patterns, clonality and signal transduction of TRAV and TRBV repertoire. This alteration might play a role in mediating GVHD in G-CSF mobilized allo-PBSCT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe Hypoxemia in a Healthy Donor for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Only the First Administration of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keita; Doki, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Haraguchi, Kyoko; Okuyama, Yoshiki; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) in healthy donors. A few reports have shown that some healthy donors developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or capillary leak syndrome after more than several rounds of G-CSF administration or leukapheresis. Case Report We report the case of a healthy donor for allogeneic stem cell transplantation who developed severe hypoxemia 1 h after only the first administration of G-CSF. The donor was administered 10 μg/kg G-CSF (lenograstim) subcutaneously for PBSC mobilization. 1 h after the first administration of G-CSF, the donor suddenly presented with dry cough and dyspnea. The oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2) in the room air was 88%. An electrocardiogram and chest radiography revealed no abnormalities. We excluded other causes of severe hypoxemia and diagnosed the donor with hypoxemia due to G-CSF administration, which was subsequently terminated. The donor was administered 2 l/min oxygen via a nasal cannula and 100 mg hydrocortisone intravenously. He subsequently recovered, and SpO2 in the room air returned to 98% 10 h after hypoxemia. Conclusion These respiratory symptoms might be related to anaphylactoid or hypersensitivity reaction. The donors should be observed for at least 1 h after the first administration of G-CSF. PMID:27994532

  7. Therapeutic outcomes of transplanting autologous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilised peripheral mononuclear cells in diabetic patients with critical limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, L; Samedanifard, S H; Keshavarzi, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Larijani, B; Ghavamzadeh, A; Ahmadi, A S; Shojaeifard, A; Ostadali, M R; Sharifi, A M; Amini, M R; Mahmoudian, A; Fakhraei, H; Aalaa, M; Mohajeri-Tehrani, M R

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of transplanting autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), from granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilised peripheral blood, was investigated in diabetic patients with critical limb ischaemia (CLI). After 3 months, the transplanted group of patients (n=7) showed a significant improvement in ischaemia manifestations, including pain and neurological signs, wound healing and the rate of lower-limb amputation, compared to the control group of patients (n=14). Pain was significantly reduced in the transplanted group compared to controls (P=0.014). The ankle-brachial index (ABI) and the pulse strength within ischaemic tissues of the transplanted group were significantly improved (P=0.035 and P=0.01, respectively). Importantly, 50% of the control group (7/14 patients) faced major amputation of a limb at the study's conclusion, compared to none of 7 patients in the transplanted group (P=0.047). The safety of transplantation was confirmed by observing no adverse reactions among the transplanted group, including infection and immunological rejection. Hence, this study provides further evidence that transplantation of autologous peripheral blood MSCs, mobilised by G-CSF, induces angiogenesis and improves the wound healing process in diabetic patients with CLI.

  8. A Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer with an Embedded Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Domain Induces Enhanced Antibody and T Cell Responses*

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Po-Ssu; Matthews, Katie; Michael, Elizabeth; Berkhout, Ben; Schief, William R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine should ideally induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses that provide sterilizing immunity over a prolonged period. Current HIV-1 vaccines have failed in inducing such immunity. The viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies to block infection, but several Env properties limit the ability to induce an antibody response of sufficient quantity and quality. We hypothesized that Env immunogenicity could be improved by embedding an immunostimulatory protein domain within its sequence. A stabilized Env trimer was therefore engineered with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) inserted into the V1V2 domain of gp120. Probing with neutralizing antibodies showed that both the Env and GM-CSF components of the chimeric protein were folded correctly. Furthermore, the embedded GM-CSF domain was functional as a cytokine in vitro. Mouse immunization studies demonstrated that chimeric EnvGM-CSF enhanced Env-specific antibody and T cell responses compared with wild-type Env. Collectively, these results show that targeting and activation of immune cells using engineered cytokine domains within the protein can improve the immunogenicity of Env subunit vaccines. PMID:21515681

  9. Effect of Periodic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Administration on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Different Monocyte Subsets in Pediatric Patients with Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Grubczak, Kamil; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Miklasz, Paula; Singh, Paulina; Radzikowska, Urszula; Kulak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by progressive muscle dysfunction. There is a large body of evidence indicating that angiogenesis is impaired in muscles of MD patients. Therefore, induction of dystrophic muscle revascularization should become a novel approach aimed at diminishing the extent of myocyte damage. Recently, we and others demonstrated that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) resulted in clinical improvement of patients with neuromuscular disorders. To date, however, the exact mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of G-CSF have not been fully understood. Here we used flow cytometry to quantitate numbers of CD34+ cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and different monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of pediatric MD patients treated with repetitive courses of G-CSF administration. We showed that repetitive cycles of G-CSF administration induced efficient mobilization of above-mentioned cells including cells with proangiogenic potential. These findings contribute to better understanding the beneficial clinical effects of G-CSF in pediatric MD patients. PMID:26770204

  10. The effect of repeated administrations of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for blood stem cells mobilization in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Gianni; Tesei, Silvana; Canesi, Margherita; Sacilotto, Giorgio; Vittorio, Montefusco; Mizuno, Yoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Antonini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) may boost physiological stem cell repair system in patients with cerebral lesions. Atypical parkinsonisms (PSP, CBD, MSA) are characterized by rapidly progressive course without significant benefit from current therapies. We treated 11 patients with atypical parkinsonism (MSA n=4, PSP n=5, CBD n=2) with GCSF (5mcg/kg s.c. daily for 6 days/month) for 3 months. We assessed CBC, CD34+ cells, routine biochemical and coagulation tests, UPDRS motor scores and safety. We did not observe significant adverse events during and following GCSF treatment. One patient withdrew informed consent. Three patients complained about bone pain that improved following steroid treatment. Four patients perceived a subjective benefit after treatment was completed. UPDRS motor score improved in three patients, remained stable in two and worsened in five. GCSF can be safely administered to patients with atypical parkinsonism and potentially meaningful clinical changes may be observed in some patients. These results are encouraging and warrant further studies. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of serum levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) among non-segmental vitiligo patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Azmy Ahmed; Zaki, Amr Mohamed; Abdo, Hamed Mohamed; Aly, Dalia Gamal; Emara, Tarek Ahmed; El-Toukhy, Safinaz; Emam, Hanaa Mohamed; Abdelwahab, Mahetab Samir

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an essential factor in the growth and maturation of blood cells as well as modulation of the immune system. Few studies have investigated its involvement in the development of vitiligo, and no studies have been performed on Egyptian patients. To assess GM-CSF serum level among non-segmental Egyptian vitiligo patients and to determine its possible role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Forty patients with non-segmental vitiligo and 40 age- and sex-matched subjects were assessed for levels of GM-CSF in serum using the ELISA technique. The patients in this study showed lowerlevels ofGM-CSF in serum compared to controls (mean ± SD was 33.4 ± 5.7 pg/ml versus 63.4 ± 7.4 pg/ml, respectively, p = 0.0001). No appreciable relation was detected between levels of GM-CSF in serum and age, sex, family history, and stressful events or disease activity, type, and extent, p ˃ 0.05. GM-CSF serum level may be one of the determinants of the autoimmune hypothesis in the etiopathogenesis of non-segmental vitiligo.

  12. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  13. A chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain induces enhanced antibody and T cell responses.

    PubMed

    van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Po-Ssu; Matthews, Katie; Michael, Elizabeth; Berkhout, Ben; Schief, William R; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W

    2011-06-24

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine should ideally induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses that provide sterilizing immunity over a prolonged period. Current HIV-1 vaccines have failed in inducing such immunity. The viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies to block infection, but several Env properties limit the ability to induce an antibody response of sufficient quantity and quality. We hypothesized that Env immunogenicity could be improved by embedding an immunostimulatory protein domain within its sequence. A stabilized Env trimer was therefore engineered with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) inserted into the V1V2 domain of gp120. Probing with neutralizing antibodies showed that both the Env and GM-CSF components of the chimeric protein were folded correctly. Furthermore, the embedded GM-CSF domain was functional as a cytokine in vitro. Mouse immunization studies demonstrated that chimeric Env(GM-CSF) enhanced Env-specific antibody and T cell responses compared with wild-type Env. Collectively, these results show that targeting and activation of immune cells using engineered cytokine domains within the protein can improve the immunogenicity of Env subunit vaccines.

