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Sample records for human hedgehog-interacting protein

  1. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  2. Human hedgehog interacting protein expression and promoter methylation in medulloblastoma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rey, Juan A.; Fan, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric brain tumor and its development is affected by genetic and epigenetic factors. In this study we found there is low or no expression of the hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP), a negative regulator of the sonic hedgehog pathway, in most medulloblastoma cell lines and primary samples explored. We proceeded to promoter methylation assays of this gene by MCA-Meth, and found that HHIP was hypermethylated in all medulloblastoma cell lines, but only in 2 out of 14 (14%) primary tumor samples. Methylation correlated with low or unexpressed HHIP in cell lines but not in primary tumor samples. These results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of HHIP in medulloblastoma, similarly to gastric, hepatic and pancreatic cancer. However, HHIP seems to be not only under regulation of promoter methylation, but under other factors involved in the control of its low levels of expression in medulloblastoma. PMID:20853133

  3. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  4. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  5. Importance of hedgehog interacting protein and other lung function genes in asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingnan; Howard, Timothy D; Moore, Wendy C; Ampleford, Elizabeth J; Li, Huashi; Busse, William W; Calhoun, William J; Castro, Mario; Chung, Kian Fan; Erzurum, Serpil C; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaston, Benjamin; Israel, Elliot; Jarjour, Nizar N; Teague, W Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E; Peters, Stephen P; Hawkins, Gregory A; Bleecker, Eugene R; Meyers, Deborah A

    2011-06-01

    Two recent large meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of lung function in general populations of European descent identified 11 candidate genes/regions. The importance of these genes in lung function in white and African American subjects with asthma is unknown. To determine whether genes that regulate lung function in general populations are associated with lung function abnormalities in subjects with asthma from different racial groups. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested in 5 asthma populations (N = 1441) for association with pulmonary function, and meta-analysis was performed across populations. The SNPs with the highest significance were then tested for association with bronchodilator reversibility and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. A joint analysis of consistently replicated SNPs was performed to predict lung function in asthma. Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) on chromosome 4q31 was associated with lung function in all 5 populations (rs1512288: P(meta) = 9.62E-05 and 3.23E-05 for percent predicted FEV(1) [ppFEV(1)] and percent predicted forced vital capacity [ppFVC], respectively). The SNPs in HHIP were also associated with reversibility (P < .05) but not bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Because of differences in linkage disequilibrium in the African American subjects, the most relevant SNPs in HHIP were identified. A subset of normal lung function genes, including HHIP, family with sequence similarity 13, member A (FAM13A), and patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), together predict lung function abnormalities, a measure of severity in white and African American subjects with asthma. A subset of the genes, including HHIP, that regulate lung function in general populations are associated with abnormal lung function in asthma in non-Hispanic white and African American subjects. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of hedgehog interacting protein and other lung function genes in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Howard, Timothy D.; Moore, Wendy C.; Ampleford, Elizabeth J.; Li, Huashi; Busse, William W.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Chung, Kian Fan; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Gaston, Benjamin; Israel, Elliot; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Teague, W. Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E.; Peters, Stephen P.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Two recent large meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of lung function in general populations of European descent identified 11 candidate genes/regions. The importance of these genes in lung function in whites and African Americans with asthma is unknown. Objectives To determine if genes that regulate lung function in general populations are associated with lung function abnormalities in subjects with asthma from different racial groups. Methods SNPs were tested in five asthma populations (n = 1,441) for association with pulmonary function and meta-analysis was performed across populations. The SNPs with the highest significance were then tested for association with bronchodilator reversibility and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (BHR). A joint analysis of consistently replicated SNPs was performed to predict lung function in asthma. Results Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) on chromosome 4q31 was associated with lung function in all five populations, rs1512288: Pmeta = 9.62E-05 and 3.23E-05 for ppFEV1 and ppFVC, respectively. The SNPs in HHIP were also associated with reversibility (P < 0.05) but not BHR. Because of differences in linkage disequilibrium in the African-American subjects, the most relevant SNPs in HHIP were identified. A subset of normal lung function genes, including HHIP, family with sequence similarity 13, member A (FAM13A), and patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), together predict lung function abnormalities, a measure of severity in whites and African Americans with asthma. Conclusion A subset of the genes, including HHIP, which regulate lung function in general populations are associated with abnormal lung function in asthma in non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. PMID:21397937

  7. Estradiol triggers sonic-hedgehog-induced angiogenesis during peripheral nerve regeneration by downregulating hedgehog-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Haruki; Ii, Masaaki; Jujo, Kentaro; Renault, Marie-Ange; Thorne, Tina; Clarke, Trevor; Ito, Aiko; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Klyachko, Ekaterina; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Losordo, Douglas

    2012-04-01

    Both estradiol (E2) and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) contribute to angiogenesis and nerve regeneration. Here, we investigated whether E2 improves the recovery of injured nerves by downregulating the Shh inhibitor hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP) and increasing Shh-induced angiogenesis. Mice were treated with local injections of E2 or placebo one week before nerve-crush injury; 28 days after injury, nerve conduction velocity, exercise duration, and vascularity were significantly greater in E2-treated mice than in placebo-treated mice. E2 treatment was also associated with higher mRNA levels of Shh, the Shh receptor Patched-1, and the Shh transcriptional target Gli1, but with lower levels of HIP. The E2-induced enhancement of nerve vascularity was abolished by the Shh inhibitor cyclopamine, and the effect of E2 treatment on Shh, Gli1, and HIP mRNA expression was abolished by the E2 inhibitor ICI. Gli-luciferase activity in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) increased more after treatment with E2 and Shh than after treatment with E2 alone, and E2 treatment reduced HIP expression in HUVECs and Schwann cells without altering Shh expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that E2 improves nerve recovery, at least in part, by reducing HIP expression, which subsequently leads to an increase in Shh signaling and Shh-induced angiogenesis.

  8. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  10. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  11. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  12. Protein carbonylation in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Giustarini, Daniela; Colombo, Roberto; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo

    2003-04-01

    Oxidative modifications of enzymes and structural proteins play a significant role in the aetiology and/or progression of several human diseases. Protein carbonyl content is the most general and well-used biomarker of severe oxidative protein damage. Human diseases associated with protein carbonylation include Alzheimer's disease, chronic lung disease, chronic renal failure, diabetes and sepsis. Rapid recent progress in the identification of carbonylated proteins should provide new diagnostic (possibly pre-symptomatic) biomarkers for oxidative damage, and yield basic information to aid the establishment an efficacious antioxidant therapy.

  13. Protein Analysis with Human Hair

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Brad; Anex, Deon; Parker, Glendon

    2016-09-07

    In an important breakthrough for the forensic science community, researchers have developed the first-ever biological identification method that exploits the information encoded in proteins of human hair.

  14. Protein Analysis with Human Hair

    ScienceCinema

    Hart, Brad; Anex, Deon; Parker, Glendon

    2016-09-09

    In an important breakthrough for the forensic science community, researchers have developed the first-ever biological identification method that exploits the information encoded in proteins of human hair.

  15. Viral Organization of Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, Stefan; Siwo, Geoffrey; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF) allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus. PMID:20827298

  16. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  17. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  18. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  20. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  1. The human protein coevolution network.

    PubMed

    Tillier, Elisabeth R M; Charlebois, Robert L

    2009-10-01

    Coevolution maintains interactions between phenotypic traits through the process of reciprocal natural selection. Detecting molecular coevolution can expose functional interactions between molecules in the cell, generating insights into biological processes, pathways, and the networks of interactions important for cellular function. Prediction of interaction partners from different protein families exploits the property that interacting proteins can follow similar patterns and relative rates of evolution. Current methods for detecting coevolution based on the similarity of phylogenetic trees or evolutionary distance matrices have, however, been limited by requiring coevolution over the entire evolutionary history considered and are inaccurate in the presence of paralogous copies. We present a novel method for determining coevolving protein partners by finding the largest common submatrix in a given pair of distance matrices, with the size of the largest common submatrix measuring the strength of coevolution. This approach permits us to consider matrices of different size and scale, to find lineage-specific coevolution, and to predict multiple interaction partners. We used MatrixMatchMaker to predict protein-protein interactions in the human genome. We show that proteins that are known to interact physically are more strongly coevolving than proteins that simply belong to the same biochemical pathway. The human coevolution network is highly connected, suggesting many more protein-protein interactions than are currently known from high-throughput and other experimental evidence. These most strongly coevolving proteins suggest interactions that have been maintained over long periods of evolutionary time, and that are thus likely to be of fundamental importance to cellular function.

  2. The human protein coevolution network

    PubMed Central

    Tillier, Elisabeth R.M.; Charlebois, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Coevolution maintains interactions between phenotypic traits through the process of reciprocal natural selection. Detecting molecular coevolution can expose functional interactions between molecules in the cell, generating insights into biological processes, pathways, and the networks of interactions important for cellular function. Prediction of interaction partners from different protein families exploits the property that interacting proteins can follow similar patterns and relative rates of evolution. Current methods for detecting coevolution based on the similarity of phylogenetic trees or evolutionary distance matrices have, however, been limited by requiring coevolution over the entire evolutionary history considered and are inaccurate in the presence of paralogous copies. We present a novel method for determining coevolving protein partners by finding the largest common submatrix in a given pair of distance matrices, with the size of the largest common submatrix measuring the strength of coevolution. This approach permits us to consider matrices of different size and scale, to find lineage-specific coevolution, and to predict multiple interaction partners. We used MatrixMatchMaker to predict protein–protein interactions in the human genome. We show that proteins that are known to interact physically are more strongly coevolving than proteins that simply belong to the same biochemical pathway. The human coevolution network is highly connected, suggesting many more protein–protein interactions than are currently known from high-throughput and other experimental evidence. These most strongly coevolving proteins suggest interactions that have been maintained over long periods of evolutionary time, and that are thus likely to be of fundamental importance to cellular function. PMID:19696150

  3. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  4. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  6. Regulators of G protein signalling proteins in the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Ladds, Graham; Zervou, Sevasti; Vatish, Manu; Thornton, Steven; Davey, John

    2009-05-21

    The contractile state of the human myometrium is controlled by extracellular signals that promote relaxation or contraction. Many of these signals function through G protein-coupled receptors at the cell surface, stimulating heterotrimeric G proteins and leading to changes in the activity of effector proteins responsible for bringing about the response. G proteins can interact with multiple receptors and many different effectors and are key players in the response. Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase activating proteins for heterotrimeric G proteins and help terminate the signal. Little is known about the function of RGS proteins in human myometrium and we have therefore analysed transcript levels for RGS proteins at various stages of pregnancy (non-pregnant, preterm, term non-labouring, term labouring). RGS2 and RGS5 were the most abundantly expressed isolates in each of the patient groups. The levels of RGS4 and RGS16 (and to a lesser extent RGS2 and RGS14) increased in term labouring samples relative to the other groups. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation in myometrial cells revealed that both RGS2 and RGS5 interact directly with the cytoplasmic tail of the oxytocin receptor, suggesting they might help regulate signalling through this receptor.

  7. Computational Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions of Human Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su-Fang; Oh, Sangho; Si, Yue-Xiu; Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Han, Hong-Yan; Lee, Jinhyuk; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The various studies on tyrosinase have recently gained the attention of researchers due to their potential application values and the biological functions. In this study, we predicted the 3D structure of human tyrosinase and simulated the protein-protein interactions between tyrosinase and three binding partners, four and half LIM domains 2 (FHL2), cytochrome b-245 alpha polypeptide (CYBA), and RNA-binding motif protein 9 (RBM9). Our interaction simulations showed significant binding energy scores of −595.3 kcal/mol for FHL2, −859.1 kcal/mol for CYBA, and −821.3 kcal/mol for RBM9. We also investigated the residues of each protein facing toward the predicted site of interaction with tyrosinase. Our computational predictions will be useful for elucidating the protein-protein interactions of tyrosinase and studying its binding mechanisms. PMID:22577521

  8. Protein aggregation profile of the human kinome

    PubMed Central

    Graña-Montes, Ricardo; Sant'Anna de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ventura, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is associated with the onset of an increasing number of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and some types of cancer. The ability to form toxic amyloids appears to be a property of most polypeptides. Accordingly, it has been proposed that reducing aggregation and its effect in cell fitness is a driving force in the evolution of proteins sequences. This control of protein solubility should be especially important for regulatory hubs in biological networks, like protein kinases. These enzymes are implicated in practically all processes in normal and abnormal cell physiology, and phosphorylation is one of the most frequent protein modifications used to control protein activity. Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to study the aggregation propensity of kinase sequences. We compared them with the rest of globular proteins to decipher whether they display differential aggregation properties. In addition, we compared the human kinase complement with the kinomes of other organisms to see if we can identify any evolutionary trend in the aggregational properties of this protein superfamily. Our analysis indicates that kinase domains display significant aggregation propensity, a property that decreases with increasing organism complexity. PMID:23181023

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  10. New Anthocyanin-Human Salivary Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Gallego, Raúl; Soares, Susana; Mateus, Nuno; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián; Escribano-Bailón, M Teresa; de Freitas, Victor

    2015-08-04

    The interaction between phenolic compounds and salivary proteins is considered the basis of the poorly understood phenomenon of astringency. Furthermore, this interaction is an important factor in relation to their bioavailability. In this work, interactions between anthocyanin and human salivary protein fraction were studied by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS and FIA-ESI-MS) and saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. Anthocyanins were able to interact with saliva proteins. The dissociation constant (KD) between malvidin 3-glucoside and salivary proline-rich proteins was 1.92 mM for the hemiketal form (pH 3.4) and 1.83 mM for the flavylium cation (pH 1.0). New soluble complexes between these salivary proteins and malvidin 3-glucoside were identified for the first time.

  11. Nuclear matrix proteins in human colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Keesee, S K; Meneghini, M D; Szaro, R P; Wu, Y J

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer. Images PMID:8127905

  12. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy.

  13. Nitrogen and protein components of human milk.

    PubMed

    Hambraeus, L; Lönnerdal, B; Forsum, E; Gebre-Medhin, M

    1978-09-01

    The true protein content of human milk is 0.9%, in well-nourished as well as malnourished mothers. Casein constitutes only about 20% of the protein nitrogen in human milk. The remaining 80% is derived from the whey proteins, the three dominant components being alpha-lactalbumin, lactoferrin and secretory IgA. alpha-lactalbumin is a subunit of lactose synthetase. Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein which plays a role in the defence against gastro-intestinal infections and is probably also involved in iron transport in the gut. Secretory IgA is comparatively stable at low pH; it is resistant to proteolytic enzymes and plays an essential role in the immunological defence against gastro-intestinal infections. Lysozyme is a minor component of the whey proteins and represents an active enzyme with a bactericidal effect. The nutritional and immunological significance of the marked differences with respect to the nitrogen and protein compositions of human milk and cow's milk should not be underestimated, but need further elucidation.

  14. Surfactant proteins of the human larynx.

    PubMed

    Sheats, M; Schröder, H; Rausch, F; Bohr, C; Kißlinger, F; de Tristan, J; Iro, H; Garreis, F; Paulsen, F; Schicht, M; Bräuer, L

    2016-11-01

    Surfactant proteins (SPs) originally identified in lung tissue are important players in the innate immune system. Beyond this, they contribute to stability and rheology of gaseous or aqueous interphases. In the present study, we determined the expression and presence of SPs (A, B, C and D) in different areas of the human larynx. mRNA expression of SP-A, -B, -C and -D was analyzed by means of RT-PCR in healthy samples of epiglottis, vocal and vestibular folds, subglottis and trachea. Distribution and localization of all four SPs were analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry in healthy human tissue samples. All four SPs were detected at the mRNA- and protein level in the human larynx as well as by means of immunohistochemistry in the different tissue samples of the human larynx. The results reveal that all four SPs are produced with different expression patterns within the human larynx. Based on the known functions, our results suggest that SPs might be involved in maintaining mucus rheology and subsequently they could be essential components for proper phonation. Moreover, the proteins seem to play a role in immune defense of the larynx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  16. Purification of human alpha uterine protein.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, R G; Bolton, A E; Sharp, F; Nicholson, L V; MacKinnon, R

    1980-03-01

    Human alpha uterine protein (AUP) has been prepared from extracts of decudua by antibody affinity chromatography, DEAE Sepharose chromatography and by filtration through Sephadex G-150. This procedure yielded a protein fraction containing AUP, which was labelled with 125I by chloramine T. When analysed by SDS gel electrophoresis this radioiodinated protein fraction was found to contain predominantly a single species of protein which was precipitated by antibodies against AUP in antibody-antigen crossed electrophoresis. Rabbit anti-AUP precipitated 55-65% of the tracer in a double-antibody system. Sephadex G150 gel filtration of AUP obtained before and after affinity chromatography provided a molecular weight estimate of 50000. Since SDS gel electrophoresis revealed a polypeptide molecular weight of 23000-25000, it is suggested that AUP is a dimer.

  17. A monoclonal antibody against human MUDENG protein.

    PubMed

    Wagley, Yadav; Choi, Jun-Ha; Wickramanayake, Dimuthu Dhammika; Choi, Geun-Yeol; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-08-01

    MUDENG (mu-2-related death-inducing gene, MuD) encodes a predicted ∼54-kDa protein in humans, considered to be involved in trafficking proteins from endosomes toward other membranous compartments as well as in inducing cell death. Here we report on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the middle domain of human (h) MuD. This IgG sub 1 MAb, named M3H9, recognizes residues 244-326 in the middle domain of the MuD protein. Thus, the MuD proteins expressed in an astroglioma cell line and primary astrocytes can be detected by the M3H9 MAb. We showed that M3H9 MAb can be useful in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments. In addition, M3H9 MAb can detect the expression of the MuD protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse ovary and uterus tissues. These results indicate that the MuD MAb M3H9 could be useful as a new biomarker of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other related diseases.

  18. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  19. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  20. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  1. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  2. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  3. Antibiotic proteins of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, J E; Scott, R W; Campanelli, D; Griffith, J; Wilde, C; Marra, M N; Seeger, M; Nathan, C F

    1989-01-01

    Nine polypeptide peaks with antibiotic activity were resolved from human polymorphonuclear leukocyte azurophil granule membranes. All but 1 of the 12 constituent polypeptides were identified by N-terminal sequence analysis. Near quantitative recovery of protein and activity permitted an assessment of the contribution of each species to the overall respiratory-burst-independent antimicrobial capacity of the cell. Three uncharacterized polypeptides were discovered, including two broad-spectrum antibiotics. One of these, a defensin that we have designated human neutrophil antimicrobial peptide 4, was more potent than previously described defensins but represented less than 1% of the total protein. The other, named azurocidin, was abundant and comparable to bactericidal permeability-increasing factor in its contribution to the killing of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:2501794

  4. Do cancer proteins really interact strongly in the human protein-protein interaction network?

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Sun, Jingchun; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2011-06-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis has been widely applied in the investigation of the mechanisms of diseases, especially cancer. Recent studies revealed that cancer proteins tend to interact more strongly than other categories of proteins, even essential proteins, in the human interactome. However, it remains unclear whether this observation was introduced by the bias towards more cancer studies in humans. Here, we examined this important issue by uniquely comparing network characteristics of cancer proteins with three other sets of proteins in four organisms, three of which (fly, worm, and yeast) whose interactomes are essentially not biased towards cancer or other diseases. We confirmed that cancer proteins had stronger connectivity, shorter distance, and larger betweenness centrality than non-cancer disease proteins, essential proteins, and control proteins. Our statistical evaluation indicated that such observations were overall unlikely attributed to random events. Considering the large size and high quality of the PPI data in the four organisms, the conclusion that cancer proteins interact strongly in the PPI networks is reliable and robust. This conclusion suggests that perturbation of cancer proteins might cause major changes of cellular systems and result in abnormal cell function leading to cancer. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    PubMed

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  6. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Rodríguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, José; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Suárez-Franco, José Luis; Chavarría, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramírez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  7. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  8. Antibodies to endogenous tear protein in normal human tears.

    PubMed

    Remington, Susann G; Crow, Jean M; Nelson, J Daniel

    2009-10-01

    To identify endogenous tear proteins immunoselected by antibodies from normal human ocular tears. Proteins were immunoselected from normal human tear samples without the addition of primary antibodies. Captured proteins were electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gels and silver stained. Human tears were also used as primary antibodies on immunoblots of tear proteins. Lysozyme, lipocalin-1, and lactoferrin were immunoselected from normal human tear samples without the addition of primary antibodies. Antibodies from normal tears recognized lysozyme on immunoblots of tear proteins. Normal human ocular tears contain antibodies to endogenous tear protein.

  9. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

  10. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  11. Automating human intuition for protein design.

    PubMed

    Nivón, Lucas G; Bjelic, Sinisa; King, Chris; Baker, David

    2014-05-01

    In the design of new enzymes and binding proteins, human intuition is often used to modify computationally designed amino acid sequences prior to experimental characterization. The manual sequence changes involve both reversions of amino acid mutations back to the identity present in the parent scaffold and the introduction of residues making additional interactions with the binding partner or backing up first shell interactions. Automation of this manual sequence refinement process would allow more systematic evaluation and considerably reduce the amount of human designer effort involved. Here we introduce a benchmark for evaluating the ability of automated methods to recapitulate the sequence changes made to computer-generated models by human designers, and use it to assess alternative computational methods. We find the best performance for a greedy one-position-at-a-time optimization protocol that utilizes metrics (such as shape complementarity) and local refinement methods too computationally expensive for global Monte Carlo (MC) sequence optimization. This protocol should be broadly useful for improving the stability and function of designed binding proteins. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mechanism of Unfolding of Human Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reman K; Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2017-01-26

    Misfolding and aggregation of prion proteins are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of the misfolding process is of enormous interest in the scientific community. It has been speculated and widely discussed that the native cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) form needs to undergo substantial unfolding to a more stable PrP(C*) state, which may further oligomerize into the toxic scrapie (PrP(Sc)) form. Here, we have studied the mechanism of the unfolding of the human prion protein (huPrP) using a set of extensive well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Through multiple microsecond-long metadynamics simulations, we find several possible unfolding pathways. We show that each pathway leads to an unfolded state of lower free energy than the native state. Thus, our study may point to the signature of a PrP(C*) form that corresponds to a global minimum on the conformational free-energy landscape. Moreover, we find that these global minima states do not involve an increased β-sheet content, as was assumed to be a signature of PrP(Sc) formation in previous simulation studies. We have further analyzed the origin of metastability of the PrP(C) form through free-energy surfaces of the chopped helical segments to show that the helices, particularly H2 and H3 of the prion protein, have the tendency to form either a random coil or a β-structure. Therefore, the secondary structural elements of the prion protein are only weakly stabilized by tertiary contacts and solvation forces so that relatively weak perturbations induced by temperature, pressure, pH, and so forth can lead to substantial unfolding with characteristics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  13. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  14. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  15. Proteins of human milk. I. Identification of major components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.G.; Powers, M.T.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    Traditionally, human milk proteins are identified largely by reference to bovine milk. Hence, to identify the major proteins in human milk, we subjected human and bovine milk, in parallel, to high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. Isoelectric precipitation at pH 4.6 was our criterion for distinguishing whey proteins from those of the casein complex. The ..cap alpha..- and..beta..-caseins were identified on the basis of relative abundance, relative molecular mass, and relative isoelectric points. No protein disappeared from ISO-DALT patterns of human milk after rennin treatment, and no new protein comparable to bovine para K-casein appeared in the BASO-DALT patterns; this suggests that K-casein is absent from human milk. The proteins identified in human milk patterns include the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. casein families, lactalbumin, albumin, transferrin, IgA, and lactoferrin. Numerous additional proteins seen in patterns for human milk remain to be identified.

  16. The Proteins of Human Chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Costa, Alberto C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent genomic sequence annotation suggests that the long arm of human chromosome 21 encodes more than 400 genes. Because there is no evidence to exclude any significant segment of 21q from containing genes relevant to the Down syndrome cognitive phenotype, all genes in this entire set must be considered as candidates. Only a subset, however, is likely to make critical contributions. Determining which these are is both a major focus in biology and a critical step in efficient development of therapeutics. The subtle molecular abnormality in Down syndrome, the 50% increase in chromosome 21 gene expression, presents significant challenges for researchers in detection and quantitation. Another challenge is the current limitation in understanding gene functions and in interpreting biological characteristics. Here, we review information on chromosome 21-encoded proteins compiled from the literature and from genomics and proteomics databases. For each protein, we summarize their evolutionary conservation, the complexity of their known protein interactions and their level of expression in brain, and discuss the implications and limitations of these data. For a subset, we discuss neurologically relevant phenotypes of mouse models that include knockouts, mutations or overexpression. Lastly, we highlight a small number of genes for which recent evidence suggests a function in biochemical/cellular pathways that are relevant to cognition. Until knowledge deficits are overcome, we suggest that effective development of gene-phenotype correlations in Down syndrome requires a serious and continuous effort to assimilate broad categories of information on chromosome 21 genes, plus the creation of more versatile mouse models. PMID:17048356

  17. Protein composition of rhesus monkey milk: comparison to human milk.

    PubMed

    Kunz, C; Lönnerdal, B

    1993-04-01

    1. Proteins in human milk and Rhesus monkey milk have been compared by FPLC gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography, SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, nitrogen and protein determination. 2. Mature Rhesus milk is higher in protein concentration (15-20 mg/ml) than human milk (8-9 mg/ml). 3. Non-Protein nitrogen is 6-13% in Rhesus milk but 25-30% in human milk. 4. Secretory IgA, lactoferrin, serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme are present in Rhesus milk, but at a lower concentration than in human milk. 5. The casein subunit pattern is more complex in Rhesus milk compared to human milk. 6. The ratio of whey proteins to casein is similar in both milks (approximately 60/40). 7. A protein with a M(r) of 21,600 is a major component in monkey whey but is not found in human milk.

  18. Mobile phone radiation might alter protein expression in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Karinen, Anu; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Nylund, Reetta; Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    Background Earlier we have shown that the mobile phone radiation (radiofrequency modulated electromagnetic fields; RF-EMF) alters protein expression in human endothelial cell line. This does not mean that similar response will take place in human body exposed to this radiation. Therefore, in this pilot human volunteer study, using proteomics approach, we have examined whether a local exposure of human skin to RF-EMF will cause changes in protein expression in living people. Results Small area of forearm's skin in 10 female volunteers was exposed to RF-EMF (specific absorption rate SAR = 1.3 W/kg) and punch biopsies were collected from exposed and non-exposed areas of skin. Proteins extracted from biopsies were separated using 2-DE and protein expression changes were analyzed using PDQuest software. Analysis has identified 8 proteins that were statistically significantly affected (Anova and Wilcoxon tests). Two of the proteins were present in all 10 volunteers. This suggests that protein expression in human skin might be affected by the exposure to RF-EMF. The number of affected proteins was similar to the number of affected proteins observed in our earlier in vitro studies. Conclusion This is the first study showing that molecular level changes might take place in human volunteers in response to exposure to RF-EMF. Our study confirms that proteomics screening approach can identify protein targets of RF-EMF in human volunteers. PMID:18267023

  19. Inferring High-Confidence Human Protein-Protein Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    iPfam: visualization of protein-protein interactions in PDB at domain and amino acid resolutions. Bioinformatics 2005, 21(3):410–412. 43. Kanehisa M, Goto...comprised proteins that had the same specific func- tion or were subunits of the same protein complex, such as branched chain keto acid E1 alpha (BCKDHA...and branched chain keto acid E1 beta (BCKDHB) [3,29], and dynein cytoplasmic 2 intermediate chain 1 (D2LIC) and dynein cytoplasmic 2 heavy chain 1

  20. Regulation of muscle protein synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bethan E; Hill, Derek S; Atherton, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the regulation of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) are a cornerstone of understanding the control of muscle mass. Rates of MPS are finely tuned according to levels of activity, nutrient availability and health status. For instance, rates of MPS are positively regulated by exercise and nutrition, and negatively regulated by inactivity (e.g. disuse), ageing (i.e. sarcopenia) and in muscle-wasting related diseases (e.g. cancer). Skeletal muscles display a high degree of intrinsic regulation. Increases in MPS after exercise occur independently of the systemic milieu for example growth hormone/testosterone concentrations. In the absence of exercise, increases in MPS after feeding are of finite duration despite enduring precursor availability; that is muscles can sense they are 'full'. Intriguingly, exercise delays this 'muscle-full' response to allow for building and repair. In contrast, muscle-wasting conditions exhibit a premature 'muscle-full' response to nutrition and exercise (i.e. anabolic resistance), which may cause atrophy. Observations of 'dissociations' between MPS and anabolic signalling pathways have cast doubt on how much we understand of the molecular regulation of human MPS. Anabolic and anticatabolic interventions in health and disease should be aimed at manipulating the 'muscle-full' set point to maximize muscle maintenance/hypertrophy.

  1. A method for whole protein isolation from human cranial bone.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Sarah M; Mayampurath, Anoop; Rogers, M Rose; Wolfgeher, Donald J; Fisher, Sean M; Volchenboum, Samuel L; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R

    2016-12-15

    The presence of the dense hydroxyapatite matrix within human bone limits the applicability of conventional protocols for protein extraction. This has hindered the complete and accurate characterization of the human bone proteome thus far, leaving many bone-related disorders poorly understood. We sought to refine an existing method of protein extraction from mouse bone to extract whole proteins of varying molecular weights from human cranial bone. Whole protein was extracted from human cranial suture by mechanically processing samples using a method that limits protein degradation by minimizing heat introduction to proteins. The presence of whole protein was confirmed by western blotting. Mass spectrometry was used to sequence peptides and identify isolated proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003215. Extracted proteins were characterized as both intra- and extracellular and had molecular weights ranging from 9.4 to 629 kDa. High correlation scores among suture protein spectral counts support the reproducibility of the method. Ontology analytics revealed proteins of myriad functions including mediators of metabolic processes and cell organelles. These results demonstrate a reproducible method for isolation of whole protein from human cranial bone, representing a large range of molecular weights, origins and functions.

  2. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2017-01-04

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have 'selected' (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have ‘selected’ (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. PMID:27924015

  4. Protein-Linked Glycan Degradation in Infants Fed Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Sela, David; Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2014-01-01

    Many human milk proteins are glycosylated. Glycosylation is important in protecting bioactive proteins and peptide fragments from digestion. Protein-linked glycans have a variety of functions; however, there is a paucity of information on protein-linked glycan degradation in either the infant or the adult digestive system. Human digestive enzymes can break down dietary disaccharides and starches, but most of the digestive enzymes required for complex protein-linked glycan degradation are absent from both human digestive secretions and the external brush border membrane of the intestinal lining. Indeed, complex carbohydrates remain intact throughout their transit through the stomach and small intestine, and are undegraded by in vitro incubation with either adult pancreatic secretions or intact intestinal brush border membranes. Human gastrointestinal bacteria, however, produce a wide variety of glycosidases with regio- and anomeric specificities matching those of protein-linked glycan structures. These bacteria degrade a wide array of complex carbohydrates including various protein-linked glycans. That bacteria possess glycan degradation capabilities, whereas the human digestive system, perse, does not, suggests that most dietary protein-linked glycan breakdown will be of bacterial origin. In addition to providing a food source for specific bacteria in the colon, protein-linked glycans from human milk may act as decoys for pathogenic bacteria to prevent invasion and infection of the host. The composition of the intestinal microbiome may be particularly important in the most vulnerable humans-the elderly, the immunocompromised, and infants (particularly premature infants). PMID:24533224

  5. Adenovirus dodecahedron allows large multimeric protein transduction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Schoehn, G; Foucaud-Gamen, J; Gout, E; Garcel, A; Drouet, E; Chroboczek, J

    2003-04-01

    Adenovirus dodecahedron is a virus-like particle composed of only two viral proteins of human adenovirus serotype 3 that are responsible for virus attachment and internalization. We show here that this dodecameric particle, devoid of genetic information, efficiently penetrates human cells and can deliver large multimeric proteins such as immunoglobulins.

  6. A human protein interaction network shows conservation of aging processes between human and invertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Bell, Russell; Hubbard, Alan; Chettier, Rakesh; Chen, Di; Miller, John P; Kapahi, Pankaj; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Sahasrabuhde, Sudhir; Melov, Simon; Hughes, Robert E

    2009-03-01

    We have mapped a protein interaction network of human homologs of proteins that modify longevity in invertebrate species. This network is derived from a proteome-scale human protein interaction Core Network generated through unbiased high-throughput yeast two-hybrid searches. The longevity network is composed of 175 human homologs of proteins known to confer increased longevity through loss of function in yeast, nematode, or fly, and 2,163 additional human proteins that interact with these homologs. Overall, the network consists of 3,271 binary interactions among 2,338 unique proteins. A comparison of the average node degree of the human longevity homologs with random sets of proteins in the Core Network indicates that human homologs of longevity proteins are highly connected hubs with a mean node degree of 18.8 partners. Shortest path length analysis shows that proteins in this network are significantly more connected than would be expected by chance. To examine the relationship of this network to human aging phenotypes, we compared the genes encoding longevity network proteins to genes known to be changed transcriptionally during aging in human muscle. In the case of both the longevity protein homologs and their interactors, we observed enrichments for differentially expressed genes in the network. To determine whether homologs of human longevity interacting proteins can modulate life span in invertebrates, homologs of 18 human FRAP1 interacting proteins showing significant changes in human aging muscle were tested for effects on nematode life span using RNAi. Of 18 genes tested, 33% extended life span when knocked-down in Caenorhabditis elegans. These observations indicate that a broad class of longevity genes identified in invertebrate models of aging have relevance to human aging. They also indicate that the longevity protein interaction network presented here is enriched for novel conserved longevity proteins.

  7. Protein-Protein Interactions Suggest Novel Activities of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pUL103

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Daniel A.; Glassbrook, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that causes severe disease in newborns and immunocompromised patients. During infection, the host cell endosecretory system is remodeled to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). We and others previously identified the conserved, multifunctional HCMV virion tegument protein pUL103 as important for cVAC biogenesis and efficient secondary envelopment. To help define its mechanisms of action and predict additional functions, we used two complementary methods, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) and proximity biotinylation (BioID), to identify viral and cellular proteins that interact with pUL103. By using the two methods in parallel and applying stringent selection criteria, we identified potentially high-value interactions of pUL103 with 13 HCMV and 18 cellular proteins. Detection of the previously identified pUL103-pUL71 interaction, as well as verification of several interactions by reverse co-IP, supports the specificity of our screening process. As might be expected for a tegument protein, interactions were identified that suggest distinct roles for pUL103 across the arc of lytic infection, including interactions with proteins involved in cellular antiviral responses, nuclear activities, and biogenesis and transport of cytoplasmic vesicles. Further analysis of some of these interactions expands our understanding of the multifunctional repertoire of pUL103: we detected HCMV pUL103 in nuclei of infected cells and identified an ALIX-binding domain within the pUL103 sequence. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is able to reconfigure the host cell machinery to establish a virion production factory, the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). cVAC biogenesis and operation represent targets for development of novel HCMV antivirals. We previously showed that the HCMV tegument protein pUL103 is required for cVAC biogenesis. Using pUL103 as bait, we investigated viral and

  8. Interferon-induced human protein with homology to protein Mx of influenza virus-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Staeheli, P; Haller, O

    1985-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies with specificity for protein Mx (a karyophilic 75,000-dalton protein induced by interferon [IFN] in mouse cells carrying the influenza virus resistance allele Mx+) detected an IFN-induced 80,000-dalton protein in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in fibroblasts of healthy human donors. The human protein, like protein Mx, was induced by IFN-alpha but not by IFN-gamma. Unlike the mouse protein, it was predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm. Images PMID:3939324

  9. Determination of Dideoxyosone Precursors of AGEs in Human Lens Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Johar, Kaid; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2011-01-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-{[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl) benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 AU/mg protein vs. 31.7±19.5 AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. PMID:21820400

  10. Determination of dideoxyosone precursors of AGEs in human lens proteins.

    PubMed

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Kaid Johar, S R; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2011-10-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl)benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by Western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 vs. 31.7±19.5AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioactive proteins in human milk: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2010-02-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins, with very diverse functions. Some of these proteins are involved in the synthesis and expression of milk, but the majority appears to have evolved to provide physiological activities in the breast-fed infant. These activities are exerted by a wide variety of mechanisms and have largely been unraveled by in vitro studies. To be active in the gastrointestinal tract, these proteins must be able to resist proteolytic degradation, at least for some time. We have evaluated the human milk proteins lactoferrin, haptocorrin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, and transforming growth factor -beta in an in vitro digestion model, mimicking the conditions of the infant gastrointestinal milieu. These bioactive proteins are resistant against proteolysis and can remain intact or as larger fragments through passage of the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro digestibility assays can be helpful to assess which human milk proteins can resist proteolysis and to what extent.

  12. Human lipopolysaccharide-binding protein potentiates bactericidal activity of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, A H; Williams, R E; Nowakowski, G

    1995-01-01

    Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) from neutrophils and a recombinant amino-terminal fragment, rBPI23, bind to and are cytotoxic for gram-negative bacteria both in vitro and ex vivo in plasma or whole blood. To function in vivo as an extracellular bactericidal agent, rBPI23 must act in the presence of the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), which also binds to but has no reported cytotoxicity for gram-negative bacteria. LBP, which is present at 5 to 10 micrograms/ml in healthy humans and at much higher levels in septic patients, mediates proinflammatory host responses to gram-negative infection. On the basis of these previous observations, we have examined the effect of recombinant LBP (rLBP) on the bactericidal activity of rBPI23 against Escherichia coli J5 in vitro. Physiological concentrations of rLBP (5 to 20 micrograms/ml) had little or no bactericidal activity but reduced by up to approximately 10,000-fold the concentration of BPI required for bactericidal or related activities in assays which measure (i) cell viability as CFUs on solid media or growth in broth culture and (ii) protein synthesis following treatment with BPI. LBP also potentiated BPI-mediated permeabilization of the E. coli outer membrane to actinomycin D by about 100-fold but had no permeabilizing activity of its own. Under optimal conditions for potentiation, fewer than 100 BPI molecules were required to kill a single E. coli J5 bacterium. PMID:7822017

  13. Global landscape of HIV-human protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Stefanie; Cimermancic, Peter; Gulbahce, Natali; Johnson, Jeffrey R; McGovern, Kathryn E; Clarke, Starlynn C; Shales, Michael; Mercenne, Gaelle; Pache, Lars; Li, Kathy; Hernandez, Hilda; Jang, Gwendolyn M; Roth, Shoshannah L; Akiva, Eyal; Marlett, John; Stephens, Melanie; D'Orso, Iván; Fernandes, Jason; Fahey, Marie; Mahon, Cathal; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Todorovic, Aleksandar; Morris, John H; Maltby, David A; Alber, Tom; Cagney, Gerard; Bushman, Frederic D; Young, John A; Chanda, Sumit K; Sundquist, Wesley I; Kortemme, Tanja; Hernandez, Ryan D; Craik, Charles S; Burlingame, Alma; Sali, Andrej; Frankel, Alan D; Krogan, Nevan J

    2011-12-21

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has a small genome and therefore relies heavily on the host cellular machinery to replicate. Identifying which host proteins and complexes come into physical contact with the viral proteins is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of how HIV rewires the host's cellular machinery during the course of infection. Here we report the use of affinity tagging and purification mass spectrometry to determine systematically the physical interactions of all 18 HIV-1 proteins and polyproteins with host proteins in two different human cell lines (HEK293 and Jurkat). Using a quantitative scoring system that we call MiST, we identified with high confidence 497 HIV-human protein-protein interactions involving 435 individual human proteins, with ∼40% of the interactions being identified in both cell types. We found that the host proteins hijacked by HIV, especially those found interacting in both cell types, are highly conserved across primates. We uncovered a number of host complexes targeted by viral proteins, including the finding that HIV protease cleaves eIF3d, a subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3. This host protein is one of eleven identified in this analysis that act to inhibit HIV replication. This data set facilitates a more comprehensive and detailed understanding of how the host machinery is manipulated during the course of HIV infection.

  14. Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque protein(s) change HDL protein(s) composition and impair HDL anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Volkova, Nina; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) anti-atherogenic functions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor, and are dictated by its composition, which is often affected by environmental factors. The present study investigates the effects of the human carotid plaque constituents on HDL composition and biological functions. To this end, human carotid plaques were homogenized and incubated with HDL. Results showed that after incubation, most of the apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) protein was released from the HDL, and HDL diameter increased by an average of approximately 2 nm. In parallel, HDL antioxidant activity was impaired. In response to homogenate treatment HDL could not prevent the accelerated oxidation of LDL caused by the homogenate. Boiling of the homogenate prior to its incubation with HDL abolished its effects on HDL composition changes. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay revealed an interaction between plaque component(s) and HDL, an interaction that was reduced by 50% upon using pre-boiled homogenate. These results led to hypothesize that plaque protein(s) interacted with HDL-associated Apo A1 and altered the HDL composition. Immuno-precipitation of Apo A1 that was released from the HDL after its incubation with the homogenate revealed a co-precipitation of three isomers of actin. However, beta-actin alone did not significantly affect the HDL composition, and yet the active protein within the plaque was elusive. In conclusion then, protein(s) in the homogenate interact with HDL protein(s), leading to release of Apo A1 from the HDL particle, a process that was associated with an increase in HDL diameter and with impaired HDL anti-oxidant activity.

  15. Protein Translation and Signaling in Human Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Stephane; Shen, Zhong-Jian; Malter, James S.

    2017-01-01

    We have recently reported that, unlike IL-5 and GM-CSF, IL-3 induces increased translation of a subset of mRNAs. In addition, we have demonstrated that Pin1 controls the activity of mRNA binding proteins, leading to enhanced mRNA stability, GM-CSF protein production and prolonged eosinophil (EOS) survival. In this review, discussion will include an overview of cap-dependent protein translation and its regulation by intracellular signaling pathways. We will address the more general process of mRNA post-transcriptional regulation, especially regarding mRNA binding proteins, which are critical effectors of protein translation. Furthermore, we will focus on (1) the roles of IL-3-driven sustained signaling on enhanced protein translation in EOS, (2) the mechanisms regulating mRNA binding proteins activity in EOS, and (3) the potential targeting of IL-3 signaling and the signaling leading to mRNA binding activity changes to identify therapeutic targets to treat EOS-associated diseases. PMID:28971096

  16. Identification of proteins binding coding and non-coding human RNAs using protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation and function of mammalian RNAs has been increasingly appreciated to operate via RNA-protein interactions. With the recent discovery of thousands of novel human RNA molecules by high-throughput RNA sequencing, efficient methods to uncover RNA-protein interactions are urgently required. Existing methods to study proteins associated with a given RNA are laborious and require substantial amounts of cell-derived starting material. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a rapid and large-scale approach to characterize binding of in vitro transcribed labeled RNA to ~9,400 human recombinant proteins spotted on protein microarrays. Results We have optimized methodology to probe human protein microarrays with full-length RNA molecules and have identified 137 RNA-protein interactions specific for 10 coding and non-coding RNAs. Those proteins showed strong enrichment for common human RNA binding domains such as RRM, RBD, as well as K homology and CCCH type zinc finger motifs. Previously unknown RNA-protein interactions were discovered using this technique, and these interactions were biochemically verified between TP53 mRNA and Staufen1 protein as well as between HRAS mRNA and CNBP protein. Functional characterization of the interaction between Staufen 1 protein and TP53 mRNA revealed a novel role for Staufen 1 in preserving TP53 RNA stability. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates a scalable methodology, allowing rapid and efficient identification of novel human RNA-protein interactions using RNA hybridization to human protein microarrays. Biochemical validation of newly identified interactions between TP53-Stau1 and HRAS-CNBP using reciprocal pull-down experiments, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrates the utility of this approach to study uncharacterized RNA-protein interactions. PMID:23157412

  17. Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Rob M; Chu, Peter; Elisma, Fred; Li, Hongyan; Taylor, Paul; Climie, Shane; McBroom-Cerajewski, Linda; Robinson, Mark D; O'Connor, Liam; Li, Michael; Taylor, Rod; Dharsee, Moyez; Ho, Yuen; Heilbut, Adrian; Moore, Lynda; Zhang, Shudong; Ornatsky, Olga; Bukhman, Yury V; Ethier, Martin; Sheng, Yinglun; Vasilescu, Julian; Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Duewel, Henry S; Stewart, Ian I; Kuehl, Bonnie; Hogue, Kelly; Colwill, Karen; Gladwish, Katharine; Muskat, Brenda; Kinach, Robert; Adams, Sally-Lin; Moran, Michael F; Morin, Gregg B; Topaloglou, Thodoros; Figeys, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is an invaluable tool for understanding protein function. Here, we report the first large-scale study of protein-protein interactions in human cells using a mass spectrometry-based approach. The study maps protein interactions for 338 bait proteins that were selected based on known or suspected disease and functional associations. Large-scale immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged versions of these proteins followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 24,540 potential protein interactions. False positives and redundant hits were filtered out using empirical criteria and a calculated interaction confidence score, producing a data set of 6463 interactions between 2235 distinct proteins. This data set was further cross-validated using previously published and predicted human protein interactions. In-depth mining of the data set shows that it represents a valuable source of novel protein-protein interactions with relevance to human diseases. In addition, via our preliminary analysis, we report many novel protein interactions and pathway associations.

  18. Protein interactions in human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Bateman, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method that combines protein structure information with protein interaction data to identify residues that form part of an interaction interface. Our prediction method can retrieve interaction hotspots with an accuracy of 60% (at a 20% false positive rate). The method was applied to all mutations in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, predicting 1,428 mutations to be related to an interaction defect. Combining predicted and hand-curated sets, we discuss how mutations affect protein interactions in general. PMID:18199329

  19. The Evolution of Human Cells in Terms of Protein Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Adam J.; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type–specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type–specific domain architectures. PMID:24692656

  20. The evolution of human cells in terms of protein innovation.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Adam J; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J L

    2014-06-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type-specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type-specific domain architectures.

  1. Untapped Potential of Disordered Proteins in Current Druggable Human Proteome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gang; Wu, Zhonghua; Wang, Kui; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in design and characterization of drugs often rely on the structure of their protein targets. However, a large fraction of proteins lack unique 3-D structures and exist as highly dynamic structural ensembles. These intrinsically disordered proteins are involved in pathogenesis of various human diseases and are highly abundant in eukaryotes. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current druggable human proteome covering 12 drug classes and 18 major classes of drug targets we show a significant bias toward high structural coverage and low abundance of intrinsic disorder. We review reasons for this bias including widespread use of the structural information in various stages of drug development and characterization process and difficulty with attaining structures for the intrinsically disordered proteins. We also discuss future of intrinsically disordered proteins as drug targets. Given the overall high disorder content of the human proteome and current bias of the druggable human proteome toward structural proteins, it is inevitable that disordered proteins will have to raise up on the list of prospective drug targets. The protein disorder-assisted drug design can draw from current rational drug design techniques and would also need novel approaches that no longer rely on a unique protein structure.

