Science.gov

Sample records for human hepatocyte cultures

  1. Rifampicin induction of lidocaine metabolism in cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, A P; Rasmussen, A; Xu, L; Kaminski, D L

    1995-08-01

    In our laboratory, cultured human hepatocytes are being evaluated as an experimental system to study drug interactions. We report the effect of a known cytochrome P450 (CYP) inducer, rifampicin, on the metabolism of lidocaine by primary human hepatocytes. Rifampicin has been shown to induce CYP3A4, a major human hepatic CYP isozyme that is known to metabolize lidocaine to its primary metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. Human hepatocytes were cultured on collagen-coated plates in serum-free, hormone-supplemented Waymouth medium for a 3-day period before they were treated with rifampicin at 50 microM for 1 to 3 days. Hepatocytes isolated from five individuals were studied, and, in all cases, lidocaine metabolism was found to be induced by rifampicin, as demonstrated by a higher rate of monoethylglycinexylidide formation than concurrent controls. For three of the hepatocyte cultures, lidocaine metabolism was evaluated at various times after treatment. Induction was observed at 1 day after treatment, and reached higher levels at day 2 or 3. The level of induction was found to be approximately 100% for two hepatocyte isolations and approximately 600% for one isolation. In a separate experiment, hepatocytes were treated with rifampicin for a 2-day period. Rate of lidocaine metabolism at multiple substrate concentrations (10-120 microM) were then studied. Rifampicin induction of lidocaine metabolism (approximately 100%) was observed at all the lidocaine concentrations studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot of the data showed an increase in Vmax and a less significant change in Km. Induction of lidocaine metabolism by rifampicin (concentrations of 0.1-50 microM) was found to be dose-dependent, with significant induction observed at 1 microM and higher concentrations. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. [Study on the interface of human hepatocyte L-02 polypropylene:simple culture method of human hepatocyte with spheroidal aggregate culture].

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng-hong; Han, Bao-san; Gao, Chang-you; Ma, Zu-wei; Zhao, Zhi-ming; Wang, Yong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Gui-di; Yang, Mei-juan

    2004-09-07

    To found new interface of human hepatocyte/poly propylene with good cytocompatibility for made polypropylene hollow fibers bioreactor of bioartificial liver in future. Using the macromolecular hydroperoxide groups on the polypropylene membrane surface as initiators, acrylamides were polymerized on the polypropylene membranes, under induction by both UV irradiation and Fe2+ reduction. Growth characteristics of human hepatocyte L-02 were detected when it was cultured on polystyrene, polypropylene and modified polypropylene membrane surface. Water contact angle measurement of the polypropylene and the modified polypropylene membranes decreased from (72 +/- 5) degrees to (30 +/- 4) degrees , which indicated that the hydrophilicity of the membrane was improved obviously after the grafting modification. Human hepatocyte L-02 could not adhere and spread on modified polypropylene membrane surface, and grown in spheroidal aggregate with higher density and higher proliferation ratio measured by MTT method. Acrylamide polymerized on the polypropylene membranes is a good method which not only improved human hepatocytes cytocompatibility but also found a new simple culture method with spheroidal aggregate culture of human hepatocyte.

  3. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  4. Use of cryopreserved human hepatocytes in sandwich culture to measure hepatobiliary transport.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yi-an; Kazolias, Diana; Duignan, David B

    2006-09-01

    Fresh hepatocytes cultured in a sandwich configuration allow for the development of intact bile canaliculi and the ability to measure hepatic uptake and biliary clearance. A disadvantage of this model is its dependence upon hepatocytes from fresh tissue. Therefore, the ability to use cryopreserved human hepatocytes in this model would be a great advantage. Multiple variables were tested, and the recommended conditions for culturing cryopreserved human hepatocytes in a sandwich configuration in 24-well plates are as follows: BioCoat plates, a cell density of 0.35 x 10(6) cells/well in 500 microl, an overlay of Matrigel and InVitroGRO media. These conditions resulted in good hepatocyte morphology and the formation of distinct bile canaliculi. The function of multiple uptake and efflux transporters was tested in multiple lots of cryopreserved and fresh human hepatocytes. For taurocholate [Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide/organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) uptake/bile salt export pump efflux], the average apparent uptake, apparent intrinsic biliary clearance, and biliary excretion index among five cryopreserved hepatocyte lots was high, ranging from 11 to 17 pmol/min/mg protein, 5.8 to 10 microl/min/mg protein, and 41 to 63%, respectively. The corresponding values for digoxin (OATP-8 uptake/multidrug resistance protein 1 efflux) were 0.69 to 1.5 pmol/min/mg protein, 0.60 to 1.5 microl/min/mg protein, and 37 to 63%. Both substrates exhibited similar results when fresh human hepatocytes were used. In addition, substrates of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 were also tested in this model, and all cryopreserved lots showed functional transport of these substrates. The use of cryopreserved human hepatocytes in 24-well sandwich culture to form intact bile canaliculi and to exhibit functional uptake and efflux transport has been successfully demonstrated.

  5. Sex differences in DNA damage produced by the carcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene in cultured human hepatocytes compared to rat liver and cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gary M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Perrone, Carmen E

    2016-02-01

    Male rats are more susceptible to the induction of liver cancer by the aromatic amine 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) than are females. To assess the basis for this difference and to determine whether sex differences in susceptibility to AAF are present in human liver cells, the DNA reactivity of AAF was measured in livers of male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and in cultured SD rat and human hepatocytes of both sexes. In livers of rats administered oral doses of AAF, the total levels of adducts measured by nucleotide postlabelling at up to 8 weeks were about twofold greater in males than in females. Similarly, the level of AAF-DNA adducts formed in cultured male rat hepatocytes dosed with AAF was about twofold greater than in female rat hepatocytes. Also, the level of DNA repair synthesis was about threefold greater in AAF-dosed cultured male rat hepatocytes compared with female, indicating that the greater adduct levels in males was not due to lesser repair. In contrast, in cultured human hepatocytes of both sexes, AAF produced similar levels of adducts and DNA repair synthesis, which were intermediate between those produced in male and female rat hepatocytes. Thus, the greater susceptibility of male rats to AAF hepatocarcinogenicity is due at least in part to greater bioactivation and formation of AAF-DNA adducts in hepatocytes. Moreover, the data from human hepatocytes suggest that human liver could be less susceptible than male rat liver to the carcinogenic effects of aromatic amine carcinogens of the AAF type.

  6. Cytotoxicity evaluation using cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes in various culture formats.

    PubMed

    Richert, Lysiane; Baze, Audrey; Parmentier, Céline; Gerets, Helga H J; Sison-Young, Rowena; Dorau, Martina; Lovatt, Cerys; Czich, Andreas; Goldring, Christopher; Park, B Kevin; Juhila, Satu; Foster, Alison J; Williams, Dominic P

    2016-09-06

    Sixteen training compounds selected in the IMI MIP-DILI consortium, 12 drug-induced liver injury (DILI) positive compounds and 4 non-DILI compounds, were assessed in cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes. When a ten-fold safety margin threshold was applied, the non-DILI-compounds were correctly identified 2h following a single exposure to pooled human hepatocytes (n=13 donors) in suspension and 14-days following repeat dose exposure (3 treatments) to an established 3D-microtissue co-culture (3D-MT co-culture, n=1 donor) consisting of human hepatocytes co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells (NPC). In contrast, only 5/12 DILI-compounds were correctly identified 2h following a single exposure to pooled human hepatocytes in suspension. Exposure of the 2D-sandwich culture human hepatocyte monocultures (2D-sw) for 3days resulted in the correct identification of 11/12 DILI-positive compounds, whereas exposure of the human 3D-MT co-cultures for 14days resulted in identification of 9/12 DILI-compounds; in addition to ximelagatran (also not identified by 2D-sw monocultures, Sison-Young et al., 2016), the 3D-MT co-cultures failed to detect amiodarone and bosentan. The sensitivity of the 2D human hepatocytes co-cultured with NPC to ximelagatran was increased in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but only at high concentrations, therefore preventing its classification as a DILI positive compound. In conclusion (1) despite suspension human hepatocytes having the greatest metabolic capacity in the short term, they are the least predictive of clinical DILI across the MIP-DILI test compounds, (2) longer exposure periods than 72h of human hepatocytes do not allow to increase DILI-prediction rate, (3) co-cultures of human hepatocytes with NPC, in the presence of LPS during the 72h exposure period allow the assessment of innate immune system involvement of a given drug.

  7. Characterization of rat or human hepatocytes cultured in microphysiological systems (MPS) to identify hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Yu; Voellinger, Jenna L; Van Ness, Kirk P; Chapron, Brian; Shaffer, Rachel M; Neumann, Thomas; White, Collin C; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Kelly, Edward J; Eaton, David L

    2017-04-01

    The liver is the main site for drug and xenobiotics metabolism, including inactivation or bioactivation. In order to improve the predictability of drug safety and efficacy in clinical development, and to facilitate the evaluation of the potential human health effects from exposure to environmental contaminants, there is a critical need to accurately model human organ systems such as the liver in vitro. We are developing a microphysiological system (MPS) based on a new commercial microfluidic platform (Nortis, Inc.) that can utilize primary liver cells from multiple species (e.g., rat and human). Compared to conventional monolayer cell culture, which typically survives for 5-7days or less, primary rat or human hepatocytes in an MPS exhibited higher viability and improved hepatic functions, such as albumin production, expression of hepatocyte marker HNF4α and canaliculi structure, for up to 14days. Additionally, induction of Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and 3A4 in cryopreserved human hepatocytes was observed in the MPS. The acute cytotoxicity of the potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogen, aflatoxin B1, was evaluated in human hepatocytes cultured in an MPS, demonstrating the utility of this model for acute hepatotoxicity assessment. These results indicate that MPS-cultured hepatocytes provide a promising approach for evaluating chemical toxicity in vitro. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  9. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  10. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  11. Ultrastructural and biochemical alterations induced in human, rat and mouse hepatocytes in primary culture exposed to selected carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB{sub 1}), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and actinomycin D are all potential human liver carcinogens. In order to investigate carcinogenic susceptibility of human liver to these agents, primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes were exposed to the four carcinogens. In the first series of experiments, human, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed to actinomycin D, AFB{sub 1}, and DMN for 24 h and examined for ultrastructural alterations. In an effort to relate the ultrastructural effects with total covalent binding of the carcinogen to DNA, human, rat and mouse hepatocytes were exposed to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M ({sup 3}H)AFB{sub 1} for 24 h. Hepatocytes from male rats had the highest degree of ({sup 3}H)AFB{sub 1}-DNA binding. Human hepatocytes contained the next highest binding level, while hepatocytes from female rats bound 38 pmoles/mg DNA. The AFB{sub 1}-DNA binding level in mouse hepatocytes was 1.4 pmoles/mg DNA. In similar experiments, human, and male and female rat hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed to the carcinogen 2-acetylamino (9-{sup 14}C)fluorene for 24 h. It was determined that male rat hepatocytes had the highest amount of radiolabeled 2-AAF bound to their DNA, female rats contained 0.57 nmoles/mg DNA, while human hepatocytes contained 0.29 nmoles/mg DNA.

  12. Organochlorine pesticides induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition of human primary cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zucchini-Pascal, Nathalie; Peyre, Ludovic; de Sousa, Georges; Rahmani, Roger

    2012-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are a group of organic or chemicals that adversely affect human health and are persistent in the environment. These highly toxic compounds include industrial chemicals, pesticides such as organochlorines, and unwanted wastes such as dioxins. Although studies have described the general toxicity effects of organochlorine pesticides, the mechanisms underlying its potential carcinogenic effects in the liver are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the effect of three organochlorine pesticides (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, heptachlore and endosulfan) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in primary cultured human hepatocytes. We found that these compounds modified the hepatocyte phenotype, inducing cell spread, formation of lamellipodia structures and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in stress fibers. These morphological alterations were accompanied by disruption of cell-cell junctions, E-cadherin repression and albumin down-regulation. Interestingly, these characteristic features of dedifferentiating hepatocytes were correlated with the gain of expression of various mesenchymal genes, including vimentin, fibronectin and its receptor ITGA5. These various results show that organochlorines and TCDD accelerate cultured human hepatocyte dedifferentiation and EMT processes. These events could account, at least in part, for the carcionogenic and/or fibrogenic activities of these POPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene expression profiling and differentiation assessment in primary human hepatocyte cultures, established hepatoma cell lines, and human liver tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Olsavsky, Katy M.; Page, Jeanine L.; Johnson, Mary C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J. . E-mail: cjo10@psu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Frequently, primary hepatocytes are used as an in vitro model for the liver in vivo. However, the culture conditions reported vary considerably, with associated variability in performance. In this study, we characterized the differentiation character of primary human hepatocytes cultured using a highly defined, serum-free two-dimensional sandwich system, one that configures hepatocytes with collagen I as the substratum together with a dilute extracellular matrix (Matrigel{sup TM}) overlay combined with a defined serum-free medium containing nanomolar levels of dexamethasone. Gap junctional communication, indicated by immunochemical detection of connexin 32 protein, was markedly enhanced in hepatocytes cultured in the Matrigel sandwich configuration. Whole genome expression profiling enabled direct comparison of liver tissues to hepatocytes and to the hepatoma-derived cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. PANTHER database analyses were used to identify biological processes that were comparatively over-represented among probe sets expressed in the in vitro systems. The robustness of the primary hepatocyte cultures was reflected by the extent of unchanged expression character when compared directly to liver, with more than 77% of the probe sets unchanged in each of the over-represented categories, representing such genes as C/EBP{alpha}, HNF4{alpha}, CYP2D6, and ABCB1. In contrast, HepG2 and Huh7 cells were unchanged from the liver tissues for fewer than 48% and 55% of these probe sets, respectively. Further, hierarchical clustering of the hepatocytes, but not the cell lines, shifted from donor-specific to treatment-specific when the probe sets were filtered to focus on phenobarbital-inducible genes, indicative of the highly differentiated nature of the hepatocytes when cultured in a highly defined two-dimensional sandwich system.

  14. Cholesterol can stimulate secretion of apolipoprotein B by cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kosykh, V A; Preobrazhensky, S N; Fuki, I V; Zaikina, O E; Tsibulsky, V P; Repin, V S; Smirnov, V N

    1985-10-02

    During a 5 day cultivation of human hepatocytes in a primary culture the secretion of apolipoprotein B was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Density-gradient ultracentrifugation demonstrated that the majority of the secreted apolipoprotein B was associated with the very-low-density lipoprotein fraction. Exposure of the cells to cholesterol (5-100 micrograms/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in apolipoprotein B secretion rate.

  15. Troglitazone increases cytochrome P-450 3A protein and activity in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V; Kostrubsky, V E; Komoroski, B J; Zhang, S; Dorko, K; Esplen, J E; Strom, S C; Venkataramanan, R

    1999-10-01

    Troglitazone (TRO) is an insulin sensitizer used in the treatment of type II diabetes. TRO is known to increase the activity of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 3A in vivo. We have investigated the effect of TRO on CYP3A protein content and the activity of CYP3A (as measured by the formation of 6beta-hydroxytestosterone formation) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes in comparison with rifampicin (RIF). Hepatocytes were isolated from four human livers by perfusion with collagenase, plated on collagen-coated plates, and maintained in William's E medium. After 48 h in culture, cells were exposed to RIF (10 microM) or TRO (0-50 microM) twice, each over a period of 24 h, and the activity of CYP3A was measured. TRO increased the activity of CYP3A in a concentration-dependent manner, reaching a maximal response at 5 microM. Pretreatment of the hepatocytes with 10 microM TRO or 10 microM RIF resulted in a 4- to 15-fold increase in the activity of CYP3A. Maximum increase in CYP3A protein was observed at 5 microM TRO. There was a significant correlation (R(2) = 0.89) between the content of immunoreactive CYP3A protein in the hepatocytes and the rate of formation of 6beta-hydroxytestosterone. These results indicate that TRO is a potent inducer of CYP3A and is similar to RIF in inducing CYP3A in human hepatocytes. At concentrations of 25 microM and above, TRO was toxic to the cells, as determined by a decrease in the activity of CYP3A, a reduction in the amount of immunoreactive protein, and changes in the morphology of the cells.

  16. Lipid-mediated transfection of normal adult human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ourlin, J C; Vilarem, M J; Daujat, M; Harricane, M C; Domergue, J; Joyeux, H; Baulieux, J; Maurel, P

    1997-04-05

    The aim of this work was to develop a procedure for the lipid-mediated transfection of DNA into normal adult human hepatocytes in culture. Cells were plated in a serum-free culture medium at various cell densities, on plastic or collagen-coated dishes, both in the absence and in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF). The cells were incubated for various periods of time with mixtures of DNA-lipofectin or DNA-3 beta[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-chol) liposomes, and the efficiency of transfection was assessed by measuring the activity of reporter genes, beta-galactosidase or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). For comparison, similar experiments were carried out with human cell lines including HepG2, Caco-2, and WRL68. The efficiency of transfection (in percentage of cells) was not significantly different after transfection with lipofectin or DC-chol and comprised between 0.04 and 1.7% (extreme values) for different cultures. The efficiency of transfection decreased as the age or density of the culture increased and increased in cultures treated with EGF. Direct measurement of the rate of DNA synthesis suggested that the efficiency of transfection was related to the number of cells entering the S phase. Under the same conditions, the efficiency of transfection was one to two orders of magnitude greater in the three cell lines. A plasmid harboring 660 bp of the 5'-flanking region of CYP1A1 (containing two xenobiotic enhancer elements) fused upstream of the promoter of thymidine kinase and the CAT reporter gene was constructed. When this plasmid was transfected in human hepatocytes, CAT activity was induced as expected. We conclude that normal adult human hepatocytes can be transfected with exogenous DNA and that the transfected construct is regulated in the manner expected from in vivo studies.

  17. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C.; Dandri, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  18. Influence of commonly used clinical antidotes on antioxidant systems in human hepatocyte culture intoxicated with alpha-amanitin.

    PubMed

    Magdalan, Jan; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Gomułkiewicz, Agnieszka; Sozański, Tomasz; Szeląg, Adam; Dziegięl, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    α-Amanitin (α-AMA) is the main toxin of Amanita phalloides and its subspecies (A. virosa and A. verna). The primary mechanism of α-AMA toxicity is associated with protein synthesis blocking in hepatocytes. Additionally, α-AMA exhibits prooxidant properties that may contribute to its severe hepatotoxicity. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of α-AMA on lipid peroxidation and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in human hepatocyte culture. The effects of benzylpenicillin (BPCN), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (ACC), and silibinin (SIL) on SOD and CAT activities and on lipid peroxidation in human hepatocyte culture intoxicated with α-AMA were also examined. In human hepatocyte culture, 48-hour exposure to α-AMA at a 2-μM concentration caused an increase in SOD activity, a reduction of CAT activity, and a significant increase in lipid peroxidation. Changes in SOD and CAT activity caused by α-AMA could probably enhance lipid peroxidation by increased generation of hydrogen peroxide combined with reduced detoxification of that oxygen radical. The addition of antidotes (ACC or SIL) to the culture medium provided more effective protection against lipid peroxidation in human hepatocytes intoxicated with α-AMA than the addition of BPCN, possessing no antioxidant properties.

  19. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  20. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  1. Persistent hepatitis C virus infection in microscale primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ploss, Alexander; Khetani, Salman R; Jones, Christopher T; Syder, Andrew J; Trehan, Kartik; Gaysinskaya, Valeriya A; Mu, Kathy; Ritola, Kimberly; Rice, Charles M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2010-02-16

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major public health problem, affecting approximately 130 million people worldwide. HCV infection can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver disease, as well as extrahepatic complications such as cryoglobulinemia and lymphoma. Preventative and therapeutic options are severely limited; there is no HCV vaccine available, and nonspecific, IFN-based treatments are frequently ineffective. Development of targeted antivirals has been hampered by the lack of robust HCV cell culture systems that reliably predict human responses. Here, we show the entire HCV life cycle recapitulated in micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs) of primary human hepatocytes and supportive stroma in a multiwell format. MPCCs form polarized cell layers expressing all known HCV entry factors and sustain viral replication for several weeks. When coupled with highly sensitive fluorescence- and luminescence-based reporter systems, MPCCs have potential as a high-throughput platform for simultaneous assessment of in vitro efficacy and toxicity profiles of anti-HCV therapeutics.

  2. Small human hepatocytes in rotary culture for treatment of alcohol addicts? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pavlic, Marion; Libiseller, Kathrin; Hermann, Martin; Hengster, Paul; Margreiter, Raimund; Wurm, Martin

    2007-05-01

    Current approaches to support alcohol addict and/or benzodiazepine-treated patients with liver failure include culturing human cells to take over basic metabolic functions for a certain time. Small human hepatocytes (SH) were grown in a rotary cell culture system, and their potential to metabolize alcohol and the benzodiazepines oxazepam and diazepam was evaluated. Control experiments were performed with SV40-immortalized HEP cells and cell respective drug-free media. Our results show that SH in rotary culture are able to metabolize ethanol in reasonable amounts compared with evaporation controls (p<0.01). Moreover, SH are also able to metabolize oxazepam and diazepam which proves their ability to perform conjugation and the presence of functional cytochrome P450 enzymes. Basic metabolic activities such as glucose consumption, albumin and urea production are not significantly influenced by the drugs used, which is a precondition for clinical use of these cells. Significantly increased lactate dehydrogenase release indicates enhanced cell death in cultures of SH incubated with either ethanol (p<0.05) or diazepam (p<0.005), but stable viability at or above 90% suggests that cell proliferation is able to keep up with drug-induced cell death. Our preliminary study provides evidence that SH are basically suited to support alcohol-abusing and/or benzodiazepine-treated patients undergoing liver failure.

  3. Drug-induced cholestasis risk assessment in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Oorts, Marlies; Baze, Audrey; Bachellier, Philippe; Heyd, Bruno; Zacharias, Thomas; Annaert, Pieter; Richert, Lysiane

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis (DIC) is recognized as one of the prime mechanisms for DILI. Hence, earlier detection of drug candidates with cholestatic signature is crucial. Recently, we introduced an in vitro model for DIC and evaluated its performance with several cholestatic drugs. We presently expand on the validation of this model by 14 training compounds (TCs) of the EU-EFPIA IMI project MIP-DILI. Several batches of human hepatocytes in sandwich-culture were qualified for DIC assessment by verifying the bile acid-dependent increase in sensitivity to the toxic effects of cyclosporin A. The cholestatic potential of the TCs was expressed by determining the drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI). A safety margin (SM) was calculated as the ratio of the lowest TC concentration with a DICI≤0.80 to the Cmax,total. Nefazodone, bosentan, perhexiline and troglitazone were flagged for cholestasis (SM<30). The hepatotoxic (but non-cholestatic) compounds, amiodarone, diclofenac, fialuridine and ximelagatran, and all non-hepatotoxic compounds were cleared as "safe" for DIC. Tolcapone and paracetamol yielded DICI-based SM values equal to or higher than those based on cytotoxicity, thus excluding DIC as a DILI mechanism. This hepatocyte-based in vitro assay provides a unique tool for early and reliable identification of drug candidates with cholestasis risk.

  4. 3D cultured immortalized human hepatocytes useful to develop drugs for blood-borne HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Hussein Hassan; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Hijikata, Makoto

    2009-02-06

    Due to the high polymorphism of natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants, existing recombinant HCV replication models have failed to be effective in developing effective anti-HCV agents. In the current study, we describe an in vitro system that supports the infection and replication of natural HCV from patient blood using an immortalized primary human hepatocyte cell line cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. Comparison of the gene expression profile of cells cultured in the 3D system to those cultured in the existing 2D system demonstrated an up-regulation of several genes activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) signaling. Furthermore, using PPAR{alpha} agonists and antagonists, we also analyzed the effect of PPAR{alpha} signaling on the modulation of HCV replication using this system. The 3D in vitro system described in this study provides significant insight into the search for novel anti-HCV strategies that are specific to various strains of HCV.

  5. Expression profiling of interindividual variability following xenobiotic exposures in primary human hepatocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Goyak, Katy M.O.; Johnson, Mary C.; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2008-09-01

    To examine the magnitude of human variability across the entire transcriptome after chemical challenge, we profiled gene expression responses to three different prototypic chemical inducers in primary human hepatocyte cultures from ten independent donors. Correlation between basal expression in any two hepatocyte donors ranged from r{sup 2} values of 0.967 to 0.857, and chemical treatment tended to negatively impact correlation between donors. Including anticipated target genes, 10,812, 8373, and 7847 genes were changed in at least one donor by Aroclor 1254 (A1254), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and phenobarbital (PB), respectively. A subset of these gene targets (n = 41) were altered with a high level of reproducibility in at least 9 donors, gene responses that correlated well with literature-reported mechanism of action. Filtering responses to the level of gene subsets clarified the biological impact associated with the respective chemical effectors, in lieu of substantial interindividual variation among donor responses. In these respects, the use of hierarchical clustering methods successfully grouped seven of the ten donors into chemical-specific rather than donor-specific clusters. However, at the whole-genome level, the magnitude of conserved gene expression changes among donors was surprisingly small, with fewer than 50% of the gene responses altered by a single chemical conserved in more than one donor. The use of higher level descriptors, such as those defined by the PANTHER classification system, may enable more consistent categorization of gene expression changes across individuals, as increased reproducibility was identified using this method.

  6. Application of three-dimensional culture conditions to human embryonic stem cell-derived definitive endoderm cells enhances hepatocyte differentiation and functionality.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Thamil Selvee; Yu, Jason S L; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphery; Cui, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an unlimited source for the generation of human hepatocytes, owing to their indefinite self-renewal and pluripotent properties. Both hESC-/iPSC-derived hepatocytes hold great promise in treating liver diseases as potential candidates for cell replacement therapies or as an in vitro platform to conduct new drug trials. It has been previously demonstrated that the initiation of hESC differentiation in monolayer cultures increases the generation of definitive endoderm (DE) and subsequently of hepatocyte differentiation. However, monolayer culture may hinder the maturation of hESC-derived hepatocytes, since such two-dimensional (2D) conditions do not accurately reflect the complex nature of three-dimensional (3D) hepatocyte specification in vivo. Here, we report the sequential application of 2D and 3D culture systems to differentiate hESCs to hepatocytes. Human ESCs were initially differentiated in a monolayer culture to DE cells, which were then inoculated into Algimatrix scaffolds. Treatments of hESC-DE cells with a ROCK inhibitor before and after inoculation dramatically enhanced their survival and the formation of spheroids, which are distinct from HepG2 carcinoma cells. In comparison with monolayer culture alone, sequential 2D and 3D cultures significantly improved hepatocyte differentiation and function. Our results demonstrate that hESC-DE cells can be incorporated into Algimatrix 3D culture systems to enhance hepatocyte differentiation and function.

  7. Metabolic Activation of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Bile Acid-Dependent Toxicity in Human Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogimura, Eiichiro; Tokizono, Mayuko; Sekine, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Bando, Kiyoko; Ito, Kousei

    2017-09-01

    We previously reported a cell-based toxicity assay using sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in combination with a titrated amount of human bile acid (BA) species. In this assay, test compound-induced inhibition of BA efflux from sandwich-cultured hepatocytes leads to BA-dependent cell toxicity (BAtox, i.e., cell death due to the accumulation of BAs). Using this assay, we investigated whether 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT; a nonselective cytochrome P450 inhibitor) enhanced or suppressed test compound-induced BAtox. There was a tendency that BAtox of many compounds was enhanced by 1-ABT in human hepatocytes; in contrast, such a tendency was not observed in rat hepatocytes. In particular, 1-ABT tended to enhance BAtox of several compounds (clopidogrel, ticlopidine, everolimus, etc.) in human, whereas 1-ABT tended to enhance BAtox of only ticlopidine in rat. These results indicate that this system can be used to evaluate BAtox while taking into account drug metabolism and the existence of an interspecies difference in the effect of 1-ABT treatment on BAtox. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of arsenic hepatobiliary transport using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Roggenbeck, Barbara A; Carew, Michael W; Charrois, Gregory J; Douglas, Donna N; Kneteman, Norman M; Lu, Xiufen; Le, X Chris; Leslie, Elaine M

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic is a proven human carcinogen and is associated with a myriad of other adverse health effects. This metalloid is methylated in human liver to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) and eliminated predominantly in urine. Hepatic basolateral transport of arsenic species is ultimately critical for urinary elimination; however, these pathways are not fully elucidated in humans. A potentially important human hepatic basolateral transporter is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) that in vitro is a high-affinity transporter of DMA(V) and the diglutathione conjugate of MMA(III) [MMA(GS)(2)]. In rats, the related canalicular transporter Mrp2/Abcc2 is required for biliary excretion of arsenic as As(GS)(3) and MMA(GS)(2). The current study used sandwich cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) as a physiological model of human arsenic hepatobiliary transport. Arsenic efflux was detected only across the basolateral membrane for 9 out of 14 SCHH preparations, 5 had both basolateral and canalicular efflux. Basolateral transport of arsenic was temperature- and GSH-dependent and inhibited by the MRP inhibitor MK-571. Canalicular efflux was completely lost after GSH depletion suggesting MRP2-dependence. Treatment of SCHH with As(III) (0.1-1 µM) dose-dependently increased MRP2 and MRP4 levels, but not MRP1, MRP6, or aquaglyceroporin 9. Treatment of SCHH with oltipraz (Nrf2 activator) increased MRP4 levels and basolateral efflux of arsenic. In contrast, oltipraz increased MRP2 levels without increasing biliary excretion. These results suggest arsenic basolateral transport prevails over biliary excretion and is mediated at least in part by MRPs, most likely including MRP4. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. In vitro metabolism of beta-lapachone (ARQ 501) in mammalian hepatocytes and cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiu-Sheng; Zhong, Caiyun; Wang, Yunxia; Savage, Ronald E; Yang, Rui-Yang; Kizer, Darin; Volckova, Erika; Ashwell, Mark A; Chan, Thomas C K

    2009-01-01

    ARQ 501 (3,4-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-2H-naphthol[1,2-b]pyran-5,6-dione, beta-lapachone) is an anticancer agent, currently in multiple phase II clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cytotoxic drugs. This study focuses on in vitro metabolism in cryopreserved hepatocytes from mice, rats, dogs and humans using [(14)C]-labeled ARQ 501. Metabolite profiles were characterized using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry combined with an accurate radioactivity counter. Ion trap mass spectrometry was employed for further structural elucidation. A total of twelve metabolites were detected in the mammalian hepatocytes studied; all of which but one were generated from phase II conjugation reactions. Ten of the observed metabolites were produced by conjugations occurring at the reduced ortho-quinone carbonyl groups of ARQ 501. The metabolite profiles revealed that glucuronidation was the major biotransformation pathway in mouse and human hepatocytes. Monosulfation was the major pathway in dog, while, in rat, it appears glucuronidation and sulfation pathways contributed equally. Three major metabolites were found in rats: monoglucuronide M1, monosulfate M6, and glucuronide-sulfate M9. Two types of diconjugation metabolites were formed by attachment of the second glycone to an adjacent hydroxyl or to an existing glycone. Of the diconjugation metabolites, glucosylsulfate M10, diglucuronide M5, and glucuronide-glucoside M11 represent rarely observed phase II metabolites in mammals. The only unconjugated metabolite was generated through hydrolysis and was observed in rat, dog and human hepatocytes. ARQ 501 appeared less stable in human hepatocytes than in those of other species. To further elucidate the metabolism of ARQ 501 in extrahepatic sites, its metabolism in human kidney, lung and intestine cells was also studied, and only monoglucuronide M1 was observed in all the cell types examined. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Endogenous Bile Acid Disposition in Rat and Human Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St. Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2013-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR® technology, BAs were measured in cells+bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells+bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.85 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 55.6 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.210 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. PMID:22342602

  11. Direct infection and replication of naturally occurring hepatitis C virus genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in normal human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Buck, Martina

    2008-07-16

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection afflicts about 170 million individuals worldwide. However, the HCV life cycle is only partially understood because it has not been possible to infect normal human hepatocytes in culture. The current Huh-7 systems use cloned, synthetic HCV RNA expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells to produce virions, but these cells cannot be infected with naturally occurring HCV obtained from infected patients. Here, we describe a human hepatocyte culture permissible to the direct infection with naturally occurring HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the blood of HCV-infected patients. The culture system mimics the biology and kinetics of HCV infection in humans, and produces infectious virions that can infect naïve human hepatocytes. This culture system should complement the existing systems, and may facilitate the understanding of the HCV life cycle, its effects in the natural host cell, the hepatocyte, as well as the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines.

  12. Evaluation of the effect of static magnetic fields combined with human hepatocyte growth factor on human satellite cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Birk, Richard; Sommer, Ulrich; Faber, Anne; Aderhold, Christoph; Schulz, Johannes D; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Stern-Straeter, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising research field, which aims to create new functional muscle tissue in vitro, by utilizing the myogenic differentiation potential of human stem cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of static magnetic fields (SMF), combined with the use of the myogenic differentiation enhancing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), on human satellite cell cultures, which are one of the preferred stem cell sources in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. We performed almarBlue® proliferation assays and semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the following myogenic markers: desmin (DES), myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myogenic differentiation antigen 1 (MYOD1), myogenin (MYOG), myosin heavy chain (MYH) and α1 actin (ACTA1) to detect the effects on myogenic maturation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining (ICC) and fusion index (FI) determination as independent markers of differentiation were performed on satellite cell cultures stimulated with HGF and HGF + SMF with an intensity of 80 mT. ICC verified the muscle phenotype at all time points. SMF enhanced the proliferation of satellite cell cultures treated with HGF. RT-PCR analysis, ICC and FI calculation revealed the effects of HGF/SMF on the investigated differentiation markers and stimulation with HGF and SMF verified the continuing maturation, however no significant increase in analysed markers could be detected when compared with control cultures treated with serum cessation. In conclusion, HGF or HGF + SMF stimulation of human satellite cell cultures did not lead to the desired enhancement of myogenic maturation of human satellite cell cultures compared with cell cultures stimulated with growth factor reduction.

  13. HepG2 and human healthy hepatocyte in vitro culture and co-culture in PCL electrospun platforms.

    PubMed

    Fasolino, Ines; Guarino, Vincenzo; Marrese, Marica; Cirillo, Valentina; Vallifuoco, Marianna; Tamma, Maria Luisa; Vassallo, Valentina; Bracco, Adele; Calise, Fulvio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2017-09-13

    The discovery of new drugs to treat pathological cells in the case of aggressive liver primary cancer is imposing the identification of high-throughput screening systems to predict the in vivo response of new therapeutic molecules, in order to reduce current use of animals and drug testing costs. Recently, micro/nanostructured scaffolds have been adopted to reproduce the hepatic microenvironment due to their higher similarity to the biological niche with respect to the traditional two-dimensional culture plate, so providing novel in vitro models for reliably understanding molecular mechanisms related to cancer cells activity. Herein, we propose the study of electrospun scaffolds made of polycaprolactone (PCL) as in vitro model that can mimic the morphological organization of native extracellular matrix (ECM) and the co-culture of hepatic cell lines - i.e., HepG2, Human Healthy Hepatocytes (HHH). The micro- and nano-scale morphological features of fibers with diameter equal to (3.22 ± 0.42) µm and surface roughness of (17.84 ± 4.43) nm - allow the reproduction of the in vivo scenario influencing the adhesion and proliferation rate of the cultured cells. A much lower proliferation rate is observed for the HepG2 cells compared to the HHH cells, when cultured on the fibrous scaffolds over a time course of 4 weeks. Moreover, results on oxidative stress mechanisms indicate an antioxidant effect of fibers mainly in the case of co-colture, thus suggesting a promising use as new in vitro models to explore alternative therapeutic strategies in hepatocarcinoma treatment. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Establishment and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Hepatic Stellate Cell Line for Applications in Co-Culturing with Immortalized Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, XiaoPing; Wang, Yini; Yu, XiaoPeng; Li, JianZhou; Zhou, Ning; Du, WeiBo; Zhang, YanHong; Cao, HongCui; Zhu, DanHua; Chen, Yu; Li, LanJuan

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective. The liver-specific functions of hepatocytes are improved by co-culturing hepatocytes with primary hepatic stellate cells (HSC). However, primary HSC have a short lifespan in vitro, which is considered a major limitation for their use in various applications. This study aimed to establish immortalized human HSC using the simian virus 40 large T antigen (SV40LT) for applications in co-culturing with hepatocytes and HSC in vitro. Methods. Primary human HSC were transfected with a recombinant retrovirus containing SV40LT. The immortalized human HSC were characterized by analyzing their gene expression and functional characteristics. The liver-specific functions of hepatocytes were evaluated in a co-culture system incorporating immortalized human hepatocytes with HSC-Li cells. Results. The immortalized HSC line, HSC-Li, was obtained after infection with a recombinant retrovirus containing SV40LT. The HSC-Li cells were longitudinally spindle-like and had numerous fat droplets in their cytoplasm as shown using electron microscopy. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), VEGF Receptor 1(Flt-1), collagen type Iα1 and Iα2 mRNA expression levels were observed in the HSC-Li cells by RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the HSC-Li cells were positive for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β), vimentin, and SV40LT protein expression. The HSC-Li cells produced both HGF and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in a time-dependent manner. Real-time PCR showed that albumin, CYP3A5, CYP2E1, and UGT2B7 mRNA expression generally increased in the co-culture system. The enzymatic activity of CYP1A2 under the co-culture conditions also generally increased as compared to the monoculture of immortalized human hepatocytes. Conclusions. We successfully established the immortalized human HSC cell line HSC-Li. It has the specific phenotypic and functional characteristics of primary human HSC, which would be

  15. Hepatocyte Culture in Autologous Decellularized Spleen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Wu, Wanquan; Xiang, Junxi; Lv, Yi; Zheng, Xinglong; Chen, Qian; Wang, Haohua; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhengwen; Ma, Feng

    2015-01-01

    abstract Background and Aims: Using decellularized scaffold to reengineer liver tissue is a promising alternative therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Though the decellularized human liver matrix is the ideal scaffold for reconstruction of the liver theoretically, the shortage of liver donors is still an obstacle for potential clinical application. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In the present study, we used a tissue engineering approach to prepare a rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) and evaluate the effectiveness of this DSM for primary rat hepatocytes culture. Methods: Rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) was prepared by perfusion of a series of detergents through spleen vasculature. DSM was characterized by residual DNA and specific extracellular matrix distribution. Thereafter, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in the DSM in a 3-dimensional dynamic culture system, and liver cell survival and biological functions were evaluated by comparison with 3-dimensional sandwich culture and also with cultured in decellularized liver matrix (DLM). Results: Our research found that DSM did not exhibit any cellular components, but preserved the main extracellular matrix and the intact vasculature evaluated by DNA detection, histology, immunohistochemical staining, vessel corrosion cast and upright metallurgical microscope. Moreover, the method of DSM preparation procedure was relatively simple with high success rate (100%). After seeding primary hepatocytes in DSM, the cultured hepatocytes survived inside DSM with albumin synthesis and urea secretion within 10 d. Additionally, hepatocytes in dynamic culture medium had better biological functions at day 10 than that in sandwich culture. Albumin synthesis was 85.67 ± 6.34 μg/107cell/24h in dynamic culture in DSM compared to 62.43 ± 4.59 μg/107cell/24h in sandwich culture (P < 0.01) and to 87.54 ± 5.25 μg/107cell/24h in DLM culture (P > 0.05); urea release was 32.14 ± 8.62

  16. Co-culturing human prostate carcinoma cells with hepatocytes leads to increased expression of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Yates, C C; Shepard, C R; Stolz, D B; Wells, A

    2007-01-01

    Metastasis is a multi-step process wherein tumour cells detach from the primary mass, migrate through barrier matrices, gain access to conduits to disseminate, and subsequently survive and proliferate in an ectopic site. During the initial invasion stage, prostate carcinoma cells undergo epithelial–mesenchymal-like transition with gain of autocrine signalling and loss of E-cadherin, hallmarks that appear to enable invasion and dissemination. However, some metastases express E-cadherin, and we found close connections between prostate carcinoma cells and hepatocytes in a liver microtissue bioreactor. We hypothesise that phenotypic plasticity occurs late in prostate cancer progression at the site of ectopic seeding. Immunofluorescence staining for E-cadherin in co-cultures of hepatocytes and DU-145 prostate cancer cells revealed E-cadherin upregulation at peripheral sites of contact by day 2 of co-culture; E-cadherin expression also increased in PC-3 cells in co-culture. These carcinoma cells bound to hepatocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner. Although the signals by which the hepatocytes elicited E-cadherin expression remain undetermined, it appeared related to downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. Inhibition of autocrine EGFR signalling increased E-cadherin expression and cell–cell heterotypic adhesion; further, expression of a downregulation-resistant EGFR variant prevented E-cadherin upregulation. These findings were supported by finding E-cadherin and catenins but not activated EGFR in human prostate metastases to the liver. We conclude that the term epithelial–mesenchymal transition only summarises the transient downregulation of E-cadherin for invasion with re-expression of E-cadherin being a physiological consequence of metastatic seeding. PMID:17406365

  17. Use of Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes to Predict Biliary Clearance of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Clbiliary) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Clbiliary for limited sets of compounds. The purpose of this study was 1) to determine the in vitro Clbiliary in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism and 2) to compare the predicted Clbiliary values with estimated in vivo hepatic clearance data in humans. The average biliary excretion index and in vitro intrinsic Clbiliary values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes were 35, 23, 31, 25, and 16%, respectively, and 0.943, 1.20, 0.484, 3.39, and 5.48 ml/min/kg, respectively. Clbiliary values predicted from sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes correlated with estimated in vivo hepatic clearance values based on published data (no in vivo data in humans was available for pitavastatin), and the rank order was also consistent. In conclusion, in vitro Clbiliary determined in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes can be used to predict in vivo Clbiliary of compounds in humans. PMID:19074974

  18. Absence of oncogenic transformation despite acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Haker, Björn; Fuchs, Sigrid; Dierlamm, Judith; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Wege, Henning

    2007-10-18

    As a culture model to study hepatocarcinogenesis, telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes were monitored for karyotype changes evolving in long-term culture and development of functional defects in DNA damage response. G-banding revealed acquisition of characteristic karyotype abnormalities, e.g., trisomy 7 and monosomy X, in two independently immortalized and cultured populations after 80-100 population doublings. Interestingly, the detected aneuploidies resemble some of the genetic events observed in hepatocellular cancer. However, these genetic changes were not sufficient to induce oncogenic transformation reflected by absence of anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized cells preserved p53 expression levels and effective p53-mediated damage response.