  14. Circadian rhythm of neutrophil counts and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) under clozapine treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ferrea, Stefano; Fehsel, Karin; Cordes, Joachim; Luckhaus, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Agranulocytosis is a severe side effect of clozapine which requires stopping this medication immediately in the case of progressive neutropenia. There are, however, cases of benign neutropenia under clozapine that do not progress. The ability to predict progression vs. non-progression in neutropenia cases under clozapine would be highly valuable for avoiding unnecessary treatment withdrawals. In this context, we closely monitored circadian neutrophil counts and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) levels in a patient who had low normal neutrophil counts at baseline and developed neutropenia under clozapine treatment. Venous blood samples were drawn in close intervals for 4 weeks. At several time points blood was sampled in the morning between 08:30 and 9:30 h and a second time in the afternoon between 14:00 and 15:00 h. The circadian rhythm of neutrophil counts and GM-CSF levels was unchanged. There was no progression to agranulocytosis, and clozapine could be continued. In view of the available literature and the presented case it is suggested that further studying of circadian profiles of neutrophil counts, neutrophil regulatory factors, such as GM-CSF, and their intercorrelation may help to find a biomarker of benign vs. malign neutropenia under clozapine.

  15. Decreased expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is associated with adverse clinical outcome in patients with gastric cancer undergoing gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Lin, Chao; Shen, Zhenbin; Zhang, Heng; He, Hongyong; Li, He; Qin, Jing; Qin, Xinyu; Xu, Jiejie; Sun, Yihong

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have revealed the clinical significance of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in gastric cancer, whereas the role of the cytokines that orchestrate TAM polarization in gastric cancer remains elusive. The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expression in patients with gastric cancer. Intratumoral GM-CSF expression was investigated by immunohistochemical staining in 408 retrospectively enrolled patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic value of GM-CSF expression. Predictive nomograms were generated to predict the overall survival and disease-free survival rates of the patients. Decreased intratumoral GM-CSF expression was identified, and indicated a poorer clinical outcome for patients with gastric cancer, particularly in advanced stages. Intratumoral GM-CSF expression may provide an additional risk stratification for the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer based on the Tumor-Node-Metastasis (TNM) staging system. Cox multivariate analysis identified GM-CSF expression as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival time. The generated nomograms performed well in predicting the 3-and 5-year clinical outcome of patients with gastric cancer. In conclusion, GM-CSF is a potential independent prognostic indicator for patients with gastric cancer, which may be integrated with TNM staging systems to improve the predictive accuracy for clinical outcome, particularly in advanced tumors.

  16. Therapeutic vaccination based on side population cells transduced by the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene elicits potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, C; Kohara, H; Inoue, H; Narusawa, M; Ogawa, Y; Hirose-Yotsuya, L; Miyamoto, S; Matsumura, Y; Yamada, K; Takahashi, A; Tani, K

    2017-04-01

    Among cancer immunotherapies, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene-transduced tumor cell vaccine (GVAX) therapies appear promising and have been shown to be safe and effective in multiple clinical trials. However, the antitumor efficacies of GVAX therapy alone are in some cases limited. Here we showed that GVAX therapy targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs) substantially suppressed tumor development in syngeneic immunocompetent mice recapitulating normal immune systems. CSCs were isolated as side population (SP) cells from 4T1 murine breast carcinoma cell line and transduced with GM-CSF gene delivered by non-transmissible Sendai virus (4T1-SP/GM). Impaired tumorigenicity of subcutaneously injected 4T1-SP/GM depended on CD8(+) T cells in concert with CD4(+) T cells and natural killer cells. Mice therapeutically vaccinated with irradiated 4T1-SP/GM cells had markedly suppressed tumor development of subcutaneously transplanted 4T1-SP cells compared with those treated with irradiated cells of non-transduced 4T1-SP cells or non-SP (4T1-NSP/GM) cells. Tumor suppression was accompanied by the robust accumulation of mature dendritic cells at vaccination sites and T-helper type 1-skewed systemic cellular immunity. Our results suggested that CSC cell-based GVAX immunotherapy might be clinically useful for inducing potent tumor-specific antitumor immunity.

  17. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A.; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ−/− leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ+/+ counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ−/− neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus–challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  18. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Influences Angiogenesis by Regulating the Coordinated Expression of VEGF and the Ang/Tie System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingling; Chen, Lei; Shu, Bin; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Qi, Shaohai; Xu, Yingbin

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can accelerate wound healing by promoting angiogenesis. The biological effects of GM-CSF in angiogenesis and the corresponding underlying molecular mechanisms, including in the early stages of primitive endothelial tubule formation and the later stages of new vessel maturation, have only been partially clarified. This study aimed to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on angiogenesis and its regulatory mechanisms. Employing a self-controlled model (Sprague-Dawley rats with deep partial-thickness burn wounds), we determined that GM-CSF can increase VEGF expression and decrease the expression ratio of Ang-1/Ang-2 and the phosphorylation of Tie-2 in the early stages of the wound healing process, which promotes the degradation of the basement membrane and the proliferation of endothelial cells. At later stages of wound healing, GM-CSF can increase the expression ratio of Ang-1/Ang-2 and the phosphorylation of Tie-2 and maintain a high VEGF expression level. Consequently, pericyte coverages were higher, and the basement membrane became more integrated in new blood vessels, which enhanced the barrier function of blood vessels. In summary, we report here that increased angiogenesis is associated with GM-CSF treatment, and we indicate that VEGF and the Ang/Tie system may act as angiogenic mediators of the healing effect of GM-CSF on burn wounds. PMID:24658178

  20. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  1. Similar in vitro effects and pulp regeneration in ectopic tooth transplantation by basic fibroblast growth factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, N; Hayashi, Y; Murakami, M; Alvarez, F J; Horibe, H; Iohara, K; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to have combinatorial trophic effects with dental pulp stem cells for pulp regeneration. The aim of this investigation is to examine the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in vitro and in vivo compared with those of G-CSF and to assess the potential utility of bFGF as an alternative to G-CSF for pulp regeneration. Five different types of cells were examined in the in vitro effects of bFGF on cell migration, proliferation, anti-apoptosis, neurite outgrowth, angiogenesis, and odontogenesis compared with those of G-CSF. The in vivo regenerative potential of pulp tissue including vasculogenesis and odontoblastic differentiation was also compared using an ectopic tooth transplantation model. Basic fibroblast growth factor was similar to G-CSF in high migration, proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects and angiogenic and neurite outgrowth stimulatory activities in vitro. There was no significant difference between bFGF and G-CSF in the regenerative potential in vivo. The potential utility of bFGF for pulp regeneration is demonstrated as a homing/migration factor similar to the influence of G-CSF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  3. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Increases Cerebral Blood Flow via a NO Surge Mediated by Akt/eNOS Pathway to Reduce Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Hock-Kean; Kuo, Jon-Son; Wang, Jia-Yi; Pang, Cheng-Yoong

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects brain from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthases partially reduces G-CSF protection. We thus further investigated the effects of G-CSF on ischemia-induced NO production and its consequence on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and neurological deficit. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) microinfused above middle cerebral artery caused a rapid reduction of rCBF (ischemia) which lasted for 30 minutes and was followed by a gradual recovery of blood flow (reperfusion) within the striatal region. Regional NO concentration increased rapidly (NO surge) during ischemia and recovered soon to the baseline. G-CSF increased rCBF resulting in shorter ischemic duration and an earlier onset of reperfusion. The enhancement of the ischemia-induced NO by G-CSF accompanied by elevation of phospho-Akt and phospho-eNOS was noted, suggesting an activation of Akt/eNOS. I/R-induced infarct volume and neurological deficits were also reduced by G-CSF treatment. Inhibition of NO synthesis by L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the effects of G-CSF on rCBF, NO surge, infarct volume, and neurological deficits. We conclude that G-CSF increases rCBF through a NO surge mediated by Akt/eNOS, which partially contributes to the beneficial effect of G-CSF on brain I/R injury. PMID:26146654

  4. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Increases Cerebral Blood Flow via a NO Surge Mediated by Akt/eNOS Pathway to Reduce Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Liew, Hock-Kean; Kuo, Jon-Son; Wang, Jia-Yi; Pang, Cheng-Yoong

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects brain from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthases partially reduces G-CSF protection. We thus further investigated the effects of G-CSF on ischemia-induced NO production and its consequence on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and neurological deficit. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) microinfused above middle cerebral artery caused a rapid reduction of rCBF (ischemia) which lasted for 30 minutes and was followed by a gradual recovery of blood flow (reperfusion) within the striatal region. Regional NO concentration increased rapidly (NO surge) during ischemia and recovered soon to the baseline. G-CSF increased rCBF resulting in shorter ischemic duration and an earlier onset of reperfusion. The enhancement of the ischemia-induced NO by G-CSF accompanied by elevation of phospho-Akt and phospho-eNOS was noted, suggesting an activation of Akt/eNOS. I/R-induced infarct volume and neurological deficits were also reduced by G-CSF treatment. Inhibition of NO synthesis by L-N(G)-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the effects of G-CSF on rCBF, NO surge, infarct volume, and neurological deficits. We conclude that G-CSF increases rCBF through a NO surge mediated by Akt/eNOS, which partially contributes to the beneficial effect of G-CSF on brain I/R injury.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized CFU-F can be found in the peripheral blood but have limited expansion potential.