  2. Spaceflight and protein metabolism, with special reference to humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Gaprindashvili, T.

    1994-01-01

    Human space missions have shown that human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Specific changes include a loss of lean body mass, decreased muscle mass in the calves, decreased muscle strength, and changes in plasma proteins and amino acids. The major muscle loss is believed to be associated with the antigravity (postural) muscle. The most significant loss of protein appears to occur during the first month of flight. The etiology is believed to be multifactorial with contributions from disuse atrophy, undernutrition, and a stress type of response. This article reviews the results of American and Russian space missions to investigate this problem in humans, monkeys, and rats. The relationship of the flight results with ground-based models including bedrest for humans and hindlimb unweighting for rats is also discussed. The results suggest that humans adapt to spaceflight much better than either monkeys or rats.

  3. Spaceflight and protein metabolism, with special reference to humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Gaprindashvili, T.

    1994-01-01

    Human space missions have shown that human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Specific changes include a loss of lean body mass, decreased muscle mass in the calves, decreased muscle strength, and changes in plasma proteins and amino acids. The major muscle loss is believed to be associated with the antigravity (postural) muscle. The most significant loss of protein appears to occur during the first month of flight. The etiology is believed to be multifactorial with contributions from disuse atrophy, undernutrition, and a stress type of response. This article reviews the results of American and Russian space missions to investigate this problem in humans, monkeys, and rats. The relationship of the flight results with ground-based models including bedrest for humans and hindlimb unweighting for rats is also discussed. The results suggest that humans adapt to spaceflight much better than either monkeys or rats.

  4. Mitochondrial protein import and human health and disease.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, James A; Payne, R Mark

    2007-05-01

    The targeting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins are essential processes because the energy supply of humans is dependent upon the proper functioning of mitochondria. Defective import of mitochondrial proteins can arise from mutations in the targeting signals within precursor proteins, from mutations that disrupt the proper functioning of the import machinery, or from deficiencies in the chaperones involved in the proper folding and assembly of proteins once they are imported. Defects in these steps of import have been shown to lead to oxidative stress, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders. In addition, protein import into mitochondria has been found to be a dynamically regulated process that varies in response to conditions such as oxidative stress, aging, drug treatment, and exercise. This review focuses on how mitochondrial protein import affects human health and disease.

  5. Human protein reference database as a discovery resource for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Amanchy, Ramars; Surendranath, Vineeth; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Suresh, Shubha; Rashmi, B. P.; Shanker, K.; Padma, N.; Niranjan, Vidya; Harsha, H. C.; Talreja, Naveen; Vrushabendra, B. M.; Ramya, M. A.; Yatish, A. J.; Joy, Mary; Shivashankar, H. N.; Kavitha, M. P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Mohan, Sujatha; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Prasad, C. K.; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    The rapid pace at which genomic and proteomic data is being generated necessitates the development of tools and resources for managing data that allow integration of information from disparate sources. The Human Protein Reference Database (http://www.hprd.org) is a web-based resource based on open source technologies for protein information about several aspects of human proteins including protein–protein interactions, post-translational modifications, enzyme–substrate relationships and disease associations. This information was derived manually by a critical reading of the published literature by expert biologists and through bioinformatics analyses of the protein sequence. This database will assist in biomedical discoveries by serving as a resource of genomic and proteomic information and providing an integrated view of sequence, structure, function and protein networks in health and disease. PMID:14681466

  6. Identification of the human testis protein phosphatase 1 interactome.

    PubMed

    Fardilha, Margarida; Esteves, Sara L C; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vintém, Ana Paula; Domingues, Sara C; Rebelo, Sandra; Morrice, Nick; Cohen, Patricia T W; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F

    2011-11-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a critical regulatory mechanism in cellular signalling. To this end, PP1 is a major eukaryotic serine/threonine-specific phosphatase whose cellular functions, in turn, depend on complexes it forms with PP1 interacting proteins-PIPs. The importance of the testis/sperm-enriched variant, PP1γ2, in sperm motility and spermatogenesis has previously been shown. Given the key role of PIPs, it is imperative to identify the physiologically relevant PIPs in testis and sperm. Hence, we performed Yeast Two-Hybrid screens of a human testis cDNA library using as baits the different PP1 isoforms and also a proteomic approach aimed at identifying PP1γ2 binding proteins. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest data set of the human testis PP1 interactome. We report the identification of 77 proteins in human testis and 7 proteins in human sperm that bind PP1. The data obtained increased the known PP1 interactome by reporting 72 novel interactions. Confirmation of the interaction of PP1 with 5 different proteins was also further validated by co-immunoprecipitation or protein overlays. The data here presented provides important insights towards the function of these proteins and opens new possibilities for future research. In fact, such diversity in PP1 regulators makes them excellent targets for pharmacological intervention.

  7. The human protein index: a prospect for laboratory medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.G.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    A description is given of an annotated human protein index constructed with the use of new, high-resolution separation techniques combined with computerized image analysis, data reduction and data-base organization and management methods. Isoelectric focusing and gel electrophoresis have been combined in a two-dimensional procedure which should be capable of separating more than 10,000 proteins. Uses of the protein map in molecular pathology and biotechnology are discussed.

  8. Protein Buffering in Model Systems and in Whole Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Lamanda, Andreas; Cheaib, Zeinab; Turgut, Melek Dilek; Lussi, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum) of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and α-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16%) between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate) staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s) belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva. PMID:17327922

  9. Immunocytochemical detection of protein p38 in human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Casasco, A; Calligaro, A; Casasco, M; Menghini, P; Marchetti, C; Poggi, P; Springall, D R; Polak, J M

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of protein p38 (synaptophysin) were investigated by immunofluorescence. Immunoreactivity for protein p38-like antigen was detected within axons of radicular nerve trunks entering the tooth and within nerve terminals close to blood vessels. Immunoreactive structures were also observed in the para-odontoblastic region. It is proposed that protein p38, translocated within small synaptic vesicles from neuronal perikarya along the axons, may be a reliable marker for detection of nerve endings in human tooth.

  10. Protein Dynamics in Individual Human Cells: Experiment and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Danon, Tamar; Issaeva, Irina; Kopito, Ronen Benjamine; Perzov, Natalie; Milo, Ron; Sigal, Alex; Alon, Uri

    2009-01-01

    A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle–dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell–cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell–cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells. PMID:19381343

  11. Cell polarity proteins: common targets for tumorigenic human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Javier, RT

    2012-01-01

    Loss of polarity and disruption of cell junctions are common features of epithelial-derived cancer cells, and mounting evidence indicates that such defects have a direct function in the pathology of cancer. Supporting this idea, results with several different human tumor viruses indicate that their oncogenic potential depends in part on a common ability to inactivate key cell polarity proteins. For example, adenovirus (Ad) type 9 is unique among human Ads by causing exclusively estrogen-dependent mammary tumors in experimental animals and in having E4 region-encoded open reading frame 1 (E4-ORF1) as its primary oncogenic determinant. The 125-residue E4-ORF1 protein consists of two separate protein-interaction elements, one of which defines a PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) required for E4-ORF1 to induce both cellular transformation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Most notably, the E4-ORF1 PBM mediates interactions with a selected group of cellular PDZ proteins, three of which include the cell polarity proteins Dlg1, PATJ and ZO-2. Data further indicate that these interactions promote disruption of cell junctions and a loss of cell polarity. In addition, one or more of the E4-ORF1-interacting cell polarity proteins, as well as the cell polarity protein Scribble, are common targets for the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 or human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoproteins. Underscoring the significance of these observations, in humans, high-risk HPV and HTLV-1 are causative agents for cervical cancer and adult T-cell leukemia, respectively. Consequently, human tumor viruses should serve as powerful tools for deciphering mechanisms whereby disruption of cell junctions and loss of cell polarity contribute to the development of many human cancers. This review article discusses evidence supporting this hypothesis, with an emphasis on the human Ad E4-ORF1 oncoprotein. PMID:19029943

  12. Meat protein fractions enhance nonheme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Richard F; Reddy, Manju B; Juillerat, Marcel; Cook, James D

    2006-11-01

    The nature of the enhancing effect of muscle tissue on nonheme iron absorption in humans is unclear but thought to be related to muscle proteins. We conducted radioiron absorption studies to compare iron absorption from proteins isolated from beef and chicken muscle with that from freeze-dried beef and chicken muscle and from egg albumin. All meals contained an equivalent amount of protein as part of a semisynthetic liquid formula. Freeze-dried beef and chicken muscle increased iron absorption 180% (P < 0.001) and 100% (P < 0.001), respectively, relative to egg albumin. When added to the meal at an equivalent protein level (15 g), the isolated beef protein and the isolated heme-free beef protein with 94 and 98% protein content, respectively, increased iron absorption to the same extent as the native beef muscle. Similarly, when added to the meal at an equivalent protein level (30 g), isolated chicken muscle protein (94% protein) increased iron absorption similarly to native chicken muscle. Iron absorption from the meal containing the isolated heme-free chicken protein, however, was 120% (P < 0.01) greater than from the meal containing freeze-dried chicken muscle, indicating that a nonprotein component of muscle tissue with iron-binding potential may have been removed or concentrated by the protein extraction and separation procedures. Our results support the hypothesis that the enhancing effect of muscle tissue on iron absorption is mainly protein related but indicate that other factors may also play a role.

  13. Prediction of the Ebola virus infection related human genes using protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuanming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-03-10

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes.

  14. Converting Human Proteins into Precision Polymer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Felix; Liu, Weina; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Cells as the smallest unit of life rely on precise macromolecules and programmable supramolecular interactions to accomplish the various vital functions. To translate such strategies to precisely control architectures and interactions into the synthetic world represents an exciting endeavor. Polymers with distinct structures, sequences and architectures are still challenging to achieve. However, in particular for biomedical applications, reproducible synthesis, narrow dispersities, tunable functionalities and additionally biocompatibility of the polymeric materials are crucial. Polymers derived from protein precursors provide many advantages of proteins such as precise monomer sequences and contour lengths, biodegradability and multiple functionalities, which can be synergistically combined with the valuable features of synthetic polymers e.g. stability, tunable solubility and molecular weights. The resulting polymeric biohybrid materials offer many applications ranging from drug delivery to biosensing and therapeutic hydrogels. This minireview summarizes the most recent advances in this field.

  15. Apoptosis induced by a human milk protein.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, A; Zhivotovsky, B; Orrenius, S; Sabharwal, H; Svanborg, C

    1995-08-15

    To the breast-fed infant, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of molecules that restrict microbes, such as antibodies, bactericidins, and inhibitors of bacterial adherence. However, it has rarely been considered that human milk may also contain substances bioactive toward host cells. While investigating the effect of human milk on bacterial adherence to a human lung cancer cell line, we were surprised to discover that the milk killed the cells. Analysis of this effect revealed that a component of milk in a particular physical state--multimeric alpha-lact-albumin--is a potent Ca(2+)-elevating and apoptosis-inducing agent with broad, yet selective, cytotoxic activity. Multimeric alpha-lactalbumin killed all transformed, embryonic, and lymphoid cells tested but spared mature epithelial elements. These findings raise the possibility that milk contributes to mucosal immunity not only by furnishing antimicrobial molecules but also by policing the function of lymphocytes and epithelium. Finally, analysis of the mechanism by which multimeric alpha-lactalbumin induces apoptosis in transformed epithelial cells could lead to the design of antitumor agents.

  16. Human protein status modulates brain reward responses to food cues.

    PubMed

    Griffioen-Roose, Sanne; Smeets, Paul Am; van den Heuvel, Emmy; Boesveldt, Sanne; Finlayson, Graham; de Graaf, Cees

    2014-07-01

    Protein is indispensable in the human diet, and its intake appears tightly regulated. The role of sensory attributes of foods in protein intake regulation is far from clear. We investigated the effect of human protein status on neural responses to different food cues with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The food cues varied by taste category (sweet compared with savory) and protein content (low compared with high). In addition, food preferences and intakes were measured. We used a randomized crossover design whereby 23 healthy women [mean ± SD age: 22 ± 2 y; mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 22.5 ± 1.8] followed two 16-d fully controlled dietary interventions involving consumption of either a low-protein diet (0.6 g protein · kg body weight(-1) · d(-1), ~7% of energy derived from protein, approximately half the normal protein intake) or a high-protein diet (2.2 g protein · kg body weight(-1) · d(-1), ~25% of energy, approximately twice the normal intake). On the last day of the interventions, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to odor and visual food cues were measured by using fMRI. The 2 interventions were followed by a 1-d ad libitum phase, during which a large array of food items was available and preference and intake were measured. When exposed to food cues (relative to the control condition), the BOLD response was higher in reward-related areas (orbitofrontal cortex, striatum) in a low-protein state than in a high-protein state. Specifically, BOLD was higher in the inferior orbitofrontal cortex in response to savory food cues. In contrast, the protein content of the food cues did not modulate the BOLD response. A low protein state also increased preferences for savory food cues and increased protein intake in the ad libitum phase as compared with a high-protein state. Protein status modulates brain responses in reward regions to savory food cues. These novel findings suggest that dietary protein status

  17. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-02-21

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies.

  18. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-01-01

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies. PMID:28220872

  19. Deep conservation of human protein tandem repeats within the eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥ 61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE.

  20. Protein aggregation, misfolding and consequential human neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Sami, Neha; Rahman, Safikur; Kumar, Vijay; Zaidi, Sobia; Islam, Asimul; Ali, Sher; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-11-01

    Proteins are major components of the biological functions in a cell. Biology demands that a protein must fold into its stable three-dimensional structure to become functional. In an unfavorable cellular environment, protein may get misfolded resulting in its aggregation. These conformational disorders are directly related to the tissue damage resulting in cellular dysfunction giving rise to different diseases. This way, several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson Huntington diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are caused. Misfolding of the protein is prevented by innate molecular chaperones of different classes. It is envisaged that work on this line is likely to translate the knowledge into the development of possible strategies for early diagnosis and efficient management of such related human diseases. The present review deals with the human neurodegenerative diseases caused due to the protein misfolding highlighting pathomechanisms and therapeutic intervention.

  1. Enteral delivery of proteins enhances the expression of proteins involved in the cytoskeleton and protein biosynthesis in human duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Goichon, Alexis; Bertrand, Julien; Chan, Philippe; Lecleire, Stéphane; Coquard, Aude; Cailleux, Anne-Françoise; Vaudry, David; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2015-08-01

    Amino acids are well known to be key effectors of gut protein turnover. We recently reported that enteral delivery of proteins markedly stimulated global duodenal protein synthesis in carbohydrate-fed healthy humans, but specifically affected proteins remain unknown. We aimed to assess the influence of an enteral protein supply on the duodenal mucosal proteome in carbohydrate-fed humans. Six healthy volunteers received for 5 h, on 2 occasions and in random order, either an enteral infusion of maltodextrins alone (0.25 g · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) mimicking the fed state or maltodextrins with a protein powder (0.14 g proteins · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹). Endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were then collected and frozen until analysis. A 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics analysis was then performed, and differentially expressed proteins (at least ±1.5-fold change; Student's t test, P < 0.05) were identified by mass spectrometry. Protein expression changes were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Thirty-two protein spots were differentially expressed after protein delivery compared with maltodextrins alone: 28 and 4 spots were up- or downregulated, respectively. Among the 22 identified proteins, 11 upregulated proteins were involved either in the cytoskeleton (ezrin, moesin, plastin 1, lamin B1, vimentin, and β-actin) or in protein biosynthesis (glutamyl-prolyl-transfer RNA synthetase, glutaminyl-transfer RNA synthetase, elongation factor 2, elongation factor 1δ, and eukaryotic translation and initiation factor 3 subunit f). Enteral delivery of proteins altered the duodenal mucosal proteome and mainly stimulated the expression of proteins involved in cytoskeleton and protein biosynthesis. These results suggest that protein supply may affect intestinal morphology by stimulating actin cytoskeleton remodeling. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Human Proteinpedia enables sharing of human protein data

    SciTech Connect

    Mathivanan, Suresh; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ahn, Natalie G.; Alexandre, Hainard; Amanchy, Ramars; Andrews, Philip C.; Bader, Joel S.; Balgley, Brian M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Bennett, Keiryn; Bjorling, Erik; Blagoev, Blagoy; Bose , Ron; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Burlingame, Alma S.; Bustelo, Xos R.; Cagney, Gerard; Cantin, Greg T; Cardasis, Helene L; Celis, Julio E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chu, Feixia; Cole, Phillip A.; Costello, Catherine E; Cotter , Robert J.; Crockett, David; DeLany , James P.; De Marzo, Angelo M; DeSouza, Leroi V; Deutsch, Eric W.; Dransfield , Eric; Drewes , Gerard; Droit , Arnaud; Dunn, Michael; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo; Ewing, Rob M.; Van Eyk , Jennifer; Faca , Vitor; Falkner , Jayson; Fang, Xiangming; Fenselau , Catherine; Figeys , Daniel; Gagne , Pierre; Gelfi , Cecilia; Gevaert , Kris; Gimble , Jeffrey; Gnad , Florian; Goel, Renu; Gromov , Pavel; Hanash, Samir M.; Hancock, William S.; Harsha , HC; Hart , Gerald; Faith , Hays; He , Fuchu; Hebbar , Prashantha; Helsens , Kenny; Hermeking , Heiko; Hide , Winston; Hjerno, Karin; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Hofmann, Oliver; Horn , David M.; Hruban , Ralph H.; Ibarrola , Nieves; James , Peter; Jensen , Ole N.; Jensen, Pia H.; Jung , Peter; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Kheterpal , Indu; Kikuno , Reiko; Korf, Ulrike; Korner, Roman; Kuster, Bernhard; Kwon , Min-Seok; Lee , Hyoung-Joo; Lee , Young - Jin; Lefevre , Michael; Lehvaslaiho, Minna; Lescuyer, Pierre; Levander, Fredrik; Lim, Megan S.; Lobke, Christian; Loo, Joseph; Mann, Matthias; Martens , Lennart; Martinez-Heredia, Juan; McComb, Mark E.; McRedmond , James; Mehrle, Alexander; Menon, Rajasree; Miller, Christine A.; Mischak, Harald; Mohan, S Sujatha; Mohmood , Riaz; Molina , Henrik; Moran , Michael F.; Morgan, James D.; Moritz , Robert; Morzel, Martine; Muddiman, David C.; Nalli , Anuradha; Navarro, J. D.; Neubert , Thomas A.; Ohara , Osamu; Oliva, Rafael; Omenn, Gilbert; Oyama , Masaaki; Paik, Young-Ki; Pennington , Kyla; Pepperkok, Rainer; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Poirier, Guy G.; Prasad, T S Keshava; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rahiman , B Abdul; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Ramachandra , Y L; Rice, Robert H.; Rick , Jens; Ronnholm , Ragna H.; Salonen , Johanna; Sanchez , Jean - Charles; Sayd , Thierry; Seshi, Beerelli; Shankari, Kripa; Sheng , Shi Jun; Shetty , Vivekananda; Shivakumar, K.; Simpson, Richard J.; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Siu , K W Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Richard D.; States, David J.; Sugano, Sumio; Sullivan , Matthew; Superti - Furga, Giulio; Takatalo , Maarit; Thongboonkerd , Visith; Trinidad , Jonathan C.; Uhlen , Mathias; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Vasilescu , Julian; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Vidal - Taboada, Jose - Manuel; Vihinen, Mauno; Wait , Robin; Wang, Xiaoyue; Wiemann, Stefan; Wu , Billy; Xu, Tao; Yates, John R.; Zhong, Jun; Zhou, Ming; Zhu, Yunping; Zurbig, Petra; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-02-01

    Proteomic technologies, such as yeast twohybrid, mass spectrometry (MS), protein/ peptide arrays and fluorescence microscopy, yield multi-dimensional data sets, which are often quite large and either not published or published as supplementary information that is not easily searchable. Without a system in place for standardizing and sharing data, it is not fruitful for the biomedical community to contribute these types of data to centralized repositories. Even more difficult is the annotation and display of pertinent information in the context of the corresponding proteins. Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia that anyone can edit, has already proven quite successful1 and can be used as a model for sharing biological data. However, the need for experimental evidence, data standardization and ownership of data creates scientific obstacles.

  3. Large scale analysis of protein stability in OMIM disease related human protein variants.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fariselli, Piero; Savojardo, Castrense; Babbi, Giulia; Aggazio, Francesco; Casadio, Rita

    2016-06-23

    Modern genomic techniques allow to associate several Mendelian human diseases to single residue variations in different proteins. Molecular mechanisms explaining the relationship among genotype and phenotype are still under debate. Change of protein stability upon variation appears to assume a particular relevance in annotating whether a single residue substitution can or cannot be associated to a given disease. Thermodynamic properties of human proteins and of their disease related variants are lacking. In the present work, we take advantage of the available three dimensional structure of human proteins for predicting the role of disease related variations on the perturbation of protein stability. We develop INPS3D, a new predictor based on protein structure for computing the effect of single residue variations on protein stability (ΔΔG), scoring at the state-of-the-art (Pearson's correlation value of the regression is equal to 0.72 with mean standard error of 1.15 kcal/mol on a blind test set comprising 351 variations in 60 proteins). We then filter 368 OMIM disease related proteins known with atomic resolution (where the three dimensional structure covers at least 70 % of the sequence) with 4717 disease related single residue variations and 685 polymorphisms without clinical consequence. We find that the effect on protein stability of disease related variations is larger than the effect of polymorphisms: in particular, by setting to |1 kcal/mol| the threshold between perturbing and not perturbing variations of the protein stability, about 44 % of disease related variations and 20 % of polymorphisms are predicted with |ΔΔG| > 1 kcal/mol, respectively. A consistent fraction of OMIM disease related variations is however predicted to promote |ΔΔG| ≤ 1 kcal/mol and we focus here on detecting features that can be associated to the thermodynamic property of the protein variant. Our analysis reveals that some 47 % of disease related variations

  4. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Human Coronavirus NL63

    PubMed Central

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV. PMID:25700263

  5. Molecular interactions of graphene oxide with human blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenry, Affa Affb Affc; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and human blood plasma proteins. To gain an insight into the bio-physico-chemical activity of GO in biological and biomedical applications, we performed a series of biophysical assays to quantify the molecular interactions between GO with different lateral size distributions and the three essential human blood plasma proteins. We elucidate the various aspects of the GO-protein interactions, particularly, the adsorption, binding kinetics and equilibrium, and conformational stability, through determination of quantitative parameters, such as GO-protein association constants, binding cooperativity, and the binding-driven protein structural changes. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions between GO and plasma proteins are significantly dependent on the lateral size distribution and mean lateral sizes of the GO nanosheets and their subtle variations may markedly influence the GO-protein interactions. Consequently, we propose the existence of size-dependent molecular interactions between GO nanosheets and plasma proteins, and importantly, the presence of specific critical mean lateral sizes of GO nanosheets in achieving very high association and fluorescence quenching efficiency of the plasma proteins. We anticipate that this work will provide a basis for the design of graphene-based and other related nanomaterials for a plethora of biological and biomedical applications.

  6. Canola Proteins for Human Consumption: Extraction, Profile, and Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siong H; Mailer, Rodney J; Blanchard, Christopher L; Agboola, Samson O

    2011-01-01

    Canola protein isolate has been suggested as an alternative to other proteins for human food use due to a balanced amino acid profile and potential functional properties such as emulsifying, foaming, and gelling abilities. This is, therefore, a review of the studies on the utilization of canola protein in human food, comprising the extraction processes for protein isolates and fractions, the molecular character of the extracted proteins, as well as their food functional properties. A majority of studies were based on proteins extracted from the meal using alkaline solution, presumably due to its high nitrogen yield, followed by those utilizing salt extraction combined with ultrafiltration. Characteristics of canola and its predecessor rapeseed protein fractions such as nitrogen yield, molecular weight profile, isoelectric point, solubility, and thermal properties have been reported and were found to be largely related to the extraction methods. However, very little research has been carried out on the hydrophobicity and structure profiles of the protein extracts that are highly relevant to a proper understanding of food functional properties. Alkaline extracts were generally not very suitable as functional ingredients and contradictory results about many of the measured properties of canola proteins, especially their emulsification tendencies, have also been documented. Further research into improved extraction methods is recommended, as is a more systematic approach to the measurement of desired food functional properties for valid comparison between studies. PMID:21535703

  7. Development of a full-length human protein production pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin; Petritis, Brianne; Sau, Sujay; Rauf, Femina; Gaskin, Michael; Ober-Reynolds, Benjamin; Mineyev, Irina; Magee, Mitch; Chaput, John; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    There are many proteomic applications that require large collections of purified protein, but parallel production of large numbers of different proteins remains a very challenging task. To help meet the needs of the scientific community, we have developed a human protein production pipeline. Using high-throughput (HT) methods, we transferred the genes of 31 full-length proteins into three expression vectors, and expressed the collection as N-terminal HaloTag fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and two commercial cell-free (CF) systems, wheat germ extract (WGE) and HeLa cell extract (HCE). Expression was assessed by labeling the fusion proteins specifically and covalently with a fluorescent HaloTag ligand and detecting its fluorescence on a LabChip® GX microfluidic capillary gel electrophoresis instrument. This automated, HT assay provided both qualitative and quantitative assessment of recombinant protein. E. coli was only capable of expressing 20% of the test collection in the supernatant fraction with ≥20 μg yields, whereas CF systems had ≥83% success rates. We purified expressed proteins using an automated HaloTag purification method. We purified 20, 33, and 42% of the test collection from E. coli, WGE, and HCE, respectively, with yields ≥1 μg and ≥90% purity. Based on these observations, we have developed a triage strategy for producing full-length human proteins in these three expression systems. PMID:24806540

  8. The nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV.

  9. Homology between a human protein and a protein of the green garden pea.

    PubMed

    Lee, P; Kuhl, W; Gelbart, T; Kamimura, T; West, C; Beutler, E

    1994-05-15

    In screening a rat mucosa cDNA subtraction library, a clone that exhibited a remarkable degree of homology with a previously described cDNA from the green garden pea, designated the 26g pea turgor protein, was found. A partial cDNA sequence from rat and a complete cDNA sequence from human were obtained. The deduced human protein had a molecular weight of 55,285 and was designated antiquitin because of its remarkable level of conservation through evolution. Human antiquitin was 60% homologous to the green pea 26g with only a single amino acid gap in each sequence. The 66 amino acids at the carboxyl ends of the human antiquitin and pea 26g proteins were 86% identical, and one segment of 52 amino acids was 92% identical. A similar partial sequence encoding 164 amino acids has been detected in Caenorhabditis elegans. Yeast DNA was found to have sequences that hybridize with a human antiquitin probe on Southern blotting. Analysis of the amount of mRNA in various rat and human tissues indicated that the largest amounts were found in rat kidney and liver and in cultured human hepatoma cells. Only minimal amounts were detected in human peripheral blood leukocytes, rat lung, or cultured human fibroblasts. Attempts to induce the mRNA by heat-shock, dehydration, ionizing irradiation, or treatment with iron, t-butylhydroperoxide, or glucocorticoids were unsuccessful. The function of the protein remains unknown.

  10. Exceptional overproduction of a functional human membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nyblom, Maria; Oberg, Fredrik; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Hallgren, Karin; Findlay, Heather; Wikström, Jennie; Karlsson, Anders; Hansson, Orjan; Booth, Paula J; Bill, Roslyn M; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2007-11-01

    Eukaryotic--especially human--membrane protein overproduction remains a major challenge in biochemistry. Heterologously overproduced and purified proteins provide a starting point for further biochemical, biophysical and structural studies, and the lack of sufficient quantities of functional membrane proteins is frequently a bottleneck hindering this. Here, we report exceptionally high production levels of a correctly folded and crystallisable recombinant human integral membrane protein in its active form; human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) has been heterologously produced in the membranes of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. After solubilisation and a two step purification procedure, at least 90 mg hAQP1 per liter of culture is obtained. Water channel activity of this purified hAQP1 was verified by reconstitution into proteoliposomes and performing stopped-flow vesicle shrinkage measurements. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of hAQP1 in crude membrane preparations, and also from purified protein reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Furthermore, crystallisation screens yielded diffraction quality crystals of untagged recombinant hAQP1. This study illustrates the power of the yeast P. pastoris as a host to produce exceptionally high yields of a functionally active, human integral membrane protein for subsequent functional and structural characterization.

  11. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  12. Systems Proteomics View of the Endogenous Human Claudin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S.; Lundberg, Emma K.; Beavis, Ronald C.; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L.; Baker, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein–protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation. PMID:26680015

  13. Crystal cataracts: Human genetic cataract caused by protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Ajay; Pande, Jayanti; Asherie, Neer; Lomakin, Aleksey; Ogun, Olutayo; King, Jonathan; Benedek, George B.

    2001-05-01

    Several human genetic cataracts have been linked recently to point mutations in the D crystallin gene. Here we provide a molecular basis for lens opacity in two genetic cataracts and suggest that the opacity occurs because of the spontaneous crystallization of the mutant proteins. Such crystallization of endogenous proteins leading to pathology is an unusual event. Measurements of the solubility curves of crystals of the Arg-58 to His and Arg-36 to Ser mutants of D crystallin show that the mutations dramatically lower the solubility of the protein. Furthermore, the crystal nucleation rate of the mutants is enhanced considerably relative to that of the wild-type protein. It should be noted that, although there is a marked difference in phase behavior, there is no significant difference in protein conformation among the three proteins.

  14. DNA helicase activity in purified human RECQL4 protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Ishimi, Yukio

    2009-09-01

    Human RECQL4 protein was expressed in insect cells using a baculovirus protein expression system and it was purified to near homogeneity. The protein sedimented at a position between catalase (230 kDa) and ferritin (440 kDa) in glycerol gradient centrifugation, suggesting that it forms homo-multimers. Activity to displace annealed 17-mer oligonucleotide in the presence of ATP was co-sedimented with hRECQL4 protein. In ion-exchange chromatography, both DNA helicase activity and single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase activity were co-eluted with hRECQL4 protein. The requirements of ATP and Mg for the helicase activity were different from those for the ATPase activity. The data suggest that the helicase migrates on single-stranded DNA in a 3'-5' direction. These results suggest that the hRECQL4 protein exhibits DNA helicase activity.

  15. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    PubMed

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  16. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans.

    PubMed

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars; Kristiansen, Troels Z; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Surendranath, Vineeth; Niranjan, Vidya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T K B; Gronborg, Mads; Ibarrola, Nieves; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K; Shivashankar, H N; Rashmi, B P; Ramya, M A; Zhao, Zhixing; Chandrika, K N; Padma, N; Harsha, H C; Yatish, A J; Kavitha, M P; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Suresh, Shubha; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R; Chandran, Sreenath; Krishna, Subhalakshmi; Joy, Mary; Anand, Sanjeev K; Madavan, V; Joseph, Ansamma; Wong, Guang W; Schiemann, William P; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Huang, Lily; Khosravi-Far, Roya; Steen, Hanno; Tewari, Muneesh; Ghaffari, Saghi; Blobe, Gerard C; Dang, Chi V; Garcia, Joe G N; Pevsner, Jonathan; Jensen, Ole N; Roepstorff, Peter; Deshpande, Krishna S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Hamosh, Ada; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-10-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This database, which has an intuitive query interface allowing easy access to all the features of proteins, was built by using open source technologies and will be freely available at http://www.hprd.org to the academic community. This unified bioinformatics platform will be useful in cataloging and mining the large number of proteomic interactions and alterations that will be discovered in the postgenomic era.

  17. Development of Human Protein Reference Database as an Initial Platform for Approaching Systems Biology in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Surendranath, Vineeth; Niranjan, Vidya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T.K.B.; Gronborg, Mads; Ibarrola, Nieves; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K.; Shivashankar, H.N.; Rashmi, B.P.; Ramya, M.A.; Zhao, Zhixing; Chandrika, K.N.; Padma, N.; Harsha, H.C.; Yatish, A.J.; Kavitha, M.P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Suresh, Shubha; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Krishna, Subhalakshmi; Joy, Mary; Anand, Sanjeev K.; Madavan, V.; Joseph, Ansamma; Wong, Guang W.; Schiemann, William P.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Huang, Lily; Khosravi-Far, Roya; Steen, Hanno; Tewari, Muneesh; Ghaffari, Saghi; Blobe, Gerard C.; Dang, Chi V.; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Pevsner, Jonathan; Jensen, Ole N.; Roepstorff, Peter; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Hamosh, Ada; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This database, which has an intuitive query interface allowing easy access to all the features of proteins, was built by using open source technologies and will be freely available at http://www.hprd.org to the academic community. This unified bioinformatics platform will be useful in cataloging and mining the large number of proteomic interactions and alterations that will be discovered in the postgenomic era. PMID:14525934

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  19. Human Protein Atlas of redox systems - what can be learnt?

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Pascal; Arnér, Elias S J

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput screening projects are popular approaches to yield a vast amount of information amenable for database mining and "hypothesis generation". The keys to success for these approaches depend upon the quality of primary data, choice of algorithms for data analyses, solidity in data annotations and the general usefulness of the results. A large initiative aimed at mapping the expression of all human proteins is the Human Protein Atlas (www.proteinatlas.org), encompassing immunohistochemical analyses of human tissues utilizing antibodies raised against a large number of human proteins. Here, we wished to probe what could be learnt from this atlas using a manual in-depth analysis of the results regarding the expression of key proteins in the human glutathione and thioredoxin systems. The freely available on-line data of immunohistochemical analyses for selected human redox proteins within the Human Protein Atlas were here analyzed, provided that reasonably solid data existed for the antibodies that were employed. This included tissue expression data for thioredoxin 1 (Trx1), Trx2, thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), TrxR2, glutathione reductase (GR), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), γ-glutamyl cysteinyl synthase (gGCS) and the six peroxiredoxins Prx1 to Prx6. The data were further complemented with a screen using a polyclonal peptide antibody raised against the unique glutaredoxin domain of TXNRD1_v3 ("v3"). The results from fifteen major tissues and organs are presented (lung, kidney, liver, lymph node, testis, prostate, ovary, breast, pancreas, cerebellum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, skin, skeletal muscle and heart muscle) and discussed considering earlier findings described in the literature. Staining patterns proved to be highly variable and often unexpected both in terms of tissues analyzed and the individual target proteins. Among the analyzed tissues, only macrophages of the lung, tubular cells of the kidney, lymphoid cells of lymph nodes

  20. Exploiting Bacterial Operons To Illuminate Human Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Banci, Lucia; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Organisms from all kingdoms of life use iron-sulfur proteins (FeS-Ps) in a multitude of functional processes. We applied a bioinformatics approach to investigate the human portfolio of FeS-Ps. Sixty-one percent of human FeS-Ps bind Fe4S4 clusters, whereas 39% bind Fe2S2 clusters. However, this relative ratio varies significantly depending on the specific cellular compartment. We compared the portfolio of human FeS-Ps to 12 other eukaryotes and to about 700 prokaryotes. The comparative analysis of the organization of the prokaryotic homologues of human FeS-Ps within operons allowed us to reconstruct the human functional networks involving the conserved FeS-Ps common to prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These functional networks have been maintained during evolution and thus presumably represent fundamental cellular processes. The respiratory chain and the ISC machinery for FeS-P biogenesis are the two conserved processes that involve the majority of human FeS-Ps. Purine metabolism is another process including several FeS-Ps, in which BOLA proteins possibly have a regulatory role. The analysis of the co-occurrence of human FeS-Ps with other proteins highlighted numerous links between the iron-sulfur cluster machinery and the response mechanisms to cell damage, from repair to apoptosis. This relationship probably relates to the production of reactive oxygen species within the biogenesis and degradation of FeS-Ps.

  1. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron-containing) rp genes is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes elsewhere in the genome. To date, we have assigned (or confirmed the previous assignment of) 38 rp genes to individual human chromosomes by PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids containing subsets of human chromosomes, with all but four chromosomes carrying at least one rp gene. We have also identified more than 100 large-insert human YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones that contain individual rp genes. Such screening of YAC libraries will result in precise positioning of the rp genes on the emerging physical map of the human genome.

  2. Informing the Human Plasma Protein Binding of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The free fraction of a xenobiotic in plasma (Fub) is an important determinant of chemical adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity, yet experimental plasma protein binding data is scarce for environmentally relevant chemicals. The presented work explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to predict Fub for environmentally relevant chemicals via machine learning techniques. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were constructed with k nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machines (SVM), and random forest (RF) machine learning algorithms from a training set of 1045 pharmaceuticals. The models were then evaluated with independent test sets of pharmaceuticals (200 compounds) and environmentally relevant ToxCast chemicals (406 total, in two groups of 238 and 168 compounds). The selection of a minimal feature set of 10-15 2D molecular descriptors allowed for both informative feature interpretation and practical applicability domain assessment via a bounded box of descriptor ranges and principal component analysis. The diverse pharmaceutical and environmental chemical sets exhibit similarities in terms of chemical space (99-82% overlap), as well as comparable bias and variance in constructed learning curves. All the models exhibit significant predictability with mean absolute errors (MAE) in the range of 0.10-0.18 Fub. The models performed best for highly bound chemicals (MAE 0.07-0.12), neutrals (MAE 0

  3. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-06

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5' and 3' untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5' untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3' untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels.

  4. Studies of alpha-granule proteins in cultured human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Dragoslava Kika; Cramer, Elisabeth M; Alimardani, Gulie; Fichelson, Serge; Massé, Jean-Marc; Hayward, Catherine P M

    2003-11-01

    alpha-Granule protein storage is important for producing platelets with normal haemostatic function. The low to undetectable levels of several megakaryocyte-synthesized alpha-granule proteins in normal plasma suggest megakaryocytes are important to sequester these proteins in vivo. alpha-Granule protein storage in vitro has been studied using other cell types, with differences observed in how some proteins are processed compared to platelets. Human megakaryocytes, cultured from cord blood CD34(+) cells and grown in serum-free media containing thrombopoietin, were investigated to determine if they could be used as a model for studying normal alpha-granule protein processing and storage. ELISA indicated that cultured megakaryocytes contained the alpha-granule proteins multimerin, von Willebrand factor, thrombospondin-1, beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4, but no detectable fibrinogen and factor V. A significant proportion of the alpha-granule protein in megakaryocyte cultures was contained within the cells (averages: 41-71 %), consistent with storage. Detailed analyses of multimerin and von Willebrand factor confirmed that alpha-granule proteins were processed to mature forms and were predominantly located in the alpha-granules of cultured megakaryocytes.Thrombopoietin-stimulated cultured megakaryocytes provide a useful model for studying alpha-granule protein processing and storage.

  5. Dietary protein oxidation: A silent threat to human health?

    PubMed

    Estévez, M; Luna, C

    2017-11-22

    Protein oxidation has become a topic of great scientific interest in the field of food science and nutrition. Food proteins are known to be preferential targets of radical species, and protein oxidation has relevant consequences on protein functionality and food quality. Current trends in this field call attention to the nutritional and health dimensions of oxidized foods. Both lipid and protein oxidation products are accumulated in food during processing and storage and also upon food intake during the subsequent digestion phases. The gastrointestinal tract and internal organs are exposed to the cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of these species. While the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of particular dietary lipid oxidation products is well known, the impact of dietary oxidized proteins on human health has been largely ignored. The well-established association between in vivo protein oxidation and aging and age-related diseases urges scientists to investigate the contribution of dietary protein oxidation to particular pathological conditions. Recent reports indicate the involvement of dietary protein oxidation species on particular health disorders, which emphasizes the link between dietary and in vivo protein oxidation.

  6. Are animal models predictive for human postmortem muscle protein degradation?

    PubMed

    Ehrenfellner, Bianca; Zissler, Angela; Steinbacher, Peter; Monticelli, Fabio C; Pittner, Stefan

    2017-07-18

    A most precise determination of the postmortem interval (PMI) is a crucial aspect in forensic casework. Although there are diverse approaches available to date, the high heterogeneity of cases together with the respective postmortal changes often limit the validity and sufficiency of many methods. Recently, a novel approach for time since death estimation by the analysis of postmortal changes of muscle proteins was proposed. It is however necessary to improve the reliability and accuracy, especially by analysis of possible influencing factors on protein degradation. This is ideally investigated on standardized animal models that, however, require legitimization by a comparison of human and animal tissue, and in this specific case of protein degradation profiles. Only if protein degradation events occur in comparable fashion within different species, respective findings can sufficiently be transferred from the animal model to application in humans. Therefor samples from two frequently used animal models (mouse and pig), as well as forensic cases with representative protein profiles of highly differing PMIs were analyzed. Despite physical and physiological differences between species, western blot analysis revealed similar patterns in most of the investigated proteins. Even most degradation events occurred in comparable fashion. In some other aspects, however, human and animal profiles depicted distinct differences. The results of this experimental series clearly indicate the huge importance of comparative studies, whenever animal models are considered. Although animal models could be shown to reflect the basic principles of protein degradation processes in humans, we also gained insight in the difficulties and limitations of the applicability of the developed methodology in different mammalian species regarding protein specificity and methodic functionality.

  7. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Summary AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post translational modification employed by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes and is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method to identify new substrates using protein microarrays, which can significantly expand the list of potential substrates. Here, we describe procedures to detect AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high throughput, and non-radioactive manner. The approach employs high-density protein microarrays fabricated using NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The assay can be accomplished within 11 hours. PMID:25881200

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human protein interaction database at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Fu, William; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Katz, Kenneth S; Maglott, Donna R; Pruitt, Kim D; Ptak, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Protein Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/HIVInteractions, was created to catalog all interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins published in the peer-reviewed literature. The database serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. To facilitate this discovery approach, the following information for each HIV-1 human protein interaction is provided and can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, Entrez Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. Currently, 2589 unique HIV-1 to human protein interactions and 5135 brief descriptions of the interactions, with a total of 14,312 PMID references to the original articles reporting the interactions, are stored in this growing database. In addition, all protein-protein interactions documented in the database are integrated into Entrez Gene records and listed in the 'HIV-1 protein interactions' section of Entrez Gene reports. The database is also tightly linked to other databases through Entrez Gene, enabling users to search for an abundance of information related to HIV pathogenesis and replication.

  9. Viral proteins that bridge unconnected proteins and components in the human PPI network.

    PubMed

    Rachita, H R; Nagarajaram, H A

    2014-07-29

    Viruses, despite having small genomes and few proteins, make an array of interactions with host proteins as they solely depend on host machinery for their replication and reproduction. Hence, analysis of the Human-Virus Protein-Protein Interaction Network (Hu-Vir PPI network) helps us to gain certain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the hijacking of host cell machinery by viruses for their perpetuation. Here we report an analysis of the Human-Virus Bridged PPI Networks that has led us to identify viral articulation points (VAPs) which connect unconnected components of the Human-PPI (Hu-PPI) network. VAPs cross-link peripheral nodes to the giant component of the Hu-PPI network. VAPs interact with a number of relatively lower topologically central human proteins and are conserved among related viruses. The linked nodes comprise of those that are mostly expressed during viral infection, as well as those that are found exclusively in some metabolic pathways, indicating that the novel viral mediation of certain human protein-protein interactions may form the basis for virus-specific tuning of the host machinery. The functional importance of VAPs and their interaction partners in virus replication make them potential drug targets against viral infection. Our investigations also led to the discovery of an example of a Human Endogenous Retrovirus (HERV) encoded protein, syncytin, as an Articulation Point (AP) in the Hu-PPI network, suggesting that VAPs may be retained in a genome if they result in any beneficial function in the host.

  10. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  11. Transduction of human recombinant proteins into mitochondria as a protein therapeutic approach for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S

    2011-11-01

    Protein therapy is considered an alternative approach to gene therapy for treatment of genetic-metabolic disorders. Human protein therapeutics (PTs), developed via recombinant DNA technology and used for the treatment of these illnesses, act upon membrane-bound receptors to achieve their pharmacological response. On the contrary, proteins that normally act inside the cells cannot be developed as PTs in the conventional way, since they are not able to "cross" the plasma membrane. Furthermore, in mitochondrial disorders, attributed either to depleted or malfunctioned mitochondrial proteins, PTs should also have to reach the subcellular mitochondria to exert their therapeutic potential. Nowadays, there is no effective therapy for mitochondrial disorders. The development of PTs, however, via the Protein Transduction Domain (PTD) technology offered new opportunities for the deliberate delivery of human recombinant proteins inside eukaryotic subcellular organelles. To this end, mitochondrial disorders could be clinically encountered with the delivery of human mitochondrial proteins (engineered via recombinant DNA and PTD technologies) at specific intramitochondrial sites to exert their function. Overall, PTD-mediated Protein Replacement Therapy emerges as a suitable model system for the therapeutic approach for mitochondrial disorders.

  12. Expansion of the Protein Repertoire in Newly Explored Environments: Human Gut Microbiome Specific Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Ellrott, Kyle; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Li, Weizhong; Wooley, John C.; Godzik, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The microbes that inhabit particular environments must be able to perform molecular functions that provide them with a competitive advantage to thrive in those environments. As most molecular functions are performed by proteins and are conserved between related proteins, we can expect that organisms successful in a given environmental niche would contain protein families that are specific for functions that are important in that environment. For instance, the human gut is rich in polysaccharides from the diet or secreted by the host, and is dominated by Bacteroides, whose genomes contain highly expanded repertoire of protein families involved in carbohydrate metabolism. To identify other protein families that are specific to this environment, we investigated the distribution of protein families in the currently available human gut genomic and metagenomic data. Using an automated procedure, we identified a group of protein families strongly overrepresented in the human gut. These not only include many families described previously but also, interestingly, a large group of previously unrecognized protein families, which suggests that we still have much to discover about this environment. The identification and analysis of these families could provide us with new information about an environment critical to our health and well being. PMID:20532204

  13. N-Linked glycoengineering for human therapeutic proteins in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pandhal, Jagroop; Wright, Phillip C

    2010-09-01

    Approx. 70% of human therapeutic proteins are N-linked glycoproteins, and therefore host cells for production must contain the relevant protein modification machinery. The discovery and characterisation of the N-linked glycosylation pathway in the pathogenic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni, and subsequently its functional transfer to Escherichia coli, presents the opportunity of using prokaryotes as cell factories for therapeutic protein production. Not only could bacteria reduce costs and increase yields, but the improved feasibility to genetically control microorganisms means new and improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics is an exciting possibility. This is a relatively new concept, and progress in bacterial N-glycosylation characterisation is reviewed and metabolic engineering targets revealed.

  14. Human muscle proteins: analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1983-09-01

    Proteins from single frozen sections of human muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detected by fluorography or Coomassie Blue staining. The major proteins were identical in different normal muscles obtained from either sex at different ages, and in Duchenne and myotonic dystrophy samples. Congenital myopathy denervation atrophy, polymyositis, and Becker's muscular dystrophy samples, however, showed abnormal myosin light chain compositions, some with a decrease of fast-fiber myosin light chains and others with a decrease of slow-fiber light chains. These protein alterations did not correlate with any specific disease, and may be cause by generalized muscle-fiber damage.