  19. The current status of primary hepatocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Mitaka, Toshihiro

    1998-01-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances toward the development of culture conditions that promote proliferation of primary rodent hepatocytes. There are two major methods for the multiplication of hepatocytes in vitro: one is the use of nicotinamide, the other is the use of a nutrient-rich medium. In the medium containing a high concentration of nicotinamide and a growth factor, primary hepatocytes can proliferate well. In this culture condition small mononucleate cells, which are named small hepatocytes, appear and form colonies. Small hepatocytes have a high potential to proliferate while maintaining hepatic characteristics, and can differentiate into mature ones. On the other hand, combining the nutrient-rich medium with 2% DMSO, the proliferated hepatocytes can recover the hepatic differentiated functions and maintain them for a long time. In this review I describe the culture conditions for the proliferation and differentiation of primary hepatocytes and discuss the small hepatocytes, especially their roles in liver growth. PMID:10319020

  20. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  1. Differences in hypolipidaemic effects of two statins on Hep G2 cells or human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, T.; Sbarra, V.; Domingo, N.; Rault, J. P.; Diaconescu, N.; Moutardier, V.; Hasselot, N.; Lafont, H.; Jadot, G.; Laruelle, C.; Chanussot, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to compare in cultured human hepatocytes or Hep G2 cells, changes in the fate of unesterified low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol induced by crilvastatin, a new cholesterol lowering drug and a reference statin, simvastatin. 2. The experiments were carried out for 20 h, each well contained 4.2 x 10(5)/cm2 Hep G2 cells or 0.5 x 10(5)/Cm2 human hepatocytes, 130 microM ursodeoxycholate, 0.68 microCi or 1.59 microCi unesterified human [14C]-LDL-cholesterol, crilvastatin or simvastatin at 0 or 50 microM (both cell types) or 300 microM (Hep-G2 cells). Incubation with the two drugs resulted in increased amounts of unesterified [14C]-LDL-cholesterol taken by the two cell types, compared to control. 3. Crilvastatin 50 microM led to significantly higher quantities of [14C]-glyco-tauro-conjugated bile salts, compared to simvastatin. Statins reduced the apo B100 level secreted by the two cell types (simvastatin) or human hepatocytes (crilvastatin). Crilvastatin enhanced both the level of apo A1 secreted by the Hep G2 cells and the level of APF, a high density lipoprotein (HDL) and biliary apoprotein. 4. Crilvastatin not only acts by stimulating LDL-cholesterol uptake by hepatocytes, but also by enhancing the catabolism of LDL-cholesterol in bile salts and probably by stimulating HDL and/or bile component secretion. Such a mechanism was not previously described for HMG CoA reductase inhibitors. Our results on APF show that this apoprotein could be considered also as an indicator of changes in bile and/or HDL compartments. 5. The human hepatocyte model appeared to be a suitable and relevant model in the pharmacological-metabolic experiments carried out in this study. It led to more consistent data than those obtained with Hep G2 cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8842455

  2. S-adenosylmethionine and methylthioadenosine are antiapoptotic in cultured rat hepatocytes but proapoptotic in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ansorena, Eduardo; García-Trevijano, Elena R; Martínez-Chantar, Maria L; Huang, Zong-Zhi; Chen, Lixin; Mato, José M; Iraburu, Maria; Lu, Shelly C; Avila, Matías A

    2002-02-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is an essential compound in cellular transmethylation reactions and a precursor of polyamine and glutathione synthesis in the liver. In liver injury, the synthesis of AdoMet is impaired and its availability limited. AdoMet administration attenuates experimental liver damage, improves survival of alcoholic patients with cirrhosis, and prevents experimental hepatocarcinogenesis. Apoptosis contributes to different liver injuries, many of which are protected by AdoMet. The mechanism of AdoMet's hepatoprotective and chemopreventive effects are largely unknown. The effect of AdoMet on okadaic acid (OA)-induced apoptosis was evaluated using primary cultures of rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines. AdoMet protected rat hepatocytes from OA-induced apoptosis dose dependently. It attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, caspase 3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. These effects were independent from AdoMet-dependent glutathione synthesis, and mimicked by 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which is derived from AdoMet. Interestingly, AdoMet and MTA did not protect HuH7 cells from OA-induced apoptosis; conversely both compounds behaved as proapoptotic agents. AdoMet's proapoptotic effect was dose dependent and observed also in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AdoMet exerts opposing effects on apoptosis in normal versus transformed hepatocytes that could be mediated through its conversion to MTA. These effects may participate in the hepatoprotective and chemopreventive properties of this safe and well-tolerated drug.

  3. Two compartment model of diazepam biotransformation in an organotypical culture of primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Acikgoez, Ali; Karim, Najibulla; Giri, Shibashish; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-01-15

    Drug biotransformation is one of the most important parameters of preclinical screening tests for the registration of new drug candidates. Conventional existing tests rely on nonhuman models which deliver an incomplete metabolic profile of drugs due to the lack of proper CYP450 expression as seen in human liver in vivo. In order to overcome this limitation, we used an organotypical model of human primary hepatocytes for the biotransformation of the drug diazepam with special reference to metabolites in both the cell matrix phase and supernatant and its interaction of three inducers (phenobarbital, dexamethasone, aroclor 1254) in different time responses (1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h). Phenobarbital showed the strongest inducing effect in generating desmethyldiazepam and induced up to a 150 fold increase in oxazepam-content which correlates with the increased availability of the precursor metabolites (temazepam and desmethyldiazepam). Aroclor 1254 and dexamethasone had the strongest inducing effect on temazepam and the second strongest on oxazepam. The strong and overlapping inductive role of phenobarbital strengthens the participation of CYP2B6 and CYP3A in diazepam N-demethylation and CYP3A in temazepam formation. Aroclor 1254 preferentially generated temazepam due to the interaction with CYP3A and potentially CYP2C19. In parallel we represented these data in the form of a mathematical model with two compartments explaining the dynamics of diazepam metabolism with the effect of these other inducers in human primary hepatocytes. The model consists of ten differential equations, with one for each concentration c{sub i,j} (i = diazepam, temazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam, other metabolites) and one for each compartment (j = cell matrix phase, supernatant), respectively. The parameters p{sub k} (k = 1, 2, 3, 4, 13) are rate constants describing the biotransformation of diazepam and its metabolites and the other parameters (k = 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15) explain the

  4. One Standardized Differentiation Procedure Robustly Generates Homogenous Hepatocyte Cultures Displaying Metabolic Diversity from a Large Panel of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Annika; Pradip, Arvind; van Giezen, Mariska; Aspegren, Anders; Choukair, Helena; Rehnström, Marie; Jacobsson, Susanna; Ghosheh, Nidal; El Hajjam, Dorra; Holmgren, Sandra; Larsson, Susanna; Benecke, Jörg; Butron, Mariela; Wigander, Annelie; Noaksson, Karin; Sartipy, Peter; Björquist, Petter; Edsbagge, Josefina; Küppers-Munther, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Human hepatocytes display substantial functional inter-individual variation regarding drug metabolizing functions. In order to investigate if this diversity is mirrored in hepatocytes derived from different human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) lines, we evaluated 25 hPSC lines originating from 24 different donors for hepatic differentiation and functionality. Homogenous hepatocyte cultures could be derived from all hPSC lines using one standardized differentiation procedure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a standardized hepatic differentiation procedure that is generally applicable across a large panel of hPSC lines without any adaptations to individual lines. Importantly, with regard to functional aspects, such as Cytochrome P450 activities, we observed that hepatocytes derived from different hPSC lines displayed inter-individual variation characteristic for primary hepatocytes obtained from different donors, while these activities were highly reproducible between repeated experiments using the same line. Taken together, these data demonstrate the emerging possibility to compile panels of hPSC-derived hepatocytes of particular phenotypes/genotypes relevant for drug metabolism and toxicity studies. Moreover, these findings are of significance for applications within the regenerative medicine field, since our stringent differentiation procedure allows the derivation of homogenous hepatocyte cultures from multiple donors which is a prerequisite for the realization of future personalized stem cell based therapies.

  5. Quantitative Nuclease Protection Assays (qNPA) as Windows into Chemical-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultures of Primary Human Hepatocytes (Concentration and Time-Response)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultures of primary human hepatocytes have been shown to be dynamic in vitro model systems that retain liver-like functionality (e.g. metabolism, transport, induction). We have utilized these culture models to interrogate 309 ToxCast chemicals. The study design characterized both...

  6. Quantitative Nuclease Protection Assays (qNPA) as Windows into Chemical-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultures of Primary Human Hepatocytes (Concentration and Time-Response)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultures of primary human hepatocytes have been shown to be dynamic in vitro model systems that retain liver-like functionality (e.g. metabolism, transport, induction). We have utilized these culture models to interrogate 309 ToxCast chemicals. The study design characterized both...

  7. Labeling of primary human hepatocytes with micron-sized iron oxide particles in suspension culture suitable for large-scale preparation.

    PubMed

    Kammer, Nora N; Billecke, Nils; Morgul, Mehmet H; Adonopoulou, Michaela K; Mogl, Martina; Huang, Mao D; Florek, Stefan; Schmitt, Katharina R L; Raschzok, Nathanael; Sauer, Igor M

    2011-04-01

    Labeling of hepatocytes with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs) enables cell detection using clinical magnetic resonance equipment. For clinical applications, large numbers of cells must be labeled in a simple and rapid manner and have to be applied in suspension. However, all existing protocols are based on adhesion culture labeling with subsequent resuspension, only suitable for small experimental settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of preparing MPIO-labeled primary human hepatocytes in a temporary suspension culture. Human hepatocytes were isolated from 16 donors and labeled with MPIOs in suspension, using the Rotary Cell Culture System. Particle incorporation was investigated by light and electron microscopy. Cells were compared with adhesion culture-labeled and subsequently enzymatically resuspended cells. During a period of 5 days, hepatocyte-specific parameters of cell damage (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and metabolic activity (urea and albumin) were analyzed (n=7). Suspension cultures showed a higher outcome in cell recovery compared with the conventional labeling method. When incubated with 180 particles/viable cell for 4 h, the mean particle uptake was 28.8 particles/cell at a labeling efficiency of 95.1%. Labeling in suspension had no adverse effects on cell integrity or metabolic activity. We conclude that labeling of human hepatocytes in suspension is feasible and simple and may serve future large-scale processing of cells. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Prediction of Drug Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions in Microscale Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Christine; Shi, Julianne; Moore, Amanda; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of in vivo hepatic drug clearance using in vitro assays is important to properly estimate clinical dosing regimens. Clearance of low-turnover compounds is especially difficult to predict using short-lived suspensions of unpooled primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and functionally declining PHH monolayers. Micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 fibroblasts have been shown previously to display major liver functions for several weeks in vitro. In this study, we first characterized long-term activities of major cytochrome P450 enzymes in MPCCs created from unpooled cryopreserved PHH donors. MPCCs were then used to predict the clearance of 26 drugs that exhibit a wide range of turnover rates in vivo (0.05-19.5 ml/min per kilogram). MPCCs predicted 73, 92, and 96% of drug clearance values for all tested drugs within 2-fold, 3-fold, and 4-fold of in vivo values, respectively. There was good correlation (R(2) = 0.94, slope = 1.05) of predictions between the two PHH donors. On the other hand, suspension hepatocytes and conventional monolayers created from the same donor had significantly reduced predictive capacity (i.e., 30-50% clearance values within 4-fold of in vivo), and were not able to metabolize several drugs. Finally, we modulated drug clearance in MPCCs by inducing or inhibiting P450s. Rifampin-mediated CYP3A4 induction increased midazolam clearance by 73%, while CYP3A4 inhibition with ritonavir decreased midazolam clearance by 79%. Similarly, quinidine-mediated CYP2D6 inhibition reduced clearance of dextromethorphan and desipramine by 71 and 22%, respectively. In conclusion, MPCCs created using cryopreserved unpooled PHHs can be used for drug clearance predictions and to model drug-drug interactions.

  9. The efficacy of nafamostat mesilate on the performance of a hybrid-artificial liver using a polyurethane foam/porcine hepatocyte spheroid culture system in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Shimada, M; Tsujita, E; Rikimaru, T; Ijima, H; Nakazawa, K; Sakiyama, R; Fukuda, J; Funatsu, K; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (FUT) is a protease inhibitor of complement activation. The present study investigates whether FUT protects porcine hepatocytes from being injured by human plasma in a multi-capillary polyurethane foam packed-bed culture system (MC-PUF) such as the hybrid-artificial liver (PUF-HAL). Human plasmas with 1 mM of added ammonia were perfused using a small-scale PUF-HAL with porcine hepatocytes. FUT was continuously infused (10 microg/ml, 50 microg/ml). The ammonia detoxification was maintained in human plasma for 24 hours and for 48 hours with FUT which suppressed the rapid increase of asparaginic acid aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). After 60 hours of perfusion, hepatocyte spheroids completely collapsed in the human plasma, but a small amount of hepatocyte spheroid was maintained by FUT. The effect of FUT was slightly greater at 50 microg/ml than at 10 microg/ml. Our results suggest that FUT has protective effects against porcine hepatocytes in human plasma, and our PUF-HAL using porcine hepatocytes can function in human plasma for about 48 hours with FUT.

  10. Effect of rifampin and nelfinavir on the metabolism of methadone and buprenorphine in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Fang, Wenfang B; Lin, Shen-Nan; Weyant, Denise M; Strom, Stephen C; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2009-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that primary cultures of human hepatocytes could predict potential drug interactions with methadone and buprenorphine. Hepatocytes (five donors) were preincubated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (vehicle), rifampin, or nelfinavir before incubation with methadone or buprenorphine. Culture media (0-60 min) was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for R- and S-methadone and R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) or for buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and their glucuronides [buprenorphine-3-glucuronide (B-3-G) and norbuprenorphine-3-glucuronide (N-3-G)]. R- and S-EDDP were detected in three of five, four of five, and five of five media from cells pretreated with DMSO, nelfinavir, and rifampin. R-EDDP increased 3.1- and 26.5-fold, and S-EDDP increased 2.5- and 21.3-fold after nelfinavir and rifampin. The rifampin effect was significant. B-3-G production was detected in media of all cells incubated with buprenorphine and accounted for most of the buprenorphine loss from culture media; it was not significantly affected by either pretreatment. Norbuprenorphine and N-3-G together were detected in three of five, four of five, and five of five donors pretreated with DMSO, nelfinavir and rifampin, and norbuprenorphine in one of five, one of five, and two of five donors. Although there was a trend for norbuprenorphine (2.8- and 4.9-fold) and N-3-G (1.7- and 1.9-fold) to increase after nelfinavir and rifampin, none of the changes were significant. To investigate low norbuprenorphine production, buprenorphine was incubated with human liver and small intestine microsomes fortified to support both N-dealkylation and glucuronidation; N-dealkylation predominated in small intestine and glucuronidation in liver microsomes. These studies support the hypothesis that methadone metabolism and its potential for drug interactions can be predicted with cultured human hepatocytes, but for buprenorphine the combined

  11. Improved Survival and Initiation of Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Hepatocyte-Like Cells upon Culture in William’s E Medium followed by Hepatocyte Differentiation Inducer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte differentiation inducer (HDI) lacks both glucose and arginine, but is supplemented with galactose and ornithine, and is added together with other reagents such as apoptosis inhibitor and oncostatin M. Although human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells initiate hepatocyte differentiation, most die within 7 days. In this study, we investigated both HDI and conventional media for their potential to improve cell survival. Materials and Methods 201B7 iPS cells were cultured in conventional media. This consisted of three cycles of 5-day culture in William’s E (WE) medium, followed by a 2-day culture in HDI. Results Expression levels of α-feto protein (AFP) were higher in cells cultured in WE and in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12). 201B7 cells expressed the highest AFP and albumin (ALB) when cultured in HDI for 2 days following 7-day culture in WE. After three cycles of 5-day culture in WE followed by 2 days in HDI, 201B7 cells expressed AFP and ALB 54 ± 2.3 (average ± standard deviation) and 73 ± 15.1 times higher, respectively, than those cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free condition). Conclusion 201B7 cells survived culture in WE for 7 days followed HDI for 2 days. After three cycles of culture under these conditions, hepatocyte differentiation was enhanced, as evidenced by increased AFP and ALB expression. PMID:27073925

  12. Comparison of basal gene expression profiles and effects of hepatocarcinogens on gene expression in cultured primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, Angela J; Dial, Stacey L; Casciano, Daniel A

    2004-05-18

    Toxicogenomics is a relatively new discipline of toxicology. Microarrays and bioinformatics tools are being used successfully to understand the effects of toxicants on in vivo and in vitro model systems, and to gain a better understanding of the relevance of in vitro models commonly used in toxicological studies. In this study, cDNA filter arrays were used to determine the basal expression patterns of human cultured primary hepatocytes from different male donors; compare the gene expression profile of HepG2 to that of primary hepatocytes; and analyze the effects of three genotoxic hepatocarcinogens; aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)), 2-acetylaminofluorene (2AAF), and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), as well as one non-gentoxic hepatotoxin, acetaminophen (APAP) on gene expression in both in vitro systems. Real-time PCR was used to verify differential gene expression for selected genes. Of the approximately 31,000 genes screened, 3-6% were expressed in primary hepatocytes cultured on matrigel for 16 h. Of these genes, 867 were expressed in cultured hepatocytes from all donors. HepG2 cells expressed about 98% of the genes detectable in cultured primary hepatocytes, however, 31% of the HepG2 transcriptome was unique to the cell line. A number of these genes are expressed in human liver but expression is apparently lost during culture. There was considerable variability in the response to chemical carcinogen exposure in primary hepatocytes from different donors. The transcription factors, E2F1 and ID1 mRNA were increased three-fold and six-fold (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), respectively, in AFB(1) treated primary human hepatocytes but were not altered in HepG2. ID1 expression was also increased by dimethylnitrosamine, acetylaminofluorene and acetaminophen in both primary hepatocytes and HepG2. Identification of genes that are expressed in primary hepatocytes from most donors, as well as those genes with variable expression, will aid in understanding the variability in human reactions to drugs

  13. Effect of Remifentanil on Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption of Cultured Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Djafarzadeh, Siamak; Vuda, Madhusudanarao; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M.

    2012-01-01

    increases cellular respiration of human hepatocytes and prevents TNF-α-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. The results were not explained by uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:23028840

  14. Comparison of the effects of the synthetic pyrethroid Metofluthrin and phenobarbital on CYP2B form induction and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yukihiro; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Yamada, Tomoya; Deguchi, Yoshihito; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Nishioka, Kazuhiko; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Kawamura, Satoshi; Isobe, Naohiko; Lake, Brian G; Okuno, Yasuyoshi

    2009-04-05

    High doses of Metofluthrin (MTF) have been shown to produce liver tumours in rats by a mode of action (MOA) involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor leading to liver hypertrophy, induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms and increased cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MTF with those of the known rodent liver tumour promoter phenobarbital (PB) on the induction CYP2B forms and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes. Treatment with 50 microM MTF and 50 microM PB for 72 h increased CYP2B1 mRNA levels in male Wistar rat hepatocytes and CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Replicative DNA synthesis was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine over the last 24 h of a 48 h treatment period. Treatment with 10-1000 microM MTF and 100-500 microM PB resulted in significant increases in replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes. While replicative DNA synthesis was increased in human hepatocytes treated with 5-50 ng/ml epidermal growth factor or 5-100 ng/ml hepatocyte growth factor, treatment with MTF and PB had no effect. These results demonstrate that while both MTF and PB induce CYP2B forms in both species, MTF and PB only induced replicative DNA synthesis in rat and not in human hepatocytes. These results provide further evidence that the MOA for MTF-induced rat liver tumour formation is similar to that of PB and some other non-genotoxic CYP2B form inducers and that the key event of increased cell proliferation would not occur in human liver.

  15. Regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic protein expression by nuclear receptor PXR in primary cultures of human and rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Nathalie; de Sousa, Georges; Bailly-Maitre, Béatrice; Gugenheim, Jean; Bars, Rémi; Lemaire, Géraldine; Rahmani, Roger

    2005-08-15

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays a major role in the protection of the body by regulating the genes involved in the metabolism and elimination of potentially toxic xeno- and endobiotics. We previously described that PXR activator dexamethasone protects hepatocytes from spontaneous apoptosis. We hypothesise a PXR-dependent co-regulation process between detoxication and programmed cell death. Using primary cultured human and rat hepatocytes, we investigated to determine if PXR is implicated in the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, two crucial apoptosis inhibitors. In the present study we demonstrated that the treatment of primary cultured hepatocytes with PXR agonists increased hepatocyte viability and protects them from staurosporine-induced apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic capacity of PXR activation was correlated with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL induction at both the transcriptional and protein levels in man and rats, respectively. The inhibition of PXR expression by antisense oligonucleotide abolished PXR activators Bcl-xL induction. Accordingly, PXR overexpression in HepG2 cells led to bcl-2 induction upon clotrimazole treatment and protects cells against Fas-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that PXR expression is required for Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL up-regulation upon PXR activators treatment in human and rat hepatocytes. They also suggest that PXR may protect the liver against chemicals by simultaneously regulating detoxication and the apoptotic pathway.

  16. Nonsterol Isoprenoids Activate Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor in an Isoform-Selective Manner in Primary Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rondini, Elizabeth A.; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids following treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor, squalestatin 1 (SQ1) markedly induced cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B1 mRNA and reporter activity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes, which was dependent on activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether isoprenoids likewise activate murine CAR (mCAR) or one or more isoforms of human CAR (hCAR) produced by alternative splicing (SPTV, hCAR2; APYLT, hCAR3). We found that SQ1 significantly induced Cyp2b10 mRNA (∼3.5-fold) in primary hepatocytes isolated from both CAR–wild-type and humanized CAR transgenic mice, whereas the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin had no effect. In the absence of CAR, basal Cyp2b10 mRNA levels were reduced by 28-fold and the effect of SQ1 on Cyp2b10 induction was attenuated. Cotransfection with an expression plasmid for hCAR1, but not hCAR2 or hCAR3, mediated SQ1-induced CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 reporter activation in hepatocytes isolated from CAR-knockout mice. This effect was also observed following treatment with the isoprenoid trans,trans-farnesol. The direct agonist CITCO increased interaction of hCAR1, hCAR2, and hCAR3 with steroid receptor coactivator-1. However, no significant effect on coactivator recruitment was observed with SQ1, suggesting an indirect activation mechanism. Further results from an in vitro ligand binding assay demonstrated that neither farnesol nor other isoprenoids are direct ligands for hCAR1. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SQ1 activates CYP2B transcriptional responses through farnesol metabolism in an hCAR1-dependent manner. Further, this effect probably occurs through an indirect mechanism. PMID:26798158

  17. Hepatic heme catabolism in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, B.C.; Bonkovsky, H.L.

    1987-05-01

    Uncertainty persists concerning the role and importance of heme oxygenase in the catabolism of heme by hepatocytes. The products of heme oxygenase catalyzed heme catabolism are equimolar amounts of biliverdin IX..cap alpha.., CO, and iron. Previous reports from studies with rodent hepatocyte cultures have suggested the possibility that non-heme oxygenase pathway(s) predominate in the breakdown of hepatic hemoprotein heme. The authors have studied this question in cultured chick embryo hepatocytes, which retain normal regulation of heme metabolism and levels of cytochromes P-450 as in intact animals. Exogenous heme added to the culture medium with control chick embryo hepatocyte cultures was quantitatively converted to biliverdin IX..cap alpha... To study endogenous heme breakdown, cellular heme was labelled by exposing cultured cells to (5-/sup 14/C) 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The hepatocytes were also treated with mephenytoin that increases cytochrome P-450, total hepatic heme and heme oxygenase. At various times after labelling heme, biliverdin, and CO were isolated and counted. For at least 8 hrs, the increase in CO radioactivity corresponded to the loss of radioactivity in heme. Beyond 1 h biliverdin was unstable in culture medium, but for 1 h after labelling (dpm BVIX..cap alpha.. + dpm CO) ..delta..dpm heme. All BV detected was the ..cap alpha.. isomer. They conclude that heme oxygenase accounts for both endogenous and exogenous heme breakdown by hepatocytes.

  18. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  19. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  20. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  1. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  2. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Curt; Ellis, Ewa; Abrahamsson, Anna; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Björkhem, Ingemar; Axelson, Magnus

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William’s E medium. The medium was collected and re newed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDC A was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamethasone and thyroid hormone alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addit ion of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium. PMID:11819640

  3. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems.

  4. Histological Organization in Hepatocyte Organoid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.; Bowen, William C.; Mulè, Karen; Stolz, Donna Beer

    2001-01-01

    Hepatocytes and other cellular elements isolated by collagenase perfusion of the liver and maintained in defined culture conditions undergo a series of complex changes, including apoptosis and cell proliferation, to reconstruct tissue with specific architecture. Cultures in collagen-coated pleated surface roller bottles, with hepatocyte growth medium medium and in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), form characteristic and reproducible tissue architecture composed of a superficial layer of biliary epithelial cells, an intermediate layer of connective tissue and hepatocytes, and a basal layer of endothelial cells. Dexamethasone, EGF, and HGF are required for the complete histological organization. Analysis of the structures formed demonstrates that the receptor tyrosine kinase ligands HGF and EGF are required for the presence, growth, and phenotypic maturation of the biliary epithelium on the surface of the cultures and for the formation of connective tissue in the cultures. Dexamethasone, in the presence of HGF and EGF, was required for the phenotypic maturation of hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the role of these molecules for the formation and phenotypic maturation of specific histological elements of the liver and suggest roles for these signaling molecules in the formation and structure of the in vivo hepatic architecture. PMID:11696448

  5. Antioxidative and apoptotic properties of polyphenolic extracts from edible part of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) on cultured rat hepatocytes and on human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miccadei, Stefania; Di Venere, Donato; Cardinali, Angela; Romano, Ferdinando; Durazzo, Alessandra; Foddai, Maria Stella; Fraioli, Rocco; Mobarhan, Sohrab; Maiani, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Cultured rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma HepG2 cells were used to evaluate the hepatoprotective properties of polyphenolic extracts from the edible part of artichoke (AE). The hepatocytes were exposed to H2O2generated in situ by glucose oxidase and were treated with either AE, or pure chlorogenic acid (ChA) or with the well known antioxidant, N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenilenediamine (DPPD). Addition of glucose oxidase to the culture medium caused depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) content, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the cultures, as a lipid peroxidation indicator, and cell death. These results demonstrated that AE protected cells from the oxidative stress caused by glucose oxidase, comparable to DPPD. Furthermore, AE, as well as ChA, prevented the loss of total GSH and the accumulation of MDA. Treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h with AE reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, however, ChA had no prominent effects on the cell death rate. Similarly, AE rather than ChA induced apoptosis, measured by flow cytometric analysis of annexin and by activation of caspase-3, in HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that AE had a marked antioxidative potential that protects hepatocytes from an oxidative stress. Furthermore, AE reduced cell viability and had an apoptotic activity on a human liver cancer cell line.

  6. Prediction of Clinically Relevant Herb-Drug Clearance Interactions Using Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes: Schisandra spp. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan P; Freeman, Kimberly M; Friley, Weslyn W; Herman, Ashley G; Black, Christopher B; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Roe, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    The Schisandraceae family is reported to have a range of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory effects. As with all herbal preparations, extracts of Schisandra species are mixtures composed of >50 lignans, especially schizandrins, deoxyschizandrins, and gomisins. In China, Schisandra sphenanthera extract (SSE) is often coadministered with immunosuppressant treatment of transplant recipients. In cases of coadministration, the potential for herb-drug interactions (HDIs) increases. Clinical studies have been used to assess HDI potential of SSE. Results demonstrated that chronic SSE administration reduced midazolam (MDZ) clearance by 52% in healthy volunteers. Although clinical studies are definitive and considered the "gold standard," these studies are impractical for routine HDI assessments. Alternatively, in vitro strategies can be used to reduce the need for clinical studies. Transporter-certified sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHHs) provide a fully integrated hepatic cell system that maintains drug clearance pathways (metabolism and transport) and key regulatory pathways constitutive active/androstane receptor and pregnane X receptor (CAR/PXR) necessary for quantitative assessment of HDI potential. Mechanistic studies conducted in SCHHs demonstrated that SSE and the more commonly used dietary supplement Schisandra chinensis extract (SCE) inhibited CYP3A4/5-mediated metabolism and induced CYP3A4 mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. SSE and SCE reduced MDZ clearance to 0.577- and 0.599-fold of solvent control, respectively, in chronically exposed SCHHs. These in vitro results agreed with SSE clinical findings and predicted a similar in vivo HDI effect with SCE exposure. These findings support the use of an SCHH system that maintains transport, metabolic, and regulatory functionality for routine HDI assessments to predict clinically relevant clearance interactions. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  7. Secretion of albumin and induction of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in novel three-dimensional culture system for human hepatocytes using micro-space plate.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masuhiro; Hagi, Mieko; Ejiri, Yoko; Kishimoto, Sanae; Horie, Toru; Narimatsu, Shizuo; Naito, Shinsaku

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated a novel primary three-dimensional culture system for human hepatocytes using micro-space plates. The functional activity of human hepatocytes in primary culture was determined by measuring albumin secretion from hepatocytes to medium and measuring expression levels of albumin, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA. Albumin secretion was higher in micro-space plates compared with traditional plates after 72 h of culture; the levels of albumin secretion from hepatocytes to medium in culture using micro-space plates after 96 h of culture were 2.7-fold higher than those in culture using traditional plates, and secretion of albumin in micro-space plate culture subsequently remained constant. Expression levels of albumin, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA in the culture of hepatocytes were significantly higher using micro-space plates than using traditional plates. The inducibility of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA after exposure to inducers in hepatocyte culture on micro-space plates was comparable to that in culture on traditional plates, while expression of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA after exposure to inducers was higher on micro-space plates than on traditional plates. The present study demonstrates that a novel primary three-dimensional culture system of cryopreserved human hepatocytes using micro-space plates could be used for evaluating the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. This in vitro method may thus be useful for screening the induction potency of new drug candidates.

  8. 10-(6'-Plastoquinonyl)decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1) Does Not Increase the Level of Cytochromes P450 in Rat Liver and Human Hepatocyte Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, K N; Silachev, D N; Petrov, A D

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 did not increase the content of cytochromes P450 in livers of rats that were given SkQ1 in drinking water for 5 days in a dose (2.5 µmol per kg body weight) that exceeded 10 times the SkQ1 therapeutic dose. SkQ1 did not affect the levels of cytochrome P450 forms CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in monolayer cultures of freshly isolated human hepatocytes, while specific inducers of these forms (omeprazole, phenobarbital, and rifampicin, respectively) significantly increased expression of the cytochromes P450 under the same conditions. We conclude that therapeutic doses of SkQ1 do not induce cytochromes P450 in liver, and the absence of the inducing effect cannot be explained by poor availability of hepatocytes to SkQ1 in vivo.

  9. Serum-free culture of primary human hepatocytes in a miniaturized hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor for pharmacological in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Lübberstedt, Marc; Müller-Vieira, Ursula; Biemel, Klaus M; Darnell, Malin; Hoffmann, Stefan A; Knöspel, Fanny; Wönne, Eva C; Knobeloch, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas K; Gerlach, Jörg C; Andersson, Tommy B; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2015-09-01

    Primary human hepatocytes represent an important cell source for in vitro investigation of hepatic drug metabolism and disposition. In this study, a multi-compartment capillary membrane-based bioreactor technology for three-dimensional (3D) perfusion culture was further developed and miniaturized to a volume of less than 0.5 ml to reduce demand for cells. The miniaturized bioreactor was composed of two capillary layers, each made of alternately arranged oxygen and medium capillaries serving as a 3D culture for the cells. Metabolic activity and stability of primary human hepatocytes was studied in this bioreactor in the presence of 2.5% fetal calf serum (FCS) under serum-free conditions over a culture period of 10 days. The miniaturized bioreactor showed functions comparable to previously reported data for larger variants. Glucose and lactate metabolism, urea production, albumin synthesis and release of intracellular enzymes (AST, ALT, GLDH) showed no significant differences between serum-free and serum-supplemented bioreactors. Activities of human-relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4/5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2B6) analyzed by determination of product formation rates from selective probe substrates were also comparable in both groups. Gene expression analysis showed moderately higher expression in the majority of CYP enzymes, transport proteins and enzymes of Phase II metabolism in the serum-free bioreactors compared to those maintained with FCS. In conclusion, the miniaturized bioreactor maintained stable function over the investigated period and thus provides a suitable system for pharmacological studies on primary human hepatocytes under defined serum-free conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Obeticholic acid, a selective farnesoid X receptor agonist, regulates bile acid homeostasis in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jackson, Jonathan P; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2017-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a master regulator of bile acid homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in bile acid synthesis and cellular membrane transport. Impairment of bile acid efflux due to cholangiopathies results in chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal elevation of intrahepatic and systemic bile acid levels. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a potent and selective FXR agonist that is 100-fold more potent than the endogenous ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The effects of OCA on genes involved in bile acid homeostasis were investigated using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. Gene expression was determined by measuring mRNA levels. OCA dose-dependently increased fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) which, in turn, suppress mRNA levels of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo synthesis of bile acids. Consistent with CYP7A1 suppression, total bile acid content was decreased by OCA (1 μmol/L) to 42.7 ± 20.5% relative to control. In addition to suppressing de novo bile acids synthesis, OCA significantly increased the mRNA levels of transporters involved in bile acid homeostasis. The bile salt excretory pump (BSEP), a canalicular efflux transporter, increased by 6.4 ± 0.8-fold, and the basolateral efflux heterodimer transporters, organic solute transporter α (OSTα ) and OSTβ increased by 6.4 ± 0.2-fold and 42.9 ± 7.9-fold, respectively. The upregulation of BSEP and OSTα and OSTβ, by OCA reduced the intracellular concentrations of d8 -TCA, a model bile acid, to 39.6 ± 8.9% relative to control. These data demonstrate that OCA does suppress bile acid synthesis and reduce hepatocellular bile acid levels, supporting the use of OCA to treat bile acid-induced toxicity observed in cholestatic diseases. © 2017 Intercept Pharmaceuticals. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and

  11. The mycotoxin, patulin, increases the expression of PXR and AhR and their target cytochrome P450s in primary cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Pascussi, Jean Marc; Rjiba, Karima; Maurel, Patrick; Bacha, Hassen; Hassen, Wafa

    2012-07-01

    The mycotoxin, patulin (PAT), which is frequently found in apples, grapes, oranges, pear, peaches, and in apple juices, has previously been shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic. In this study, we have investigated the effect of PAT on mRNA level of pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and their corresponding target cytochrome P450s. Using primary cultures of adult human hepatocytes, we evaluated PAT cytotoxicity on hepatocytes after 24 hours of treatment. Real time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction procedure was employed to determine the effect of PAT on receptors (PXR, CAR, and AhR) and cytochrome (CYP3A4, 2B6, 3A5, 2C9, 1A1, and 1A2) genes. Our results showed that PAT reduced hepatocyte viability. At a noncytotoxic range of PAT concentrations, PAT induced an upregulation of the PXR gene in the three treated hepatocytes cultures, whereas CAR was overexpressed in only 1 treated liver. PXR gene induction was accompanied by the enhancement of CYP2B6, 3A5, 2C9, and 3A4 expression. PAT was also found to induce an overexpression of AhR and CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNA expression. These findings suggested that PAT may activate PXR and/or CAR and AhR. However, further investigations are needed to confirm nuclear receptor activation by PAT and to elucidate the molecular mechanism of PAT action.

  12. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Ullah, Shahid; Schmidt, Staffan; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Beck, Olof; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lauschke, Volker M

    2017-03-06

    Adverse reactions or lack of response to medications are important concerns for drug development programs. However, faithful predictions of drug metabolism and toxicity are difficult because animal models show only limited translatability to humans. Furthermore, current in vitro systems, such as hepatic cell lines or primary human hepatocyte (PHH) 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, can be used only for acute toxicity tests because of their immature phenotypes and inherent instability. Therefore, the migration to novel phenotypically stable models is of prime importance for the pharmaceutical industry. Novel 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been shown to accurately mimic in vivo hepatic phenotypes on transcriptomic and proteomic level, but information about their metabolic stability is lacking. Using a combination of targeted and untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that PHHs in 3D spheroid cultures remained metabolically stable for multiple weeks, whereas metabolic patterns of PHHs from the same donors cultured as conventional 2D monolayers rapidly deteriorated. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic differences between donors were maintained in 3D spheroid cultures, enabling studies of interindividual variability in drug metabolism and toxicity. We conclude that the 3D spheroid system is metabolically stable and constitutes a suitable model for in vitro studies of long-term drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.-Vorrink, S. U., Ullah, S., Schmid, S., Nandania, J., Velagapudi, V., Beck, O., Ingelman-Sundberg, M., Lauschke, V. M. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

  13. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Ullah, Shahid; Schmidt, Staffan; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Beck, Olof; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lauschke, Volker M.

    2017-01-01

    Adverse reactions or lack of response to medications are important concerns for drug development programs. However, faithful predictions of drug metabolism and toxicity are difficult because animal models show only limited translatability to humans. Furthermore, current in vitro systems, such as hepatic cell lines or primary human hepatocyte (PHH) 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, can be used only for acute toxicity tests because of their immature phenotypes and inherent instability. Therefore, the migration to novel phenotypically stable models is of prime importance for the pharmaceutical industry. Novel 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been shown to accurately mimic in vivo hepatic phenotypes on transcriptomic and proteomic level, but information about their metabolic stability is lacking. Using a combination of targeted and untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that PHHs in 3D spheroid cultures remained metabolically stable for multiple weeks, whereas metabolic patterns of PHHs from the same donors cultured as conventional 2D monolayers rapidly deteriorated. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic differences between donors were maintained in 3D spheroid cultures, enabling studies of interindividual variability in drug metabolism and toxicity. We conclude that the 3D spheroid system is metabolically stable and constitutes a suitable model for in vitro studies of long-term drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.—Vorrink, S. U., Ullah, S., Schmid, S., Nandania, J., Velagapudi, V., Beck, O., Ingelman-Sundberg, M., Lauschke, V. M. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics. PMID:28264975

  14. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-05-15

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [{sup 73}As]arsenite (iAs{sup III}; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs{sup III} to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs{sup III} than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs{sup III} was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs{sup III} and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to

  15. In utero Transplanted Human Hepatocytes Allows for Postnatal Engraftment of Human Hepatocytes in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James E; Lillegard, Joseph B; Mckenzie, Travis J; Rodysill, Brian R; Wettstein, Peter J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2012-01-01

    In utero cell transplantation (IUCT) can lead to postnatal engraftment of human cells in the xenogeneic recipient. Most reports of IUCTs have involved hematopoietic stem cells. It is unknown if human hepatocytes used for IUCT in fetal pigs will lead to engraftment of these same cells in the postnatal environment. In this study, fetal pigs received direct liver injections of 1×107 human hepatocytes in utero and were delivered by cesarean-section at term. Piglets received a second direct liver injection of 5×107 human hepatocytes 1 week postnatally. Serum was analyzed for human albumin at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-engraftment. Piglet livers were harvested 6 weeks after transplantation and examined by immunohistochemistry, PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization for human specific sequences. Piglets receiving IUCT with human hepatocytes that were postnatally engrafted with human hepatocytes showed significant levels of human albumin production in their serum at all post-engraftment time points. Human albumin gene expression, the presence of human hepatocytes and the presence of human beta-2 microglobulin were all confirmed 6 weeks post-engraftment. IUCT in fetal pigs using human hepatocytes early in gestation allowed for engraftment of human hepatocytes, which remained viable and functional for weeks after transplantation. IUCT followed by postnatal engraftment may provide a future means for large scale expansion of human hepatocytes in genetically-engineered pigs. PMID:23280879

  16. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The liver is the major site for the enzymatic methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans. Primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes isolated from tissue obtained at surgery or from donor livers have been used to study interindividual variation in the capacity of live...

  17. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The liver is the major site for the enzymatic methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans. Primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes isolated from tissue obtained at surgery or from donor livers have been used to study interindividual variation in the capacity of live...

  18. Coculture with mesenchymal stem cells results in improved viability and function of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Emer; Wu, Yue; Dhadda, Paramjeet; Hughes, Robin D; Mitry, Ragai R; Qin, Hong; Lehec, Sharon C; Heaton, Nigel D; Dhawan, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is becoming an accepted therapy for acute liver failure, either as a bridge to liver regeneration or to organ transplantation. Hepatocytes provide liver function in place of the failing organ. The maintenance of sufficient viability and function of the transplanted hepatocytes is a concern. There is a lot of recent interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the provision of structural and trophic support to hepatocytes, but few studies currently use primary human hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate if coculture of human MSCs with cryopreserved human hepatocytes may improve their function and viability, thus with potential for cellular therapy of liver disease. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord or adipose tissue. Hepatocytes were isolated from donor organs unsuitable for transplantation. MSCs and hepatocytes were cocultured in both direct and indirect contact. Conditioned medium (CM) from cocultured MSCs and hepatocytes was also used on hepatocytes. Viability and liver-specific function were compared between test and controls. Human hepatocytes that were cocultured directly with MSCs demonstrated improved production of albumin from day 5 to day 25 of culture. This effect was most prominent at day 15. Likewise, urea production was improved in coculture from day 5 to 25. Indirect coculture demonstrated improved albumin production by day 4 (1,107 ng/ml) versus hepatocyte monoculture (940 ng/ml). Hepatocytes in CM demonstrated a nonsignificant improvement in function. The viability of cocultured hepatocytes was superior to that of monocultured cells with up to a 16% improvement. Thus, coculture of human hepatocytes with MSCs demonstrates both improved function and viability. The effect is seen mainly with direct coculture but can also be seen in indirect culture and with CM. Such coculture conditions may convey major advantages in hepatocyte survival and function for cell transplantation.