    PubMed

    Lund, Troy C; Tolar, Jakub; Orchard, Paul J

    2008-06-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent cells found lining the bone marrow cavity supporting the growth and differentiation of hematologic progenitors. There is growing evidence that these cells can, under the right circumstances, enter the peripheral circulation. We show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood contains cells which form colonies and have a similar fibroblastic morphology (termed CFU-F) to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These cells were found at a very low incidence (0.0002%). Mobilized peripheral blood CFU-F were successfully differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. FACS analysis showed that the cells had a similar profile to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Importantly, mobilized peripheral blood CFU-F had limited expansion potential and became senescent 20-25 days after isolation. Mobilized peripheral blood CFU-F also did not have any telomerase activity and displayed significant telomere shortening. The rarity of CFU-F in mobilized peripheral blood and the subsequent pressure to divide in cell culture probably contribute to early cellular senescence. Their potential for use in transplant or gene therapy is, therefore, limited.

  6. Administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor after liver transplantation leads to an increased incidence and severity of ischemic biliary lesions in the rat model

    PubMed Central

    Dirsch, Olaf; Chi, Haidong; Ji, Yuan; Gu, Yan Li; Broelsch, Christoph E; Dahmen, Uta

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Recently it has been reported that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can induce hypercoagulability in healthy bone marrow donors. It is conceivable that the induction of a prothrombotic state in a recipient of an organ graft with already impaired perfusion might cause further deterioration in the transplanted organ. This study evaluated whether G-CSF treatment worsens liver perfusion following liver transplantation in the rat model. METHODS: A non-arterialized rat liver transplantation model was employed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF treatment on the liver in a syngeneic and allogeneic strain combination. Study outcomes included survival time and liver damage as investigated by liver enzymes and liver histology. Observation times were 1 d, 1 wk and 12 wk. RESULTS: Rats treated with G-CSF had increased incidence and severity of biliary damage following liver transplantation. In these animals, hepatocellular necrosis was accentuated in the centrilobular region. These lesions are indicative of impaired perfusion in G-CSF treated animals. CONCLUSION: G-CSF should be used with caution in recipients of liver transplantation, as treatment might enhance preexisting, undetected perfusion problems and ultimately lead to ischemia induced biliary complications. PMID:16937499

  7. Tyrosine residues in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor mediate G-CSF-induced differentiation of murine myeloid leukemic (M1) cells.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S E; Starr, R; Novak, U; Hilton, D J; Layton, J E

    1996-10-25

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine residues of many growth factor receptors have been shown to be important for receptor signal transduction via the recruitment of proteins containing phosphotyrosine-binding domains. This study demonstrates the importance of specific tyrosine residues in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor cytoplasmic domain in G-CSF-induced macrophage cell differentiation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a series of G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) mutants in which the tyrosine residues were replaced with phenylalanine either singly or in combination. The mouse myeloid leukemic cell line (M1) transfected with G-CSF-R cDNA can be induced to differentiate into macrophages in response to G-CSF. The effect of the tyrosine mutations on this differentiation response was assessed by examining cell morphology and differentiation in soft agar colony assays. Although three of the four cytoplasmic tyrosine residues appeared to contribute to the differentiation response, mutation of a single residue (Tyr744) significantly reduced the ability of the M1 cells to differentiate. The STAT family of signaling molecules (Stat1, Stat3, and Stat5) were activated by G-CSF in M1 cells expressing those G-CSF-R tyrosine mutants unable to mediate G-CSF-induced differentiation. Furthermore, activation of STAT proteins was shown to occur in the absence of all four cytoplasmic tyrosine residues, suggesting an alternative mechanism for STAT activation other than direct interaction with receptor phosphotyrosines.

  8. Immunotherapy against metastatic bladder cancer by combined administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Hua, Rui; Liu, Li; Zhan, Xiaomin; Chen, Simei; Quan, Song; Chu, Qing-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Tong

    2017-02-16

    In previous studies, it has been shown that the granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs) vaccine could induce a specific antitumor immunity and against bladder cancer in mice model respectively. However, whether combined administration of GM-CSF and IL-2 could produce specific immune responses to cancer stem cells (CSCs) was uncertain. MCSCs were established and characterized. GM-CSF and IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared and bioactivity was evaluated. The therapeutic, protective, specific, and memorial immune response animal experiments were designed. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry assay were performed to indentify whether vaccine caused an antitumor immunity. Streptavidin (SA)-GM-CSF and SA-IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared successfully. Such vaccines inhibited the volume of tumor and prolonged the survival of the mice in animal experiments. The express of IgG or IFN-c, the portion of dendritic cells, CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were highest in the combined vaccines group than the SA-GM-CSF vaccine group, the SA-IL-2 vaccine group, the MCSCs group and the PBS group. The combined of GM-CSF and IL-2 vaccines could induce better antitumor immunity than a vaccine alone.

  9. Tachyplesin III and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor enhance the efficacy of tazobactam/piperacillin in a neutropenic mouse model of polymicrobial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Kamysz, Wojciech; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Mocchegiani, Federico; Di Matteo, Fabio; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Riva, Alessandra; Rocchi, Marco; Saba, Vittorio; Scalise, Giorgio; Giacometti, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of tazobactam/piperacillin (TZP), tachyplesin III and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in an experimental murine neutropenic intraabdominal infection. BALB/c male mice were rendered neutropenic by intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide on days -4 and -2 pre-infection. Septic shock was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Animals received intravenously isotonic sodium chloride solution (control group C1), 1mg/kg of tachyplesin III, 120 mg/kg of TZP, 0.1mg/kg of G-CSF, tachyplesin III plus TZP, G-CSF plus TZP and finally tachyplesin III plus G-CSF plus TZP, respectively. Lethality, bacterial growth in blood, peritoneum, spleen, liver, and mesenteric lymph nodes, endotoxin, IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations in plasma were evaluated. All compounds reduced the lethality when compared to controls. Endotoxin and cytokine plasma levels were significantly higher in TZP-treated animals compared to tachyplesin III-treated animals. Finally, all drug combinations showed to be the most effective treatment in reducing all variables measured. Interestingly, the strongest results concerning the bacterial growth inhibition, lethality and endotoxemia were obtained when the three compounds were contemporaneously administered. The presence of their positive interaction makes tachyplesin III and G-CSF potentially valuable as an adjuvant for antimicrobial chemotherapy of sepsis.