  15. Protein kinase Cι: human oncogene, prognostic marker and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Alan P.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2009-01-01

    The Protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been the subject of intensive study in the field of cancer since their initial discovery as major cellular receptors for the tumor promoting phorbol esters nearly thirty years ago. However, despite these efforts, the search for a direct genetic link between members of the PKC family and human cancer has yielded only circumstantial evidence that any PKC isozyme is a true cancer gene. This situation changed in the past year with the discovery that atypical protein kinase C iota (PKCι) is a bonafide human oncogene. PKCι is required for the transformed growth of human cancer cells and the PKCι gene is the target of tumor-specific gene amplification in multiple forms of human cancer. PKCι participates in multiple aspects of the transformed phenotype of human cancer cells including transformed growth, invasion and survival. Herein, we review pertinent aspects of atypical PKC structure, function and regulation that relate to the role of these enzymes in oncogenesis. We discuss the evidence that PKCι is a human oncogene, review mechanisms controlling PKCι expression in human cancers, and describe the molecular details of PKCι-mediated oncogenic signaling. We conclude with a discussion of how oncogenic PKCι signaling has been successfully targeted to identify a novel, mechanism-based therapeutic drug currently entering clinical trials for treatment of human lung cancer. Throughout, we identify key unanswered questions and exciting future avenues of investigation regarding this important oncogenic molecule. PMID:17570678

  16. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-19

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein-pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism.

  17. Chemoproteomic profiling and discovery of protein electrophiles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Megan L.; He, Lin; Horning, Benjamin D.; Olson, Erika J.; Correia, Bruno E.; Yates, John R.; Dawson, Philip E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-10-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) serves as a chemical proteomic platform to discover and characterize functional amino acids in proteins on the basis of their enhanced reactivity towards small-molecule probes. This approach, to date, has mainly targeted nucleophilic functional groups, such as the side chains of serine and cysteine, using electrophilic probes. Here we show that 'reverse-polarity' (RP)-ABPP using clickable, nucleophilic hydrazine probes can capture and identify protein-bound electrophiles in cells. Using this approach, we demonstrate that the pyruvoyl cofactor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (AMD1) is dynamically controlled by intracellular methionine concentrations. We also identify a heretofore unknown modification—an N-terminally bound glyoxylyl group—in the poorly characterized protein secernin-3. RP-ABPP thus provides a versatile method to monitor the metabolic regulation of electrophilic cofactors and discover novel types of electrophilic modifications on proteins in human cells.

  18. ABC proteins protect the human body and maintain optimal health.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2011-01-01

    Human MDR1, a multi-drug transporter gene, was isolated as the first of the eukaryote ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) proteins from a multidrug-resistant carcinoma cell line in 1986. To date, over 25 years, many ABC proteins have been found to play important physiological roles by transporting hydrophobic compounds. Defects in their functions cause various diseases, indicating that endogenous hydrophobic compounds, as well as water-soluble compounds, are properly transported by transmembrane proteins. MDR1 transports a large number of structurally unrelated drugs and is involved in their pharmacokinetics, and thus is a key factor in drug interaction. ABCA1, an ABC protein, eliminates excess cholesterol in peripheral cells by generating HDL. Because ABCA1 is a key molecule in cholesterol homeostasis, its function and expression are highly regulated. Eukaryote ABC proteins function on the body surface facing the outside and in organ pathways to adapt to the extracellular environment and protect the body to maintain optimal health.

  19. Chemoproteomic profiling and discovery of protein electrophiles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Megan L.; He, Lin; Horning, Benjamin D.; Olson, Erika J.; Correia, Bruno E.; Yates, John R.; Dawson, Philip E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2017-03-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) serves as a chemical proteomic platform to discover and characterize functional amino acids in proteins on the basis of their enhanced reactivity towards small-molecule probes. This approach, to date, has mainly targeted nucleophilic functional groups, such as the side chains of serine and cysteine, using electrophilic probes. Here we show that 'reverse-polarity' (RP)-ABPP using clickable, nucleophilic hydrazine probes can capture and identify protein-bound electrophiles in cells. Using this approach, we demonstrate that the pyruvoyl cofactor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (AMD1) is dynamically controlled by intracellular methionine concentrations. We also identify a heretofore unknown modification—an N-terminally bound glyoxylyl group—in the poorly characterized protein secernin-3. RP-ABPP thus provides a versatile method to monitor the metabolic regulation of electrophilic cofactors and discover novel types of electrophilic modifications on proteins in human cells.

  20. Biotechnology: alternatives to human plasma-derived therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T J

    2000-12-01

    Proteins derived from human plasma have become critically important therapeutic products since their introduction in the 1940s. In the last 20 years, the tools of molecular biology have provided alternatives to the administration of the natural products. Recombinant analogues of Factor VIII and Factor IX are commercially available, and recombinant forms of other plasma proteins are under development. Genetic engineering also provides the opportunity to modify a natural protein to improve the efficiency with which it can be produced in vitro, or to change its therapeutic profile. More efficient production systems, such as transgenic plants or animals, may yield less costly therapies and a wider availability of products that are now in limited supply. Finally, gene therapy offers the prospect of permanently correcting conditions arising from deficiencies in any one of several plasma proteins, freeing individuals from the need to undergo periodic treatments with exogenous proteins. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  1. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Koski, Raymond A; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  2. Characterization of the human GARP (Golgi associated retrograde protein) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liewen, Heike; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Oliveira, Vasco; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Luo Guorong; Wadle, Andreas; Jung, Martin; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Stenner-Liewen, Frank . E-mail: stenlie@t-online.de

    2005-05-15

    The Golgi associated retrograde protein complex (GARP) or Vps fifty-three (VFT) complex is part of cellular inter-compartmental transport systems. Here we report the identification of the VFT tethering factor complex and its interactions in mammalian cells. Subcellular fractionation shows that human Vps proteins are found in the smooth membrane/Golgi fraction but not in the cytosol. Immunostaining of human Vps proteins displays a vesicular distribution most concentrated at the perinuclear envelope. Co-staining experiments with endosomal markers imply an endosomal origin of these vesicles. Significant accumulation of VFT complex positive endosomes is found in the vicinity of the Trans Golgi Network area. This is in accordance with a putative role in Golgi associated transport processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, GARP is the main effector of the small GTPase Ypt6p and interacts with the SNARE Tlg1p to facilitate membrane fusion. Accordingly, the human homologue of Ypt6p, Rab6, specifically binds hVps52. In human cells, the 'orphan' SNARE Syntaxin 10 is the genuine binding partner of GARP mediated by hVps52. This reveals a previously unknown function of human Syntaxin 10 in membrane docking and fusion events at the Golgi. Taken together, GARP shows significant conservation between various species but diversification and specialization result in important differences in human cells.

  3. Mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins from human blood.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Zhang, Du; Marshall, John G

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to convey the accelerating rate and growing importance of mass spectrometry applications to human blood proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry can rapidly detect and identify the ionizable peptides from the proteins in a simple mixture and reveal many of their post-translational modifications. However, blood is a complex mixture that may contain many proteins first expressed in cells and tissues. The complete analysis of blood proteins is a daunting task that will rely on a wide range of disciplines from physics, chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, electromagnetic instrumentation, mathematics and computation. Therefore the comprehensive discovery and analysis of blood proteins will rank among the great technical challenges and require the cumulative sum of many of mankind's scientific achievements together. A variety of methods have been used to fractionate, analyze and identify proteins from blood, each yielding a small piece of the whole and throwing the great size of the task into sharp relief. The approaches attempted to date clearly indicate that enumerating the proteins and peptides of blood can be accomplished. There is no doubt that the mass spectrometry of blood will be crucial to the discovery and analysis of proteins, enzyme activities, and post-translational processes that underlay the mechanisms of disease. At present both discovery and quantification of proteins from blood are commonly reaching sensitivities of ∼1 ng/mL.

  4. Human growth hormone prevents the protein catabolic side effects of prednisone in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Horber, F F; Haymond, M W

    1990-01-01

    Prednisone treatment causes protein wasting and adds additional risks to a patient, whereas human growth hormone (hGH) treatment causes positive nitrogen balance. To determine whether concomitant administration of hGH prevents the protein catabolic effects of prednisone, four groups of eight healthy volunteers each were studied using isotope dilution and nitrogen balance techniques after 7 d of placebo, hGH alone (0.1 mg.kg-1.d-1), prednisone alone (0.8 mg.kg-1.d-1), or prednisone plus hGH (n = 8 in each group). Whether protein balance was calculated from the leucine kinetic data or nitrogen balance values, prednisone alone induced protein wasting (P less than 0.001), whereas hGH alone resulted in positive (P less than 0.001) protein balance, when compared to the placebo-treated subjects. When hGH was added to prednisone therapy, the glucocorticoid-induced protein catabolism was prevented. Using leucine kinetic data, negative protein balance during prednisone was due to increased (P less than 0.05) proteolysis, whereas hGH had no effect on proteolysis and increased (P less than 0.01) whole body protein synthesis. During combined treatment, estimates of proteolysis and protein synthesis were similar to those observed in the placebo treated control group. In conclusion, human growth hormone may have a distinct role in preventing the protein losses associated with the administration of pharmacologic doses of glucocorticosteroids in humans. PMID:2195062

  5. Evaluation of silica nanoparticle binding to major human blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Katsutomo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials are used for various biomedical applications because they are often more effective than conventional materials. Recently, however, it has become clear that the protein corona that forms on the surface of nanomaterials when they make contact with biological fluids, such as blood, influences the pharmacokinetics and biological responses induced by the nanomaterials. Therefore, when evaluating nanomaterial safety and efficacy, it is important to analyze the interaction between nanomaterials and proteins in biological fluids and to evaluate the effects of the protein corona. Here, we evaluated the interaction of silica nanoparticles, a commonly used nanomaterial, with the human blood proteins albumin, transferrin, fibrinogen, and IgG. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the amount of albumin, transferrin, and IgG binding to the silica particles increased as the particle size decreased under conditions where the silica particle mass remained the same. However, under conditions in which the specific surface area remained constant, there were no differences in the binding of human plasma proteins to the silica particles tested, suggesting that the binding of silica particles with human plasma proteins is dependent on the specific surface area of the silica particles. Furthermore, the amount of albumin, transferrin, and IgG binding to silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 70 nm (nSP70) and a functional amino group was lower than that with unmodified nSP70, although there was no difference in the binding between nSP70 with the surface modification of a carboxyl functional group and nSP70. These results suggest that the characteristics of nanomaterials are important for binding with human blood proteins; this information may contribute to the development of safe and effective nanomaterials.

  6. Human SUMO fusion systems enhance protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Haolong; Guan, Wei; Ling, Haili; Wang, Zhiyong; Mu, Tianyang; Shuler, Franklin D; Fang, Xuexun

    2010-10-01

    A major challenge associated with recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is generation of large quantities of soluble, functional protein. Yeast SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), has been shown to enhance heterologous protein expression and solubility as fusion tag, however, the effects of human SUMOs on protein expression have not been investigated. Here we describe the use of human SUMO1 and SUMO2 as a useful gene fusion technology. Human SUMO1 and SUMO2 fusion expression vectors were constructed and tested in His-tag and ubiquitin fusion expression systems. Two difficult-to-express model proteins, matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP13) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) were fused to the C-terminus of the human SUMO1 and SUMO2 expression vectors. These constructs were expressed in E. coli and evaluation of MMP13 and eGFP expression and solubility was conducted. We found that both SUMO1 and SUMO2 had the ability to enhance the solubility of MMP13 and eGFP, with the SUMO2 tag having a more significant effect. Since fusion tags produce varying quantities of soluble proteins, we assessed the effect of SUMO2 coupled with ubiquitin (Ub). SUMO2-ubiquitin and ubiquitin-SUMO2 fusion expression plasmids were constructed with eGFP as a passenger protein. Following expression in E. coli, both plasmids could improve eGFP expression and solubility similar to the SUMO2 fusion and better than the ubiquitin fusion. The sequential order of SUMO2 and ubiquitin had little effect on expression and solubility of eGFP. Purification of eGFP from the gene fusion product, SUMO2-ubiquitin-eGFP, involved cleavage by a deubiquitinase (Usp2-cc) and Ni-Sepharose column chromatography. The eGFP protein was purified to high homogeneity. In summary, human SUMO1 and SUMO2 are useful gene fusion technologies enhancing the expression, solubility and purification of model heterologous proteins. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteome-wide protein concentrations in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin Thin; Scholten, Arjen; Taouatas, Nadia; Varro, Andras; Van Veen, Toon A B; Vos, Marc A; Heck, Albert J R

    2010-10-01

    The largest component of the human heart, the left ventricle (LV), plays a major role in delivering blood throughout the body. Therefore, an in-depth detailed quantitative proteome analysis of the human LV is a valuable resource. For this purpose, a multifaceted proteomics approach combining differential sample fractionations (gel, strong cation exchange (SCX)), enzymatic digestions (trypsin, chymotrypsin, LysN), and peptide fragmentation techniques (CID and ETcaD) was used to enhance protein sequence coverage, identification confidence and quantitative abundance determination. Using stringent criteria, 3584 distinct proteins could be identified from the latest well-annotated Swissprot database (23,000 entries). Commutatively, the over 130,000 identified MS/MS spectra were used to assess concentrations of each identified LV protein through a combination of spectral counting methods. Among the most concentrated proteins, many currently used biomarkers for detection of myocardial infarction reside. These cardiac leakage markers have a good diagnostic power, but their prognostic potential seems limited. Discovery of markers that represent etiological determinants of cardiac disease require a shift of focus towards the signaling proteome. Therefore, a protein-class centered quantitative analysis of kinases, phosphatases and GTPases was adopted. These comparative analyses revealed many cardiac involved kinases (PKA, CaMKII, ERK) to reside among the most abundant signaling proteins, and also to mediate many observed in vivo phosphorylation sites. The abundance chart of signaling proteins may assist in identifying novel functional pathways, for instance through the abundant, but relatively little known, kinases STK38L and OXSR1. The obtained quantitative protein library of the human left ventricle is a valuable resource to isolate signaling based, putative biomarkers with concentrations likely to be detectable in plasma.

  8. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  9. Phospholipid transfer protein in human plasma associates with proteins linked to immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Marian C; Vaisar, Tomás; Han, Xianlin; Heinecke, Jay W; Albers, John J

    2010-08-31

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which associates with apolipoprotein A-I (the major HDL protein), plays a key role in lipoprotein remodeling. Because its level in plasma increases during acute inflammation, it may also play previously unsuspected roles in the innate immune system. To gain further insight into its potential physiological functions, we isolated complexes containing PLTP from plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography and determined their composition. Shotgun proteomics revealed that only 6 of the 24 proteins detected in the complexes were apolipoproteins. The most abundant proteins were clusterin (apoJ), PLTP itself, coagulation factors, complement factors, and apoA-I. Remarkably, 20 of the 24 proteins had known protein-protein interactions. Biochemical studies confirmed two previously established interactions and identified five new ones between PLTP and proteins. Moreover, clusterin, apoA-I, and apoE preserved the lipid-transfer activity of recombinant PLTP in the absence of lipid, indicating that these interactions may have functional significance. Unexpectedly, lipids accounted for only 3% of the mass of the PLTP complexes. Collectively, our observations indicate that PLTP in human plasma resides on lipid-poor complexes dominated by clusterin and proteins implicated in host defense and inflammation. They further suggest that protein-protein interactions drive the formation of PLTP complexes in plasma.

  10. 3-Methyladenine-DNA glycosylase (MPG protein) interacts with human RAD23 proteins.

    PubMed

    Miao, F; Bouziane, M; Dammann, R; Masutani, C; Hanaoka, F; Pfeifer, G; O'Connor, T R

    2000-09-15

    Human 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase (MPG protein) initiates base excision repair by severing the glycosylic bond of numerous damaged bases. In comparison, homologues of the Rad23 proteins (hHR23) and the hXPC protein are involved in the recognition of damaged bases in global genome repair, a subset of nucleotide excision repair. In this report, we show that the hHR23A and -B also interact with the MPG protein and can serve as accessory proteins for DNA damage recognition in base excision repair. Furthermore, the MPG.hHR23 protein complex elevates the rate of MPG protein-catalyzed excision from hypoxanthine-containing substrates. This increased excision rate is correlated with a greater binding affinity of the MPG protein-hHR23 protein complex for damaged DNA. These data suggest that the hHR23 proteins function as universal DNA damage recognition accessory proteins in both of these major excision repair pathways.

  11. Antibody humanization by structure-based computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonjoo; Hua, Casey; Sentman, Charles L; Ackerman, Margaret E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies derived from non-human sources must be modified for therapeutic use so as to mitigate undesirable immune responses. While complementarity-determining region (CDR) grafting-based humanization techniques have been successfully applied in many cases, it remains challenging to maintain the desired stability and antigen binding affinity upon grafting. We developed an alternative humanization approach called CoDAH ("Computationally-Driven Antibody Humanization") in which computational protein design methods directly select sets of amino acids to incorporate from human germline sequences to increase humanness while maintaining structural stability. Retrospective studies show that CoDAH is able to identify variants deemed beneficial according to both humanness and structural stability criteria, even for targets lacking crystal structures. Prospective application to TZ47, a murine anti-human B7H6 antibody, demonstrates the approach. Four diverse humanized variants were designed, and all possible unique VH/VL combinations were produced as full-length IgG1 antibodies. Soluble and cell surface expressed antigen binding assays showed that 75% (6 of 8) of the computationally designed VH/VL variants were successfully expressed and competed with the murine TZ47 for binding to B7H6 antigen. Furthermore, 4 of the 6 bound with an estimated KD within an order of magnitude of the original TZ47 antibody. In contrast, a traditional CDR-grafted variant could not be expressed. These results suggest that the computational protein design approach described here can be used to efficiently generate functional humanized antibodies and provide humanized templates for further affinity maturation.

  12. DNA replication in protein extracts from human cells requires ORC and Mcm proteins.

    PubMed

    Baltin, Jens; Leist, Sandra; Odronitz, Florian; Wollscheid, Hans-Peter; Baack, Martina; Kapitza, Thomas; Schaarschmidt, Daniel; Knippers, Rolf

    2006-05-05

    We used protein extracts from proliferating human HeLa cells to support plasmid DNA replication in vitro. An extract with soluble nuclear proteins contains the major replicative chain elongation functions, whereas a high salt extract from isolated nuclei contains the proteins for initiation. Among the initiator proteins active in vitro are the origin recognition complex (ORC) and Mcm proteins. Recombinant Orc1 protein stimulates in vitro replication presumably in place of endogenous Orc1 that is known to be present in suboptimal amounts in HeLa cell nuclei. Partially purified endogenous ORC, but not recombinant ORC, is able to rescue immunodepleted nuclear extracts. Plasmid replication in the in vitro replication system is slow and of limited efficiency but robust enough to serve as a basis to investigate the formation of functional pre-replication complexes under biochemically defined conditions.

  13. Identification of human olfactory cleft mucus proteins using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Débat, Hélène; Eloit, Corinne; Blon, Florence; Sarazin, Benoît; Henry, Céline; Huet, Jean-Claude; Trotier, Didier; Pernollet, Jean-Claude

    2007-05-01

    In humans, the olfactory epithelium is located in two narrow passages, the olfactory clefts, at the upper part of the nasal cavities. The olfactory epithelium is covered by a mucus layer which is essential for the function of the olfactory neurons that are directly connected with the brain through the cribriform plate. This anatomical weakness of the brain protection may be the source of infection. Little is known about the composition of this mucus in humans. Previous proteomic analyses have been performed on washes of the entire nasal cavities and therefore might better correspond to the mucus over the respiratory epithelium than to the mucus covering the olfactory epithelium. In the present study, we sampled the olfactory mucus directly from the clefts of 16 healthy adult volunteers, and 83 proteins were identified in the samples using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF, RPLC, and Edman sequencing. Forty-three proteins were not previously observed either in nasal mucus sampled through washings, saliva, tear, or cerebrospinal fluid. In Accordance with the data in the protein databases, the most abundant proteins are secreted, whereas some others correspond to intracellular proteins covering a large range of functions: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, protease inhibition, antioxidant, transport, transcription, transduction, cytoskeletal, regulation, binding, and metabolism of odorant molecules. This study clearly demonstrates the complexity of the mucus covering the human olfactory epithelium, which might comprise potential markers for characterizing pathophysiological states.

  14. A family of human cdc2-related protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, M; Enders, G H; Wu, C L; Su, L K; Gorka, C; Nelson, C; Harlow, E; Tsai, L H

    1992-01-01

    The p34cdc2 protein kinase is known to regulate important transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. We have identified 10 human protein kinases based on their structural relation to p34cdc2. Seven of these kinases are novel and the products of five share greater than 50% amino acid sequence identity with p34cdc2. The seven novel genes are broadly expressed in human cell lines and tissues with each displaying some cell type or tissue specificity. The cdk3 gene, like cdc2 and cdk2, can complement cdc28 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that all three of these protein kinases can play roles in the regulation of the mammalian cell cycle. The identification of a large family of cdc2-related kinases opens the possibility of combinatorial regulation of the cell cycle together with the emerging large family of cyclins. Images PMID:1639063

  15. Exocyst Complex Protein Expression in the Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, I.M.; Ackerman, W.E.; Vandre, D.D.; Robinson, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Protein production and secretion are essential to syncytiotrophoblast function and are associated with cytotrophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. Syncytiotrophoblast hormone secretion is a crucial determinant of maternal-fetal health, and can be misregulated in pathological pregnancies. Although, polarized secretion is a key component of placental function, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Objective While the octameric exocyst complex is classically regarded as a master regulator of secretion in various mammalian systems, its expression in the placenta remained unexplored. We hypothesized that the syncytiotrophoblast would express all exocyst complex components and effector proteins requisite for vesicle-mediated secretion more abundantly than cytotrophoblasts in tissue specimens. Methods A two-tiered immunobiological approach was utilized to characterize exocyst and ancillary proteins in normal, term human placentas. Exocyst protein expression and localization was documented in tissue homogenates via immunoblotting and immunofluorescence labeling of placental sections. Results The eight exocyst proteins, EXOC1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, were found in the human placenta. In addition, RAB11, an important exocyst complex modulator, was also expressed. Exocyst and Rab protein expression appeared to be regulated during trophoblast differentiation, as the syncytiotrophoblast expressed these proteins with little, if any, expression in cytotrophoblast cells. Additionally, exocyst proteins were localized at or near the syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane, the major site of placental secretion Discussion/Conclusion Our findings highlight exocyst protein expression as novel indicators of trophoblast differentiation. The exocyst’s regulated localization within the syncytiotrophoblast in conjunction with its well known functions suggests a possible role in placental polarized secretion PMID:24856041

  16. Exocyst complex protein expression in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, I M; Ackerman, W E; Vandre, D D; Robinson, J M

    2014-07-01

    Protein production and secretion are essential to syncytiotrophoblast function and are associated with cytotrophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. Syncytiotrophoblast hormone secretion is a crucial determinant of maternal-fetal health, and can be misregulated in pathological pregnancies. Although, polarized secretion is a key component of placental function, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. While the octameric exocyst complex is classically regarded as a master regulator of secretion in various mammalian systems, its expression in the placenta remained unexplored. We hypothesized that the syncytiotrophoblast would express all exocyst complex components and effector proteins requisite for vesicle-mediated secretion more abundantly than cytotrophoblasts in tissue specimens. A two-tiered immunobiological approach was utilized to characterize exocyst and ancillary proteins in normal, term human placentas. Exocyst protein expression and localization was documented in tissue homogenates via immunoblotting and immunofluorescence labeling of placental sections. The eight exocyst proteins, EXOC1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, were found in the human placenta. In addition, RAB11, an important exocyst complex modulator, was also expressed. Exocyst and Rab protein expression appeared to be regulated during trophoblast differentiation, as the syncytiotrophoblast expressed these proteins with little, if any, expression in cytotrophoblast cells. Additionally, exocyst proteins were localized at or near the syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane, the major site of placental secretion. Our findings highlight exocyst protein expression as novel indicators of trophoblast differentiation. The exocyst's regulated localization within the syncytiotrophoblast in conjunction with its well known functions suggests a possible role in placental polarized secretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tight binding of proteins to membranes from older human cells.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Roger J W; Comte-Walters, Susana; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Schwacke, John H; Berry, Yoke; Korlimbinis, Anastasia; Friedrich, Michael G; Schey, Kevin L

    2011-12-01

    The lens is an ideal model system for the study of macromolecular aging and its consequences for cellular function, since there is no turnover of lens fibre cells. To examine biochemical processes that take place in the lens and that may also occur in other long-lived cells, membranes were isolated from defined regions of human lenses that are synthesised at different times during life, and assayed for the presence of tightly bound cytosolic proteins using quantitative iTRAQ proteomics technology. A majority of lens beta crystallins and all gamma crystallins became increasingly membrane bound with age, however, the chaperone proteins alpha A and alpha B crystallin, as well as the thermally-stable protein, βB2 crystallin, did not. Other proteins such as brain-associated signal protein 1 and paralemmin 1 became less tightly bound in the older regions of the lens. It is evident that protein-membrane interactions change significantly with age. Selected proteins that were formerly cytosolic become increasingly tightly bound to cell membranes with age and are not removed even by treatment with 7 M urea. It is likely that such processes reflect polypeptide denaturation over time and the untoward binding of proteins to membranes may alter membrane properties and contribute to impairment of communication between older cells.

  18. Identification of Cellular Proteins that Interact with Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early Protein 1 by Protein Array Assay

    PubMed Central

    Puerta Martínez, Francisco; Tang, Qiyi

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression during infection is characterized as a sequential process including immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L)-stage gene expression. The most abundantly expressed gene at the IE stage of infection is the major IE (MIE) gene that produces IE1 and IE2. IE1 has been the focus of study because it is an important protein, not only for viral gene expression but also for viral replication. It is believed that IE1 plays important roles in viral gene regulation by interacting with cellular proteins. In the current study, we performed protein array assays and identified 83 cellular proteins that interact with IE1. Among them, seven are RNA-binding proteins that are important in RNA processing; more than half are nuclear proteins that are involved in gene regulations. Tumorigenesis-related proteins are also found to interact with IE1, implying that the role of IE1 in tumorigenesis might need to be reevaluated. Unexpectedly, cytoplasmic proteins, such as Golgi autoantigen and GGA1 (both related to the Golgi trafficking protein), are also found to be associated with IE1. We also employed a coimmunoprecipitation assay to test the interactions of IE1 and some of the proteins identified in the protein array assays and confirmed that the results from the protein array assays are reliable. Many of the proteins identified by the protein array assay have not been previously reported. Therefore, the functions of the IE1-protein interactions need to be further explored in the future. PMID:24385082

  19. Nuclear and nucleolar targeting of human ribosomal protein S6.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C; Lipsius, E; Kruppa, J

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric proteins were constructed to define the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of human ribosomal protein S6. The complete cDNA sequence, different cDNA fragments and oligonucleotides of the human ribosomal proteins S6, respectively, were joined to the 5' end of the entire LacZ gene of Escherichia coli by using recombinant techniques. The hybrid genes were transfected into L cells, transiently expressed, and the intracellular location of the fusion proteins was determined by their beta-galactosidase activity. Three NLSs were identified in the C-terminal half of the S6 protein. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that a single NLS is sufficient for targeting the corresponding S6-beta-galactosidase chimera into the nucleus. Removal of all three putative NLSs completely blocked the nuclear import of the resulting S6-beta-galactosidase fusion protein, which instead became evenly distributed in the cytoplasm. Chimeras containing deletion mutants of S6 with at least one single NLS or unmodified S6 accumulated in the nucleolus. Analysis of several constructs reveals the existence of a specific domain that is essential but not sufficient for nucleolar accumulation of S6. Images PMID:8590812

  20. Singlet CH domain containing human multidomain proteins: an inventory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton presents the basic force in processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking and cell migration. Here, we list 30 human singlet CH (calpononin homology/actin binding) containing multidomain molecules, each encoded by one gene. We show the domain distributions as given by the SMART program. These mosaic proteins organize geographically the placement of selected proteins in proximity within the cell. In most instances, their precise location, their actin binding capacity by way of the singlet CH (or by other domains?) and their physiological functions need further elucidation. A dendrogram based solely on the relationship for the human singlet CH domains (in terms of AA sequences) for the various molecules that possess the domain, implies that the singlet descended from a common ancestor which in turn sprouted three main branches of protein products. Each branch bifurcated multiple times thus accounting for a cornucopia of products. Wherever, additional (unassigned), highly homologous regions exist in related proteins (e.g., in LIM and LMO7 or in Tangerin and EH/BP1), these unrecognized domain regions await assignment as specific functional domains. Frequently genes coding multidomain proteins duplicated. The varying modular nature within multidomain proteins should have accelerated evolutionary changes to a degree not feasible to achieve by means of mere post-duplication mutational changes.

  1. Human milk proteins: an interactomics and updated functional overview.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Zolla, Lello

    2010-07-02

    Milk and milk fractions are characterized by a wide array of proteins, whose concentration spans across several orders of magnitude. By exploiting a combined approach based on functional gene ontology enrichment (FatiGO/Babelomics), hierarchical clustering, and pathway and network analyses, we merged data from literature dealing with protein-oriented studies on human milk. A total of 285 entries defined a nonredundant list upon comparison with the Ingenuity Knowledge Base from the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Results were compared with an inventory of bovine milk proteins gathered from dedicated proteomic studies. A protein core of 106 proteins was found, with most of the entries associated to three main biological functions, namely nutrient transport/lipid metabolism, concretization of the immune system response and cellular proliferation processes. Our analyses confirm and emphasize that the biological role of the human milk proteins is not only limited to the provision of external nutrients and defense molecules against pathogens to the suckling but also to the direct stimulation of the growth of neonate tissues/organs and to the development of a proper independent immune system, both through the induction of a number of molecular cascades associated with cell proliferation/differentiation. The latter aspects were previously investigated by single-molecule dedicated studies, missing the holistic view that results from our analysis.

  2. Beer consumption and changes in stability of human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Caspi, A; Goshev, I; Moncheva, S; Zemser, M; Weisz, M; Libman, I; Lerner, H T; Trakhtenberg, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of beer consumption (BC) on the functional and structural properties of human serum proteins (HSP). Thirty-eight volunteers (after coronary bypass) were divided into two groups: experimental (EG) and control (CG). Nineteen volunteers of the EG consumed 330 mL per day of beer (about 20 g of alcohol) for 30 consecutive days. The CG volunteers consumed mineral water instead of beer. Blood samples were collected from EG and CG patients before and after the experiment. Albumin (Alb), globulin (Glo), and methanol-precipitable proteins (MPP) from human serum were denatured with 8 M urea. Fluorescence and electrophoresis were employed in order to elucidate urea-induced conformational changes and structural behavior of proteins. The measured fluorescence emission spectra were used to estimate the stability of native and denatured protein fractions before and after BC. It was found that before BC the fractions most stable to urea denaturation were Glo, Alb, and MPP fractions. After BC in most of the beer-consuming patients (EG) some changes in native and denatured protein fractions were detected: a tendency to lower stability and minor structural deviations. These qualitative changes were more profound in MPP than in Alb and Glo. Thus, Glo is more resistible to alcohol influence than Alb, which in turn is more resistible than MPP. No serum protein changes were detected in patients of CG.

  3. Presence of hypochlorite-modified proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, L J; Arnold, L; Flowers, D; Waeg, G; Malle, E; Stocker, R

    1996-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL may contribute to atherogenesis, though the nature of the in vivo oxidant(s) remains obscure. Myeloperoxidase, the enzyme responsible for hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl) production in vivo, is present in active form in human atherosclerotic lesions, and HOCl aggregates and transforms LDL into a high-uptake form for macrophages in vitro. Here we demonstrate HOCl-modified proteins in human lesions using an mAb raised against HOCl-modified LDL that recognizes HOCl-oxidized proteins but does not cross-react with Cu2+-, malondialdehyde-, or 4-hydroxynonenal-modified LDL. This antibody detected significantly more material in advanced atherosclerotic lesions than normal arteries, even though azide and methionine were included during sample work-up to inhibit myeloperoxidase and to scavenge HOCl. The epitope(s) recognized was predominantly cell associated and present in monocyte/macrophages, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. The intima and cholesterol clefts stained more heavily than the center of the thickened vessels; adventitial staining was apparent in some cases. Immunostaining was also detected in a very early lesion from an accident victim, beside healthy areas that were unreactive. LDL oxidized by HOCl in vitro, but not native LDL, effectively competed with the epitopes in lesions for antibody binding. Density centrifugation of plaque homogenates and Western blot analysis showed that, in the apo B-containing lipoprotein fraction, the mAb recognized protein(s) of molecular mass greater than apo B, similar to those produced during oxidation of LDL with HOCl in vitro. Three major proteins were recognized by the anti-HOCl-modified protein antibody but not by an anti-apo B antibody in the apo B-free fraction. Together, these results demonstrate HOCl-oxidized proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions, implicating this oxidant in LDL modification in vivo. PMID:8617887

  4. Localization of luteinizing hormone receptor protein in the human ovary.

    PubMed

    Yung, Y; Aviel-Ronen, S; Maman, E; Rubinstein, N; Avivi, C; Orvieto, R; Hourvitz, A

    2014-09-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) plays a pivotal role during follicular development. Consequently, its expression pattern is of major importance for research and has clinical implications. Despite the accumulated information regarding LHR expression patterns, our understanding of its expression in the human ovary, specifically at the protein level, is incomplete. Therefore, our aim was to determine the LHR protein localization and expression pattern in the human ovary. We examined the presence of LHR by immunohistochemical staining of human ovaries and western blots of mural granulosa and cumulus cells aspirated during IVF treatments. We were not able to detect LHR protein staining in primordial or primary follicles. We observed equivocal positive staining in granulosa cells and theca cells of secondary follicles. The first appearance of a clear signal of LHR protein was observed in granulosa cells and theca cells of small antral follicles, and there was evidence of increasing LHR production as the follicles mature to the pre-ovulatory stage. After ovulation, LHR protein was ubiquitously produced in the corpus luteum. To confirm the expression pattern in granulosa cells and cumulus cells, we performed western blots and found that LHR expression was stronger in granulosa cells than in cumulus cells, with the later demonstrating low, but still significant, amounts of LHR protein. In summary, we conclude that LHR protein starts to appear on granulosa cells and theca cells of early antral follicles, and low but significant expression of LHR exists also in the cumulus cells. These results may have implications for the future design of clinical protocols and culture mediums for in vitro fertilization and especially in vitro maturation of oocytes.

  5. Structural principles within the human-virus protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Franzosa, Eric A.; Xia, Yu

    2011-01-01

    General properties of the antagonistic biomolecular interactions between viruses and their hosts (exogenous interactions) remain poorly understood, and may differ significantly from known principles governing the cooperative interactions within the host (endogenous interactions). Systems biology approaches have been applied to study the combined interaction networks of virus and human proteins, but such efforts have so far revealed only low-resolution patterns of host-virus interaction. Here, we layer curated and predicted 3D structural models of human-virus and human-human protein complexes on top of traditional interaction networks to reconstruct the human-virus structural interaction network. This approach reveals atomic resolution, mechanistic patterns of host-virus interaction, and facilitates systematic comparison with the host’s endogenous interactions. We find that exogenous interfaces tend to overlap with and mimic endogenous interfaces, thereby competing with endogenous binding partners. The endogenous interfaces mimicked by viral proteins tend to participate in multiple endogenous interactions which are transient and regulatory in nature. While interface overlap in the endogenous network results largely from gene duplication followed by divergent evolution, viral proteins frequently achieve interface mimicry without any sequence or structural similarity to an endogenous binding partner. Finally, while endogenous interfaces tend to evolve more slowly than the rest of the protein surface, exogenous interfaces—including many sites of endogenous-exogenous overlap—tend to evolve faster, consistent with an evolutionary “arms race” between host and pathogen. These significant biophysical, functional, and evolutionary differences between host-pathogen and within-host protein-protein interactions highlight the distinct consequences of antagonism versus cooperation in biological networks. PMID:21680884

  6. Transgenic rabbits as therapeutic protein bioreactors and human disease models.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianglin; Watanabe, Teruo

    2003-09-01

    Genetically modified laboratory animals provide a powerful approach for studying gene expression and regulation and allow one to directly examine structure-function and cause-and-effect relationships in pathophysiological processes. Today, transgenic mice are available as a research tool in almost every research institution. On the other hand, the development of a relatively large mammalian transgenic model, transgenic rabbits, has provided unprecedented opportunities for investigators to study the mechanisms of human diseases and has also provided an alternative way to produce therapeutic proteins to treat human diseases. Transgenic rabbits expressing human genes have been used as a model for cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and cancer research. The recombinant proteins can be produced from the milk of transgenic rabbits not only at lower cost but also on a relatively large scale. One of the most promising and attractive recombinant proteins derived from transgenic rabbit milk, human alpha-glucosidase, has been successfully used to treat the patients who are genetically deficient in this enzyme. Although the pronuclear microinjection is still the major and most popular method for the creation of transgenic rabbits, recent progress in gene targeting and animal cloning has opened new avenues that should make it possible to produce transgenic rabbits by somatic cell nuclear transfer in the future. Based on a computer-assisted search of the studies of transgenic rabbits published in the English literature here, we introduce to the reader the achievements made thus far with transgenic rabbits, with emphasis on the application of these rabbits as human disease models and live bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and on the recent progress in cloned rabbits.

  7. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  8. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, D R; Martin-Morris, L; Luo, L Q; White, K

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development. Images PMID:2494667

  10. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  11. Peptide-protein interactions within human hair keratins.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Célia F; Matamá, Teresa; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2017-03-15

    We selected 1235 decapeptides from human hair proteins encoded by human genes of keratins and keratin associated proteins. The peptides were linked to glass arrays and screened for their affinity towards a solution of human hair extracted keratin fraction. Based on the physicochemical properties of the peptides, ten variables were studied: content of different types of amino acid side chains (cysteine, hydrophobic, polar, basic, acidic, aromatic rings, amide, alcohol side chains), isoelectric point, and net charge. We found differences statistically significant on the binding affinity of peptides based on their content of cysteine, hydrophobic and polar amino acids, mainly containing alcohols. These results point to the formation of hydrophobic interactions and disulfide bonds between small peptides and human hair keratins as the main driving forces for the interaction of possible cosmetic peptides, namely designed to strength human hair. As so, our results enlighten the nature of the interaction of keratin based materials with human hair, which are claimed to enhance hair fiber strength, and enable a more directed and sustained hair care peptide design.

  12. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. PMID:23566956

  13. Human protein cluster analysis using amino acid frequencies.

    PubMed

    Vernone, Annamaria; Berchialla, Paola; Pescarmona, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on the development of a software tool for protein clustering according to their amino acid content. All known human proteins were clustered according to the relative frequencies of their amino acids starting from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot reference database and making use of hierarchical cluster analysis. RESULTS were compared to those based on sequence similarities. Proteins display different clustering patterns according to type. Many extracellular proteins with highly specific and repetitive sequences (keratins, collagens etc.) cluster clearly confirming the accuracy of the clustering method. In our case clustering by sequence and amino acid content overlaps. Proteins with a more complex structure with multiple domains (catalytic, extracellular, transmembrane etc.), even if classified very similar according to sequence similarity and function (aquaporins, cadherins, steroid 5-alpha reductase etc.) showed different clustering according to amino acid content. Availability of essential amino acids according to local conditions (starvation, low or high oxygen, cell cycle phase etc.) may be a limiting factor in protein synthesis, whatever the mRNA level. This type of protein clustering may therefore prove a valuable tool in identifying so far unknown metabolic connections and constraints.

  14. [Exogenic proteins in the human exhaled breath condensate].

    PubMed

    Kurova, V S; Kononikhin, A S; Sakharov, D A; Popov, I A; Larina, I M; Tonevitskiĭ, A G; Varfolomeev, S D; Nikolaev, E N

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the protein composition of exhaled breath to diagnose diseases of the respiratory system raises a problem of differentiation proteins of expressed in the tissues of the lungs and respiratory tract (endogenous) and got in the respiratory system from the ambient air in the process of respiration (exogenous). In this work an attempt was made to estimate a set of exhaled exogenic proteins by mass spectrometry coupled with nanoflow HPLC. Six-month isolation of healthy donors indoors with air cleaned of dust leads to removal from the spectrum of exhaled proteins of some keratins that are considered therefore to be exogenic. Non-keratin proteins may also circulate between the ambient air and human respiratory ways, but their concentration appears to be significantly lower the keratin concentrations (especially epidermis keratin). Among non-keratins dermcidin seems to be the most significant exogenic protein of exhaled air. The conclusion of the diagnostic value of exhaled proteins can be done only after careful comparison of the results of quantitative and qualitative analysis of their composition in norm and pathology for a statistically significant sample of donors.

  15. Semiconductor Microcavity Flow Spectroscopy of Intracellular Protein in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; Cox, Jim; Hendricks, Judy; McDonald, Anthony; Copeland, Guild; Sasaki, Darryl; Skirboll, Steve; Curry, Mark

    2001-03-01

    The speed of light through a biofluid or biological cell is inversely related to the biomolecular concentration of proteins and other complex molecules that modify the refractive index at wavelengths accessible to semiconductor lasers. By placing a fluid or cell into a semiconductor microcavity laser, these decreases in light speed can be sensitively recorded in picoseconds as frequency red-shifts in the laser output spectrum. This biocavity laser equipped with microfluidics for transporting cells at high speed through the laser microcavity has shown potential for rapid analysis of biomolecular mass of normal and malignant human cells in their physiologic condition without time-consuming fixing, staining, or tagging. We have used biocavity laser spectroscopy to measure the optical properties of solutions of standard biomolecules (sugars, proteins, DNA, and ions) and human cells. The technique determines the frequency shift, relative to that of water, of spontaneous or stimulated emission from cavity filled with a biomolecular solution. The shift was also measured in human glioblastoma cells that had been sorted by conventional fluorescence-activated cell sorting according to protein content. The results show a direct correlation between protein measured by fluorescence and the frequency shift observed in the microcavity laser.

  16. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  17. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  18. Prediction of 492 human protein kinase substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Javad; Maňuch, Ján; Gupta, Arvind; Stacho, Ladislav; Pelech, Steven

    2011-10-14

    Complex intracellular signaling networks monitor diverse environmental inputs to evoke appropriate and coordinated effector responses. Defective signal transduction underlies many pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, autoimmunity and about 400 other human diseases. Therefore, there is high impetus to define the composition and architecture of cellular communications networks in humans. The major components of intracellular signaling networks are protein kinases and protein phosphatases, which catalyze the reversible phosphorylation of proteins. Here, we have focused on identification of kinase-substrate interactions through prediction of the phosphorylation site specificity from knowledge of the primary amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain of each kinase. The presented method predicts 488 different kinase catalytic domain substrate specificity matrices in 478 typical and 4 atypical human kinases that rely on both positive and negative determinants for scoring individual phosphosites for their suitability as kinase substrates. This represents a marked advancement over existing methods such as those used in NetPhorest (179 kinases in 76 groups) and NetworKIN (123 kinases), which consider only positive determinants for kinase substrate prediction. Comparison of our predicted matrices with experimentally-derived matrices from about 9,000 known kinase-phosphosite substrate pairs revealed a high degree of concordance with the established preferences of about 150 well studied protein kinases. Furthermore for many of the better known kinases, the predicted optimal phosphosite sequences were more accurate than the consensus phosphosite sequences inferred by simple alignment of the phosphosites of known kinase substrates. Application of this improved kinase substrate prediction algorithm to the primary structures of over 23, 000 proteins encoded by the human genome has permitted the identification of about 650, 000 putative phosphosites, which are posted on the

  19. The Effect of Protein Mass Modulation on Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Kevin; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli has long served as a model enzyme with which to elucidate possible links between protein dynamics and the catalyzed reaction. Such physical properties of its human counterpart have not been rigorously studied so far, but recent computer-based simulations suggest that these two DHFRs differ significantly in how closely coupled the protein dynamics and the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer step are. To test this prediction, two contemporary probes for studying the effect of protein dynamics on catalysis were combined here: temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) that are sensitive to the physical nature of the chemical step, and protein mass-modulation that slows down fast dynamics (femto- to picosecond timescale) throughout the protein. The intrinsic H/T KIEs of human DHFR, like those of E. coli DHFR, are shown to be temperature-independent in the range from 5–45 °C, indicating fast sampling of donor and acceptor distances (DADs) at the reaction’s transition state (or tunneling ready state – TRS). Mass modulation of these enzymes through isotopic labeling with 13C, 15N, and 2H at nonexchangeable hydrogens yield an 11% heavier enzyme. The additional mass has no effect on the intrinsic KIEs of the human enzyme. This finding indicates that the mass-modulation of the human DHFR affects neither DAD distribution nor the DAD’s conformational sampling dynamics. Furthermore, reduction in the enzymatic turnover number and the dissociation rate constant for the product indicate that the isotopic substitution affects kinetic steps that are not the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer. The findings are discussed in terms of fast dynamics and their role in catalysis, the comparison of calculations and experiments, and the interpretation of isotopically-modulated heavy enzymes in general. PMID:26813442

  20. Binding of perfluorooctanoic acid to rat and human plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Han, Xing; Snow, Timothy A; Kemper, Raymond A; Jepson, Gary W

    2003-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a commercially important organic fluorochemical and is considered to have a long half-life in human blood. In this paper, PFOA binding to rat and human plasma proteins was investigated. On the basis of results from size-exclusion chromatography and ligand blotting, most PFOA was in protein-bound form in male and female rat plasma, and the primary PFOA binding protein in plasma was serum albumin. PFOA binding to rat serum albumin (RSA) in the gas phase was observed by electrospray ionization MS. (19)F NMR experiments revealed that binding to RSA caused peak broadening and chemical shift changes of PFOA resonances, and on the basis of this observation, the dissociation constant was determined to be approximately 0.3 mM. The dissociation constants for PFOA binding to RSA and human serum albumin (HSA) and the numbers of PFOA binding sites on RSA and HSA were also determined by a separation method using microdesalting columns. No significant difference was found between PFOA binding to RSA and PFOA binding to HSA. The dissociation constants for binding of PFOA to RSA or HSA and the numbers of PFOA binding sites were in the range of 0.3-0.4 mM and 6-9, respectively. On the basis of these binding parameters and the estimated plasma concentration of serum albumin, greater than 90% of PFOA would be bound to serum albumin in both rat and human blood.