  19. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-11-30

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes.

  20. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes. PMID:27916916

  1. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Definition of metabolism-dependent xenobiotic toxicity with co-cultures of human hepatocytes and mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in the novel integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture (IdMOC) experimental system: results with model toxicants aflatoxin B1, cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Li, Albert P; Uzgare, Aarti; LaForge, Yumiko S

    2012-07-30

    The integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture system (IdMOC) allows the co-culturing of multiple cell types as physically separated cells interconnected by a common overlying medium. We report here the application of IdMOC with two cell types: the metabolically competent primary human hepatocytes, and a metabolically incompetent cell line, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, in the definition of the role of hepatic metabolism on the cytotoxicity of three model toxicants: cyclophosphamide (CPA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB) and tamoxifen (TMX). The presence of hepatic metabolism in IdMOC with human hepatocytes was demonstrated by the metabolism of the P450 isoform 3A4 substrate, luciferin-IPA. The three model toxicants showed three distinct patterns of cytotoxic profile: TMX was cytotoxic to 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes, with slightly lower cytotoxicity towards both 3T3 cells and hepatocytes in the IdMOC. AFB was selective toxic towards the human hepatocytes and relatively noncytotoxic towards 3T3 cells both in the presence and absence of the hepatocytes. CPA cytotoxicity to the 3T3 cells was found to be significantly enhanced by the presence of the hepatocytes, with the cytotoxicity dependent of the number of hepatocytes, and with the cytotoxicity attenuated by the presence of a non-specific P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole. We propose here the following classification of toxicants based on the role of hepatic metabolism as defined by the human hepatocyte-3T3 cell IdMOC assay: type I: direct-acting cytotoxicants represented by TMX as indicated by cytotoxicity in 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes; type II: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity represented by AFB1 with effects localized within the site of metabolic activation (i. e. hepatocytes); and type III: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity with metabolites that can diffuse out of the hepatocytes to cause toxicity in cells distal from the site of metabolism, as exemplified by CPA.

  3. Hepatobiliary Clearance Prediction: Species Scaling From Monkey, Dog, and Rat, and In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes Using 17 Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Emi; Bi, Yi-An; Kosa, Rachel E; Tremaine, Larry M; Varma, Manthena V S

    2017-09-01

    Hepatobiliary elimination can be a major clearance pathway dictating the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Here, we first compared the dose eliminated in bile in preclinical species (monkey, dog, and rat) with that in human and further evaluated single-species scaling (SSS) to predict human hepatobiliary clearance. Six compounds dosed in bile duct-cannulated (BDC) monkeys showed biliary excretion comparable to human; and the SSS of hepatobiliary clearance with plasma fraction unbound correction yielded reasonable predictions (within 3-fold). Although dog SSS also showed reasonable predictions, rat overpredicted hepatobiliary clearance for 13 of 24 compounds. Second, we evaluated the translatability of in vitro sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHHs) to predict human hepatobiliary clearance for 17 drugs. For drugs with no significant active uptake in SCHH studies (i.e., with or without rifamycin SV), measured intrinsic biliary clearance was directly scalable with good predictability (absolute average fold error [AAFE] = 1.6). Drugs showing significant active uptake in SCHH, however, showed improved predictability when scaled based on extended clearance term (AAFE = 2.0), which incorporated sinusoidal uptake along with a global scaling factor for active uptake and the canalicular efflux clearance. In conclusion, SCHH is a useful tool to predict human hepatobiliary clearance, whereas BDC monkey model may provide further confidence in the prospective predictions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hepatobiliary disposition of 17-OHPC and taurocholate in fetal human hepatocytes: a comparison with adult human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shringi; Ellis, Ewa C S; Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc; Mattison, Donald R; Caritis, Steve N; Hines, Ronald N; Venkataramanan, Raman; Strom, Stephen C

    2013-02-01

    Little information is available in the literature regarding the expression and activity of transporters in fetal human liver or cultured cells. A synthetic progesterone structural analog, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is used in the prevention of spontaneous abortion in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (habitual abortion). 17-OHPC has been reported to traverse the placental barrier and gain access to fetal circulation. In this study, the role of transporters in the disposition of 17-OHPC in fetal and adult human hepatocytes was examined. Progesterone metabolites have been reported to induce trans-inhibition of bile acid transporter, ABCB11. Thus, we investigated the effect of 17-OHPC or its metabolites on [(3)H]taurocholic acid transport in sandwich-cultured human fetal and adult hepatocytes. 17-OHPC was taken up rapidly into the cells and transported out partially by an active efflux process that was significantly inhibited by cold temperature, cyclosporine, verapamil, and rifampin. The active efflux mechanism was observed in both adult and fetal hepatocyte cultures. 17-OHPC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of taurocholate efflux into canaliculi in sandwich-cultured adult and fetal human hepatocytes. However, given the high concentrations required to cause inhibition of these transport processes, no adverse effects would be anticipated from therapeutic levels of 17-OHPC. We also evaluated the expression of various hepatic transporters (ABCB1, ABCB4, SLCO1B1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, ABCB11, SLC10A1, ABCC2, ABCC3, ABCC4, and ABCG2) in fetal and adult hepatocytes. With the exception of ABCB4, all transporters examined were expressed, albeit at lower mRNA levels in fetal hepatocytes compared with adults.

  5. Hepatobiliary Disposition of 17-OHPC and Taurocholate in Fetal Human Hepatocytes: A Comparison with Adult Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shringi; Ellis, Ewa C. S.; Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc; Mattison, Donald R.; Caritis, Steve N.; Hines, Ronald N.; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2013-01-01

    Little information is available in the literature regarding the expression and activity of transporters in fetal human liver or cultured cells. A synthetic progesterone structural analog, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is used in the prevention of spontaneous abortion in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (habitual abortion). 17-OHPC has been reported to traverse the placental barrier and gain access to fetal circulation. In this study, the role of transporters in the disposition of 17-OHPC in fetal and adult human hepatocytes was examined. Progesterone metabolites have been reported to induce trans-inhibition of bile acid transporter, ABCB11. Thus, we investigated the effect of 17-OHPC or its metabolites on [3H]taurocholic acid transport in sandwich-cultured human fetal and adult hepatocytes. 17-OHPC was taken up rapidly into the cells and transported out partially by an active efflux process that was significantly inhibited by cold temperature, cyclosporine, verapamil, and rifampin. The active efflux mechanism was observed in both adult and fetal hepatocyte cultures. 17-OHPC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of taurocholate efflux into canaliculi in sandwich-cultured adult and fetal human hepatocytes. However, given the high concentrations required to cause inhibition of these transport processes, no adverse effects would be anticipated from therapeutic levels of 17-OHPC. We also evaluated the expression of various hepatic transporters (ABCB1, ABCB4, SLCO1B1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, ABCB11, SLC10A1, ABCC2, ABCC3, ABCC4, and ABCG2) in fetal and adult hepatocytes. With the exception of ABCB4, all transporters examined were expressed, albeit at lower mRNA levels in fetal hepatocytes compared with adults. PMID:23129211

  6. Cyclosporin A drug interactions. Screening for inducers and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 (cyclosporin A oxidase) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Pichard, L; Fabre, I; Fabre, G; Domergue, J; Saint Aubert, B; Mourad, G; Maurel, P

    1990-01-01

    In previous papers we demonstrated that cyclosporin A (CsA) was specifically oxidized in rabbit and human liver by cytochrome P-450IIIA. We therefore anticipated that any drug that is an inducer or an inhibitor of this cytochrome should lead to interaction with CsA when given in association with it. In order to confirm this hypothesis, primary cultures of human hepatocytes and human liver microsomes were used to "reproduce" in vitro clinically significant interactions observed between CsA and drugs known either as specific inducers (i.e., rifampicin) or as specific inhibitors (i.e., erythromycin) of P-450IIIA. Our results were in close agreement with the clinical reports. Human hepatocytes maintained in primary cultures for 72 hr in the presence of 50 microM rifampicin exhibited increased levels of P-450IIIA, determined by Western blot using specific antibodies, and concomitant increase in CsA oxidase activity, determined by HPLC analysis of extra and intracellular media. Conversely, these cultures exhibited erythromycin concentration-dependent decreases in CsA oxidase activity when incubated in the presence of 5, 20, and 100 microM erythromycin. In addition, a Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the erythromycin-mediated inhibition of CsA oxidase activity in human liver microsomes revealed competitive inhibition (with Ki of 75 microM) as expected, this macrolide being a specific substrate of P-450IIIA. Using this experimental approach, 59 molecules representative of 17 different therapeutic classes were screened for inducers and inhibitors of CsA oxidase activity. Our results allowed us to elucidate the molecular mechanism of previously observed, but unexplained, drug interactions involving CsA, and to detect drugs that should interfere with CsA metabolism as inducers or inhibitors. Drugs detected as potential inducers of CsA oxidase included: rifampicin, sulfadimidine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, phenylbutazone, dexamethasone, sulfinpyrazone, and carbamazepine. Drugs

  7. Mangifera indica L. extract and mangiferin modulate cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodeiro, Idania; José Gómez-Lechón, M; Perez, Gabriela; Hernandez, Ivones; Herrera, José Alfredo; Delgado, Rene; Castell, José V; Teresa Donato, M

    2013-05-01

    The aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica L. (MSBE) has been reported to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. In previous studies, we showed that MSBE and mangiferin, its main component, lower the activity of some cytochrome P-450 (P450) enzymes in rat hepatocytes and human liver microsomes. In the present study, the effects of MSBE and mangiferin on several P450 enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in human-cultured hepatocytes have been examined. After hepatocytes underwent a 48-h treatment with sub-cytotoxic concentrations of the products (50-250 µg/mL), a concentration-dependent decrease of the activity of the five P450 enzymes measured (CYP1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4) was observed. For all the activities, a reduction of at least 50% at the highest concentration (250 µg/mL) was observed. In addition, UGT activities diminished. MSBE considerably reduced UGT1A9 activity (about 60% at 250 µg/mL) and lesser effects on the other UGTs. In contrast, 250 µg/mL mangiferin had greater effects on UGT1A1 and 2B7 than on UGT1A9 (about 55% vs. 35% reduction, respectively). Quantification of specific mRNAs revealed reduced CYP3A4 and 3A5 mRNAs content, and an increase in CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 mRNAs. No remarkable effects on the CYP2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 2E1 levels were observed. Our results suggest that the activity and/or expression of major P450 and UGT enzymes is modulated by MSBE and that potential herb-drugs interactions could arise after a combined intake of this extract with conventional medicines. Therefore, the potential safety risks of this natural product derived by altering the ADMET properties of co-administered drugs should be examined.

  8. Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone on rats and human by gel entrapped hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; Zhang, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Troglitazone, despite passing preclinical trials on animals, was shortly withdrawn from market due to its severe hepatotoxicity in clinic. As rat hepatocyte monolayer consistently showed sensitive troglitazone toxicity as human hepatocyte monolayer in contrast to the species-specific toxicity in vivo, this paper utilized both hepatocytes in three-dimensional culture of gel entrapment to reflect the species difference on hepatotoxicity. Rat hepatocytes in gel entrapment did not show obvious cellular damage even under a long-term exposure for 21 days while gel entrapped human hepatocytes significantly displayed oxidative stress, steatosis, mitochondrial damage and cell death at a short exposure for 4 days. As a result, the detected species-specific toxicity of troglitazone between gel entrapped rat and human hepatocytes consisted well with the situation in vivo but was in a sharp contrast to the performance of two hepatocytes by monolayer culture. Such contradictory toxicity of rat hepatocytes between monolayer and gel entrapment culture could be explained by the fact that troglitazone was cleared more rapidly in gel entrapment than in monolayer culture. Similarly, the differential clearance of troglitazone in rat and human might also explain its species-specific toxicity. Therefore, gel entrapment of hepatocytes might serve as a platform for evaluation of drug toxicity at early stage of drug development by reducing costs, increasing the likelihood of clinical success and limiting human exposure to unsafe drugs. -- Highlights: ► Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone reflected by rat/human hepatocytes ► 3D hepatocytes in 21 days’ long-term culture used for drug hepatotoxicity ► Oversensitive toxicity in hepatocyte monolayer by slow troglitazone clearance.

  9. Steatotic rat hepatocytes in primary culture are more susceptible to the acute toxic effect of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Kučera, O; Al-Dury, S; Lotková, H; Roušar, T; Rychtrmoc, D; Červinková, Z

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in humans. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most frequent chronic liver disease in developed countries. The aim of our work was to compare the effect of APAP on intact rat hepatocytes and hepatocytes isolated from steatotic liver in primary cultures. Male Wistar rats were fed with standard diet (10 % energy from fat) and high-fat diet (71 % energy from fat) for 6 weeks and then hepatocytes were isolated. After cell attachment, APAP (1; 2.5; 3.75 and 5 mM) was added to culture media (William's E medium) and hepatocytes were cultured for up to 24 hours. APAP caused more severe dose-dependent damage of steatotic hepatocytes as documented by increased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and LDH leakage, decreased activity of cellular dehydrogenases (WST-1 test) and reduced albumin production. Intact steatotic hepatocytes contained lower amount of reduced glutathione (GSH). Treatment with APAP (1 and 2.5 mmol/l) caused more pronounced decrease in GSH in steatotic hepatocytes. ROS (reactive oxygen species) formation after 24-hour incubation was significantly higher in fatty hepatocytes using APAP at concentration of 3.75 and 5 mmol/l. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) production was elevated in 2.5 mM APAP-treated nonsteatotic and steatotic hepatocyte cultures at 8 hours, compared to appropriate controls. In conclusions, our results indicate that steatotic hepatocytes exert higher sensitivity to the toxic action of APAP. This sensitivity may be caused by lower content of GSH in intact steatotic hepatocytes and by more pronounced APAP-induced decrease in intracellular concentration of GSH.

  10. Enhanced Metabolizing Activity of Human ES Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Using a 3D Culture System with Repeated Exposures to Xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jang, Yu Jin; An, Su Yeon; Son, Jeongsang; Lee, Jaehun; Lee, Gyunggyu; Park, Ji Young; Park, Han-Jin; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Han, Jiyou

    2015-09-01

    Highly homogeneous and functional stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are considered a promising option in the cell-based therapy of liver disease and the development of effective in vitro toxicity screening tools. However, the purity of cells and expression and/or activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in stem cell-derived HLCs are usually too low to be useful for clinical or in vitro applications. Here, we describe a highly optimized hepatic differentiation protocol, which produces >90% (BGO1 and CHA15) albumin-positive HLCs with no purification process from human embryonic stem cell lines. In addition, we show that hepatic enzyme gene expressions and activities were significantly improved by generating 3D spheroidal aggregate of HLCs, compared with 2D HLCs. The 3D differentiation method increased expression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that regulate the proper expression of key hepatic enzymes. Furthermore, significantly increased hepatic functions such as albumin and urea secretion were observed in 3D hepatic spheroids, compared with 2D HLCs. HLCs in the spheroid exhibited morphological and ultrastructural features of normal hepatocytes. Importantly, we show that repeated exposures to xenobiotics facilitated further functional maturation of HLC, as confirmed by increased expression of genes for drug metabolizing enzymes and transcription factors. In conclusion, the 3D culture system with repeated exposures to xenobiotics may be a new strategy for enhancing hepatic metabolizing ability of stem cell-derived HLCs as a cell source for in vitro high-throughput hepatotoxicity models. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Prediction of the metabolic clearance of benzophenone-2, and its interaction with isoeugenol and coumarin using cryopreserved human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Georges; Teng, Sophie; Salle-Siri, Romain; Pery, Alexandre; Rahmani, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Benzophenone-2 (BP2) is widely used as a UV screen in both industrial products and cosmetic formulations, where it is frequently found associated with fragrance compounds, such as isoeugenol and coumarin. BP2 is now recognized as an endocrine disruptor, but to date, no information has been reported on its fate in humans. The intrinsic clearance (Clint) and metabolic interactions of BP2 were explored using cryopreserved human hepatocytes in primary cultures. In vitro kinetic experiments were performed to estimate the Michaelis-Menten parameters. The substrate depletion method demonstrated that isoeugenol was cleared more rapidly than BP2 or coumarin (Clint = 259, 94.7 and 0.40 μl/min/10(6) cells respectively). This vitro model was also used to study the metabolic interactions between BP2 and isoeugenol and coumarin. Coumarin exerted no effects on either isoeugenol or BP2 metabolism, because of its independent metabolic pathway (CYP2A6). Isoeugenol appeared to be a potent competitive substrate inhibitor of BP2 metabolism, equivalent to the specific UGT1A1 substrate: estradiol. Despite the fact that inhibition of UGT by xenobiotics is not usually considered to be a major concern, the involvement of UGT1A1 in BP2 metabolism may have pharmacokinetic and pharmacological consequences, due to the its polymorphisms in humans and its pure estrogenic effect.

  12. Contextualizing Hepatocyte Functionality of Cryopreserved HepaRG Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jonathan P.; Li, Linhou; Chamberlain, Erica D.; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade HepaRG cells have emerged as a promising alternative to primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and have been featured in over 300 research publications. Most of these reports employed freshly differentiated HepaRG cells that require time-consuming culture (∼28 days) for full differentiation. Recently, a cryopreserved, predifferentiated format of HepaRG cells (termed here “cryo-HepaRG”) has emerged as a new model that improves global availability and experimental flexibility; however, it is largely unknown whether HepaRG cells in this format fully retain their hepatic characteristics. Therefore, we systematically investigated the hepatocyte functionality of cryo-HepaRG cultures in context with the range of interindividual variation observed with PHH in both sandwich-culture and suspension formats. These evaluations uncovered a novel adaptation period for the cryo-HepaRG format and demonstrated the impact of extracellular matrix on cryo-HepaRG functionality. Pharmacologically important drug-metabolizing alleles were genotyped in HepaRG cells and poor metabolizer alleles for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A5 were identified and consistent with higher frequency alleles found in individuals of Caucasian decent. We observed liver enzyme inducibility with aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and pregnane X receptor activators comparable to that of sandwich-cultured PHH. Finally, we show for the first time that cryo-HepaRG supports proper CAR cytosolic sequestration and translocation to hepatocyte nuclei in response to phenobarbital treatment. Taken together, these data reveal important considerations for the use of this cell model and demonstrate that cryo-HepaRG are suitable for metabolism and toxicology screening. PMID:27338863

  13. Strong induction of cytochrome P450 1A/3A, but not P450 2B, in cultured hepatocytes from common marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys by typical human P450 inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takako; Inoue, Takashi; Utoh, Masahiro; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-14

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) are used as non-human primate models in preclinical studies for drug development. The assessment of P450 induction in hepatocytes from marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys was performed using typical P450 inducers. Induction of cytochrome P450 1-4 family enzymes was analyzed in two lots of cultured hepatocytes from common marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys after 24-h treatment with typical human P450 inducing agents by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Marmoset P450 3A4 mRNA and P450 2C8/2C19 mRNA in hepatocytes were strongly (>10-fold) and weakly (>2) induced by rifampicin, respectively. Marmoset 1A1 and 1A2 mRNA were induced strongly (>200-fold) by β-naphthoflavone and omeprazole. Marmoset P450 2B6 mRNA was induced (~5-fold) by a constitutive androstane receptor agonist, but not by phenobarbital. Cynomolgus monkey P450 3A4 mRNA and P450 1A1 mRNA in cultured hepatocytes were also induced by rifampicin and omeprazole, respectively, but P450 2B6 mRNA was not induced by phenobarbital. These results indicated that P450 1A/3A induction by typical human P450 inducers in hepatocytes from marmosets and/or cynomolgus monkeys were similar to those of humans, except for P450 2B induction by phenobarbital in humans, suggesting that marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys might be suitable models for evaluating the drug interactions in preclinical studies.

  14. Dipeptide Phe-Cys derived from in silico thermolysin-hydrolysed RuBisCO large subunit suppresses oxidative stress in cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Cho, Young-Sook; Gong, Min; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2015-03-15

    A dipeptide (Phe-Cys) was predicted to be bioactive following bioinformatics analysis of the large subunit of plant and microalgae ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO), which was hydrolysed in silico with thermolysin. The peptide was synthesised and found to possess in vitro reducing potential and inhibitory activity against lipid peroxidation, comparable to the activity of glutathione. In cultured Chang human hepatocytes, 2.5-10 μM Phe-Cys was found to induce the suppression of reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in oxidative stressed cells. Intracellular glutathione levels were found to increase in the peptide-treated cells under normal condition, which can potentially contribute in protecting the cells from oxidative damage. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that the levels of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase-1, increased in the hepatic cells when treated with Phe-Cys in the presence of the oxidant. The results show that this peptide has great potential to be used against oxidative stress-induced health conditions.

  15. Species Differences in Hepatobiliary Disposition of Taurocholic Acid in Human and Rat Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes: Implications for Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kyunghee; Pfeifer, Nathan D.; Köck, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) plays an important role in bile acid excretion. Impaired BSEP function may result in liver injury. Bile acids also undergo basolateral efflux, but the relative contributions of biliary (CLBile) versus basolateral efflux (CLBL) clearance to hepatocellular bile acid excretion have not been determined. In the present study, taurocholic acid (TCA; a model bile acid) disposition was characterized in human and rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) combined with pharmacokinetic modeling. In human SCH, biliary excretion of TCA predominated (CLBile = 0.14 ± 0.04 ml/min per g liver; CLBL = 0.042 ± 0.019 ml/min per g liver), whereas CLBile and CLBL contributed approximately equally to TCA hepatocellular excretion in rat SCH (CLBile = 0.34 ± 0.07 ml/min per g liver; CLBL = 0.26 ± 0.07 ml/min per g liver). Troglitazone decreased TCA uptake, CLBile, and CLBL; membrane vesicle assays revealed for the first time that the major metabolite, troglitazone sulfate, was a noncompetitive inhibitor of multidrug resistance–associated protein 4, a basolateral bile acid efflux transporter. Simulations revealed that decreased CLBile led to a greater increase in hepatic TCA exposure in human than in rat SCH. A decrease in both excretory pathways (CLBile and CLBL) exponentially increased hepatic TCA in both species, suggesting that 1) drugs that inhibit both pathways may have a greater risk for hepatotoxicity, and 2) impaired function of an alternate excretory pathway may predispose patients to hepatotoxicity when drugs that inhibit one pathway are administered. Simulations confirmed the protective role of uptake inhibition, suggesting that a drug’s inhibitory effects on bile acid uptake also should be considered when evaluating hepatotoxic potential. Overall, the current study precisely characterized basolateral efflux of TCA, revealed species differences in hepatocellular TCA efflux pathways, and provided insights about altered hepatic bile acid

  16. Maintenance of human hepatocyte function in vitro by liver-derived extracellular matrix gels.

    PubMed

    Sellaro, Tiffany L; Ranade, Aarati; Faulk, Denver M; McCabe, George P; Dorko, Kenneth; Badylak, Stephen F; Strom, Stephen C

    2010-03-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TE&RM) approaches to treating liver disease have the potential to provide temporary support with biohybrid-liver-assist devices or long-term therapy by replacing the diseased liver with functional constructs. A rate-limiting step for TE&RM strategies has been the loss of hepatocyte-specific functions after hepatocytes are isolated from their highly specialized in vivo microenvironment and placed in in vitro culture systems. The identification of a biologic substrate that can maintain a functional hepatocyte differentiation profile during in vitro culture would advance potential TE&RM therapeutic strategies. The present study compared two different biologic substrates for their ability to support human hepatocyte function in vitro: porcine-liver-derived extracellular matrix (PLECM) or Matrigel. Because Matrigel has been shown to be the most useful matrix for static, traditional hepatocyte culture, we directly compared PLECM with Matrigel in each experiment. Albumin secretion, hepatic transport activity, and ammonia metabolism were used to determine hepatocyte function. Hepatocytes cultured between two layers of PLECM or Matrigel showed equally high levels of albumin expression and secretion, ammonia metabolism, and hepatic transporter expression and function. We conclude that like Matrigel, PLECM represents a favorable substrate for in vitro culture of human hepatocytes.

  17. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  18. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  19. Acute accumulation of free cholesterol induces the degradation of perilipin 2 and Rab18-dependent fusion of ER and lipid droplets in cultured human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Asami; Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Murate, Motohide; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Tomishige, Nario; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Shizuya; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Vidal, Hubert; Lagarde, Michel; Delton, Isabelle; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated hepatic cholesterol homeostasis with free cholesterol accumulation in the liver is relevant to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, contributing to the chronicity of liver toxicity. Here we examined the effect of free cholesterol accumulation on the morphology and biochemical properties of lipid droplets (LDs) in cultured hepatocytes. Acute free cholesterol accumulation induced the fusion of LDs, followed by degradation of the coat protein of LDs, perilipin 2 (PLIN2; also called adipophilin or adipose differentiation–related protein), and association of apolipoprotein B 100 (ApoB 100) to LDs. The degradation of PLIN2 was inhibited by inhibitors of ubiquitination, autophagy, and protein synthesis. The results indicate that association of ApoB 100 with LDs is dependent on the activity of low–molecular weight GTP-binding protein Rab18 and highlight the role of LDs as targets of free cholesterol toxicity in hepatocytes. PMID:27582390

  20. Zearalenone activates pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and corresponding phase I target genes mRNA in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Pascussi, Jean Marc; Maurel, Patrick; Bacha, Hassen; Hassen, Wafa

    2011-01-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is found worldwide as a contaminant in cereals and grains. ZEN subchronic and chronic toxicities are dominated by reproductive disorders in different mammalian species which have made ZEN established mammalian endocrine disrupter. Over the last 30 years of ZEN biotransformation study, the toxin was thought to undergo reductive metabolism only, with the generation in several species of α- and β-isomers of zearalenol. However, recent investigations have noticed that the mycoestrogen is prone to oxidative metabolism leading to hydroxylation of ZEN though the involvement of different cytochromes P450 (CYPs) isoforms. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effect of ZEN on regulation of some CYPs using primary cultures of human hepatocytes. For this aim, using real time RT-PCR, we monitored in a first time, the effect of ZEN on mRNA levels of pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), nuclear receptors known to be involved in the regulation of some CYPs. In a second time, we looked for ZEN effect on expression of PXR, CAR and AhR corresponding phase I target genes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2). Finally, we realised the luciferase assay in HepG2 treated with the toxin and transiently transfected with p-CYP3A4-Luc in the presence of a hPXR vector or transfected with p-CYPA1-Luc.Our results clearly showed that ZEN activated human PXR, CAR and AhR mRNA levels in addition to some of their phase I target genes mainly CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP1A1 and at lesser extent CYP3A5 and CYP2C9 at ZEN concentrations as low as 0.1 μM.

  1. A food contaminant ochratoxin A suppresses pregnane X receptor (PXR)-mediated CYP3A4 induction in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Doricakova, Aneta; Vrzal, Radim

    2015-11-04

    Ochratoxin A (OCHA) is a mycotoxin, which can be found in food such as coffee, wine, cereals, meat, nuts. Since it is absorbed via gastrointestinal tract, it is reasonable to anticipate that the liver will be the first organ to which OCHA comes into the contact before systemic circulation. Many xenobiotics are metabolically modified after the passage of the liver to biologically more active substances, sometimes with more harmful activity. Promoting own metabolism is often achieved via transcriptional regulation of biotransformation enzymes through ligand-activated transcription factors. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) belongs to such a group of regulators and it was demonstrated to be activated by many compounds of synthetic as well as natural origin. Our intention was to investigate if OCHA is capable of activating the PXR with consequent induction of PXR-regulated CYP3A4 gene. We found that OCHA does not activate PXR but displays antagonist-like behavior when combined with rifampicin (RIF) in gene reporter assay in human embryonal kidney cells (Hek293T). It was very weak inducer of CYP3A4 mRNA in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and it antagonized RIF-mediated CYP3A4 induction of mRNA as well as protein. In addition, it caused the decline of PXR protein as well as mRNA which was faster than that with actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor. Since we found that OCHA induced the expression of miR-148a, which was described to regulate PXR expression, we conclude that antagonist-like behavior of OCHA is not due to the antagonism itself but due to the downregulation of PXR gene expression. Herein we provide important findings which bring a piece of puzzle into the understanding of mechanism of toxic action of ochratoxin A.

  2. Evaluation of the endothelin receptor antagonists ambrisentan, darusentan, bosentan, and sitaxsentan as substrates and inhibitors of hepatobiliary transporters in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J Craig; Brouwer, Kenneth; Mandagere, Arun; Melvin, Lawrence; Gorczynski, Richard

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate potential mechanisms of clinical hepatotoxicity, 4 endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) were examined for substrate activity and inhibition of hepatic uptake and efflux transporters in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. The 4 transporters studied were sodium-dependent taurocholate cotransporter (NTCP), organic anion transporter (OATP), bile salt export pump (BSEP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2). ERA transporter inhibition was examined using the substrates taurocholate (for NTCP and BSEP), [(3)H]estradiol-17beta-D-glucuronide (for OATP), and [2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine]enkephalin (for MRP2). ERA substrate activity was evaluated using probe inhibitors ritonavir (OATP and BSEP), bromosulfalein (OATP), erythromycin (P-glycoprotein), probenecid (MRP2 and OATP), and cyclosporin (NTCP). ERAs were tested at 2, 20, and 100 micromol*L-1 for inhibition and at 2 micromol*L-1 as substrates. OATP, NTCP, or BSEP transport activity was not reduced by ambrisentan or darusentan. Bosentan and sitaxsentan attenuated NTCP transport at higher concentrations. Only sitaxsentan decreased OATP transport (52%), and only bosentan reduced BSEP transport (78%). MRP2 transport activity was unaltered. OATP inhibitors decreased influx of all ERAs. Darusentan influx was least affected (84%-100% of control), whereas bosentan was most affected (32%-58% of control). NTCP did not contribute to influx of ERAs. Only bosentan and darusentan were shown as substrates for both BSEP and P-glycoprotein efflux. All ERAs tested were substrates for at least one hepatic transporter. Bosentan and sitaxsentan, but not ambrisentan and darusentan, inhibited human hepatic transporters, which provides a potential mechanism for the increased hepatotoxicity observed for these agents in the clinical setting.

  3. Hepatobiliary Disposition of Troglitazone and Metabolites in Rat and Human Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes: Use of Monte Carlo Simulations to Assess the Impact of Changes in Biliary Excretion on Troglitazone Sulfate Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Marion, Tracy L.; Abe, Koji; Lim, Changwon; Pollock, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the hepatobiliary disposition of troglitazone (TGZ) and metabolites [TGZ sulfate (TS), TGZ glucuronide (TG), and TGZ quinone (TQ)] over time in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). Cells were incubated with TGZ; samples were analyzed for TGZ and metabolites by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. SCH mimicked the disposition of TGZ/metabolites in vivo in rats and humans; TGZ was metabolized primarily to TS and to a lesser extent to TG and TQ. In human SCH, the biliary excretion index (BEI) was negligible for TGZ and TQ, ∼16% for TS, and ∼43% for TG over the incubation period; in rat SCH, the BEI for TS and TG was ∼13 and ∼41%, respectively. Hepatocyte accumulation of TS was extensive, with intracellular concentrations ranging from 132 to 222 μM in rat SCH; intracellular TGZ concentrations ranged from 7.22 to 47.7 μM. In human SCH, intracellular TS and TGZ concentrations ranged from 136 to 160 μM and from 49.4 to 84.7 μM, respectively. Pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the impact of modulating the biliary excretion rate constant (Kbile) for TS on TS accumulation in hepatocytes and medium. Simulations demonstrated that intracellular concentrations of TS may increase up to 3.1- and 5.7-fold when biliary excretion of TS was decreased 2- and 10-fold, respectively. It is important to note that altered hepatobiliary transport and the extent of hepatocyte exposure may not always be evident based on medium concentrations (analogous to systemic exposure in vivo). Pharmacokinetic modeling/simulation with data from SCH is a useful approach to examine the impact of altered hepatobiliary transport on hepatocyte accumulation of drug/metabolites. PMID:19801447

  4. CYP2E1-dependent hepatotoxicity and oxidative damage after ethanol administration in human primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lie-Gang; Yan, Hong; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Wen; Zou, Li-Jun; Song, Fang-Fang; Li, Ke; Sun, Xiu-Fa

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) activity, in order to address if inhibition of CYP2E1 could attenuate ethanol-induced cellular damage. METHODS: The dose-dependent (25-100 mmol/L) and time-dependent (0-24 h) exposures of primary human cultured hepatocytes to ethanol were carried out. CYP2E1 activity and protein expression were detected by spectrophotometer and Western blot analysis respectively. Hepatotoxicity was investigated by determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) level in hepatocyte culture supernatants, as well as the intracellular formation of malondialdehyde (MDA). RESULTS: A dose-and time-dependent response between ethanol exposure and CYP2E1 activity in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Moreover, there was a time-dependent increase of CYP2E1 protein after 100 mmol/L ethanol exposure. Meanwhile, ethanol exposure of hepatocytes caused a time-dependent increase of cellular MDA level, LDH, and AST activities in supernatants. Furthermore, the inhibitor of CYP2E1, diallyl sulfide (DAS) could partly attenuate the increases of MDA, LDH, and AST in human hepatocytes. CONCLUSION: A positive relationship between ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human primary cultured hepatocytes and CYP2E1 activity was exhibited, and the inhibition of CYP2E1 could partly attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative damage. PMID:16052683

  5. Acquisition of susceptibility to hepatitis C virus replication in HepG2 cells by fusion with primary human hepatocytes: establishment of a quantitative assay for hepatitis C virus infectivity in a cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Yasui, K; Mukaigawa, J; Katsume, A; Kohara, M; Mitamura, K

    2001-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in human and chimpanzee hepatocytes. To characterize the nature of HCV and evaluate antiviral agents, the development of an HCV replication system in a cell culture is essential. We developed a cell line derived from human hepatocytes by fusing them with a hepatoblastoma cell line, HepG2, and obtained several clones. When we tested the clones for their ability to support HCV replication by nested RT-PCR, we found 1 clone (IMY-N9) that was more susceptible to HCV replication than HepG2. The negative-strand HCV RNA was detected in IMY-N9 by strand-specific RT-PCR, and viral RNA was identified in culture supernatant during the culture. Then we monitored HCV RNA titers in IMY-N9 and HepG2, respectively, by real-time detection PCR throughout the culture. A significant increase in the HCV RNA titer was observed only in IMY-N9. Serial passages of HCV culture supernatant were shown in the culture system. Furthermore, we tested several infectious materials for viral infectivity by monitoring HCV RNA titers and/or 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) of HCV on IMY-N9. In each material, HCV showed various growth patterns and a different TCID50 even though the PCR titer in each material was identical. The results showed that HCV in each material served various growth patterns and different TCID50 even though PCR titer in each material was identical. This cell line is useful for estimating viral activity and for studying cellular factors that may be necessary to HCV replication in human hepatocytes.

  6. Hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Olsavsky Goyak, Katy M; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, research suggests that for certain systems, animal models are insufficient for human toxicology testing. The development of robust, in vitro models of human toxicity is required to decrease our dependence on potentially misleading in vivo animal studies. A critical development in human toxicology testing is the use of human primary hepatocytes to model processes that occur in the intact liver. However, in order to serve as an appropriate model, primary hepatocytes must be maintained in such a way that they persist in their differentiated state. While many hepatocyte culture methods exist, the two-dimensional collagen "sandwich" system combined with a serum-free medium, supplemented with physiological glucocorticoid concentrations, appears to robustly maintain hepatocyte character. Studies in rat and human hepatocytes have shown that when cultured under these conditions, hepatocytes maintain many markers of differentiation including morphology, expression of plasma proteins, hepatic nuclear factors, phase I and II metabolic enzymes. Functionally, these culture conditions also preserve hepatic stress response pathways, such as the SAPK and MAPK pathways, as well as prototypical xenobiotic induction responses. This chapter will briefly review culture methodologies but will primarily focus on hallmark hepatocyte structural, expression and functional markers that characterize the differentiation status of the hepatocyte.

  7. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Moll, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Nies, Cordula; Zantl, Roman; Wagner, Helga; Burkhardt, Britta; Sánchez, Juan J. Martínez; Ladurner, Ruth; Thasler, Wolfgang; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device. PMID:27600213

  8. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathway of Bosentan and of the Cytotoxicity of Bosentan Metabolites Based on a Quantitative Modeling of Metabolism and Transport in Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Norikazu; Kaneko, Naomi; Staub, Angelina Yukiko; Nakanishi, Takeo; Nunoya, Ken-ichi; Imawaka, Haruo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2016-01-01

    To quantitatively understand the events in the human liver, we modeled a hepatic disposition of bosentan and its three known metabolites (Ro 48-5033, Ro 47-8634, and Ro 64-1056) in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes based on the known metabolic pathway. In addition, the hepatotoxicity of Ro 47-8634 and Ro 64-1056 was investigated because bosentan is well known as a hepatotoxic drug. A model illustrating the hepatic disposition of bosentan and its three metabolites suggested the presence of a novel metabolic pathway(s) from the three metabolites. By performing in vitro metabolism studies on human liver microsomes, a novel metabolite (M4) was identified in Ro 47-8634 metabolism, and its structure was determined. Moreover, by incorporating the metabolic pathway of Ro 47-8634 to M4 into the model, the hepatic disposition of bosentan and its three metabolites was successfully estimated. In hepatocyte toxicity studies, the cell viability of human hepatocytes decreased after exposure to Ro 47-8634, and the observed hepatotoxicity was diminished by pretreatment with tienilic acid (CYP2C9-specific inactivator). Pretreatment with 1-aminobenzotriazole (broad cytochrome P450 inactivator) also tended to maintain the cell viability. Furthermore, Ro 64-1056 showed hepatotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that Ro 64-1056 is directly involved in bosentan-induced liver injury partly because CYP2C9 specifically mediates hydroxylation of the t-butyl group of Ro 47-8634. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of a quantitative modeling of hepatic disposition of drugs and metabolites in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes. In addition, the newly identified metabolic pathway may be an alternative route that can avoid Ro 64-1056-induced liver injury.

  9. Differential effects of cytokines on the inducible expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Muntané-Relat, J; Ourlin, J C; Domergue, J; Maurel, P

    1995-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of cytokines, including interleukin-6 (Il-6), interleukin-1 alpha (Il-1 alpha), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), on the inducible expression of cytochrome P450s (CYP) CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes in primary culture. The ability of these cultures to mimic the acute phase response when stimulated with cytokines was evaluated using immunoblotting to measure the production of albumin, ferritin, fibrinogen, and ceruloplasmin. The cytokines exhibited specific patterns of action on the production of these proteins. Albumin was depressed by all the cytokines. In contrast to Il-6 and Il-1 alpha, TNF-alpha reduced the production of fibrinogen and ceruloplasmin but stimulated the production of ferritin. When cells were treated with the CYP inducer alone, large increases in the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 by beta-naphthoflavone and of CYP3A4 by rifampicin were observed at messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels, by ribonuclease protection and immunoblotting, respectively. When the cells were treated with the inducer plus cytokines, the induction of mRNA was greatly reduced. Again, specific patterns of action were revealed: Il-6 had the most potent effect on CYP3A4, whereas TNF-alpha was the most potent with CYP1A genes. In all cases, changes at the protein levels paralleled changes at the mRNA levels. In cells preinduced with beta-naphthoflavone or rifampicin, the decay with time of the levels of the CYP1A2 or CYP3A4 proteins, after the removal of the inducer, was not affected by cytokines. We conclude that cytokines strongly repress the inducibility of CYP1As and CYP3A4 genes at a transcriptional or a posttranscriptional level, but affect neither the rate of translation of CYP mRNAs nor the rate of degradation of the CYP proteins in these cultures.

  10. Acetaminophen metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity in rat primary hepatocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Milam, K.M.; Byard, J.L.

    1985-06-30

    Acetaminophen (APAP) metabolism, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity were measured in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Although 3 mM APAP caused a slight increase in cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, cellular glutathione concentration (an index of APAP metabolism) was reduced by 50%. APAP at 7 mM was significantly more toxic to these hepatocytes and had a similar but more marked effect on glutathione concentrations. In spite of its cytotoxicity, neither dose of APAP stimulated DNA repair synthesis when monitored by the rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA following exposure to APAP. Thus, although APAP has been shown to be both hepato- and nephrotoxic in several in vivo and in vitro systems, the reactive toxic metabolite of APAP is not genotoxic in rat primary hepatocyte cultures.

  11. Loofa sponge as a scaffold for culture of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Lin, Tsung-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The dried fruit from Luffa cylindrica (loofa sponge, LS), which represents a new chitinous source material, was used as a 3-D scaffold for the culture of rat hepatocytes. With the macroporous structure and large pore size (ca. 800 microm) of LS, cell loading to the scaffold should be carried out by dynamic seeding with continuous shaking throughout the seeding period. Hepatocytes attach well to the surface of loofa fibers after seeding and maintain their round shapes. The initial ammonia removal and urea-N synthesis rates of hepatocytes immobilized within LS slightly decreased with increasing cell densities, but their metabolic activities were comparable to or better than those in monolayer culture on tissue culture polystyrene control surfaces. Both urea-N synthesis and albumin secretion rates could be maintained up to 7 days for cells immobilized within LS and spheroid-like cell aggregates could be found after the second day.

  12. Epigenetic Modifications as Antidedifferentiation Strategy for Primary Hepatocytes in Culture.

    PubMed

    Bolleyn, Jennifer; Fraczek, Joanna; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    A well-known problem of cultured primary hepatocytes is their rapid dedifferentiation. During the last years, several strategies to counteract this phenomenon have been developed, of which changing the in vitro environment is the most popular one. However, mimicking the in vivo setting in vitro by adding soluble media additives or the restoration of both cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is not sufficient and only delays the dedifferentiation process instead of counteracting it. In this chapter, new strategies to prevent the deterioration of the liver-specific phenotype of primary hepatocytes in culture by targeting the (epi)genetic mechanisms that drive hepatocellular gene expression are described.