  10. Case Report: Combination Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Case of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Saberi, Hooshang; Tayebi Meybodi, Keyvan; Taghvaei, Mohammad; Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various neuroregenerative procedures have been recently employed along with neurorehabilitation programs to promote neurological function after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), and recently most of them have focused on the acute stage of spinal cord injury. In this report, we present a case of acute SCI treated with neuroprotective treatments in conjunction with conventional rehabilitation program. Methods: A case of acute penetrative SCI (gunshot wound), 40 years old, was treated with intrathecal bone marrow derived stem cells and parenteral Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) along with rehabilitation program. The neurological outcomes as well as safety issues have been reported. Results: Assessment with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), showed neurological improvement, meanwhile he reported neuropathic pain, which was amenable to oral medication. Discussion: In the acute setting, combination therapy of G-CSF and intrathecal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) was safe in our case as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation programs. Further controlled studies are needed to find possible side effects, and establish net efficacy. PMID:26649168

  11. Low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming regimen versus idarubicin plus cytarabine regimen as induction therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jie; Chen, Jian; Suo, Shanshan; Qian, Wenbin; Meng, Haitao; Mai, Wenyuan; Tong, Hongyan; Huang, Jian; Yu, Wenjuan; Wei, Juyin; Lou, Yinjun

    2015-06-01

    With limited data available on the low-dose cytarabine, aclarubicin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CAG) regimen in newly diagnosed older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), this study aimed at comparing the efficacy and toxicity of CAG with idarubicin plus cytarabine (IA) remission induction therapy in these patients. A total of 154 consecutive patients (52 with CAG and 102 with IA) were retrospectively analyzed. The patients in the CAG group had a higher median age (68 vs. 65 years, p = 0.002) and a higher proportion of previous myelodysplastic syndrome (25.0% vs. 2.9%, p < 0.0001) compared to those in the IA group. The complete remission rates with the CAG and IA regimens were 55.8% and 52.9% (p = 0.864). The median overall survival (12.1 vs. 11.7 months, p = 0.650) and 3-year disease-free survival rates (29.6% vs. 48.6%, p = 0.657) were not statistically different in the two groups. The CAG regimen might be an alternative to conventional chemotherapy in older patients with AML.

  12. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Veronica R.; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but 1 patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 106/kilogram of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 106/kilogram of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 106/kilogram of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non- hematologic toxic effects were observed. PMID:23749720

  13. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed.

  14. Controlled Release of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Osteoconductive and Biodegradable Properties of Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate in a Rat Calvarial Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Tomohiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Oyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamao, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuhei

    2014-01-01

    Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard for the treatment of congenital craniofacial disorders; however, there are potential problems including donor site morbidity and limitations to the amount of bone that can be harvested. Recent studies suggest that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes fracture healing or osteogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether topically applied G-CSF can stimulate the osteoconductive properties of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in a rat calvarial defect model. A total of 27 calvarial defects 5 mm in diameter were randomly divided into nine groups, which were treated with various combinations of a β-TCP disc and G-CSF in solution form or controlled release system using gelatin hydrogel. Histologic and histomorphometric analyses were performed at eight weeks postoperatively. The controlled release of low-dose (1 μg and 5 μg) G-CSF significantly enhanced new bone formation when combined with a β-TCP disc. Moreover, administration of 5 μg G-CSF using a controlled release system significantly promoted the biodegradable properties of β-TCP. In conclusion, the controlled release of 5 μg G-CSF significantly enhanced the osteoconductive and biodegradable properties of β-TCP. The combination of G-CSF slow-release and β-TCP is a novel and promising approach for treating pediatric craniofacial bone defects. PMID:24829581

  15. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in amniotic fluid before the onset of labor and during labor do not differ in normal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masatoshi; Sohma, Ryoichi; Sumioka, Yumiko; Inaba, Noriyuki

    2006-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) at the implantation site may regulate invasion and differentiation of placental trophoblast. We evaluated whether GM-CSF levels in amniotic fluid during labor contributing to subsequent delivery differed from those before the onset of labor in normal pregnancies. This study enrolled 36 Japanese women experiencing normal pregnancies with single fetuses who had no infection. Of these pregnancies, 18 were women during labor that led to subsequent term delivery (labors). The other 18 were women without labor underwent cesarean section (controls). These two groups (18 labors and 18 controls) were compared. The average gestational age at entry was 38-39 weeks of gestation. The women's ages and gestational ages did not differ significantly between the two groups. Amniotic fluid was collected and the GM-CSF levels were compared between two groups. The GM-CSF level was determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. There was no significant increase in GM-CSF levels in amniotic fluid during labor compared with that before the onset of labor. The GM-CSF in amniotic fluid may not promote the onset of labor at term and/or term labor contributing to subsequent delivery may not induce the production and secretion of GM-CSF into amniotic cavity.

  16. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  17. Assaying the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a mitogen of immature cells in fetal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Borrell, A; Jou, J M; Besón, I; Soler, A; Carrió, A; Margarit, E; Caballín, R; Ballesta, F; Fortuny, A

    1999-01-01

    Based on the presence of immature cells in fetal blood, and in an attempt to shorten the cytogenetic reporting time, three simultaneous one-day culture regimes were established in 23 fetal blood samples: (a) the standard phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes culture, (b) a culture using the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an alternative mitogen, and (c) an unstimulated culture. Diagnostic success rates achieved by these three methods were as follows: 43 per cent (95 per cent CI: 23-64) (GM-CSF), 30 per cent (95 per cent CI: 12-49) (PHA) and 9 per cent (unstimulated). These three regimes were also assayed in three-day cultures giving 100 per cent diagnostic success rate for the PHA and GM-CSF, and 62 per cent (95 per cent CI: 41-83) for the unstimulated. A moderate correlation was found between the initial concentration of cultured erythroblasts and the metaphase count in one-day GM-CSF-stimulated (r=0.43, p=0.01) and unstimulated (r=0.35, p=0.05) cultures, suggesting that erythroblasts may be in part responsible for the mitotic index observed in these two regime cultures. In conclusion, our experience suggests that immature cells in fetal blood may be successfully cultured for diagnostic purposes.

  18. PU.1 (Spi-1) and C/EBP alpha regulate expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, S; Petrovick, M S; Voso, M T; Sun, Z; Zhang, D E; Tenen, D G

    1995-01-01

    Growth factor receptors play an important role in hematopoiesis. In order to further understand the mechanisms directing the expression of these key regulators of hematopoiesis, we initiated a study investigating the transcription factors activating the expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha gene. Here, we demonstrate that the human GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter directs reporter gene activity in a tissue-specific fashion in myelomonocytic cells, which correlates with its expression pattern as analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter contains an important functional site between positions -53 and -41 as identified by deletion analysis of reporter constructs. We show that the myeloid and B cell transcription factor PU.1 binds specifically to this site. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a CCAAT site located upstream of the PU.1 site between positions -70 and -54 is involved in positive-negative regulation of the GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter activity. C/EBP alpha is the major CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) form binding to this site in nuclear extracts of U937 cells. Point mutations of either the PU.1 site or the C/EBP site that abolish the binding of the respective factors result in a significant decrease of GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter activity in myelomonocytic cells only. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in myeloid and B cell extracts, PU.1 forms a novel, specific, more slowly migrating complex (PU-SF) when binding the GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter PU.1 site. This is the first demonstration of a specific interaction with PU.1 on a myeloid PU.1 binding site. The novel complex is distinct from that described previously as binding to B cell enhancer sites and can be formed by addition of PU.1 to extracts from certain nonmyeloid cell types which do not express PU.1, including T cells and epithelial cells, but not from erythroid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PU

  19. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor autoantibodies are a risk factor for central nervous system infection by Cryptococcus gattii in otherwise immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Tomomi; Chen, Jianghan; Chen, Sharon C-A; Rosen, Lindsey B; Yi, Jin; Sorrell, Tania C; Bennett, John E; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2014-03-18

    Cryptococcosis is caused by either Cryptococcus neoformans or C. gattii. While cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is caused mostly by C. neoformans in immunocompromised patients, the risk factors remain unclear for patients with no known immune defect. Recently, anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies were detected in the plasma of seven "immunocompetent" cryptococcosis patients, and the cryptococcal strains from these patients were reported as C. neoformans (three strains), C. gattii (one strain), and Cryptococcus (three strains not identified to the species level). We identified all three strains that had not been identified to the species level as C. gattii. Notably, the three strains that were reported as C. neoformans but were unavailable for species confirmation originated from Sothern California and Thailand where C. gattii is endemic. Most clinical laboratories designate C. neoformans without distinguishing between the two species; hence, these three strains could have been C. gattii. Since C. gattii infects more immunocompetent patients than C. neoformans, we pursued the possibility that this antibody may be more prevalent in patients infected with C. gattii than in those infected with C. neoformans. We screened the plasma of 20 healthy controls and 30 "immunocompetent" patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis from China and Australia (multiple ethnicities). Anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies were detected only in the plasma of seven patients infected by C. gattii and one healthy volunteer and in none infected by C. neoformans. While plasma from these C. gattii patients completely prevented GM-CSF-induced p-STAT5 in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), plasma from one healthy volunteer positive for anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies caused only partial blockage. Our results suggest that anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies may predispose otherwise immunocompetent individuals to meningoencephalitis caused by C. gattii but