  1. Characterization of Tight Junction Proteins in Cultured Human Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, Alice; Dorokhov, Nikolay; Ryerse, Jan; Klumpp, David J.; McHowat, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential for normal function of epithelia, restricting paracellular diffusion and contributing to the maintainance of cell surface polarity. Superficial cells of the urothelium develop TJs, the basis for the paracellular permeability barrier of the bladder against diffusion of urinary solutes. Focusing on the superficial cell layer of stratified cell cultures of an immortalized human ureteral cell line, TEU-2 cells, we have examined the presence of TJ and TJ-associated proteins. TEU-2 cells were treated with calcium chloride and fetal bovine serum culture conditions used to induce stratification that resembles the normal transitional epithelial phenotype. Cultures were examined for TJ and TJ-associated proteins by confocal immuno-fluorescence microscopy and evaluated for TJ mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). TEU-2 cultures exhibited immunoreactivity at intercellular margins for claudins 1, 4, 5, 7, 14 and 16 whereas claudins 2, 8 and 12 were intracellular. RT-PCR corroborated the presence of these claudins at the mRNA level. The TJ-associated proteins occludin, JAM-1, and zonula occludens (ZO-1, ZO-2 and ZO-3) were localized at cell margins. We have found that numerous TJs and TJ-associated proteins are expressed in stratified TEU-2 cultures. Further, we propose TEU-2s provide a useful ureteral model for future studies on the involvement of TJs proteins in the normal and pathological physiology of the human urinary system. PMID:18553212

  2. Determination of in vivo protein synthesis in human palatine tonsil.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    The palatine tonsils are constantly exposed to ingested or inhaled antigens which, in turn, lead to a permanent activation of tonsillar immune cells, even in a basic physiological state. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the immunological activation of the human palatine tonsil is reflected by a high metabolic activity, as determined by in vivo measurement of protein synthesis. The protein synthesis rate of the tonsil was also compared with that of the circulating T-lymphocytes, the total blood mononuclear cells and the whole population of blood leucocytes. Phenotypic characterization of immune-competent cells in tonsil tissue and blood was performed by flow cytometry. Pinch tonsil biopsies were taken after induction of anaesthesia in healthy adult patients (n=12) scheduled for ear surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or nose surgery. Protein synthesis was quantitatively determined during a 90-min period by a flooding-dose technique. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in the palatine tonsils was 22.8+/-5.7%/24 h (mean+/-S.D.), whereas protein synthesis in the circulating T-lymphocytes was 10.7+/-3.4%/24 h, in mononuclear cells was 10.8+/-2.8%/24 h and in leucocytes was 3.2+/-1.2%/24 h. CD3+ lymphocytes were the most abundant cell population in the tonsil. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in human tonsils was higher compared with the circulating immune cells. This high metabolic rate may reflect the permanent immunological activity present in human tonsils, although cell phenotypes and activity markers do not explain the differences.

  3. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from h-invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset.

    PubMed

    Kikugawa, Shingo; Nishikata, Kensaku; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Mami; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the assigned protein complexes. We

  4. The binding of drugs to major human milk whey proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, H C; Begg, E J

    1988-01-01

    The binding of nine drugs of diverse physicochemical characteristics to major human milk whey proteins is reported. This group included acids, bases and neutral drugs. No drug bound to alpha-lactalbumin, which is the protein present in greatest concentrations in mature milk. Four drugs, diclofenac, phenytoin, prednisolone and warfarin, bound to albumin but to a much lesser extent than in plasma, consistent with quantitatively less albumin in milk. None of the basic drugs studied bound to albumin. Five drugs, atenolol, diclofenac, prednisolone, propranolol and warfarin, bound to lactoferrin though the extent was minimal except for diclofenac. This group included acids, bases and neutral drugs. PMID:3203054

  5. INCAP studies of vegetable proteins for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Bressani, Ricardo

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the efforts of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP) to develop a relatively low-cost vegetable protein mixture suitable as a complementary food for infants and young children. As it turned out, the resulting product became popular with older children and adults, and its superior nutritional benefits were widely recognized by the population. This effort led to broader studies by INCAP of the nutritional quality of vegetable protein mixtures, including raw materials, processing to convert them into human-grade products, product formulation, and commercialization.

  6. Membrane Protein Profiling of Human Colon Reveals Distinct Regional Differences *

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sjoerd; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2014-01-01

    The colonic epithelium is a highly dynamic system important for the regulation of ion and water homeostasis via absorption and secretion and for the maintenance of a protective barrier between the outer milieu and the inside of the body. These processes are known to gradually change along the length of the colon, although a complete characterization at the protein level is lacking. We therefore analyzed the membrane proteome of isolated human (n = 4) colonic epithelial cells from biopsies obtained via routine colonoscopy for four segments along the large intestine: ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon. Label-free quantitative proteomic analyses using high-resolution mass spectrometry were performed on enriched membrane proteins. The results showed a stable level for the majority of membrane proteins but a distinct decrease in proteins associated with bacterial sensing, cation transport, and O-glycosylation in the proximal to distal regions. In contrast, proteins involved in microbial defense and anion transport showed an opposing gradient and increased toward the distal end. The gradient of ion-transporter proteins could be directly related to previously observed ion transport activities. All individual glycosyltransferases required for the O-glycosylation of the major colonic mucin MUC2 were observed and correlated with the known glycosylation variation along the colon axis. This is the first comprehensive quantitative dataset of membrane protein abundance along the human colon and will add to the knowledge of the physiological function of the different regions of the colonic mucosa. Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000987. PMID:24889196

  7. Prognostic implications of Kindlin proteins in human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Kai; Zhang, Haoshaqiang; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The Kindlin protein family, comprising Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3, play important roles in various human cancers. Here, to explore the clinical significance of Kindlins in human osteosarcomas, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to detect the expression of Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3 mRNAs and proteins in 20 self-pairs of osteosarcoma and adjacent noncancerous tissues. Then, immunohistochemistry was performed to examine subcellular localizations and expression patterns of Kindlin proteins in 100 osteosarcoma and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues. Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3 protein immunostainings were localized in the cytoplasm, nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively, of tumor cells in primary osteosarcoma tissues. Statistically, the expression levels of Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 mRNAs and proteins in osteosarcoma tissues were all significantly higher (both P<0.01), but those of Kindlin-3 mRNA and protein were both dramatically lower (both P<0.05), than in matched adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, the overexpressions of Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 proteins were both significantly associated with high tumor grade (both P=0.01), presence of metastasis (both P=0.006), recurrence (both P=0.006) and poor response to chemotherapy (both P=0.02). Moreover, Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 expressions were both identified as independent prognostic factors for overall (both P=0.01) and disease-free (P=0.02 and 0.01, respectively) survivals of osteosarcoma patients. However, no associations were observed between Kindlin-3 expression and various clinicopathologic features and patients’ prognosis. In conclusion, aberrant expression of Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 may function as reliable markers for progression and prognosis in osteosarcoma patients, especially for tumor recurrence. PMID:28223823

  8. Human erythrocyte dematin and protein 4.2 (pallidin) are ATP binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Azim, A C; Marfatia, S M; Korsgren, C; Dotimas, E; Cohen, C M; Chishti, A H

    1996-03-05

    Dematin and protein 4.2 are peripheral membrane proteins associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Isoforms of dematin and protein 4.2 exist in many nonerythroid cells. In solution, dematin is a trimeric protein containing two subunits of 48 kDa and one subunit of 52 kDa. Recent determination of the primary structure of the 52 kDa subunit of dematin showed that it contains an additional 22-amino acid sequence in the headpiece domain. An alignment of the 22-amino acid insertion sequence revealed that the 52 kDa subunit of dematin shares a novel 11-amino acid motif with protein 4.2. In this communication, we report that the conserved 11-amino acid motif in dematin52 and protein 4.2 contains a nucleotide binding P-loop. Direct binding of ATP is demonstrated to the glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing corresponding segments of dematin52 and protein 4.2 as well as to purified protein 4.2. The binding of ATP to the recombinant domains of dematin52 and protein 4.2 is specific, saturable, and of high affinity. The nucleotide specificity of the P-loop is restricted to ATP since no detectable binding was observed with GTP. These results show that the 11-amino acid motif provides an ATP binding site in dematin52 and protein 4.2. Although the functional significance of ATP binding is not yet clear, our findings open new perspectives for the function of dematin and protein 4.2 in vivo.

  9. Structural Characterization of Human Coronavirus NL63 N Protein.

    PubMed

    Szelazek, Bozena; Kabala, Wojciech; Kus, Krzysztof; Zdzalik, Michal; Twarda-Clapa, Aleksandra; Golik, Przemyslaw; Burmistrz, Michal; Florek, Dominik; Wladyka, Benedykt; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2017-06-01

    Coronaviruses are responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections in humans. It is estimated that 1 to 10% of the population suffers annually from cold-like symptoms related to infection with human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63), an alphacoronavirus. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, the major structural component of the capsid, facilitates RNA packing, links the capsid to the envelope, and is also involved in multiple other processes, including viral replication and evasion of the immune system. Although the role of N protein in viral replication is relatively well described, no structural data are currently available regarding the N proteins of alphacoronaviruses. Moreover, our understanding of the mechanisms of RNA binding and nucleocapsid formation remains incomplete. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the N- and C-terminal domains (NTD, residues 10 to 140, and CTD, residues 221 to 340, respectively) of the N protein of HCoV-NL63, both at a 1.5-Å resolution. Based on our structure of NTD solved here, we proposed and experimentally evaluated a model of RNA binding. The structure of the CTD reveals the mode of N protein dimerization. Overall, this study expands our understanding of the initial steps of N protein-nucleic acid interaction and may facilitate future efforts to control the associated infections.IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are responsible for the common cold and other respiratory tract infections in humans. According to multiple studies, 1 to 10% of the population is infected each year with HCoV-NL63. Viruses are relatively simple organisms composed of a few proteins and the nucleic acids that carry the information determining their composition. The nucleocapsid (N) protein studied in this work protects the nucleic acid from the environmental factors during virus transmission. This study investigated the structural arrangement of N protein, explaining the first steps of its interaction with nucleic acid at the initial stages of

  10. Differential interactions of human kallikrein-binding protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin with human tissue kallikrein.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L M; Chao, L; Mayfield, R K; Chao, J

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of a new kallikrein-binding protein in human serum and its activities were studied. Both the kallikrein-binding protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin form 92 kDa SDS-stable and heat-stable complexes with human tissue kallikrein. In non-SDS/PAGE, the mobility of these complexes differ. Complex-formation between kallikrein and the binding protein is inhibited by heparin, whereas that between kallikrein and alpha 1-antitrypsin is heparin-resistant. In normal or alpha 1-antitrypsin-deficient-serum, the amount of 92 kDa SDS-stable complex formed upon addition of kallikrein is not related to serum alpha 1-antitrypsin levels. The rate of complex-formation between kallikrein and the binding protein is 12 times higher than that between kallikrein and alpha 1-antitrypsin. Purified alpha 1-antitrypsin, which exhibits normal elastase binding, has a kallikrein-binding activity less than 5% of that of serum. Binding of tissue kallikrein in serum is not inhibited by increasing elastase concentrations, and elastase binding in serum is not inhibited by excess tissue kallikrein. A specific monoclonal antibody to human alpha 1-antitrypsin does not bind to either 92 kDa endogenous or exogenous kallikrein complexes isolated from human serum. The studies demonstrate a new tissue kallikrein-binding protein, distinct from alpha 1-antitrypsin, is present in human serum. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2327990

  11. Cellular Localization of Engineered Human LINE-1 RNA and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Aurélien J; Basyuk, Eugénia; Gilbert, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The human LINE-1 retrotransposon has the ability to mobilize into a new genomic location through an intracellular replication cycle. Immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization experiments have been developed to detect subcellular localization of retrotransposition intermediates (i.e., ORF1p, ORF2p, and L1 mRNA). Currently, these protocols are also used to validate the interaction between retrotransposition complex components and potential cellular partners involved in L1 replication. Here, we describe in details methods for the identification of LINE-1 proteins and/or RNA in cells transfected with vectors expressing engineered human LINE-1 elements.

  12. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ .

  13. Processing and targeting of granule proteins in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, U; Bengtsson, N; Bülow, E; Garwicz, D; Lindmark, A; Olsson, I

    1999-12-17

    Neutrophils contain an assembly of granules destined for regulated secretion, each granule type with distinct constituents formed before terminal differentiation. The earliest granules are designated azurophil (primary), followed in time by specific (secondary), and gelatinase granules as well as secretory vesicles. Transcription factors regulate the genes for the granule proteins to ensure that expression of the gene products to be stored in different organelles is separated in time. Similar to lysosomal enzymes, many granule proteins, in particular those of the heterogeneous azurophil granules, are trimmed by proteolytic processing into mature proteins. Rodent myeloid cell lines have been utilized for research on the processing and targeting of human granule proteins after transfection of cDNA. Results from extensive work on the hematopoietic serine proteases of azurophil granules, employing in vitro mutagenesis, indicate that both an immature and a mature conformation are compatible with targeting for storage in granules. On the other hand, the amino-terminal propeptide of myeloperoxidase facilitates both the export from the endoplasmic reticulum and targeting for storage in granules. Similarly, targeting of defensins rely on an intact propeptide. The proteolytic processing into mature granule protein is most commonly a post-sorting event. Mis-sorting of specific granule proteins into azurophil or lysosome-like granules can result in premature activation and degradation, but represents a potential for manipulating the composition and function of neutrophil granules.

  14. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  15. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  16. Redox Proteomics Identification of Oxidatively Modified Myocardial Proteins in Human Heart Failure: Implications for Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF. PMID:22606238

  17. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  18. Effect of protein level and protein source on zinc absorption in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.A.; Almgren, A.; Kivistoe, B.C.; Cederblad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing levels of various protein sources on zinc absorption from a legume-based meal was studied in humans with the use of a radionuclide technique. The meals were extrinsically labelled with 65Zn and absorption was determined from measurements of the whole-body retention of the isotope. The mean fractional zinc absorption for the 13 meals was 24.7 +/- 6.9% and was only influenced by the protein content of the meal to a limited extent (r = 0.45). However, the amount of zinc absorbed from the meals was strongly correlated with both the protein (r = 0.85) and zinc content (r = 0.86): 5.9 +/- 1.7 mumol of zinc was absorbed from the basal bean meal which had the lowest protein content; the addition of low zinc chicken doubled the protein content and increased zinc absorption to 10.3 +/- 2.0 mumol; the addition of zinc-rich beef also doubled the protein content, however, zinc absorption was increased to 15.9 +/- 4.7 mumol. It is concluded that the zinc content of the main protein source of the diet determines the amount of zinc absorbed to a large extent. However, relatively small amounts of animal protein can significantly improve the value of a legume-based meal as a source of zinc.

  19. Protein Carbonylation and Heat Shock Proteins in Human Skeletal Muscle: Relationships to Age and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Beltran Valls, Maria R.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Narici, Marco V.; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E.; Caporossi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into “old” and “old sarcopenic”) were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r 2 = −.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r 2 = −.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. PMID:24621945

  20. Protein Kinase A Subunit α Catalytic and A Kinase Anchoring Protein 79 in Human Placental Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ma, Maggie Pui Chi; Thomson, Murray

    2012-01-01

    Components of protein phosphorylation signalling systems have been discovered in mitochondria and it has been proposed that these molecules modulate processes including oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis and steroidogenesis. We used electrophoresis and Western blots probed with specific antibodies to protein kinase A α catalytic subunit (PKAα Cat) and A kinase anchoring protein of approximately 79 kDa molecular weight (AKAP79) to demonstrate the presence of these two proteins in human placental mitochondria. Heavy mitochondria characteristic of cytotrophoblast were separated from light mitochondria characteristic of syncytiotrophoblast by centrifugation. PKAα Cat and AKAP79 were present in both heavy and light mitochondria with no significant difference in concentration. Sucrose density gradient separation of submitochondrial fractions indicated PKAα Cat is located predominantly in the outer membrane whereas AKAP79 is present mainly in the contact site fractions. These data indicate that PKAα Cat is present in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria of placental cells. AKAP79 is also present in human placental mitochondria but there may be anchoring proteins other than AKAP79 responsible for fixing PKA to the outer membrane. PKA may play roles in mitochondrial protein phosphorylation systems in both cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast.

  1. Mining topological structures of protein-protein interaction networks for human brain-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, W J; Gong, X J; Yu, H; Zhang, X C

    2015-10-16

    Compared to other placental mammals, humans have unique thinking and cognitive abilities because of their developed cerebral cortex composed of billions of neurons and synaptic connections. As the primary effectors of the mechanisms of life, proteins and their interactions form the basis of cellular and molecular functions in the living body. In this paper, we developed a pipeline for mining topological structures, identifying functional modules, and analyzing their functions from publically available datasets. A human brain-specific protein-protein interaction network with 1482 nodes and 3105 edges was built using a MapReduce based shortest path algorithm. Within this, 7 functional cliques were identified using a network clustering method, 98 hub proteins were obtained by the calculation of betweenness and connectivity, and 5 closest relationship to clique connector proteins were recognized by the combination scores of topological distance and gene ontology similarity. Furthermore, we discovered functional modules interacting with TP53 protein, which involves several fragmented research study conclusions and might be an important clue for further in vivo or in silico experiments to confirm these associations.

  2. Coactosin-like protein, a human F-actin-binding protein: critical role of lysine-75.

    PubMed Central

    Provost, P; Doucet, J; Stock, A; Gerisch, G; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-01-01

    Coactosin-like protein (CLP) was recently identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using 5-lipoxygenase as bait. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of CLP as a human filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein. CLP mRNA shows a wide tissue distribution and is predominantly expressed in placenta, lung, kidney and peripheral-blood leucocytes. Endogenous CLP is localized in the cytosol of myeloid cells. Using a two-hybrid approach, actin was identified as a CLP-interacting protein. Binding experiments indicated that CLP associates with F-actin, but does not form a stable complex with globular actin. In transfected mammalian cells, CLP co-localized with actin stress fibres. CLP bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of 1:2 (CLP: actin subunits), but could be cross-linked to only one subunit of actin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the involvement of Lys(75) of CLP in actin binding, a residue highly conserved in related proteins and supposed to be exposed on the surface of the CLP protein. Our results identify CLP as a new human protein that binds F-actin in vitro and in vivo, and indicate that Lys(75) is essential for this interaction. PMID:11583571

  3. Preparation and application of vegetable proteins, especially proteins from sunflower seed, for human consumption. An approach.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, B

    1983-01-01

    About 80% of the world protein production are of vegetable origin. More than half the vegetable protein is fed to animals, whereas merely 10 kg protein per capita are obtained from meat, milk and eggs per year. Therefore, and because of rising prices for raw materials and energy the production and the firsthand utilisation of proteinacous plants for foodstuffs are a worldwide problem. As future source of protein for human nutrition sunflower seed and oil extraction residues from sunflower seed, respectively, are of great significance. Sunflower seed does not contain anti-nutritive and toxical compounds. After crossing of species having a high oil content, the today cultivated sunflower hybrids bring seeds containing 17-22% crude protein and 30-52% oil. The cultivation also has led to a considerable reduction of the hull content. In processing of sunflower proteins colour problems occur resulting from finely ground particles of dark hulls and from polyphenolic acids which are easily oxidized and converted into brown polymerics. Essential components of the sunflower protein production are, therefore, the at least 98% dehulling before processing as well as the separation of polyphenolic acids and/or the prevention of their oxidation. In principle, the variation and combination of technological steps in pre-treating and defatting of sunflower seed, in extracting, precipitating, washing and drying of proteins, the chemical modification of proteins obtained, the interaction with neutral salts or complexing agents, and the admixture of lysine or proteins of high lysine content allow to adapt sunflower proteins to each type of application.

  4. Predicted structures of two proteins involved in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H X; Wang, G

    2001-01-01

    Structures of 79 proteins involved in human diseases were predicted by sequence alignments with structural templates. The predicted structures for ALDP and CSA, proteins responsible for adrenoleukodystrophy and the Cockayne syndrome, respectively, were analyzed to elucidate the molecular basis of disease mutations. In particular we positioned residue P484 of ALDP in the homodimer interface. This positioning is consistent with a recent experimental finding that the mutation P484R significantly decreases the self-interaction of ALDP and suggests that the disease mechanism of this mutation lies in the impaired ALDP dimerization. We identified two new WD repeats in CSA and suggest that one of these forms part of the interaction surface with other proteins.

  5. Role of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Proteins in Virion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca Marie; Kosuri, Srivenkat; Kerry, Julie Anne

    2014-01-01

    Like other herpesviruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains a unique proteinaceous layer between the virion envelope and capsid, termed the tegument. Upon infection, the contents of the tegument layer are delivered to the host cell, along with the capsid and the viral genome, where they facilitate the initial stages of virus replication. The tegument proteins also play important roles in virion assembly and this dual nature makes them attractive potential targets for antiviral therapies. While our knowledge regarding tegument protein function during the initiation of infection has been the subject of intense study, their roles in assembly are much less well understood. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that highlight the functions of HCMV tegument proteins during assembly, and pose key questions for further investigation. PMID:24509811

  6. Interaction of p53 with the human Rad51 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buchhop, S; Gibson, M K; Wang, X W; Wagner, P; Stürzbecher, H W; Harris, C C

    1997-01-01

    p53 is thought to function in the maintenance of genomic stability by modulating transcription and interacting with cellular proteins to influence the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. p53 mutations occur in >50% of human cancers, and cells which lack wild type p53 accumulate karyotypic abnormalities such as amplifications, deletions, inversions and translocations. We propose that p53 hinders these promiscuous recombinational events by interacting with cellular recombination and repair machinery. We recently reported that p53 can directly bind in vivo to human Rad51 (hRad51) protein and in vitro to its bacterial homologue RecA. We used GST-fusion and his-tagged protein systems to further investigate the physical interaction between p53 and hRad51, homologue of the yeast Rad51 protein that is involved in recombination and DNA double strand repair. The hRad51 binds to wild-type p53 and to a lesser extent, point mutants 135Y, 249S and 273H. This binding is not mediated by a DNA or RNA intermediate. Mapping studies using a panel of p53 deletion mutants indicate that hRad51 could bind to two regions of p53; one between amino acids 94 and 160 and a second between 264 and 315. Addition of anti-p53 antibody PAb421 (epitope 372-381 amino acids) inhibited the interaction with hRad51. In contrast, p53 interacts with the region between aa 125 and 220 of hRad51, which is highly conserved among Rad51 related proteins from bacteria to human. In Escherichia coli ecA protein, this region is required for homo-oligomerization, suggesting that p53 might disrupt the interaction between RecA and Rad51 subunits, thus inhibiting biochemical functions of Rad51 like proteins. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that p53 interaction with hRAD51 may influence DNA recombination and repair and that additional modifications of p53 by mutation and protein binding may affect this interaction. PMID:9380510

  7. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. [Study of molecular function of proteins in human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mikako

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has no more than nine genes expressing approximately twenty proteins. When T lymphocytes and macrophages in a body are infected with HIV, these proteins work in turn at specific time and location, causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), a disease yet to be overcome. Since the elucidation of molecular mechanism of HIV proteins should lead to remedy of AIDS, the author has been engaged in the study of HIV protein in the past decade. Described herein are viral protein X (Vpx), uniquely found in HIV-2, and its homologous protein Vpr found both in HIV-1 and -2. We found that Vpx enhances genome nuclear import in T lymphocytes, and is critical for reverse transcription of viral RNA in macrophages. This finding on the function in macrophages corrected long-term misleading belief. Furthermore, functional region mapping of Vpx was performed. In 2011, the protein SAMHD1 was identified as the host restriction factor counteracted by Vpx, by foreign researchers. After that, our independent study demonstrated the presence of SAMHD1-independent functions of Vpx in T cells, in addition to its SAMHD1-dependent functions in macrophages. Another topic of this review is Gag protein. Recently, it has reported by overseas researchers that PI(4,5)P2 (one of phosphoinositide) regulates Pr55(Gag) localization and assembly. In this study, we determined the binding affinity between N-terminal MA domain of Pr55(Gag) and various phosphoinositide derivatives using surface plasmon resonance. The results suggested that both negatively charged inositol phosphates and hydrophobic acyl chain are required for the MA binding.

  9. Comparative study of lens proteins of gray squirrel and human.

    PubMed

    Zigman, S; Paxhia, T; Lou, M; Yu, N T

    1990-01-01

    1. The four crystallins of the gray squirrel lens have been characterized using gel filtration chromatography, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunoblotting. Alpha, beta-heavy, beta-light, and gamma crystallins of squirrel lenses have been identified immunologically, and they cross-react strongly with rabbit polyclonal antibodies. The gamma-24 crystallin of the squirrel lens also reacts strongly with monoclonal anti-human lens gamma-24, as shown by its inhibition of the ELISA reaction by 85%. 2. The water-insoluble urea soluble proteins represent non-covalently associated species of soluble crystallins and the lens cytoskeletal proteins. The membrane intrinsic protein in the urea insoluble pellet has a mol. wt of 27,000 but other lower and higher mol. wt components are also present, which were removed by washing with 0.1 NaOH. The N-terminal 30 amino acid of squirrel lens gamma crystallin was found to be identical to that of the bovine (and human) lens. 3. Measurements of the distribution and state of SH and SS compounds in the squirrel lens have shown greater similarities to those of primates than those of rodents. The findings show that on the basis of both protein and sulfur chemistry the squirrel lens is a representative model for studies of oxidative lens changes in diurnal animals, including man.

  10. Differential DNA binding properties of three human homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Corsetti, M T; Briata, P; Sanseverino, L; Daga, A; Airoldi, I; Simeone, A; Palmisano, G; Angelini, C; Boncinelli, E; Corte, G

    1992-01-01

    The products of three human homeobox containing (HOX) genes, 2C, 3C and 4B, were produced in insect cells using the Baculovirus expression system and purified to near homogeneity. In this system we observed that the DNA binding forms of the three proteins are not glycosylated. HOX 3C and 4B are phosphorylated in insect cells, while HOX 2C is not. The three HOX proteins bind to a DNA sequence known to be a target site for Antennapedia protein with a very similar affinity (Kd = 1-2 x 10(-9) M). We then measured their binding properties to four human sequences present in the HOX 3D, 4C, 1C and 4B promoters. Two of these sequences have been reported to be binding sites for HOX proteins. HOX 2C, 3C and 4B behaved quite differently, showing low affinity for promoters of genes located upstream from their own gene in the HOX clusters and a higher affinity for regulatory sequences of their own gene and downstream HOX genes. Images PMID:1357628

  11. Insights into bacterial protein glycosylation in human microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The study of human microbiota is an emerging research topic. The past efforts have mainly centered on studying the composition and genomic landscape of bacterial species within the targeted communities. The interaction between bacteria and hosts is the pivotal event in the initiation and progression of infectious diseases. There is a great need to identify and characterize the molecules that mediate the bacteria-host interaction. Bacterial surface exposed proteins play an important role in the bacteria- host interaction. Numerous surface proteins are glycosylated, and the glycosylation is crucial for their function in mediating the bacterial interaction with hosts. Here we present an overview of surface glycoproteins from bacteria that inhabit three major mucosal environments across human body: oral, gut and skin. We describe the important enzymes involved in the process of protein glycosylation, and discuss how the process impacts the bacteria-host interaction. Emerging molecular details underlying glycosylation of bacterial surface proteins may lead to new opportunities for designing anti-infective small molecules, and developing novel vaccines in order to treat or prevent bacterial infection.

  12. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  13. Insights into bacterial protein glycosylation in human microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The study of human microbiota is an emerging research topic. The past efforts have mainly centered on studying the composition and genomic landscape of bacterial species within the targeted communities. The interaction between bacteria and hosts is the pivotal event in the initiation and progression of infectious diseases. There is a great need to identify and characterize the molecules that mediate the bacteria-host interaction. Bacterial surface exposed proteins play an important role in the bacteria-host interaction. Numerous surface proteins are glycosylated, and the glycosylation is crucial for their function in mediating the bacterial interaction with hosts. Here we present an overview of surface glycoproteins from bacteria that inhabit three major mucosal environments across human body: oral, gut and skin. We describe the important enzymes involved in the process of protein glycosylation, and discuss how the process impacts the bacteria-host interaction. Emerging molecular details underlying glycosylation of bacterial surface proteins may lead to new opportunities for designing anti-infective small molecules, and developing novel vaccines in order to treat or prevent bacterial infection. PMID:26712033

  14. Expression of heat stress proteins by human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sauk, J J; Norris, K; Foster, R; Moehring, J; Somerman, M J

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of the present report was to document the stress response produced by physical and chemical abuses to human periodontal ligament cells, and to review some of the known functions of stress response proteins produced as a result of such treatments. For these studies human PDL cells were exposed to sublethal challenges of 43 degrees C heat, sodium arsenite and the amino acid analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC). The cells were labelled with [35S]-methionine and the proteins produced were examined by autofluorography of SDS-PAGE gels. Heat challenges were shown to induce hsps with an apparent mol. wts. of 90K, 68-72K, 41-47K, and 36 K. Arsenite-treated cells produced similar hsps including a 30k protein not produced by other forms of stress. AZC treatment resulted in the production of apparent functionless hsps with apparent molecular weights of 90,000, 72,000, 68,000 and 36,000. The function of these proteins and their possible role in periodontal disease is discussed.

  15. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  16. Serologic Cross-Reactions between Nucleocapsid Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yange; Pohl, Jan; Brooks, W. Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) share virologic and epidemiologic features and cause clinically similar respiratory illness predominantly in young children. In a previous study of acute febrile respiratory illness in Bangladesh, we tested paired serum specimens from 852 children presenting fever and cough for diagnostic increases in titers of antibody to hRSV and hMPV by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Unexpectedly, of 93 serum pairs that showed a ≥4-fold increase in titers of antibody to hRSV, 24 (25.8%) showed a concurrent increase in titers of antibody to hMPV; of 91 pairs showing an increase to hMPV, 13 (14.3%) showed a concurrent increase to hRSV. We speculated that common antigens shared by these viruses explain this finding. Since the nucleocapsid (N) proteins of these viruses show the greatest sequence homology, we tested hyperimmune antisera prepared for each virus against baculovirus-expressed recombinant N (recN) proteins for potential cross-reactivity. The antisera were reciprocally reactive with both proteins. To localize common antigenic regions, we first expressed the carboxy domain of the hMPV N protein that was the most highly conserved region within the hRSV N protein. Although reciprocally reactive with antisera by Western blotting, this truncated protein did not react with hMPV IgG-positive human sera by EIA. Using 5 synthetic peptides that spanned the amino-terminal portion of the hMPV N protein, we identified a single peptide that was cross-reactive with human sera positive for either virus. Antiserum prepared for this peptide was reactive with recN proteins of both viruses, indicating that a common immunoreactive site exists in this region. PMID:25740767

  17. Improved Protein Extractionand Protein Identification from Archival Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Human Aortas

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zongming; Yan, Kun; Rosenberg, Avraham; Jin, Zhicheng; Crain, Barbara; Athas, Grace; Vander Heide, Richard S; Howard, Timothy; Everett, Allen D.; Herrington, David; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate combination of heat and elevated pressure to enhance protein extraction and quality of formaldehyde-fixed (FF), and FF paraffin-embedded (FFPE) aorta for proteomics. Experiment design Proteins were extracted from fresh frozen aorta at RT. FF and FFPE aortas (3 months and 15 years) were extracted at RT, heat alone, or a combination of heat and high pressure. Protein yields were compared, and digested peptides from the extracts were analyzed with mass spectrometry. Results Combined heat and elevated pressure increased protein yield from human FF or FFPE aorta compared to matched tissues with heat alone (1.5 fold) or at RT (8.3 fold), resulting in more proteins identified and with more sequence coverage. The length of storage did adversely affect the quality of proteins from FF tissue. For long term storage, aorta was preserved better with FFPE than FF alone. Periostin and MGF-E8 were demonstrated suitable for MRM assays from FFPE aorta. Conclusions and clinical relevance Combination of heat and high pressure is an effective method to extract proteins from FFPE aorta for downstream proteomics. This method opens the possibility for use of archival and often rare FFPE aortas and possibly other tissues available to proteomics for biomarker discovery and quantification. PMID:23339088

  18. Improved protein extraction and protein identification from archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human aortas.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zongming; Yan, Kun; Rosenberg, Avraham; Jin, Zhicheng; Crain, Barbara; Athas, Grace; Heide, Richard S Vander; Howard, Timothy; Everett, Allen D; Herrington, David; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-04-01

    Evaluate combination of heat and elevated pressure to enhance protein extraction and quality of formalin-fixed (FF), and FF paraffin-embedded (FFPE) aorta for proteomics. Proteins were extracted from fresh frozen aorta at room temperature (RT). FF and FFPE aortas (3 months and 15 years) were extracted at RT, heat alone, or a combination of heat and high pressure. Protein yields were compared, and digested peptides from the extracts were analyzed with MS. Combined heat and elevated pressure increased protein yield from human FF or FFPE aorta compared to matched tissues with heat alone (1.5-fold) or at RT (8.3-fold), resulting in more proteins identified and with more sequence coverage. The length of storage did adversely affect the quality of proteins from FF tissue. For long-term storage, aorta was preserved better with FFPE than FF alone. Periostin and MGF-E8 were demonstrated suitable for MRM assays from FFPE aorta. Combination of heat and high pressure is an effective method to extract proteins from FFPE aorta for downstream proteomics. This method opens the possibility for use of archival and often rare FFPE aortas and possibly other tissues available to proteomics for biomarker discovery and quantification. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h.

  20. Determining protein concentrations of the human ventricular proteome.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Arjen; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics is mostly used for measurements of relative differences in protein concentrations. Although such analyses are meaningful for comparing differences between two and more conditions, they do not directly provide details on the absolute protein concentrations within a system. Now, proteomics is heading more towards absolute quantitative strategies with results being expressed in copies/cell or ng/mg tissue. In the cardiac context, such quantitative information is crucial for (1) evaluating the feasibility of selecting a certain protein as potential novel drug target, (2) the expected concentration excreted into the circulation when selecting a biomarker, and (3) to build a model of cardiac function at the molecular level. At the same time, by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, a wealth of spectral information is gathered that can be used to evaluate protein levels of a select set of novel disease-altered proteins using, for instance, single reaction monitoring. Here we describe how to build a quantitative map of the human left ventricular proteome using a simple yet effective mass spectrometry-based spectral count method.

  1. Fast protein chromatofocusing of human very-low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weisweiler, P; Friedl, C; Schwandt, P

    1986-01-03

    Using fast protein chromatofocusing, a high-efficiency column chromatography method with a self-generated pH gradient and focusing effects, soluble human very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) apolipoproteins were fractionated between pH 6.3 and 4.0. In the presence of 6 mol/l urea and with a flow rate of 1 ml/min, one run (up to 10 mg of protein) took 30 min. VLDL apolipoproteins were separated in seven peaks. As revealed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing and double-immunodiffusion against mono-specific antisera, fractions corresponded to the following proteins: apolipoprotein C-I, albumin, apolipoproteins A-I, E, C-II plus C-III0, C-III1 and C-III2, respectively. Apolipoproteins were eluted in sharp, well-resolved peaks. The recovery of proteins was 78% of the starting material. With fast protein chromatofocusing, an efficient isolation of single apolipoproteins is possible from small amounts of VLDL apolipoprotein preparations. This technique is superior to the commonly used, time-consuming methods for apolipoprotein isolation.

  2. Pre-fusion structure of a human coronavirus spike protein.

    PubMed

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Cottrell, Christopher A; Wang, Nianshuang; Pallesen, Jesper; Yassine, Hadi M; Turner, Hannah L; Corbett, Kizzmekia S; Graham, Barney S; McLellan, Jason S; Ward, Andrew B

    2016-03-03

    HKU1 is a human betacoronavirus that causes mild yet prevalent respiratory disease, and is related to the zoonotic SARS and MERS betacoronaviruses, which have high fatality rates and pandemic potential. Cell tropism and host range is determined in part by the coronavirus spike (S) protein, which binds cellular receptors and mediates membrane fusion. As the largest known class I fusion protein, its size and extensive glycosylation have hindered structural studies of the full ectodomain, thus preventing a molecular understanding of its function and limiting development of effective interventions. Here we present the 4.0 Å resolution structure of the trimeric HKU1 S protein determined using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. In the pre-fusion conformation, the receptor-binding subunits, S1, rest above the fusion-mediating subunits, S2, preventing their conformational rearrangement. Surprisingly, the S1 C-terminal domains are interdigitated and form extensive quaternary interactions that occlude surfaces known in other coronaviruses to bind protein receptors. These features, along with the location of the two protease sites known to be important for coronavirus entry, provide a structural basis to support a model of membrane fusion mediated by progressive S protein destabilization through receptor binding and proteolytic cleavage. These studies should also serve as a foundation for the structure-based design of betacoronavirus vaccine immunogens.

  3. Biosynthesis of von Willebrand protein by human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Sporn, L A; Chavin, S I; Marder, V J; Wagner, D D

    1985-09-01

    Immunofluorescence staining of buffy coat smears from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in accelerated phase showed that approximately 13% of all nucleated cells contained von Willebrand protein and, therefore, appeared to be of megakaryocytic origin. This was confirmed by positive staining with antisera against platelet factor 4 and platelet glycoproteins. Short-term cultures of the buffy coat, which lacked endothelial cells, were metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine, and von Willebrand protein was immunopurified from cell lysates and culture medium. Cultures from this patient synthesized and secreted von Willebrand protein, in contrast with cultures from other patients with leukemia, who lacked circulating megakaryocytes, and from normal volunteers. The subunit composition of the megakaryocytic von Willebrand protein was very similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The size of the processed subunit (220 kD) and of the cellular (260 kD) and secreted (275 kD) precursors from the two cell types were indistinguishable by gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the ratio of precursor to processed subunit and the pattern of cellular and secreted nonreduced multimers were very similar. It appears, therefore, that the processing steps in biosynthesis of von Willebrand protein used by the megakaryocytes are very similar to those of umbilical vein endothelial cells.

  4. Leucine incorporation into mixed skeletal muscle protein in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, K.S.; Halliday, D.; Griggs, R.C. Clinical Research Centre, Harrow )

    1988-02-01

    Fractional mixed skeletal muscle protein synthesis (FMPS) was estimated in 10 postabsorptive healthy men by determining the increment in the abundance of ({sup 13}C)-leucine in quadriceps muscle protein during an intravenous infusion of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine. Whole-body muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was calculated based on the estimation of muscle mass from creatinine excretion and compared with whole-body protein synthesis (WBPS) calculated from the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux. A significant correlation was found between MPS. The contribution of MPS to WBPS was 27 {plus minus} 1%, which is comparable to the reports in other species. Morphometric analyses of adjacent muscle samples in eight subjects demonstrated that the biopsy specimens consisted of 86.5 {plus minus} 2% muscular as opposed to other tissues. Because fiber type composition varies between biopsies, the authors examined the relationship between proportions of each fiber type and FMPS. Variation in the composition of biopsies and in fiber-type proportion did not affect the estimation of muscle protein synthesis rate. They conclude that stable isotope techniques using serial needle biopsies permit the direct measurement of FMPS in humans and that this estimation is correlated with an indirect estimation of WBPS.

  5. Prefusion structure of a human coronavirus spike protein

    PubMed Central

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Cottrell, Christopher A.; Wang, Nianshuang; Pallesen, Jesper; Yassine, Hadi M.; Turner, Hannah L.; Corbett, Kizzmekia S.; Graham, Barney S.; McLellan, Jason S.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    HKU1 is a human betacoronavirus that causes mild yet prevalent respiratory disease1 and is related to the zoonotic SARS2 and MERS3 betacoronaviruses that have high fatality rates and pandemic potential. Cell tropism and host range is determined in part by the coronavirus spike (S) protein4, which binds cellular receptors and mediates membrane fusion. As the largest known class I fusion protein, its size and extensive glycosylation have hindered structural studies of the full ectodomain, thus preventing a molecular understanding of its function and limiting development of effective interventions. Here we present the 4.0 Å resolution structure of the trimeric HKU1 S protein determined using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. In the prefusion conformation, the receptor-binding subunits, S1, rest atop the fusion-mediating subunits, S2, preventing their conformational rearrangement. Surprisingly, the S1 C-terminal domains are interdigitated and form extensive quaternary interactions that occlude surfaces known to bind protein receptors in other coronaviruses. These features, along with the location of the two protease sites known to be important for coronavirus entry, provide a structural basis to support a model of membrane fusion mediated by progressive S protein destabilization through receptor binding and proteolytic cleavage. Additionally, these studies should serve as a foundation for the structure-based design of betacoronavirus vaccine immunogens. PMID:26935699

  6. Biological and immunological characterization of a human liver immunoregulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Schrempf-Decker, G E; Baron, D P; Brattig, N W; Bockhorn, H; Berg, P A

    1983-01-01

    The liver immunoregulatory protein (LIP) was originally characterized as human liver-derived soluble factor which inhibited the alloantigen and phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation of human lymphocytes (1). Soluble extracts prepared under the same experimental conditions from kidney, spleen, heart, lymph nodes, and erythrocytes did not exert any inhibitory activity (2). The purpose of this study was to characterize the immunobiological properties of LIP. In the primary one-way mixed lymphocyte culture, LIP depressed the generation of suppressor T cells which inhibited the lymphocyte proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or alloantigens. In addition, LIP suppressed in primary mixed lymphocyte culture the induction of cytotoxic T cells and memory cells as determined by cell-mediated lympholysis and secondary mixed lymphocyte culture, respectively. In the presence of LIP, the concanavalin A-mediated induction of suppressor T cells, the pokeweed mitogen-induced IgG synthesis in vitro and the cytolytic activity of K cells reacting in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity were also inhibited. Cytotoxic effects could be excluded since the viability of human lymphoblastoid cells, hepatocytes, and allogeneically stimulated lymphocytes was not affected by LIP. LIP was shown to be different from other liver-derived substances like acute phase proteins, immunoregulatory alpha-globulins, C-reactive protein, lipoproteins, and F antigen. Furthermore, LIP is not identical to other serum components like the immunoregulatory rosette inhibition factor and the serum inhibitory factor (3). However, the characteristics described herein strongly indicate that LIP is very similar to the liver extract described by Chisari (4) and the liver-derived inhibitory protein (LIP) described by Grol and Schumacher (5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Distribution of SR protein exonic splicing enhancer motifs in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Smith, Philip J; Krainer, Adrian R; Zhang, Michael Q

    2005-01-01

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are pre-mRNA cis-acting elements required for splice-site recognition. We previously developed a web-based program called ESEfinder that scores any sequence for the presence of ESE motifs recognized by the human SR proteins SF2/ASF, SRp40, SRp55 and SC35 (http://rulai.cshl.edu/tools/ESE/). Using ESEfinder, we have undertaken a large-scale analysis of ESE motif distribution in human protein-coding genes. Significantly higher frequencies of ESE motifs were observed in constitutive internal protein-coding exons, compared with both their flanking intronic regions and with pseudo exons. Statistical analysis of ESE motif frequency distributions revealed a complex relationship between splice-site strength and increased or decreased frequencies of particular SR protein motifs. Comparison of constitutively and alternatively spliced exons demonstrated slightly weaker splice-site scores, as well as significantly fewer ESE motifs, in the alternatively spliced group. Our results underline the importance of ESE-mediated SR protein function in the process of exon definition, in the context of both constitutive splicing and regulated alternative splicing.

  8. Cloning and characterization of human erythroid membrane-associated protein, human ERMAP.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Foltz, L; Sha, Y; Madlansacay, M R; Cain, C; Lindemann, G; Vargas, J; Nagy, D; Harriman, B; Mahoney, W; Schueler, P A

    2001-08-01

    We describe here the cloning and characterization of the human gene ERMAP, identified by subtractive hybridization using early and late gestation human fetal liver. By in situ hybridization, we found human ERMAP to be expressed not only in erythoid cells in fetal liver and adult bone marrow, but also in reticulocytes and circulating erythroblasts in 8-12-week fetal cord blood. The human ERMAP protein is predicted to contain a transmembrane segment and one extracellular immunoglobulin fold (IgV). The cytoplasmic region contains a highly conserved B30.2 motif, multiple consensus sequences for kinases, and post-Golgi sorting signals. The protein was localized to the cell surface as shown by an antibody specific for a peptide predicted from the IgV fold. The amino acid sequence of human ERMAP is highly homologous with that of mouse ERMAP, but differs in the number of extracellular immunoglobulin folds. Human ERMAP represents a new unique member of the rapidly growing B30.2 domain proteins.

  9. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. EML proteins in microtubule regulation and human disease.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew M; O'Regan, Laura; Montgomery, Jessica; Adib, Rozita; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-10-15

    The EMLs are a conserved family of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). The founding member was discovered in sea urchins as a 77-kDa polypeptide that co-purified with microtubules. This protein, termed EMAP for echinoderm MAP, was the major non-tubulin component present in purified microtubule preparations made from unfertilized sea urchin eggs [J. Cell Sci. (1993) 104: , 445-450; J. Cell Sci. (1987) 87: (Pt 1), 71-84]. Orthologues of EMAP were subsequently identified in other echinoderms, such as starfish and sand dollar, and then in more distant eukaryotes, including flies, worms and vertebrates, where the name of ELP or EML (both for EMAP-like protein) has been adopted [BMC Dev. Biol. (2008) 8: , 110; Dev. Genes Evol. (2000) 210: , 2-10]. The common property of these proteins is their ability to decorate microtubules. However, whether they are associated with particular microtubule populations or exercise specific functions in different microtubule-dependent processes remains unknown. Furthermore, although there is limited evidence that they regulate microtubule dynamics, the biochemical mechanisms of their molecular activity have yet to be explored. Nevertheless, interest in these proteins has grown substantially because of the identification of EML mutations in neuronal disorders and oncogenic fusions in human cancers. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the expression, localization and structure of what is proving to be an interesting and important class of MAPs. We also speculate about their function in microtubule regulation and highlight how the studies of EMLs in human diseases may open up novel avenues for patient therapy.