  13. Evaluation and optimization of hepatocyte culture media factors by design of experiments (DoE) methodology.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jia; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik; Lübberstedt, Marc; Urbaniak, Thomas; Nüssler, Andreas K N; Knobeloch, Daniel; Gerlach, Jörg C; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2008-07-01

    Optimization of cell culture media based on statistical experimental design methodology is a widely used approach for improving cultivation conditions. We applied this methodology to refine the composition of an established culture medium for growth of a human hepatoma cell line, C3A. A selection of growth factors and nutrient supplements were systematically screened according to standard design of experiments (DoE) procedures. The results of the screening indicated that the medium additives hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and fibroblast growth factor 4 significantly influenced the metabolic activities of the C3A cell line. Surface response methodology revealed that the optimum levels for these factors were 30 ng/ml for hepatocyte growth factor and 35 ng/ml for oncostatin M. Additional experiments on primary human hepatocyte cultures showed high variance in metabolic activities between cells from different individuals, making determination of optimal levels of factors more difficult. Still, it was possible to conclude that hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and oncostatin M had decisive effects on the metabolic functions of primary human hepatocytes.

  14. Engineering of human hepatocyte lines for cell therapies in humans: prospects and remaining hurdles.

    PubMed

    Kobayashit, Naoya; Tanaka, Noriaki

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocyte-based biological therapies are increasingly envisioned for temporary support in acute liver failure and provision of specific-liver functions in liver-based metabolic deficiency. One of the hurdles to develop such therapies is severe shortage of human livers for hepatocyte isolation. To address the issue, we have focused on reversible immortalization of human hepatocytes. Such technology can allow rapid preparation of functional and uniform human hepatocytes. Here we present our strategy to construct transplantable human hepatocyte cell lines.

  15. Engineering of Human Hepatocyte Lines for Cell Therapies in Humans: Prospects and Remaining Hurdles.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Tanaka, Noriaki

    2002-07-01

    Hepatocyte-based biological therapies are increasingly envisioned for temporary support in acute liver failure and provision of specific-liver functions in liver-based metabolic deficiency. One of the hurdles to develop such therapies is severe shortage of human livers for hepatocyte isolation. To address the issue, we have focused on reversible immortalization of human hepatocytes. Such technology can allow rapid preparation of functional and uniform human hepatocytes. Here we present our strategy to construct transplantable human hepatocyte cell lines.

  16. Ethanol-induced phosphorylation of cytokeratin in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiromu; Cadrin, M.; French, S.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of ethanol on the phosphorylation of cytokeratins (CKs) in cultured hepatocytes since CK filaments are resulted by phosphorylation and they are abnormal in alcoholic liver disease. Hepatocytes were obtained from 14-day-old rats and cultured for 48 hrs. The hepatocytes were exposed to ethanol for 30 min. The residual insoluble cytoskeletons were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. 2D gel electrophoresis showed CK 55 and CK 49 or 8 and 18 and actin. The CKs had several isoelectric variants. The most basic spot was the dominant protein which was not phosphorylated. The more acidic spots were phosphorylated. After ethanol treatment, the phosphorylation of CK 55 and CK 49 were markedly increased over controls. They compared these results, with the effect of vasopressin, TPA and db-cAMP on the phosphorylation of CKs. Vasopressin and TPA caused the phosphorylation of CK 55 and 49 but db-cAMP did not.

  17. Hepatitis B virus infection and replication in a new cell culture system established by fusing HepG2 cells with primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sai, Lin-Tao; Yao, Yong-Yuan; Guan, Yan-Yan; Shao, Li-Hua; Ma, Rui-Ping; Ma, Li-Xian

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is strictly species and tissue specific, therefore none of the cell models established previously can reproduce the natural infection process of HBV in vitro. The aim of this study was to establish a new cell line that is susceptible to HBV and can support the replication of HBV. A hybrid cell line was established by fusing primary human hepatocytes with HepG2 cells. The hybrid cells were incubated with HBV-positive serum for 12 hours. HBV DNA was detected by quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR). HBsAg (surface antigen) and HBeAg (extracellular form of core antigen) were observed by electrochemiluminescence (ECL). HBcAg (core antigen) was detected by the indirect immunofluorescence technique. HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) was analyzed by Southern blot hybridization and quantified using real-time PCR. A new cell line was established and named HepCHLine-7. The extracellular HBV DNA was observed from Day 2 and the levels ranged from 9.80 (± 0.32) × 10(2) copies/mL to 3.12 (± 0.03) × 10(4) copies/mL. Intracellular HBV DNA was detected at Day 2 after infection and the levels ranged from 7.92 (± 1.08) × 10(3) copies/mL to 5.63 (± 0.11) × 10(5) copies/mL. HBsAg in the culture medium was detected from Day 4 to Day 20. HBeAg secretion was positive from Day 5 to Day 20. HBcAg constantly showed positive signals in approximately 20% (± 0.82%) of hybrid cells. Intracellular HBV cccDNA could be detected as early as 2 days postinfection and the highest level was 15.76 (± 0.26) copies/cell. HepCHLine-7 cells were susceptible to HBV and supported the replication of HBV. They are therefore suitable for studying the complete life cycle of HBV. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  19. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  20. [Action of a herbicide (paraquat) on hepatocytes in histiotypic culture].

    PubMed

    Verne, J; Fournier, E; Hebert, S; Richshoffer, N

    1975-01-01

    The toxicant action on hepatocytes of "paraquat" introduced at very low concentrations in an in vitro culture of such cells is here established. Mitoses are slowed down and moreover, the lysosomial system is impaired, thus inducing a decrease in its enzymic reactions and the proliferation of very large vesicles.

  1. Early membrane depressions in hepatocytes cultured on Primaria supports.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, B J; Evans, P J

    2001-01-01

    The topography of spreading hepatocytes on positively charged Primaria plates was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The cells acquired a uniform morphology within 2 h. The spreading was rapid and the surface of the cells showed early prominent depressions or dips. The hepatocytes had either one or two of these structures which corresponded to the frequency of mononuclear and binuclear cells, respectively. The nuclear origin of the dips was strengthened after 6 h. They contained solid structures, whose number, size and shape were the same as nucleoli. The membrane dipping was independent of cell density and took place under conditions where phenotypic changes can occur. Kidney proximal tubule cells had no dips. Co-cultures of hepatocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells showed that the cell types behave differently.

  2. Human hepatocyte functions in a crossed hollow fiber membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    De Bartolo, Loredana; Salerno, Simona; Curcio, Efrem; Piscioneri, Antonella; Rende, Maria; Morelli, Sabrina; Tasselli, Franco; Bader, Augustinus; Drioli, Enrico

    2009-05-01

    An important challenge in liver tissue engineering is the development of bioartificial systems that are able to favour the liver reconstruction and to modulate liver cell behaviour. A crossed hollow fiber membrane bioreactor was developed to support the long-term maintenance and differentiation of human hepatocytes. The bioreactor consists of two types of hollow fiber (HF) membranes with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) and physico-chemical properties cross-assembled in alternating manner: modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) and polyethersulfone (PES), used for the medium inflow and outflow, respectively. The combination of these two fiber set produces an extracapillary network for the adhesion of cells and a high mass exchange through the cross-flow of culture medium. The transport of liver specific products such as albumin and urea together with the transport of drug such as diazepam was modelled and compared with the experimental metabolic data. The theoretical metabolite concentration differed 7.5% for albumin and 5% for urea with respect to experimental data. The optimised perfusion conditions of the bioreactor allowed the maintenance of liver functions in terms of urea synthesis, albumin secretion and diazepam biotransformation up to 18 days of culture. In particular the good performance of the bioreactor was confirmed by the high rate of urea synthesis (28.7 microg/h 10(6) cells) and diazepam biotransformation. In the bioreactor human hepatocytes expressed at high levels the individual cytochrome P450 isoenzymes involved in the diazepam metabolism. The results demonstrated that crossed HF membrane bioreactor is able to support the maintenance of primary human hepatocytes preserving their liver specific functions for all investigated period. This device may be a potential tool in the liver tissue engineering for drug metabolism/toxicity testing and study of disease pathogenesis alternatively to animal experimentation.

  3. Toxicogenomics directory of chemically exposed human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Marianna; Stöber, Regina M; Edlund, Karolina; Rempel, Eugen; Godoy, Patricio; Reif, Raymond; Widera, Agata; Madjar, Katrin; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Marchan, Rosemarie; Sachinidis, Agapios; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Hescheler, Jürgen; Carmo, Helena; Arbo, Marcelo D; van de Water, Bob; Wink, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Escher, Sylvia; Hardy, Barry; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Waldmann, Tanja; Mardinoglu, Adil; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas S; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfons; Schaap, Mirjam M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Stierum, Rob H; Leist, Marcel; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of numerous research projects is to identify biomarkers for in vitro systems predicting toxicity in vivo. Often, transcriptomics data are used to identify candidates for further evaluation. However, a systematic directory summarizing key features of chemically influenced genes in human hepatocytes is not yet available. To bridge this gap, we used the Open TG-GATES database with Affymetrix files of cultivated human hepatocytes incubated with chemicals, further sets of gene array data with hepatocytes from human donors generated in this study, and publicly available genome-wide datasets of human liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). After a curation procedure, expression data of 143 chemicals were included into a comprehensive biostatistical analysis. The results are summarized in the publicly available toxicotranscriptomics directory ( http://wiki.toxbank.net/toxicogenomics-map/ ) which provides information for all genes whether they are up- or downregulated by chemicals and, if yes, by which compounds. The directory also informs about the following key features of chemically influenced genes: (1) Stereotypical stress response. When chemicals induce strong expression alterations, this usually includes a complex but highly reproducible pattern named 'stereotypical response.' On the other hand, more specific expression responses exist that are induced only by individual compounds or small numbers of compounds. The directory differentiates if the gene is part of the stereotypical stress response or if it represents a more specific reaction. (2) Liver disease-associated genes. Approximately 20 % of the genes influenced by chemicals are up- or downregulated, also in liver disease. Liver disease genes deregulated in cirrhosis, HCC, and NASH that overlap with genes of the aforementioned stereotypical chemical stress response include CYP3A7, normally expressed in fetal liver; the

  4. Serum-Derived Hepatitis C Virus Infection of Primary Human Hepatocytes Is Tetraspanin CD81 Dependent▿

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Sonia; Castet, Valerie; Pichard-Garcia, Lydiane; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Meurs, Eliane; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Sureau, Camille; Fabre, Jean-Michel; SaCunha, Antonio; Larrey, Dominique; Dubuisson, Jean; Coste, Joliette; McKeating, Jane; Maurel, Patrick; Fournier-Wirth, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus-positive serum (HCVser, genotypes 1a to 3a) or HCV cell culture (JFH1/HCVcc) infection of primary normal human hepatocytes was assessed by measuring intracellular HCV RNA strands. Anti-CD81 antibodies and siRNA-CD81 silencing markedly inhibited (>90%) HCVser infection irrespective of HCV genotype, viral load, or liver donor, while hCD81-large intracellular loop (LEL) had no effect. However, JFH1/HCVcc infection of hepatocytes was modestly inhibited (40 to 60%) by both hCD81-LEL and anti-CD81 antibodies. In conclusion, CD81 is involved in HCVser infection of human hepatocytes, and comparative studies of HCVser versus JFH1/HCVcc infection of human hepatocytes and Huh-7.5 cells revealed that the cell-virion combination is determinant of the entry process. PMID:17942559

  5. Investigation of functional and morphological integrity of freshly isolated and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, A; Bode, D C; Pruss, J; Bilir, B; Smith, G D; Zeisloft, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a pressing need for alternative therapeutic methods effective in the treatment of patients with liver insufficiency. Isolated human hepatocytes may be a viable alternative or adjunct to orthotopic liver transplantation in such patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the viability and functional integrity of freshly isolated and cryopreserved human hepatocytes, in preparation for a multi-center human hepatocyte transplantation trial. We are currently processing transplant-grade human parenchymal liver cells from nondiseased human livers that are obtained through a network of organ procurement organizations (OPOs). Thus far, sixteen hepatocyte transplants have been performed using hepatocytes processed by our methods. At the time of referral all specimens were deemed unsuitable for transplantation due to anatomical anomalies, high fat content, medical history, etc. Hepatocytes were isolated from encapsulated liver sections by a modified two-step perfusion technique. Isolated cells were cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen for one to twelve months. The total yield of freshly isolated hepatocytes averaged 3.7x10(7) cells per gram of wet tissue. Based on trypan blue exclusion, fresh preparations contained an average of 85% viable hepatocytes vs. 70% in cryopreserved samples. The plating efficiencies of cells seeded immediately after isolation ranged from 87% to 98%, while those of cryopreserved/thawed cells were markedly lower. Flow cytometry analysis of cells labeled with 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) showed that there was no significant difference in viability compared with trypan blue staining. Both freshly isolated hepatocytes and those recovered from cryopreservation showed typical and intact morphology as demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. The product of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reaction was always expressed more intensely in cultures of freshly

  6. Application of multivariate analysis to optimize function of cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christina; Hwang, Daehee; Stephanopoulos, Gregory N; Yarmush, Martin L; Stephanopoulos, George

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the metabolic and regulatory pathways of hepatocytes is important for biotechnological applications involving liver cells, including the development of bioartificial liver (BAL) devices. To characterize intermediary metabolism in the hepatocytes, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was applied to elucidate the changes in intracellular pathway fluxes of primary rat hepatocytes exposed to human plasma and to provide a comprehensive snapshot of the hepatic metabolic profile. In the current study, the combination of preconditioning and plasma supplementation produced distinct metabolic states. Combining the metabolic flux distribution obtained by MFA with methodologies such as Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA) and partial least squares or projection to latent structures (PLS) provided insights into the underlying structure and causal relationship within the data. With the aid of these analyses, patterns in the cellular response of the hepatocytes that contributed to the separation of the different hepatic states were identified. Of particular interest was the recognition of distal pathways that strongly correlated with a particular hepatic function. The hepatic functions investigated were intracellular triglyceride accumulation and urea production. This study illustrates a framework for optimizing hepatic function and a possibility of identifying potential targets for improving hepatic functions.

  7. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD[P]H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) by a phenolic antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and its metabolite, tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) in primary-cultured human and rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Keum, Young-Sam; Han, Yong-Hae; Liew, Celine; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Xu, Changjiang; Yuan, Xiaoling; Shakarjian, Michael P; Chong, Saeho; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2006-11-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of a phenolic antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and its metabolite, tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) on the induction of HO-1, NQO1 and Nrf2 proteins and their regulatory mechanisms in primary-cultured hepatocytes. After exposure of BHA and tBHQ to primary-cultured rat and human hepatocytes and mouse neonatal fibroblasts (MFs), Western blot, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and microarray analysis were conducted. Induction of HO-1, NQO1 and Nrf2 proteins and activation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 were observed after BHA and tBHQ treatments in primary-cultured rat and human hepatocytes. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR study and microarray analysis revealed that HO-1 and NQO1 were transcriptionally activated in primary-cultured rat hepatocytes and a substantial transcriptional activation, including HO-1 occurred in primary-cultured human hepatocytes after BHA treatment. Whereas BHA failed to induce HO-1 in wild-type and Nrf2 knock-out MFs, tBHQ strongly induced HO-1 in wild-type, but not in Nrf2 knock-out MFs. Our data demonstrate that both BHA and tBHQ are strong chemical inducers of HO-1, NQO1 and Nrf2 proteins in primary-cultured human and rat hepatocytes with the activation of MAPK ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. However, in MFs, BHA failed to induce HO-1, whereas tBHQ strongly induced HO-1 in Nrf2 wild-type but not in Nrf2 knock-out, suggesting that Nrf2 is indispensable for tBHQ-induced HO-1 in MF.

  8. Morphological behaviour and metabolic capacity of cryopreserved human primary hepatocytes cultivated in a perfused multiwell device.

    PubMed

    Vivares, Aurelie; Salle-Lefort, Sandrine; Arabeyre-Fabre, Catherine; Ngo, Robert; Penarier, Geraldine; Bremond, Michele; Moliner, Patricia; Gallas, Jean-François; Fabre, Gerard; Klieber, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    1. The quantitative prediction of the pharmacokinetic parameters of a drug from data obtained using human in vitro systems remains a significant challenge i.e. prediction of metabolic clearance in humans and estimation of the relative contribution of enzymes involved in the clearance. This has become particularly problematic for low turnover compounds. 2. Having human hepatocytes with stable cellular function over several days that adequately mimic the complexity of the physiological environment would be a major advance. Thus, we evaluated human hepatocytes, maintained in culture during 7 days in the microfluidic LiverChip™ system, in terms of morphological appearance, relative mRNA expression of phase I and II enzymes and transporters as a function of time, and metabolic capacity using probe substrates. 3. The results showed that mRNA levels of the major genes for enzymes involved in drug metabolism were well-maintained over a 7-day period of culture. Furthermore, after 4 days of culture, in the Liverchip™ device, human hepatocytes exhibited higher or similar CYPs activities compared to 1 day of culture in 2D-static conditions. 4. The functional data were supported by light/electron microscopies and immunohistochemistry showing viable tissue structure and well-differentiated human hepatocytes: presence of cell junctions, glycogen storage, and bile canaliculi.

  9. Direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts to functional and expandable hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengyu; Zhang, Ludi; Gao, Yimeng; He, Zhiying; Yao, Dan; Wu, Zhitao; Cen, Jin; Chen, Xiaotao; Liu, Changcheng; Hu, Yiping; Lai, Dongmei; Hu, Zhenlei; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Xin; Ma, Xiaojun; Pan, Guoyu; Wang, Xin; Hui, Lijian

    2014-03-06

    The generation of large numbers of functional human hepatocytes for cell-based approaches to liver disease is an important and unmet goal. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts to hepatic lineages could offer a solution to this problem but so far has only been achieved with mouse cells. Here, we generated human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) from fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of FOXA3, HNF1A, and HNF4A. hiHeps express hepatic gene programs, can be expanded in vitro, and display functions characteristic of mature hepatocytes, including cytochrome P450 enzyme activity and biliary drug clearance. Upon transplantation into mice with concanavalin-A-induced acute liver failure and fatal metabolic liver disease due to fumarylacetoacetate dehydrolase (Fah) deficiency, hiHeps restore the liver function and prolong survival. Collectively, our results demonstrate successful lineage conversion of nonhepatic human cells into mature hepatocytes with potential for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  10. Functional polymer-dependent 3D culture accelerates the differentiation of HepaRG cells into mature hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Chesné, Christophe; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The hepatoma-derived cell line HepaRG is regarded as an in vitro model of drug metabolism because fully differentiated HepaRG cells demonstrate functional metabolic responses comparable to those of primary human hepatocytes. Recently, it was demonstrated that the 3D culture of HepaRG cells enhanced their metabolic functions and toxicological responses. We approached the mechanisms underlying these enhancement effects. We compared 2D-cultured HepaRG cells with 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids in the gene expression patterns and the metabolic functions. In the present study, we performed 3D culture of HepaRG cells using functional polymers (FP). To reveal the in vivo differentiation ability, we transplanted the 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids into TK-NOG mice. A comparison between 2D and 3D cultures revealed that 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids demonstrated reductions in bile duct marker expression, accelerated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4, and increases in the ratio of albumin-expressing hepatocytes. Furthermore, catalytic activities of cytochrome P450 3A4 were modified by omeprazole and rifampicin in the 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids. Transplantation analysis revealed that 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids formed hepatocyte-like colonies rather than cholangiocytes in vivo. Our results indicated that the enhancement of hepatic functions in 3D-cultured HepaRG cells was induced by selective hepatocyte differentiation and accelerated hepatocyte maturation. HepaRG spheroids reproduced the metabolic responses of human hepatocytes. Therefore, FP-dependent 3D-cultured HepaRG cells may serve as an excellent in vitro model for evaluating the hepatic metabolism and toxicity. © 2016 The Authors. Hepatology Research published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine induced oxidative injury on primary cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ji, LiLi; Liu, TianYu; Wang, ZhengTao

    2010-04-01

    Clivorine is an otonecine-type hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloid (HPAs), to which humans are exposed when consuming herbs containing such components. In the present study, we investigated clivorine-induced oxidative stress injury on primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes were treated with various concentrations of clivorine (1-100 microM) for 48 hours, and then cell viability was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while lipid peroxidation (LPO) level, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined to evaluate the oxidative injury. The results of MTT assay showed that clivorine decreased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Clivorine also increased LPO amounts in rat hepatocytes at the concentrations of 50 microM and 100 microM. Further results showed that clivorine decreased GPx, GST and GR activities, which are all reduced glutathione (GSH)-related antioxidant enzymes. CAT and SOD are both important antioxidant enzymes, and the results showed that clivorine increased CAT activity at the low concentration of 5 muM and decreased cellular SOD activity at all concentrations. Taken together, our results demonstrated that clivorine induced toxicity on primary cultured rat hepatocytes by causing the damage on cellular redox balance.

  12. Micropatterned coculture of primary human hepatocytes and supportive cells for the study of hepatotropic pathogens.

    PubMed

    March, Sandra; Ramanan, Vyas; Trehan, Kartik; Ng, Shengyong; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Scull, Margaret A; Shlomai, Amir; Mota, Maria M; Fleming, Heather E; Khetani, Salman R; Rice, Charles M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-12-01

    The development of therapies and vaccines for human hepatropic pathogens requires robust model systems that enable the study of host-pathogen interactions. However, in vitro liver models of infection typically use either hepatoma cell lines that exhibit aberrant physiology or primary human hepatocytes in culture conditions in which they rapidly lose their hepatic phenotype. To achieve stable and robust in vitro primary human hepatocyte models, we developed micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs), which consist of primary human hepatocytes organized into 2D islands that are surrounded by supportive fibroblast cells. By using this system, which can be established over a period of days, and maintained over multiple weeks, we demonstrate how to recapitulate in vitro hepatic life cycles for the hepatitis B and C viruses and the Plasmodium pathogens P. falciparum and P. vivax. The MPCC platform can be used to uncover aspects of host-pathogen interactions, and it has the potential to be used for drug and vaccine development.

  13. Helicobacter hepaticus Induces an Inflammatory Response in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus can lead to chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in certain strains of mice. Until now the pathogenic role of Helicobacter species on human liver tissue is still not clarified though Helicobacter species identification in human liver cancer was successful in case controlled studies. Therefore we established an in vitro model to investigate the interaction of primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with Helicobacter hepaticus. Successful co-culturing of PHH with Helicobacter hepaticus was confirmed by visualization of motile bacteria by two-photon-microscopy. Isolated human monocytes were stimulated with PHH conditioned media. Changes in mRNA expression of acute phase cytokines and proteins in PHH and stimulated monocytes were determined by Real-time PCR. Furthermore, cytokines and proteins were analyzed in PHH culture supernatants by ELISA. Co-cultivation with Helicobacter hepaticus induced mRNA expression of Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in PHH (p<0.05) resulting in a corresponding increase of IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations in PHH supernatants (p<0.05). IL-8 and IL-1β mRNA expression was induced in monocytes stimulated with Helicobacter hepaticus infected PHH conditioned media (p<0.05). An increase of Cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression was observed, with a concomitant increase of prostaglandin E2 concentration in PHH supernatants at 24 and 48 h (p<0.05). In contrast, at day 7 of co-culture, no persistent elevation of cytokine mRNA could be detected. High expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on PHH cell membranes after co-culture was shown by two-photon-microscopy and confirmed by flow-cytomety. Finally, expression of Cytochrome P450 3A4 and albumin mRNA were downregulated, indicating an impairment of hepatocyte synthesis function by Helicobacter hepaticus presence. This is the first in vitro model demonstrating a pathogenic effect of a

  14. Helicobacter hepaticus induces an inflammatory response in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W R; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus can lead to chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in certain strains of mice. Until now the pathogenic role of Helicobacter species on human liver tissue is still not clarified though Helicobacter species identification in human liver cancer was successful in case controlled studies. Therefore we established an in vitro model to investigate the interaction of primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with Helicobacter hepaticus. Successful co-culturing of PHH with Helicobacter hepaticus was confirmed by visualization of motile bacteria by two-photon-microscopy. Isolated human monocytes were stimulated with PHH conditioned media. Changes in mRNA expression of acute phase cytokines and proteins in PHH and stimulated monocytes were determined by Real-time PCR. Furthermore, cytokines and proteins were analyzed in PHH culture supernatants by ELISA. Co-cultivation with Helicobacter hepaticus induced mRNA expression of Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in PHH (p<0.05) resulting in a corresponding increase of IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations in PHH supernatants (p<0.05). IL-8 and IL-1β mRNA expression was induced in monocytes stimulated with Helicobacter hepaticus infected PHH conditioned media (p<0.05). An increase of Cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression was observed, with a concomitant increase of prostaglandin E2 concentration in PHH supernatants at 24 and 48 h (p<0.05). In contrast, at day 7 of co-culture, no persistent elevation of cytokine mRNA could be detected. High expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on PHH cell membranes after co-culture was shown by two-photon-microscopy and confirmed by flow-cytometry. Finally, expression of Cytochrome P450 3A4 and albumin mRNA were downregulated, indicating an impairment of hepatocyte synthesis function by Helicobacter hepaticus presence. This is the first in vitro model demonstrating a pathogenic effect of a

  15. Hepatocytic parental progenitor cells of rat small hepatocytes maintain self-renewal capability after long-term culture

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    The liver has a variety of functions for maintaining homeostasis, and hepatocytes play a major role. In contrast with the high regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes (MHs) in vivo, they have not been successfully expanded ex vivo. Here we demonstrate that CD44-positive cells sorted from small hepatocyte (SH) colonies derived from a healthy adult rat liver can proliferate on a Matrigel-coated dish in serum-free chemically defined medium; in addition, a subpopulation of the cells can divide more than 50 times in a period of 17 weeks every 4-week-passage. The passage cells retained the capability to recover highly differentiated functions, such as glycogen storage, CYP activity and bile secretion. When Matrigel-treated cells from the third passage were transplanted into retrorsine/partial hepatectomy-treated rat livers, the cells engrafted to differentiate into MHs and cholangiocytes. These results suggest that long-term cultured CD44+ SHs retain hepatocytic characteristics in vitro and the capability to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in vivo. Thus, a newly identified subpopulation of MHs possessing the attributes of hepatocytic stem/progenitor cells can be passaged several times without losing hepatocytic characteristics. PMID:28397810

  16. Environmental carcinogens in human target tissues in culture. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, I.C.

    1986-02-19

    Cells from different organ or animal species have shown diverse activities in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. Based on the mutation assays, human hepatocytes were more effective than animal hepatocytes in detoxification of aromatic nitrogen compounds. The adduct formation was also different in human and rodent hepatocytes exposed to aminofluorene (AF) or acetylaminofluorene (AAF). Both AF and AAF adduct DNA were observed in rat liver cells exposed to AF or AAF. However, very little acetylation or deacetyl of the DNA adducts occurred in the human hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes treated with AF in primary culture produced mainly AF adducted DNA while AAF treated cells formed AAF adduct DNA. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Imaging of primary human hepatocytes performed with micron-sized iron oxide particles and clinical magnetic resonance tomography.

    PubMed

    Raschzok, Nathanael; Morgul, Mehmet H; Pinkernelle, Jens; Vondran, Florian W R; Billecke, Nils; Kammer, Nora N; Pless, Gesine; Adonopoulou, Michaela K; Leist, Christian; Stelter, Lars; Teichgraber, Ulf; Schwartlander, Ruth; Sauer, Igor M

    2008-08-01

    Transplantation of primary human hepatocytes is a promising approach in certain liver diseases. For the visualization of the hepatocytes during and following cell application and the ability of a timely response to potential complications, a non-invasive modality for imaging the transplanted cells has to be established. The aim of this study was to label primary human hepatocytes with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs), enabling the detection of cells by clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Primary human hepatocytes isolated from 13 different donors were used for the labelling experiments. Following the dose-finding studies, hepatocytes were incubated with 30 particles/cell for 4 hrs in an adhesion culture. Particle incorporation was investigated via light, fluorescence and electron microscopy, and labelled cells were fixed and analysed in an agarose suspension by a 3.0 Tesla MR scanner. The hepatocytes were enzymatically resuspended and analysed during a 5-day reculture period for viability, total protein, enzyme leakage (aspartate aminotransferase [AST], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]) and metabolic activity (urea, albumin). A mean uptake of 18 particles/cell could be observed, and the primary human hepatocytes were clearly detectable by MR instrumentation. The particle load was not affected by resuspension and showed no alternations during the culture period. Compared to control groups, labelling and resuspension had no adverse effects on the viability, enzyme leakage and metabolic activity of the human hepatocytes. The feasibility of preparing MPIO-labelled primary human hepatocytes detectable by clinical MR equipment was shown in vitro. MPIO-labelled cells could serve for basic research and quality control in the clinical setting of human hepatocyte transplantation.

  18. Gas-permeable membranes and co-culture with fibroblasts enable high-density hepatocyte culture as multilayered liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Evenou, Fanny; Hamon, Morgan; Fujii, Teruo; Takeuchi, Shoji; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2011-07-01

    To engineer reliable in vitro liver tissue equivalents expressing differentiated hepatic functions at a high level and over a long period of time, it appears necessary to have liver cells organized into a three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structure closely resembling in vivo liver cytoarchitecture and promoting both homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell contacts. In addition, such high density 3D hepatocyte cultures should be adequately supplied with nutrients and particularly with oxygen since it is one of the most limiting nutrients in hepatocyte cultures. Here we propose a novel but simple hepatocyte culture system in a microplate-based format, enabling high density hepatocyte culture as a stable 3D-multilayer. Multilayered co-cultures of hepatocytes and 3T3 fibroblasts were engineered on collagen-conjugated thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes which were assembled on bottomless frames to enable oxygen diffusion through the membrane. To achieve high density multilayered co-cultures, primary rat hepatocytes were seeded in large excess what was rendered possible due to the removal of oxygen shortage generally encountered in microplate-based hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocyte/3T3 fibroblasts multilayered co-cultures were maintained for at least 1 week; the so-cultured cells were normoxic and sustained differentiated metabolic functions like albumin and urea synthesis at higher levels than hepatocytes monocultures. Such a microplate-based cell culture system appears suitable for engineering in vitro miniature liver tissues for implantation, bioartificial liver (BAL) development, or chemical/drug screening.

  19. Hepatic Stellate Cells Improve Engraftment of Human Primary Hepatocytes: A Preclinical Transplantation Study in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Najimi, Mustapha; van Hul, Noémi; Legry, Vanessa; Khuu, Dung Ngoc; van Grunsven, Leo A; Sokal, Etienne; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    Human hepatocytes are used for liver cell therapy, but the small number of engrafting cells limits the benefit of cell transplantation. We tested whether cotransplantation of hepatocytes with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) could improve hepatocyte engraftment in vivo. Human primary hepatocytes were transplanted into SCID mice either alone or in a mixture with HSCs (quiescent or after culture activation) or LX-2 cells (ratio 20:1). Four weeks after transplantation into mouse livers, human albumin-positive (huAlb(+)) hepatocytes were found scattered. When cotransplanted in a mixture with HSCs or LX-2 cells, huAlb(+) hepatocytes formed clusters and were more numerous occupying 2- to 5.9-fold more surface on the tissue section than in livers transplanted with hepatocytes alone. Increased huAlb mRNA expression in livers transplanted with the cell mixtures confirmed those results. The presence of HSCs increased the number of hepatocytes entrapped in the host liver at an early time point posttransplantation but not their proliferation in situ as assessed by cumulative incorporation of BrdU. Importantly, 4 weeks posttransplantation, we found no accumulation of αSMA(+)-activated HSCs or collagen deposition. To follow the fate of transplanted HSCs, HSCs derived from GFP(+) mice were injected into GFP(-) littermates: 17 h posttransplant, GFP(+) HSCs were found in the sinusoids, without proliferating or actively producing ECM; they were undetectable at later time points. Coculture with HSCs improved the number of adherent hepatocytes, with best attachment obtained when hepatocytes were seeded in contact with activated HSCs. In vivo, cotransplantation of hepatocytes with HSCs into a healthy liver recipient does not generate fibrosis, but significantly improves the engraftment of hepatocytes, probably by ameliorating cell homing.

  20. The comparative effects of diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex with established proteasome inhibitors on expression levels of CYP1A2/3A4 and their master regulators, aryl hydrocarbon and pregnane X receptor in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2016-12-01

    In the recent years, a therapeutic potential of disulfiram (Antabuse) complex with copper, as an anticancer drug, was recognized towards several cancer cell lines. The proteasome was suggested as one of the cellular targets for this compound. As the therapeutic use of diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex (CuET) is expected to increase, it is of great interest to know whether this compound may be the source of drug-drug interactions via the induction of biotransformation enzymes, especially cytochromes P450 (CYPs). To this purpose, we examined the effect of CuET and compared it with typical inducers (rifampicin and dioxin) of CYPs and with well-established proteasome inhibitors (MG132 and bortezomib). Diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex revealed inconsistent and rather modulatory effect on the expression of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in several cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, it was able to cause neither ubiquitin accumulation nor significant and dose-dependent inhibition of proteasome activity. It had no effect on essential transcription factors involved in regulation of selected CYPs, aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) nor pregnane X receptor (PXR). However, the AhR protein was increased in majority of examined hepatocyte cultures. The main finding of this study is that: (i) disulfiram-copper complex is not the cause of drug-drug interactions via CYP1A2/3A4 induction; (ii) proteasome inhibitors may have different impact on studied parameters in given in vitro system. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  1. Human foreskin fibroblast-like stromal cells can differentiate into functional hepatocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsing-I; Chen, Shao-Kuan; Wang, Robert Y-L; Shen, Chia-Rui; Cheng, Yu-Che

    2013-12-01

    Foreskin fibroblast-like stromal cells (FDSCs) are progenitors isolated from human tissue that can differentiate into diverse cell types. Many types of stem cells can differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, which could be used for drug testing or in liver regeneration therapy, but whether FDSCs can be converted into functional hepatocytes is unknown. FDSCs show divergent properties when cultured in distinct media, forming spheres in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) containing F12, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF), but have fibroblast-like morphology when cultured in DMEM-based growth medium. Both cell populations express the typical mesenchymal stem cell markers CD90, CD105, and CD73, but the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) was detected only in FDSC spheres. Both types of FDSCs can differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, which express typical liver markers, including albumin and hepatocyte paraffin 1 (Hep Par1), along with liver-specific biological activities. When plasmids containing the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome were transfected transiently into FDSCs, differentiated hepatocyte-like cells secrete large amounts of HBe and HBs antigens. FDSCs could be used for clinical hepatic therapy and/or serve as a model of HBV.

  2. Benzylpenicillin, acetylcysteine and silibinin as antidotes in human hepatocytes intoxicated with alpha-amanitin.

    PubMed

    Magdalan, Jan; Ostrowska, Alina; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Gomułkiewicz, Agnieszka; Podhorska-Okołów, Marzena; Patrzałek, Dariusz; Szelag, Adam; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2010-07-01

    Fatalities due to mushroom poisonings are increasing worldwide, with high mortality rate resulting from ingestion of amanitin-producing species. Intoxications caused by amanitin-containing mushrooms represent an unresolved problem in clinical toxicology since no specific and fully efficient antidote is available. The objective of this study was a comparative evaluation of benzylpenicillin (BPCN), acetylcysteine (ACC) and silibinin (SIL) as an antidotes in human hepatocytes intoxicated with alpha-amanitin (alpha-AMA). All experiments were performed on cultured human hepatocytes. Cytotoxicity evaluation of cultured cells using MTT assay and measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was performed at 12, 24 and 48h of exposure to alpha-AMA and/or antidotes. The significant decline of cell viability and significant increase of LDH activity were observed in all experimental hepatocyte cultures after 12, 24 and 36h exposure to alpha-AMA at concentration 2microM. Exposure of the cells to alpha-AMA resulted also in significant reduction of cell spreading and attachment. However, addition of tested antidotes to experimental cultures significantly stimulated cell proliferation and attachment. In cell cultures exposed simultaneously to alpha-AMA and tested antidotes cytotoxic parameters (MTT and LDH) were not significantly different from control incidences. The cytoprotective effect of all antidotes was not dose-related, which reflects a high efficacy of all these substances. Administration of studied antidotes was not associated with any adverse effects in hepatocytes. The administration of ACC, BPCN or SIL to human hepatocyte cultures showed a similar strong protective effect against cell damage in alpha-AMA toxicity.

  3. Evaluation of multiple mechanism-based toxicity endpoints in primary cultured human hepatocytes for the identification of drugs with clinical hepatotoxicity: Results from 152 marketed drugs with known liver injury profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Doshi, Utkarsh; Suzuki, Ayako; Chang, Ching-Wei; Borlak, Jürgen; Li, Albert P; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    We report here the results of a collaborative research program to develop a robust and reliable in vitro system to allow an accurate definition of the drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potential of new drug entities during drug development. The in vitro hepatotoxic potential of 152 drugs with known DILI profiles were evaluated in primary cultured human hepatocytes with four mechanistically-relevant endpoints: cellular ATP depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) depletion, and caspase activation for apoptosis. The drugs, 80 in the testing set and 72 in the validation set, were classified based on serious clinical/regulatory outcomes as defined by reported acute liver failure, black-box warning, and/or withdrawal. The drugs were further sub-categorized for dominant types of liver injury. Logistic regression models were performed to calculate the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) and to evaluate the prediction potential of the selected endpoints for serious clinical/regulatory outcomes. The ROS/ATP ratio was found to yield an excellent AUROC in both the testing (0.8989, P < 0.0001) and validation set (0.8545, P < 0.0001), and was found to distinguish drugs associated with severe from non-severe DILI cases (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that evaluation of drugs in primary human hepatocytes using the ROS/ATP ratio endpoint may aid the definition of their potential to cause severe DILI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro culture of isolated primary hepatocytes and stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-08-01

    Various liver diseases result in terminal hepatic failure, and liver transplantation, cell transplantation and artificial liver support systems are emerging as effective therapies for severe hepatic disease. However, all of these treatments are limited by organ or cell resources, so developing a sufficient number of functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration is a priority. Liver regeneration is a complex process regulated by growth factors (GFs), cytokines, transcription factors (TFs), hormones, oxidative stress products, metabolic networks, and microRNA. It is well-known that the function of isolated primary hepatocytes is hard to maintain; when cultured in vitro, these cells readily undergo dedifferentiation, causing them to lose hepatocyte function. For this reason, most studies focus on inducing stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. In this review, we mainly focus on the nature of the liver regeneration process and discuss how to maintain and enhance in vitro hepatic function of isolated primary hepatocytes or stem cell-derived HLCs for liver regeneration. In this way, hepatocytes or HLCs may be applied for clinical use for the treatment of terminal liver diseases and may prolong the survival time of patients in the near future.

  5. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A improves hepatic differentiation of immortalized adult human hepatocytes and improves liver function and survival.

    PubMed

    Hang, Hua-Lian; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hai-Tian; Xu, Ning; Bian, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Xia, Lei; Xia, Qiang

    2017-09-06

    Immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) could provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, but insufficient differentiation and phenotypic instability restrict their clinical application. This study aimed to determine the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A) in hepatic differentiation of IHH, and whether encapsulation of IHH overexpressing HNF4A could improve liver function and survival in rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Primary human hepatocytes were transduced with lentivirus-mediated catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to establish IHH. Cells were analyzed for telomerase activity, proliferative capacity, hepatocyte markers, and tumorigenicity (c-myc) expression. Hepatocyte markers, hepatocellular functions, and morphology were studied in the HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. Hepatocyte markers and karyotype analysis were completed in the primary hepatocytes using shRNA knockdown of HNF4A. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin was assessed. Rat models of ALF were treated with encapsulated IHH or HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. A HNF4A-positive IHH line was established, which was non-tumorigenic and conserved properties of primary hepatocytes. HNF4A overexpression significantly enhanced mRNA levels of genes related to hepatic differentiation in IHH. Urea levels were increased by the overexpression of HNF4A, as measured 24h after ammonium chloride addition, similar to that of primary hepatocytes. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in primary hepatocytes transfected with HNF4A shRNA. HNF4α overexpression could significantly promote β-catenin activation. Transplantation of HNF4A overexpressing IHH resulted in better liver function and survival of rats with ALF compared with IHH. HNF4A improved hepatic differentiation of IHH. Transplantation of HNF4A-overexpressing IHH could improve the liver function and survival in a rat model of ALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of rat and hamster hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Barfknect, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated marked differences in the capacity of hepatocytes from rats or hamsters to mediate the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to genotoxic (i.e., mutagenic) products. Thus far, very few investigations of species differences in DNA repair have been performed. Therefore, a comparison of the relative extent of DNA repair elicited by various genotoxic chemicals in rat and hamster hepatocyes was conducted, using the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay. Of the ll chemicals tested, eight were more potent in inducing DNA repair in hamster hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. Dimethylnitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 9-aminoacridine, pararosaniline hydrochloride, 1-naphthylamine, benzidine and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane were all active in hamster hepatocytes at a concentration at least ten times less than the lowest effective concentration in rat hepatocytes. The direct-acting alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, was equipotent inducing DNA repair in both rat and hamster hepatocytes, indicating that the differences in DNA repair observed for the other chemicals were probably not a result of species differences in DNA repair capacities. In contrast, 1-nitropyrene produced a greater DNA repair response in rat hepatocyes than hamster hepatocytes, while the bacterial mutagen 3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride was inactive in both hepatocyte systems. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using hamster hepatocytes in the HPC/DR assay and illustrate the utility of performing the assay with hepatocytes from more than one species.