  20. The Toll-like receptor 4-activated neuroprotective microglia subpopulation survives via granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and JAK2/STAT5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kamigaki, Mayumi; Hide, Izumi; Yanase, Yuhki; Shiraki, Hiroko; Harada, Kana; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Seki, Takahiro; Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Michihiro; Sakai, Norio

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 mediates inflammation and is also known to trigger apoptosis in microglia. Our time-lapse observations showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induced rapid death in primary cultures of rat microglia, while a portion of the microglia escaped from death and survived for much longer than 2 days, in which time, all of the control cells had died. However, it remains unclear how the LPS-stimulated microglia subpopulation could continue to survive in the absence of any supplied growth factors. In the present study, to clarify the mechanism underlying the LPS-stimulated survival, we investigated whether microglia could produce their own survival factors in response to LPS, focusing on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-34, which are mainly supplied by astrocytes or neurons. The LPS-stimulated microglia drastically induced the expression of the GM-CSF mRNA and protein, while M-CSF and IL-34 levels were unchanged. The surviving microglia also significantly upregulated the expression of GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) mRNA without affecting M-CSFR. As for the GM-CSFR downstream signal, LPS resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT5 and its translocation to the nucleus in the surviving microglia. Moreover, a specific JAK2 inhibitor, NVP-BSK805, suppressed STAT5 phosphorylation and microglia survival in response to LPS, indicating a critical role of the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in this survival mechanism. Together, these results suggest that a subpopulation of TLR4-activated microglia may survive by producing GM-CSF and up-regulating GM-CSFR. This autocrine GM-CSF pathway may activate the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, which controls the transcription of survival-related genes. Finally, these surviving microglia may have neuroprotective functions because the neurons remained viable in co-cultures with these microglia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. High yield primary microglial cultures using granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor from embryonic murine cerebral cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Yu, Adam C; Neil, Sarah E; Quandt, Jacqueline A

    2017-06-15

    Microglia play vital roles in neurotrophic support and modulating immune or inflammatory responses to pathogens or damage/stressors during disease. This study describes the ability to establish large numbers of microglia from embryonic tissues with the addition of granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and characterizes their similarities to adult microglia examined ex vivo as well as their responses to inflammatory mediators. Microglia were seeded from a primary embryonic mixed cortical suspension with the addition of GM-CSF. Microglial expression of CD45, CD11b, CD11c, MHC class I and II, CD40, CD80, and CD86 was analyzed by flow cytometry and compared to those isolated using different culture methods and to the BV-2 cell line. GM-CSF microglia immunoreactivity and cytokine production was examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Our results demonstrate GM-CSF addition during microglial culture yields higher cell numbers with greater purity than conventionally cultured primary microglia. We found that the expression of immune markers by GM-CSF microglia more closely resemble adult microglia than other methods or an immortalized BV-2 cell line. Primary differences amongst the different groups were reflected in their levels of CD39, CD86 and MHC class I expression. GM-CSF microglia produce CCL2, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 and IL-10 following exposure to LPS and alter costimulatory marker expression in response to LPS or IFN-γ. Notably, GM-CSF microglia were often more responsive than the commonly used BV-2 cell line which produced negligible IL-10. GM-CSF cultured microglia closely model the phenotype of adult microglia examined ex vivo. GM-CSF microglia are robust in their responses to inflammatory stimuli, altering immune markers including Iba-1 and expressing an array of cytokines characteristic of both pro-inflammatory and reparative processes. Consequently, the addition of GM-CSF for the culturing of primary

  2. Colony-stimulating factor-1 antisense treatment suppresses growth of human tumor xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar; Paulus, Patrick; Abri, Hojatollah; Hofmann, Michael; Grossschmidt, Karl; Schäfer, Romana; Stanley, E Richard; Hofbauer, Reinhold

    2002-09-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) foster cellular invasion by disrupting extracellular matrix barriers and thereby facilitate tumor development. MMPs are synthesized by both cancer cells and adjacent stromal cells, primarily macrophages. The production of macrophages is regulated by colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Tissue CSF-1 expression increased significantly in embryonic and colon cancer xenografts. We, therefore, hypothesized that blocking CSF-1 may suppress tumor growth by decelerating macrophage-mediated extracellular matrix breakdown. Cells expressing CSF-1 and mice xenografted with CSF-1 receptor (c-fms)- and CSF-1-negative malignant human embryonic or colon cancer cells were treated with mouse CSF-1 antisense oligonucleotides. Two weeks of CSF-1 antisense treatment selectively down-regulated CSF-1 mRNA and protein tissue expression in tumor lysates. CSF-1 blockade suppressed the growth of embryonic tumors to dormant levels and the growth of the colon carcinoma by 50%. In addition, tumor vascularity and the expression of MMP-2 and angiogenic factors were reduced. Six-month survival was observed in colon carcinoma mice only after CSF-1 blockade, whereas controls were all dead at day 65. These results suggest that human embryonic and colon cancer cells up-regulate host CSF-1 and MMP-2 expression. Because the cancer cells used were CSF-1 negative, CSF-1 antisense targeted tumor stromal cell CSF-1 production. CSF-1 blockade could be a novel strategy in treatment of solid tumors.

  3. [Recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (filgrastim): optimization of conditions of isolation and purification from inclusion body].

    PubMed

    Kononova, N V; Iakovlev, A V; Zhuravko, A M; Pankeev, N N; Minaev, S V; Bobruskin, A I; Mart'ianov, V A

    2014-01-01

    We developed a unified process platform for two recombinant human GCSF medicines--one with the non-prolonged and the other with prolonged action. This unified technology led to a simpler and cheaper production while introduction of the additional pegylation stage to the technological line eased obtaining of the medicines with different action and allowed to standardize technological process documenting according to GMP requirements.

  4. Effectiveness of daily versus non-daily granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in patients with solid tumours undergoing chemotherapy: a multivariate analysis of data from current practice

    PubMed Central

    Almenar Cubells, D; Bosch Roig, C; Jiménez Orozco, E; Álvarez, R; Cuervo, JM; Díaz Fernández, N; Sánchez Heras, AB; Galán Brotons, A; Giner Marco, V; Codes M De Villena, M

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre, retrospective, observational study including patients with solid tumours (excluding breast cancer) that received granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) and chemotherapy. We investigated the effectiveness of daily vs. non-daily G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim) adjusting by potential confounders. The study included 391 patients (211 daily G-CSF; 180 pegfilgrastim), from whom 47.3% received primary prophylaxis (PP) (57.8% pegfilgrastim), 26.3% secondary prophylaxis (SP: initiation after cycle 1 and no reactive treatment in any cycle) (51.5% pegfilgrastim) and 26.3% reactive treatment (19.4% pegfilgrastim). Only 42.2% of patients with daily G-CSF and 46.2% with pegfilgrastim initiated prophylaxis within 72 h after chemotherapy, and only 10.5% of patients with daily G-CSF received it for ≥7 days. In the multivariate models, daily G-CSF was associated with higher risk of grade 3-4 neutropenia (G3-4N) vs. pegfilgrastim [odds ratio (OR): 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.004–2.97]. Relative to SP, PP protected against G3-4N (OR for SP vs. PP: 6.0, 95%CI: 3.2–11.4) and febrile neutropenia (OR: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.1–8.8), and was associated to less chemotherapy dose delays and reductions (OR for relative dose intensity <85% for SP vs. PP: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.7–5.4) and higher response rate (OR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.7). Data suggest that pegfilgrastim, compared with a daily G-CSF, and PP, compared with SP, could be more effective in preventing neutropenia and its related events in the clinical practice. PMID:23331323

  5. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor supplementation in culture medium on embryo quality and pregnancy outcome of women aged over 35 years.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhui; Chu, Dapeng; Sha, Wei; Fu, Lei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether a low concentration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) supplementation in culture medium is beneficial to infertile women aged over 35 years. A retrospective cohort study was performed to analyze the embryo quality and pregnancy outcome of 212 controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) cycles with or without GM-CSF addition (n = 117 [GM-CSF, 0.2 ng/mL] vs n = 95 [control]). No significant difference was observed in cleavage rate (96.2 vs 96.5 %), blastocyst formation rate (53.2 vs 54.0 %), good blastocyst rate (26.8 vs 26.8 %), or available embryo rate (54.2 vs 49.7 %) between the GM-CSF group and the control group. However, the average age of the GM-CSF group (38.41 ± 3.13 years) was significantly 1 year older than that of the corresponding control group (37.45 ± 2.74 years) (P < 0.05). GM-CSF addition greatly decreased the occurrence of biochemical pregnancy (55.6 % [control] vs 20.8 % [GM-CSF], P < 0.05). No case of neonatal malformation was observed in the present study. Although no benefit of GM-CSF on embryo quality was observed, the addition of this factor significantly decreased the occurrence of chemical pregnancy of women aged over 35 years, indicating the role of GM-CSF in improving implantation competence of embryos derived from elderly infertile women.