  11. Protein-protein interactions and human cellular cofactors as new targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Brai, Annalaura; Fallacara, Anna Lucia; Fazi, Roberta; Schenone, Silvia; Botta, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Two novel approaches for the development of new drugs against AIDS are summarized each leading to the achievement of important discoveries in anti-HIV therapy. Despite the success of HAART in reducing mortality, resistant strains continue to emerge in the clinic, underscoring the importance of developing next-generation drugs. Protein-protein interactions and human cellular cofactors represent the new targets of tomorrow in HIV research. The most relevant results obtained in the last few years by the two new strategies are described herein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineered cell-laden human protein-based elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Weiss, Anthony S.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Elastic tissue equivalence is a vital requirement of synthetic materials proposed for many resilient, soft tissue engineering applications. Here we present a bioelastomer made from tropoelastin, the human protein that naturally facilitates elasticity and cell interactions in all elastic tissues. We combined this protein’s innate versatility with fast non-toxic fabrication techniques to make highly extensible, cell compatible hydrogels. These hydrogels can be produced in less than a minute through photocrosslinking of methacrylated tropoelastin (MeTro) in an aqueous solution. The fabricated MeTro gels exhibit high extensibility (up to 400%) and superior mechanical properties that outperform other photocrosslinkable hydrogels. MeTro gels were used to encapsulate cells within a flexible 3D environment and to manufacture highly elastic 2D films for cell attachment, growth, and proliferation. In addition, the physical properties of this fabricated bioelastomer such as elasticity, stiffness, and pore characteristics were tuned through manipulation of the methacrylation degree and protein concentration. This photocrosslinkable, functional tissue mimetic gel benefits from the innate biological properties of a human elastic protein and opens new opportunities in tissue engineering. PMID:23639533

  13. Protein requirements for sister telomere association in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canudas, Silvia; Houghtaling, Benjamin R; Kim, Ju Youn; Dynek, Jasmin N; Chang, William G; Smith, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in human cells indicate that sister telomeres have distinct requirements for their separation at mitosis. In cells depleted for tankyrase 1, a telomeric poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, sister chromatid arms and centromeres separate normally, but telomeres remain associated and cells arrest in mitosis. Here, we use biochemical and genetic approaches to identify proteins that might mediate the persistent association at sister telomeres. We use immunoprecipitation analysis to show that the telomeric proteins, TRF1 (an acceptor of PARsylation by tankyrase 1) and TIN2 (a TRF1 binding partner) each bind to the SA1 ortholog of the cohesin Scc3 subunit. Sucrose gradient sedimentation shows that TRF1 cosediments with the SA1–cohesin complex. Depletion of the SA1 cohesin subunit or the telomeric proteins (TRF1 and TIN2) restores the normal resolution of sister telomeres in mitosis in tankyrase 1-depleted cells. Moreover, depletion of TRF1 and TIN2 or SA1 abrogates the requirement for tankyrase 1 in mitotic progression. Our studies indicate that sister telomere association in human cells is mediated by a novel association between a cohesin subunit and components of telomeric chromatin. PMID:17962804

  14. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  15. Expression of ACAT-1 protein in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured human monocytes-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Sakashita, N; Lee, O; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, S; Hakamata, H; Morganelli, P M; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y

    1998-10-01

    The acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) gene was first cloned in 1993 (Chang et al, J Biol Chem. 1993;268:20747-20755; designated ACAT-1). Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against the N-terminal portion of human ACAT-1 protein, we performed immunohistochemical localization studies and showed that the ACAT-1 protein was highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions of the human aorta. We also performed cell-specific localization studies using double immunostaining and showed that ACAT-1 was predominantly expressed in macrophages but not in smooth muscle cells. We then used a cell culture system in vitro to monitor the ACAT-1 expression in differentiating monocytes-macrophages. The ACAT-1 protein content increased by up to 10-fold when monocytes spontaneously differentiated into macrophages. This increase occurred within the first 2 days of culturing the monocytes and reached a plateau level within 4 days of culturing, indicating that the increase in ACAT-1 protein content is an early event during the monocyte differentiation process. The ACAT-1 protein expressed in the differentiating monocytes-macrophages was shown to be active by enzyme assay in vitro. The high levels of ACAT-1 present in macrophages maintained in culture can explain the high ACAT-1 contents found in atherosclerotic lesions. Our results thus support the idea that ACAT-1 plays an important role in differentiating monocytes and in forming macrophage foam cells during the development of human atherosclerosis.

  16. C-reactive protein modulates human lung fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuhiko; Kohyama, Tadashi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Takami, Kazutaka; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Desaki, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Rennard, Stephen I; Takizawa, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been classically used as a marker of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CRP on migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) to human plasma fibronectin (HFn). Using the blindwell chamber technique, CRP inhibited HFL-1 migration in a dose-dependent fashion (at 1 microg/mL, inhibition: 32.5% +/- 7.1%; P < .05). Western blot analysis showed that CRP inhibited the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in the presence of HFn. Moreover, the MAPK inhibitors SB202190 (25 microM) and SB203580 (25 microM) inhibited HFn-induced cell migration, suggesting an important role of p38 MAPK in HFn-induced migration. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effect of CRP is mediated by blocking MAPK. In summary, this study demonstrates that CRP directly modulates human lung fibroblasts migration. Thus, CRP may contribute to regulation of wound healing and may be endogenous antifibrotic factor acting on lung fibrosis.

  17. [Biosynthesis and isolation of a recombinant protein for producing genetically-engineered human proinsulin].

    PubMed

    Ivankin, A N; Mitaleva, S I; Nekliudov, A D

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of the recombinant protein from a genetically engineered Escherichia coli 1854 producer for further chemical enzymatic transformation into human insulin through proinsulin was studied. Under optimal conditions, the recombinant protein formation was more than 35% of the total cell proteins. Structures of the polypeptides obtained and purified chromatographically were confirmed by amino acid analysis. Human proinsulin was derived from the recombinant protein isolated.

  18. Predicting protein-protein interactions between human and hepatitis C virus via an ensemble learning method.

    PubMed

    Emamjomeh, Abbasali; Goliaei, Bahram; Zahiri, Javad; Ebrahimpour, Reza

    2014-12-01

    An estimated 170 million people, approximately 3% of the world population, are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). More than 350,000 deaths are reported annually, which are caused by HCV. HCV, similar to a variety of viruses, causes disease in humans by altering protein-protein interactions within the host cells. Experimental approaches for the detection of host-virus PPIs have many inherent limitations. Computational approaches to predict these interactions are therefore of significant importance. While many studies have been developed to predict intra-species PPIs in the last decade, predictions on inter-species PPIs such as human-HCV PPIs are rare. In this study, we developed an ensemble learning method to predict PPIs between human and HCV proteins. Our model utilises four well-established diverse learners as base classifiers including random forest (RF), Naïve Bayes (NB), support vector machine (SVM) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). In addition, an MLP was used as a meta-learner to combine base learners' predictions to provide the final prediction. To encode human and HCV proteins as feature vectors, we used six different descriptors as follows: amino acid composition (ACC), pseudo amino acid composition (PAC), evolutionary information feature, network centrality measures, tissue information and post-translational modification information. To assess the prediction power of the proposed method, we assembled a benchmark dataset composed of confident positive and negative PPIs. In a 10-fold cross-validation experiment, our prediction method achieved accuracy and specificity as high as 83% and 94%, respectively. Furthermore, in an independent test set the proposed method achieved an accuracy of 84% and a specificity of 92%. When compared with the existing method, our method showed a better performance. These results revealed that our method is suitable for performing PPI prediction in a host-pathogen context.

  19. The protein-protein interaction network of the human Sirtuin family.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankush; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks are useful for studying human diseases and to look for possible health care through a holistic approach. Networks are playing an increasing and important role in the understanding of physiological processes such as homeostasis, signaling, spatial and temporal organizations, and pathological conditions. In this article we show the complex system of interactions determined by human Sirtuins (Sirt) largely involved in many metabolic processes as well as in different diseases. The Sirtuin family consists of seven homologous Sirt-s having structurally similar cores but different terminal segments, being rather variable in length and/or intrinsically disordered. Many studies have determined their cellular location as well as biological functions although molecular mechanisms through which they act are actually little known therefore, the aim of this work was to define, explore and understand the Sirtuin-related human interactome. As a first step, we have integrated the experimentally determined protein-protein interactions of the Sirtuin-family as well as their first and second neighbors to a Sirtuin-related sub-interactome. Our data showed that the second-neighbor network of Sirtuins encompasses 25% of the entire human interactome, and exhibits a scale-free degree distribution and interconnectedness among top degree nodes. Moreover, the Sirtuin sub interactome showed a modular structure around the core comprising mixed functions. Finally, we extracted from the Sirtuin sub-interactome subnets related to cancer, aging and post-translational modifications for information on key nodes and topological space of the subnets in the Sirt family network.

  20. Substrate Specificity of Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, You; Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Clarke, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) methylates arginine residues on various protein substrates and is involved in DNA transcription, RNA splicing, DNA repair, cell differentiation, and metastasis. The substrate sequences it recognizes in vivo and the enzymatic mechanism behind it, however, remain to be explored. Here we characterize methylation catalyzed by a bacterially expressed GST-tagged human PRMT7 fusion protein with a broad range of peptide and protein substrates. After confirming its type III activity generating only ω-NG-monomethylarginine and its distinct substrate specificity for RXR motifs surrounded by basic residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis studies on this enzyme, revealing that two acidic residues within the double E loop, Asp-147 and Glu-149, modulate the substrate preference. Furthermore, altering a single acidic residue, Glu-478, on the C-terminal domain to glutamine nearly abolished the activity of the enzyme. Additionally, we demonstrate that PRMT7 has unusual temperature dependence and salt tolerance. These results provide a biochemical foundation to understanding the broad biological functions of PRMT7 in health and disease. PMID:25294873

  1. Expression and purification of recombinant human EGFL7 protein.

    PubMed

    Picuric, Srdjan; Friedrich, Matthias; Oess, Stefanie

    2009-11-01

    The secreted epidermal growth factor-like protein 7 (EGFL7) plays an important role in angiogenesis, especially in the recruitment of endothelial and smooth muscle cells to the site of the nascent vessel and their ordered assembly into functional vasculature. However, progress in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is to date greatly hindered by the lack of recombinant EGFL7 protein in a stable, soluble, native state, thus preventing e.g. the characterization of the proposed functional receptor as well as investigation of additional biological effects of EGFL7. So far all attempts to produce sufficient amounts of recombinant EGFL7 protein by various groups have failed. In this study we describe a procedure for the expression and purification of human EGFL7 from Sf9 cells and for the first time provide means to isolate biologically functional EGFL7 protein in sufficient quantities for its further biological characterization. We believe that the availability of EGFL7 will greatly accelerate our understanding of the precise role of EGFL7 and the underlying molecular mechanisms of EGFL7 action in the fundamentally important process of angiogenesis.

  2. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya’ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein–pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism. PMID:27044079

  3. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  4. Diffusion of human Replication Protein A along single stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Sokoloski, Joshua; Galletto, Roberto; Elson, Elliot L.; Wold, Marc S.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single stranded (ss) DNA binding protein that plays critical roles in most aspects of genome maintenance, including replication, recombination and repair. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, destabilizes DNA secondary structure and facilitates binding of other proteins to ssDNA. However, RPA must be removed from or redistributed along ssDNA during these processes. To probe the dynamics of RPA-DNA interactions, we combined ensemble and single molecule fluorescence approaches to examine human RPA diffusion along ssDNA and find that an hRPA hetero-trimer can diffuse rapidly along ssDNA. Diffusion of hRPA is functional in that it provides the mechanism by which hRPA can transiently disrupt DNA hairpins by diffusing in from ssDNA regions adjacent to the DNA hairpin. hRPA diffusion was also monitored by the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity of a Cy3 fluorophore attached to the end of ssDNA. Using a novel method to calibrate the Cy3 fluorescence intensity as a function of hRPA position on the ssDNA, we estimate a one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of hRPA on ssDNA of D1 ~5000 nucleotide2s−1 at 37°C. Diffusion of hRPA while bound to ssDNA enables it to be readily repositioned to allow other proteins access to ssDNA. PMID:25058683

  5. CBS domains: structure, function, and pathology in human proteins.

    PubMed

    Ignoul, Sofie; Eggermont, Jan

    2005-12-01

    The cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein domain that is present in the proteome of archaebacteria, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. CBS domains usually come in tandem repeats and are found in cytosolic and membrane proteins performing different functions (metabolic enzymes, kinases, and channels). Crystallographic studies of bacterial CBS domains have shown that two CBS domains form an intramolecular dimeric structure (CBS pair). Several human hereditary diseases (homocystinuria, retinitis pigmentosa, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myotonia congenital, etc.) can be caused by mutations in CBS domains of, respectively, cystathionine-beta-synthase, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, AMP kinase, and chloride channels. Despite their clinical relevance, it remains to be established what the precise function of CBS domains is and how they affect the structural and/or functional properties of an enzyme, kinase, or channel. Depending on the protein in which they occur, CBS domains have been proposed to affect multimerization and sorting of proteins, channel gating, and ligand binding. However, recent experiments revealing that CBS domains can bind adenosine-containing ligands such ATP, AMP, or S-adenosylmethionine have led to the hypothesis that CBS domains function as sensors of intracellular metabolites.

  6. Targeting human SET1/MLL family of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blazer, Levi; Eram, Mohammad S.; Barsyte‐Lovejoy, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Hajian, Taraneh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET1 family of proteins, and in particular MLL1, are essential regulators of transcription and key mediators of normal development and disease. Here, we summarize the detailed characterization of the methyltransferase activity of SET1 complexes and the role of the key subunits, WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30. We present new data on full kinetic characterization of human MLL1, MLL3, SET1A, and SET1B trimeric, tetrameric, and pentameric complexes to elaborate on substrate specificities and compare our findings with what has been reported before. We also review exciting recent work identifying potent inhibitors of oncogenic MLL1 function through disruption of protein–protein interactions within the MLL1 complex. PMID:28160335

  7. Human erythrocyte membrane proteins of zone 4.5 exist as families of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, C F; Coleman, D B; Kay, M M; Shiffer, K A; Miller, J; Goodman, S R

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the polypeptide composition of zone 4.5 of human erythrocyte membranes has been done by immunoautoradiographic and two-dimensional peptide mapping techniques. Results of these studies demonstrated that the Coomassie blue profile was constant, with 14 well-resolved bands present. Zone 4.5 polypeptides existed as at least four families of two or more components with closely related polypeptide backbones. The families could be distinguished on the basis of their extraction characteristics, immunological cross-reactivity, and two-dimensional peptide maps. One family was related to protein 4.1, one family was related to band 3, and two families were independent and not similar to other larger membrane proteins. The data show that all of the visualized bands in zone 4.5 do not have the same protein composition and that several closely related forms of some polypeptides are present.

  8. Predicting human plasma protein binding of drugs using plasma protein interaction QSAR analysis (PPI-QSAR).

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Chen, Zhuxi; Xu, Xuejun; Sui, Xiaofan; Guo, Tao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jiwen

    2011-09-01

    A novel method, named as the plasma protein-interaction QSAR analysis (PPI-QSAR) was used to construct the QSAR models for human plasma protein binding. The intra-molecular descriptors of drugs and inter-molecular interaction descriptors resulted from the docking simulation between drug molecules and human serum albumin were included as independent variables in this method. A structure-based in silico model for a data set of 65 antibiotic drugs was constructed by the multiple linear regression method and validated by the residual analysis, the normal Probability-Probability plot and Williams plot. The R(2) and Q(2) values of the entire data set were 0.87 and 0.77, respectively, for the training set were 0.86 and 0.72, respectively. The results indicated that the fitted model is robust, stable and satisfies all the prerequisites of the regression models. Combining intra-molecular descriptors with inter-molecular interaction descriptors between drug molecules and human serum albumin, the drug plasma protein binding could be modeled and predicted by the PPI-QSAR method successfully.

  9. Investigating protein haptenation mechanisms of skin sensitisers using human serum albumin as a model protein.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Maja; Pease, Camilla K; Basketter, David A; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne

    2007-06-01

    Covalent modification of skin proteins by electrophiles is a key event in the induction of skin sensitisation but not skin irritation although the exact nature of the binding mechanisms has not been determined empirically for the vast majority of sensitisers. It is also unknown whether immunologically relevant protein targets exist in the skin contributing to effecting skin sensitisation. To determine the haptenation mechanism(s) and spectra of amino acid reactivity in an intact protein for two sensitisers expected to react by different mechanisms, human serum albumin (HSA) was chosen as a model protein. The aim of this work was also to verify for selected non-sensitisers and irritants that no protein haptenation occurs even under forcing conditions. HSA was incubated with chemicals and the resulting complexes were digested with trypsin and analysed deploying matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The data confirmed that different residues (lysine, cysteine, histidine and tyrosine) are covalently modified in a highly selective and differential manner by the sensitisers 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene and phenyl salicylate. Additionally, non-sensitisers 2,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene, butyl paraben and benzaldehyde and irritants benzalkonium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulphate did not covalently modify HSA under any conditions. The data indicate that covalent haptenation is a prerequisite of skin sensitisation but not irritation. The data also suggest that protein modifications are targeted to certain amino acids residing in chemical microenvironments conducive to reactivity within an intact protein. Deriving such information is relevant to our understanding of antigen formation in the immunobiology of skin sensitisation and in the development of in vitro protein haptenation assays.

  10. Systematic protein-protein interaction mapping for clinically relevant human GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Sokolina, Kate; Kittanakom, Saranya; Snider, Jamie; Kotlyar, Max; Maurice, Pascal; Gandía, Jorge; Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Tadagaki, Kenjiro; Oishi, Atsuro; Wong, Victoria; Malty, Ramy H; Deineko, Viktor; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Amin, Shahreen; Yao, Zhong; Morató, Xavier; Otasek, David; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Menendez, Javier; Auerbach, Daniel; Angers, Stephane; Pržulj, Natasa; Bouvier, Michel; Babu, Mohan; Ciruela, Francisco; Jockers, Ralf; Jurisica, Igor; Stagljar, Igor

    2017-03-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of integral membrane receptors with key roles in regulating signaling pathways targeted by therapeutics, but are difficult to study using existing proteomics technologies due to their complex biochemical features. To obtain a global view of GPCR-mediated signaling and to identify novel components of their pathways, we used a modified membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) approach and identified interacting partners for 48 selected full-length human ligand-unoccupied GPCRs in their native membrane environment. The resulting GPCR interactome connects 686 proteins by 987 unique interactions, including 299 membrane proteins involved in a diverse range of cellular functions. To demonstrate the biological relevance of the GPCR interactome, we validated novel interactions of the GPR37, serotonin 5-HT4d, and adenosine ADORA2A receptors. Our data represent the first large-scale interactome mapping for human GPCRs and provide a valuable resource for the analysis of signaling pathways involving this druggable family of integral membrane proteins. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. Protein binding elements in the human beta-polymerase promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Englander, E W; Wilson, S H

    1990-01-01

    The core promoter for human DNA polymerase beta contains discrete binding sites for mammalian nuclear proteins, as revealed by DNasel footprinting and gel mobility shift assays. Two sites correspond to sequences identical with the Sp1 factor binding element, and a third site includes an eight residue palindromic sequence, TGACGTCA, known as the CRE element of several cAMP responsive promoters; the 5 to 10 residues flanking this palindrome on each side have no apparent sequence homology with known elements in other promoters. Nuclear extract from a variety of tissues and cells were examined; these included rat liver and testes and cultured cells of human and hamster origin. The DNasel footprint is strong over and around the palindromic element for each of the extracts and is equivalent in size (approximately 22 residues); footprinting over the Sp1 binding sites is seen also. Two potential tissue-specific binding sites, present in liver but not in testes, were found corresponding to residues -13 to -10 and +33 to +48, respectively. Protein binding to the palindromic element was confirmed by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the core promoter as probe. Binding specificity of the 22 residue palindromic element, as revealed by oligonucleotide competition, is different from that of AP-1 binding element. Controlled proteolysis with trypsin was used to study structural properties of proteins forming the mobility shift bands. Following digestion with trypsin, most of the palindrome binding activity of each extract corresponded to a sharp, faster migrating band, potentially representing a DNA binding domain of the palindrome binding protein. Images PMID:2315044

  12. Localization of eosinophil granule major basic protein in human basophils

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    In experiments using an immunofluorescent method to localize human eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) in cells and tissues, a small number of cells stained for MBP that subsequently could not be identified as eosinophils. Because the Charcot-Leyden crystal protein, another eosinophil protein, was recently identified in basophils, we tested whether MBP might also be a constituent of blood basophils. Highly purified, eosinophil-free basophil suspensions were prepared using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) to sort basophil- containing mononuclear cell preparations stained with fluorescein- conjugated sheep IgG anti-human IgE antibody. Using these FACS-purified basophils, we found that: (a) enrichment for surface IgE-positive cells (greater than 95% basophils) by FACS also enriched for cells staining for MBP by immunofluorescence; (b) MBP appeared to be localized in the histamine-, heparin-containing granules; (c) significant quantities of MBP were measurable by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in freeze-thaw detergent extracts of purified basophils; and (d) RIA dose-response curves for extracts of purified eosinophils and basophils had identical slopes. The MBP content of basophils from normal individuals averaged 140 ng/10(6) cells, whereas purified eosinophils from normal donors and patients with the hyper-eosinophilic syndrome averaged 4,979 and 824 ng/10(6) cells, respectively. MBP was also detected by immunofluorescence and RIA in cells obtained from a patient with basophil leukemia, although the MBP content for basophil leukemia cells was lower than that for normal basophils. We conclude that basophils contain a protein that is immunochemically indistinguishable from eosinophil granule MBP. PMID:6350526

  13. Characteristics and clustering of human ribosomal protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kyota; Washio, Takanori; Uechi, Tamayo; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya; Tomita, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    Background The ribosome is a central player in the translation system, which in mammals consists of four RNA species and 79 ribosomal proteins (RPs). The control mechanisms of gene expression and the functions of RPs are believed to be identical. Most RP genes have common promoters and were therefore assumed to have a unified gene expression control mechanism. Results We systematically analyzed the homogeneity and heterogeneity of RP genes on the basis of their expression profiles, promoter structures, encoded amino acid compositions, and codon compositions. The results revealed that (1) most RP genes are coordinately expressed at the mRNA level, with higher signals in the spleen, lymph node dissection (LND), and fetal brain. However, 17 genes, including the P protein genes (RPLP0, RPLP1, RPLP2), are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. (2) Most promoters have GC boxes and possible binding sites for nuclear respiratory factor 2, Yin and Yang 1, and/or activator protein 1. However, they do not have canonical TATA boxes. (3) Analysis of the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins indicated a high lysine and arginine content. (4) The major RP genes exhibit a characteristic synonymous codon composition with high rates of G or C in the third-codon position and a high content of AAG, CAG, ATC, GAG, CAC, and CTG. Conclusion Eleven of the RP genes are still identified as being unique and did not exhibit at least some of the above characteristics, indicating that they may have unknown functions not present in other RP genes. Furthermore, we found sequences conserved between human and mouse genes around the transcription start sites and in the intronic regions. This study suggests certain overall trends and characteristic features of human RP genes. PMID:16504170

  14. Characterization of muscle ankyrin repeat proteins in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wette, Stefan G; Smith, Heather K; Lamb, Graham D; Murphy, Robyn M

    2017-09-01

    Muscle ankyrin repeat proteins (MARPs) are a family of titin-associated, stress-response molecules and putative transducers of stretch-induced signaling in skeletal muscle. In cardiac muscle, cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) and diabetes-related ankyrin repeat protein (DARP) reportedly redistribute from binding sites on titin to the nucleus following a prolonged stretch. However, it is unclear whether ankyrin repeat domain protein 2 (Ankrd 2) shows comparable stretch-induced redistribution to the nucleus. We measured the following in rested human skeletal muscle: 1) the absolute amount of MARPs and 2) the distribution of Ankrd 2 and DARP in both single fibers and whole muscle preparations. In absolute amounts, Ankrd 2 is the most abundant MARP in human skeletal muscle, there being ~3.1 µmol/kg, much greater than DARP and CARP (~0.11 and ~0.02 µmol/kg, respectively). All DARP was found to be tightly bound at cytoskeletal (or possibly nuclear) sites. In contrast, ~70% of the total Ankrd 2 is freely diffusible in the cytosol [including virtually all of the phosphorylated (p)Ankrd 2-Ser99 form], ~15% is bound to non-nuclear membranes, and ~15% is bound at cytoskeletal sites, likely at the N2A region of titin. These data are not consistent with the proposal that Ankrd 2, per se, or pAnkrd 2-Ser99 mediates stretch-induced signaling in skeletal muscle, dissociating from titin and translocating to the nucleus, because the majority of these forms of Ankrd 2 are already free in the cytosol. It will be necessary to show that the titin-associated Ankrd 2 is modified by stretch in some as-yet-unidentified way, distinct from the diffusible pool, if it is to act as a stretch-sensitive signaling molecule. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  16. Localization of alpha-uterine protein in human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Horne, C H; Paterson, W F; Sutcliffe, R G

    1982-07-01

    Immunoperoxidase staining was used to investigate the origin of human alpha-uterine protein (AUP). Specific staining was observed in the glandular epithelium of the endometrium during the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle and during pregnancy, and in a patient on an oestrogen-progestagen contraceptive pill. The pattern of staining strongly suggests that AUP is secreted into the uterine lumen. The location and concentration of AUP in the uterus may explain the relative concentrations of AUP in amniotic fluid and maternal serum.

  17. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  18. Protein kinase C and the antiviral effect of human interferon.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Constantinescu, S N; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M; Cajal, N

    1989-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors: Hidaka's compounds H-7 (10 microM) and H-8 (20 microM), palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) and phloretin (50 microM), did not modify the antiviral effect of human natural or recombinant interferon alpha and of natural interferon beta. The tumor promoter 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (200 nM), known as activator of PKC induced an antiviral state when tested on human embryo fibroblasts challenged with the vesicular stomatitis virus. The battery of PKC inhibitors used inhibited the antiviral effect induced by TPA. Palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) exerted a toxic effect that was reversed by interferon treatment (2,000 IU/ml interferon alpha). These results suggest that PKC, possibly activated by interferon-receptor interaction, is not essential for inducing the antiviral effect of interferon, but, probably, mediates the antiviral effect of TPA.

  19. Phosphorylation sites in human erythrocyte band 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Yannoukakos, D; Vasseur, C; Piau, J P; Wajcman, H; Bursaux, E

    1991-01-30

    The human red cell anion-exchanger, band 3 protein, is one of the main phosphorylated proteins of the erythrocyte membrane. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that ATP-depletion of the red blood cell decreased the anion-exchange rate, suggesting that band 3 protein phosphorylation could be involved in the regulation of anion transport function (Bursaux et al. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 777, 253-260). Phosphorylation occurs mainly on the cytoplasmic domain of the protein and the major site of phosphorylation was assigned to tyrosine-8 (Dekowski et al. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 2750-2753). This site being very far from the integral, anion-exchanger domain, the aim of the present study was to determine whether phosphorylation sites exist in the integral domain. The phosphorylation reaction was carried out on isolated membranes in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and phosphorylated band 3 protein was then isolated. Both the cytoplasmic and the membrane spanning domains were purified. The predominant phosphorylation sites were found on the cytoplasmic domain. RP-HPLC analyses of the tryptic peptides of whole band 3 protein, and of the isolated cytoplasmic and membrane-spanning domains allowed for the precise localization of the phosphorylated residues. 80% of the label was found in the N-terminal tryptic peptide (T-1), (residues 1-56). In this region, all the residues susceptible to phosphorylation were labeled but in varying proportion. Under our conditions, the most active membrane kinase was a tyrosine kinase, activated preferentially by Mn2+ but also by Mg2+. Tyrosine-8 was the main phosphate acceptor residue (50-70%) of the protein, tyrosine-21 and tyrosine-46 residues were also phosphorylated but to a much lesser extent. The main targets of membrane casein kinase, preferentially activated by Mg2+, were serine-29, serine-50, and threonine(s)-39, -42, -44, -48, -49, -54 residue(s) located in the T-1 peptide. A tyrosine phosphatase activity was

  20. In vivo human Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Posey, Karen L; Davies, Sherri; Bales, Elise S; Haynes, Richard; Sandell, Linda J; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2005-12-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a large extracellular matrix protein whose function is unknown. Mutations in COMP cause pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, two skeletal dysplasias which are associated with intracellular retention of COMP in chondrocytes. In contrast, COMP null mice are normal suggesting gene redundancy or that the detrimental effect is associated with mutant COMP rather than the absence of functional COMP. To define the elements that regulate COMP transcription and tissue-specificity, we have evaluated the human COMP promoter driving fusion gene expression in vitro and in vivo. COMP promoter activity is higher in rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS) than in a fibroblast cell line. In RCS cells, expression of a reporter gene containing 1.7 kb of the human COMP promoter was three-fold higher than all shorter COMP promoter constructs. In transgenic mice, 1.7 kb of the human COMP promoter is active early in development in the limbs, spine, and eye. As development progresses, promoter activity diminishes in the eye and migrates from the center to the ends of the long bones. On the other hand, while 375 bp of the human COMP promoter is sufficient for proper tissue-specific expression, levels are less than those found with the 1.7-COMP promoter. The expression pattern of both promoters recapitulates endogenous cartilage COMP expression in mice. Our findings indicate that the elements required for chondrocyte-specific expression lie within 375 bp of the translational start site, while DNA enhancer elements are located between 1.0 to 1.7 kb.

  1. Small Heat Shock Proteins Potentiate Amyloid Dissolution by Protein Disaggregases from Yeast and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Duennwald, Martin L.; Echeverria, AnaLisa; Shorter, James

    2012-01-01

    How small heat shock proteins (sHsps) might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI +] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22723742

  2. Recent coselection in human populations revealed by protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Zhou, Hang; Tang, Kun

    2014-12-21

    Genome-wide scans for signals of natural selection in human populations have identified a large number of candidate loci that underlie local adaptations. This is surprising given the relatively short evolutionary time since the divergence of the human population. One hypothesis that has not been formally examined is whether and how the recent human evolution may have been shaped by coselection in the context of complex molecular interactome. In this study, genome-wide signals of selection were scanned in East Asians, Europeans, and Africans using 1000 Genome data, and subsequently mapped onto the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. We found that the candidate genes of recent positive selection localized significantly closer to each other on the PPI network than expected, revealing substantial clustering of selected genes. Furthermore, gene pairs of shorter PPI network distances showed higher similarities of their recent evolutionary paths than those further apart. Last, subnetworks enriched with recent coselection signals were identified, which are substantially overrepresented in biological pathways related to signal transduction, neurogenesis, and immune function. These results provide the first genome-wide evidence for association of recent selection signals with the PPI network, shedding light on the potential mechanisms of recent coselection in the human genome. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  4. Secretion of Human Protein C in Mouse Milk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chae-Won; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    To determine the production of recombinant human protein C (rec-hPC) in milk, we created two homozygous mice lines for the goat β-casein/hPC transgene. Females and males of both lines (#10 and #11) displayed normal growth, fertility, and lactated normally. The copy number of the transgene was about fivefold higher in #10 line as compared to #11 line. mRNA expression of the transgene was only detected in the mammary glands of both lines. Furthermore, mRNA expression was fourfold higher on day 7 than on day 1 during lactation. Northern blot analysis of mRNA expression in the #10 line of transgenic (Tg) mice indicated a strong expression of the transgene in the mammary glands after seven days of lactation. Comparison of rec-hPC protein level with that of mRNA in the mammary glands showed a very similar pattern. A 52-kDa band corresponding to the hPC protein was strongly detected in mammary glands of the #10 line during lactation. We also detected two bands of heavy chain and one weak band of light chain in the milk of the #10 and #11 lines. One single band at 52 kDa was detected from CHO cells transfected with hPC cDNA. hPC was mainly localized in the alveolar epithelial cell of the mammary glands. The protein is strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of the cultured mammary gland tissue. hPC protein produced in milk ranged from 2 to 28 ng/mL. These experiments indicated that rec-hPC can be produced at high levels in mice mammary glands. PMID:25749471

  5. Dissecting the Human Protein-Protein Interaction Network via Phylogenetic Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cho-Yi; Ho, Andy; Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network offers a conceptual framework for better understanding the functional organization of the proteome. However, the intricacy of network complexity complicates comprehensive analysis. Here, we adopted a phylogenic grouping method combined with force-directed graph simulation to decompose the human PPI network in a multi-dimensional manner. This network model enabled us to associate the network topological properties with evolutionary and biological implications. First, we found that ancient proteins occupy the core of the network, whereas young proteins tend to reside on the periphery. Second, the presence of age homophily suggests a possible selection pressure may have acted on the duplication and divergence process during the PPI network evolution. Lastly, functional analysis revealed that each age group possesses high specificity of enriched biological processes and pathway engagements, which could correspond to their evolutionary roles in eukaryotic cells. More interestingly, the network landscape closely coincides with the subcellular localization of proteins. Together, these findings suggest the potential of using conceptual frameworks to mimic the true functional organization in a living cell. PMID:25412639

  6. Human Rad54 protein stimulates human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga M.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Rad54, a key protein of homologous recombination, physically interacts with a DNA structure-specific endonuclease, Mus81–Eme1. Genetic data indicate that Mus81–Eme1 and Rad54 might function together in the repair of damaged DNA. In vitro, Rad54 promotes branch migration of Holliday junctions, whereas the Mus81–Eme1 complex resolves DNA junctions by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we show that human Rad54 stimulates Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity on various Holliday junction-like intermediates. This stimulation is the product of specific interactions between the human Rad54 (hRad54) and Mus81 proteins, considering that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad54 protein does not stimulate human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity. Stimulation of Mus81–Eme1 cleavage activity depends on formation of specific Rad54 complexes on DNA substrates occurring in the presence of ATP and, to a smaller extent, of other nucleotide cofactors. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional link between the branch migration activity of hRad54 and the structure-specific endonuclease activity of hMus81–Eme1, suggesting that the Rad54 and Mus81–Eme1 proteins may cooperate in the processing of Holliday junction-like intermediates during homologous recombination or DNA repair. PMID:19017809

  7. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Affects Global Protein Synthesis in Dividing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch‐1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch‐1 by means of γ‐secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post‐mortem analysis of GSI‐treated, NSCLC‐burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E‐BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non‐canonical 4E‐BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement—a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF‐4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF‐4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF‐4A assembly into eIF‐4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap‐ and IRES‐dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin‐1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC‐1) inhibition affected 4E‐BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC‐1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C‐terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC‐1 regulation of cap‐dependent protein synthesis. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 1064–1074, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25283437

  9. Chaperone activity of human small heat shock protein-GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Arbach, Hannah; Butler, Caley; McMenimen, Kathryn A

    2017-07-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a ubiquitous part of the machinery that maintains cellular protein homeostasis by acting as molecular chaperones. sHsps bind to and prevent the aggregation of partially folded substrate proteins in an ATP-independent manner. sHsps are dynamic, forming an ensemble of structures from dimers to large oligomers through concentration-dependent equilibrium dissociation. Based on structural studies and mutagenesis experiments, it is proposed that the dimer is the smallest active chaperone unit, while larger oligomers may act as storage depots for sHsps or play additional roles in chaperone function. The complexity and dynamic nature of their structural organization has made elucidation of their chaperone function challenging. HspB1 and HspB5 are two canonical human sHsps that vary in sequence and are expressed in a wide variety of tissues. In order to determine the role of the dimer in chaperone activity, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was genetically linked as a fusion protein to the N-terminus regions of both HspB1 and HspB5 (also known as Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, respectively) proteins in order to constrain oligomer formation of HspB1 and HspB5, by using GST, since it readily forms a dimeric structure. We monitored the chaperone activity of these fusion proteins, which suggest they primarily form dimers and monomers and function as active molecular chaperones. Furthermore, the two different fusion proteins exhibit different chaperone activity for two model substrate proteins, citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). GST-HspB1 prevents more aggregation of MDH compared to GST-HspB5 and wild type HspB1. However, when CS is the substrate, both GST-HspB1 and GST-HspB5 are equally effective chaperones. Furthermore, wild type proteins do not display equal activity toward the substrates, suggesting that each sHsp exhibits different substrate specificity. Thus, substrate specificity, as described here for full-length GST

  10. [Human bone morphogenetic protein-2: recombinant expression in E. coli].

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Dang, G; Ma, D

    1998-04-01

    To explore the way of producing human bone morphogenetic protein-2(hBMP-2) for bone healing by using the gene engeneering techniques. hBMP-2 cDNA fragment, which consists of 3' end partial propeptide and mature peptide sequence, was inserted into the multiple cloning site of expression vector pkpL-3a via ligation. The recombinant plasmid pkpL-3a/hBMP-2 was transformed into E. coli pOp2136. By the method of restriction map, the positive expression clone was selected. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a new foreign protein band near 27,000 after induction. The yield of induced hBMP-2 accouned for 10% of the total bacterial proteins. The partial purified recombinant hBMP-2 was implanted into Wistar rat thigh. After 4 weeks, histological analysis showed that it induced the proliferation of mesenchymal type cells and formation of new cartilage and bone in the implantation area. The hBMP-2 produced by gene engeneering techniques has the biologic capacity of ectopic bone formation.

  11. Structural plasticity in human heterochromatin protein 1β.

    PubMed

    Munari, Francesca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Xiang, Shengqi; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-01-01

    As essential components of the molecular machine assembling heterochromatin in eukaryotes, HP1 (Heterochromatin Protein 1) proteins are key regulators of genome function. While several high-resolution structures of the two globular regions of HP1, chromo and chromoshadow domains, in their free form or in complex with recognition-motif peptides are available, less is known about the conformational behavior of the full-length protein. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy in combination with small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering to characterize the dynamic and structural properties of full-length human HP1β (hHP1β) in solution. We show that the hinge region is highly flexible and enables a largely unrestricted spatial search by the two globular domains for their binding partners. In addition, the binding pockets within the chromo and chromoshadow domains experience internal dynamics that can be useful for the versatile recognition of different binding partners. In particular, we provide evidence for the presence of a distinct structural propensity in free hHP1β that prepares a binding-competent interface for the formation of the intermolecular β-sheet with methylated histone H3. The structural plasticity of hHP1β supports its ability to bind and connect a wide variety of binding partners in epigenetic processes.

  12. Evolution and organization of the human protein C gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plutzky, J; Hoskins, J A; Long, G L; Crabtree, G R

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated overlapping phage genomic clones covering an area of 21 kilobases that encodes the human protein C gene. The gene is at least 11.2 kilobases long and is made up of nine exons and eight introns. Two regions homologous to epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor are encoded by amino acids 46-91 and 92-136 and are precisely delimited by introns, as is a similar sequence in the genes for coagulation factor IX and tissue plasminogen activator. When homologous amino acids of factor IX and protein C are aligned, the positions of all eight introns correspond precisely, suggesting that these genes are the product of a relatively recent gene duplication. Nevertheless, the two genes are sufficiently distantly related that no nucleic acid homology remains in the intronic regions and that the size of the introns varies dramatically between the two genes. The similarity of the genes for factor IX and protein C suggests that they may be the most closely related members of the serine protease gene family involved in coagulation and fibrinolysis. Images PMID:3511471

  13. Structure of human Niemann–Pick C1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann–Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a “sterol-sensing domain” (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2–13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  14. Thyroid-Related Protein Expression in the Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Do Joon; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Radioiodine whole body scan (WBS), related to sodium iodide symporter (NIS) function, is widely used to detect recurrence/metastasis in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer. However, the normal thymic uptake of radioiodine has occasionally been observed in young patients. We evaluated the expression of thyroid-related genes and proteins in the human thymus. Thymic tissues were obtained from 22 patients with thyroid cancer patients of all ages. The expression of NIS, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), thyroperoxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) was investigated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. NIS and TSHR were expressed in 18 (81.8%) and 19 samples (86.4%), respectively, whereas TPO was expressed in five samples (22.7%). Three thyroid-related proteins were localized to Hassall's corpuscles and thymocytes. In contrast, Tg was detected in a single patient (4.5%) localized to vascular endothelial cells. The expression of thyroid-related proteins was not increased in young thymic tissues compared to that in old thymic tissues. In conclusion, the expression of NIS and TSHR was detected in the majority of normal thymus samples, whereas that of TPO was detected less frequently, and that of Tg was detected rarely. The increased thymic uptake of radioiodine in young patients is not due to the increased expression of NIS. PMID:28386277

  15. Pharmacological chaperone for the structured domain of human prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Andrew J.; Trevitt, Clare R.; Tattum, M. Howard; Risse, Emmanuel; Quarterman, Emma; Ibarra, Amaurys Avila; Wright, Connor; Jackson, Graham S.; Sessions, Richard B.; Farrow, Mark; Waltho, Jonathan P.; Clarke, Anthony R.; Collinge, John

    2010-01-01

    In prion diseases, the misfolded protein aggregates are derived from cellular prion protein (PrPC). Numerous ligands have been reported to bind to human PrPC (huPrP), but none to the structured region with the affinity required for a pharmacological chaperone. Using equilibrium dialysis, we screened molecules previously suggested to interact with PrP to discriminate between those which did not interact with PrP, behaved as nonspecific polyionic aggregates or formed a genuine interaction. Those that bind could potentially act as pharmacological chaperones. Here we report that a cationic tetrapyrrole [Fe(III)-TMPyP], which displays potent antiprion activity, binds to the structured region of huPrP. Using a battery of biophysical techniques, we demonstrate that Fe(III)-TMPyP forms a 1∶1 complex via the structured C terminus of huPrP with a Kd of 4.5 ± 2 μM, which is in the range of its IC50 for curing prion-infected cells of 1.6 ± 0.4 μM and the concentration required to inhibit protein-misfolding cyclic amplification. Therefore, this molecule tests the hypothesis that stabilization of huPrPC, as a principle, could be used in the treatment of human prion disease. The identification of a binding site with a defined 3D structure opens up the possibility of designing small molecules that stabilize huPrP and prevent its conversion into the disease-associated form. PMID:20876144

  16. Phosphorylation of proteins during human myometrial contractions: A phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Claire A; López Bernal, Andrés

    2017-01-22

    Phasic myometrial contractility is a key component of human parturition and the contractions are driven by reversible phosphorylation of myosin light chains catalyzed by the calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MYLK). Other yet unknown phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation events may contribute to myometrial contraction and relaxation. In this study we have performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis of human myometrial tissue using tandem mass tagging to detect changes in the phosphorylation status of individual myometrial proteins during spontaneous and oxytocin-driven phasic contractions. We were able to detect 22 individual phosphopeptides whose relative ratio changed (fold > 2 or < 0.5) in response to spontaneous or oxytocin-stimulated contraction. The most significant changes in phosphorylation were to MYLK on serine 1760, a site associated with reductions in calmodulin binding and subsequent kinase activity. Phosphorylated MYLK (ser1760) increased significantly during spontaneous (9.83 ± 3.27 fold, P < 0.05) and oxytocin -induced (18.56 ± 8.18 fold, P < 0.01) contractions and we were able to validate these data using immunoblotting. Pathway analysis suggested additional proteins involved in calcium signalling, cGMP-PRKG signalling, adrenergic signalling and oxytocin signalling were also phosphorylated during contractions. This study demonstrates that a global phosphoproteomic analysis of myometrial tissue is a sensitive approach to detect changes in the phosphorylation of proteins during myometrial contractions, and provides a platform for further validation of these changes and for identification of their functional significance.

  17. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins in human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Hagen, T; Vidal-Puig, A

    2002-02-01

    Uncoupling proteins are mitochondrial carrier proteins that catalyse a regulated proton leak across the inner mitochondrial membrane, diverting free energy from ATP synthesis by the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase to the production of heat. Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is exclusively expressed in brown adipose tissue, is the mediator of thermogenesis in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Using gene a knockout mouse model, UCP1 has been shown to be required for cold acclimation. Two homologues of UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3, have been identified recently and show a much wider tissue distribution. UCP2 and UCP3 have been postulated to play a role in the regulation of cold acclimation, energy expenditure and diet-induced thermogenesis in humans, who, in contrast to rodents, have very little brown fat in adult life. However, evidence is accumulating that thermogenesis and regulation of body weight may not be the physiological functions of UCP2 and UCP3. For instance, mice deficient for UCP2 or UCP3 are not cold-intolerant and do not develop obesity. Alternative functions were suggested, primarily based on findings in UCP2 and UCP3 gene knockout mice. Both UCP2- and UCP3-deficient mice were found to overproduce reactive oxygen species and UCP2-deficient mice to hypersecrete insulin. Thus, the UCP1 homologues may play a role in regulating mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and b-cell function. In this review, we discuss the role of UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 in human physiology and disease, primarily based on findings from the various animal models that have been generated.

  18. Factors that contribute to the immmunogenicity of therapeutic recombinant human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Sabljic, Thomas; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Ofosu, Frederick A

    2008-05-01

    Use of recombinant human proteins has revolutionized medicine by providing over 200 highly purified hormones and proteins that effectively treat many inherited and acquired peptide hormone and protein deficiencies. With the exception of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, these biological medicines are synthesized by cultured cells using DNA sequences that would yield proteins with identical amino acid sequences as endogenous human proteins. Therefore, there was the broad expectation that recombinant human biological medicines would be non-immunogenic in patients capable of synthesizing even sub-optimal levels of these therapeutic proteins to which they are innately tolerant. However, the widespread clinical use of recombinant human proteins has demonstrated that nearly all of them are immunogenic. This observation suggests that factors additional to differences in amino acid sequences of endogenous and biotherapeutic proteins contribute to the immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. The main aim of this review is to summarize some of the factors that are known to contribute to the immunogenicity of recombinant therapeutic proteins.

  19. Calcium buffer proteins are specific markers of human retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kántor, Orsolya; Mezey, Szilvia; Adeghate, Jennifer; Naumann, Angela; Nitschke, Roland; Énzsöly, Anna; Szabó, Arnold; Lukáts, Ákos; Németh, János; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Völgyi, Béla

    2016-07-01

    Ca(2+)-buffer proteins (CaBPs) modulate the temporal and spatial characteristics of transient intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration changes in neurons in order to fine-tune the strength and duration of the output signal. CaBPs have been used as neurochemical markers to identify and trace neurons of several brain loci including the mammalian retina. The CaBP content of retinal neurons, however, varies between species and, thus, the results inferred from animal models cannot be utilised directly by clinical ophthalmologists. Moreover, the shortage of well-preserved human samples greatly impedes human retina studies at the cellular and network level. Our purpose has therefore been to examine the distribution of major CaBPs, including calretinin, calbindin-D28, parvalbumin and the recently discovered secretagogin in exceptionally well-preserved human retinal samples. Based on a combination of immunohistochemistry, Neurolucida tracing and Lucifer yellow injections, we have established a database in which the CaBP marker composition can be defined for morphologically identified cell types of the human retina. Hence, we describe the full CaBP make-up for a number of human retinal neurons, including HII horizontal cells, AII amacrine cells, type-1 tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing amacrine cells and other lesser known neurons. We have also found a number of unidentified cells whose morphology remains to be characterised. We present several examples of the colocalisation of two or three CaBPs with slightly different subcellular distributions in the same cell strongly suggesting a compartment-specific division of labour of Ca(2+)-buffering by CaBPs. Our work thus provides a neurochemical framework for future ophthalmological studies and renders new information concerning the cellular and subcellular distribution of CaBPs for experimental neuroscience.