  7. High Content Analysis of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocytes Reveals Drug Induced Steatosis and Phospholipidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pradip, Arvind; Steel, Daniella; Jacobsson, Susanna; Holmgren, Gustav; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Sartipy, Peter; Björquist, Petter; Johansson, Inger; Edsbagge, Josefina

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is one of the most cited reasons for withdrawal of approved drugs from the market. The use of nonclinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing systems contributes to the high attrition rates. Recent advances in differentiating human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into pure cultures of hepatocyte-like cells expressing functional drug metabolizing enzymes open up possibilities for novel, more relevant human cell based toxicity models. The present study aimed to investigate the use of hiPSC derived hepatocytes for conducting mechanistic toxicity testing by image based high content analysis (HCA). The hiPSC derived hepatocytes were exposed to drugs known to cause hepatotoxicity through steatosis and phospholipidosis, measuring several endpoints representing different mechanisms involved in drug induced hepatotoxicity. The hiPSC derived hepatocytes were benchmarked to the HepG2 cell line and generated robust HCA data with low imprecision between plates and batches. The different parameters measured were detected at subcytotoxic concentrations and the order of which the compounds were categorized (as severe, moderate, mild, or nontoxic) based on the degree of injury at isomolar concentration corresponded to previously published data. Taken together, the present study shows how hiPSC derived hepatocytes can be used as a platform for screening drug induced hepatotoxicity by HCA. PMID:26880940

  8. Efficient programming of human mesenchymal stem cell-derived hepatocytes by epigenetic regulations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Lun; Yeh, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Yun; Ting, Chin-Tsung; Chiu, Yen-Hui; Tao, Mi-Hua; Li, Wan-Chun; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    In view of its unique properties of detoxification and involvement of metabolic and biochemical functions, in vitro hepatocyte culture serves as a valuable material for drug screening and mechanistic analysis for pathology of liver diseases. The restriction of rapid de-differentiation and inaccessibility of human hepatocytes from routine clinical procedure, however, limits its use. To address this issue, the effort to direct human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into hepatocytes using a modified protocol was proposed. With the additional treatment of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi), in vitro hMSC-derived hepatocytes were cultivated and their hepatic characteristics were examined. By using a modified protocol, it was shown that Trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycitidine protected differentiating cells from death and could sufficiently trigger a wide range of liver-specific markers as well as liver functions including albumin production, glycogen storage, and urea cycle in hMSC-derived hepatocytes. The increased mRNA expression for hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry including CD81, Occludin, LDL receptor, and scavenger receptor class B type I in hMSC-derived hepatocytes was also detected, implying its potential to be utilized as an in vitro model to analyze dynamic HCV infection. The present study successfully established a protocol to direct hMSCs into hepatocyte-like cells suggesting the beneficial impact to apply HDACi and DNMTi as potent modulators for hMSCs to liver differentiation. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Gel entrapment culture of rat hepatocytes for investigation of tetracycline-induced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Chong; Meng Qin Schmelzer, Eva; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-07-15

    This paper aimed to explore three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes for testing drug-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Gel entrapped rat hepatocytes were applied for investigation of the tetracycline-induced steatohepatitis, while hepatocyte monolayer was set as a control. The toxic responses of hepatocytes were systematically evaluated by measuring cell viability, liver-specific function, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, adenosine triphosphate content and mitochondrial membrane potential. The results suggested that gel entrapped hepatocytes showed cell death after 96 h of tetracycline treatment at 25 {mu}M which is equivalent to toxic serum concentration in rats, while hepatocyte monolayer showed cell death at a high dose of 200 {mu}M. The concentration-dependent accumulation of lipid as well as mitochondrial damage were regarded as two early events for tetracycline hepatotoxicity in gel entrapment culture due to their detectability ahead of subsequent increase of oxidative stress and a final cell death. Furthermore, the potent protection of fenofibrate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate were evidenced in only gel entrapment culture with higher expressions on the genes related to {beta}-oxidation than hepatocyte monolayer, suggesting the mediation of lipid metabolism and mitochondrial damage in tetracycline toxicity. Overall, gel entrapped hepatocytes in three-dimension reflected more of the tetracycline toxicity in vivo than hepatocyte monolayer and thus was suggested as a more relevant system for evaluating steatogenic drugs.

  10. Arsenite decreases CYP3A23 induction in cultured rat hepatocytes by transcriptional and translational mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Noreault, Trisha L.; Nichols, Ralph C.; Trask, Heidi W.; Wrighton, Steven A.; Sinclair, Peter R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Sinclair, Jacqueline F. . E-mail: JSINC@dartmouth.edu

    2005-12-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring, worldwide contaminant implicated in numerous pathological conditions in humans, including cancer and several forms of liver disease. One of the contributing factors to these disorders may be the alteration of cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels by arsenic. In rat and human hepatocyte cultures, arsenic, in the form of arsenite, decreases the induction of several CYPs. The present study investigated whether arsenite utilizes transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms to decrease CYP3A23 in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. In these cultures, a 6-h treatment with 5 {mu}M arsenite abolished dexamethasone (DEX)-mediated induction of CYP3A23 protein and activity, but did not inhibit general protein synthesis. However, arsenite treatment only reduced DEX-induced levels of CYP3A23 mRNA by 30%. The effects of arsenite on CYP3A23 transcription were examined using a luciferase reporter construct containing 1.4 kb of the CYP3A23 promoter. Arsenite caused a 30% decrease in DEX-induced luciferase expression of this reporter. Since arsenite abolished induction of CYP3A23 protein, but caused only a small decrease in CYP3A23 mRNA, the effects of arsenite on translation of CYP3A23 mRNA were investigated. Polysomal distribution analysis showed that arsenite decreased translation by decreasing the DEX-mediated increase in CYP3A23 mRNA association with polyribosomes. Arsenite did not decrease intracellular glutathione or increase lipid peroxidation, suggesting that the effect of arsenite on CYP3A23 does not involve oxidative stress. Overall, the results suggest that low-level arsenite decreases both transcription and translation of CYP3A23 in primary rat hepatocyte cultures.

  11. Assembly of Hepatocyte Spheroids Using Magnetic 3D Cell Culture for CYP450 Inhibition/Induction

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pujan K.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2017-01-01

    There is a significant need for in vitro methods to study drug-induced liver injury that are rapid, reproducible, and scalable for existing high-throughput systems. However, traditional monolayer and suspension cultures of hepatocytes are difficult to handle and risk the loss of phenotype. Generally, three-dimensional (3D) cell culture platforms help recapitulate native liver tissue phenotype, but suffer from technical limitations for high-throughput screening, including scalability, speed, and handling. Here, we developed a novel assay for cytochrome P450 (CYP450) induction/inhibition using magnetic 3D cell culture that overcomes the limitations of other platforms by aggregating magnetized cells with magnetic forces. With this platform, spheroids can be rapidly assembled and easily handled, while replicating native liver function. We assembled spheroids of primary human hepatocytes in a 384-well format and maintained this culture over five days, including a 72 h induction period with known CYP450 inducers/inhibitors. CYP450 activity and viability in the spheroids were assessed and compared in parallel with monolayers. CYP450 activity was induced/inhibited in spheroids as expected, separate from any toxic response. Spheroids showed a significantly higher baseline level of CYP450 activity and induction over monolayers. Positive staining in spheroids for albumin and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2) indicates the preservation of hepatocyte function within spheroids. The study presents a proof-of-concept for the use of magnetic 3D cell culture for the assembly and handling of novel hepatic tissue models. PMID:28524079

  12. High concentrations of stavudine impair fatty acid oxidation without depleting mitochondrial DNA in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Igoudjil, Anissa; Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Descatoire, Véronique; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The antiretroviral nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine (d4T) can induce mild to severe liver injuries such as steatosis (i.e. triglyceride accumulation), steatohepatitis and liver failure. NRTI-induced toxicity has been ascribed to the inhibition of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication causing mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain dysfunction. This can secondarily impair the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid oxidation (FAO), thus leading to lactic acidosis and hepatic steatosis. However, NRTIs could also impair mitochondrial function and induce hepatic steatosis through other mechanisms. In this study, we sought to determine whether d4T could inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation through a mtDNA-independent mechanism. Since human tumoral and non-tumoral hepatic cell lines were unable to efficiently oxidize palmitic acid, the effects of d4T on mitochondrial FAO were assessed on cultured rat hepatocytes. Our results showed that 750 microM of d4T significantly inhibited palmitic acid oxidation after 48 or 72 h of culture, without inducing cell death. Importantly, high concentrations of zidovudine and zalcitabine (two other NRTIs that can induce hepatic steatosis), or beta-aminoisobutyric acid (a d4T metabolite), did not impair FAO in rat hepatocytes. D4T-induced FAO inhibition was observed without mtDNA depletion and lactate production, and was fully prevented with l-carnitine or clofibrate coincubation. l-carnitine also prevented the accretion of neutral lipids within rat hepatocytes. High concentrations of d4T were unable to inhibit FAO on freshly isolated liver mitochondria. Moreover, a microarray analysis was performed to clarify the mechanism whereby d4T can inhibit mitochondrial FAO and induce triglyceride accumulation in rat hepatocytes. The microarray data, confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, showed that d4T increased the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c

  13. Dynamic Interplay of Flow and Collagen Stabilizes Primary Hepatocytes Culture in a Microfluidic Platform

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Manjunath; Jindal, Rohit; Bhushan, Abhinav; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; McCarty, William J; Golberg, Inna; Usta, O. Berk; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    The creation of stable flow cultures of hepatocytes is highly desirable for the development of platforms for drug toxicity screening, bio-artificial liver support devices, and models for investigating liver physiology and pathophysiology. Given that hepatocytes cultured using the collagen overlay or ‘sandwich’ configuration maintain a wide range of differentiated functions, we describe a simple method for adapting this culture configuration within a microfluidic device. The device design consists of a porous membrane sandwiched between two layers of PDMS resulting in a two-chambered device. In the bottom chamber, hepatocytes are cultured in the collagen sandwich configuration, while the top chamber is accessible for flow. We demonstrate that hepatocytes cultured under flow exhibit higher albumin and urea secretion, and induce cytochrome P450 1A1 activity in comparison to static cultures. Furthermore, over two weeks, hepatocytes cultured under flow show a well-connected cellular network with bile canaliculi formation, whereas static cultures result in the formation of gaps in the cellular network that progressively increase over time. Although enhanced functional response of hepatocytes cultured under flow has been observed in multiple prior studies, the exact mechanism for this flow induced effect remains unknown. In our work, we identified that hepatocytes secrete higher level of collagen in the flow cultures; inhibiting collagen secretion within the flow cultures reduced albumin secretion and restored the appearance of gaps in the cellular network similar to the static cultures. These results demonstrate the importance of the increased collagen secretion by hepatocytes cultured under flow as a mechanism to maintain well-connected cellular network and differentiated function. PMID:24770663

  14. Dynamic interplay of flow and collagen stabilizes primary hepatocytes culture in a microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Manjunath; Jindal, Rohit; Bhushan, Abhinav; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; McCarty, William J; Golberg, Inna; Usta, O Berk; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-06-21

    The creation of stable flow cultures of hepatocytes is highly desirable for the development of platforms for drug toxicity screening, bio-artificial liver support devices, and models for investigating liver physiology and pathophysiology. Given that hepatocytes cultured using the collagen overlay or in 'sandwich' configuration maintain a wide range of differentiated functions, we describe a simple method for adapting this culture configuration within a microfluidic device. The device design consists of a porous membrane sandwiched between two layers of PDMS resulting in a two-chambered device. In the bottom chamber, hepatocytes are cultured in the collagen sandwich configuration, while the top chamber is accessible for flow. We demonstrate that hepatocytes cultured under flow exhibit higher albumin and urea secretions and induce cytochrome P450 1A1 activity in comparison to static cultures. Furthermore, over two weeks, hepatocytes cultured under flow show a well-connected cellular network with bile canaliculi formation, whereas static cultures show formation of gaps in the cellular network that progressively increase over time. Although enhanced functional response of hepatocytes cultured under flow has been observed in multiple prior studies, the exact mechanism for this flow induced effect remains unknown. In our work, we identified that hepatocytes secrete a higher level of collagen in the flow cultures; inhibiting collagen secretion within the flow cultures reduced albumin secretion and restored the appearance of gaps in the cellular network similar to the static cultures. These results demonstrate the importance of the increased collagen secretion by hepatocytes cultured under flow as a mechanism to maintain a well-connected cellular network and a differentiated function.

  15. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine's metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 cells showed that caffeine is not an activator of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a major transcription factor involved in upregulation of CYP1A2. Furthermore, caffeine did not induce CYP1A2 expression in primary human hepatocytes at a concentration attained by ordinary coffee drinking. On the other hand, caffeine enhanced CYP1A2 expression by 9-fold in rat hepatocytes. Our results suggest that caffeine from ordinary coffee drinking does not induce CYP1A2 expression in humans and that factors other than CYP1A2 induction by caffeine likely contribute to development of caffeine tolerance in humans.

  16. Applicability of second-generation upcyte® human hepatocytes for use in CYP inhibition and induction studies

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sarada D; Vivarès, Aurélie; Klieber, Sylvie; Hewitt, Nicola J; Muenst, Bernhard; Heinz, Stefan; Walles, Heike; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Human upcyte® hepatocytes are proliferating hepatocytes that retain many characteristics of primary human hepatocytes. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the application of second-generation upcyte® hepatocytes from four donors for inhibition and induction assays using a selection of reference inhibitors and inducers. CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 were reproducibly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner and the calculated IC50 values for each compound correctly classified them as potent inhibitors. Upcyte® hepatocytes were responsive to prototypical CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 inducers, confirming that they have functional AhR-, CAR-, and PXR-mediated CYP regulation. A panel of 11 inducers classified as potent, moderate or noninducers of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 were tested. There was a good fit of data from upcyte® hepatocytes to three different predictive models for CYP3A4 induction, namely the Relative Induction Score (RIS), AUCu/F2, and Cmax,u/Ind50. In addition, PXR (rifampicin) and CAR-selective (carbamazepine and phenytoin) inducers of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction, respectively, were demonstrated. In conclusion, these data support the use of second-generation upcyte® hepatocytes for CYP inhibition and induction assays. Under the culture conditions used, these cells expressed CYP activities that were equivalent to or higher than those measured in primary human hepatocyte cultures, which could be inhibited or induced by prototypical CYP inhibitors and inducers, respectively. Moreover, they can be used to predict in vivo CYP3A4 induction potential using three prediction models. Bulk availability of cells from multiple donors makes upcyte® hepatocytes suitable for DDI screening, as well as more in-depth mechanistic investigations. PMID:26516577

  17. Circadian Rhythms of PER2::LUC in Individual Primary Mouse Hepatocytes and Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Penny C.; Yu, Jimmy K.; Li, Alexander S.; Leise, Tanya L.; Harrington, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, express core clock genes, such as Period2 and Cryptochrome2, which are involved in the transcriptional/translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. Whether or not the liver is capable of sustaining rhythms independent of a central pacemaker is controversial. Whether and how circadian information may be shared among cells in the liver in order to sustain oscillations is currently unknown. Results In this study we isolated primary hepatocytes from transgenic Per2Luc mice and used bioluminescence as a read-out of the state of the circadian clock. Hepatocytes cultured in a collagen gel sandwich configuration exhibited persistent circadian rhythms for several weeks. The amplitude of the rhythms damped, but medium changes consistently reset the phase and amplitude of the cultures. Cry2−/− Per2Luc cells oscillated robustly and expressed a longer period. Co-culturing with wildtype cells did not significantly shorten the period, indicating that coupling among hepatocytes is insufficient to synchronize cells with significantly differing periods. However, spatial patterns revealed by cellular imaging of wildtype cultures provided evidence of weak local coupling among the hepatocytes. Conclusions Our results with primary hepatocyte cultures demonstrate that cultured hepatocytes are weakly coupled. While this coupling is not sufficient to sustain global synchrony, it does increase local synchrony, which may stabilize the circadian rhythms of peripheral oscillators, such as the liver, against noise in the entraining signals. PMID:24498336

  18. Characterization of aldehyde oxidase enzyme activity in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Yang, Young-Sun; Albaugh, Daniel; Fullenwider, Cody L; Schmenk, Jennifer; Fisher, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Substrates of aldehyde oxidase (AO), for which human clinical pharmacokinetics are reported, were selected and evaluated in pooled mixed-gender cryopreserved human hepatocytes in an effort to quantitatively characterize AO activity. Estimated hepatic clearance (Cl(h)) for BIBX1382, carbazeran, O⁶-benzylguanine, zaleplon, and XK-469 using cryopreserved hepatocytes was 18, 17, 12, <4.3, and <4.3 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹, respectively. The observed metabolic clearance in cryopreserved hepatocytes was confirmed to be a result of AO-mediated metabolism via two approaches. Metabolite identification after incubations in the presence of H₂¹⁸O confirmed that the predominant oxidative metabolite was generated by AO, as expected isotope patterns in mass spectra were observed after analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Second, clearance values were efficiently attenuated upon coincubation with hydralazine, an inhibitor of AO. The low exposure after oral doses of BIBX1382 and carbazeran (∼5% F) would have been fairly well predicted using simple hepatic extraction (f(h)) values derived from cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, the estimated hepatic clearance value for O⁶-benzylguanine was within ∼80% of the observed total clearance in humans after intravenous administration (15 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹), indicating a reasonable level of quantitative activity from this in vitro system. However, a 3.5-fold underprediction of total clearance was observed for zaleplon, despite the 5-oxo metabolite being clearly observed. These data taken together suggest that the use of cryopreserved hepatocytes may be a practical approach for assessing AO-mediated metabolism in discovery and potentially useful for predicting hepatic clearance of AO substrates.

  19. Primary human hepatocytes on biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) matrices: a promising model for improving transplantation efficiency with tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Török, Eva; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Bierwolf, Jeanette; Melbeck, Stefan; Düllmann, Jochen; Nashan, Bjoern; Ma, Peter X; Pollok, Joerg M

    2011-02-01

    Liver transplantation is an established treatment for acute and chronic liver disease. However, because of the shortage of donor organs, it does not fulfill the needs of all patients. Hepatocyte transplantation is promising as an alternative method for the treatment of end-stage liver disease and as bridging therapy until liver transplantation. Our group has been working on the optimization of matrix-based hepatocyte transplantation. In order to increase cell survival after transplantation, freshly isolated human hepatocytes were seeded onto biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) polymer scaffolds and were cultured in a flow bioreactor. PLLA discs were seeded with human hepatocytes and exposed to a recirculated medium flow for 6 days. Human hepatocytes formed spheroidal aggregates with a liver-like morphology and active metabolic function. Phase contrast microscopy showed increasing numbers of spheroids of increasing diameter during the culture period. Hematoxylin and eosin histology showed viable and intact hepatocytes inside the spheroids. Immunohistochemistry confirmed sustained hepatocyte function and a preserved hepatocyte-specific cytoskeleton. Albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and urea assays showed continued production during the culture period. Northern blot analysis demonstrated increasing albumin signals. Scanning electron micrographs showed hepatocyte spheroids with relatively smooth undulating surfaces and numerous microvilli. Transmission electron micrographs revealed intact hepatocytes and junctional complexes with coated pits and vesicles inside the spheroids. Therefore, we conclude that primary human hepatocytes, precultured in a flow bioreactor on a PLLA scaffold, reorganize to form morphologically intact liver neotissue, and this might offer an optimized method for hepatocyte transplantation because of the expected reduction of the initial cell loss, the high regenerative potential in vivo, and the preformed functional integrity. Copyright © 2011

  20. A new three-dimensional culture system for hepatocytes using reticulated polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Ochiya, T; Yasuda, Y; Matsubara, K

    1994-04-01

    Poly-N-para-vinylbenzyl-lactonamide (PVLA)-coated reticulated polyurethane (PVLA-RPU) has been employed for the long-term maintenance of primary rat hepatocyte cultures. After 3 days of incubation of 2 x 10(7) hepatocytes/cm3 embedded in PVLA-RPU discs and kept in culture medium, most cells showed typical hepatocyte morphology, with some bile canaliculus-like intercellular spaces among the hepatocytes on examination with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The cells were attached to the surface of the PVLA-RPU and formed multicellular spheroids in the reticulated pores. The hepatocytes maintained various liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion, ammonium metabolism, urea synthesis and gluconeogenesis, and they were viable. The liver-specific functions could be maintained for more than 1 month when the cells were kept in the rats' peritoneal cavities. This new system may be useful as a bioreactor for an artificial liver.

  1. Optimizing human hepatocyte models for metabolic phenotype and function: effects of treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Green, Charlotte J; Gunn, Pippa J; Hodson, Leanne; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2016-11-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are considered to be the "gold standard" cellular model for studying hepatic fatty acid and glucose metabolism; however, they come with limitations. Although the HepG2 cell line retains many of the primary hepatocyte metabolic functions they have a malignant origin and low rates of triglyceride secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dimethyl sulfoxide supplementation in the media of HepG2 cells would enhance metabolic functionality leading to the development of an improved in vitro cell model that closely recapitulates primary human hepatocyte metabolism. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing 1% dimethyl sulfoxide for 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days. Gene expression, protein levels, intracellular triglyceride, and media concentrations of triglyceride, urea, and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured. Dimethyl sulfoxide treatment altered the expression of genes involved in lipid (FAS, ACC1, ACC2, DGAT1, DGAT2, SCD) and glucose (PEPCK, G6Pase) metabolism as well as liver functionality (albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, AFP). mRNA changes were paralleled by alterations at the protein level. DMSO treatment decreased intracellular triglyceride content and lactate production and increased triglyceride and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in the media in a time-dependent manner. We have demonstrated that the addition of 1% dimethyl sulfoxide to culture media changes the metabolic phenotype of HepG2 cells toward a more primary human hepatocyte phenotype. This will enhance the currently available in vitro model systems for the study of hepatocyte biology related to pathological processes that contribute to disease and their response to specific therapeutic interventions.

  2. Species-specific interaction of HIV protease inhibitors with accumulation of cholyl-glycylamido-fluorescein (CGamF) in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-wei; Van Pelt, Jos; Camus, Sandrine; Snoeys, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2010-06-01

    Using sandwich-cultured hepatocytes from rat, dog, pig, and human, we investigated the species-specificity of interaction of HIV protease inhibitors (PI) with in vitro hepatic accumulation of the bile salt analogue cholyl-glycylamido-fluorescein (CGamF). Extracellular sodium depletion or coincubation with the OATP/Oatp inhibitors rifampicin and digoxin revealed that about 35% of active CGamF accumulation was mediated by Ntcp/NTCP in rat and human hepatocytes, while the contribution of this sodium-dependent transporter reached 50-60% in dog and pig hepatocytes. One or more sodium-independent transporters, likely belonging to the Oatp/OATP family, constitute a major transport mechanism for CGamF accumulation. Various HIV PI (0.5, 5, 25 microM) exhibited pronounced species differences in their interaction with active CGamF accumulation (1 microM), although some similarity was observed between the dog and human interaction profiles when HIV PI were tested at 0.5 microM. Atazanavir, indinavir, and darunavir were the most potent inhibitors of CGamF accumulation in human hepatocytes. Potent inhibition of CGamF accumulation by ritonavir in rat hepatocytes contrasted with a weak effect in human hepatocytes. Thorough characterization of in vitro disposition of probe substrates in preclinical species compared to human hepatocytes will ultimately support a better insight in species-specific mechanisms underlying drug interactions and drug-mediated toxicity.

  3. Bile canaliculi formation and biliary transport in 3D sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in dependence of the extracellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Deharde, Daniela; Schneider, Christin; Hiller, Thomas; Fischer, Nicolas; Kegel, Victoria; Lübberstedt, Marc; Freyer, Nora; Hengstler, Jan G; Andersson, Tommy B; Seehofer, Daniel; Pratschke, Johann; Zeilinger, Katrin; Damm, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are still considered as gold standard for investigation of in vitro metabolism and hepatotoxicity in pharmaceutical research. It has been shown that the three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of PHH in a sandwich configuration between two layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) enables the hepatocytes to adhere three dimensionally leading to formation of in vivo like cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different ECM compositions on morphology, cellular arrangement and bile canaliculi formation as well as bile excretion processes in PHH sandwich cultures systematically. Freshly isolated PHH were cultured for 6 days between two ECM layers made of collagen and/or Matrigel in four different combinations. The cultures were investigated by phase contrast microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis with respect to cell-cell connections, repolarization as well as bile canaliculi formation. The influence of the ECM composition on cell activity and viability was measured using the XTT assay and a fluorescent dead or alive assay. Finally, the bile canalicular transport was analyzed by live cell imaging to monitor the secretion and accumulation of the fluorescent substance CDF in bile canaliculi. Using collagen and Matrigel in different compositions in sandwich cultures of hepatocytes, we observed differences in morphology, cellular arrangement and cell activity of PHH in dependence of the ECM composition. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes with an underlay of collagen seem to represent the best in vivo tissue architecture in terms of formation of trabecular cell arrangement. Cultures overlaid with collagen were characterized by the formation of abundant bile canaliculi, while the bile canaliculi network in hepatocytes cultured on a layer of Matrigel and overlaid with collagen showed the most branched and stable canalicular network. All cultures showed a time-dependent leakage of

  4. Nanofabricated Collagen-Inspired Synthetic Elastomers for Primary Rat Hepatocyte Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Kulig, Katherine M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic substrates that mimic the properties of extracellular matrix proteins hold significant promise for use in systems designed for tissue engineering applications. In this report, we designed a synthetic polymeric substrate that is intended to mimic chemical, mechanical, and topological characteristics of collagen. We found that elastomeric poly(ester amide) substrates modified with replica-molded nanotopographic features enhanced initial attachment, spreading, and adhesion of primary rat hepatocytes. Further, hepatocytes cultured on nanotopographic substrates also demonstrated reduced albumin secretion and urea synthesis, which is indicative of strongly adherent hepatocytes. These results suggest that these engineered substrates can function as synthetic collagen analogs for in vitro cell culture. PMID:18847357

  5. Scalable Differentiation of Human iPSCs in a Multicellular Spheroid-based 3D Culture into Hepatocyte-like Cells through Direct Wnt/β-catenin Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Fisher, Robert A; Mangino, Martin J.; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute liver failure by cell transplantation is hindered by a shortage of human hepatocytes. Current protocols for hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) result in low yields, cellular heterogeneity, and limited scalability. In the present study, we have developed a novel multicellular spheroid-based hepatic differentiation protocol starting from embryoid bodies of hiPSCs (hiPSC-EBs) for robust mass production of human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using two novel inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. The resultant hiPSC-EB-HLCs expressed liver-specific genes, secreted hepatic proteins such as Albumin, Alpha Fetoprotein, and Fibrinogen, metabolized ammonia, and displayed cytochrome P450 activities and functional activities typical of mature primary hepatocytes, such as LDL storage and uptake, ICG uptake and release, and glycogen storage. Cell transplantation of hiPSC-EB-HLC in a rat model of acute liver failure significantly prolonged the mean survival time and resolved the liver injury when compared to the no-transplantation control animals. The transplanted hiPSC-EB-HLCs secreted human albumin into the host plasma throughout the examination period (2 weeks). Transplantation successfully bridged the animals through the critical period for survival after acute liver failure, providing promising clues of integration and full in vivo functionality of these cells after treatment with WIF-1 and DKK-1. PMID:27616299

  6. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. PMID:25395831

  7. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5-50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans.

  8. Effects of methylmercury on primary cultured rat hepatocytes: Cell injury and inhibition of growth factor stimulated DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, Keiichi; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Tajima, Shizuko; Fujiki, Motoo )

    1992-08-01

    Many more studies deal with the toxicity of methylmercury on nervous tissue than on its toxicity to the liver. Methylmercury accumulates in the liver in higher concentrations than brain and the liver has the primary function of detoxifying methylmercury. According to recent studies, hepatocyte mitochondrial membranes are destroyed by methylmercury and DNA synthesis is inhibited by methylmercury during hepatocyte regeneration. Methylmercury alters the membrane ion permeability of isolate skate hepatocytes, and inhibits the metal-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase of primary cultured rat hepatocytes. However, little is known about the effect of methylmercury on hepatocyte proliferation in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. We therefore used the primary cultured rat hepatocytes to investigate the effects of methylmercury on cell injury and growth factor stimulate DNA synthesis. The primary effect of methylmercury is to inhibit hepatocyte proliferation rather than to cause direct cell injury. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes for transplantation: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D

    2006-10-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from unused donor livers are being used for transplantation in patients with acute liver failure and liver-based metabolic defects. As large numbers of hepatocytes can be prepared from a single liver and hepatocytes need to be available for emergency and repeated treatment of patients it is essential to be able to cryopreserve and store cells with good thawed cell function. This review considers the current status of cryopreservation of human hepatocytes discussing the different stages involved in the process. These include pre-treatment of cells, freezing solution, cryoprotectants and freezing and thawing protocols. There are detrimental effects of cryopreservation on hepatocyte structure and metabolic function, including cell attachment, which is important to the engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes have been successfully used in clinical transplantation, with evidence of replacement of missing function. Further optimisation of hepatocyte cryopreservation protocols is important for their use in hepatocyte transplantation.

  10. Blood-Compatible Polymer for Hepatocyte Culture with High Hepatocyte-Specific Functions toward Bioartificial Liver Development.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Otaki, Takayuki; Nemoto, Eri; Maruyama, Hiroka; Tanaka, Masaru

    2015-08-19

    The development of bioartificial liver (BAL) is expected because of the shortage of donor liver for transplantation. The substrates for BAL require the following criteria: (a) blood compatibility, (b) hepatocyte adhesiveness, and (c) the ability to maintain hepatocyte-specific functions. Here, we examined blood-compatible poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and poly(tetrahydrofurfuryl acrylate) (PTHFA) (PTHFA) as the substrates for BAL. HepG2, a human hepatocyte model, could adhere on PMEA and PTHFA substrates. The spreading of HepG2 cells was suppressed on PMEA substrates because integrin contribution to cell adhesion on PMEA substrate was low and integrin signaling was not sufficiently activated. Hepatocyte-specific gene expression in HepG2 cells increased on PMEA substrate, whereas the expression decreased on PTHFA substrates due to the nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that blood-compatible PMEA is suitable for BAL substrate. Also, PMEA is expected to be used to regulate cell functions for blood-contacting tissue engineering.

  11. Depression of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in rat hepatocyte culture by dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Mezey, E; Potter, J J; Diehl, A M

    1986-01-15

    Hepatocytes harvested from castrated rats retained a higher alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) activity than hepatocytes harvested from normal rats during 7 days of culture. Dihydrotestosterone (1 microM) decreased the enzyme activity, after 2 and 5 days of culture, in hepatocytes from castrated and control animals respectively. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the enzyme activity to similar values in both groups of hepatocytes by the end of 7 days of culture. Testosterone (1 microM) had no effect on the enzyme activity in normal hepatocytes and only a transitory effect in decreasing the enzyme activity in hepatocytes from castrated animals. The increases in alcohol dehydrogenase activity after castration and their suppression by dihydrotestosterone were associated with parallel changes in the rate of ethanol elimination. Additions of substrates of the malate-aspartate shuttle or dinitrophenol did not modify ethanol elimination. These observations indicate that dihydrotestosterone has a direct suppressant effect on hepatocyte alcohol dehydrogenase and that the enzyme activity is a major determinant of the rate of ethanol elimination.

  12. U. v. -enhanced reactivation of u. v. -irradiated herpes virus by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, J.; Yager, J.D. )

    1984-04-01

    Carcinogen treatment of cultured mammalian cells prior to infection with u.v.-irradiated virus results in enhanced virus survival and mutagenesis suggesting the induction of SOS-type processes. The development of a primary rat hepatocyte culture system is reported to investigate cellular responses to DNA damage which may be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis in vivo. Enhanced reactivation of u.v.-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) occurred in hepatocytes irradiated with u.v. Cultured hepatocytes were pretreated with u.v. at the time of enhanced DNA synthesis. These treatments caused an inhibition followed by a recovery of DNA synthesis. At various times after pretreatment, the hepatocytes were infected with control or u.v.-irradiated HSV-1 at low multiplicity, and virus survival was measured. U.v.-irradiated HSV-1 exhibited the expected two-component survival curve in control or u.v. pretreated hepatocytes. The magnitude of enhanced reactivation of HSV-1 was dependent on the u.v. dose to the hepatocytes, the time of infection following u.v. pretreatment, and the level of DNA synthesis at the time of pretreatment. These results suggest that u.v. treatment of rat hepatocytes causes the induction of SOS-type functions tht may have a role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  13. Sex and strain differences in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, C.A.; Way, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The hepatocyte primary culture (HPC)/DNA repair test was developed using hepatocytes isolated from male F-344 rats. A number of genetic polymorphisms have been shown to occur in inbred strains of rats, which may lead to variation in biotransformation of xenobiotics resulting in differences in susceptibility to genotoxins. The effect of the strain utilized as a source of hepatocytes was investigated with female Lewis, F-344, and DA rats. Variation was observed when hepatocytes from the three strains were exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). No clearcut strain differences were seen when cells were exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or 2-acetylaminofluorene. These results demonstrate that both the strain and the sex of the animal used as a source of hepatocytes can affect the HPC/DNA repair test.

  14. Effects of culturing media on hepatocytes differentiation using Volvox sphere as co-culturing vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun Lieh; Chang, Siou Han; Manousakas, Ioannis; Huang, Han Hsiang; Teong, Benjamin; Chuang, Chin Wen; Kuo, Shyh Ming

    2015-03-13

    Volvox sphere is a unique design to mimic natural volvox consists of a large outer-sphere that contains smaller inner-spheres, which provide three-dimensional (3D) environment to culture cells. The purpose of this study is to co-culture mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and AML12 liver cells in Volvox spheres and to evaluate the effects of two media, DMEM and DMEM/F12 on the cultured cells. The results of this study shows that the 3D Volvox sphere can successfully be applied for co-culture of MSCs and AML12 liver cells, and the MSCs are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells expressing hepatocyte-specific markers including albumin (ALB), alpha feto-protein (AFP) and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) mRNA expressions and producing CK18 and ALB proteins. Interestingly, the MSCs expressed higher ALB, AFP and CK18 mRNA expression at the initial 7-day culture by using DMEM, whereas, the MSCs expressed more mRNA expressions from 7-day to 14-day by the usage of DMEM/F12. The result demonstrated that DMEM and DMEM/F12 media could affect MSCs behaviors during a 14-day culture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential effects of long-term exposure to Aroclor 1254 on lipid secretion by primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Figueroa, T.; Hernandez, A.; Lopez, L.

    1992-06-01

    PCBs produce hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation (fatty liver) in experimental animals and humans exposed accidentally and occupationally. It has been suggested that this effect could be due to a block in TG secretion. On the other hand, increased levels of plasmatic TG and cholesterol have been described in rats after dietary exposure to Aroclor 1254 (Aro) and other PCBs; hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension have been also described in humans exposed for long periods to low concentrations of PCBs. Since the study of hepatic lipid metabolism and its alteration by toxic chemicals is complicated in the whole animal, short term cultures of adult rat hepatocytes have been used. We have described a system for the long term culture of adult rat hepatocytes which for several weeks maintain differentiated functions, like fatty acid and TG synthesis and their export to the culture medium. In this paper we used this culture system to study the effect of long-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of Aro on the secretion of lipids by cultured hepatocytes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hydroxylation, conjugation and sulfation of bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Meijer, P.

    1988-08-15

    Hydroxylation of lithocholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic and cholic acids was studied in monolayers of rat hepatocytes cultured for 76 h. The majority of added lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids was metabolized to beta-muricholic acid (56-76%). A small part of these bile acids (9%), however, and a considerable amount of deoxycholic and cholic acids (21%) were converted into metabolites more polar than cholic acid in the first culture period. Formation of these compounds decreased during the last day of culture. Bile acids synthesized after addition of (4-/sup 14/C)-cholesterol were almost entirely (97%) sulfated and/or conjugated, predominantly with taurine (54-66%), during culture. Sulfated bile acids were mainly composed of free bile acids. The ability of hepatocytes to sulfurylate bile acids declined with culture age. Thus, rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture are capable to sulfurylate bile acids and to hydroxylate trihydroxylated bile acids, suggesting formation of polyhydroxylated metabolites.

  17. Auto-inhibition of verapamil metabolism in rat hepatocytes of gel entrapment culture.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Meng, Qin; Dong, Xiaomei

    2011-08-01

    Mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A by verapamil and the resulting drug-drug interactions have been studied in vitro, but the inhibition of verapamil on its own metabolic clearance in clinic, namely auto-inhibition of verapamil metabolism, has never been reproduced in vitro. This paper aimed to evaluate the utility of gel entrapped rat hepatocytes in reflecting such metabolic auto-inhibition using hepatocyte monolayer as a control. Despite being a similar concentration- and time-dependent profile, auto-inhibition of verapamil metabolism showed apparent distinctions between the two culture models. Firstly, gel entrapped hepatocytes were more sensitive to such inhibition, which could be largely due to their higher CYP3A activity detected by the formation rates of 6β-hydroxy testosterone and 1'-hydroxy midazolam. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of ketoconazole and verapamil on CYP 3A activity as well as the reduction of verapamil intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) by ketoconazole was only observed in gel-entrapped hepatocytes. In this respect, the involvement of CYP3A in auto-inhibition of verapamil metabolism could be illustrated in gel-entrapped hepatocytes but not in hepatocyte monolayer. All of these results indicated that hepatocytes of gel entrapment reflected more of verapamil metabolic auto-inhibition than hepatocyte monolayer and could serve as a suitable system for investigating drug metabolism.

  18. Regulation of bile acid synthesis in rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kubaska, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hepatocyte monolayer cultures (PHC) were prepared and incubated in serum free media. Cells from a cholestyramine fed rat converted exogenous (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-bile acids at a 3-fold greater rate than rats fed a normal diet. PHC synthesize bile acids (BA) at a rate of approximately 0.06 ..mu..g/mg protein/h. The major bile acid composition, as determined by GLC, was ..beta..-muricholic acid (BMC) and cholic acid (CA) in a 3:1 ratio, respectively. PHC rapidly converted free BA and BA intermediates into taurine conjugated trihydroxy-BA up to 87h after plating. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A-reductase activity assayed in microsomes prepared from PHC, decreased during the initial 48h, then remained constant. Cholesterol 7..cap alpha..-hydroxylase activity decreased during the initial 48h, then increased during the next 48h. This occurred while whole cells produced BA at a linear rate. The effect of individual BA on bile acid synthesis (BAS) was also studied. Relative rates of BAS were measured as the conversion of (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-BA. BA combinations were tested in order to simulate the composition of the enterohepatic circulation. The addition of TCA (525 ..mu..M) plus TCDCA (80..mu..M), in concentrations which greatly exceed the concentration of BA (60..mu..M) in rate portal blood, failed to inhibit BAS. BA plus phospholipid and/or cholesterol also did not inhibit BAS. Surprisingly, crude rat bile with a final concentration comparable to those in the synthetic mix inhibited (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol conversion into (/sup 14/C)-BA.

  19. Culture of porcine hepatocytes or bile duct epithelial cells by inductive serum-free media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A serum-free, feeder-cell-dependent, selective culture system for the long-term culture of porcine hepatocytes or cholangiocytes was developed. Liver cells were isolated from 1 wk old pigs or young adult pigs (25 and 63 kg live weight) and were placed in primary culture on feeder-cell layers of mit...

  20. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteomic Characterization of Primary Mouse Hepatocytes in Collagen Monolayer and Sandwich Culture.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Malina; Sperber, Saskia; Noor, Fozia; Hoffmann, Esther; Weber, Susanne N; Hall, Rabea A; Lammert, Frank; Heinzle, Elmar

    2017-06-08

    Dedifferentiation of primary hepatocytes in vitro makes their application in long-term studies difficult. Embedding hepatocytes in a sandwich of extracellular matrix is reported to delay the dedifferentiation process to some extent. In this study, we compared the intracellular proteome of primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH) in conventional monolayer cultures (ML) to collagen sandwich culture (SW) after 1 day and 5 days of cultivation. Quantitative proteome analysis of PMH showed no differences between collagen SW and ML cultures after 1 day. Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were strongly affected by long-term cultivation in both ML and SW cultures. Interestingly, culture conditions had no effect on cellular lipid metabolism. After 5 days, PMH in collagen SW and ML cultures exhibit characteristic indications of oxidative stress. However, in the SW culture the defense system against oxidative stress is significantly up-regulated to deal with this, whereas in the ML culture a down-regulation of these important enzymes takes place. Regarding the multiple effects of ROS and oxidative stress in cells, we conclude that the down-regulation of these enzymes seem to play a role in the loss of hepatic function observed in the ML cultivation. In addition, enzymes of the urea cycle were clearly down-regulated in ML culture. Proteomics confirms lack in oxidative stress defense mechanisms as the major characteristic of hepatocytes in monolayer cultures compared to sandwich cultures. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-8, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Protective effect of S-adenosyl-L-methionine against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Kodama, K; Oguchi, K

    1990-02-01

    Effect of S-adenosyl-L-methionine disulfate tosylate salt (SAMe-ST) and L-methionine (L-Met) on primary cultured rat hepatocytes were studied. In cultured hepatocytes treated with CCl4, SAMe-ST and L-Met suppressed the decrease in urea-nitrogen secretion as well as the leakages of GOT and GPT. The membrane-protective action of these two compounds was verified by the histological data. Failure of SAMe-ST to counteract CCl4-induced reduction of radioactive leucine incorporation into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble materials in hepatocytes indicates that the observed effects of SAMe-ST or L-Met do not involve acceleration of protein synthesis. The present results indicate that SAMe-ST remarkably protects hepatocytes from CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, probably by either changing the structure or compositions of membrane phospholipids or by modifying the interaction of CCl4 with the intracellular drug-metabolizing enzyme systems.