  6. Increased susceptibility to liver injury after hemorrhagic shock in rats chronically fed ethanol: role of nuclear factor-kappa B, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masafumi; Yu, Bi; Hardison, Edith G; Mastrangelo, Mary-Ann A; Tweardy, David J

    2004-06-01

    Chronic ethanol use preceding severe trauma and hemorrhagic shock (HS) is associated with an increased incidence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and death; however, the molecular basis for this increased susceptibility is unknown. We previously demonstrated that production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), mediated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), each make essential contributions to organ injury and inflammation in a rodent model of controlled HS, and we proposed in this study to examine the hypothesis that the increased susceptibility to MOF after shock/trauma in the setting of chronic ethanol use is due to an exaggerated activation of NF-kappa B and production of these proinflammatory cytokines. We observed increased HS-induced liver injury 4 h after resuscitation in rats fed the ethanol-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks compared with rats fed the control liquid diet (3-fold increase in serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT], P = 0.008, and 2-fold increase in focal liver necrosis, P = 0.005). The increased liver injury in the ethanol-fed HS rats was accompanied by a 70% increase in liver NF-kappa B activation (P < 0.05), a 3- to 5-fold increase in hepatocyte and Kupffer cell production of IL-6 and G-CSF (P < 0.05 for each), and a 2-fold increase in neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.005) compared with the control diet-fed HS rats. Thus, increased susceptibility to HS-induced liver injury in the setting of chronic ethanol use may be mediated, at least in part, by increased NF-kappa B activation resulting in increased local production of IL-6 and G-CSF and increased infiltration of neutrophils, which can damage liver cells directly and contribute to impaired sinusoidal blood flow.

  7. Acute exposure to cadmium induces prolonged neutrophilia along with delayed induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hyogo; Oguma, Etsuko

    2016-12-01

    Acute exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes systemic inflammation characterized by neutrophilia. To elucidate the mechanism of neutrophilia induced by Cd, we investigated the induction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which regulates neutrophil production, in mice with acute Cd toxicity, and compared it with mice injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an inducer of general inflammatory responses. We injected BALB/c mice with Cd at 2.5 mg/kg i.p. or LPS at 0.5 mg/kg i.p. and sampled the peripheral blood and organs at time points up to 24 h. In Cd-treated mice, the peripheral neutrophil count increased steadily up to 24 h, whereas LPS-treated mice showed a more rapid increase with a peak at 12 h. The serum G-CSF level increased gradually to reach a plateau at 12-18 h in Cd-treated mice, but LPS-treated mice showed a marked increase, reaching a peak at 2-3 h. A gradual elevation of G-CSF mRNA expression up to 24 h was detected by real-time PCR in the livers of Cd-treated mice, but in LPS-treated mice its highest expression was observed in the liver with a rapid increase at 2 h. By in situ hybridization using G-CSF RNA probes, hepatic Kupffer cells were identified as G-CSF-producing cells in the liver. These results indicated that Cd has a characteristic effect of delayed induction of G-CSF in the liver, causing systemic inflammation accompanied by prolonged neutrophilia.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) blockade augments the protective effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anding; Weiss, Stefanie; Fang, Haoshu; Claus, Ralf A; Rödel, Jürgen; Dirsch, Olaf; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-05-01

    The effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on sepsis is discussed controversially in clinical studies. We previously demonstrated that G-CSF treatment induced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitization via up-regulation of LPS-binding protein (LBP). We hypothesized that the futile effect of G-CSF-treatment in sepsis might be due to its ability to up-regulate LBP. Therefore, blockade of LBP may attenuate the G-CSF-induced LPS sensitization and protect animals from polymicrobial sepsis. Endogenous LBP levels were up-regulated by pretreatment with G-CSF, and the LBP protein was blocked by administration of a specific blocking peptide-LBPK95A. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of feces slurry. Rats were monitored every 3 up to 72 h to observe the survival rate. Tissue injury, bacterial infiltration, local inflammatory response, and neutrophil infiltration at 0, 2, and 12 h after the septic insult were analyzed. The survival benefit of G-CSF pretreatment was improved when combined with LBPK95A treatment (control vs. G-CSF vs. combi: 36% vs. 56% vs. 93%; P < 0.05). Combined treatment of G-CSF and LBPK95A was associated with the minimal tissue damage. Treatment with LBPK95A significantly inhibited the neutrophil infiltration without interfering with the bacterial clearance. The G-CSF-induced inflammatory sensitization effect was inhibited by LBPK95A, indicated by the decrease of cytokines expression, and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway. In conclusion, these results suggested that the effect of prophylactic augmentation of the host's response via G-CSF pretreatment was further enhanced by inhibition of the up-regulation of LBP.

  9. Efficacy of polyethylene glycol-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    Hassfurther, Renee L; TerHune, Terry N; Canning, Peter C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (bG-CSF) on the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. 211 periparturient Holstein cows and heifers. Approximately 7 days before the anticipated date of parturition (day of parturition = day 0), healthy cattle received SC injections of sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) or PEG-bG-CSF at 5, 10, or 20 μg/kg. Cattle were commingled and housed in a pen with dirt flooring, which was kept wet to maximize the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis. Within 24 hours after parturition, each animal again received the assigned treatment. Mammary glands and milk were visually scored for abnormalities twice daily for 28 days after parturition. Milk samples were aseptically collected from mammary glands with an abnormal appearance or abnormal milk and submitted for microbial culture. Daily milk production was recorded, and milk composition was assessed on days 3, 5, 7, and 10. Cattle treated with PEG-bG-CSF at 10 and 20 μg/kg had significantly fewer cases of clinical mastitis (9/54 and 5/53, respectively), compared with control cattle (18/53). Administration of PEG -bG-CSF did not significantly affect daily milk production or milk composition. Results suggested that PEG-bG-CSF was effective for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. Further investigations of the use of PEG-bG-CSF as a potential preventative intervention should be conducted.

  10. The efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in infertile women with a thin endometrium: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Jo, Jae Dong; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the day of ovulation triggering or oocyte retrieval in infertile women with a thin endometrium. Methods Fifty women whose endometrial thickness (EMT) was ≤8 mm at the time of triggering during at least one previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle and an index IVF cycle were selected. On the day of triggering (n=12) or oocyte retrieval (n=38), 300 µg of G-CSF was instilled into the uterine cavity. Results In the 50 index IVF cycles, the mean EMT was 7.2±0.6 mm on the triggering day and increased to 8.5±1.5 mm on the embryo transfer day (p<0.001). The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 22.0%, the implantation rate was 15.9%, and the ongoing pregnancy rate was 20%. The clinical pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 15.8%), the implantation rate (26.7% vs. 11.7%), and the ongoing pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 13.2%) were higher when G-CSF was instilled on the triggering day than when it was instilled on the retrieval day, although this tendency was likewise not statistically significant. Aspects of the stimulation process and mean changes in EMT were similar in women who became pregnant and women who did not. Conclusion Intrauterine instillation of G-CSF enhanced endometrial development and resulted in an acceptable pregnancy rate. Instillation of G-CSF on the triggering day showed better outcomes. G-CSF instillation should be considered as a strategy for inducing endometrial growth and good pregnancy results in infertile women with a thin endometrium. PMID:28090464

  11. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for mobilizing bone marrow stem cells in subacute stroke: the stem cell trial of recovery enhancement after stroke 2 randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    England, Timothy J; Abaei, Maryam; Auer, Dorothee P; Lowe, James; Jones, D Rhodri E; Sare, Gillian; Walker, Marion; Bath, Philip M W

    2012-02-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is neuroprotective in experimental stroke and mobilizes CD34(+) peripheral blood stem cells into the circulation. We assessed the safety of G-CSF in recent stroke in a phase IIb single-center randomized, controlled trial. G-CSF (10 μg/kg) or placebo (ratio 2:1) was given SC for 5 days to 60 patients 3 to 30 days after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. The primary outcome was the frequency of serious adverse events. Peripheral blood counts, CD34(+) count, and functional outcome were measured. MRI assessed lesion volume, atrophy, and the presence of iron-labeled CD34(+) cells reinjected on day 6. Sixty patients were recruited at mean of 8 days (SD ± 5) post ictus, with mean age 71 years (± 12 years) and 53% men. The groups were well matched for baseline minimization/prognostic factors. There were no significant differences between groups in the number of participants with serious adverse events: G-CSF 15 (37.5%) of 40 versus placebo 7 (35%) of 20, death or dependency (modified Rankin Score: G-CSF 3.3 ± 1.3, placebo 3.0 ± 1.3) at 90 days, or the number of injections received. G-CSF increased CD34(+) and total white cell counts of 9.5- and 4.2-fold, respectively. There was a trend toward reduction in MRI ischemic lesion volume with respect to change from baseline in G-CSF-treated patients (P=0.06). In 1 participant, there was suggestion that labeled CD34(+) cells had migrated to the ischemic lesion. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial suggests that G-CSF is safe when administered subacutely. It is feasible to label and readminister iron-labeled CD34(+) cells in patients with ischemic stroke. URL: www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN63336619.