  20. Casein and soy protein meals differentially affect whole-body and splanchnic protein metabolism in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Jäkel, Martin; Soeters, Peter B

    2005-05-01

    Dietary protein quality is considered to be dependent on the degree and velocity with which protein is digested, absorbed as amino acids, and retained in the gut as newly synthesized protein. Metabolic animal studies suggest that the quality of soy protein is inferior to that of casein protein, but confirmatory studies in humans are lacking. The study objective was to assess the quality of casein and soy protein by comparing their metabolic effects in healthy human subjects. Whole-body protein kinetics, splanchnic leucine extraction, and urea production rates were measured in the postabsorptive state and during 8-h enteral intakes of isonitrogenous [0.42 g protein/(kg body weight . 8 h)] protein-based test meals, which contained either casein (CAPM; n = 12) or soy protein (SOPM; n = 10) in 2 separate groups. Stable isotope techniques were used to study metabolic effects. With enteral food intake, protein metabolism changed from net protein breakdown to net protein synthesis. Net protein synthesis was greater in the CAPM group than in the SOPM group [52 +/- 14 and 17 +/- 14 nmol/(kg fat-free mass (FFM) . min), respectively; P < 0.02]. Urea synthesis rates decreased during consumption of both enteral meals, but the decrease tended to be greater in the subjects that consumed CAPM (P = 0.07). Absolute splanchnic extraction of leucine was higher in the subjects that consumed CAPM [306 +/- 31 nmol/(kg FFM . min)] vs. those that consumed SOPM [235 +/- 29 nmol/(kg FFM . min); P < 0.01]. In conclusion, a significantly larger portion of soy protein is degraded to urea, whereas casein protein likely contributes to splanchnic utilization (probably protein synthesis) to a greater extent. The biological value of soy protein must be considered inferior to that of casein protein in humans.

  1. Arabinosylation of recombinant human immunoglobulin-based protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hossler, Patrick; Chumsae, Christopher; Racicot, Christopher; Ouellette, David; Ibraghimov, Alexander; Serna, Daniel; Mora, Alessandro; McDermott, Sean; Labkovsky, Boris; Scesney, Susanne; Grinnell, Christine; Preston, Gregory; Bose, Sahana; Carrillo, Ralf

    Protein glycosylation is arguably the paramount post-translational modification on recombinant glycoproteins, and highly cited in the literature for affecting the physiochemical properties and the efficacy of recombinant glycoprotein therapeutics. Glycosylation of human immunoglobulins follows a reasonably well-understood metabolic pathway, which gives rise to a diverse range of asparagine-linked (N-linked), or serine/threonine-linked (O-linked) glycans. In N-linked glycans, fucose levels have been shown to have an inverse relationship with the degree of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and high mannose levels have been implicated in potentially increasing immunogenicity and contributing to less favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to potentially reduce the presence of high-mannose species in recombinant human immunoglobulin preparations, as well as facilitate an approximate 100% replacement of fucosylation with arabinosylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture through media supplementation with D-arabinose, an uncommonly used mammalian cell culture sugar substrate. The replacement of fucose with arabinose was very effective and practical to implement, since no cell line engineering or cellular adaptation strategies were required. Arabinosylated recombinant IgGs and the accompanying reduction in high mannose glycans, facilitated a reduction in dendritic cell uptake, increased FcγRIIIa signaling, and significantly increased the levels of ADCC. These aforementioned effects were without any adverse changes to various structural or functional attributes of multiple recombinant human antibodies and a bispecific DVD-Ig. Protein arabinosylation represents an expansion of the N-glycan code in mammalian expressed glycoproteins.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of plastin, a human leukocyte protein expressed in transformed human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C S; Aebersold, R H; Kent, S B; Varma, M; Leavitt, J

    1988-01-01

    The phosphoprotein plastin was originally identified as an abundant transformation-induced polypeptide of chemically transformed neoplastic human fibroblasts. This abundant protein is normally expressed only in leukocytes, suggesting that it may play a role in hemopoietic cell differentiation. Protein microsequencing of plastin purified from leukemic T lymphocytes by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis produced eight internal oligopeptide sequences. An oligodeoxynucleotide probe corresponding to one of the oligopeptides was used to clone cDNAs from transformed human fibroblasts that encoded the seven other oligopeptides predicted for human plastin. Sequencing and characterization of two cloned cDNAs revealed the existence of two distinct, but closely related, isoforms of plastin--l-plastin, which is expressed in leukocytes and transformed fibroblasts, and t-plastin, which is expressed in normal cells of solid tissues and transformed fibroblasts. The leukocyte isoform l-plastin is expressed in a diverse variety of human tumor cell lines, suggesting that it may be involved in the neoplastic process of some solid human tumors. Images PMID:3211125

  3. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection.

  4. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis. Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  5. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human atheromatous plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Nelken, N A; Coughlin, S R; Gordon, D; Wilcox, J N

    1991-01-01

    Monocytes appear to be central to atherogenesis both as the progenitors of foam cells and as a potential source of growth factors mediating intimal hyperplasia, but the chemical messages which stimulate the influx of monocytes into human atheroma remain unknown. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a recently described molecule with powerful monocyte chemotactic activity expressed by monocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells in culture. To begin to address the role of MCP-1 in vivo, we examined 10 normal arteries and 14 diseased human arteries for MCP-1 expression by in situ hybridization. MCP-1 mRNA was detected in 16% of 10,768 cells counted in human carotid endarterectomy specimens with highest expression seen in organizing thrombi (33%) and in macrophage rich areas bordering the necrotic lipid core (24%) as compared to the fibrous cap (8%) and the necrotic lipid core itself (5%). Based on immunohistochemical staining of serial sections and on cell morphology, MCP-1 mRNA appeared to be expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), mesenchymal appearing intimal cells (MICs), and macrophages. By contrast, few cells expressing MCP-1 mRNA were found in normal arteries (less than 0.1%). These data suggest a potential role for MCP-1 in mediating monocytic infiltration of the artery wall. Images PMID:1843454

  6. Protein Stability and Dynamics Modulation: The Case of Human Frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mariana; Salvay, Andres G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN) depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR) of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90–195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90–195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90–195 and hFXN90–210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function. PMID:23049850

  7. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  8. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Human Astrovirus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Yukimatsu; Harper, Justin; Dryden, Kelly A.; Yeager, Mark; Méndez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. HAstV is a nonenveloped virus with a T=3 capsid and a positive-sense RNA genome. The capsid protein (CP) of HAstV is synthesized as a 90-kDa precursor (VP90) that can be divided into three linear domains: a conserved N-terminal domain, a hypervariable domain, and an acidic C-terminal domain. Maturation of HAstV requires proteolytic processing of the astrovirus CP both inside and outside the host cell, resulting in the removal of the C-terminal domain and the breakdown of the rest of the CP into three predominant protein species with molecular masses of ∼34, 27/29, and 25/26 kDa, respectively. We have now solved the crystal structure of VP9071–415 (amino acids [aa] 71 to 415 of VP90) of human astrovirus serotype 8 at a 2.15-Å resolution. VP9071–415 encompasses the conserved N-terminal domain of VP90 but lacks the hypervariable domain, which forms the capsid surface spikes. The structure of VP9071–415 is comprised of two domains: an S domain, which adopts the typical jelly-roll β-barrel fold, and a P1 domain, which forms a squashed β-barrel consisting of six antiparallel β-strands similar to what was observed in the hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid structure. Fitting of the VP9071–415 structure into the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps of HAstV produced an atomic model for a continuous, T=3 icosahedral capsid shell. Our pseudoatomic model of the human HAstV capsid shell provides valuable insights into intermolecular interactions required for capsid assembly and trypsin-mediated proteolytic maturation needed for virus infectivity. Such information has potential applications in the development of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine as well as small-molecule drugs targeting astrovirus assembly/maturation. IMPORTANCE Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. As a nonenveloped virus

  10. Partial amino acid sequence of human pancreatic stone protein, a novel pancreatic secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, G; Bonicel, J; Multigner, L; Rovery, M; Sarles, H; De Caro, A

    1986-01-01

    Pancreatic stone protein (PSP) is the major organic component of human pancreatic stones. With the use of monoclonal antibody immunoadsorbents, five immunoreactive forms (PSP-S) with close Mr values (14,000-19,000) were isolated from normal pancreatic juice. By CM-Trisacryl M chromatography the lowest-Mr form (PSP-S1) was separated from the others and some of its molecular characteristics were investigated. The Mr of the PSP-S1 polypeptide chain calculated from the amino acid composition was about 16,100. The N-terminal sequences (40 residues) of PSP and PSP-S1 are identical, which suggests that the peptide backbone is the same for both of these polypeptides. The PSP-S1 sequence was determined up to residue 65 and was found to be different from all other known protein sequences. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3541906

  11. Protein-protein interface-binding peptides inhibit the cancer therapy target human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Daniela; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Tondi, Donatella; Luciani, Rosaria; Henrich, Stefan; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Ferrari, Stefania; Marverti, Gaetano; Guerrieri, Davide; Ligabue, Alessio; Frassineti, Chiara; Pozzi, Cecilia; Mangani, Stefano; Fessas, Dimitrios; Guerrini, Remo; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-23

    Human thymidylate synthase is a homodimeric enzyme that plays a key role in DNA synthesis and is a target for several clinically important anticancer drugs that bind to its active site. We have designed peptides to specifically target its dimer interface. Here we show through X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, kinetic, and calorimetric evidence that the peptides do indeed bind at the interface of the dimeric protein and stabilize its di-inactive form. The "LR" peptide binds at a previously unknown binding site and shows a previously undescribed mechanism for the allosteric inhibition of a homodimeric enzyme. It inhibits the intracellular enzyme in ovarian cancer cells and reduces cellular growth at low micromolar concentrations in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells without causing protein overexpression. This peptide demonstrates the potential of allosteric inhibition of hTS for overcoming platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  12. Dual Processing of FAT1 Cadherin Protein by Human Melanoma Cells Generates Distinct Protein Products*

    PubMed Central

    Sadeqzadeh, Elham; de Bock, Charles E.; Zhang, Xu Dong; Shipman, Kristy L.; Scott, Naomi M.; Song, Chaojun; Yeadon, Trina; Oliveira, Camila S.; Jin, Boquan; Hersey, Peter; Boyd, Andrew W.; Burns, Gordon F.; Thorne, Rick F.

    2011-01-01

    The giant cadherin FAT1 is one of four vertebrate orthologues of the Drosophila tumor suppressor fat. It engages in several functions, including cell polarity and migration, and in Hippo signaling during development. Homozygous deletions in oral cancer suggest that FAT1 may play a tumor suppressor role, although overexpression of FAT1 has been reported in some other cancers. Here we show using Northern blotting that human melanoma cell lines variably but universally express FAT1 and less commonly FAT2, FAT3, and FAT4. Both normal melanocytes and keratinocytes also express comparable FAT1 mRNA relative to melanoma cells. Analysis of the protein processing of FAT1 in keratinocytes revealed that, like Drosophila FAT, human FAT1 is cleaved into a non-covalent heterodimer before achieving cell surface expression. The use of inhibitors also established that such cleavage requires the proprotein convertase furin. However, in melanoma cells, the non-cleaved proform of FAT1 is also expressed at the cell surface together with the furin-cleaved heterodimer. Moreover, furin-independent processing generates a potentially functional proteolytic product in melanoma cells, a persistent 65-kDa membrane-bound cytoplasmic fragment no longer in association with the extracellular fragment. In vitro localization studies of FAT1 showed that melanoma cells display high levels of cytosolic FAT1 protein, whereas keratinocytes, despite comparable FAT1 expression levels, exhibited mainly cell-cell junctional staining. Such differences in protein distribution appear to reconcile with the different protein products generated by dual FAT1 processing. We suggest that the uncleaved FAT1 could promote altered signaling, and the novel products of alternate processing provide a dominant negative function in melanoma. PMID:21680732

  13. Proteomic characterization of human milk whey proteins during a twelve-month lactation period.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yalin; Alvarado, Rudy; Phinney, Brett; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Human milk is a rich source of bioactive proteins that support the early growth and development of the newborn. Although the major components of the protein fraction in human milk have been studied, the expression and relative abundance of minor components have received limited attention. We examined the expression of low-abundance proteins in the whey fraction of human milk and their dynamic changes over a twelve-month lactation period. The low-abundance proteins were enriched by ProteoMiner beads, and protein identification was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred and fifteen proteins were identified, thirty-eight of which have not been previously reported in human colostrum or milk. We also for the first time described differences in protein patterns among the low-abundance proteins during lactation. These results enhance our knowledge about the complexity of the human milk proteome, which constitutes part of the advantages to the breast-fed infant.

  14. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Sottrup-Jensen, L; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, T; Tack, B F

    1984-01-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated protein. Its quaternary structure (two covalently bound 180-kDa subunits, which are further non-covalently assembled into a tetramer of 720 kDa) is similar to that of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Here we show, from the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins is 68%, indicating a close evolutionary relationship between PZP and alpha 2M. Although the function of PZP in pregnancy is largely unknown, its close structural relationship to alpha 2M suggests analogous proteinase binding properties and a potential for being taken up in cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this regard our studies indicate a bait region in PZP significantly different from that present in alpha 2M. PZP could be the human equivalent of the acute-phase alpha-macroglobulins (e.g., rat alpha 2M and rabbit alpha 1M) described earlier. PMID:6209714

  15. Protein selectivity with immobilized metal ion-tacn sorbents: chromatographic studies with human serum proteins and several other globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Graham, B; Spiccia, L; Hearn, M T

    1998-01-01

    The chromatographic selectivity of the immobilized chelate system, 1,4,7-triazocyclononane (tacn), complexed with the borderline metal ions Cu2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ has been investigated with hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart cytochrome c, and horse skeletal muscle myoglobin, as well as proteins present in partially fractionated preparations of human plasma. The effects of ionic strength and pH of the loading and elution buffers on protein selectivities of these new immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic (IMAC) systems have been examined. The results confirm that immobilized Mn;pl-tacn sorbents exhibit a novel type of IMAC behavior with proteins. In particular, the chromatographic properties of these immobilized M(n+)-tacn ligand systems were significantly different compared to the IMAC behavior observed with other types of immobilized tri- and tetradentate chelating ligands, such as iminodiacetic acid, O-phosphoserine, or nitrilotriacetic acid, when complexed with borderline metal ions. The experimental results have consequently been evaluated in terms of the additional contributions to the interactive processes mediated by effects other than solely the conventional lone pair Lewis soft acid-Lewis soft base coordination interactions, typically found for the IMAC of proteins with borderline and soft metal ions, such as Cu2+ or Ni2+.

  16. Insight into bacterial virulence mechanisms against host immune response via the Yersinia pestis-human protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-11-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP.

  17. Dengue-2 Structural Proteins Associate with Human Proteins to Produce a Coagulation and Innate Immune Response Biased Interactome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is a public health threat to hundreds of millions of individuals in the tropical regions of the globe. Although Dengue infection usually manifests itself in its mildest, though often debilitating clinical form, dengue fever, life-threatening complications commonly arise in the form of hemorrhagic shock and encephalitis. The etiological basis for the virus-induced pathology in general, and the different clinical manifestations in particular, are not well understood. We reasoned that a detailed knowledge of the global biological processes affected by virus entry into a cell might help shed new light on this long-standing problem. Methods A bacterial two-hybrid screen using DENV2 structural proteins as bait was performed, and the results were used to feed a manually curated, global dengue-human protein interaction network. Gene ontology and pathway enrichment, along with network topology and microarray meta-analysis, were used to generate hypothesis regarding dengue disease biology. Results Combining bioinformatic tools with two-hybrid technology, we screened human cDNA libraries to catalogue proteins physically interacting with the DENV2 virus structural proteins, Env, cap and PrM. We identified 31 interacting human proteins representing distinct biological processes that are closely related to the major clinical diagnostic feature of dengue infection: haemostatic imbalance. In addition, we found dengue-binding human proteins involved with additional key aspects, previously described as fundamental for virus entry into cells and the innate immune response to infection. Construction of a DENV2-human global protein interaction network revealed interesting biological properties suggested by simple network topology analysis. Conclusions Our experimental strategy revealed that dengue structural proteins interact with human protein targets involved in the maintenance of blood coagulation and innate anti-viral response processes, and

  18. Infection Strategies of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens through Pathogen–Human Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Durmuş Tekir, Saliha; Çakir, Tunahan; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2012-01-01

    Since ancient times, even in today’s modern world, infectious diseases cause lots of people to die. Infectious organisms, pathogens, cause diseases by physical interactions with human proteins. A thorough analysis of these interspecies interactions is required to provide insights about infection strategies of pathogens. Here we analyzed the most comprehensive available pathogen–human protein interaction data including 23,435 interactions, targeting 5,210 human proteins. The data were obtained from the newly developed pathogen–host interaction search tool, PHISTO. This is the first comprehensive attempt to get a comparison between bacterial and viral infections. We investigated human proteins that are targeted by bacteria and viruses to provide an overview of common and special infection strategies used by these pathogen types. We observed that in the human protein interaction network the proteins targeted by pathogens have higher connectivity and betweenness centrality values than those proteins not interacting with pathogens. The preference of interacting with hub and bottleneck proteins is found to be a common infection strategy of all types of pathogens to manipulate essential mechanisms in human. Compared to bacteria, viruses tend to interact with human proteins of much higher connectivity and centrality values in the human network. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the human proteins targeted by pathogens indicates crucial clues about the infection mechanisms of bacteria and viruses. As the main infection strategy, bacteria interact with human proteins that function in immune response to disrupt human defense mechanisms. Indispensable viral strategy, on the other hand, is the manipulation of human cellular processes in order to use that transcriptional machinery for their own genetic material transcription. A novel observation about pathogen–human systems is that the human proteins targeted by both pathogens are enriched in the regulation of

  19. The TissueNet v.2 database: A quantitative view of protein-protein interactions across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Omer; Barshir, Ruth; Sharon, Moran; Lerman, Eugene; Kirson, Binyamin F.; Hekselman, Idan; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions of human proteins within tissues is important for identifying their tissue-specific roles and for shedding light on tissue phenotypes. However, many protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have no tissue-contexts. The TissueNet database bridges this gap by associating experimentally-identified PPIs with human tissues that were shown to express both pair-mates. Users can select a protein and a tissue, and obtain a network view of the query protein and its tissue-associated PPIs. TissueNet v.2 is an updated version of the TissueNet database previously featured in NAR. It includes over 40 human tissues profiled via RNA-sequencing or protein-based assays. Users can select their preferred expression data source and interactively set the expression threshold for determining tissue-association. The output of TissueNet v.2 emphasizes qualitative and quantitative features of query proteins and their PPIs. The tissue-specificity view highlights tissue-specific and globally-expressed proteins, and the quantitative view highlights proteins that were differentially expressed in the selected tissue relative to all other tissues. Together, these views allow users to quickly assess the unique versus global functionality of query proteins. Thus, TissueNet v.2 offers an extensive, quantitative and user-friendly interface to study the roles of human proteins across tissues. TissueNet v.2 is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/tissuenet. PMID:27899616

  20. Explosive percolation in the human protein homology network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenfeld, H. D.; Gallos, L. K.; Makse, H. A.

    2010-06-01

    We study the explosive character of the percolation transition in a real-world network. We show that the emergence of a spanning cluster in the Human Protein Homology Network (H-PHN) exhibits similar features to an Achlioptas-type process and is markedly different from regular random percolation. The underlying mechanism of this transition can be described by slow-growing clusters that remain isolated until the later stages of the process, when the addition of a small number of links leads to the rapid interconnection of these modules into a giant cluster. Our results indicate that the evolutionary-based process that shapes the topology of the H-PHN through duplication-divergence events may occur in sudden steps, similarly to what is seen in first-order phase transitions.

  1. Explosive Percolation in the Human Protein Homology Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenfeld, Hernan; Gallos, Lazaros; Makse, Hernan

    2011-03-01

    We study the explosive character of the percolation transition in a real-world network. We show that the emergence of a spanning cluster in the Human Protein Homology Network (H-PHN) exhibits similar features to an Achlioptas-type process and is markedly different from regular random percolation. The underlying mechanism of this transition can be described by slow-growing clusters that remain isolated until the later stages of the process, when the addition of a small number of links leads to the rapid interconnection of these modules into a giant cluster. Our results indicate that the evolutionary-based process that shapes the topology of the H-PHN through duplication-divergence events may occur in sudden steps.

  2. RNA protein interactions governing expression of the most abundant protein in human body, type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in human body. The protein turns over slowly and its replacement synthesis is low. However, in wound healing or in pathological fibrosis the cells can increase production of type I collagen several hundred fold. This increase is predominantly due to posttranscriptional regulation, including increased half-life of collagen messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and their increased translatability. Type I collagen is composed of two α1 and one α2 polypeptides that fold into a triple helix. This stoichiometry is strictly regulated to prevent detrimental synthesis of α1 homotrimers. Collagen polypeptides are co-translationally modified and the rate of modifications is in dynamic equilibrium with the rate of folding, suggesting coordinated translation of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) polypeptides. Collagen α1(I) mRNA has in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) a C-rich sequence that binds protein αCP, this binding stabilizes the mRNA in collagen producing cells. In the 5' UTR both collagen mRNAs have a conserved stem-loop (5' SL) structure. The 5' SL is critical for high collagen expression, knock in mice with disruption of the 5' SL are resistant to liver fibrosis. the 5' SL binds protein LARP6 with strict sequence specificity and high affinity. LARP6 recruits RNA helicase A to facilitate translation initiation and associates collagen mRNAs with vimentin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. Binding to vimentin stabilizes collagen mRNAs, while nonmuscle myosin regulates coordinated translation of α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs. When nonmuscle myosin filaments are disrupted the cells secrete only α1 homotrimers. Thus, the mechanism governing high collagen expression involves two RNA binding proteins and development of cytoskeletal filaments. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  4. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  5. FTIR protein secondary structure analysis of human ascending aortic tissues.

    PubMed

    Bonnier, Franck; Rubin, Sylvain; Debelle, Laurent; Ventéo, Lydie; Pluot, Michel; Baehrel, Bernard; Manfait, Michel; Sockalingum, Ganesh D

    2008-08-01

    The advent of moderate dilatations in ascending aortas is often accompanied by structural modifications of the main components of the aortic tissue, elastin and collagen. In this study, we have undertaken an approach based on FTIR microscopy coupled to a curve-fitting procedure to analyze secondary structure modifications in these proteins in human normal and pathological aortic tissues. We found that the outcome of the aortic pathology is strongly influenced by these proteins, which are abundant in the media of the aortic wall, and that the advent of an aortic dilatation is generally accompanied by a decrease of parallel beta-sheet structures. Elastin, essentially composed of beta-sheet structures, seems to be directly related to these changes and therefore indicative of the elastic alteration of the aortic wall. Conventional microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to compare FTIR microscopy results with the organization of the elastic fibers present in the tissues. This in-vitro study on 6 patients (three normal and three pathologic), suggests that such a spectroscopic marker, specific to aneurismal tissue characterization, could be important information for surgeons who face the dilemma of moderate aortic tissue dilatation of the ascending aortas.

  6. Ca2+-binding protein from human kidney. Purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Staun, M; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    1984-01-01

    A Ca2+-binding protein (CaBP) from human kidney was purified by two different procedures. The first involved heat-precipitation of a kidney cytosol fraction followed by gel filtration and chromatofocusing. This resulted in a 200-fold increase in the specific Ca2+-binding activity with a yield of 10%. A specific antibody was raised against the purified CaBP, as demonstrated by one precipitate in crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a kidney cytosol fraction. The antibody was coupled to Sepharose 4B and CaBP was then purified by immunoadsorbent chromatography. Applying this technique, a 500-fold purification of CaBP with a yield of 50% was obtained. Both preparations appeared homogeneous in crossed immunoelectrophoresis against a polyvalent antiserum and migrated as a single band corresponding to a mol.wt. of 26000 on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. In gel filtration under non-denaturing conditions CaBP was eluted corresponding to a mol.wt. of 28000. The association constant for the high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites of CaBP was estimated by gel filtration to be 0.1 X 10(6)M-1, and the protein displayed Ca2+-dependent electrophoretic mobility, with more rapid anodic migration in the presence of EDTA. The protein eluted at a position corresponding to a pI of 4.5 in chromatofocusing. Immunochemical experiments with the specific antibody showed no cross-reaction between renal and intestinal CaBP. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:6421283

  7. Development of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell-targeted protein cages.

    PubMed

    Toita, Riki; Murata, Masaharu; Tabata, Shigekazu; Abe, Kana; Narahara, Sayoko; Piao, Jing Shu; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Hashizume, Makoto

    2012-07-18

    We described herein a human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell-targeted protein cage for which the HCC-binding peptide termed SP94 was modified at the surface of a naturally occurred heat shock protein (Hsp) cage. Six types of HCC-targeted Hsp cages were chemically synthesized using two types of heterobifunctional linker (SM(PEG)(n)) with different lengths and two types of SP94 peptide, which contained a unique Cys residue at the N- or C-terminus of the peptide. These Hsp cages were characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) analyses, sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Fluorescence microscopic observations revealed that all the engineered protein cages bind selectively to HCC cells but not to the other cell lines tested (including normal liver cell). Moreover, the number of SP94 peptides on Hsp cages, conjugation site of SP94 peptide, and linker length between a Hsp cage and a SP94 peptide had important effects upon the binding of engineered Hsp cages to HCC cells. An engineered Hsp cage conjugated to the N-terminus of SP94 peptide via a longer linker molecule and containing high SP94 peptide levels showed greater binding toward HCC cells. Surprisingly, through optimization of these three factors, up to 10-fold greater affinity toward HCC cells was achieved. These results are critically important not only for the development of HCC cell-targeting devices using SP94 peptide, but also to create other cell-targeting materials that utilize other peptide ligands.

  8. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  9. Considerations in meeting protein needs of the human milk-fed preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Hanson, Corrine; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2014-08-01

    Preterm infants provided with sufficient nutrition to achieve intrauterine growth rates have the greatest potential for optimal neurodevelopment. Although human milk is the preferred feeding for preterm infants, unfortified human milk provides insufficient nutrition for the very low-birth-weight infant. Even after fortification with human milk fortifier, human milk often fails to meet the high protein needs of the smallest preterm infants, and additional protein supplementation must be provided. Although substantial evidence exists to support quantitative protein goals for human milk-fed preterm infants, the optimal type of protein for use in human milk fortification remains uncertain. This question was addressed through a PubMed literature search of prospective clinical trials conducted since 1990 in preterm or low-birth-weight infant populations. The following 3 different aspects of protein quality were evaluated: whey-to-casein ratio, hydrolyzed versus intact protein, and bovine milk protein versus human milk protein. Because of a scarcity of current studies conducted with fortified human milk, studies examining protein quality using preterm infant formulas were included to address certain components of the clinical question. Twenty-six studies were included in the review study. No definite advantage was found for any specific whey-to-casein ratio. Protein hydrolyzate products with appropriate formulations can support adequate growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status and may reduce gastrointestinal transit time, gastroesophageal reflux events, and later incidence of atopic dermatitis in some infants. Plasma amino acid levels similar to those of infants fed exclusive human milk-based diets can be achieved with products composed of a mixture of bovine proteins, peptides, and amino acids formulated to replicate the amino acid composition of human milk. Growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status are similar for infants fed human milk

  10. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  11. A role for heterochromatin protein 1γ at human telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Canudas, Silvia; Houghtaling, Benjamin R.; Bhanot, Monica; Sasa, Ghadir; Savage, Sharon A.; Bertuch, Alison A.; Smith, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Human telomere function is mediated by shelterin, a six-subunit complex that is required for telomere replication, protection, and cohesion. TIN2, the central component of shelterin, has binding sites to three subunits: TRF1, TRF2, and TPP1. Here we identify a fourth partner, heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ), that binds to a conserved canonical HP1-binding motif, PXVXL, in the C-terminal domain of TIN2. We show that HP1γ localizes to telomeres in S phase, where it is required to establish/maintain cohesion. We further demonstrate that the HP1-binding site in TIN2 is required for sister telomere cohesion and can impact telomere length maintenance by telomerase. Remarkably, the PTVML HP1-binding site is embedded in the recently identified cluster of mutations in TIN2 that gives rise to dyskeratosis congenita (DC), an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by defects in telomere maintenance. We show that DC-associated mutations in TIN2 abrogate binding to HP1γ and that DC patient cells are defective in sister telomere cohesion. Our data indicate a novel requirement for HP1γ in the establishment/maintenance of cohesion at human telomeres and, furthermore, may provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenesis in TIN2-mediated DC. PMID:21865325

  12. A radioimmunoassay for bone Gla protein (BGP) in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J S; Mølholm Hansen, J E; Christiansen, C

    1987-03-01

    To study the value of bone Gla protein (BGP) as a biochemical marker of normal bone physiology and metabolic bone disorders, we have developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the detection of BGP in human plasma. Antibodies were generated in rabbits immunized with purified calf BGP conjugated to thyroglobulin. Human plasma BGP reacted identically with the calf BGP standard, thus demonstrating the suitability of the assay to measure plasma BGP levels in man. The RIA is sensitive, accurate, and technically simple. Plasma BGP levels were determined in normal subjects (N = 35) and in patients with hypothyroidism (N = 10), hyperthyroidism (N = 22) and chronic renal failure (N = 35). The mean (+/- 1 SEM) concentration of plasma BGP in normal subjects was 1.27 +/- 0.07 nmol/l. Plasma BGP was significantly increased in patients with hyperthyroidism, 4.04 +/- 0.78 nmol/l (P less than 0.001) and chronic renal failure, 10.17 +/- 2.47 nmol/l (P less than 0.001). Low concentrations were found in patients with hypothyroidism, 0.74 +/- 0.11 nmol/l (P less than 0.01). Our studies indicate that plasma BGP provides a useful technique in the diagnosis of patients with bone disease.

  13. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of human platelet surface proteins by an ecto-protein kinase/phosphatase system.

    PubMed

    Naik, U P; Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H

    1991-04-17

    We have characterized a novel ecto-protein kinase activity and a novel ecto-protein phosphatase activity on the membrane surface of human platelets. Washed intact platelets, when incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in Tyrode's buffer, showed the phosphorylation of a membrane surface protein migrating with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa on 5-15% SDS polyacrylamide gradient gels. The 42 kDa protein could be further resolved on 15% SDS gels into two proteins of 39 kDa and 42 kDa. In this gel system, it was found that the 39 kDa protein became rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated, whereas the 42 kDa protein was phosphorylated and dephosphorylated at a much slower rate. NaF inhibited the dephosphorylation of these proteins indicating the involvement of an ecto-protein phosphatase. The platelet membrane ecto-protein kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of both of these proteins was identified as a serine kinase and showed dependency on divalent cations Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions. Ca2+ ions potentiated the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-protein kinase activity. The ecto-protein kinase rapidly phosphorylated histone and casein added exogenously to the extracellular medium of intact platelets. Following activation of platelets by alpha-thrombin, the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from exogenously added [gamma-32P]ATP by endogenous protein substrates was reduced by 90%, suggesting a role of the ecto-protein kinase system in the regulation of platelet function. The results presented here demonstrate that both protein kinase and protein phosphatase activities reside on the membrane surface of human platelets. These activities are capable of rapidly phosphorylating and dephosphorylating specific surface platelet membrane proteins which may play important roles in early events of platelet activation and secretion.

  14. Bone morphogenetic proteins differentially regulate pigmentation in human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suman K; Abbas, Waqas A; Tobin, Desmond J

    2012-09-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a large family of multi-functional secreted signalling molecules. Previously BMP2/4 were shown to inhibit skin pigmentation by downregulating tyrosinase expression and activity in epidermal melanocytes. However, a possible role for other BMP family members and their antagonists in melanogenesis has not yet been explored. In this study we show that BMP4 and BMP6, from two different BMP subclasses, and their antagonists noggin and sclerostin were variably expressed in melanocytes and keratinocytes in human skin. We further examined their involvement in melanogenesis and melanin transfer using fully matched primary cultures of adult human melanocytes and keratinocytes. BMP6 markedly stimulated melanogenesis by upregulating tyrosinase expression and activity, and also stimulated the formation of filopodia and Myosin-X expression in melanocytes, which was associated with increased melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. BMP4, by contrast, inhibited melanin synthesis and transfer to below baseline levels. These findings were confirmed using siRNA knockdown of BMP receptors BMPR1A/1B or of Myosin-X, as well as by incubating cells with the antagonists noggin and sclerostin. While BMP6 was found to use the p38MAPK pathway to regulate melanogenesis in human melanocytes independently of the Smad pathway, p38MAPK, PI3-K and Smad pathways were all involved in BMP6-mediated melanin transfer. This suggests that pigment formation may be regulated independently of pigment transfer. These data reveal a complex involvement of regulation of different members of the BMP family, their antagonists and inhibitory Smads, in melanocytes behaviour.

  15. Protein expression pattern of human MIER1 alpha, a novel estrogen receptor binding protein

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Patti L.; Paterno, Gary D.; Gillespie, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    MIER1 is a transcriptional regulator that exists as several isoforms. Of particular interest is the MIER1α isoform, which contains in its unique C-terminus an LXXLL motif for interaction with nuclear hormone receptors. Indeed, MIER1α has been shown to interact with ERα and inhibit estrogen-stimulated growth of breast carcinoma cells. Moreover, the subcellular localization of MIER1α changes dramatically, from nuclear to cytoplasmic, during progression to invasive breast carcinoma. While human MIER1 RNA and protein expression pattern data have been posted on several websites, none of these studies use probes or antibodies that distinguish between the α and β isoforms. We report here the first immunohistochemical study of the MIER1α protein expression pattern in human tissues. Our analysis revealed intense staining of specific cell types within virtually every endocrine and reproductive tissue except for the thyroid gland. In particular, we detected intense staining of ovarian follicles and germinal epithelium, ductal epithelial cells of the breast, pancreatic islet cells, all areas of the anterior pituitary and all zones of the adrenal cortex; moderate staining of germ cells and Leydig cells within the testis, patches of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla and weak staining of the fibromuscular stroma within the prostate. Immunoreactivity was limited to the cytoplasm in all positive cells except for oocytes and germinal epithelial cells in which the nucleus was also stained and in ductal epithelial cells of the breast in which staining was exclusively nuclear. In general, non-endocrine tissues were negative, however a few exceptions were noted. These included hepatocytes, myocardial fibers and neurons in all regions of the brain examined, with the exception of the thalamus. Neuronal staining was restricted to the cell bodies and dendrites, as most axons were negative. These data suggest that human MIER1α functions specifically in endocrine tissues and in

  16. Nuclear Localization and DNA Binding Properties of a Protein Expressed by Human c-myc Oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Hakan; Leder, Philip

    1984-08-01

    Antisera to the human cellular myc oncogene product were used to identify a human c-myc specific protein with a molecular weight of 65,000. Subcellular fractionation showed that the human c-myc protein is predominantly found in the cell nucleus. The p65 Kc-myc protein binds to double- and single-stranded DNA as measured by a DNA affinity chromatography assay.

  17. The importance of selecting a proper biological milieu for protein corona analysis in vitro: Human plasma versus human serum.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) exposure to biological fluids in the body results in protein binding to the NP surface, which forms a protein coating that is called the "protein corona". To simplify studies of protein-NP interactions and protein corona formation, NPs are incubated with biological solutions, such as human serum or human plasma, and the effects of this exposure are characterized in vitro. Yet, how NP exposure to these two different biological milieus affects protein corona composition and cell response has not been investigated. Here, we explore the differences between the protein coronas that form when NPs are incubated in human serum versus human plasma. NP characterization indicated that NPs that were exposed to human plasma had higher amounts of proteins bound to their surfaces, and were slightly larger in size than those exposed to human serum. In addition, significant differences in corona composition were also detected with gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, where a higher fraction of coagulation proteins and complement factors were found on the plasma-exposed NPs. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the uptake of plasma-exposed NPs was higher than that of serum-exposed NPs by RAW 264.7 macrophage immune cells, but not by NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. This difference is likely due to the elevated amounts of opsonins, such as fibrinogen, on the surfaces of the NPs exposed to plasma, but not serum, because these components trigger NP internalization by immune cells. As the human plasma better mimics the composition of the in vivo environment, namely blood, in vitro protein corona studies should employ human plasma, and not human serum, so the biological phenomena that is observed is more similar to that occurring in vivo.

  18. Proteomic characterization of human milk fat globule membrane proteins during a 12 month lactation period.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yalin; Alvarado, Rudy; Phinney, Brett; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-08-05

    The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) contains proteins which have been implicated in a variety of health benefits. Milk fat globule membrane proteins were isolated from human milk during a 12 month lactation period and subjected to in-solution digestion and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Data were pooled, and our results showed that 191 proteins were identified. Relative quantification of the identified MFGM proteins during the course of lactation was performed by label free spectral counting and differentiation expression analysis, which showed some proteins decreasing during the course of lactation whereas some increased or remained at a relatively constant level. The human MFGM proteins are distributed between intracellular, extracellular, and membrane-associated proteins, and they are mainly involved in cell communication and signal transduction, immune function, metabolism and energy production. This study provides more insights into the dynamic composition of human MFGM proteins, which in turn will enhance our understanding of the physiological significance of MFGM proteins.

  19. Bioactive Proteins in Human Milk-Potential Benefits for Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Human milk contains many bioactive proteins that are likely to be involved in the better outcomes of breast-fed infants compared with those fed infant formula. Bovine milk proteins or protein fractions may be able to provide some of these benefits and may, therefore, be used for preterm infants. Recombinant human milk proteins are likely to exert bioactivities similar to those of the native human milk proteins, but considerable research is needed before they can be used in routine care of preterm infants.

  20. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  1. C-reactive protein makes human endothelium stiff and tight.

    PubMed

    Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Urbanova, Katarina; Blanqué, Anja; Wilhelmi, Marianne; Schillers, Hermann; Kliche, Katrin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Brand, Eva; Oberleithner, Hans

    2011-02-01

    Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human blood accompanies inflammatory processes, including cardiovascular diseases. There is increasing evidence that the acute-phase reactant CRP is not only a passive marker protein for systemic inflammation but also affects the vascular system. Further, CRP is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and the development of hypertension. Another crucial player in atherosclerotic processes is the mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone. Even in low physiological concentrations, it stimulates the expression and membrane insertion of the epithelial sodium channel, thereby increasing the mechanical stiffness of endothelial cells. This contributes to the progression of endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, the hypothesis was tested that the acute application of CRP (25 mg/L), in presence of aldosterone (0.5 nmol/L; 24 hour incubation), modifies the mechanical stiffness and permeability of the endothelium. We found that endothelial cells stiffen in response to CRP. In parallel, endothelial epithelial sodium channel is inserted into the plasma membrane, while, surprisingly, the endothelial permeability decreases. CRP actions are prevented either by the inhibition of the intracellular aldosterone receptors using spironolactone (5 nmol/L) or by the inactivation of epithelial sodium channel using specific blockers. In contrast, inhibition of the release of the vasodilating gas nitric oxide via blockade of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway has no effect on the CRP-induced stiffening of endothelial cells. The data indicate that CRP enhances the effects of aldosterone on the mechanical properties of the endothelium. Thus, CRP could counteract any decrease in arterial blood pressure that accompanies severe acute inflammatory processes.

  2. Autophagy and lysosomal related protein expression patterns in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Mitrakas, Achileas; Kalamida, Dimitra; Zois, Christos E; Haider, Syed; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Pappa, Aglaia; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells are resistant to apoptotic stimuli with autophagic death prevailing under cytotoxic stress. Autophagy interfering agents may represent a new strategy to test in combination with chemo-radiation. We investigated the patterns of expression of autophagy related proteins (LC3A, LC3B, p62, Beclin 1, ULK1 and ULK2) in a series of patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Experiments with glioblastoma cell lines (T98 and U87) were also performed to assess autophagic response under conditions simulating the adverse intratumoral environment. Glioblastomas showed cytoplasmic overexpression of autophagic proteins in a varying extent, so that cases could be grouped into low and high expression groups. 10/23, 5/23, 13/23, 5/23, 8/23 and 9/23 cases examined showed extensive expression of LC3A, LC3B, Beclin 1, Ulk 1, Ulk 2 and p62, respectively. Lysosomal markers Cathepsin D and LAMP2a, as well as the lyososomal biogenesis transcription factor TFEB were frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas (10/23, 11/23, and 10/23 cases, respectively). TFEB was directly linked with PTEN, Cathepsin D, HIF1α, LC3B, Beclin 1 and p62 expression. PTEN was also significantly related with LC3B but not LC3A expression, in both immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Confocal microscopy in T98 and U87 cell lines showed distinct identity of LC3A and LC3B autophagosomes. The previously reported stone-like structure (SLS) pattern of LC3 expression was related with prognosis. SLS were inducible in glioblastoma cell lines under exposure to acidic conditions and 2DG mediated glucose antagonism. The present study provides the basis for autophagic characterization of human glioblastoma for further translational studies and targeted therapy trials.

  3. Binding of aluminum to human serum transferrin, human serum albumin and rat serum proteins

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae, A.K.H.; Zeid, M.M.A.; Abdel-Rahman, F.H.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    Human serum transferrin (HSTF), human serum albumin (HSA) and rat serum were compared for their interaction with AlCl[sub 3], in a Tris-HCl buffer solutions. The AlCl[sub 3] was tested in series of concentrations in the range of 50 [mu]M up to 500 [mu]M. HSTF, HSA and their 1:1 mixture and rat serum were incubated at 37 C with series of AlCl[sub 3] concentrations. The protein profile of the incubated solutions were compared to control using SDS-PAGE and FPLC tests. The results indicated that HSTF was more specifically responsive to AlCl[sub 3] showing a characteristic increase in it UV absorption, peak and area dimensions. Simultaneously, HSA was less affected, but it showed a significant shift with an increase in molecular weight accompanied with a change in its profile. The respective bands of transferrin and albumin in rat serum behaved similarly.

  4. An integrated map of HIV-human protein complexes that facilitate viral infection.

    PubMed

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Olivieri, Kevin; Pache, Lars; Shih, Hsin Ling; Pustovalova, Olga; Bessarabova, Marina; Young, John A T; Chanda, Sumit K; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Recent proteomic and genetic studies have aimed to identify a complete network of interactions between HIV and human proteins and genes. This HIV-human interaction network provides invaluable information as to how HIV exploits the host machinery and can be used as a starting point for further functional analyses. We integrated this network with complementary datasets of protein function and interaction to nominate human protein complexes with likely roles in viral infection. Based on our approach we identified a global map of 40 HIV-human protein complexes with putative roles in HIV infection, some of which are involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription, translation, and cytoskeletal regulation. Targeted RNAi screens were used to validate several proteins and complexes for functional impact on viral infection. Thus, our HIV-human protein complex map provides a significant resource of potential HIV-host interactions for further study.

  5. The hexameric structures of human heat shock protein 90.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Ta-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2011-01-01

    The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis.

  6. Conversion of human choriogonadotropin into a follitropin by protein engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.K.; Dean-Emig, D.M.; Moyle, W.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Human reproduction is dependent upon the action of follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), luteinizing hormone (hLH), and chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). While the {alpha} subunits of these heterodimeric proteins can be interchanged without effect on receptor-binding specificity, their {beta} subunits differ and direct hormone binding to either LH/CG or FSH receptors. Previous studies employing chemical modifications of the hormones, monoclonal antibodies, or synthetic peptides have implicated hCG {beta}-subunit residues between Cys-38 and Cys-57 and corresponding regions of hLH{beta} and hFSH{beta} in receptor recognition and activation. Since the {beta} subunits of hCG or hLH and hFSH exhibit very little sequence similarity in this region, the authors postulated that these residues might contribute to hormone specificity. To test this hypothesis the authors constructed chimeric hCG/hFSH {beta} subunits, coexpressed them with the human {alpha} subunit, and examined their ability to interact with LH and FSH receptors and hormone-specific monoclonal antibodies. Surprisingly, substitution of hFSH{beta} residues 33-52 for hCG{beta} residues 39-58 had no effect on receptor binding or stimulation. However, substitution of hFSH{beta} residues 88-108 in place of the carboxyl terminus of hCG{beta} (residues 94-145) resulted in a hormone analog identical to hFSH in its ability to bind and stimulate FSH receptors. The altered binding specificity displayed by this analog is not attributable solely to the replacement of hCG{beta} residues 108-145 or substitution of residues in the determinant loop located between hCD{beta} residues 93 and 100.

  7. Conversion of human choriogonadotropin into a follitropin by protein engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R K; Dean-Emig, D M; Moyle, W R

    1991-01-01

    Human reproduction is dependent upon the actions of follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), luteinizing hormone (hLH), and chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). While the alpha subunits of these heterodimeric proteins can be interchanged without effect on receptor-binding specificity, their beta subunits differ and direct hormone binding to either LH/CG or FSH receptors. Previous studies employing chemical modifications of the hormones, monoclonal antibodies, or synthetic peptides have implicated hCG beta-subunit residues between Cys-38 and Cys-57 and corresponding regions of hLH beta and hFSH beta in receptor recognition and activation. Since the beta subunits of hCG or hLH and hFSH exhibit very little sequence similarity in this region, we postulated that these residues might contribute to hormone specificity. To test this hypothesis we constructed chimeric hCG/hFSH beta subunits, coexpressed them with the human alpha subunit, and examined their ability to interact with LH and FSH receptors and hormone-specific monoclonal antibodies. Surprisingly, substitution of hFSH beta residues 33-52 for hCG beta residues 39-58 had no effect on receptor binding or stimulation. However, substitution of hFSH beta residues 88-108 in place of the carboxyl terminus of hCG beta (residues 94-145) resulted in a hormone analog identical to hFSH in its ability to bind and stimulate FSH receptors. The altered binding specificity displayed by this analog is not attributable solely to the replacement of hCG beta residues 108-145 or substitution of residues in the "determinant loop" located between hCG beta residues 93 and 100. PMID:1899483

  8. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (F)Xa and its cofactor FVa) plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC), an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative analysis of in vitro

  9. Human Spermatozoa as a Model for Detecting Missing Proteins in the Context of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Jumeau, Fanny; Com, Emmanuelle; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; Lagarrigue, Mélanie; Lavigne, Régis; Guillot, Laëtitia; Rondel, Karine; Gateau, Alain; Melaine, Nathalie; Guével, Blandine; Sergeant, Nicolas; Mitchell, Valérie; Pineau, Charles

    2015-09-04

    The Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) aims at cataloguing the proteins as gene products encoded by the human genome in a chromosome-centric manner. The existence of products of about 82% of the genes has been confirmed at the protein level. However, the number of so-called "missing proteins" remains significant. It was recently suggested that the expression of proteins that have been systematically missed might be restricted to particular organs or cell types, for example, the testis. Testicular function, and spermatogenesis in particular, is conditioned by the successive activation or repression of thousands of genes and proteins including numerous germ cell- and testis-specific products. Both the testis and postmeiotic germ cells are thus promising sites at which to search for missing proteins, and ejaculated spermatozoa are a potential source of proteins whose expression is restricted to the germ cell lineage. A trans-chromosome-based data analysis was performed to catalog missing proteins in total protein extracts from isolated human spermatozoa. We have identified and manually validated peptide matches to 89 missing proteins in human spermatozoa. In addition, we carefully validated three proteins that were scored as uncertain in the latest neXtProt release (09.19.2014). A focus was then given to the 12 missing proteins encoded on chromosomes 2 and 14, some of which may putatively play roles in ciliation and flagellum mechanistics. The expression pattern of C2orf57 and TEX37 was confirmed in the adult testis by immunohistochemistry. On the basis of transcript expression during human spermatogenesis, we further consider the potential for discovering additional missing proteins in the testicular postmeiotic germ cell lineage and in ejaculated spermatozoa. This project was conducted as part of the C-HPP initiatives on chromosomes 14 (France) and 2 (Switzerland). The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited with the Proteome

  10. The cellular proteins which can associate specifically with polyomavirus middle T antigen in human 293 cells include the major human 70-kilodalton heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Pallas, D C; Morgan, W; Roberts, T M

    1989-11-01

    We compared the proteins which associate with middle T antigen (MT) of polyomavirus in human cells infected with Ad5(pymT), a recombinant adenovirus which directs the overexpression of MT, with the MT-associated proteins (MTAPs) previously identified in murine fibroblasts expressing MT. MTAPs of 27, 29, 36, and 63 kilodaltons (kDa) appeared to be fairly well conserved between the two species, as judged by comigration on two-dimensional gels. Several 61-kDa MTAP species detected in MT immunoprecipitates from both cell sources also comigrated on these gels. However, no protein comigrating precisely with the murine 85-kDa MTAP could be detected in the human cells. Furthermore, two proteins of 72 and 74 kDa associated with wild-type MT in the infected human cells but not in murine fibroblasts expressing MT. It had been previously reported for murine cells that the 70-kDa heat shock protein associates with a particular mutant MT but not with wild-type MT (G. Walter, A. Carbone, and W.J. Welch, J. Virol. 61:405-410, 1987). By the criteria of comigration on two-dimensional gels, tryptic peptide mapping, and immunoblotting, we showed that the 72- and 74-kDa proteins that associate with wild-type MT in human cells are the major human 70-kDa heat shock proteins.