  3. Early oxidative damage in primary cultured trout hepatocytes: a time course study.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Michela; Radice, Sonia; Catalani, Paolo; Francolini, Maura; Marabini, Laura; Chiesara, Enzo

    2002-09-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the two-step hepatocyte isolation procedure on primary cultured trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes over time. We characterised the possible changes of a variety of some cellular parameters within the first 24-48 h after seeding. We followed the time dependent changes of these parameters during subsequent culture times in order to see if the cells maintained a differentiated status. Scanning electron microscopy revealed bleb formation and 20% cell damage in freshly isolated hepatocytes. During subsequent culture times the bleb dimension appear to be reduced. Heat shock proteins 70 and 50 (HSP70, HSP50) were induced by hepatocyte isolation. During the first 4 h of culture, the hepatocytes showed a variation in mitochondrial activity, an increase in free radical species (ROS), and a decrease in both glutathione (GSH) content and catalase (CAT) activity; the generation of free radicals led to an increase in the formation of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the DNA. The cells showed detectable ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity after 4 h of culture, which had rapidly increased by the 24th hour. After 24 h, mitochondrial and CAT activity, free radical production, and the content of GSH and 8-OHdG returned to their original levels. P450 activity was retained for at least 48 h after seeding. Our data show that trout hepatocytes suffer significant cell injury as a result of the isolation procedure, but primary cultured cells metabolically recover from this stress after a few hours: they are capable of repairing their damaged surfaces, recovering their antioxidant defences and retaining their ability to repair DNA. Our results also confirm that trout hepatocytes in a primary culture maintain their in vivo-like metabolic activities for 3-8 days.

  4. Hepatocytes cultured in alginate microspheres: an optimized technique to study enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Ringel, M; von Mach, M A; Santos, R; Feilen, P J; Brulport, M; Hermes, M; Bauer, A W; Schormann, W; Tanner, B; Schön, M R; Oesch, F; Hengstler, J G

    2005-01-05

    An important application of hepatocyte cultures is identification of drugs acting as inducers of biotransformation enzymes that alter metabolic clearance of other therapeutic agents. In the present study we optimized an in vitro system with hepatocytes cultured in alginate microspheres that allow studies of enzyme induction with excellent sensitivity. Induction factors obtained with standard inducers, such as 3-methylcholanthrene or phenobarbital, were higher compared to those with conventional hepatocyte co-cultures on collagen coated dishes. This is illustrated by activities of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) after incubation with 5 microM 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), a standard inducer for cytochrome P4501A1 and 1A2. Mean activities for solvent controls and 3-MC exposed cells were 2.99 and 449 pmol/min/mg protein (induction factor: 150) for hepatocytes cultured in microspheres compared to 2.72 and 80.6 pmol/min/mg (induction factor: 29.6) for hepatocytes on collagen coated dishes. To compare these in vitro data to the in vivo situation male Sprague Dawley rats, the same strain that was used also for the in vitro studies, were exposed to 3-MC in vivo using a protocol that guarantees maximal induction. Activities were 29.2 and 1656 pmol/min/mg in liver homogenate of solvent and 3-MC treated animals (induction factor: 56.7). Thus, the absolute activities of 3-MC exposed hepatocytes in microspheres are lower compared to the in vivo situation. However, the induction factor in vitro was even higher compared to the in vivo situation (150-fold versus 56.7-fold). A similar scenario was observed using phenobarbital (0.75 mM) for induction of CYP2B and 3A isoenzymes: induction factors for testosterone hydroxylation in position 16beta were 127.5- and 50.4-fold for hepatocytes in microspheres and conventionally cultured hepatocytes, respectively. The new in vitro system with hepatocytes embedded in solid alginate microspheres offers several technical advantages: (i

  5. A novel mouse model for stable engraftment of a human immune system and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Strick-Marchand, Helene; Dusséaux, Mathilde; Darche, Sylvie; Huntington, Nicholas D; Legrand, Nicolas; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Corcuff, Erwan; Ahodantin, James; Weijer, Kees; Spits, Hergen; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS) and human hepatocytes (HUHEP) in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2Rγc-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20-50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months) and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates.

  6. A thin-walled polydimethylsiloxane bioreactor for high-density hepatocyte sandwich culture.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guo-Dong Sean; Toh, Guoyang William; Birgersson, Erik; Robens, Jeffrey; van Noort, Danny; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2013-06-01

    In vitro drug testing requires long-term maintenance of hepatocyte liver specific functions. Hepatocytes cultured at a higher seeding density in a sandwich configuration exhibit an increased level of liver specific functions when compared to low density cultures due to the better cell to cell contacts that promote long term maintenance of polarity and liver specific functions. However, culturing hepatocytes at high seeding densities in a standard 24-well plate poses problems in terms of the mass transport of nutrients and oxygen to the cells. In view of this drawback, we have developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bioreactor that was able to maintain the long-term liver specific functions of a hepatocyte sandwich culture at a high seeding density. The bioreactor was fabricated with PDMS, an oxygen permeable material, which allowed direct oxygenation and perfusion to take place simultaneously. The mass transport of oxygen and the level of shear stress acting on the cells were analyzed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The combination of both direct oxygenation and perfusion has a synergistic effect on the liver specific function of a high density hepatocyte sandwich culture over a period of 9 days.

  7. Methamphetamine enhances Hepatitis C virus replication in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Peng, J S; Wang, X; Wang, Y J; Luo, G X; Ho, W Z

    2008-04-01

    Very little is known about the interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and methamphetamine, which is a highly abused psychostimulant and a known risk factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV infection. This study examined whether methamphetamine has the ability to inhibit innate immunity in the host cells, facilitating HCV replication in human hepatocytes. Methamphetamine inhibited intracellular interferon alpha expression in human hepatocytes, which was associated with the increase in HCV replication. In addition, methamphetamine also compromised the anti-HCV effect of recombinant interferon alpha. Further investigation of mechanism(s) responsible for the methamphetamine action revealed that methamphetamine was able to inhibit the expression of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, a key modulator in interferon-mediated immune and biological responses. Methamphetamine also down-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory factor-5, a crucial transcriptional factor that activates the interferon pathway. These in vitro findings that methamphetamine compromises interferon alpha-mediated innate immunity against HCV infection indicate that methamphetamine may have a cofactor role in the immunopathogenesis of HCV disease.

  8. Methamphetamine enhances Hepatitis C virus replication in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L.; Peng, J. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. J.; Luo, G. X.; Ho, W. Z.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Very little is known about the interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and methamphetamine, which is a highly abused psychostimulant and a known risk factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV infection. This study examined whether methamphetamine has the ability to inhibit innate immunity in the host cells, facilitating HCV replication in human hepatocytes. Methamphetamine inhibited intracellular interferon alpha expression in human hepatocytes, which was associated with the increase in HCV replication. In addition, methamphetamine also compromised the anti-HCV effect of recombinant interferon alpha. Further investigation of mechanism(s) responsible for the methamphetamine action revealed that methamphetamine was able to inhibit the expression of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, a key modulator in interferon-mediated immune and biological responses. Methamphetamine also down-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory factor-5, a crucial transcriptional factor that activates the interferon pathway. These in vitro findings that methamphetamine compromises interferon alpha-mediated innate immunity against HCV infection indicate that methamphetamine may have a cofactor role in the immunopathogenesis of HCV disease. PMID:18307590

  9. Liver-specific RNA metabolism in hepatocytes in long-term culture

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoff, I.; Isom, H.C.; Salditt-Georgieff, M.; Darnell, J.E. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the transcription of liver-specific and housekeeping genes in rat hepatocytes maintained in culture for up to 40 days in chemically defined medium. RNA extracted from these cells was analyzed using northern and dot blot methods. RNA in nuclei extracted from parallel cultures was analyzed by nascent chain extension experiments. Autoradiography of northern and dot blots indicated that in vitro hepatocyte gene expression relative to in vivo liver gene expression can be divided into four classes: (1) liver-specific genes that show loss of expression with time in culture; (2) liver-specific genes that are expressed for up to 40 days in culture at levels approximately 30-100% of those found in liver, e.g., albumin; (3) housekeeping genes that are expressed for up to 40 days in culture at levels approximately equivalent to those found in liver; and (4) housekeeping genes that are expressed at higher levels in cells in culture than liver. The results of nascent chain extension experiments indicated that the rate of synthesis of albumin message was many fold lower in hepatocytes than in liver, whereas rates of synthesis of messages for housekeeping genes were equal to or slightly higher in nuclei from hepatocytes in culture than in nuclei extracted from liver. Molecular analyses of nuclear RNA suggest that the high levels of albumin mRNA in cultured cells are due to an increased stability probably in the cytoplasm.

  10. Enhancement of proliferation in a rat hepatocyte co-culture model after mitogenic stimulation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary mouse and rat hepatocyte cultures have long been the gold standard for assessment of cellular changes following chemical exposure. While helpful for assessing proliferative and responses in vitro, these cultures are limited to 1 or 2 days of incubation. Our motivation was...

  11. Enhancement of proliferation in a rat hepatocyte co-culture model after mitogenic stimulation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary mouse and rat hepatocyte cultures have long been the gold standard for assessment of cellular changes following chemical exposure. While helpful for assessing proliferative and responses in vitro, these cultures are limited to 1 or 2 days of incubation. Our motivation was...

  12. Primary hepatocyte cultures as in vitro tools for toxicity testing: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-04-01

    Cultures of primary hepatocytes are versatile tools that can serve many in vitro toxicity testing purposes. However, they cope with dedifferentiation, a process that is already initiated during the hepatocyte isolation procedure and that is manifested as the progressive loss of functionality upon subsequent cultivation. A number of strategies to prevent dedifferentiation have been introduced over the last decades, all which aim at re-establishing the in vivo hepatocyte micro-environment in vitro, but that are of merely limited success. Recent mechanistic insight into the mechanisms that underlie hepatocyte dedifferentiation has opened new avenues for the development of novel approaches that target the actual causes of this deteriorative process and thus for the generation of a long-term hepatic in vitro tool. Such experimental system is urgently needed, especially in the light of the stringent European legislative modifications that are currently encountered by the pharmaceutical, chemical and, particularly, the cosmetic industry.

  13. The influence of glycosaminoglycans and crosslinking agents on the phenotype of hepatocytes cultured on collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Kataropoulou, Margarita; Henderson, Catherine; Grant, Helen

    2003-02-01

    The use of primary hepatocyte cultures as in vitro models for studying xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity is limited by the loss of liver-specific differentiated functions with time in culture and the inability of the cells to proliferate. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of incorporating 20% chondroitin-6-sulphate (Ch6SO4), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), into collagen gels (0.3% w/v) and crosslinking the gels with either 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) or 1,6-diaminohexane (DAH) on the expression of glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) and the activity of cytochrome P450 in hepatocytes cultured for 48 hours and 7 days. Hepatocytes were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats by collagenase perfusion. Cell homogenates were immunoblotted against class alpha and pi GST subunits. To measure cytochrome P450 activity, testosterone hydroxylation was assessed. Viability of the cultured cells was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the vital stain carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA). Cells cultured on gels crosslinked with EDAC were dead by 48 hours as judged by lack of CFDA-derived fluorescence and absence of GST bands on the immunoblots. The viability and morphology of the cells were unaffected by any of the other components of the substrata tested. Expression of GSTs indicated that the hepatocyte phenotype was stable for at least 48 hours. The addition of GAG did not improve the phenotype at either 48 hours or 7 days in culture, but the combination of GAG and DAH crosslinking improved GST expression in the 7-day cultures. However, the hepatocyte cytochrome P450 activity did not show any improvement on any of the gels. The combination of GAG and DAH crosslinking provided the most stable substratum environment in terms of GST expression in hepatocytes.

  14. [An experimental study on the protective effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) for the primary cultured hepatocytes obtained from iron-loaded rats].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, J

    1995-01-01

    Pathological iron deposition in liver is often found in various liver diseases. The deposited iron is thought to be one of the most important factor of liver cell injury, not only in hemochromotosis but also in cirrhosis following hepatitis virus B or C infection. To investigate the influence of the deposited iron on damage and regeneration of hepatocyte, primary cultured hepatocytes obtained from carbonyl iron-loaded rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in the presence or absence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Although the section of liver from carbonyl iron-loaded rats showed no necrosis and fibrosis, iron-loaded hepatocytes contained about twofold more iron than control. The damage of iron-loaded hepatocytes induced by CCl4 was more serious than that of control, and HGF decreased this injury only in iron-loaded hepatocytes but not in control. There is no difference in DNA synthesis stimulated by HGF between iron-loaded hepatocytes and control. These findings suggest that the pathological iron deposition induces the fragility of hepatocyte and that cytoprotective effect of HGF is induced by this pathological iron.

  15. Repopulation of adult and neonatal mice with human hepatocytes: a chimeric animal model.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Le, Tam T; Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Verma, Inder M

    2007-12-18

    We report the successful transplantation of human hepatocytes in immunodeficient, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (fah(-/-)) mice. Engraftment occurs over the entire liver acinus upon transplantation. A few weeks after transplantation, increasing concentrations of human proteins (e.g., human albumin and human C3a) can be measured in the blood of the recipient mouse. No fusion between mouse and human hepatocytes can be detected. Three months after transplantation, up to 20% of the mouse liver is repopulated by human hepatocytes, and sustained expression of lentiviral vector transduced gene can be observed. We further report the development of a hepatocyte transplantation method involving a transcutaneous, intrahepatic injection in neonatal mice. Human hepatocytes engraft over the entire injected lobe with an expansion pattern similar to those observed with intrasplenic transplantation.

  16. DNA Adduct Formation of 4-Aminobiphenyl and Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nauwelaers, Gwendoline; Bessette, Erin E.; Gu, Dan; Tang, Yijin; Rageul, Julie; Fessard, Valérie; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.; Langouët, Sophie; Turesky, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA adduct formation of the aromatic amine, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), a known human carcinogen present in tobacco smoke, and the heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (AαC), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylmidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), potential human carcinogens, which are also present in tobacco smoke or formed during the high-temperature cooking of meats, was investigated in freshly cultured human hepatocytes. The carcinogens (10 μM) were incubated with hepatocytes derived from eight different donors for time periods up to 24 h. The DNA adducts were quantified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The principal DNA adducts formed for all of the carcinogens were N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl) (dG-C8) adducts. The levels of adducts ranged from 3.4 to 140 adducts per 107 DNA bases. The highest level of adduct formation occurred with AαC, followed by 4-ABP, then by PhIP, MeIQx, and IQ. Human hepatocytes formed dG-C8-HAA-adducts at levels that were up to 100-fold greater than the amounts of adducts produced in rat hepatocytes. In contrast to HAA adducts, the levels of dG-C8-4-ABP adduct formation were similar in human and rat hepatocytes. These DNA binding data demonstrate that the rat, an animal model that is used for carcinogenesis bioassays, significantly underestimates the potential hepatic genotoxicity of HAAs in humans. The high level of DNA adducts formed by AαC, a carcinogen produced in tobacco smoke at levels that are up to 100-fold higher than the amounts of 4-ABP, is noteworthy. The possible causal role of AαC in tobacco-associated cancers warrants investigation. PMID:21456541

  17. Three-dimensional culture of hepatocytes for prediction of drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qin

    2010-06-01

    Hepatotoxicity is the most frequent reason for the withdrawal of an approved drug from the market. Monolayer culture of hepatocyte in two-dimension, which is relatively inexpensive, convenient and easy to use, serves a traditional hepatocyte-based high-content screening for identifying hepatotoxic side effects of tested drugs. However, two-dimensional methods have their limitations in lack of insensitivity on reflection of drug hepatotoxicity. Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of hepatocytes in sandwich, spheroid and gel entrapment provide a microenvironment for high expression of liver-specific functions and are being proposed for prediction of drug hepatotoxicity. This review addressed the reliability of 3D culture models on screening hepatotoxic drugs with particular emphasis on gel entrapment culture model due to its more systematic data on drug testing. The reader will gain a comprehensive understanding of the improved prediction efficacy of 3D culture models. Hepatocytes in 3D cultures, although in need of further standardization required by the throughput operation, show great potential in attempts to ensure the efficacy on prediction of drug hepatotoxicity.

  18. Distribution and origin of the basement membrane component perlecan in rat liver and primary hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rescan, P. Y.; Loréal, O.; Hassell, J. R.; Yamada, Y.; Guillouzo, A.; Clément, B.

    1993-01-01

    Basement membranes contain three major components (ie collagen IV, laminin, and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan termed perlecan). Although the distribution and origin of both collagen IV and laminin have been well documented in the liver, perlecan has been poorly investigated, so far. We have studied the distribution and cellular origin of perlecan in rat livers in various conditions as well as in hepatocyte primary culture. By immunolocalization in both adult and 18-day-old fetal liver, perlecan was found in portal spaces, around central veins, and throughout the lobule. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed its presence at the level of basement membranes surrounding bile ducts and blood vessels, and in the space of Disse discontinuously interacting with hepatocyte microvilli. Precursors of perlecan were detected in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of bile duct cells and both vascular and sinusoidal endothelial cells. Both hepatocytes and Ito cells were negative. Northern-blot analysis confirmed the lack of appreciable expression of perlecan in hepatocytes isolated from either fetal or adult livers. In 18-month-diethylnitrosamine-treated rat liver, perlecan was abundant in neoplastic nodules. Electron microscopic investigation revealed an almost continuous layer of perlecan in the space of Disse and intracellular staining in sinusoidal endothelial cells, only. Perlecan mRNAs were detectable in malignant nodules, and absent in hepatocytes from nontumorous areas. Hepatocytes expressed high levels of perlecan mRNAs only when put in culture. This expression was reduced in conditions that allow improvement of hepatocyte survival and function (ie addition of corticoids, dimethylsulfoxide or nicotinamide to the medium, or in coculture with liver epithelial cells from biliary origin). Immunolocalization by light and electron microscopy showed that deposition of the proteoglycan occurred in coculture, in basement membranelike structures located around hepatocyte cords. In

  19. Glucose metabolism by adult hepatocytes in primary culture and by cell lines from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Bissell, D M; Levine, G A; Bissell, M J

    1978-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [U-14C]glucose has been examined in detail in adult rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture, as well as in two permanent cell lines--Buffalo rat liver (BRL) and transplantable rat hepatoma (HTC) cells-derived from normal rat liver and from rat hepatoma, respectively. Under defined conditions of incubation, at a glucose concentration of 5.5 mM, the three types of cultured liver cells exhibited pronounced differences in glucose metabolism. Primary cultures, like the intact liver, differed from the cell lines in consuming relatively small amounts of glucose and converting approximately 50% of the total metabolized glucose to lactate. By contrast, the permantent cell lines consumed glucose at a 40-fold greater rate than did primary cultures, converting 80--90% of the carbohydrate to lactate. Oxidative metabolism of glucose carbon also differed among the three types of liver culture. Of the total [U-14C]glucose consumed, primary cultures converted approximately 30% to labeled CO2 per hour, whereas the liver cell lines converted 5--10%. Finally, glucose metabolism in primary culture exhibited adaptation as hepatocytes aged in culture, shifting progressively toward the pattern exhibited by the permanent cell lines. This change occurred over a time course similar to that for other kinds of functional change in hepatocytes in primary culture and thus may be relevant to the general problem of phenotypic alteration in liver cell culture.

  20. Sulodexide induces hepatocyte growth factor release in humans.

    PubMed

    Borawski, Jacek; Dubowski, Miroslaw; Pawlak, Krystyna; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2007-03-08

    Heparin influences numerous pleiotropic growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), partially by their release from endothelial and extracellular matrix stores. The effects of sulodexide, a heparin-like glycosaminoglycan medication of growing importance in medicine, on HGF liberation are not known. We performed a 2-week open-label sulodexide trial in healthy male volunteers. The drug was initially administered intravenously (i.v.) in a single dose of 1200 Lipoprotein Lipase Releasing Units (LRU), then -- orally for 12 days (500 LRU twice a day), and -- again by i.v. route (1200 LRU) on day 14. Intravenous sulodexide injections were repeatedly found to induce marked and reproducible increases in immunoreactive plasma HGF levels (more than 3500% vs baseline after 10 min, and more than 1200% after 120 min), and remained unchanged when measured 120 min following oral sulodexide administration. The percentage increments in plasma HGF evoked by i.v. sulodexide at both time points and on both days inversely correlated with baseline levels of the growth factor. On day 14, the HGF levels after 120 min and their percentage increase vs baseline were strongly and directly dependent on i.v. sulodexide dose per kg of body weight. This study shows that sulodexide has a novel, remarkable and plausibly biologically important stimulating effect on the release of pleiotropic hepatocyte growth factor in humans.

  1. In vitro biocompatibility of polypyrrole/PLGA conductive nanofiber scaffold with cultured rat hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xue-Hui; Xu, Qian; Feng, Zhang-Qi; Xiao, Jiang-Qiang; Li, Qiang; Sun, Xi-Tai; Cao, Yang; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2014-09-01

    To intruduce conductive biomaterial into liver tissue engineering, a conductive nanofiber scaffold, polypyrrole/poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid(PLGA), was designed and prepared via electro-spinning and oxidative polymerization. Effects of the scaffold on hepatocyte adhesion, viability and function were then investigated. SEM revealed pseudopodium formation and abundant extracellular matrix on the surface of PLGA membrane and polypyrrole/PLGA membrane. The adhesion rate, cellular activity, urea synthesis and albumin secretion of the hepatocytes cultured on polypyrrole/PLGA group were similar to those on the PLGA group, but were significantly higher than those on the control group. There were no significant differences in concentrations of LDH and TNF-α among three groups. These results suggested the potential application of this conductive nanofiber scaffold as a suitable substratum for hepatocyte culturing in liver tissue engineering.

  2. Prolonged survival of mice with acute liver failure with transplantation of monkey hepatocytes cultured with an antiapoptotic pentapeptide V5.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kimiaki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Gutierrez, Alejandro Soto; Rivas-Carrillo, Jorge David; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Chen, Yong; Narushima, Michiki; Miki, Atsushi; Okitsu, Teru; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Noriaki

    2006-02-15

    Because hepatocyte transplantation has been considered to be an attractive method to treat acute liver failure (ALF), efficient recovery of hepatocytes and maintenance of differentiated hepatocyte functions is of extreme importance. We here report the usefulness of an antiapoptotic pentapeptide V5, composed of Val-Pro-Met-Leu-Lys, in the monkey hepatocyte cultures. We evaluated albumin production, metabolizing abilities of ammonia, lidocaine, and diazepam of monkey hepatocytes cultured with V5. The protein expression of apoptosis-associated molecules was analyzed using power blot analysis. An unwoven cloth inoculated with V5-treated monkey hepatocytes was transplanted on the surface of the spleen of both SCID mice and Balb/c mice suffering from ALF induced by 90% hepatectomy. When 100 microM V5 was utilized, ammonia-, lidocaine- and diazepam- metabolizing capacities and albumin production ability were significantly increased in V5-treated monkey hepatocytes. Such hepatocytes showed decreased Annexin V binding and increased the expression of anti-apoptotic and/or cytoprotective molecules, including Ku70, NF-kappaB, IKAP, hILP/XIAP, IkappaB, and CAS. Transplantation of the cloth containing the monkey hepatocytes significantly improved blood levels of glucose and ammonia and encephalopathy score and prolonged the survival of the mice with ALF. The present work clearly demonstrates the usefulness of V5 for maintaining the functions of monkey hepatocytes in tissue culture.

  3. Primary human hepatocytes from metabolic-disordered children recreate highly differentiated liver-tissue-like spheroids on alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Deichmann, Steffen; Erbes, Johannes; Volz, Tassilo; Dandri, Maura; Cohen, Smadar; Nashan, Bjoern; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias

    2012-07-01

    Human hepatocyte transplantation has not been routinely established as an alternative to liver transplantation in liver disease due to low cell engraftment rates. Preimplantation in vitro engineering of liver tissue using primary human hepatocytes on three-dimensional scaffolds could be an alternative model. Alginate bioscaffolds were seeded with 1×10(6) hepatocytes freshly isolated from the livers of three children suffering from different metabolic disorders. During a culture period of 14 days only a marginal loss of hepatocytes was observed via measurement of DNA content per scaffold. Formation of hepatocyte spheroids was detected from day 3 onward using transmission light microscopy. Biochemical assays for albumin, α1-antitrypsin, and urea revealed excellent metabolic function with its maximum at day 7. Low lactate dehydrogenase enzyme release demonstrated minor cellular membrane damage. Hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff staining displayed high cell viability and well-preserved glycogen storage until day 7. Immunofluorescent staining of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, zonula occludens protein 1, and cytokeratin 18 revealed highly differentiated hepatocytes in spheroids with a tissue-like structure on scaffolds. Fluorescent labeling of cytochrome P450 and bile canaliculi demonstrated detoxification ability as well as a well-shaped bile canaliculi network. Almost constant expression levels in most target genes were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of TUNEL reaction implicated a safe scaffold-dissolving procedure. Our results indicate that alginate scaffolds provide a favorable microenvironment for liver neo-tissue recreation and regeneration. Further, we demonstrate that livers from children with inherited metabolic disorders could serve as an alternative cell source for in vitro experiments.

  4. Functional xenobiotic metabolism and efflux transporters in trout hepatocyte spheroid cultures

    PubMed Central

    Uchea, Chibuzor; Chipman, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of xenobiotic fate in fish is important for the regulatory assessment of chemicals under current legislation. Trout hepatocyte spheroids are a promising in vitro model for this assessment. In this investigation, the gene expression and function for xenobiotic metabolism and cellular efflux were characterised. Using fluorescence, transport and real time PCR analysis, the expression and functionality of a variety of genes related to xenobiotic metabolism and drug efflux were assessed in a range of trout hepatocyte culture preparations. Significantly greater levels of expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and efflux were measured in spheroids (which have been shown to remain viable in excess of 30 days), compared to hepatocytes cultured using conventional suspension and monolayer culture techniques. A transient decline in the expression of genes related to both xenobiotic metabolism and transport was determined during spheroid development, with a subsequent recovery in older spheroids. The most mature spheroids also exhibited an expression profile most comparable to that reported in vivo. Functionality of efflux transporters in spheroids was also demonstrated using fluorescent markers and specific inhibitors. In conclusion, the more physiologically relevant architecture in spheroid cultures provides a high functional integrity in relation to xenobiotic metabolism and efflux. Together with the enhanced gene expression and longevity of the model, hepatocytes in spheroid culture may prove to be an accurate alternative model to study the mechanisms of these processes in fish liver and provide an assay to determine the bioaccumulation potential of environmental contaminants. PMID:25893091

  5. Comparison of S9 mix and hepatocytes as external metabolizing systems in mammalian cell cultures: cytogenetic effects of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene and aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Madle, E.; Tiedemann, G.; Madle, S.; Oett, A.; Kaufmann, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two external metabolizing systems, S9 mix from Aroclor-induced rat livers and freshly isolated hepatocytes, were used for activation in cultures of human lymphocytes and V79 cells. 7, 12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were employed as indirectly acting reference mutagens. Mutagenic effects were measured by induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). With DMBA, SCE-inducing effects were found to be quite similar after activation by S9 mix and activation by hepatocytes. In contrast with AFB1, S9 activation led to a stronger SCE induction than hepatocyte activation in both target cells. The induction of chromosomal aberrations by AFB1 after activation by the two metabolizing systems was also analyzed in V79 cells. This experiment again revealed that AFB1 was more efficiently activated by S9 mix than by hepatocytes. The experiments have shown that the suitability of hepatocytes as an activation system is not restricted to microbial or eukaryotic point mutation assays, but that hepatocyte metabolism can also be successfully included in cytogenetic tests with short- and long-term cultures of mammalian target cells.

  6. Pregnane X Receptor Modulates the Inflammatory Response in Primary Cultures of Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mengxi; Cui, Wenqi; Woody, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is characterized by a rapid increase in the expression of inflammatory mediators to initiate the acute phase response in liver. Inflammatory mediator release is counterbalanced by the coordinated expression of anti-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1-Ra) through time. This study determined whether activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) alters the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible gene expression program in primary cultures of hepatocytes (PCHs). Preactivation of PXR for 24 hours in PCHs isolated from wild-type mice suppressed the subsequent LPS-inducible expression of the key inflammatory mediators interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) but not in PCHs isolated from Pxr-null (PXR-knockout [KO]) mice. Basal expression of key inflammatory cytokines was elevated in PCHs from PXR-KO mice. Stimulation of PCHs from PXR-KO mice with LPS alone produced enhanced levels of IL-1β when compared with wild-type mice. Experiments performed using PCHs from both humanized-PXR transgenic mice as well as human donors indicate that prolonged activation of PXR produces an increased secretion of IL1-Ra from cells through time. Our data reveal a working model that describes a pivotal role for PXR in both inhibiting as well as in resolving the inflammatory response in hepatocytes. Understanding the molecular details of how PXR is converted from a positive regulator of drug-metabolizing enzymes into a transcriptional suppressor of inflammation in liver will provide new pharmacologic strategies for modulating inflammatory-related diseases in the liver and intestine. PMID:25527709

  7. Microstructured multi-well plate for three-dimensional packed cell seeding and hepatocyte cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy N.; Au, Sam H.; Faris, Ronald A.; Yuen, Po Ki

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a microstructured multi-well plate for enabling three-dimensional (3D) high density seeding and culture of cells through the use of a standard laboratory centrifuge to promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. Each well has microfeatures on the bottom that are comprised of a series of ditches/open microchannels. The dimensions of the microchannels promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro. After cell seeding with a standard pipette, the microstructured multi-well plates were centrifuged to tightly pack cells inside the ditches in order to enhance cell-cell interactions and induce formation of 3D cellular structures during cell culture. Cell-cell interactions were optimized based on cell packing by considering dimensions of the ditches/open microchannels, orientation of the microstructured multi-well plate during centrifugation, cell seeding density, and the centrifugal force and time. With the optimized cell packing conditions, we demonstrated that after 7 days of cell culture, primary human hepatocytes adhered tightly together to form cord-like structures that resembled 3D tissue-like cellular architecture. Importantly, cell membrane polarity was restored without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. PMID:25379107

  8. Microstructured multi-well plate for three-dimensional packed cell seeding and hepatocyte cell culture.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Au, Sam H; Faris, Ronald A; Yuen, Po Ki

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we present a microstructured multi-well plate for enabling three-dimensional (3D) high density seeding and culture of cells through the use of a standard laboratory centrifuge to promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. Each well has microfeatures on the bottom that are comprised of a series of ditches/open microchannels. The dimensions of the microchannels promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro. After cell seeding with a standard pipette, the microstructured multi-well plates were centrifuged to tightly pack cells inside the ditches in order to enhance cell-cell interactions and induce formation of 3D cellular structures during cell culture. Cell-cell interactions were optimized based on cell packing by considering dimensions of the ditches/open microchannels, orientation of the microstructured multi-well plate during centrifugation, cell seeding density, and the centrifugal force and time. With the optimized cell packing conditions, we demonstrated that after 7 days of cell culture, primary human hepatocytes adhered tightly together to form cord-like structures that resembled 3D tissue-like cellular architecture. Importantly, cell membrane polarity was restored without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants.

  9. Differentiation of human foreskin fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Zhao, Ping; Wan, Zhihong; Jin, Xueyuan; Cheng, Yongqian; Yan, Tao; Qing, Song; Ding, Ning; Xin, Shaojie

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differentiation potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). The iPSCs were firstly induced by transduction of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC into HFFs using retrovirus. Afterwards, expressions of pluripotency factors were identified by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining, and karyotype, embryoid, and teratoma were observed by microscope. Then, iPSCs were gradually differentiated into endoderm cells, hepatic progenitor cells, and mature HLCs by special culture medium. During this process, differentiation efficiency into each kind of cells was evaluated by detecting SOX17, HNF4a, and ALB using flow cytometry, respectively. Besides, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was conducted to detect the secretion of ALB in iPSC-induced HLCs and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of hepatocyte-specific genes. The iPSCs were successfully induced by HFFs, which exhibited typical embryonic stem cells morphology, positive alkaline phosphatase staining, normal diploid karyotype, and positive expression of various pluripotency factors. Meanwhile, spherical embryoid and teratoma with 3 germ layers were formed by iPSCs. The iPSCs were consecutively induced into endoderm cells, hepatic progenitor cells and mature HLCs, and the differentiation efficiency was 55.7 ± 2.9%, 45.7 ± 4.8%, and 35.0 ± 3.9%, respectively. Besides, the secretion of ALB and expression of various hepatocyte-specific genes was highly detected in iPSC-induced HLCs. The iPSCs were successfully derived from HFFs and then differentiated into HLCs, which proved a new source for hepatocyte transplantation.

  10. Modulation of protein synthesis and secretion by substratum in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhakaran, P.R.; Stamatoglou, S.C.; Hughes, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    Hepatocytes isolated by perfusion of adult rat liver and cultured on substrata consisting of one or more of the major components of the liver biomatrix (fibronectin, laminin, type IV collagen) have been examined for the synthesis of defined proteins. Under these conditions, tyrosine amino transferase, a marker of hepatocyte function, is maintained at similar levels in response to dexamethasone over 5 days in culture on each substratum, and total cellular protein synthesis remains constant. By contrast, there is a rapid decrease in synthesis and secretion of albumin and a 3-7-fold increase in synthesis and section of ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein which are most marked on a laminin substratum, but least evident on type IV collagen, and an increased synthesis of fibronectin and type IV collagen. The newly synthesized matrix proteins are present in the cell layer as well as in cell secretions. The enhanced synthesis of fibronectin is less in cells seeded onto a fibronectin substratum than on laminin or type IV collagen substrata. These results indicate that hepatocytes cultured in serum-free medium on substrata composed of components of the liver biomatrix maintain certain functions of the differentiated state (tyrosine amino transferase), lose others (albumin secretion) and switch to increased synthesis of matrix components as well as fetal markers such as ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein. The magnitude of these effects depends on the substratum on which the hepatocytes are cultured.

  11. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund Cj; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in "humanized" mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer.

  12. Clonal Expansion of Normal-Appearing Human Hepatocytes during Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mason, William S.; Liu, Chen; Aldrich, Carol E.; Litwin, Samuel; Yeh, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are associated with persistent immune killing of infected hepatocytes. Hepatocytes constitute a largely self-renewing population. Thus, immune killing may exert selective pressure on the population, leading it to evolve in order to survive. A gradual course of hepatocyte evolution toward an HBV-resistant state is suggested by the substantial decline in the fraction of infected hepatocytes that occurs during the course of chronic infections. Consistent with hepatocyte evolution, clones of >1,000 hepatocytes develop postinfection in the noncirrhotic livers of chimpanzees chronically infected with HBV and of woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (W. S. Mason, A. R. Jilbert, and J. Summers, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102:1139-1144, 2005; W. S. Mason et al., J. Virol. 83:8396-8408, 2009). The present study was carried out to determine (i) if extensive clonal expansion of hepatocytes also occurred in human HBV carriers, particularly in the noncirrhotic liver, and (ii) if clonal expansion included normal-appearing hepatocytes, not just hepatocytes that appear premalignant. Host DNA extracted from fragments of noncancerous liver, collected during surgical resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), was analyzed by inverse PCR for randomly integrated HBV DNA as a marker of expanding hepatocyte lineages. This analysis detected extensive clonal expansion of hepatocytes, as previously found in chronically infected chimpanzees and woodchucks. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), and DNA was extracted from the adjacent section for inverse PCR to detect integrated HBV DNA. This analysis revealed that clonal expansion can occur among normal-appearing human hepatocytes. PMID:20519397

  13. A pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform for the efficient differentiation of human hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ong, Louis Jun Ye; Chong, Lor Huai; Jin, Lin; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Lee, Poh Seng; Yu, Hanry; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Leo, Hwa Liang; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2017-10-01

    The practical application of microfluidic liver models for in vitro drug testing is partly hampered by their reliance on human primary hepatocytes, which are limited in number and have batch-to-batch variation. Human stem cell-derived hepatocytes offer an attractive alternative cell source, although their 3D differentiation and maturation in a microfluidic platform have not yet been demonstrated. We develop a pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform to achieve long-term and efficient differentiation of human liver progenitor cells into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). The device contains a micropillar array to immobilize cells three-dimensionally in a central cell culture compartment flanked by two side perfusion channels. Constant pump-free medium perfusion is accomplished by controlling the differential heights of horizontally orientated inlet and outlet media reservoirs. Computational fluid dynamic simulation is used to estimate the hydrostatic pressure heads required to achieve different perfusion flow rates, which are experimentally validated by micro-particle image velocimetry, as well as viability and functional assessments in a primary rat hepatocyte model. We perform on-chip differentiation of HepaRG, a human bipotent progenitor cell, and discover that 3D microperfusion greatly enhances the hepatocyte differentiation efficiency over static 2D and 3D cultures. However, HepaRG progenitor cells are highly sensitive to the time-point at which microperfusion is applied. Isolated HepaRG cells that are primed as static 3D spheroids before being subjected to microperfusion yield a significantly higher proportion of HLCs (92%) than direct microperfusion of isolated HepaRG cells (62%). This platform potentially offers a simple and efficient means to develop highly functional microfluidic liver models incorporating human stem cell-derived HLCs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2360-2370. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Sulindac and Its Metabolites Inhibit Multiple Transport Proteins in Rat and Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Paine, Mary F.

    2010-01-01

    Sulindac is a commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. This study tested the hypothesis that sulindac-mediated drug–drug interactions and/or hepatotoxicity may be caused, in part, by inhibition of proteins responsible for the hepatic transport of drugs and/or bile acids by sulindac and/or sulindac metabolites [sulindac sulfone (S-sulfone) and sulindac sulfide (S-sulfide)]. The uptake and excretion of model substrates, [3H]taurocholate (TC), [3H]estradiol 17-β-glucuronide (E217G), and nitrofurantoin (NF), were investigated in rat and human suspended and sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). In suspended rat hepatocytes, S-sulfone and S-sulfide inhibited Na+-dependent TC initial uptake (IC50 of 24.9 ± 6.4 and 12.5 ± 1.8 μM, respectively) and Na+-independent E217G initial uptake (IC50 of 12.1 ± 1.6 and 6.3 ± 0.3 μM, respectively). In rat SCH, sulindac metabolites (100 μM) decreased the in vitro biliary clearance (Clbiliary) of TC, E217G, and NF by 38 to 83%, 81 to 97%, and 33 to 57%, respectively; S-sulfone and S-sulfide also decreased the TC and NF biliary excretion index by 39 to 55%. In suspended human hepatocytes, S-sulfone and S-sulfide inhibited Na+-dependent TC initial uptake (IC50 of 42.2 and 3.1 μM, respectively); S-sulfide also inhibited the TC Clbiliary in human SCH. Sulindac/metabolites markedly inhibited hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of E217G by 51 to 100% in human SCH. In conclusion, sulindac and metabolites are potent inhibitors of the uptake and biliary clearance of bile acids in rat and human hepatocytes and also inhibit substrates of rat breast cancer resistance protein, rat and human organic anion-transporting polypeptides, and human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Inhibition of multiple hepatic transport proteins by sulindac/metabolites may play an important role in clinically significant sulindac-mediated drug–drug interactions and/or liver injury. PMID:20430841

  15. Sulindac and its metabolites inhibit multiple transport proteins in rat and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Paine, Mary F; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2010-08-01

    Sulindac is a commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. This study tested the hypothesis that sulindac-mediated drug-drug interactions and/or hepatotoxicity may be caused, in part, by inhibition of proteins responsible for the hepatic transport of drugs and/or bile acids by sulindac and/or sulindac metabolites [sulindac sulfone (S-sulfone) and sulindac sulfide (S-sulfide)]. The uptake and excretion of model substrates, [(3)H]taurocholate (TC), [(3)H]estradiol 17-beta-glucuronide (E217G), and nitrofurantoin (NF), were investigated in rat and human suspended and sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). In suspended rat hepatocytes, S-sulfone and S-sulfide inhibited Na(+)-dependent TC initial uptake (IC(50) of 24.9 +/- 6.4 and 12.5 +/- 1.8 microM, respectively) and Na(+)-independent E217G initial uptake (IC(50) of 12.1 +/- 1.6 and 6.3 +/- 0.3 microM, respectively). In rat SCH, sulindac metabolites (100 microM) decreased the in vitro biliary clearance (Cl(biliary)) of TC, E217G, and NF by 38 to 83%, 81 to 97%, and 33 to 57%, respectively; S-sulfone and S-sulfide also decreased the TC and NF biliary excretion index by 39 to 55%. In suspended human hepatocytes, S-sulfone and S-sulfide inhibited Na(+)-dependent TC initial uptake (IC(50) of 42.2 and 3.1 microM, respectively); S-sulfide also inhibited the TC Cl(biliary) in human SCH. Sulindac/metabolites markedly inhibited hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of E217G by 51 to 100% in human SCH. In conclusion, sulindac and metabolites are potent inhibitors of the uptake and biliary clearance of bile acids in rat and human hepatocytes and also inhibit substrates of rat breast cancer resistance protein, rat and human organic anion-transporting polypeptides, and human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Inhibition of multiple hepatic transport proteins by sulindac/metabolites may play an important role in clinically significant sulindac-mediated drug-drug interactions and/or liver injury.