  12. Immunomodulation of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, S T; Yang, S L; Hsieh, C C; Yang, M D; Wang, T F; Lin, J G

    2000-11-01

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BZYQT) is a Chinese medicine, and has been used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. At present, we still do not fully understand the effects of BZYQT on the cellular physiology. Present in vitro study demonstrated that BZYQT is capable of increasing granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in healthy volunteers and patients with HCC. The productions of G-CSF and TNF-alpha by PBMC of volunteers were significantly stimulated by more than 125 microg/ml of BZYQT. G-CSF levels stimulated by PBMC of healthy volunteers were higher than in PBMC of the HCC patients when more than 625 microg/ml of BZYQT was administrated. The reason may be due to the impaired immunologic reactivity of mononuclear cells in HCC patients. However, the production levels of TNF-alpha in HCC patients can be stimulated to levels as high as those in healthy volunteers. When adding high concentration (3.125 mg/ml) of BZYQT to the cultured PBMC, the increments of G-CSF and TNF-alpha production decreased although there were no obvious changes in the number of metabolic active PBMC changed. TNF-alpha andG-CSF are known to play important roles in the biological defensive mechanism. These findings show that BZYQT is a unique formula for the stimulation of PBMC to produce G-CSF and TNF-alpha. Administration of BZYQT may be beneficial for patients with HCC to modulate these cytokines.

  13. Stem cell mobilisation by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Long-term results of the REVIVAL-2 trial.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit; Hadamitzky, Martin; Ibrahim, Tareq; Groha, Philip; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan; Ott, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials may suggest that treatment with G-CSF leads to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischaemic heart disease. In the REVIVAL-2 study we found that stem cell mobilisation by G-CSF does not influence infarct size, left ventricular function and coronary restenosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) that underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of G-CSF treatment on seven-year clinical outcomes from the REVIVAL-2 trial. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled REVIVAL-2 study, 114 patients with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were enrolled five days after successful reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were assigned to receive 10 µg/kg G-CSF (n=56) or placebo (n=58) for five days. The primary endpoint for this long-term outcome analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or stroke seven years after randomisation. The endpoint occurred in 14.3 % of patients in the G-CSF group versus 17.2 % assigned to placebo (p=0.67). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 14.3 % of the patients assigned to G-CSF and 15.5 % of the patients assigned to placebo (p=0.85). In conclusion, these long-term follow-up data show that G-CSF does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  14. Combined therapy with sitagliptin plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction - Long-term results of the SITAGRAMI trial.

    PubMed

    Gross, Lisa; Theiss, Hans Diogenes; Grabmaier, Ulrich; Adrion, Christine; Mansmann, Ulrich; Sohn, Hae-Young; Hoffmann, Ellen; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Brenner, Christoph

    2016-07-15

    Autologous progenitor cell therapy comprising granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization of bone-marrow derived progenitor cells (BMPCs) into peripheral blood and inhibition of dipeptidylpeptidase-IV by sitagliptin for enhanced myocardial recruitment of circulating BMPCs has been shown to improve survival after acute myocardial infarction (MI) in preclinical studies. In the SITAGRAMI trial we found that during short-term follow-up G-CSF plus sitagliptin (GS) failed to show a beneficial effect on cardiac function and clinical events in patients with acute MI that underwent successful PCI. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of GS versus placebo treatment on long-term clinical outcomes of the SITAGRAMI trial patient population. In the randomized, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled SITAGRAMI trial, 174 patients with acute MI were assigned to GS or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome for the present long-term analysis was the composite of death, MI or stroke on long-term follow-up. The median [IQR] follow-up duration was 4.50 [3.56-5.95] years. The primary outcome occurred in 12.8% of patients assigned to placebo and 9.2% assigned to GS (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.28-1.69; p=0.42). The incidence of the combined cardiovascular outcome was 47.7% in the placebo- and 41.4% in the GS-group (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.48-1.18; p=0.21). Overall, there was no significant difference in MACCE rates between both treatment groups (p=0.41). These long-term follow-up data indicate that GS therapy does not improve clinical outcomes of patients with acute MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and current practice of prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors in cancer patients in Spain: a prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Jolis, L; Carabantes, F; Pernas, S; Cantos, B; López, A; Torres, P; Funes, C; Caballero, D; Benedit, P; Salar, A

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to describe the incidence of neutropenia in breast cancer and lymphoma patients and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) use in clinical practice. We conducted a multicentre, prospective, observational study including breast cancer and lymphoma patients initiating chemotherapy (≥ 10% febrile neutropenia risk). We included 734 patients with breast cancer and 291 with lymphoma. Over the first four chemotherapy cycles, patients had an incidence of 11.0% grade 3-4 neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1.0 × 10(9) /L) and 4.3% febrile neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <0.5 × 10(9) /L and fever ≥ 38 °C) in the breast cancer cohort, and 40.5% and 14.8% in the lymphoma cohort. Full dose on schedule (>85% of planned chemotherapy dose and ≤ 3 days delay) was achieved by 85.6% of breast cancer and 68.9% of lymphoma patients. Hospitalisation due to febrile neutropenia was required in 2.0% and 12.0% of breast cancer and lymphoma patients respectively. G-CSF was administered to 70.0% of breast cancer and 83.8% of lymphoma patients, and initiated from the first chemotherapy cycle (primary prophylaxis) in 60.6% and 64.2% of cases. Severe neutropenia affects approximately one in 10 breast cancer patients and one in two lymphoma patients receiving chemotherapy with moderate or greater risk of febrile neutropenia. Most patients received treatment with G-CSF in Spanish clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. pH responsive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor variants with implications for treating Alzheimer's disease and other central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Systemic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has yielded encouraging results in treating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Making G-CSF a viable AD therapeutic will, however, require increasing G-CSF's ability to stimulate neurons within the brain. This objective could be realized by increasing transcytosis of G-CSF across the blood brain barrier (BBB). An established correlation between G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) binding pH responsiveness and increased recycling of G-CSF to the cell exterior after endocytosis motivated development of G-CSF variants with highly pH responsive G-CSFR binding affinities. These variants will be used in future validation of our hypothesis that increased BBB transcytosis can enhance G-CSF therapeutic efficacy. Flow cytometric screening of a yeast-displayed library in which G-CSF/G-CSFR interface residues were mutated to histidine yielded a G-CSF triple His mutant (L109H/D110H/Q120H) with highly pH responsive binding affinity. This variant's KD, measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), increases ∼20-fold as pH decreases from 7.4 to below histidine's pKa of ∼6.0; an increase 2-fold greater than for previously reported G-CSF His mutants. Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) enabled expression and purification of soluble, bioactive G-CSF triple His variant protein, an outcome inaccessible via Escherichia coli inclusion body refolding. This purification and bioactivity validation will enable future identification of correlations between pH responsiveness and transcytosis in BBB cell culture model and animal experiments. Furthermore, the library screening and CFPS methods employed here could be applied to developing other pH responsive hematopoietic or neurotrophic factors for treating CNS disorders.