  11. Production of Tissue Microarrays, Immunohistochemistry Staining and Digitalization Within the Human Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, IngMarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts 1 2. Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) 3 4. The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  12. Production of tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry staining and digitalization within the human protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, Ingmarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-05-31

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts (1 2). Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) (3 4). The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  13. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  14. Transport of amphipathic anions by human multidrug resistance protein 3.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Liu, G; Rea, P A; Kruh, G D

    2000-09-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT or MRP2) are ATP-binding cassette transporters that confer resistance to some anticancer drugs and efflux glutathione and glucuronate conjugates from the cell. The MRP subfamily of ABC transporters, however, contains at least four other members of which MRP3 (MOAT-D) bears the closest structural resemblance to MRP1. Although transfection studies have established that human MRP3 confers increased resistance to several anticancer agents, neither the substrate selectivity nor physiological functions of this transporter have been determined. Here we report the results of investigations of the in vitro transport properties of cloned human MRP3 using membrane vesicles prepared from MRP3-transfected HEK293 cells. It is shown that the expression of MRP3 is specifically associated with enhancement of the MgATP-dependent transport into membrane vesicles of the glucuronide estradiol 17-beta-D-glucuronide (E(2)17betaG), the glutathione conjugates 2,4-dinitrophenyl S-glutathione (DNP-SG) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4), the antimetabolite methotrexate, and the bile acid glycocholate. DNP-SG, LTC4, and E(2)17betaG are transported at moderate affinity and low capacity with Km and Vmax values of 5.7 +/- 1.7 microM and 3.8 +/- 0.1 pmol/mg/min, 5.3 +/- 2.6 microM and 20.2 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, and 25.6 +/- 5.4 microM and 75.6 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, respectively. Methotrexate and glycocholate are transported at low affinity and high capacity with Km and Vmax values of 776 +/- 319 microM and 288 +/- 54 pmol/mg/min and 248 +/- 113 microM and 183 +/- 34 pmol/mg/min, respectively. On the basis of these findings, the osmotic dependence of the transport measured and its inability to transport taurocholate, MRP3, like MRP1 and cMOAT, is concluded to be competent in the transport of glutathione S-conjugates, glucuronides, and methotrexate, albeit at low to moderate affinity. In

  15. C-Reactive Protein in Human Atherogenesis: Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kefei; Zaczkiewicz, Myron; Liu, Zhongmin; Torzewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atherosclerosis is controversially discussed. Whereas initial experimental studies suggested a pathogenic role for CRP in atherogenesis, more recent genetic data from Mendelian randomization trials failed to provide evidence for a causative role of CRP in cardiovascular disease. Also, experimental results from laboratories all over the world were indeed contradictory, partly because of species differences in CRP biology and partly because data were not accurately evaluated. Here we summarize the published data from experimental work with mainly human material in order to avoid confusion based on species differences in CRP biology. Experimental work needs to be reevaluated after reconsideration of some traditional rules in research: (1) in order to understand a molecule's role in disease it may be helpful to be aware of its role in physiology; (2) it is necessary to define the disease entity that experimental CRP research deals with; (3) the scientific consensus is as follows: do not try to prove your hypothesis. Specific CRP inhibition followed by use of CRP inhibitors in controlled clinical trials may be the only way to prove or disprove a causative role for CRP in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24799767

  16. C-reactive protein in human atherogenesis: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Oliver; Li, Kefei; Zaczkiewicz, Myron; Graf, Matthias; Liu, Zhongmin; Torzewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atherosclerosis is controversially discussed. Whereas initial experimental studies suggested a pathogenic role for CRP in atherogenesis, more recent genetic data from Mendelian randomization trials failed to provide evidence for a causative role of CRP in cardiovascular disease. Also, experimental results from laboratories all over the world were indeed contradictory, partly because of species differences in CRP biology and partly because data were not accurately evaluated. Here we summarize the published data from experimental work with mainly human material in order to avoid confusion based on species differences in CRP biology. Experimental work needs to be reevaluated after reconsideration of some traditional rules in research: (1) in order to understand a molecule's role in disease it may be helpful to be aware of its role in physiology; (2) it is necessary to define the disease entity that experimental CRP research deals with; (3) the scientific consensus is as follows: do not try to prove your hypothesis. Specific CRP inhibition followed by use of CRP inhibitors in controlled clinical trials may be the only way to prove or disprove a causative role for CRP in cardiovascular disease.

  17. Nucleic acid-binding specificity of human FUS protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueyin; Schwartz, Jacob C.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    FUS, a nuclear RNA-binding protein, plays multiple roles in RNA processing. Five specific FUS-binding RNA sequence/structure motifs have been proposed, but their affinities for FUS have not been directly compared. Here we find that human FUS binds all these sequences with Kdapp values spanning a 10-fold range. Furthermore, some RNAs that do not contain any of these motifs bind FUS with similar affinity. FUS binds RNA in a length-dependent manner, consistent with a substantial non-specific component to binding. Finally, investigation of FUS binding to different nucleic acids shows that it binds single-stranded DNA with three-fold lower affinity than ssRNA of the same length and sequence, while binding to double-stranded nucleic acids is weaker. We conclude that FUS has quite general nucleic acid-binding activity, with the various proposed RNA motifs being neither necessary for FUS binding nor sufficient to explain its diverse binding partners. PMID:26150427

  18. BMP-7 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IS DOWNREGULATED IN HUMAN DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ivanac-Janković, Renata; Ćorić, Marijana; Furić-Čunko, Vesna; Lovičić, Vesna; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar

    2015-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is expressed in all parts of the normal kidney parenchyma, being highest in the epithelium of proximal tubules. It protects kidney against acute and chronic injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease, and is characterized by decreased expression of BMP-7. The aim of our study was to analyze whether the expression of BMP-7 is significantly changed in advanced stages of human diabetic nephropathy. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of BMP-7 was performed on archival material of 30 patients that underwent renal biopsy and had confirmed diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Results showed that BMP-7 was differently expressed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of proximal tubules and podocytes among all stages of diabetic nephropathy. At early stages of diabetic nephropathy, BMP-7 was strongly positive in proximal tubules and podocytes, while low expression was recorded in the majority of samples at advanced stages. In conclusion, increased expression of BMP-7 at initial stages of diabetic nephropathy with subsequent decrease at advanced stage highlights the role of BMP-7 in the protection of kidney structure and function. Further investigations should be focused on disturbances of BMP-7 receptors and signaling pathways in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein tat and methamphetamine interactions.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Shaji; Stolberg, Stephanie; Cass, Wayne A; Maragos, William F

    2006-08-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) affects the central nervous system (CNS) in approximately 30% of infected individuals and basal ganglia structures seem to be most affected. The HIV-1-transactivating protein, Tat, has been suggested to be pathogenically relevant in HIV-1-induced neuronal injury. The abuse of methamphetamine (METH), which is great among this patient population, also affects the basal ganglia, causing degeneration of dopaminergic terminals. In previous studies, we demonstrated that coexposure to these two toxins caused a synergistic loss of striatal dopamine and binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), suggesting a loss of dopamine terminals. Because the loss of dopamine and DAT, however, do not necessarily reflect dopamine terminal degeneration, we have used silver staining and TH immunohistochemistry to further examine this issue. We have also examined the glial reaction using GFAP as a marker of astrocyte activation and OX-42 as a marker of activated microglia. Lastly, we have begun to explore the mechanism of synergy by investigating the role that the cytokine TNF-alpha might play in Tat + METH synergy. Our data indicate that the synergistic loss of dopamine is likely the result of dopamine terminal degeneration. This injury is not a direct result of the number of activated glia but does involve TNF-alpha.

  20. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Jessica; Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Sickmann, Albert; Weber, Gerhard; Grosse, Jirka; Infanger, Manfred; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains. PMID:23303277

  1. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent.

  2. Multiple protein–protein interactions converging on the Prp38 protein during activation of the human spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Tonio; Ulrich, Alexander K.C.; Apelt, Luise; Will, Cindy L.; Bartlick, Natascha; Seeger, Martin; Weber, Gert; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C.

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosomal Prp38 proteins contain a conserved amino-terminal domain, but only higher eukaryotic orthologs also harbor a carboxy-terminal RS domain, a hallmark of splicing regulatory SR proteins. We show by crystal structure analysis that the amino-terminal domain of human Prp38 is organized around three pairs of antiparallel α-helices and lacks similarities to RNA-binding domains found in canonical SR proteins. Instead, yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that the amino-terminal domain is a versatile protein–protein interaction hub that possibly binds 12 other spliceosomal proteins, most of which are recruited at the same stage as Prp38. By quantitative, alanine surface-scanning two-hybrid screens and biochemical analyses we delineated four distinct interfaces on the Prp38 amino-terminal domain. In vitro interaction assays using recombinant proteins showed that Prp38 can bind at least two proteins simultaneously via two different interfaces. Addition of excess Prp38 amino-terminal domain to in vitro splicing assays, but not of an interaction-deficient mutant, stalled splicing at a precatalytic stage. Our results show that human Prp38 is an unusual SR protein, whose amino-terminal domain is a multi-interface protein–protein interaction platform that might organize the relative positioning of other proteins during splicing. PMID:26673105

  3. Predicting Human Protein Subcellular Locations by the Ensemble of Multiple Predictors via Protein-Protein Interaction Network with Edge Clustering Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Pufeng; Wang, Lusheng

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental tasks in biology is to identify the functions of all proteins to reveal the primary machinery of a cell. Knowledge of the subcellular locations of proteins will provide key hints to reveal their functions and to understand the intricate pathways that regulate biological processes at the cellular level. Protein subcellular location prediction has been extensively studied in the past two decades. A lot of methods have been developed based on protein primary sequences as well as protein-protein interaction network. In this paper, we propose to use the protein-protein interaction network as an infrastructure to integrate existing sequence based predictors. When predicting the subcellular locations of a given protein, not only the protein itself, but also all its interacting partners were considered. Unlike existing methods, our method requires neither the comprehensive knowledge of the protein-protein interaction network nor the experimentally annotated subcellular locations of most proteins in the protein-protein interaction network. Besides, our method can be used as a framework to integrate multiple predictors. Our method achieved 56% on human proteome in absolute-true rate, which is higher than the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:24466278

  4. Molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding human GLEPP1, a membrane protein tyrosine phosphatase: characterization of the GLEPP1 protein distribution in human kidney and assignment of the GLEPP1 gene to human chromosome 12p12-p13.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, R C; Wiggins, J E; Goyal, M; Wharram, B L; Thomas, P E

    1995-05-01

    Human glomerular epithelial protein 1 (GLEPP1), a receptor-like membrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), was cloned and sequenced from a human renal cortical cDNA library. The human nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences were, respectively, 90 and 97% identical to those of rabbit. Human GLEPP1 is predicted to contain 1188 amino acids. The predicted mature protein is 1159 amino acids long and contains a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane domain, and a single intracellular PTPase domain. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against a human GLEPP1 fusion protein recognized a protein with distribution restricted to the glomerulus in human kidney and with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 200 kDa. The GLEPP1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 12p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  5. Dietary proteins in humans: basic aspects and consumption in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Guigoz, Yves

    2011-03-01

    This introductory review gives an overview on protein metabolism, and discusses protein quality, sources, and requirements as well as the results from recent studies on Swiss spontaneous protein consumption. To assess protein quality in protein mixes and foods, the "protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score" (PDCAAS) is presented as a valuable tool in addition to the biological value (BV). Considering protein intake recommendations, the lower limit recommended has been defined according to the minimal amount needed to maintain short-term nitrogen balance in healthy people with moderate activity. Evaluation of intakes in Switzerland from food consumption data is about 90 g/day of protein per person. Two-thirds of proteins consumed in Switzerland are animal proteins with high biological value [meat and meat products (28 %), milk and dairy products (28 %), fish (3 %), and eggs (3 %)] and about 1/3 of proteins are of plant origin (25 % of cereals, 3 - 4 % of vegetables). Actual spontaneous protein consumption in Switzerland by specific groups of subjects is well within the actual recommendations (10 - 20 % of energy) with only the frail elderly being at risk of not covering their requirements for protein.

  6. Interaction of human plasma fibronectin with viral proteins of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Torre, D; Pugliese, A; Ferrario, G; Marietti, G; Forno, B; Zeroli, C

    1994-02-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is present in soluble and matrix forms in various body fluids and tissues, and has been shown to bind to several pathogens, including viruses. The interaction of FN with viral proteins of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) was investigated by immunofluorescence technique using a cell line chronically infected with HIV-1 (H9-V). The results of this study showed that FN binds to HIV-1 infected cells, especially at FN concentration of 5 micrograms/ml. In addition, FN-pentapeptide has shown the ability to bind to HIV-1 infected cells. On the other hand, preincubation with antibodies against FN abolished the binding of FN to HIV-1 infected cells. Finally, FN has shown to bind to HIV-1 glycoproteins, including gp41 and gp120. In contrast, no binding to HIV-1 core proteins, including p15 and p24, was noted. We suggest that FN, in binding HIV-1 particles, may reduce viremia and thus may be involved in the clearance of viral proteins from the cells.

  7. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum as a conduit to human disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Kaufman, Randal J

    2016-01-21

    In eukaryotic cells, the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for the folding and trafficking of proteins that enter the secretory pathway. Environmental insults or increased protein synthesis often lead to protein misfolding in the organelle, the accumulation of misfolded or unfolded proteins - known as endoplasmic reticulum stress - and the activation of the adaptive unfolded protein response to restore homeostasis. If protein misfolding is not resolved, cells die. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the unfolded protein response help to determine cell fate and function. Furthermore, endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to the aetiology of many human diseases.

  8. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better prediction of protein yield, demonstrates the effect of the different types of N-glycosylation of protein yield, and can be used to predict potential targets for strain improvement. The model represents a step towards a more complete description of protein production in P. pastoris, which is required for using these models to understand and optimize protein production processes.

  9. Effects of human hair and nail proteins and their films on rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Murai, Shinya; Ohkawa, Kousaku; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2008-06-01

    Human hair and nail are valuable materials for producing individual corresponding biocompatible materials. A rapid and convenient protein extraction method (Shindai method) and novel procedures for preparing their protein films from their extracts have been developed using human hair and nail. The effects of the human hair and nail proteins and their films on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells were investigated. Both protein solutions and their films, mainly consisting of keratins and matrix proteins, did not induce histamine release from the mast cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed that the mast cells were only slightly affected by adding the human hair and nail proteins or by incubating on their protein films. The IgE-dependent histamine release was inhibited by the hair and nail proteins and their films. Incubation of the mast cells with the hair and nail proteins prior to the addition of the IgE serum resulted in a high inhibition (50%) of the histamine release, while the inhibition was approximately 10% when the protein solutions were mixed with the mast cells after incubation with the IgE serum. These results suggest that the human hair and nail proteins and their films will be useful materials for antiallergic actions.

  10. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  11. Protein polymorphism of human IL-18 identified by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seya, T; Matsumoto, M; Shiratori, I; Fukumori, Y; Toyoshima, K

    2001-11-01

    Six mAbs were raised against human "functionally inactive" recombinant IL-18, ELISA for determination of "functionally inactive" forms of IL-18 were established using two of these mAbs (#21 and #132), and inactive species of IL-18 protein were examined with human blood plasma and macrophages (Mp). In 6-day GM-CSF-treated monocytes, namely Mp, the mAb #21 recognized the IL-18 proform (24 kDa) and a 48 kDa dimer by immunoblotting. In contrast, only the 24 kDa species was detected as a relatively faint band with a commercial mAb against "active" IL-18. No IL-18 species was detected in premature monocytes. Thus, the dimeric IL-18 was produced in Mp and detectable with the mAb we established. In blood plasma of normal subjects and patients, the #21-recognizable IL-18 was also detected by ELISA, the levels of which were not consistent with those obtained with the commercially available kit for determination of "functionally active" IL-18. We designated the former as type 2 and the latter as type 1. Strikingly, IL-18 type 1 was detected in all volunteers while type 2 was detected in approximately 30% of healthy subjects, and the levels of type 2 were high (10-100 ng/ml) compared to those of type 1 (0.02-0.55 ng/ml) in their blood plasma. In patients with atopic dermatitis, the mean value of type 1 was high (200 ng/ml) compared to those of normal subjects (0.122 ng/ml) and patients with lung cancer (0.113 ng/ml). Production of high type 1 may be associated with an immunomodulatory state in atopic dermatitis. The levels and frequencies of IL-18 type 2 were not significantly changed among these populations. Hence, large amounts of type 2 species are produced in monocyte-Mp differentiation, and their levels and frequencies are unchanged in blood plasma irrespective of the levels of type 1.

  12. The physical characteristics of human proteins in different biological functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tengjiao; Tang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of gene products are the foundation of their biological functions. In this study, we systematically explored relationships between physical properties and biological functions. The physical properties including origin time, evolution pressure, mRNA and protein stability, molecular weight, hydrophobicity, acidity/alkaline, amino acid compositions, and chromosome location. The biological functions are defined from 4 aspects: biological process, molecular function, cellular component and cell/tissue/organ expression. We found that the proteins associated with basic material and energy metabolism process originated earlier, while the proteins associated with immune, neurological system process etc. originated later. Tissues may have a strong influence on evolution pressure. The proteins associated with energy metabolism are double-stable. Immune and peripheral cell proteins tend to be mRNA stable/protein unstable. There are very few function items with double-unstable of mRNA and protein. The proteins involved in the cell adhesion tend to consist of large proteins with high proportion of small amino acids. The proteins of organic acid transport, neurological system process and amine transport have significantly high hydrophobicity. Interestingly, the proteins involved in olfactory receptor activity tend to have high frequency of aromatic, sulfuric and hydroxyl amino acids.

  13. Skeletal ligament healing using the recombinant human amelogenin protein.

    PubMed

    Hanhan, Salem; Ejzenberg, Ayala; Goren, Koby; Saba, Faris; Suki, Yarden; Sharon, Shay; Shilo, Dekel; Waxman, Jacob; Spitzer, Elad; Shahar, Ron; Atkins, Ayelet; Liebergall, Meir; Blumenfeld, Anat; Deutsch, Dan; Haze, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Injuries to ligaments are common, painful and debilitating, causing joint instability and impaired protective proprioception sensation around the joint. Healing of torn ligaments usually fails to take place, and surgical replacement or reconstruction is required. Previously, we showed that in vivo application of the recombinant human amelogenin protein (rHAM(+)) resulted in enhanced healing of the tooth-supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether amelogenin might also enhance repair of skeletal ligaments. The rat knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) was chosen to prove the concept. Full thickness tear was created and various concentrations of rHAM(+), dissolved in propylene glycol alginate (PGA) carrier, were applied to the transected MCL. 12 weeks after transection, the mechanical properties, structure and composition of transected ligaments treated with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) were similar to the normal un-transected ligaments, and were much stronger, stiffer and organized than control ligaments, treated with PGA only. Furthermore, the proprioceptive free nerve endings, in the 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) treated group, were parallel to the collagen fibres similar to their arrangement in normal ligament, while in the control ligaments the free nerve endings were entrapped in the scar tissue at different directions, not parallel to the axis of the force. Four days after transection, treatment with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) increased the amount of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers at the injured site. In conclusion application of rHAM(+) dose dependently induced mechanical, structural and sensory healing of torn skeletal ligament. Initially the process involved recruitment and proliferation of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers.

  14. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins and cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins during osteophyte formation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zoricic, Sanja; Maric, Ivana; Bobinac, Dragica; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2003-01-01

    Bone- and cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (BMPs and CDMPs), which are TGFβ superfamily members, are growth and differentiation factors that have been recently isolated, cloned and biologically characterized. They are important regulators of key events in the processes of bone formation during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, remodelling and regeneration of the skeleton. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical methods to investigate the distribution of BMP-2, -3, -5, -6, -7 and CDMP-1, -2, -3 in human osteophytes (abnormal bony outgrowths) isolated from osteoarthritic hip and knee joints from patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery. All osteophytes consisted of three different areas of active bone formation: (1) endochondral bone formation within cartilage residues; (2) intramembranous bone formation within the fibrous tissue cover and (3) bone formation within bone marrow spaces. The immunohistochemistry of certain BMPs and CDMPs in each of these three different bone formation sites was determined. The results indicate that each BMP has a distinct pattern of distribution. Immunoreactivity for BMP-2 was observed in fibrous tissue matrix as well as in osteoblasts; BMP-3 was mainly present in osteoblasts; BMP-6 was restricted to young osteocytes and bone matrix; BMP-7 was observed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts and young osteocytes of both endochondral and intramembranous bone formation sites. CDMP-1, -2 and -3 were strongly expressed in all cartilage cells. Surprisingly, BMP-3 and -6 were found in osteoclasts at the sites of bone resorption. Since a similar distribution pattern of bone morphogenetic proteins was observed during embryonal bone development, it is suggested that osteophyte formation is regulated by the same molecular mechanism as normal bone during embryogenesis. PMID:12713267

  15. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Trichohyalin-like 1 protein is a member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. ► Specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein were generated. ► TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. ► TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in tumor nests of BCC and SCC. ► The expression of TCHHL1 proteins increased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris. - Abstract: Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes.

  16. A new uncoupling protein: a potential component of the human body weight regulation system.

    PubMed

    Wolf, G

    1997-05-01

    A mitochondrial protein that uncouples the respiratory chain from oxidative phosphorylation and generates heat is found in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of rodents. Although humans have little BAT, a second uncoupling protein has been discovered that is widely distributed in human tissues. It is induced in mice by a high-fat diet and in mice with obese mutations, and may play a role in human body weight regulation.

  17. Human CDC45 protein binds to minichromosome maintenance 7 protein and the p70 subunit of DNA polymerase alpha.

    PubMed

    Kukimoto, I; Igaki, H; Kanda, T

    1999-11-01

    Budding yeast CDC45 encodes Cdc45p, an essential protein required to trigger initiation of DNA replication in late G1 phase. We cloned four and one species of the human Cdc45p homolog cDNA, resulting from different splicing patterns, from HeLa cell and human placenta cDNA libraries, respectively. A comparison of the cDNAs and the genomic sequence showed that the longest encoding a 610-amino acid protein was comprised of 20 exons. One species, which lacks exon 7 and contains the shorter of two exons 18, was identical with the previously reported CDC45L cDNA and constituted 24 out of 28 clones from HeLa cells. Splicing was different in HeLa cells and TIG-1 cells, a human diploid cell line. Human CDC45 protein was found to bind directly in vitro to human minichromosome maintenance 7 protein (hMCM7) and to the p70 subunit of DNA polymerase alpha. The data support a thesis that human CDC45 acts as a molecular tether to mediate loading of the DNA polymerase alpha on to the DNA replication complex through binding to hMCM7.

  18. Human respiratory syncytial virus N, P and M protein interactions in HEK-293T cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andressa P; Simabuco, Fernando M; Tamura, Rodrigo E; Guerrero, Manuel C; Ribeiro, Paulo G G; Libermann, Towia A; Zerbini, Luiz F; Ventura, Armando M

    2013-10-01

    Characterization of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (HRSV) protein interactions with host cell components is crucial to devise antiviral strategies. Viral nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein and matrix protein genes were optimized for human codon usage and cloned into expression vectors. HEK-293T cells were transfected with these vectors, viral proteins were immunoprecipitated, and co-immunoprecipitated cellular proteins were identified through mass spectrometry. Cell proteins identified with higher confidence scores were probed in the immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. The results indicate that nucleoprotein interacts with arginine methyl-transferase, methylosome protein and Hsp70. Phosphoprotein interacts with Hsp70 and tropomysin, and matrix with tropomysin and nucleophosmin. Additionally, we performed immunoprecipitation of these cellular proteins in cells infected with HRSV, followed by detection of co-immunoprecipitated viral proteins. The results indicate that these interactions also occur in the context of viral infection, and their potential contribution for a HRSV replication model is discussed.

  19. Dual Coordination of Post Translational Modifications in Human Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Woodsmith, Jonathan; Kamburov, Atanas; Stelzl, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity, stability and interaction profiles and are critical for cellular functioning. Further regulation is gained through PTM interplay whereby modifications modulate the occurrence of other PTMs or act in combination. Integration of global acetylation, ubiquitination and tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphorylation datasets with protein interaction data identified hundreds of protein complexes that selectively accumulate each PTM, indicating coordinated targeting of specific molecular functions. A second layer of PTM coordination exists in these complexes, mediated by PTM integration (PTMi) spots. PTMi spots represent very dense modification patterns in disordered protein regions and showed an equally high mutation rate as functional protein domains in cancer, inferring equivocal importance for cellular functioning. Systematic PTMi spot identification highlighted more than 300 candidate proteins for combinatorial PTM regulation. This study reveals two global PTM coordination mechanisms and emphasizes dataset integration as requisite in proteomic PTM studies to better predict modification impact on cellular signaling. PMID:23505349

  20. Prenylation of Rho G-proteins: a novel mechanism regulating gene expression and protein stability in human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Evan B; Von Zee, Cynthia L

    2012-08-01

    Endogenous prenylation with sesquiterpene or diterpene isoprenoids facilitates membrane localization and functional activation of small monomeric GTP-binding proteins. A direct effect of isoprenoids on regulation of gene expression and protein stability has also been proposed. In this study, we determined the role of sesquiterpene or diterpene isoprenoids on the regulation of Rho G-protein expression, activation, and stability in human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. In both primary and transformed human TM cells, limiting endogenous isoprenoid synthesis with lovastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, elicited marked increases in RhoA and RhoB mRNA and protein content. The effect of lovastatin was dose-dependent with newly synthesized inactive protein accumulating in the cytosol. Supplementation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) prevented, while inhibition of geranylgeranyl transferase-I mimicked, the effects of lovastatin on RhoA and RhoB protein content. Similarly, lovastatin-dependent increases in RhoA and RhoB mRNA expression were mimicked by geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibition. Interestingly, GGPP supplementation selectively promoted the degradation of newly synthesized Rho proteins which was mediated, in part, through the 20S proteasome. Functionally, GGPP supplementation prevented lovastatin-dependent decreases in actin stress fiber organization while selectively facilitating the subcellular redistribution of accumulated Rho proteins from the cytosol to the membrane and increasing RhoA activation. Post-translational prenylation with geranylgeranyl diterpenes selectively facilitates the expression, membrane translocation, functional activation, and turnover of newly synthesized Rho proteins. Geranylgeranyl prenylation represents a novel mechanism by which active Rho proteins are targeted to the 20S proteasome for degradation in human TM cells.

  1. Effects of different kinds of essentiality on sequence evolution of human testis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Julia; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2017-01-01

    We asked if essentiality for either fertility or viability differentially affects sequence evolution of human testis proteins. Based on murine knockout data, we classified a set of 965 proteins expressed in human seminiferous tubules into three categories: proteins essential for prepubertal survival (“lethality proteins”), associated with male sub- or infertility (“male sub-/infertility proteins”), and nonessential proteins. In our testis protein dataset, lethality genes evolved significantly slower than nonessential and male sub-/infertility genes, which is in line with other authors’ findings. Using tissue specificity, connectivity in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, and multifunctionality as proxies for evolutionary constraints, we found that of the three categories, proteins linked to male sub- or infertility are least constrained. Lethality proteins, on the other hand, are characterized by broad expression, many PPI partners, and high multifunctionality, all of which points to strong evolutionary constraints. We conclude that compared with lethality proteins, those linked to male sub- or infertility are nonetheless indispensable, but evolve under more relaxed constraints. Finally, adaptive evolution in response to postmating sexual selection could further accelerate evolutionary rates of male sub- or infertility proteins expressed in human testis. These findings may become useful for in silico detection of human sub-/infertility genes. PMID:28272493

  2. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. This technique can now be extended to the study of other HERV genomes within the human chromosomes that may have contributed to

  3. Food proteins: new sources from seeds. Fortified and processed seed proteins have a role in satisfying human protein needs.

    PubMed

    Altschul, A M

    1967-10-13

    Adequate protein nutrition is possible at lower cost without the undermining of man's satisfaction with his food. This potential requires the upgrading of the proteins of cereals by supplementation with amino acids and the development of new protein foods from low-cost sources such as the oilseeds; infant malnutrition can be eliminated by such means. The more sophisticated new foods such as protein beverages and textured products are proving acceptable to man and will supplement meager supplies of animal protein.

  4. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients.

  5. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  6. Nucleotidylylation of the VPg Protein of a Human Norovirus by its Proteinase-Polymerase Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; McPhie, Peter; Green, Kim Y.

    2008-01-01

    Caliciviruses have a positive strand RNA genome covalently-linked at the 5’-end to a small protein, VPg. This study examined the biochemical modification of VPg by the ProPol form of the polymerase of human norovirus strain MD145 (GII.4). Recombinant norovirus VPg was shown to be nucleotidylylated in the presence of Mn2+ by MD145 ProPol. Phosphodiesterase I treatment of the nucleotidylylated VPg released the incorporated UMP, which was consistent with linkage of RNA to VPg via a phosphodiester bond. Mutagenesis analysis of VPg identified Tyrosine 27 as the target amino acid for this linkage, and suggested that VPg conformation was important for the reaction. Nucleotidylylation was inefficient in the presence of Mg2+; however the addition of full- and subgenomic-length MD145 RNA transcripts led to a marked enhancement of the nucleotidylylation efficiency in the presence of this divalent cation. Furthermore, evidence was found for the presence of an RNA element near the 3’-end of the polyadenylated genome that enhanced the efficiency of nucleotidylylation in the presence of Mg2+. PMID:18234264

  7. Nucleotidylylation of the VPg protein of a human norovirus by its proteinase-polymerase precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; McPhie, Peter; Green, Kim Y

    2008-04-25

    Caliciviruses have a positive strand RNA genome covalently-linked at the 5'-end to a small protein, VPg. This study examined the biochemical modification of VPg by the ProPol form of the polymerase of human norovirus strain MD145 (GII.4). Recombinant norovirus VPg was shown to be nucleotidylylated in the presence of Mn2+ by MD145 ProPol. Phosphodiesterase I treatment of the nucleotidylylated VPg released the incorporated UMP, which was consistent with linkage of RNA to VPg via a phosphodiester bond. Mutagenesis analysis of VPg identified Tyrosine 27 as the target amino acid for this linkage, and suggested that VPg conformation was important for the reaction. Nucleotidylylation was inefficient in the presence of Mg2+; however the addition of full- and subgenomic-length MD145 RNA transcripts led to a marked enhancement of the nucleotidylylation efficiency in the presence of this divalent cation. Furthermore, evidence was found for the presence of an RNA element near the 3'-end of the polyadenylated genome that enhanced the efficiency of nucleotidylylation in the presence of Mg2+.

  8. Functional test of PCDHB11, the most human-specific neuronal surface protein.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Guilherme Braga; Gonçalves, Rafaella Araújo; Gralle, Matthias

    2016-04-12

    Brain-expressed proteins that have undergone functional change during human evolution may contribute to human cognitive capacities, and may also leave us vulnerable to specifically human diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or Alzheimer's disease. In order to search systematically for those proteins that have changed the most during human evolution and that might contribute to brain function and pathology, all proteins with orthologs in chimpanzee, orangutan and rhesus macaque and annotated as being expressed on the surface of cells in the human central nervous system were ordered by the number of human-specific amino acid differences that are fixed in modern populations. PCDHB11, a beta-protocadherin homologous to murine cell adhesion proteins, stood out with 12 substitutions and maintained its lead after normalizing for protein size and applying weights for amino acid exchange probabilities. Human PCDHB11 was found to cause homophilic cell adhesion, but at lower levels than shown for other clustered protocadherins. Homophilic adhesion caused by a PCDHB11 with reversion of human-specific changes was as low as for modern human PCDHB11; while neither human nor reverted PCDHB11 adhered to controls, they did adhere to each other. A loss of function in PCDHB11 is unlikely because intra-human variability did not increase relative to the other human beta-protocadherins. The brain-expressed protein with the highest number of human-specific substitutions is PCDHB11. In spite of its fast evolution and low intra-human variability, cell-based tests on the only proposed function for PCDHB11 did not indicate a functional change.

  9. Metrics for the Human Proteome Project 2015: Progress on the Human Proteome and Guidelines for High-Confidence Protein Identification.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S; Lane, Lydie; Lundberg, Emma K; Beavis, Ronald C; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Deutsch, Eric W

    2015-09-04

    Remarkable progress continues on the annotation of the proteins identified in the Human Proteome and on finding credible proteomic evidence for the expression of "missing proteins". Missing proteins are those with no previous protein-level evidence or insufficient evidence to make a confident identification upon reanalysis in PeptideAtlas and curation in neXtProt. Enhanced with several major new data sets published in 2014, the human proteome presented as neXtProt, version 2014-09-19, has 16,491 unique confident proteins (PE level 1), up from 13,664 at 2012-12 and 15,646 at 2013-09. That leaves 2948 missing proteins from genes classified having protein existence level PE 2, 3, or 4, as well as 616 dubious proteins at PE 5. Here, we document the progress of the HPP and discuss the importance of assessing the quality of evidence, confirming automated findings and considering alternative protein matches for spectra and peptides. We provide guidelines for proteomics investigators to apply in reporting newly identified proteins.

  10. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome.

  11. Promoter-specific trans activation and repression by human cytomegalovirus immediate-early proteins involves common and unique protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, R M; Fortney, J; Barlow, S W; Magrane, B P; Nelson, J A; Ghazal, P

    1990-01-01

    trans activation of promoters by viral regulatory proteins provides a useful tool to study coordinate control of gene expression. Immediate-early (IE) regions 1 and 2 of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) code for a series of proteins that originate from differentially spliced mRNAs. These IE proteins are proposed to regulate the temporal expression of the viral genome. To examine the structure and function of the IE proteins, we used linker insertion mutagenesis of the IE gene region as well as cDNA expression vector cloning of the abundant IE mRNAs. We showed that IE1 and IE2 proteins of CMV exhibit promoter-specific differences in their modes of action by either trans activating early and IE promoters or repressing the major IE promoter (MIEP). Transient cotransfection experiments with permissive human cells revealed a synergistic interaction between the 72- and the 86-kilodalton (kDa) IE proteins in trans activating an early promoter. In addition, transfection studies revealed that the 72-kDa protein was capable of trans activating the MIEP. In contrast, the 86-kDa protein specifically repressed the MIEP and this repression was suppressed by the 72-kDa protein. Furthermore, observations based on the primary sequence structure revealed a modular arrangement of putative regulatory motifs that could either potentiate or repress gene expression. These modular domains are either shared or unique among the IE proteins. From these data, we propose a model for IE protein function in the coordinate control of CMV gene expression. Images PMID:2157043

  12. One common structural feature of "words" in protein sequences and human texts.

    PubMed

    Zemková, M; Trifonov, E N; Zahradník, D

    2014-01-01

    Frequently discussed analogy between genetic and human texts is explored by comparison of alternation of polar and non-polar amino-acid residues in proteins and alternation of consonants and vowels in human texts. In human languages, the usage of possible combinations of consonants and vowels is influenced by pronounceability of the combinations. Similarly, oligopeptide composition of proteins is influenced by requirements of protein folding and stability. One special type of structure often present in proteins is amphipathic α-helices in which polar and non-polar amino acids alternate with the period 3.5 residues, not unlike alternation of consonants and vowels. In this study, we evaluated the contribution made by amphipathic alternations to the protein sequence texts (20-24%). Their proportion is lower than respective values for alternating words in human texts (57-89%). The proteomes (full sets of proteins for selected organisms) were transformed into ranked sequences of n-grams (words of length n), including periodical amphipathic structures. Similarly, human texts were transformed into sequences of alternating consonants and vowels. Analysis of the vocabularies shows that in both types of texts (human languages and proteins) the alternating words are dominant or highly preferred, thus, strengthening the analogy between these two types of texts. The contribution of amphipathic words in the upper parts of the ranked lists for 10 analyzed proteomes varies between 58 and 74%. In human texts respective values range between 90 and 100%.

  13. Dietary protein, calcium metabolism and bone health in humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein is the major structural constituent of bone (50% by volume). But it is also a major source of metabolic acid, especially protein from animal sources because it contains sulfur amino acids that generate sulfuric acid. Increased potential renal acid load has been closely associated with increa...

  14. Evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved cellular localizations and functions of human SIRT proteins.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y; Burneskis, Jenna M; Barrett, J Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-10-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast Sir2 functions; 2) SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are localized in mitochondria, an organelle that links aging and energy metabolism; 3) cellular p53 is a major in vivo substrate of SIRT1 deacetylase, but not the other six SIRT proteins; 4) SIRT1, but not the other two nuclear SIRT proteins, shows an in vitro deacetylase activity on histone H4 and p53 peptides; and 5) overexpression of any one of the seven SIRT proteins does not extend cellular replicative lifespan in normal human fibroblasts or prostate epithelial cells. This study supports the notion that multiple human SIRT proteins have evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved functions at different cellular locations and reveals that the lifespan of normal human cells, in contrast to that of lower eukaryotes, cannot be manipulated by increased expression of a single SIRT protein.

  15. Dietary protein quality in humans--an overview.

    PubMed

    Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The first objective in evaluating protein quality is to permit a ranking of proteins according to their potential nutritive value and to permit detection of changes in nutritive value due to processing and/or storage. The second objective is to permit prediction of the contribution a food protein, or mixture of food proteins, makes toward meeting nitrogen and amino acid requirements for growth or maintenance. Different approaches are used in meeting these distinct aims. The preferred current method to meet the second aim is the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS). This article introduces the concept of PDCAAS and places it in the context of the series of papers published in this Special Guest Editor Section addressing aspects of dietary amino acid utilization.

  16. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  17. Human HOXA5 homeodomain enhances protein transduction and its application to vascular inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Kyoung sook; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Sang Do; Park, Jin Bong; Chang, Seok Jong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} We have developed an E. coli protein expression vector including human specific gene sequences for protein cellular delivery. {yields} The plasmid was generated by ligation the nucleotides 770-817 of the homeobox A5 mRNA sequence. {yields} HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 inhibited TNF-alpha-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. {yields} Human HOXA5-PTD vector provides a powerful research tools for uncovering cellular functions of proteins or for the generation of human PTD-containing proteins. -- Abstract: Cellular protein delivery is an emerging technique by which exogenous recombinant proteins are delivered into mammalian cells across the membrane. We have developed an Escherichia coli expression vector including human specific gene sequences for protein cellular delivery. The plasmid was generated by ligation the nucleotides 770-817 of the homeobox A5 mRNA sequence which was matched with protein transduction domain (PTD) of homeodomain protein A5 (HOXA5) into pET expression vector. The cellular uptake of HOXA5-PTD-EGFP was detected in 1 min and its transduction reached a maximum at 1 h within cell lysates. The cellular uptake of HOXA5-EGFP at 37 {sup o}C was greater than in 4 {sup o}C. For study for the functional role of human HOXA5-PTD, we purified HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 and applied it on monocyte adhesion. Pretreatment with HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 (100 nM) inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, compared with HOXA5-EGFP. Taken together, our data suggested that human HOXA5-PTD vector provides a powerful research tools for uncovering cellular functions of proteins or for the generation of human PTD-containing proteins.

  18. Modulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Immunogenicity through Forced Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus US Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Soland, Melisa A.; Bego, Mariana G.; Colletti, Evan; Porada, Christopher D.; Zanjani, Esmail D.; St. Jeor, Stephen; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are promising candidates for cell therapy, as they migrate to areas of injury, differentiate into a broad range of specialized cells, and have immunomodulatory properties. However, MSC are not invisible to the recipient's immune system, and upon in vivo administration, allogeneic MSC are able to trigger immune responses, resulting in rejection of the transplanted cells, precluding their full therapeutic potential. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has developed several strategies to evade cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and Natural Killer (NK) cell recognition. Our goal is to exploit HCMV immunological evasion strategies to reduce MSC immunogenicity. Methodology/Principal Findings We genetically engineered human MSC to express HCMV proteins known to downregulate HLA-I expression, and investigated whether modified MSC were protected from CTL and NK attack. Flow cytometric analysis showed that amongst the US proteins tested, US6 and US11 efficiently reduced MSC HLA-I expression, and mixed lymphocyte reaction demonstrated a corresponding decrease in human and sheep mononuclear cell proliferation. NK killing assays showed that the decrease in HLA-I expression did not result in increased NK cytotoxicity, and that at certain NK∶MSC ratios, US11 conferred protection from NK cytotoxic effects. Transplantation of MSC-US6 or MSC-US11 into pre-immune fetal sheep resulted in increased liver engraftment when compared to control MSC, as demonstrated by qPCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Conclusions and Significance These data demonstrate that engineering MSC to express US6 and US11 can be used as a means of decreasing recognition of MSC by the immune system, allowing higher levels of engraftment in an allogeneic transplantation setting. Since one of the major factors responsible for the failure of allogeneic-donor MSC to engraft is the mismatch of HLA-I molecules between the donor and the recipient, MSC-US6 and MSC-US11 could constitute an

  19. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  20. Differential digestion of human milk proteins in a simulated stomach model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Cundiff, Judy K; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Wickham, Martin S J; Faulks, Richard M; van Tol, Eric A F

    2014-02-07

    A key element in understanding how human milk proteins support the health and development of the neonate is to understand how individual proteins are affected during digestion. In the present study, a dynamic gastric model was used to simulate infant gastric digestion of human milk, and a subsequent proteomic approach was applied to study the behavior of individual proteins. A total of 413 human milk proteins were quantified in this study. This approach demonstrated a high degree of variability in the susceptibility of human milk proteins to gastric digestion. Specifically this study reports that lipoproteins are among the class of slowly digested proteins during gastric processes. The levels of integral lysozyme C and partial lactadherin in milk whey increase over digestion. Mucins, ribonuclease 4, and macrophage mannose receptor 1 are also resistant to gastric digestion. The retention or enhancement in whey protein abundance can be ascribed to the digestive release of milk-fat-globule-membrane or immune-cell enclosed proteins that are not initially accessible in milk. Immunoglobulins are more resistant to digestion compared to total milk proteins, and within the immunoglobulin class IgA and IgM are more resistant to digestion compared to IgG. The gastric digestion of milk proteins becomes more apparent from this study.

  1. Proteomic characterization of specific minor proteins in the human milk casein fraction.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yalin; Alvarado, Rudy; Phinney, Brett; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-12-02

    Human milk contains many bioactive proteins that are likely to support the early development of the newborn. The aim of this study was to identify whether there are specific minor proteins associated with the human milk casein micelle prepared by the acid precipitation method. Protein identification was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Eighty-two proteins were identified in the casein micelle, 18 of which are not present in their whey compartment. Thirty-two of these proteins specifically associated with the casein micelle have not previously been identified in human milk or colostrum. Proteins involved in immune function comprised the major part (28%) of total proteins, and another significant part is involved in metabolism/energy production (22%). Most of the proteins were of extracellular or cytoplasmic origin (accounting for 50 and 29%, respectively). This study indicates that various soluble proteins should be considered as part of the casein compartment, prepared by the acid precipitation method. The data provide new insight not only into the proteomic profile of the human milk casein micelle and its physiological significance, but also into the proper proportion of casein and casein-associated proteins to use in infant formula.

  2. N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins are convenient translation enhancers in a human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Machida, Kodai; Masutani, Mamiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis systems are useful for the production of recombinant proteins. Productivity can be increased by supplementation with GADD34, a protein that is difficult to express in and purify from E. coli. Deletion of the N-terminal 120 or 240 amino acids of GADD34 improves recovery of this protein from E. coli without compromising its ability to boost protein synthesis in an in vitro protein synthesis system. The use of N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins in place of full-length GADD34 should improve the utility of human cell-based cell-free protein synthesis systems.

  3. Restriction of an extinct retrovirus by the human TRIM5alpha antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Shari M; Malik, Harmit S; Emerman, Michael

    2007-06-22

    Primate genomes contain a large number of endogenous retroviruses and encode evolutionarily dynamic proteins that provide intrinsic immunity to retroviral infections. We report here the resurrection of the core protein of a 4-million-year-old endogenous virus from the chimpanzee genome and show that the human variant of the intrinsic immune protein TRIM5alpha can actively prevent infection by this virus. However, we suggest that selective changes that have occurred in the human lineage during the acquisition of resistance to this virus, and perhaps similar viruses, may have left our species more susceptible to infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

  4. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Hirakis, Sophia P.; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-09-05

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ~90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant ‘reading head’ in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M–C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design.

  5. Health effects of soy protein and isoflavones in humans.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chao Wu

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiological investigations suggest that soy consumption may be associated with a lower incidence of certain chronic diseases. Clinical studies also show that ingestion of soy proteins reduces the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This led to the approval of the food-labeling health claim for soy proteins in the prevention of coronary heart disease by the U.S. FDA in 1999. Similar health petitions for soy proteins have also been approved thereafter in the United Kingdom, Brazil, South Africa, the Philippines, Indonesia, Korea, and Malaysia. However, the purported health benefits are quite variable in different studies. The Nutrition Committee of the American Heart Association has assessed 22 randomized trials conducted since 1999 and found that isolated soy protein with isoflavones (ISF) slightly decreased LDL cholesterol but had no effect on HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein(a), or blood pressure. The other effects of soy consumption were not evident. Although the contributing factors to these discrepancies are not fully understood, the source of soybeans and processing procedures of the protein or ISF are believed to be important because of their effects on the content and intactness of certain bioactive protein subunits. Some studies have documented potential safety concerns on increased consumption of soy products. Impacts of soy products on thyroid and reproductive functions as well as on certain types of carcinogenesis require further study in this context. Overall, existing data are inconsistent or inadequate in supporting most of the suggested health benefits of consuming soy protein or ISF.