  16. Perfused human hepatocyte microtissues identify reactive metabolite-forming and mitochondria-perturbing hepatotoxins.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cliff; Shaeri, Mohsen; Large, Emma; Cornforth, Terri; Robinson, Angela; Kostrzewski, Tomasz; Sison-Young, Rowena; Goldring, Christopher; Park, Kevin; Hughes, David

    2017-09-15

    Hepatotoxins cause liver damage via many mechanisms but the formation of reactive metabolites and/or damage to liver mitochondria are commonly implicated. We assess 3D human primary hepatocyte microtissues as a platform for hepatotoxicity studies with reactive metabolite-forming and mitochondria-perturbing compounds. We show that microtissues formed from cryopreserved human hepatocytes had bile canaliculi, transcribed mRNA from genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism and expressed functional cytochrome P450 enzymes. Hierarchical clustering was used to distinguish dose-dependent hepatotoxicity elicited by clozapine, fialuridine and acetaminophen (APAP) from control cultures and less liver-damaging compounds, olanzapine and entecavir. The regio-isomer of acetaminophen, N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) clustered with the hepatotoxic compounds. The principal metabolites of APAP were formed and dose-dependent changes in metabolite profile similar to those seen in patient overdose was observed. The toxicological profile of APAP was indistinguishable from that of AMAP, confirming AMAP as a human hepatotoxin. Tissue oxygen consumption rate was significantly decreased within 2h of exposure to APAP or AMAP, concomitant with glutathione depletion. These data highlight the potential utility of perfused metabolically functional human liver microtissues in drug development and mechanistic toxicology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund CJ; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in “humanized” mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer. PMID:27019999

  18. Effect of Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Melatonin on the Isolation of Human Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Solanas, Estela; Sostres, Carlos; Serrablo, Alejandro; García-Gil, Agustín; García, Joaquín J; Aranguren, Francisco J; Jiménez, Pilar; Hughes, Robin D; Serrano, María T

    2015-01-01

    The availability of fully functional human hepatocytes is critical for progress in human hepatocyte transplantation and the development of bioartificial livers and in vitro liver systems. However, the cell isolation process impairs the hepatocyte status and determines the number of viable cells that can be obtained. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and melatonin in the human hepatocyte isolation protocol. Human hepatocytes were isolated from liver pieces resected from 10 patients undergoing partial hepatectomy. Each piece was dissected into 2 equally sized pieces and randomized, in 5 of 10 isolations, to perfusion with 1% DMSO-containing perfusion buffer or buffer also containing 5 mM melatonin using the 2-step collagenase perfusion technique (experiment 1), and in the other 5 isolations to standard perfusion or perfusion including 1% DMSO (experiment 2). Tissues perfused with DMSO yielded 70.6% more viable hepatocytes per gram of tissue (p = 0.076), with a 26.1% greater albumin production (p < 0.05) than those perfused with control buffer. Melatonin did not significantly affect (p > 0.05) any of the studied parameters, but cell viability, dehydrogenase activity, albumin production, urea secretion, and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activity were slightly higher in cells isolated with melatonin-containing perfusion buffer compared to those isolated with DMSO. In conclusion, addition of 1% DMSO to the hepatocyte isolation protocol could improve the availability and functionality of hepatocytes for transplantation, but further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms involved.

  19. Chemically induced hepatotoxicity in human stem cell-induced hepatocytes compared with primary hepatocytes and HepG2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Jin; Lee, Hyuk-Mi; Park, Young-Il; Yi, Hee; Lee, Hunjoo; So, ByungJae; Song, Jae-Young; Kang, Hwan-Goo

    2016-10-01

    Stem cell-induced hepatocytes (SC-iHeps) have been suggested as a valuable model for evaluating drug toxicology. Here, human-induced pluripotent stem cells (QIA7) and embryonic stem cells (WA01) were differentiated into hepatocytes, and the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen (AAP) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were compared with primary hepatocytes (p-Heps) and HepG2. In a cytotoxicity assay, the IC50 of SC-iHeps was similar to that in p-Heps and HepG2 in the AAP groups but different from that in p-Heps of the AFB1 groups. In a multi-parameter assay, phenotypic changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium influx and oxidative stress were similar between QIA7-iHeps and p-Heps following AAP and AFB1 treatment but relatively low in WA01-iHeps and HepG2. Most hepatic functional markers (hepatocyte-specific genes, albumin/urea secretion, and the CYP450 enzyme activity) were decreased in a dose-dependent manner following AAP and AFB1 treatment in SC-iHeps and p-Heps but not in HepG2. Regarding CYP450 inhibition, the cell viability of SC-iHeps and p-Heps was increased by ketoconazole, a CYP3A4 inhibitor. Collectively, SC-iHeps and p-Heps showed similar cytotoxicity and hepatocyte functional effects for AAP and AFB1 compared with HepG2. Therefore, SC-iHeps have phenotypic characteristics and sensitivity to cytotoxic chemicals that are more similar to p-Heps than to HepG2 cells.

  20. Inhibition of iron toxicity in rat hepatocyte culture by natural phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chimi, H; Morel, I; Lescoat, G; Pasdeloup, N; Cillard, P; Cillard, J

    1995-10-01

    Iron supplementation of adult rat hepatocyte culture induced a cytotoxic effect as shown by an increase of lipid peroxidation. The antioxidant activity of some natural phenolic compounds from olive oil (caffeic acid, oleuropein, tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol) has been investigated on this iron-loaded hepatocyte culture model. These compounds greatly reduced malondialdehyde production which was used as a marker for iron-induced lipid peroxidation. This reduction was concentration-dependent of phenolic compound (in the range of 20-100 mum). Moreover, it was not significantly different from one tested compound to another. To clarify the antioxidant mechanism of these compounds, their free radical scavenging activity has been tested in a cell-free experimental model using spin trapping-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The four tested compounds were able to scavenge hydroxyl and lipid radicals. They exhibited various efficiency towards hydroxyl radical whereas they presented the same order of reactivity towards lipid radicals. Moreover, only caffeic acid and oleuropein could scavenge Superoxide anion. Therefore, the reactivity of the phenolic compounds towards these reactive oxygen species provided an insight into their antioxidant activity in iron-loaded hepatocyte culture. These compounds could probably interfere with the chain-propagating steps of the lipid peroxidation induced by iron in hepatocytes, which resulted in an inhibition of toxicity.

  1. Interactions of inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and fibrates in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gerondaes, P; Alberti, K G; Agius, L

    1988-01-01

    Culture of rat hepatocytes with etomoxir, an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), for 48 h, resulted in increased carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT) activity (74%), a marked decrease in CPT activity (82%) measured in detergent extracts, and increased activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (227%) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (65%). Changes in CAT and CPT activities were not observed after 4 h culture with etomoxir. When hepatocytes were cultured with etomoxir and benzafibrate (a hypolipidaemic analogue of clofibrate) for 48 h, etomoxir prevented the 5-fold increase in CAT activity caused by bezafibrate, whereas bezafibrate suppressed the increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fructose-bisphosphatase caused by etomoxir. However, bezafibrate did not prevent the suppression of CPT activity by etomoxir. Etomoxir inhibited palmitate beta-oxidation and ketogenesis after short-term (0-4 h) and long-term (48 h) exposure, but it caused accumulation of triacylglycerol in hepatocytes only after short-term exposure (0-4 h). These effects of etomoxir on fatty acid metabolism and suppression of CPT (after 48 h) were similar in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes, but the increases in CAT and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were higher in periportal than in perivenous cells. The effects of CPT I inhibitors on CAT activity and long-term suppression of CPT activity are probably mediated by independent mechanisms. PMID:3421940

  2. Perifusion of co-cultured hepatocytes: optimization of studies on drug metabolism and cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R; Wegner, H; Alber, J

    1996-04-01

    The combination of co-cultivation of hepatocytes and epithelial cell lines with a newly developed perifusion system was used for in vitro studies on drug metabolism and cytotoxicity. This approach improved the viability and enhanced the induction of the biotransforming capacity of the hepatocytes. As demonstrated for the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity by 3-methylcholanthrene or benzanthracene, co-cultured hepatocytes in the perifusion system responded more sensitively to these inducers than without perifusion, most likely owing to stable (steady-state) concentrations of the inducers under the former conditions and rapidly declining concentrations under the latter conditions. The perifusion approach rendered it possible to determine the kinetics of drug metabolism during single or sequential incubations. After induction with 3-methylcholanthrene and phenobarbital, phase I metabolism of lonazolac to the monohydroxylated product in perifused co-cultures closely (87%) approached the values reported for the in vivo production, whereas in stationary co-cultures only 52% could be reached. Likewise, cytotoxic effects could be detected more precisely in the perifused co-cultures. If cells were pretreated with 0.2 mmol/L galactosamine for 3 h, perifusion with increasing concentrations of menadione differentially killed epithelial RL-ET-14 cells and hepatocytes at low and high concentrations, respectively, while in stationary co-cultures no differential effect was observed and only the higher concentrations were cytotoxic for both cells. Prevention by incubation with S-adenosylmethionine of menadione cytotoxicity up to a menadione concentration of 250 micromol/L was seen only in the perifused co-cultures, whereas in stationary cultures only a slight shift of the cytotoxic concentration exerting 50% cell damage to higher values was noted. These results demonstrate the versatile application of perifused co-cultures for studies on drug metabolism including

  3. Trichostatin A, a critical factor in maintaining the functional differentiation of primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Henkens, Tom . E-mail: Tom.Henkens@vub.ac.be; Papeleu, Peggy; Elaut, Greetje; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) have been shown to increase differentiation-related gene expression in several tumor-derived cell lines by hyperacetylating core histones. Effects of HDI on primary cultured cells, however, have hardly been investigated. In the present study, the ability of trichostatin A (TSA), a prototype hydroxamate HDI, to counteract the loss of liver-specific functions in primary rat hepatocyte cultures has been investigated. Upon exposure to TSA, it was found that the cell viability of the cultured hepatocytes and their albumin secretion as a function of culture time were increased. TSA-treated hepatocytes also better maintained cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated phase I biotransformation capacity, whereas the activity of phase II glutathione S-transferases (GST) was not affected. Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis of CYP1A1, CYP2B1 and CYP3A11 protein and mRNA levels, respectively, further revealed that TSA acts at the transcriptional level. In addition, protein expression levels of the liver-enriched transcription factors (LETFs) hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4{alpha}) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP{alpha}) were accordingly increased by TSA throughout culture time. In conclusion, these findings indicate that TSA plays a major role in the preservation of the differentiated hepatic phenotype in culture. It is suggested that the effects of TSA on CYP gene expression are mediated via controlling the expression of LETFs.

  4. Treatment of surgically induced acute liver failure with transplantation of highly differentiated immortalized human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Miyazaki, M; Fukaya, K; Inoue, Y; Sakaguchi, M; Noguchi, H; Matsumura, T; Watanabe, T; Totsugawa, T; Tanaka, N; Namba, M

    2000-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source of hepatic function in bioartficial liver (BAL), but the shortage of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation limits this modality. To resolve this issue, primary human fetal hepatocytes were immortalized using simian virus 40 large T antigen. One of the immortal cell lines, OUMS-29, showed highly differentiated liver functions. Intrasplenic transplantation of OUMS-29 cells protected 90% hepatectomized rats from hyperammonemia and significantly prolonged their survival. Essentially unlimited availability of OUMS-29 cells supports their clinical use for BAL treatment.

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes as an alternative to human adult hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Takeshi; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research have attracted much attention. The ability to generate such cells from somatic cells has implications for overcoming both immunological rejection and the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells. Hepatocytes derived from patient-specific iPS cells offer a possible solution to the shortage of cell sources in cell replacement therapy, drug screening, and disease model. Despite such great promise, however, recent articles have questioned the viability of the therapeutic applications of iPS cells. These cells must, therefore, satisfy stringent criteria prior to practical use. The main focus of this review is a description of the current status of hepatic differentiation technology of iPS cells and a discussion of the concerns regarding the practical use of these techniques in cell replacement therapy, drug screening, and disease model. The current status of strategies for generating iPS cells and the accumulated knowledge on strategies for differentiating ES cells into hepatocytes will be summarized. We also refer to the possibility of direct conversion of adult somatic cells into functional hepatocytes.

  6. Morphology and albumin secretion of adult rat hepatocytes cultured on a hydrophobic porous expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yuminamochi, Eri; Yasuda, Ruri; Amano, Yoshifumi

    2003-01-01

    Primary culture of rat hepatocytes was performed on a hydrophobic porous expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane incorporated into the base of a culture dish. Two types of ePTFE membranes, a uniaxially expanded type (ePTFE-1) and a biaxially expanded type (ePTFE-2), could be used as the culture surfaces for hepatocytes. The formation of multicellular aggregates was observed in the culture dish when each membrane type was used. A pore size of 1 mum or higher was adequate for cell adhesion and albumin secretion for both membrane types. The activity of albumin secretion in the dish with the ePTFE membrane was markedly higher than that in the polystyrene dish. Spheroidal multicellular aggregates (spheroids) were observed when hepatocytes were cultured on the ePTFE-1 membrane. The ePTFE-1 membrane maintained the albumin secretion activity for a longer period than the non-expanded PTFE film. It was assumed that the cooperative action of membrane structure and oxygen permeability promoted the formation of cell aggregates and increased the albumin secretion activity.

  7. Effects of model inducers on thyroxine UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase activity in vitro in rat and mouse hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Viollon-Abadie, C; Bigot-Lasserre, D; Nicod, L; Carmichael, N; Richert, L

    2000-12-01

    Thyroxine (T(4))-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity was measured directly in cultured male Sprague-Dawley rat and OF-1 mouse hepatocyte monolayers. The activity of T(4)-UGT (pmol/min/g liver) in vitro in hepatocyte cultures was, after 24 hr in culture, equivalent to that previously measured in vivo in rat and mouse liver microsomes (Viollon-Abadie et al., 1999). A progressive decline in T(4)-UGT activity occurred over time in both rat and mouse hepatocyte cultures. Treatment of cultures with various model inducers such as phenobarbital (PB), beta-naphthoflavone (NF) and clofibric acid (CLO) induced a strong increase in T(4)-UGT activity in rat hepatocyte monolayers. In addition, and as expected from available in vivo data, treatment of rat hepatocyte cultures with NF also increased p-nitrophenol (PNP)-UGT activity and treatment with PB or CLO increased bilirubin (Bili)-UGT activity. In contrast, T(4)-UGT activity in mouse hepatocyte monolayers was not affected by the treatments, neither were PNP- and Bili- UGT activities. These in vitro data confirm our previous in vivo observations that these inducers increase rat but not mouse liver T(4)-UGT activities (Viollon-Abadie et al., 1999). The present study thus demonstrates that hepatocyte monolayers are appropriated for the evaluation and inter-species comparison of the effects of xenobiotics on T(4)-UGT activities.

  8. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  9. Exposure of primary rat hepatocytes in long-term DMSO culture to selected transition metals induces hepatocyte proliferation and formation of duct-like structures.

    PubMed

    Cable, E E; Isom, H C

    1997-12-01

    We previously showed that primary rat hepatocytes plated on a rat-tail collagen coated dish and fed a chemically-defined medium supplemented with 2% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) can be maintained in a well-differentiated, non-replicating state for periods of several months. In this study, we show that the addition of copper, iron, and zinc to the DMSO-containing chemically defined medium induced DNA synthesis and cell replication during the first two months in culture without loss of hepatic differentiation. DNA synthesis occurred throughout the hepatocyte population without regard to cellular size. No changes were observed in properties indicative of well-differentiated hepatocytes, including cellular morphology, ultrastructure, albumin, or cytokeratin-8 expression. During the third month in culture, after the hepatocytes had become confluent, pseudoduct structures became apparent. Examination of cells lining the ducts by immunohistochemistry showed that these cells lost the ability to express albumin and stained more intensely for cytokeratin 19 and laminin. The ultrastructure of the cells lining the ducts was altered and became more characteristic of bile duct cells. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that connexin 43, a marker of bile-duct proliferation, was expressed in the duct-like cells. We conclude that under these specific nutritive conditions, primary rat hepatocytes proliferate and, with time, begin to form duct-like structures with altered gene expression and ultrastructural properties.

  10. Comparison of primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell line Hepg2 with regard to their biotransformation properties.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Stefan; Stahl, Frank; Bader, Augustinus

    2003-08-01

    Cultures of primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell line HepG2 are frequently used in in vitro models for human biotransformation studies. In this study, we characterized and compared the capacity of these model systems to indicate the presence of different classes of promutagens. Genotoxic sensitivity, enzyme activity, and gene expression were monitored in response to treatment with food promutagens benzo[a]pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). DNA damage could be detected reliably with the comet assay in primary human hepatocytes, which were maintained in sandwich culture. All three promutagens caused DNA damage in primary cells, but in HepG2 no genotoxic effects of DMN and PhIP could be detected. We supposed that the lack of specific enzymes accounts for their inability to process these promutagens. Therefore, we quantified the expression of a broad range of genes coding for drug-metabolizing enzymes with real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The genes code for cytochromes p450 and, in addition, for a series of important phase II enzymes. The expression level of these genes in human hepatocytes was similar to those previously reported for human liver samples. On the other hand, expression levels in HepG2 differed significantly from that in human. Activity and expression, especially of phase I enzymes, were demonstrated to be extremely low in HepG2 cells. Up-regulation of specific genes by test substances was similar in both cell types. In conclusion, human hepatocytes are the preferred model for biotransformation in human liver, whereas HepG2 cells may be useful to study regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  11. Cytotoxic mechanisms of hydrosulfide anion and cyanide anion in primary rat hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rodney W; Valentine, Holly L; Valentine, William M

    2003-06-30

    Hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide are known to compromise mitochondrial respiration through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase and this is generally considered to be their primary mechanism of toxicity. Experimental studies and the efficiency of current treatment protocols suggest that H(2)S may exert adverse physiological effects through additional mechanisms. To evaluate the role of alternative mechanisms in H(2)S toxicity, the relative contributions of electron transport inhibition, uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to hydrosulfide and cyanide anion cytotoxicity in primary hepatocyte cultures were examined. Supplementation of hepatocytes with the glycolytic substrate, fructose, rescued hepatocytes from cyanide anion induced toxicity, whereas fructose supplementation increased hydrosulfide anion toxicity suggesting that hydrosulfide anion may compromise glycolysis in hepatocytes. Although inhibitors of the MPTP opening were protective for hydrosulfide anion, they had no effect on cyanide anion toxicity, consistent with an involvement of the permeability transition pore in hydrosulfide anion toxicity but not cyanide anion toxicity. Exposure of isolated rat liver mitochondria to hydrosulfide did not result in large amplitude swelling suggesting that if H(2)S induces the permeability transition it does so indirectly through a mechanism requiring other cellular components. Hydrosulfide anion did not appear to be an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration in hepatocytes based upon the inability of oligomycin and fructose to protect hepatocytes from hydrosulfide anion toxicity. These findings support mechanisms additional to inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase in hydrogen sulfide toxicity. Further investigations are required to assess the role of the permeability transition in H(2)S toxicity, determine whether similar affects occur in other cell types or in vivo and evaluate whether this may

  12. Senescent human hepatocytes express a unique secretory phenotype and promote macrophage migration

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M; Skoien, Richard; Bokil, Nilesh J; Melino, Michelle; Thomas, Gethin P; Loo, Dorothy; Gabrielli, Brian; Hill, Michelle M; Sweet, Matthew J; Clouston, Andrew D; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To develop a model of stress-induced senescence to study the hepatocyte senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP). METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide treatment was used to induce senescence in the human HepG2 hepatocyte cell line. Senescence was confirmed by cytochemical staining for a panel of markers including Ki67, p21, heterochromatin protein 1β, and senescence-associated-β-galactosidase activity. Senescent hepatocytes were characterised by gene expression arrays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and conditioned media was used in proteomic analyses, a human chemokine protein array, and cell migration assays to characterise the composition and function of the hepatocyte SASP. RESULTS: Senescent hepatocytes induced classical markers of senescence (p21, heterochromatin protein 1β, and senescence-associated-β-galactosidase activity); and downregulated the proliferation marker, Ki67. Hepatocyte senescence induced a 4.6-fold increase in total secreted protein (P = 0.06) without major alterations in the protein profile. Senescence-induced genes were identified by microarray (Benjamini Hochberg-corrected P < 0.05); and, consistent with the increase in secreted protein, gene ontology analysis revealed a significant enrichment of secreted proteins among inducible genes. The hepatocyte SASP included characteristic factors such as interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6, as well as novel components such as SAA4, IL-32 and Fibrinogen, which were validated by qPCR and/or chemokine protein array. Senescent hepatocyte-conditioned medium elicited migration of inflammatory (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, GM-CSF-derived), but not non-inflammatory (CSF-1-derived) human macrophages (P = 0.022), which could contribute to a pro-inflammatory microenvironment in vivo, or facilitate the clearance of senescent cells. CONCLUSION: Our novel model of hepatocyte senescence provides insights into mechanisms by which senescent hepatocytes may promote chronic

  13. Hepatic Hyperplasia Associated with Discordant Xenogeneic Parenchymal-Nonparenchymal Interactions in Human Hepatocyte-Repopulated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Utoh, Rie; Tateno, Chise; Kataoka, Miho; Tachibana, Asato; Masumoto, Norio; Yamasaki, Chihiro; Shimada, Takashi; Itamoto, Toshiyuki; Asahara, Toshimasa; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Liver mass is optimized in relation to body mass. Rat (r) and human (h) hepatocytes were transplanted into liver-injured immunodeficient mice and allowed to proliferate for 3 or 11 weeks, respectively, when the transplants stopped proliferating. Liver/body weight ratio was normal throughout in r-hepatocyte-bearing mice (r-hep-mice), but increased continuously in h-hepatocyte-bearing mice (h-hep-mice), until reaching approximately three times the normal m-liver size, which was considered to be hyperplasia of h-hepatocytes because there were no significant differences in cell size among host (mouse [m-]) and donor (r- and h-) hepatocytes. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type I receptor, TGF-β type II receptor, and activin A type IIA receptor mRNAs in proliferating r-hepatocytes of r-hep-mice were lower than in resting r-hepatocytes (normal levels) and increased to normal levels during the termination phase. Concomitantly, m-hepatic stellate cells began to express TGF-β proteins. In stark contrast, TGF-β type II receptor and activin A type IIA receptor mRNAs in h-hepatocytes remained low throughout and m-hepatic stellate cells did not express TGF-β in h-hep-mice. As expected, Smad2 and 3 translocated into nuclei in r-hep-mice but not in h-hep-mice. Histological analysis showed a paucity of m-stellate cells in h-hepatocyte colonies of h-hep-mouse liver. We conclude that m-stellate cells are able to normally interact with concordant r-hepatocytes but not with discordant h-hepatocytes, which seems to be at least partly responsible for the failure of the liver size optimization in h-hep-mice. PMID:20522646

  14. Role of Phosphatidic Acid Phosphatase Domain Containing 2 in Squalestatin 1-Mediated Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Primary Cultured Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Pant, Asmita; Kocarek, Thomas A

    2016-03-01

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) is a branch-point intermediate in the mevalonate pathway that is normally converted mainly to squalene by squalene synthase in the first committed step of sterol biosynthesis. Treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor squalestatin 1 (SQ1) causes accumulation of FPP, its dephosphorylated metabolite farnesol, and several oxidized farnesol-derived metabolites. In addition, SQ1 treatment of primary cultured rat hepatocytes increases CYP2B expression through a mechanism that requires FPP synthesis and activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Because direct farnesol treatment also increases CYP2B expression, it seems likely that SQ1-mediated CAR activation requires FPP dephosphorylation to farnesol. The lipid phosphatase, phosphatidic acid phosphatase domain containing 2 (PPAPDC2), was recently reported to catalyze FPP dephosphorylation. We therefore determined the effect of overexpressing or knocking down PPAPDC2 on SQ1-mediated CAR activation in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Cotransfection of rat hepatocytes with a plasmid expressing rat or human PPAPDC2 enhanced SQ1-mediated activation of a CAR-responsive reporter by 1.7- or 2.4-fold over the SQ1-mediated activation that was produced when hepatocytes were cotransfected with empty expression plasmid. Similarly, transduction of rat hepatocytes with a recombinant adenovirus expressing PPAPDC2 enhanced SQ1-mediated CYP2B1 mRNA induction by 1.4-fold over the induction that was seen in hepatocytes transduced with control adenovirus. Cotransfection with a short hairpin RNA targeting PPAPDC2 reduced SQ1-mediated CAR activation by approximately 80% relative to the activation that occurred in hepatocytes transfected with nontargeting short hairpin RNA. These results indicate that PPAPDC2 plays an important role in SQ1-mediated CAR activation, most likely by catalyzing the conversion of FPP to farnesol. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and

  15. A rational design approach for amino acid supplementation in hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Roth, Charles M; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G

    2009-08-15

    Improvement of culture media for mammalian cells is conducted via empirical adjustments, sometimes aided by statistical design methodologies. Here, we demonstrate a proof of principle for the use of constraints-based modeling to achieve enhanced performance of liver-specific functions of cultured hepatocytes during plasma exposure by adjusting amino acid supplementation and hormone levels in the medium. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is used to determine an amino acid flux profile consistent with a desired output; this is used to design an amino acid supplementation. Under conditions of no supplementation, empirical supplementation, and designed supplementation, hepatocytes were exposed to plasma and their morphology, specific cell functions (urea, albumin production) and lipid metabolism were measured. Urea production under the designed amino acid supplementation was found to be increased compared with previously reported (empirical) amino acid supplementation. Not surprisingly, the urea production attained was less than the theoretical value, indicating the existence of pathways or constraints not present in the current model. Although not an explicit design objective, albumin production was also increased by designed amino acid supplementation, suggesting a functional linkage between these outputs. In conjunction with traditional approaches to improving culture conditions, the rational design approach described herein provides a novel means to tune the metabolic outputs of cultured hepatocytes. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Human hepatocytes as an effective alternative experimental system for the evaluation of human drug properties: general concepts and assay procedures.

    PubMed

    Li, Albert P

    2008-01-01

    Human-based in vitro hepatic experimental systems are now used routinely in drug development. The rationale for the use of human-based in vitro systems is based on the known species-species differences in drug properties. Human-specific drug properties, by definition, cannot be defined using nonhuman experimental animals, and therefore can only be assessed in the preclinical phase of drug development using in vitro human-based approaches. A widely applied human-based in vitro experimental system for preclinical evaluation of drug properties is human hepatocytes. Our laboratory was one of the first to successfully isolate highly viable and functional hepatocytes from human livers, and we recently developed cryopreservation procedures to retain high viability and high attachment efficiency of the isolated hepatocytes. Successful cryopreservation of human hepatocytes greatly enhances the utility of this valuable in vitro experimental system, allowing storage, transport, convenient scheduling of experimentation and repeat experimentation using hepatocytes isolated from the same donors. Effective assays have been developed with cryopreserved human hepatocytes using multiwell plates for the evaluation of critical drug properties, including metabolic stability, drug-drug interaction potential, and drug toxicity. Human hepatocytes represent an alternative experimental system that plays a significant role in the 3Rs - the reduction, refinement, and replacement of the use of animals in preclinical drug development research.

  17. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  18. COVALENT BINDING OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE TO PROTEINS IN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES. (R826409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant and occupational solvent trichloroethylene is metabolized to a reactive intermediate that covalently binds to specific hepatic proteins in exposed mice and rats. In order to compare covalent binding between humans and rodents, primary hepatocyte c...

  19. Recent Progress in Hepatocyte Culture Models and Their Application to the Assessment of Drug Metabolism, Transport, and Toxicity in Drug Discovery: The Value of Tissue Engineering for the Successful Development of a Microphysiological System.

    PubMed

    Tetsuka, Kazuhiro; Ohbuchi, Masato; Tabata, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineering technology has provided many useful culture models. This article reviews the merits of this technology in a hepatocyte culture system and describes the applications of the sandwich-cultured hepatocyte model in drug discovery. In addition, we also review recent investigations of the utility of the 3-dimensional bioprinted human liver tissue model and spheroid model. Finally, we present the future direction and developmental challenges of a hepatocyte culture model for the successful establishment of a microphysiological system, represented as an organ-on-a-chip and even as a human-on-a-chip. A merit of advanced culture models is their potential use for detecting hepatotoxicity through repeated exposure to chemicals as they allow long-term culture while maintaining hepatocyte functionality. As a future direction, such advanced hepatocyte culture systems can be connected to other tissue models for evaluating tissue-to-tissue interaction beyond cell-to-cell interaction. This combination of culture models could represent parts of the human body in a microphysiological system. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Micropatterned co-culture of hepatocyte spheroids layered on non-parenchymal cells to understand heterotypic cellular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Hidenori; Sasaki, Kohei; Okimura, Saya; Nagamura, Masako; Nakasone, Yuichi

    2013-12-01

    Microfabrication and micropatterning techniques in tissue engineering offer great potential for creating and controlling cellular microenvironments including cell-matrix interactions, soluble stimuli and cell-cell interactions. Here, we present a novel approach to generate layered patterning of hepatocyte spheroids on micropatterned non-parenchymal feeder cells using microfabricated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Micropatterned PEG-hydrogel-treated substrates with two-dimensional arrays of gelatin circular domains (ϕ = 100 μm) were prepared by photolithographic method. Only on the critical structure of PEG hydrogel with perfect protein rejection, hepatocytes were co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells to be led to enhanced hepatocyte functions. Then, we investigated the mechanism of the functional enhancement in co-culture with respect to the contributions of soluble factors and direct cell-cell interactions. In particular, to elucidate the influence of soluble factors on hepatocyte function, hepatocyte spheroids underlaid with fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts) or endothelial cells (BAECs: bovine aortic endothelial cells) were compared with physically separated co-culture of hepatocyte monospheroids with NIH3T3 or BAEC using trans-well culture systems. Our results suggested that direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors, both of these between hepatocytes and fibroblasts, significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions. In contrast, direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact between hepatocytes and endothelial cells only contributed to enhance hepatocyte functions. This patterning technique can be a useful experimental tool for applications in basic science, drug screening and tissue engineering, as well as in the design of artificial liver devices.

  1. Utilization of supplemental methionine sources by primary cultures of chick hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dibner, J.J.

    1983-10-01

    Utilization of 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) as a substrate for protein synthesis was studied by using primary cultures of chick liver cells. Cultures were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of livers from week old Hubbard broiler chicks and were maintained for 4 days under nonproliferative conditions. Hepatocyte differentiation was verified by using dexamethasone induction of tyrosine aminotransferase activity. Conversion of (14C)HMB to L-methionine was shown by chromatographic analysis of hepatocyte protein hydrolysate and incorporation into protein was proven by cycloheximide inhibition of synthesis. When incorporation of HMB was compared to that of DL-methionine (DLM) equimolar quantities of the two sources were found in liver cell protein. These results support, at a cellular level, the conclusion that HMB and DLM are biochemically equivalent sources of methionine for protein synthesis.

  2. Effects of magnesium and iron on lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Günther, T; Vormann, J; Höllriegl, V

    1995-03-23

    In primary cultures of rat hepatocytes, the effects of extracellular Mg2+ and Fe on lipid peroxidation (LPO) as measured by means of malondialdehyde (MDA) formation were investigated. Incubation of hepatocytes at decreasing extracellular Mg2+ concentration enhanced LPO, depending on extracellular Fe. About 96% of MDA accumulated in the culture medium. Addition of desferrioxamine prevented LPO. Additionally, the formation of oxygen free radicals was determined by fluorescence reduction of cis-parinaric acid. With this method, an immediate decay of fluorescence was found after addition of Fe2+. Fluorescence reduction was completely prevented by desferrioxamine, indicating the function of extracellular Fe. This mechanism may operate additionally to the increase in intracellular Fe and intracellular formation of oxygen free radicals during Mg deficiency in vivo.

  3. Enrichment of hepatocytes in a HepaRG culture using spatially selective photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Rodrigues, Robim M.; Whelan, Maurice P.

    2010-03-01

    The human hepatoma HepaRG cell line is an in vitro cell model that is becoming an important tool in drug metabolism, hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and enzyme induction studies. The cells are highly proliferative during their undifferentiated state but once committed, they differentiate into two distinctly different cell types, namely, hepatocyte-like and biliary epithelial-like cells. The presence of the latter in the cell culture is considered to be a drawback of the cell model. Since the proliferating undifferentiated HepaRG cells have a bipotent character, the only way to improve the content ratio of hepatic versus biliary cells of differentiated HepaRG cells is to eradicate biliary cells in situ, in a way that free surface space does not become available and thus no transdifferentiation can occur. Spatially selective photodynamic therapy has proven to be effective for that purpose. First, all the cells were administered aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA) to stimulate the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a naturally occurring photosensitizer. Then, the biliary cells were automatically identified and outlined by bright-field image processing. Last, UV light patterns were projected onto the epithelial cells alone by a spatial light modulation device connected to an optical microscope; therefore, only these cells were destroyed by photodynamic therapy.

  4. Beta-oxidation in hepatocyte cultures from mice with peroxisomal gene knockouts.

    PubMed

    Dirkx, Ruud; Meyhi, Els; Asselberghs, Stanny; Reddy, Janardan; Baes, Myriam; Van Veldhoven, Paul P

    2007-06-08

    Beta-oxidation of carboxylates takes place both in mitochondria and peroxisomes and in each pathway parallel enzymes exist for each conversion step. In order to better define the substrate specificities of these enzymes and in particular the elusive role of peroxisomal MFP-1, hepatocyte cultures from mice with peroxisomal gene knockouts were used to assess the consequences on substrate degradation. Hepatocytes from mice with liver selective elimination of peroxisomes displayed severely impaired oxidation of 2-methylhexadecanoic acid, the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycholestanoic acid (THCA), and tetradecanedioic acid. In contrast, mitochondrial beta-oxidation rates of palmitate were doubled, despite the severely affected inner mitochondrial membrane. As expected, beta-oxidation of the branched chain compounds 2-methylhexadecanoic acid and THCA was reduced in hepatocytes from mice with inactivation of MFP-2. More surprisingly, dicarboxylic fatty acid oxidation was impaired in MFP-1 but not in MFP-2 knockout hepatocytes, indicating that MFP-1 might play more than an obsolete role in peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

  5. Dependence of the carbon-tetrachloride--induced death of cultured hepatocytes on the extracellular calcium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, A.F.; Farber, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The role of extracellular Ca/sup 2/+ ions in the killing of liver cells by CCl/sub 4/ was studied in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. The dependence of in vitro cell killing on the metabolism of CCl/sub 4/ was first examined in order to document the similarity between the action of CCl/sub 4/ on cultured hepatocytes and the action of CCl/sub 4/ on liver cells in the intact animal. Cells prepared from male rats pretreated with phenobarbital were more sensitive to CCl/sub 4/ than cells prepared from either male or female rats. The killing of hepatocytes by CCl/sub 4/ was prevented by addition of SKF 525A to the culture medium. This protection was accompanied by evidence of decreased CCl/sub 4/ metabolism as assessed by the extent of covalent binding of 14C-CCl/sub 4/ metabolites to total cellular lipids and proteins, and by the extent of formation of conjugated dienes accompanying the peroxidation of phospholipids isolated from total cell lipids. The extent of killing of the hepatocytes by CCl/sub 4/ was dependent on the Ca/sup 2/+ concentration in the tissue culture medium. The results of this study indicate that it is the presence of extracellular Ca/sup 2/+ that converts initially nonlethal cell injury into irreversible cell injury in CCl/sub 4/-treated cells. This action of Ca/sup 2/+ most likely represents an influx into the cell across an injured permeability barrier at the plasma membrane, in accord with the accumulation of large quantities of Ca/sup 2/+ in CCl/sub 4/-intoxicated liver cells in the intact animal. The relation between this alteration in Ca/sup 2/+ homeostasis and the metabolism of CCl/sub 4/ is discussed.

  6. Mechanisms of chloroform and carbon tetrachloride toxicity in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruch, R.J.; Klaunig, J.E.; Schultz, N.E.; Askari, A.B.; Lacher, D.A.; Pereira, M.A.; Goldblatt, P.J.

    1986-11-01

    Mechanisms of chloroform (CHCl/sub 3/) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/) toxicity to primary cultured male B6C3F1 mouse hepatocytes were investigated. The cytotoxicity of both CHCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ was dose- and duration-dependent. Maximal hepatocyte toxicity, as determined by lactate dehydrogenase leakage into the culture medium, occurred with the highest concentrations of CHCl/sub 3/ (5 mM) and CCl/sub 4/ (2.5 mM) used and with the longest duration of treatment (20 hr). CCl/sub 4/ was approximately 16 times more toxic than CHCl/sub 3/ to the hepatocytes. The toxicity of these compounds was decreased by adding the mixed function oxidase system (MFOS) inhibitor, SKF-525A (25..mu..M) to the cultures. The addition of diethyl maleate (0.25 mM), which depletes intracellular glutathione (GSH)-potentiated CHCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ toxicity. The toxicity of CHCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ could also be decreased by adding the antioxidants N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) (25..mu..M), ..cap alpha..-tocopherol acetate (Vitamin E) (0.1 mM), or superoxide dismutase (SOD) (100 U/mL) to the cultures. These results suggest that: in mouse hepatocytes, both CHCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ are metabolized to toxic components by the MFOS; GSH plays a role in detoxifying those metabolites; free radicals are produced during the metabolism of CHCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/; and free radicals may be important mediators of the toxicity of these two halomethanes.

  7. Mechanisms of chloroform and carbon tetrachloride toxicity in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruch, R J; Klaunig, J E; Schultz, N E; Askari, A B; Lacher, D A; Pereira, M A; Goldblatt, P J

    1986-01-01

    Mechanisms of chloroform (CHCl3) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) toxicity to primary cultured male B6C3F1 mouse hepatocytes were investigated. The cytotoxicity of both CHCl3 and CCl4 was dose- and duration-dependent. Maximal hepatocyte toxicity, as determined by lactate dehydrogenase leakage into the culture medium, occurred with the highest concentrations of CHCl3 (5 mM) and CCl4 (2.5 mM) used and with the longest duration of treatment (20 hr). CCl4 was approximately 16 times more toxic than CHCl3 to the hepatocytes. The toxicity of these compounds was decreased by adding the mixed function oxidase system (MFOS) inhibitor, SKF-525A (25 microM) to the cultures. The addition of diethyl maleate (0.25 mM), which depletes intracellular glutathione (GSH)-potentiated CHCl3 and CCl4 toxicity. The toxicity of CHCl3 and CCl4 could also be decreased by adding the antioxidants N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD) (25 microM), alpha-tocopherol acetate (Vitamin E) (0.1 mM), or superoxide dismutase (SOD) (100 U/mL) to the cultures. These results suggest that: in mouse hepatocytes, both CHCl3 and CCl4 are metabolized to toxic components by the MFOS; GSH plays a role in detoxifying those metabolites; free radicals are produced during the metabolism of CHCl3 and CCl4; and free radicals may be important mediators of the toxicity of these two halomethanes. PMID:3816733

  8. Protectivity of blue honeysuckle extract against oxidative human endothelial cells and rat hepatocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Palíková, Irena; Valentová, Katerina; Oborná, Ivana; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2009-08-12

    The effect of Lonicera caerulea L. (blue honeysuckle) phenolic fraction (18.5% anthocyanins) on cell viability and against oxidative damage in low density lipoproteins (oxLDL), in rat microsomes and in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), was tested. The phenolic fraction was nontoxic to rat hepatocytes and HUVEC at tested concentrations (1-1000 microg/mL) and time intervals up to 24 h inclusive. Phenolic fraction inhibited rat liver microsome peroxidation, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH), with IC(50) values of 160 +/- 20 microg/mL. The fraction at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 microg/mL delayed LDL oxidation, induced by Cu(2+), by 130 +/- 20%, 200 +/- 30%, and 400 +/- 10%, respectively. The treatment of HUVEC with oxidatively modified LDL induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, and resulted in lower formazan formation from 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) uptake, most pronounced for 200 microg/mL (24 h oxidation) after 2 h of incubation. The protective effect of the phenolic fraction against cell damage caused by oxLDL was noted at 0.1 microg/mL for HUVEC and against tBH at 1000 microg/mL for both HUVEC and hepatocytes. The observed protective effects were probably due to the antioxidant properties of L. caerulea constituents, mainly anthocyanins. Microsome peroxidation and LDL oxidation inhibition results provide promising perspectives into the prevention of some oxidative stress-associated diseases. Other data are important in in vitro systems but seem to be accidental in vivo.

  9. A hybrid substratum for primary hepatocyte culture that enhances hepatic functionality with low serum dependency.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyuan; Tao, Chunsheng; Qiu, Zhiye; Akaike, Toshihiro; Cui, Fuzhai; Wang, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems have proven to be crucial for the in vitro maintenance of primary hepatocytes and the preservation of hepatic functional expression at a high level. A poly-(N-p-vinylbenzyl-4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-gluconamide) matrix can recognize cells and promote liver function in a spheroid structure because of a specific galactose-asialoglycoprotein receptor interaction. Meanwhile, a fusion protein, E-cadherin-Fc, when incubated with various cells, has shown an enhancing effect on cellular viability and metabolism. Therefore, a hybrid substratum was developed for biomedical applications by using both of these materials to combine their advantages for primary hepatocyte cultures. The isolated cells showed a monolayer aggregate morphology on the coimmobilized surface and displayed higher functional expression than cells on traditional matrices. Furthermore, the hybrid system, in which the highest levels of cell adhesion and hepatocellular metabolism were achieved with the addition of 1% fetal bovine serum, showed a lower serum dependency than the collagen/gelatin-coated surface. Accordingly, this substrate may attenuate the negative effects of serum and further contribute to establishing a defined culture system for primary hepatocytes.