  17. START Trial: a pilot study on STimulation of ARTeriogenesis using subcutaneous application of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as a new treatment for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    van Royen, Niels; Schirmer, Stephan H; Atasever, Bektas; Behrens, Casper Y H; Ubbink, Dirk; Buschmann, Eva E; Voskuil, Michiel; Bot, Pieter; Hoefer, Imo; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Biemond, Bart J; Tijssen, J G; Bode, Christoph; Schaper, Wolfgang; Oskam, Jacques; Legemate, Dink A; Piek, Jan J; Buschmann, Ivo

    2005-08-16

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was recently shown to increase collateral flow index in patients with coronary artery disease. Experimental models showed beneficial effects of GM-CSF on collateral artery growth in the peripheral circulation. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of GM-CSF in patients with peripheral artery disease. A double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study was performed in 40 patients with moderate or severe intermittent claudication. Patients were treated with placebo or subcutaneously applied GM-CSF (10 microg/kg) for a period of 14 days (total of 7 injections). GM-CSF treatment led to a strong increase in total white blood cell count and C-reactive protein. Monocyte fraction initially increased but thereafter decreased significantly as compared with baseline. Both the placebo group and the treatment group showed a significant increase in walking distance at day 14 (placebo: 127+/-67 versus 184+/-87 meters, P=0.03, GM-CSF: 126+/-66 versus 189+/-141 meters, P=0.04) and at day 90. Change in walking time, the primary end point of the study, was not different between groups. No change in ankle-brachial index was found on GM-CSF treatment at day 14 or at day 90. Laser Doppler flowmetry measurements showed a significant decrease in microcirculatory flow reserve in the control group (P=0.03) and no change in the GM-CSF group. The present study does not support the use of GM-CSF for treatment of patients with moderate or severe intermittent claudication. Issues that need to be addressed are dosing, the selection of patients, and potential differences between GM-CSF effects in the coronary and the peripheral circulation.

  18. Attitudes of physicians toward assessing risk and using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as primary prophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy associated with an intermediate risk of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Freyer, Gilles; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Marinca, Mihai; Tonini, Giuseppe; Ng, Say Liang; Wong, Zee Wan; Salar, Antonio; Steger, Guenther; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; DeCosta, Lucy; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a potentially fatal complication of chemotherapy. This prospective, observational study describes physicians' approaches toward assessing FN risk in patients receiving chemotherapy regimens with an intermediate (10-20 %) FN risk. In the baseline investigator assessment, physicians selected factors considered important when assessing overall FN risk and deciding on granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (PP). Physicians then completed patient assessments using the same lists of factors. The final FN risk scores and whether G-CSF PP was planned were reported. The final analysis included 165 physicians and 944 patients. The most frequently considered factor in both assessments was chemotherapy agents in the backbone (88 % of investigator and 93 % of patient assessments). History of FN (83 %), baseline laboratory values (76 %) and age (73 %) were commonly selected at baseline, whereas tumor type (72 %), guidelines (62 %) and tumor stage (43 %) were selected most during patient assessments. Median investigator-reported FN risk threshold for G-CSF PP was 20 % (range 10-85 %). G-CSF PP was planned in 82 % of patients with an FN risk at or above this threshold; therefore, almost one-fifth of qualifying patients would not receive G-CSF PP. Physicians generally follow guidelines, but also consider individual patient characteristics when assessing FN risk and deciding on G-CSF PP. A standardized FN risk assessment may optimize the use of G-CSF PP, which may minimize the incidence of FN in patients undergoing chemotherapy with an intermediate FN risk. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01813721.

  19. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Maureen J; Peters, Frank P; Mandigers, Caroline M; Dercksen, M Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M; Nortier, Hans J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W; van Warmerdam, Laurence J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Jacobs, Esther M; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C; Smilde, Tineke J; van der Velden, Annette W; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W; van Gastel, Saskia M; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-12-01

    Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF during the first cycles of chemotherapy lead to questions about the effectiveness of continued use of G-CSF throughout later cycles of chemotherapy. In a multicenter study, patients with breast cancer who were considered fit enough to receive 3-weekly polychemotherapy, but also had > 20% risk for FN, were randomly assigned to primary G-CSF prophylaxis during the first two chemotherapy cycles only (experimental arm) or to primary G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles (standard arm). The noninferiority hypothesis was that the incidence of FN would be maximally 7.5% higher in the experimental compared with the standard arm. After inclusion of 167 eligible patients, the independent data monitoring committee advised premature study closure. Of 84 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF throughout all chemotherapy cycles, eight (10%) experienced an episode of FN. In contrast, of 83 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF during the first two cycles only, 30 (36%) had an FN episode (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.54), with a peak incidence of 24% in the third cycle (ie, first cycle without G-CSF prophylaxis). In patients with early breast cancer at high risk for FN, continued use of primary G-CSF prophylaxis during all chemotherapy cycles is of clinical relevance and thus cannot be abandoned.

  20. The efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in infertile women with a thin endometrium: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dayong; Jo, Jae Dong; Kim, Seul Ki; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the day of ovulation triggering or oocyte retrieval in infertile women with a thin endometrium. Fifty women whose endometrial thickness (EMT) was ≤8 mm at the time of triggering during at least one previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle and an index IVF cycle were selected. On the day of triggering (n=12) or oocyte retrieval (n=38), 300 µg of G-CSF was instilled into the uterine cavity. In the 50 index IVF cycles, the mean EMT was 7.2±0.6 mm on the triggering day and increased to 8.5±1.5 mm on the embryo transfer day (p<0.001). The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 22.0%, the implantation rate was 15.9%, and the ongoing pregnancy rate was 20%. The clinical pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 15.8%), the implantation rate (26.7% vs. 11.7%), and the ongoing pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 13.2%) were higher when G-CSF was instilled on the triggering day than when it was instilled on the retrieval day, although this tendency was likewise not statistically significant. Aspects of the stimulation process and mean changes in EMT were similar in women who became pregnant and women who did not. Intrauterine instillation of G-CSF enhanced endometrial development and resulted in an acceptable pregnancy rate. Instillation of G-CSF on the triggering day showed better outcomes. G-CSF instillation should be considered as a strategy for inducing endometrial growth and good pregnancy results in infertile women with a thin endometrium.

  1. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) Accelerates Wound Healing in Hemorrhagic Shock Rats by Enhancing Angiogenesis and Attenuating Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Jiang, Chaoguang; Han, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Background Following severe trauma, treatment of cutaneous injuries is often delayed by inadequate blood supply. The aim of the present study was to determine whether granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects endothelial cells (ECs) and enhances angiogenesis in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury after resuscitation. Material/Methods The HS rats with full-thickness defects were resuscitated and randomly divided into a G-CSF group (200 μg/kg body weight), a normal saline group, and a blank control group. Histological staining was to used estimate the recovery and apoptosis of skin. Apoptosis- and angiogenesis-related factors were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot (WB). Scratch assay, tube formation, and WB experiments were performed to verify the functional effects of G-CSF on HUVECs in vitro. Results H&E staining and Masson trichrome staining showed earlier inflammation resolution and collagen synthesis in the G-CSF-treated group. Angiogenesis-related factors were elevated at mRNA and protein levels. TUNEL staining suggested fewer apoptotic cells in the G-CSF group. The apoptotic-related factors were down-regulated and anti-apoptotic factors were up-regulated in the G-CSF-treated group. Scratch assay and tube formation experiments revealed that G-CSF facilitated migration ability and angiogenic potential of HUVECs. The angiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects were also enhanced in vitro. Conclusions Our results suggest that G-CSF after resuscitation attenuates local apoptosis and accelerates angiogenesis. These findings hold great promise for improving therapy for cutaneous injury in severe trauma and ischemia diseases. PMID:28559534

  2. Oncolytic viral therapy with a combination of HF10, a herpes simplex virus type 1 variant and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for murine ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Fumi; Esaki, Shinichi; Luo, Chenhong; Kamakura, Maki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2014-06-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of gynecological cancer-related mortality as a majority of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage with intraperitoneal dissemination because of the absence of initial symptoms. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plays an important role in the maturation of specialized antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we utilized a herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon expressing murine GM-CSF combined with HF10 (mGM-CSF amplicon), a highly attenuated HSV type 1 strain functioning as a helper virus to strengthen anti-tumor immune response, for the treatment of ovarian cancer with intraperitoneal dissemination. A mouse ovarian cancer cell line, OV2944-HM-1 (HM-1), was intraperitoneally injected, following which HF10 only or the mGM-CSF amplicon was injected intraperitoneally three times. HF10 injection prolonged survival and decreased intraperitoneal d