  6. apl-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans gene encoding a protein related to the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, I; Li, C

    1993-01-01

    The major component of senile plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer disease patients is the beta-amyloid peptide, which is derived from a larger amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recently, a number of APP and APP-related proteins have been identified in different organisms and constitute the family of APP proteins. We have isolated several cDNAs encoding an APP-related protein in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and have designated the corresponding gene as apl-1. The apl-1 transcripts undergo two forms of posttranscriptional modification: trans-splicing and alternative polyadenylylation. In vitro translation of an apl-1 cDNA results in a protein of approximately the expected size. Similar to the Drosophila, human, and mouse APP-related proteins, APL-1 does not appear to contain the beta-amyloid peptide. Because APP-related proteins seem to be conserved through evolution, the apl-1 gene from C. elegans should be important for determining the normal function of human APP. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265668

  7. Mitochondrial iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and human disease.

    PubMed

    Stehling, Oliver; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Lill, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Work during the past 14 years has shown that mitochondria are the primary site for the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters. In fact, it is this process that renders mitochondria essential for viability of virtually all eukaryotes, because they participate in the synthesis of the Fe/S clusters of key nuclear and cytosolic proteins such as DNA polymerases, DNA helicases, and ABCE1 (Rli1), an ATPase involved in protein synthesis. As a consequence, mitochondrial function is crucial for nuclear DNA synthesis and repair, ribosomal protein synthesis, and numerous other extra-mitochondrial pathways including nucleotide metabolism and cellular iron regulation. Within mitochondria, the synthesis of Fe/S clusters and their insertion into apoproteins is assisted by 17 proteins forming the ISC (iron-sulfur cluster) assembly machinery. Biogenesis of mitochondrial Fe/S proteins can be dissected into three main steps: First, a Fe/S cluster is generated de novo on a scaffold protein. Second, the Fe/S cluster is dislocated from the scaffold and transiently bound to transfer proteins. Third, the latter components, together with specific ISC targeting factors insert the Fe/S cluster into client apoproteins. Disturbances of the first two steps impair the maturation of extra-mitochondrial Fe/S proteins and affect cellular and systemic iron homeostasis. In line with the essential function of mitochondria, genetic mutations in a number of ISC genes lead to severe neurological, hematological and metabolic diseases, often with a fatal outcome in early childhood. In this review we briefly summarize our current functional knowledge on the ISC assembly machinery, and we present a comprehensive overview of the various Fe/S protein assembly diseases.

  8. Significant enhanced expression and solubility of human proteins in Escherichia coli by fusion with protein S from Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Inouye, Masayori

    2009-08-01

    Protein S is a major spore coat protein of Myxococcus xanthus, consisting of two homologous domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the C-terminal domain, both of which contain a Ca(2+)-binding site. Protein S tightly binds to myxospores in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Here, we constructed a novel expression vector, pCold-PST, encoding two tandem repeat NTDs (PrS2). By using this vector, a number of human proteins that were expressed at low levels or in insoluble forms by a pET vector were expressed not only at high levels but also in soluble forms. We also demonstrated that an Escherichia coli protein tagged with PrS2 fully retained its function, indicating that it is folded independently from the tag. This technology not only allows simple, one-step protein purification using myxospores, but can also be used for the identification of proteins interacting with a protein of interest and will prove immensely useful for structural studies of proteins which are difficult to produce or are insoluble.

  9. Protein composition of human mRNPs spliced in vitro and differential requirements for mRNP protein recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Christian; Urlaub, Henning; Will, Cindy L.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    The deposition of proteins onto newly spliced mRNAs has far reaching consequences for their subsequent metabolism. We affinity-purified spliced human mRNPs under physiological conditions from HeLa nuclear extract and present the first comprehensive inventory of their protein composition as determined by mass spectrometry. Several proteins previously not known to be mRNP-associated were detected, including the DEAD-box helicases DDX3, DDX5, and DDX9, and the ELG, hNHN1, BCLAF1, and TRAP150 proteins. The association of some of the newly identified mRNP proteins was shown to be splicing-dependent, but not to require EJC formation. Initial recruitment of EJC proteins to the spliceosome did not require an EJC binding platform at the −20/24 region of the 5′ exon. Finally, while recruitment of EJC proteins and stable EJC formation were not dependent on the cap binding complex, several of the newly identified mRNP proteins required the latter for their association with mRNPs. These results provide novel insights into the composition of spliced mRNPs and the requirements for the association of mRNP proteins with the newly spliced mRNA. PMID:17095540

  10. Alternative splicing in the human gene for the core protein A1 generates another hnRNP protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buvoli, M; Cobianchi, F; Bestagno, M G; Mangiarotti, A; Bassi, M T; Biamonti, G; Riva, S

    1990-01-01

    The human hnRNP core protein A1 (34 kd) is encoded by a 4.6 kb gene split into 10 exons. Here we show that the A1 gene can be differentially spliced by the addition of an extra exon. The new transcript encodes a minor protein of the hnRNP complex, here defined A1B protein, with a calculated mol. wt of 38 kd, that coincides with a protein previously designated as B2 by some authors. In vitro translation of the mRNAs selected by hybridization with A1 cDNA produced two proteins of 34 and 38 kd; Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from HeLa cells revealed that the abundance of the A1B mRNA was approximately 5% that of A1. The A1B protein was detected by Western blotting with an anti-A1 monoclonal antibody both in enriched preparations of basic hnRNP proteins and in 40S hnRNP particles. The A1B protein exhibits a significantly higher affinity than A1 for ssDNA. The recombinant A1B protein, expressed in Escherichia coli, shows the same electrophoretic mobility and charge as the cellular one. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1691095

  11. Pseudomonas DING proteins as human transcriptional regulators and HIV-1 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-HIV-1 therapy depends upon multiple agents that target different phases of the viral replication cycle. Recent reports indicate that plant and human DING proteins are unique in targeting viral gene transcription as the basis of their anti-HIV-1 therapy. Methods Two cloned DING genes from Pseudomonas were transiently expressed in human cells, and effects on NFκB-mediated transcription, HIV-1 transcription, and HIV-1 production were measured. Results Both DING proteins elevated NFκB-mediated transcription. In microglial cells, one protein, from P. aeruginosa PA14, suppressed HIV-1 transcription; the other protein, from P. fluorescens SBW25, was inactive. The PA14DING protein also reduces HIV-1 production in microglial cells. Conclusions Structural differences between the two DING proteins highlight regions of the PA14DING protein essential to the anti-HIV-1 activity, and may guide the design of therapeutic agents. PMID:23855931

  12. Copper, Zinc Superoxide Dismutase is Primarily a Cytosolic Protein in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, James D.; Oury, Tim; Rabouille, Catherine; Slot, Jan W.; Chang, Ling-Yi

    1992-11-01

    The intracellular localization of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) was evaluated by using EM immunocytochemistry and both isolated human cell lines and human tissues. Eight monoclonal antibodies raised against either native or recombinant human Cu,Zn-SOD and two polyclonal antibodies raised against either native or recombinant human Cu,Zn-SOD were used. Fixation with 2% paraformaldehyde/0.2% glutaraldehyde was found necessary to preserve normal distribution of the protein. Monoclonal antibodies were less effective than polyclonal antibodies in recognizing the antigen after adequate fixation of tissue. Cu,Zn-SOD was found widely distributed in the cell cytosol and in the cell nucleus, consistent with it being a soluble cytosolic protein. Mitochondria and secretory compartments did not label for this protein. In human cells, peroxisomes showed a labeling density slightly less than that of cytoplasm.

  13. [Nutritional value and acceptibility of soy proteins in human diet].

    PubMed

    Derby, G; Poullain, B; Bleyer, R E

    1975-01-01

    These studies on textured soya protein (TSP) were directed towards the evaluation of its acceptability and nutritional value in man. ACCEPTABILITY. In the beginning, the reaction of adults to the incorporation of 40 g TSP in their daily diet was studied. After a three-week period, no intolerance or fatigue with the regim was shown. In a following study, observations made on young children's attitudes along with quantitative measurements of their food intake were noted during four one-wekk periods: -- period of "imposed diet", without TSP; -- period of imposed diet", with TSP; -- period of "free diet", without TSP; -- period of "free diet", with STP; During the periods of "imposed diets", children could eat only the proposed quantities of foodstuffs. During periods of "free diets", children were able to choose the quantity and sort of food they preferred from the proposed menu. Total protein ingested (differentiating between that of animal and vegetable origin) was calculated for each child from his daily food record. Results show that only one of the twenty-four children systematically refuse soya-containing preparations. Average consumption of soya protein during "free diet" periods was close to the desired level and not significantly different to levels achieved in the "imposed diet" period. The acceptance of TSP by the children was therefore evident. NUTRITIONAL VALUE. The following studies were designed to determine the effects of the replacement of animal protein by TSP (at the maximal levels of its tolerability) in a normal diet. In the first nitrogen balance study, with 10 convalescent subjects, the following protocol was developed: -- the habitual caloric and protein intakes of the subjects was established; -- following a four-day adaptation period, the subjects entered consecutively: a control period at established levels of calories and protein, and a test period in which 20 g of soya protein replaced an equivalent quantity of animal protein. The average

  14. Chromosome protein framework from proteome analysis of isolated human metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kiichi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    We have presented a structural model of the chromosome based on its constituent proteins. Development of a method of mass isolation for intact human metaphase chromosomes and proteome analysis by mass spectrometry of the isolated chromosomal proteins enabled us to develop a four-layer structural model of human metaphase chromosomes. The model consists of four layers, each with different chromosomal protein sets, i.e., chromosome coating proteins (CCPs), chromosome peripheral proteins (CPPs), chromosome structural proteins (CSPs), and chromosome fibrous proteins (CFPs). More than 200 identified proteins have been classified and assigned to the four layers with each layer occupying a distinct region of the chromosome. CCPs are localized at the most outer regions of the chromosomes and they attach to the regions tentatively and occasionally. CCPs include mostly mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, e.g., 70 kDa heat shock protein 9B and Hsp60. CPPs are also localized at the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, but as the essential part of the chromosomes. CPPs include nucleolin, lamin A/C, fibrillarin, etc. CSPs are the primary chromosomal structure proteins, and include topoisomerase IIalpha, condensin subunits, histones, etc. CFPs have a fibrous nature, e.g., beta-actin, vimentin, myosin II, tublin, etc. A data set of these proteins, which we developed, contains essential chromosome proteins with classified information based on this four-layer model and presents useful leads for further studies on chromosomal structure and function.

  15. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  16. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  17. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is overexpressed in human cancers and interacts with YWHAH protein

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Hong; Shin, Seung Min; Kim, Hyun Kee; Ha, Seon-Ah; Cho, Goang Won; Hur, Soo Young; Kim, Tae Eung; Kim, Jin Woo

    2006-01-01

    Background Basic studies of oncogenesis have demonstrated that either the elevated production of particular oncogene proteins or the occurrence of qualitative abnormalities in oncogenes can contribute to neoplastic cellular transformation. The purpose of our study was to identify an unique gene that shows cancer-associated expression, and characterizes its function related to human carcinogenesis. Methods We used the differential display (DD) RT-PCR method using normal cervical, cervical cancer, metastatic cervical tissues, and cervical cancer cell lines to identify genes overexpressed in cervical cancers and identified gremlin 1 which was overexpressed in cervical cancers. We determined expression levels of gremlin 1 using Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemical study in various types of human normal and cancer tissues. To understand the tumorigenesis pathway of identified gremlin 1 protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen, GST pull down assay, and immunoprecipitation to identify gremlin 1 interacting proteins. Results DDRT-PCR analysis revealed that gremlin 1 was overexpressed in uterine cervical cancer. We also identified a human gremlin 1 that was overexpressed in various human tumors including carcinomas of the lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. PIG-2-transfected HEK 293 cells exhibited growth stimulation and increased telomerase activity. Gremlin 1 interacted with homo sapiens tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, eta polypeptide (14-3-3 eta; YWHAH). YWHAH protein binding site for gremlin 1 was located between residues 61–80 and gremlin 1 binding site for YWHAH was found to be located between residues 1 to 67. Conclusion Gremlin 1 may play an oncogenic role especially in carcinomas of the uterine cervix, lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. Over-expressed gremlin 1 functions by interaction with YWHAH. Therefore, Gremlin 1 and its binding protein YWHAH could be good

  18. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is overexpressed in human cancers and interacts with YWHAH protein.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Hong; Shin, Seung Min; Kim, Hyun Kee; Ha, Seon-Ah; Cho, Goang Won; Hur, Soo Young; Kim, Tae Eung; Kim, Jin Woo

    2006-03-18

    Basic studies of oncogenesis have demonstrated that either the elevated production of particular oncogene proteins or the occurrence of qualitative abnormalities in oncogenes can contribute to neoplastic cellular transformation. The purpose of our study was to identify an unique gene that shows cancer-associated expression, and characterizes its function related to human carcinogenesis. We used the differential display (DD) RT-PCR method using normal cervical, cervical cancer, metastatic cervical tissues, and cervical cancer cell lines to identify genes overexpressed in cervical cancers and identified gremlin 1 which was overexpressed in cervical cancers. We determined expression levels of gremlin 1 using Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemical study in various types of human normal and cancer tissues. To understand the tumorigenesis pathway of identified gremlin 1 protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen, GST pull down assay, and immunoprecipitation to identify gremlin 1 interacting proteins. DDRT-PCR analysis revealed that gremlin 1 was overexpressed in uterine cervical cancer. We also identified a human gremlin 1 that was overexpressed in various human tumors including carcinomas of the lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. PIG-2-transfected HEK 293 cells exhibited growth stimulation and increased telomerase activity. Gremlin 1 interacted with homo sapiens tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, eta polypeptide (14-3-3 eta; YWHAH). YWHAH protein binding site for gremlin 1 was located between residues 61-80 and gremlin 1 binding site for YWHAH was found to be located between residues 1 to 67. Gremlin 1 may play an oncogenic role especially in carcinomas of the uterine cervix, lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. Over-expressed gremlin 1 functions by interaction with YWHAH. Therefore, Gremlin 1 and its binding protein YWHAH could be good targets for developing diagnostic and

  19. Purification and functional characterization of a protein: Bombyx mori human growth hormone like protein in silkworm pupa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianqing; Shu, Tejun; Lv, Zhengbing; Nie, Zuoming; Chen, Jian; Chen, Hao; Yu, Wei; Gai, Qijing; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2014-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a peptide hormone secreted by eosinophils of the human anterior pituitary, and a regulatory factor for a variety of metabolic pathways. A 30-kD protein from the pupa stage of silkworm was detected by Western blotting and confirmed by immunoprecipitation based on its ability to bind to anti-hGH antibody. This protein, named BmhGH-like protein, was purified from fresh silkworm pupas through low-temperature homogenization, filtration, and centrifugation to remove large impurity particles. The supernatants were precipitated, resuspended, and passed through a molecular sieve. Further purification by affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in pure protein for analysis by MS MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. An alignment with predicted proteins indicated that BmhGH-like protein consisted of two lipoproteins, which we named hGH-L1 and hGH-L2. These proteins belong to the β-trefoil superfamily, with β domains similar to the spatial structure of hGH. Assays with K562 cells demonstrated that these proteins could promote cell division in vitro. To further validate the growth-promoting effects, hGH-L2 was cloned from pupa cDNA to create recombinant silkworm baculovirus vBmNPV-hGH-L2, which was used to infect silkworm BmN cells at low titer. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the protein shortened the G0/G1 phase of the cells, and enabled the cells to rapidly traverse the G1/S phase transition point to enter S phase and promote cell division. Discovery of hGH-like protein in silkworm will once again arouse people's interest in the potential medicinal value of silkworm and establish the basis for the development of new hormone drugs.

  20. Purification and Functional Characterization of a Protein: Bombyx mori Human Growth Hormone Like Protein in Silkworm Pupa

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhengbing; Nie, Zuoming; Chen, Jian; Chen, Hao; Yu, Wei; Gai, Qijing; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2014-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a peptide hormone secreted by eosinophils of the human anterior pituitary, and a regulatory factor for a variety of metabolic pathways. A 30-kD protein from the pupa stage of silkworm was detected by Western blotting and confirmed by immunoprecipitation based on its ability to bind to anti-hGH antibody. This protein, named BmhGH-like protein, was purified from fresh silkworm pupas through low-temperature homogenization, filtration, and centrifugation to remove large impurity particles. The supernatants were precipitated, resuspended, and passed through a molecular sieve. Further purification by affinity chromatography and two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in pure protein for analysis by MS MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. An alignment with predicted proteins indicated that BmhGH-like protein consisted of two lipoproteins, which we named hGH-L1 and hGH-L2. These proteins belong to the β-trefoil superfamily, with β domains similar to the spatial structure of hGH. Assays with K562 cells demonstrated that these proteins could promote cell division in vitro. To further validate the growth-promoting effects, hGH-L2 was cloned from pupa cDNA to create recombinant silkworm baculovirus vBmNPV-hGH-L2, which was used to infect silkworm BmN cells at low titer. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the protein shortened the G0/G1 phase of the cells, and enabled the cells to rapidly traverse the G1/S phase transition point to enter S phase and promote cell division. Discovery of hGH-like protein in silkworm will once again arouse people’s interest in the potential medicinal value of silkworm and establish the basis for the development of new hormone drugs. PMID:25469649

  1. Transposable element fragments in protein-coding regions and their contributions to human functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Li, Li; Sun, Zhirong

    2007-10-15

    Transposable elements (TEs) and their contributions to protein-coding regions are of particular interest. Here we searched for TE fragments in Homo sapiens at both the transcript and protein levels. We found evidence in support of TE exonization and its association with alternative splicing. Despite recent findings that long evolutionary times are required to incorporate TE into proteins, we found many functional proteins with translated TE cassettes derived from young TEs. Analyses of two Bcl-family proteins and Alu-encoded segments suggest the coding and functional potential of TE sequences.

  2. Mutations of signal-transducing G proteins in human disease.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, P; Böhm, M

    1995-05-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) couple a large number of cell surface receptors to their intracellular effector molecules, such as enzymes or ion channels. Mutations of G proteins can lead to either activation or inactivation of the corresponding signal transduction pathway and thus cause clinical symptoms. Mutations of heterotrimeric G proteins have been found in a number of endocrine tumors, the McCune-Albright syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, and a combination of precocious puberty and pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia. The identification of the molecular defects underlying the above disorders and the investigation of their functional consequences for metabolism and growth regulation have been the subject of many studies over the past few years. A close understanding of these pathophysiologic mechanisms is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies.

  3. Evolutionary hallmarks of the human proteome: chasing the age and coregulation of protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Katia de Paiva; Campos-Laborie, Francisco José; Vialle, Ricardo Assunção; Ortega, José Miguel; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2016-10-25

    The development of large-scale technologies for quantitative transcriptomics has enabled comprehensive analysis of the gene expression profiles in complete genomes. RNA-Seq allows the measurement of gene expression levels in a manner far more precise and global than previous methods. Studies using this technology are altering our view about the extent and complexity of the eukaryotic transcriptomes. In this respect, multiple efforts have been done to determine and analyse the gene expression patterns of human cell types in different conditions, either in normal or pathological states. However, until recently, little has been reported about the evolutionary marks present in human protein-coding genes, particularly from the combined perspective of gene expression and protein evolution. We present a combined analysis of human protein-coding gene expression profiling and time-scale ancestry mapping, that places the genes in taxonomy clades and reveals eight evolutionary major steps ("hallmarks"), that include clusters of functionally coherent proteins. The human expressed genes are analysed using a RNA-Seq dataset of 116 samples from 32 tissues. The evolutionary analysis of the human proteins is performed combining the information from: (i) a database of orthologous proteins (OMA), (ii) the taxonomy mapping of genes to lineage clades (from NCBI Taxonomy) and (iii) the evolution time-scale mapping provided by TimeTree (Timescale of Life). The human protein-coding genes are also placed in a relational context based in the construction of a robust gene coexpression network, that reveals tighter links between age-related protein-coding genes and finds functionally coherent gene modules. Understanding the relational landscape of the human protein-coding genes is essential for interpreting the functional elements and modules of our active genome. Moreover, decoding the evolutionary history of the human genes can provide very valuable information to reveal or uncover their

  4. An improved method for predicting interactions between virus and human proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungmin; Alguwaizani, Saud; Zhou, Xiang; Huang, De-Shuang; Park, Byunkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of virus proteins with host proteins plays a key role in viral infection and consequent pathogenesis. Many computational methods have been proposed to predict protein-protein interactions (PPIs), but most of the computational methods are intended for PPIs within a species rather than PPIs across different species such as virus-host PPIs. We developed a method that represents key features of virus and human proteins of variable length into a feature vector of fixed length. The key features include the relative frequency of amino acid triplets (RFAT), the frequency difference of amino acid triplets (FDAT) between virus and host proteins, and amino acid composition (AC). We constructed several support vector machine (SVM) models to evaluate our method and to compare our method with others on PPIs between human and two types of viruses: human papillomaviruses (HPV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Comparison of our method to others with same datasets of HPV-human PPIs and HCV-human PPIs showed that the performance of our method is significantly higher than others in all performance measures. Using the SVM model with gene ontology (GO) annotations of proteins, we predicted new HPV-human PPIs. We believe our approach will be useful in predicting heterogeneous PPIs.

  5. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala) with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS.

  6. The Non-Protein Amino Acid BMAA Is Misincorporated into Human Proteins in Place of l-Serine Causing Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNAAla with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of l-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by l-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  7. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Ma Isabel; Pérez-García, Marissa; Terreros-Tinoco, Marisol; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Diegopérez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ramírez-Reyes, Alma Griselda; Aguilera, Penélope; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; García-Flores, María Martha

    2013-01-01

    An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV) pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS), characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA) and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa) from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa) and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa). Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1) that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2) that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2. PMID:24302878

  8. Dengue virus type 2: protein binding and active replication in human central nervous system cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ma Isabel; Pérez-García, Marissa; Terreros-Tinoco, Marisol; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Diegopérez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ramírez-Reyes, Alma Griselda; Aguilera, Penélope; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; García-Flores, María Martha

    2013-01-01

    An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV) pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS), characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA) and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa) from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa) and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa). Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1) that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2) that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2.

  9. Enhanced vulnerability of human proteins towards disease-associated inactivation through divergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Medina-Carmona, Encarnación; Fuchs, Julian E; Gavira, Jose A; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Neira, Jose L; Salido, Eduardo; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Burgos, Miguel; Timson, David J; Pey, Angel L

    2017-09-15

    Human proteins are vulnerable towards disease-associated single amino acid replacements affecting protein stability and function. Interestingly, a few studies have shown that consensus amino acids from mammals or vertebrates can enhance protein stability when incorporated into human proteins. Here, we investigate yet unexplored relationships between the high vulnerability of human proteins towards disease-associated inactivation and recent evolutionary site-specific divergence of stabilizing amino acids. Using phylogenetic, structural and experimental analyses, we show that divergence from the consensus amino acids at several sites during mammalian evolution has caused local protein destabilization in two human proteins linked to disease: cancer-associated NQO1 and alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase, mutated in primary hyperoxaluria type I. We demonstrate that a single consensus mutation (H80R) acts as a disease suppressor on the most common cancer-associated polymorphism in NQO1 (P187S). The H80R mutation reactivates P187S by enhancing FAD binding affinity through local and dynamic stabilization of its binding site. Furthermore, we show how a second suppressor mutation (E247Q) cooperates with H80R in protecting the P187S polymorphism towards inactivation through long-range allosteric communication within the structural ensemble of the protein. Our results support that recent divergence of consensus amino acids may have occurred with neutral effects on many functional and regulatory traits of wild-type human proteins. However, divergence at certain sites may have increased the propensity of some human proteins towards inactivation due to disease-associated mutations and polymorphisms. Consensus mutations also emerge as a potential strategy to identify structural hot-spots in proteins as targets for pharmacological rescue in loss-of-function genetic diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  10. Multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning for human protein subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Mei, Suyu

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed much progress in computational modelling for protein subcellular localization. However, the existing sequence-based predictive models demonstrate moderate or unsatisfactory performance, and the gene ontology (GO) based models may take the risk of performance overestimation for novel proteins. Furthermore, many human proteins have multiple subcellular locations, which renders the computational modelling more complicated. Up to the present, there are far few researches specialized for predicting the subcellular localization of human proteins that may reside in multiple cellular compartments. In this paper, we propose a multi-label multi-kernel transfer learning model for human protein subcellular localization (MLMK-TLM). MLMK-TLM proposes a multi-label confusion matrix, formally formulates three multi-labelling performance measures and adapts one-against-all multi-class probabilistic outputs to multi-label learning scenario, based on which to further extends our published work GO-TLM (gene ontology based transfer learning model for protein subcellular localization) and MK-TLM (multi-kernel transfer learning based on Chou's PseAAC formulation for protein submitochondria localization) for multiplex human protein subcellular localization. With the advantages of proper homolog knowledge transfer, comprehensive survey of model performance for novel protein and multi-labelling capability, MLMK-TLM will gain more practical applicability. The experiments on human protein benchmark dataset show that MLMK-TLM significantly outperforms the baseline model and demonstrates good multi-labelling ability for novel human proteins. Some findings (predictions) are validated by the latest Swiss-Prot database. The software can be freely downloaded at http://soft.synu.edu.cn/upload/msy.rar.

  11. Identification of shed proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells: Application of statistical confidence using human and mouse protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Hunter, Joel C.; Miller, John H.; Springer, David L.

    2005-05-01

    The shedding process releases ligands, receptors, and other proteins from the surface of the cell and is a mechanism whereby cells communicate. Even though altered regulation of this process has been implicated in several diseases, global approaches to evaluate shed proteins have not been developed. A goal of this study was to identify global changes in shed proteins in media taken from cells exposed to low-doses of radiation in an effort to develop a fundamental understanding of the bystander response. CHO cells were chosen for this study because they have been widely used for radiation studies and since they have been reported to respond to radiation by releasing factors into the media that cause genomic instability and cytotoxicity in unexposed cells, i.e., a bystander effect. Media samples taken for irradiated cells were evaluated using a combination of tandem- and FTICR-mass spectrometry analysis. Since the hamster genome has not been sequenced, mass spectrometry data was searched against the mouse and human proteins databases. Nearly 150 proteins that were identified by tandem mass spectrometry were confirmed by FTICR. When both types of mass spectrometry data were evaluated with a new confidence scoring tool, which is based on discriminant analyses, about 500 protein were identified. Approximately 20% of these identifications were either integral membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins, suggesting that they were derived from the cell surface, hence were likely shed. However, estimates of quantitative changes, based on two independent mass spectrometry approaches, did not identify any protein abundance changes attributable to the bystander effect. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of global evaluation of shed proteins using mass spectrometry in conjunction with cross-species protein databases and that significant improvement in peptide/protein identifications is provided by the confidence scoring tool.

  12. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42.

    PubMed Central

    Shinjo, K; Koland, J G; Hart, M J; Narasimhan, V; Johnson, D I; Evans, T; Cerione, R A

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated Gp (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human Gp protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins (approximately 50% identical), and the rac proteins (approximately 70% identical). The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which we designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein. Images PMID:2124704

  13. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, K; Koland, J G; Hart, M J; Narasimhan, V; Johnson, D I; Evans, T; Cerione, R A

    1990-12-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated Gp (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human Gp protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins (approximately 50% identical), and the rac proteins (approximately 70% identical). The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which we designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein.

  14. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein G sub p (G25K): Identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42

    SciTech Connect

    Shinjo, K.; Koland, J.G.; Hart, M.J.; Narasimhan, V.; Cerione, R.A. ); Johnson, D.I. ); Evans, T. )

    1990-12-01

    The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated G{sub p} (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human G{sub p} protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins and the rac proteins. The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which they designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein.

  15. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Diana I.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Cinca, Sabin A.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  16. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Diana I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.

    2007-04-23

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  17. Multiparameter functional diversity of human C2H2 zinc finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmitges, Frank W.; Radovani, Ernest; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Barazandeh, Marjan; Campitelli, Laura F.; Yin, Yimeng; Jolma, Arttu; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Hongbo; Kanagalingam, Tharsan; Dai, Wei F.; Taipale, Jussi; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    C2H2 zinc finger proteins represent the largest and most enigmatic class of human transcription factors. Their C2H2-ZF arrays are highly variable, indicating that most will have unique DNA binding motifs. However, most of the binding motifs have not been directly determined. In addition, little is known about whether or how these proteins regulate transcription. Most of the ∼700 human C2H2-ZF proteins also contain at least one KRAB, SCAN, BTB, or SET domain, suggesting that they may have common interacting partners and/or effector functions. Here, we report a multifaceted functional analysis of 131 human C2H2-ZF proteins, encompassing DNA binding sites, interacting proteins, and transcriptional response to genetic perturbation. We confirm the expected diversity in DNA binding motifs and genomic binding sites, and provide motif models for 78 previously uncharacterized C2H2-ZF proteins, most of which are unique. Surprisingly, the diversity in protein–protein interactions is nearly as high as diversity in DNA binding motifs: Most C2H2-ZF proteins interact with a unique spectrum of co-activators and co-repressors. Thus, multiparameter diversification likely underlies the evolutionary success of this large class of human proteins. PMID:27852650

  18. Computational Prediction of Human Salivary Proteins from Blood Circulation and Application to Diagnostic Biomarker Identification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaxin; Liang, Yanchun; Wang, Yan; Cui, Juan; Liu, Ming; Du, Wei; Xu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Proteins can move from blood circulation into salivary glands through active transportation, passive diffusion or ultrafiltration, some of which are then released into saliva and hence can potentially serve as biomarkers for diseases if accurately identified. We present a novel computational method for predicting salivary proteins that come from circulation. The basis for the prediction is a set of physiochemical and sequence features we found to be discerning between human proteins known to be movable from circulation to saliva and proteins deemed to be not in saliva. A classifier was trained based on these features using a support-vector machine to predict protein secretion into saliva. The classifier achieved 88.56% average recall and 90.76% average precision in 10-fold cross-validation on the training data, indicating that the selected features are informative. Considering the possibility that our negative training data may not be highly reliable (i.e., proteins predicted to be not in saliva), we have also trained a ranking method, aiming to rank the known salivary proteins from circulation as the highest among the proteins in the general background, based on the same features. This prediction capability can be used to predict potential biomarker proteins for specific human diseases when coupled with the information of differentially expressed proteins in diseased versus healthy control tissues and a prediction capability for blood-secretory proteins. Using such integrated information, we predicted 31 candidate biomarker proteins in saliva for breast cancer. PMID:24324552

  19. Identical expression profiling of human and murine TIPE3 protein reveals links to its functions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Hao, Chunyan; Zhang, Wenqian; Shao, Jie; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Guizhong; Liu, Suxia

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 like-3 (TNFAIP8L3, TIPE3) is a newly discovered member of TNFAIP8 family and regarded as a lipid second messenger transfer protein that promotes cancer. Yet the nature of the cells and tissues that express TIPE3 protein has not been determined. In this study, we examined TIPE3 expression in various murine and human tissues by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found that TIPE3 expression was almost identical in most organs from human and mice. TIPE3 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed preferentially in epithelial-derived cells with secretory functions. Furthermore, TIPE3 protein is highly expressed in most human carcinoma cell lines. These results suggest that TIPE3 may play important roles in carcinogenesis and cell secretion.

  20. Identical Expression Profiling of Human and Murine TIPE3 Protein Reveals Links to Its Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Hao, Chunyan; Zhang, Wenqian; Shao, Jie; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Guizhong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 like-3 (TNFAIP8L3, TIPE3) is a newly discovered member of TNFAIP8 family and regarded as a lipid second messenger transfer protein that promotes cancer. Yet the nature of the cells and tissues that express TIPE3 protein has not been determined. In this study, we examined TIPE3 expression in various murine and human tissues by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found that TIPE3 expression was almost identical in most organs from human and mice. TIPE3 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed preferentially in epithelial-derived cells with secretory functions. Furthermore, TIPE3 protein is highly expressed in most human carcinoma cell lines. These results suggest that TIPE3 may play important roles in carcinogenesis and cell secretion. PMID:25479791

  1. Using competitive protein adsorption to measure fibrinogen in undiluted human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seokheun; Wang, Ran; Lajevardi-Khosh, Arad; Chae, Junseok

    2010-12-01

    We report a unique sensing mechanism based on competitive protein adsorption to measure fibrinogen, a cardiovascular biomarker, in undiluted human serum. The method uses physical adsorption of proteins to a surface rather than complex and time-consuming immobilization procedures. Two fibrinogen concentrations were differentiated in spiked in human serum [3.0 mg/ml (normal concentration) versus 3.2 mg/ml (abnormal concentration with heart disease)]. Real-time surface plasmon resonance signals were monitored as fibrinogen displaced a preadsorbed protein, IgM, on a hydrophobic gold surface. The relatively strong-affinity protein, IgM, was displaced primarily by fibrinogen and much less by other proteins in human serum.

  2. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  3. An 88,000-Mr Giardia lamblia surface protein which is immunogenic in humans.

    PubMed

    Edson, C M; Farthing, M J; Thorley-Lawson, D A; Keusch, G T

    1986-12-01

    Human anti-Giardia lamblia sera specifically immunoprecipitated an 88,000-Mr surface protein from radioiodinated trophozoites, establishing this protein as a potentially important immunogen in humans. A mouse monoclonal antibody (GL-1) was isolated which immunoprecipitated the same 88,000-Mr surface protein recognized by the human sera. GL-1 gave uniform fluorescent staining of the cell surface and flagella of G. lamblia trophozoites from the Portland 1 and WB strains as well as fresh clinical isolates, but not of Giardia muris, suggesting that the surface antigen is specific to G. lamblia. Other human parasites, including Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Trichomonas hominis, were not stained. A second mouse monoclonal antibody (GL-2) gave weaker immunofluorescent staining of living G. lamblia trophozoites but intense staining of fixed cells. None of the other parasites tested were stained, with the exception of E. histolytica, which may contain a cross-reactive antigen. No proteins were recognized in immunoprecipitation studies with iodinated trophozoites.

  4. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  5. COVALENT BINDING OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE TO PROTEINS IN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES. (R826409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant and occupational solvent trichloroethylene is metabolized to a reactive intermediate that covalently binds to specific hepatic proteins in exposed mice and rats. In order to compare covalent binding between humans and rodents, primary hepatocyte c...

  6. A network biology approach to understanding the importance of chameleon proteins in human physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Marashi, Sayed-Amir

    2017-02-01

    Chameleon proteins are proteins which include sequences that can adopt α-helix-β-strand (HE-chameleon) or α-helix-coil (HC-chameleon) or β-strand-coil (CE-chameleon) structures to operate their crucial biological functions. In this study, using a network-based approach, we examined the chameleon proteins to give a better knowledge on these proteins. We focused on proteins with identical chameleon sequences with more than or equal to seven residues long in different PDB entries, which adopt HE-chameleon, HC-chameleon, and CE-chameleon structures in the same protein. One hundred and ninety-one human chameleon proteins were identified via our in-house program. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, Gene ontology (GO) enrichment, disease network, and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for our derived data set. We discovered that there are chameleon sequences which reside in protein-protein interaction regions between two proteins critical for their dual function. Analysis of the PPI networks for chameleon proteins introduced five hub proteins, namely TP53, EGFR, HSP90AA1, PPARA, and HIF1A, which were presented in four PPI clusters. The outcomes demonstrate that the chameleon regions are in critical domains of these proteins and are important in the development and treatment of human cancers. The present report is the first network-based functional study of chameleon proteins using computational approaches and might provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanisms of diseases helping us in developing new medical therapies along with discovering new proteins with chameleon properties which are highly important in cancer.

  7. Assessing the impact of protein extraction methods for human gut metaproteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Leyuan; Mayne, Janice; Ning, Zhibin; Stintzi, Alain; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-07-10

    Metaproteomics is a promising methodology for the functional characterizations of the gut microbiome. However, the performance of metaproteomic analysis is affected by protein extraction protocols in terms of the amount of protein recovered and the relative abundance of different bacteria observed in microbiome. Currently, there is a lack of consistency on protein extraction methods in published metaproteomics studies. Here we evaluated the effects of different protein extraction methods on human fecal metaproteome characterizations. We found that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-based lysis buffer obtained higher protein yields and peptide/protein group identifications compared to urea and the non-ionic detergent-based B-Per buffer. The addition of bead beating to any of the extraction buffers increased both protein yields and protein identifications. As well, bead beating led to a significant increase of the relative abundances of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. We also demonstrated that ultrasonication, another commonly used mechanical disruption approach, performed even better than bead beating for gut microbial protein extractions. Importantly, proteins of the basic metabolic pathways showed significantly higher relative abundances when using ultrasonication. Overall, these results demonstrate that protein extraction protocols markedly impact the metaproteomic results and recommend a protein extraction protocol with both SDS and ultrasonication for metaproteomic studies. The gut microbiome is emerging as an important factor influencing human health. Metaproteomics is promising for advancing the understanding of the functional roles of the microbiome in disease. However, metaproteomics suffers from a lack of consistent sample preparation procedures. In the present study, protein extraction protocols for fecal microbiome samples were evaluated for their effects on protein yields, peptide identifications, protein group identifications, taxonomic compositions and

  8. Elucidating Protein-DNA Interactions in Human Alphoid Chromatin via Hybridization Capture and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Katherine E; Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Shortreed, Michael R; Zaidan, Nur Zafirah; Olivier, Michael; Scalf, Mark; Sridharan, Rupa; Smith, Lloyd M

    2017-09-01

    The centromere is the chromosomal locus where the kinetochore forms and is critical for ensuring proper segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. A substantial amount of effort has been devoted to understanding the characteristic features and roles of the centromere, yet some fundamental aspects of the centromere, such as the complete list of elements that define it, remain obscure. It is well-known that human centromeres include a highly repetitive class of DNA known as alpha satellite, or alphoid, DNA. We present here the first DNA-centric examination of human protein-alpha satellite interactions, employing an approach known as HyCCAPP (hybridization capture of chromatin-associated proteins for proteomics) to identify the protein components of alphoid chromatin in a human cell line. Using HyCCAPP, cross-linked alpha satellite chromatin was isolated from cell lysate, and captured proteins were analyzed via mass spectrometry. After being compared to proteins identified in control pulldown experiments, 90 proteins were identified as enriched at alphoid DNA. This list included many known centromere-binding proteins in addition to multiple novel alpha satellite-binding proteins, such as LRIF1, a heterochromatin-associated protein. The ability of HyCCAPP to reveal both known as well as novel alphoid DNA-interacting proteins highlights the validity and utility of this approach.

  9. Two tetratricopeptide repeat proteins facilitate human aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles A

    2002-07-01

    A human aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor signalling pathway was constructed in yeast and used to identify regulatory proteins that may be related to those present in mammalian cells. The sequence similarity of human hepatitis B protein X-associated protein 2 (XAP2) protein to yeast Cpr7 and Cns1 proteins suggested that these proteins might be involved in Ah receptor signalling in this model system. Ah receptor signalling from a lacZ reporter gene was reduced by approximately 60% in cells that lacked Cpr7. In vitro interaction experiments indicated that a Cpr7-GST fusion protein and Ah receptor formed a complex. Expression of Cpr7, Cns1 and the isolated tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) region of Cpr7 from plasmids restored Ah receptor signalling function in the Cpr7-deficient strain. Thus, Cpr7 and Cns1 proteins facilitate the signalling of human Ah receptor expressed in yeast, perhaps in the same manner as the TPR-containing XAP2 protein and related chaperone proteins in mammalian cells.

  10. Important mitochondrial proteins in human omental adipose tissue show reduced expression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lindinger, Peter W.; Christe, Martine; Eberle, Alex N.; Kern, Beatrice; Peterli, Ralph; Peters, Thomas; Jayawardene, Kamburapola J.I.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with impaired mitochondrial function. This study compares mitochondrial protein expression in omental fat in obese and non-obese humans. Omental adipose tissue was obtained by surgical biopsy, adipocytes were purified and mitochondria isolated. Using anion-exchange chromatography, SDS-PAGE and mass-spectrometry, 128 proteins with potentially different abundances in patient groups were identified, 62 of the 128 proteins are mainly localized in the mitochondria. Further quantification of 12 of these 62 proteins by immune dot blot analysis revealed four proteins citrate synthase, HADHA, LETM1 and mitofilin being inversely associated with BMI, and mitofilin being inversely correlated with gender. PMID:26217759

  11. The development of transgenic crops to improve human health by advanced utilization of seed storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Seed storage proteins are a major component of mature seeds. They are utilized as protein sources in foods. We designed seed storage proteins containing bioactive peptides based on their three-dimensional structures. Furthermore, to create crops with enhanced food qualities, we developed transgenic crops producing seed storage proteins with bioactive peptides. This strategy promises to prevent lifestyle-related diseases by simple daily food consumption. In this review, we discuss a strategy to develop transgenic crops to improve human health by advanced utilization of seed storage proteins.

  12. Light-induced protein degradation in human-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wansheng; Zhang, Wenyao; Zhang, Chao; Mao, Miaowei; Zhao, Yuzheng; Chen, Xianjun; Yang, Yi

    2017-05-27

    Controlling protein degradation can be a valuable tool for posttranslational regulation of protein abundance to study complex biological systems. In the present study, we designed a light-switchable degron consisting of a light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2) and a C-terminal degron. Our results showed that the light-switchable degron could be used for rapid and specific induction of protein degradation in HEK293 cells by light in a proteasome-dependent manner. Further studies showed that the light-switchable degron could also be utilized to mediate the degradation of secreted Gaussia princeps luciferase (GLuc), demonstrating the adaptability of the light-switchable degron in different types of protein. We suggest that the light-switchable degron offers a robust tool to control protein levels and may serves as a new and significant method for gene- and cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary

  14. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Perkins, Simon [Los Alamos, NM; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy [Los Alamos, NM; Fischer, William M [Los Alamos, NM; Theiler, James [Los Alamos, NM; Letvin, Norman [Boston, MA; Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos, NM; Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  15. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein.

    PubMed

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Al Nakouzi, Nader; Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Oo, Htoo Z; Lee, Sherry; Gustavsson, Tobias; Rich, Jamie R; Hedberg, Bradley J; Mao, Yang; Barington, Line; Pereira, Marina A; LoBello, Janine; Endo, Makoto; Fazli, Ladan; Soden, Jo; Wang, Chris K; Sander, Adam F; Dagil, Robert; Thrane, Susan; Holst, Peter J; Meng, Le; Favero, Francesco; Weiss, Glen J; Nielsen, Morten A; Freeth, Jim; Nielsen, Torsten O; Zaia, Joseph; Tran, Nhan L; Trent, Jeff; Babcook, John S; Theander, Thor G; Sorensen, Poul H; Daugaard, Mads

    2015-10-12

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can be specifically targeted by recombinant VAR2CSA (rVAR2). In tumors, placental-like CS chains are linked to a limited repertoire of cancer-associated proteoglycans including CD44 and CSPG4. The rVAR2 protein localizes to tumors in vivo and rVAR2 fused to diphtheria toxin or conjugated to hemiasterlin compounds strongly inhibits in vivo tumor cell growth and metastasis. Our data demonstrate how an evolutionarily refined parasite-derived protein can be exploited to target a common, but complex, malignancy-associated glycosaminoglycan modification.

  16. Comparative analysis of human and bovine protein kinases reveals unique relationship and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Nuzhat N; Kazi, Julhash U

    2011-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation by protein kinases and phosphatases is a common event in various cellular processes. The eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, which is one of the largest superfamilies of eukaryotic proteins, plays several roles in cell signaling and diseases. We identified 482 eukaryotic protein kinases and 39 atypical protein kinases in the bovine genome, by searching publicly accessible genetic-sequence databases. Bovines have 512 putative protein kinases, each orthologous to a human kinase. Whereas orthologous kinase pairs are, on an average, 90.6% identical, orthologous kinase catalytic domain pairs are, on an average, 95.9% identical at the amino acid level. This bioinformatic study of bovine protein kinases provides a suitable framework for further characterization of their functional and structural properties.

  17. [Differential proteins analysis among human nasal inverted papilloma and nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-shu; Jin, Sheng; Zhang, Qiu-hang; Zhang, Man

    2010-04-01

    Proteomics-based approach was applied to analyze and compare the difference of proteins among human nasal inverted papilloma (NIP), nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa, in order to screen different proteins as marker. The total proteins of NIP, nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Protein image obtained by using the gel of Calibrated GS-800 Densitometer system, and determined different protein spots. Six differential proteins between NIP and nasal polyp tissue were identified, which were galectin-1, Manganese-superoxide dismutase, galectin-7, trichostatin A, prohibitin and transferring. All of them were increased in NIP. Six differential proteins were possibly involved in NIP, which provided a new way for discriminating NIP from nasal polyposis. The data would be good for the establishment of NIP protein 2-DE map.

  18. Structural genomics of human proteins – target selection and generation of a public catalogue of expression clones

    PubMed Central

    Büssow, Konrad; Scheich, Christoph; Sievert, Volker; Harttig, Ulrich; Schultz, Jörg; Simon, Bernd; Bork, Peer; Lehrach, Hans; Heinemann, Udo

    2005-01-01

    Background The availability of suitable recombinant protein is still a major bottleneck in protein structure analysis. The Protein Structure Factory, part of the international structural genomics initiative, targets human proteins for structure determination. It has implemented high throughput procedures for all steps from cloning to structure calculation. This article describes the selection of human target proteins for structure analysis, our high throughput cloning strategy, and the expression of human proteins in Escherichia coli host cells. Results and Conclusion Protein expression and sequence data of 1414 E. coli expression clones representing 537 different proteins are presented. 139 human proteins (18%) could be expressed and purified in soluble form and with the expected size. All E. coli expression clones are publicly available to facilitate further functional characterisation of this set of human proteins. PMID:15998469

  19. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  20. Nef Proteins of Epidemic HIV-1 Group O Strains Antagonize Human Tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, Silvia F.; Mack, Katharina; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Pujol, François M.; Heigele, Anke; Learn, Gerald H.; Usmani, Shariq M.; Sauter, Daniel; Joas, Simone; Hotter, Dominik; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Plenderleith, Lindsey J.; Peeters, Martine; Geyer, Matthias; Sharp, Paul M.; Fackler, Oliver T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2014-01-01

    SUMMAR