  10. Hepatocyte function within a stacked double sandwich culture plate cylindrical bioreactor for bioartificial liver system.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Arooz, Talha; Zhang, Shufang; Tuo, Xiaoye; Xiao, Guangfa; Susanto, Thomas Adi Kurnia; Sundararajan, Janani; Cheng, Tianming; Kang, Yuzhan; Poh, Hee Joo; Leo, Hwa Liang; Yu, Hanry

    2012-11-01

    Bioartificial liver (BAL) system is promising as an alternative treatment for liver failure. We have developed a bioreactor with stacked sandwich culture plates for the application of BAL. This bioreactor design addresses some of the persistent problems in flat-bed bioreactors through increasing cell packing capacity, eliminating dead flow, regulating shear stress, and facilitating the scalability of the bioreactor unit. The bioreactor contained a stack of twelve double-sandwich-culture plates, allowing 100 million hepatocytes to be housed in a single cylindrical bioreactor unit (7 cm of height and 5.5 cm of inner diameter). The serial flow perfusion through the bioreactor increased cell-fluid contact area for effective mass exchange. With the optimal perfusion flow rate, shear stress was minimized to achieve high and uniform cell viabilities across different plates in the bioreactor. Our results demonstrated that hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor could re-establish cell polarity and maintain liver-specific functions (e.g. albumin and urea synthesis, phase I&II metabolism functions) for seven days. The single bioreactor unit can be readily scaled up to house adequate number of functional hepatocytes for BAL development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biokinetics of chlorpromazine in primary rat and human hepatocytes and human HepaRG cells after repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Parmentier, Céline; Truisi, Germaine L; Jossé, Rozenn; Alexandre, Eliane; Savary, Camille C; Hewitt, Philip G; Mueller, Stefan O; Guillouzo, André; Richert, Lysiane; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2015-12-25

    Since drug induced liver injury is difficult to predict in animal models, more representative tests are needed to better evaluate these effects in humans. Existing in vitro systems hold great potential to detect hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals. In this study, the in vitro biokinetics of the model hepatotoxicant chlorpromazine (CPZ) were evaluated in three different liver cell systems after repeated exposure in order to incorporate repeated-dose testing into an in vitro assay. Primary rat and human hepatocytes, cultured in sandwich configuration and the human HepaRG cell line were treated daily with CPZ for 14 days. Samples were taken from medium, cells and well plastic at specific time points after the first and last exposure. The samples were analysed by HPLC-UV to determine the amount of CPZ in these samples. Based on cytotoxicity assays, the three models were tested at 1-2 μM CPZ, while the primary rat hepatocytes and the HepaRG cell line were in addition exposed to a higher concentration of 15-20 μM. Overall, the mass balance of CPZ decreased in the course of 24 h, indicating the metabolism of the compound within the cells. The largest decrease in parent compound was seen in the primary cultures; in the HepaRG cell cultures the mass balance only decreased to 50%. CPZ accumulated in the cells during the 14-day repeated exposure. Possible explanations for the accumulation of CPZ are a decrease in metabolism over time, inhibition of efflux transporters or binding to phospholipids. The biokinetics of CPZ differed between the three liver cell models and were influenced by specific cell properties as well as culture conditions. These results support the conclusion that in vitro biokinetics data are necessary to better interpret chemical-induced cytotoxicity data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HBV life cycle is restricted in mouse hepatocytes expressing human NTCP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanjie; Zhuang, Qiuyu; Wang, Yuze; Zhang, Tianying; Zhao, Jinghua; Zhang, Yali; Zhang, Junfang; Lin, Yi; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ningshao; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (SLC10A1 or NTCP) is a functional cellular receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, whether human NTCP can support HBV infection in mouse hepatocyte cell lines has not been clarified. Because an HBV-permissible mouse model would be helpful for the study of HBV pathogenesis, it is necessary to investigate whether human NTCP supports the susceptibility of mouse hepatocyte cell lines to HBV. The results show that exogenous human NTCP expression can render non-susceptible HepG2 (human), Huh7 (human), Hepa1–6 (mouse), AML-12 (mouse) cell lines and primary mouse hepatocyte (PMH) cells susceptible to hepatitis D virus (HDV) which employs HBV envelope proteins. However, human NTCP could only introduce HBV susceptibility in human-derived HepG2 and Huh7 cells, but not in mouse-derived Hepa1–6, AML-12 or PMH cells. These data suggest that although human NTCP is a functional receptor that mediates HBV infection in human cells, it cannot support HBV infection in mouse hepatocytes. Our study indicated that the restriction of HBV in mouse hepatocytes likely occurs after viral entry but prior to viral transcription. We have excluded the role of mouse hepatocyte nuclear factors in the restriction of the HBV life cycle and showed that knockdown or inhibition of Sting, TBK1, IRF3 or IRF7, the components of the anti-viral signaling pathways, had no effect on HBV infection in mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, murine restriction factors that limit HBV infection need to be identified before a HBV-permissible mouse line can be created. PMID:24509445

  13. Human but Not Mouse Hepatocytes Respond to Interferon-Lambda In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hermant, Pascale; Demarez, Céline; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Staeheli, Peter; Meuleman, Philip; Michiels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The type III interferon (IFN) receptor is preferentially expressed by epithelial cells. It is made of two subunits: IFNLR1, which is specific to IFN-lambda (IFN-λ) and IL10RB, which is shared by other cytokine receptors. Human hepatocytes express IFNLR1 and respond to IFN-λ. In contrast, the IFN-λ response of the mouse liver is very weak and IFNLR1 expression is hardly detectable in this organ. Here we investigated the IFN-λ response at the cellular level in the mouse liver and we tested whether human and mouse hepatocytes truly differ in responsiveness to IFN-λ. When monitoring expression of the IFN-responsive Mx genes by immunohistofluorescence, we observed that the IFN-λ response in mouse livers was restricted to cholangiocytes, which form the bile ducts, and that mouse hepatocytes were indeed not responsive to IFN-λ. The lack of mouse hepatocyte response to IFN-λ was observed in different experimental settings, including the infection with a hepatotropic strain of influenza A virus which triggered a strong local production of IFN-λ. With the help of chimeric mice containing transplanted human hepatocytes, we show that hepatocytes of human origin readily responded to IFN-λ in a murine environment. Thus, our data suggest that human but not mouse hepatocytes are responsive to IFN-λ in vivo. The non-responsiveness is an intrinsic property of mouse hepatocytes and is not due to the mouse liver micro-environment. PMID:24498220

  14. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated protection against bile acid-induced apoptosis in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Webster, C R; Anwer, M S

    1998-05-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to modulate apoptosis. To evaluate the role of cAMP in bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we studied the effect of agents that increase cAMP on the induction of apoptosis by glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) in cultured rat hepatocytes. GCDC induced apoptosis in 26.5%+/-1.1% of hepatocytes within 2 hours. Twenty-minute pretreatment of hepatocytes with 100 micromol/L 8-(4-chlorothiophenyl) cAMP (CP-cAMP) resulted in a reduction in the amount of apoptosis to 35.2%+/-3.8% of that seen in hepatocytes treated with GCDC alone. Other agents that increase intracellular cAMP, including dibutyryl cAMP (100 micromol/L), glucagon (200 nmol/L), and a combination of forskolin (20 micromol/L) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (20 micromol/L), also inhibited GCDC-induced apoptosis to a similar extent. Pretreatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720, prevented the protective effect of CP-cAMP and inhibited CP-cAMP-induced activation of PKA activity. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), wortmannin (50 nmol/L), or Ly 294002 (20 micromol/L) also prevented the cytoprotective effect of cAMP. PI3K assays confirmed that wortmannin (50 nmol/L) inhibited PI3K activity, while CP-cAMP had no effect on the activity of this lipid kinase. GCDC increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, but had no effect on stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) activity in hepatocytes. cAMP decreased basal and GCDC-induced MAPK activity and increased SAPK activity. The MAPK kinase inhibitor, PD 98059, inhibited both GCDC-mediated MAPK activation and GCDC-induced apoptosis. 1) agents that increase intracellular cAMP protect against hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids; 2) activation of MAPK by GCDC may be involved in bile acid-induced apoptosis; and 3) cAMP-mediated cytoprotection against bile acid-induced apoptosis appears to involve PKA, MAPK, and PI3K.

  15. Generation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for drug toxicity screening.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Because drug-induced liver injury is one of the main reasons for drug development failures, it is important to perform drug toxicity screening in the early phase of pharmaceutical development. Currently, primary human hepatocytes are most widely used for the prediction of drug-induced liver injury. However, the sources of primary human hepatocytes are limited, making it difficult to supply the abundant quantities required for large-scale drug toxicity screening. Therefore, there is an urgent need for a novel unlimited, efficient, inexpensive, and predictive model which can be applied for large-scale drug toxicity screening. Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are able to replicate indefinitely and differentiate into most of the body's cell types, including hepatocytes. It is expected that hepatocyte-like cells generated from human ES/iPS cells (human ES/iPS-HLCs) will be a useful tool for drug toxicity screening. To apply human ES/iPS-HLCs to various applications including drug toxicity screening, homogenous and functional HLCs must be differentiated from human ES/iPS cells. In this review, we will introduce the current status of hepatocyte differentiation technology from human ES/iPS cells and a novel method to predict drug-induced liver injury using human ES/iPS-HLCs.

  16. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  17. In vitro drug metabolism of green tea catechins in human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy W; Qin, Geng-Yao; Zhang, Ting; Feng, Wan-Yong

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic fate of green tea catechins [(-)-epicatechin ((-)-EC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) (-)- epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)] in cryopreserved human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes was studied. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation and isomerization pathways of (-)-EC in all five species were found. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, hydrolysis, isomerization and glucosidation pathways of ECG were found. Species differences in metabolism of (-)-EC or ECG were observed. Surprisingly, no metabolites of EGC or EGCG were detected, but chemical oxidation and polymerization were observed under these experimental conditions. It appeared that enzymatic reactions and chemical reactions were differentiated by an additional hydroxyl group on the B-ring between (-)-EC/ECG and EGC/EGCG. For (-)-EC, thirty-five metabolites including isomerized (M6. M10 and M25), glucuronidated (M3, M5 and M11), sulfated (M7, M15, M16, M18, M20, M23, M26), methylated (M2, M9, M12, M17, M19, M21, M27, M30, M32), glucuronated/methylated (M4, M8, M13, M14), sulfated/methylated (M22, M24, M28, M29, M31, M33, M34, M35) and diglucuronidate (M1), were detected and characterized. M11, M18, M19 and M23 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M10, M20, M22, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M5, M6 and M10 were major metabolites in rat hepatocytes; and M5, M6 and M13 were major metabolites in mouse hepatocytes. For ECG, twelve metabolites including isomerized (M1), hydrolyzed (M3), glucosidated (M2), glucuronidated (M4 and M6), sulfated (M9, M11 and M12), methylated (M7), sulfated/glucuronidated/methylated (M8 and M10) and diglucuronidated (M5), were detected and characterized. M4, M11 and M12 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11 and M12 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M3 and M11 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M4, M6 and

  18. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  19. Comparative Metabolism, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity of Chemical Carcinogens in Primary Cultures of Hepatocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    death and regeneration. Cytotoxicity is easily assessed in primary hepatocyte cultures by light microscopic observation (Green ott al., 1981) and/or the...The recent development of a sensitive scintillation detection of repair provides a three day assay (Loury and Byard, 1983). A UV light positive control...RATS FED 0.5% BUTYLATED HYDROXYTOLUENEa Amount of ascron.•,cut./cultur-b P10o0. Al’"I boumd/t ,acrtmooletuloc Ratlo of bound producto k’ontro I WN

  20. Generation of major human excretory and circulating drug metabolites using a hepatocyte relay method.

    PubMed

    Ballard, T Eric; Orozco, Christine C; Obach, R Scott

    2014-05-01

    The prediction of human drug metabolites using in vitro experiments containing human-derived reagents is an important approach in modern drug research; however, this can be challenging for drugs that are slowly metabolized. In this report, we describe the use of a recently developed human hepatocyte relay method for the purpose of predicting human drug metabolite profiles. Five compounds for which in vivo human metabolism data were available were selected for the investigation of this method, and the results were compared with data gathered in hepatocyte suspensions as well as previous data from a micropatterned hepatocyte coculture method. The hepatocyte relay method demonstrated an improved performance (generation of 75% of human in vivo metabolites) for those drugs for which previous methods showed a relatively low rate of success (50% of human in vivo metabolites). Metabolites included those arising from both oxidative and conjugative reactions and metabolites that required sequential reactions. Two 4-hour relays were shown to adequately generate metabolites, and no further benefit was derived from more relays. Overall, it can be concluded that the hepatocyte relay assay method can be successfully used in the generation of relevant human metabolites, even for challenging drugs.

  1. Comparative Gene Expression Profiles Induced by PPARγ and PPARα/γ Agonists in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rogue, Alexandra; Lambert, Carine; Jossé, Rozenn; Antherieu, Sebastien; Spire, Catherine; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, André

    2011-01-01

    Background Several glitazones (PPARγ agonists) and glitazars (dual PPARα/γ agonists) have been developed to treat hyperglycemia and, simultaneously, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, respectively. However, most have caused idiosyncratic hepatic or extrahepatic toxicities through mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Since the liver plays a key role in lipid metabolism, we analyzed changes in gene expression profiles induced by these two types of PPAR agonists in human hepatocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary human hepatocytes and the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells were exposed to different concentrations of two PPARγ (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPARα/γ (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists for 24 h and their transcriptomes were analyzed using human pangenomic Agilent microarrays. Principal Component Analysis, hierarchical clustering and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® revealed large inter-individual variability in the response of the human hepatocyte populations to the different compounds. Many genes involved in lipid, carbohydrate, xenobiotic and cholesterol metabolism, as well as inflammation and immunity, were regulated by both PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists in at least a number of human hepatocyte populations and/or HepaRG cells. Only a few genes were selectively deregulated by glitazars when compared to glitazones, indicating that PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists share most of their target genes. Moreover, some target genes thought to be regulated only in mouse or to be expressed in Kupffer cells were also found to be responsive in human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. Conclusions/Significance This first comprehensive analysis of gene regulation by PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists favor the conclusion that glitazones and glitazars share most of their target genes and induce large differential changes in gene profiles in human hepatocytes depending on hepatocyte donor, the compound class and/or individual compound, thereby

  2. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Storey, Stephen M; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-04-15

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in <1 min and initial rate and maximal uptake of HDL free cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2

  3. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Stephen M.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Martin, Gregory G.; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H. Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Kier, Ann B.

    2012-01-01

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in <1 min and initial rate and maximal uptake of HDL free cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2

  4. Preincubation of rat and human hepatocytes with cytoprotectants prior to cryopreservation can improve viability and function upon thawing.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Lehec, Sharon C; Hughes, Robin D

    2005-12-01

    Cryopreservation of human hepatocytes is important for the treatment of liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation and also for the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model of the liver. One factor in the success of cryopreservation is the quality of cells before freezing. Preincubation of hepatocytes with cytoprotective compounds to allow recovery from the isolation process prior to cryopreservation, such as those that will boost cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content or antioxidants, may improve the viability and function of cells upon thawing. Rat hepatocytes were used to investigate the effects of preincubation with 10 compounds: precursors (glucose, fructose, glutathione, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine), antioxidants (ascorbic acid and alpha-lipoic acid), and compounds with multiple effects (N-acetylcysteine, pentoxifylline, prostaglandin E(1), and tauroursodeoxycholic acid). Human hepatocytes were then used to investigate 5 of the original 10 compounds (glucose, fructose, alpha-lipoic acid, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and pentoxifylline). Glucose preincubation (100-300 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of rat hepatocytes and improved the viability and reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage of human hepatocytes. Fructose preincubation (100-300 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of rat hepatocytes and improved the attachment efficiency of human hepatocytes. alpha-lipoic acid preincubation (0.5-5 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of both rat and human hepatocytes. At a concentration of 2.5 mM alpha-lipoic acid also improved the albumin production of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, preincubation of hepatocytes prior to cryopreservation can improve the viability and function of thawed cells and may provide a method of obtaining better-quality cryopreserved hepatocytes for transplantation.

  5. Evaluation of 309 molecules as inducers of CYP3A4, CYP2B6, CYP1A2, OATP1B1, OCT1, MDR1, MRP2, MRP3 and BCRP in cryopreserved human hepatocytes in sandwich culture.

    PubMed

    Badolo, Lassina; Jensen, Bente; Säll, Carolina; Norinder, Ulf; Kallunki, Pekka; Montanari, Dino

    2015-02-01

    1. Regulation of hepatic metabolism or transport may lead to increase in drug clearance and compromise efficacy or safety. In this study, cryopreserved human hepatocytes were used to assess the effect of 309 compounds on the activity and mRNA expression (using qPCR techniques) of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4, as well as mRNA expression of six hepatic transport proteins: OATP1B1 (SCLO1B1), OCT1 (SLC22A1), MDR1 (ABCB1), MRP2 (ABCC2), MRP3 (ABCC3) and BCRP (ABCG2). 2. The results showed that 6% of compounds induced CYP1A2 activity (1.5-fold increase); 30% induced CYP2B6 while 23% induced CYP3A4. qPCR data identified 16, 33 or 32% inducers of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 or CYP3A4, respectively. MRP2 was induced by 27 compounds followed by MDR1 (16)>BCRP (9)>OCT1 (8)>OATP1B1 (5)>MRP3 (2). 3. CYP3A4 appeared to be down-regulated (≥2-fold decrease in mRNA expression) by 53 compounds, 10 for CYP2B6, 6 for OCT1, 4 for BCRP, 2 for CYP1A2 and OATP1B1 and 1 for MDR1 and MRP2. 4. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 inducers are bulky lipophilic molecules with a higher number of heavy atoms and a lower number of hydrogen bond donors. Finally, a strategy for testing CYP inducers in drug discovery is proposed.

  6. Prediction of the Clinical Risk of Drug-Induced Cholestatic Liver Injury Using an In Vitro Sandwich Cultured Hepatocyte Assay.

    PubMed

    Susukida, Takeshi; Sekine, Shuichi; Nozaki, Mayuka; Tokizono, Mayuko; Ito, Kousei

    2015-11-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is of concern to the pharmaceutical industry, and reliable preclinical screens are required. Previously, we established an in vitro bile acid-dependent hepatotoxicity assay that mimics cholestatic DILI in vivo. Here, we confirmed that this assay can predict cholestatic DILI in clinical situations by comparing in vitro cytotoxicity data with in vivo risk. For 38 drugs, the frequencies of abnormal increases in serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), transaminases, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase (γGT), and bilirubin were collected from interview forms. Drugs with frequencies of serum marker increases higher than 1% were classified as high DILI risk compounds. In vitro cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring lactate dehydrogenase release from rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCRHs and SCHHs) incubated with the test drugs (50 μM) for 24 hours in the absence or presence of a bile acids mixture. Receiver operating characteristic analyses gave optimal cutoff toxicity values of 19.5% and 9.2% for ALP and transaminases in SCRHs, respectively. Using this cutoff, high- and low-risk drugs were separated with 65.4-78.6% sensitivity and 66.7-79.2% specificity. Good separation was also achieved using SCHHs. In conclusion, cholestatic DILI risk can be successfully predicted using a sandwich-cultured hepatocyte-based assay. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Inhibition of DNA synthesis by chemical carcinogens in cultures of initiated and normal proliferating rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Novicki, D.L.; Rosenberg, M.R.; Michalopoulos, G.

    1985-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes in primary culture can be stimulated to replicate under the influence of rat serum and sparse plating conditions. Higher replication rates are induced by serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats. The effects of carcinogens and noncarcinogens on the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize DNA were examined by measuring the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by liquid scintillation counting and autoradiography. Hepatocyte DNA synthesis was not decreased by ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide at concentrations less than 0.5%. No effect was observed when 0.1 mM ketamine, Nembutal, hypoxanthine, sucrose, ascorbic acid, or benzo(e)pyrene was added to cultures of replicating hepatocytes. Estrogen, testosterone, tryptophan, and vitamin E inhibited DNA synthesis by approximately 50% at 0.1 mM, a concentration at which toxicity was noticeable. Several carcinogens requiring metabolic activation as well as the direct-acting carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine interfered with DNA synthesis. Aflatoxin B1 inhibited DNA synthesis by 50% (ID50) at concentrations between 1 X 10(-8) and 1 X 10(-7) M. The ID50 for 2-acetylaminofluorene was between 1 X 10(-7) and 1 X 10(-6) M. Benzo(a)pyrene and 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene inhibited DNA synthesis 50% between 1 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M. Diethylnitrosamine and dimethylnitrosamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-4) and 5 X 10(-4) M) and 1- and 2-naphthylamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-5) and 5 X 10(-4) M) caused inhibition of DNA synthesis at concentrations which overlapped with concentrations that caused measurable toxicity.

  8. Byakangelicin induces cytochrome P450 3A4 expression via transactivation of pregnane X receptors in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Luan, Xiaofei; Gui, Haiyan; Yan, Peng; Yang, Dongfang; Song, Xiulong; Liu, Wei; Hu, Gang; Yan, Bingfang

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Byakangelicin is found in extracts of the root of Angelica dahurica, used in Korea and China as a traditional medicine to treat colds, headache and toothache. As byakangelicin can inhibit the effects of sex hormones, it may increase the catabolism of endogenous hormones. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of byakangelicin on the cytochrome P450 isoform cytochrome (CY) P3A4 in human hepatocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cultures of human hepatocytes and a hepatoma cell line (Huh7 cells) were used. mRNA and protein levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Plasmid constructs and mutants were prepared by cloning and site-directed mutagenesis. Reporter (luciferase) activity was determined by transient co-transfection experiments. KEY RESULTS In human primary hepatocytes, byakangelicin markedly induced the expression of CYP3A4 both at the mRNA level (approximately fivefold) and the protein level (approximately threefold) but did not affect expression of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR). In reporter assays, byakangelicin activated CYP3A4 promoter in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50= 5 µM), and this activation was enhanced by co-transfection with hPXR. Further reporter assays demonstrated that the eNR4 binding element in the CYP3A4 promoter was required for the transcriptional activation of CYP3A4 by byakangelicin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Byakangelicin induced expression and activity of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. This induction was achieved by the transactivation of PXR and not by increased expression of PXR. Therefore, byakangelicin is likely to increase the expression of all PXR target genes (such as MDR1) and induce a wide range of drug–drug interactions. PMID:20942813

  9. Cell biology is different in small volumes: endogenous signals shape phenotype of primary hepatocytes cultured in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Haque, Amranul; Gheibi, Pantea; Gao, Yandong; Foster, Elena; Son, Kyung Jin; You, Jungmok; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Patel, Dipali; Revzin, Alexander

    2016-09-29

    The approaches for maintaining hepatocytes in vitro are aimed at recapitulating aspects of the native liver microenvironment through the use of co-cultures, surface coatings and 3D spheroids. This study highlights the effects of spatial confinement-a less studied component of the in vivo microenvironment. We demonstrate that hepatocytes cultured in low-volume microfluidic channels (microchambers) retain differentiated hepatic phenotype for 21 days whereas cells cultured in regular culture plates under identical conditions de-differentiate after 7 days. Careful consideration of nutrient delivery and oxygen tension suggested that these factors could not solely account for enhanced cell function in microchambers. Through a series of experiments involving microfluidic chambers of various heights and inhibition of key molecular pathways, we confirmed that phenotype of hepatocytes in small volumes was shaped by endogenous signals, both hepato-inductive growth factors (GFs) such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and hepato-disruptive GFs such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Hepatocytes are not generally thought of as significant producers of GFs-this role is typically assigned to nonparenchymal cells of the liver. Our study demonstrates that, in an appropriate microenvironment, hepatocytes produce hepato-inductive and pro-fibrogenic signals at the levels sufficient to shape their phenotype and function.

  10. Cell biology is different in small volumes: endogenous signals shape phenotype of primary hepatocytes cultured in microfluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Amranul; Gheibi, Pantea; Gao, Yandong; Foster, Elena; Son, Kyung Jin; You, Jungmok; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Patel, Dipali; Revzin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The approaches for maintaining hepatocytes in vitro are aimed at recapitulating aspects of the native liver microenvironment through the use of co-cultures, surface coatings and 3D spheroids. This study highlights the effects of spatial confinement-a less studied component of the in vivo microenvironment. We demonstrate that hepatocytes cultured in low-volume microfluidic channels (microchambers) retain differentiated hepatic phenotype for 21 days whereas cells cultured in regular culture plates under identical conditions de-differentiate after 7 days. Careful consideration of nutrient delivery and oxygen tension suggested that these factors could not solely account for enhanced cell function in microchambers. Through a series of experiments involving microfluidic chambers of various heights and inhibition of key molecular pathways, we confirmed that phenotype of hepatocytes in small volumes was shaped by endogenous signals, both hepato-inductive growth factors (GFs) such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and hepato-disruptive GFs such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Hepatocytes are not generally thought of as significant producers of GFs–this role is typically assigned to nonparenchymal cells of the liver. Our study demonstrates that, in an appropriate microenvironment, hepatocytes produce hepato-inductive and pro-fibrogenic signals at the levels sufficient to shape their phenotype and function. PMID:27681582

  11. Hypoxia and proinflammatory factors upregulate apelin receptor expression in human stellate cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Pauta, Montserrat; Reichenbach, Vedrana; Casals, Gregori; Ros, Josefa; Bataller, Ramon; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Jiménez, Wladimiro

    2011-10-01

    The activation of the apelin receptor (APJ) plays a major role in both angiogenic and fibrogenic response to chronic liver injury. However, the mechanisms that govern the induction of APJ expression have not been clarified so far. The regulation and the role of APJ in cultured human liver cells were investigated. Tissular expression of APJ and α-smooth muscle actin was analysed by immunocolocalisation in human cirrhotic liver and in control samples. mRNA and protein expression of APJ were analysed in two cell lines, LX-2 (as hepatic stellate cells, HSCs) and HepG2 (as hepatocytes), under hypoxic conditions or after exposure to proinflammatory or profibrogenic factors. Additionally, both hepatic cell lines were stimulated with apelin to assess cell survival and the expression of angiogenic factors. The APJ-positive signal was negligible in control livers. In contrast, APJ was highly expressed in HSCs and slightly expressed in hepatocytes of human cirrhotic liver. Sustained hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide stimulated the expression of APJ in LX-2 cells. Moreover, hypoxia, tumour necrosis factor α and angiotensin II induced the expression of APJ in HepG2 cells. Activation of APJ stimulated angiopoietin-1 expression and cell survival in LX-2 cells and, in turn, triggered the synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor type A and platelet-derived growth factor-BB in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that hypoxia and inflammatory factors could play a major role in the activation of the hepatic apelin system leading to angiogenic and fibroproliferative response occurring in chronic liver disease.

  12. Human hepatocyte and kidney cell metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene and comparison to the respective rat cells.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, R; Rudo, K

    1988-12-01

    The metabolism and mutagenic activation of 2-acetylaminofluorene by human and rat hepatocytes and kidney cells were measured. High performance liquid chromatography was used to separate the 2-acetylaminofluorene metabolites, and a cell-mediated Salmonella typhimurium mutagenesis assay was used to detect mutagenic intermediates. Rat and human differences were observed with cells from both organs and levels of metabolism and mutagenesis were higher in human cells. Within a species, liver and kidney cell differences were also evident, with levels of hepatocyte-mediated metabolism and mutagenesis being greater than kidney cells. Human inter-individual variation was apparent with cells from both organs, but the variation observed was significantly greater in hepatocytes than kidney cells. A knowledge of such differences, including an understanding that they may vary with the chemical being studied, should be useful in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to humans.

  13. S-Adenosylmethionine Regulates Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase Expression in Mouse and Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ramani, Komal; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Li, Tony W. H.; Ko, Kwangsuk; Yang, Heping; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Iglesias-Ara, Ainhoa; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Maria Rosa; Mato, José M.; Lu, Shelly C.

    2010-01-01

    Increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity correlates with a more malignant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) phenotype. There is a reciprocal regulation between p44/42 MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]1/2) and the dual-specificity MAPK phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. ERK phosphorylates DUSP1, facilitating its proteasomal degradation, whereas DUSP1 inhibits ERK activity. Methionine adenosyltransferase 1a (Mat1a) knockout (KO) mice express hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) deficiency and increased ERK activity and develop HCC. The aim of this study was to examine whether DUSP1 expression is regulated by SAM and if so, elucidate the molecular mechanisms. Studies were conducted using Mat1a KO mice livers, cultured mouse and human hepatocytes, and 20S and 26S proteasomes. DUSP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were reduced markedly in livers of Mat1a KO mice and in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes with protein falling to lower levels than mRNA. SAM treatment protected against the fall in DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels in mouse and human hepatocytes. SAM increased DUSP1 transcription, p53 binding to DUSP1 promoter, and stability of its mRNA and protein. Proteasomal chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities were increased in Mat1a KO livers and cultured hepatocytes, which was blocked by SAM treatment. SAM inhibited chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities by 40% and 70%, respectively, in 20S proteasomes and caused rapid degradation of some of the 26S proteasomal subunits, which was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. SAM treatment in Mat1a KO mice for 7 days raised SAM, DUSP1, mRNA and protein levels and lowered proteosomal and ERK activities. Conclusion DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels are lower in Mat1a KO livers and fall rapidly in cultured hepatocytes. SAM treatment increases DUSP1 expression through multiple mechanisms, and this may suppress ERK activity and malignant degeneration. PMID:20196119

  14. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  15. Marked stimulation of growth and motility of human keratinocytes by hepatocyte growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yoshikawa, K.; Nakamura, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on normal human epidermal keratinocytes cultured under conditions of low Ca2+ (0.1 mM, growth-promoting condition) and physiological Ca2+ (1.8 mM, differentiation-promoting condition) was investigated. In low Ca2+, HGF markedly enhanced the migration of keratinocytes while it suppressed cell growth and DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, HGF enhanced the migration, cell growth, and DNA synthesis of keratinocytes cultured under conditions of physiological Ca2+. The maximal stimulation of DNA synthesis (2.4-fold stimulation) in physiological Ca2+ was seen at 2.5-5 ng/ml HGF and the stimulatory effect of HGF was suppressed by transforming growth factor-beta 1. Analysis of the HGF receptor using 125I-HGF as a ligand showed that human keratinocytes expressed a single class of specific, saturable receptor for HGF in both low and physiological Ca2+ conditions, exhibiting a Kd = 17.3 pM and approximately 690 binding sites/cell under physiological Ca2+. Thus, HGF is a potent factor which enhances growth and migration of normal human keratinocytes under conditions of physiological Ca2+. HGF may play an important role in epidermal tissue repair as it enhances both the migration and growth of keratinocytes.

  16. Applying Stable Isotope Labeled Amino Acids in Micropatterned Hepatocyte Co-Culture to Directly Determine the Degradation Rate Constant for CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryan H; Shahidi-Latham, Sheerin; Wong, Susan; Chang, Jae H

    2017-03-13

    The rate of enzyme degradation (kdeg) is an important input parameter for the prediction of clinical drug-drug-interactions (DDI) that result from mechanism-based inactivation or induction of cytochrome P450s. Currently, a large range of reported estimates for CYP3A4 enzyme degradation exists, and consequently, large uncertainty exists in steady-state predictions for DDI. In the current investigations, stable isotope labeled amino acids in culture (SILAC) was applied to a long-lived primary human hepatocyte culture, HepatoPac, to directly monitor the degradation of CYP3A4. This approach allowed selective isotope labeling of a population of de novo synthesized CYP3A4, and specific quantification of proteins with mass spectrometry to determine the CYP3A4 degradation within the hepatocytes. The kdeg estimate was 0.026 ± 0.005 h- 1. This value was reproduced by cultures derived across four individual donors. For these cultures, data indicated that CYP3A4 mRNA and total protein expression (i.e. labeled and not labeled P450s), and activity were stable over the period where degradation had been determined. This kdeg value for CYP3A4 was in good agreement with recently reported values that used alternate analytical approaches, but also employed micropatterned primary human hepatocytes as the in vitro model.

  17. Development of an in vitro high content imaging assay for quantitative assessment of CAR-dependent mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Soldatow, Valerie; Peffer, Richard C; Trask, O Joseph; Cowie, David E; Andersen, Melvin E; LeCluyse, Edward; Deisenroth, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Rodent liver tumors promoted by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are known to be mediated by key events that include CAR-dependent gene expression and hepatocellular proliferation. Here, an in vitro high content imaging based assay was developed for quantitative assessment of nascent DNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures from mouse, rat, and human species. Detection of DNA synthesis was performed using direct DNA labeling with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The assay was multiplexed to enable direct quantitation of DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity, and cell count endpoints. An optimized defined medium cocktail was developed to sensitize hepatocytes to cell cycle progression. The baseline EdU response to defined medium was greatest for mouse, followed by rat, and then human. Hepatocytes from all three species demonstrated CAR activation in response to the CAR agonists TCPOBOP, CITCO, and phenobarbital based on increased gene expression for Cyp2b isoforms. When evaluated for a proliferation phenotype, TCPOBOP and CITCO exhibited significant dose-dependent increases in frequency of EdU labeling in mouse and rat hepatocytes that was not observed in hepatocytes from three human donors. The observed species differences are consistent with CAR activators inducing a proliferative response in rodents, a key event in the liver tumor mode of action that is not observed in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. IFNL3 genotype is associated with differential induction of IFNL3 in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbanov, Fuat; Kim, Yonghak; Latanich, Rachel; Chaudhari, Pooja; El-Diwany, Ramy; Knabel, Matt; Kandathil, Abraham J; Cameron, Andrew; Cox, Andrea; Jang, Yoon-Young; Thomas, David L; Balagopal, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Lambda interferons (IFNLs) have potent antiviral activity against HCV, and polymorphisms within the IFNL gene cluster near the IFNL3 gene strongly predict spontaneous- and treatment-related HCV infection outcomes. The mechanism(s) linking IFNL polymorphisms and HCV control is currently elusive. Methods IFNL induction was studied in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from 18 human donors, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 18 human donors, multiple cell lines and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-hepatocytes) from 7 human donors. After stimulation with intracellular RNA and infectious HCV, quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers and probes were designed to distinguish and quantify closely related IFNL messenger (m)RNAs from IFNL1, IFNL2 and IFNL3. Results PHH demonstrated the most potent induction of IFNLs, although had lower pre-stimulation levels compared to PBMCs, monocytes and cell lines. PHH stimulation with cytoplasmic poly I:C induced >1,000-fold expression of IFNL1, IFNL2 and IFNL3. PHH from donors who were homozygous for the favourable IFNL3 allele (IFNL3-CC) had higher IFNL3 induction compared to PHH from IFNL3-TT donors (P=0.03). Baseline IFNL mRNA expression and induction was also tested in iPSC-hepatocytes: iPSC-hepatocytes had significantly higher baseline expression of IFNLs compared to PHH (P<0.0001), and IFNL3 induction was marginally different in iPSC-hepatocytes by IFNL genotype (P=0.07). Conclusions Hepatocytes express IFNLs when stimulated by a synthetic viral RNA that signals the cell through the cytoplasm. IFNL induction may be greater in persons with the favourable IFNL3 allele. These data provide insight into the strong linkage between IFNL3 genetics and control of HCV infection. PMID:26109548

  19. Vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissue from engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Ohashi, Kazuo; Koike, Makiko; Utoh, Rie; Hasegawa, Hideko; Muraoka, Izumi; Suematsu, Takashi; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Subcutaneous liver tissue engineering is an attractive and minimally invasive approach used to curative treat hepatic failure and inherited liver diseases. However, graft failure occurs frequently due to insufficient infiltration of blood vessels (neoangiogenesis), while the maintenance of hepatocyte phenotype and function requires in vivo development of the complex cellular organization of the hepatic lobule. Here we describe a subcutaneous human liver construction allowing for rapidly vascularized grafts by transplanting engineered cellular sheets consisting of human primary hepatocytes adhered onto a fibroblast layer. The engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets (EHFSs) showed superior expression levels of vascularization-associated growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, and hepatocyte growth factor) in vitro. EHFSs developed into vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissues contained glycogen stores, synthesized coagulation factor IX, and showed significantly higher synthesis rates of liver-specific proteins (albumin and alpha 1 anti-trypsin) in vivo than tissues from hepatocyte-only sheets. The present study describes a new approach for vascularized human liver organogenesis under mouse skin. This approach could prove valuable for establishing novel cell therapies for liver diseases.

  20. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate involvement in hepatic triacylglyceride lipase release from prazosin-stimulated primary cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tetsuya; Morita, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    We recently found that hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) was released from primary cultured rat hepatocytes after treatment with prazosin, an antagonist of alpha-1 adrenoceptors. However, the details of prazosin-induced HTGL release remain uncertain. Here we investigated whether changes in cAMP levels in hepatocytes were related to HTGL release from prazosin-stimulated hepatocytes. When hepatocytes were treated with prazosin, cAMP levels during stimulated release of HTGL increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Stimulated release of HTGL was suppressed by the adenylate cyclase inhibitors MDL-12,330A and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine. Further, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity in prazosin-stimulated hepatocytes also increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, prazosin-stimulated HTGL release was suppressed by the PKA inhibitors H-89 and KT5720. These results suggest that prazosin-stimulated HTGL release from hepatocytes was due to cAMP production and partly due to subsequent PKA activation in hepatocytes.

  1. [Use of hepatocytes in primary cultures to predict potential hepatocarcinogenicity of compounds

    PubMed

    Bieri, F.; Muakkassah-Kelly, S.; Bentley, P.

    1990-01-01

    Short-term tests for genotoxic activity will detect a variety of potential carcinogens. However, experience over the last few years has shown that many chemical carcinogens are not detected in these tests. A large proportion of these non-mutagenic (non-genotoxic) carcinogens induce tumors in the rodent liver after life-long feeding. One class of such carcinogens are the hypolipidemic drugs many of which induce a characteristic hepatomegaly upon subchronic treatment. Typically this liver enlargement is accompanied by increased mitotic activity and a proliferation of the hepatic peroxisome compartment. Results also suggest a correlation between the degree and the nature of the hepatomegalic response to a compound, and its hepatocarcinogenic potency, but it remains unclear whether the growth stimulation and/or the peroxisome proliferation is correlated with the carcinogenicity. Both, the induction of peroxisomal enzyme and of replicative DMA synthesis may be measured in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes following in vitro exposition. Moreover, the ability of the compounds tested to induce in vitro replicative DNA synthesis in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes correlated well with the potency of the hepatomegalic response induced in vivo in treated rodents. Consequently, studies using such cultures might be useful to characterize and possibly predict in vitro the hepatocarcinogenic potency of some new compounds. The early recognition of the possible carcinogenic property of a new substance might accordingly contribute to the reduction of a number of life-long studies.

  2. Specific pools of phospholipids are used for lipoprotein secretion by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, J.E.; Vance, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    The role of phospholipid biosynthesis in lipoprotein secretion from cultured rat hepatocytes has been investigated. In liver, phosphatidylcholine (PC) is made both by the CDP-choline pathway and by the methylation of phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE), which in turn is derived from both serine (via phosphatidylserine) and ethanolamine (via CDP-ethanol-amine). Monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of (methyl-/sup 3/H)choline, (2-/sup 3/H)ethanolamine or (3-/sup 3/H)serine. The specific radioactivity of the phospholipids derived from each of these precursors was measured in the cells and in the secreted lipoproteins of the culture medium. The specific radioactivities of PC and PE derived from (1-/sup 3/H)ethanolamine were markedly lower (approximately 1/2 and less than 1/10, respectively) in the secreted phospholipids than in the cellular phospholipids. Thus, ethanolamine was not an effective precursor of the phospholipids in lipoproteins. On the contrary, the specific radioactivity of PC made from (methyl-/sup 3/H)choline was approximately equal in cells and lipoproteins. In addition, over the first 4 h of incubation with (3-/sup 3/H)serine, the specific radioactivities of PC and PE were significantly higher in the lipoproteins than in the cells. These data indicate that specific pools of phospholipids are selected on the basis of their routes of biosynthesis, for secretion into lipoproteins.

  3. Interleukins-12 and -23 do not alter expression or activity of multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Shannon; Chattopadhyay, Souvik; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Batheja, Ameesha; Singer, Monica; Silva, Jose

    2013-04-01

    Psoriasis is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease involving the skin. Two cytokines, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-23 have been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Ustekinumab (Stelara) is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeted against the p40 shared subunit of IL-12 and IL-23. Recently the ability of therapeutic proteins (TP) including mAbs that target either cytokines directly (e.g., Pegasys; peginterferon α-2a) or their respective cell surface receptors [e.g., tocilizumab (Actemra); anti IL-6R] to desuppress cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in vitro and in the clinic, has been demonstrated. In the present study the ability of IL-12 and IL-23 to suppress multiple P450 enzymes was investigated in vitro using six separate lots of cultured human hepatocytes. Following exposure of 10 ng/ml IL-12 and IL-23 for 48 hours, either alone or in combination, no change in CYP2B6, 2C9, 2C19, or 3A4 gene expression or functional activity was observed. None of the untreated hepatocyte donors showed appreciable expression of the IL-12 or IL-23 receptors. Similar results were seen with whole human liver samples. Exposure of hepatocytes to IL-12 and/or IL-23, known P450 suppressors (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) or known P450 inducers (β-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital, and rifampicin) did not appreciably alter the expression of the IL-12 and IL-23 receptors either. Finally, in contrast to the positive control IL-6, expression of the acute phase C-reactive protein was unaltered following IL-12 and/or IL-23 treatment. Together, these data suggest a negligible propensity for IL-12 or IL-23 to directly alter P450 enzymes in human hepatocytes.

  4. Effects of nutritional and hormonal factors on the metabolism of retinol-binding protein by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.L.; Goodman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to explore hormonal and nutritional factors that might be involved in the regulation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis and secretion by the liver. The studies employed primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats. When cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium alone, a high rate of RBP secretion was observed initially, which declined and became quite low by 24 hr. Supplementing the medium with amino acids maintained RBP and albumin secretion at moderate (but less than initial) rates for at least 3 days. Further addition of dexamethasone maintained the production and secretion rates of RBP, transthyretin, and albumin close to the initial rates for up to 3-5 days in culture as measured by radioimmunoassay. Hormonally treated hepatocytes produced and secreted RBP, transthyretin, and albumin at both absolute and relative rates similar to physiological values, as estimated from rates reported by others from studies in vivo and with perfused livers. Glucagon addition partially maintained the secretion rates of these 3 proteins, but less effectively than did dexamethasone. A number of other hormones, added singly or in combination, did not affect RBP production or secretion. Addition of retinol to the cultured normal hepatocytes was without effect upon RBP secretion. These studies show that supplementing the culture medium of hepatocytes with amino acids and dexamethasone maintains RBP production and secretion for several days. In normal hepatocytes, with ample supply of retinol available within the cell, addition of exogenous retinol does not appear to influence RBP metabolism or secretion by the cells.

  5. Extracellular matrix-enriched polymeric scaffolds as a substrate for hepatocyte cultures: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Zavan, B; Brun, P; Vindigni, V; Amadori, A; Habeler, W; Pontisso, P; Montemurro, D; Abatangelo, G; Cortivo, R

    2005-12-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach to developing hepatic tissue suitable for the functional replacement of a failing liver. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an extracellular cell matrix obtained from fibroblasts-cultured within scaffolds of hyaluronic acid (HYAFF) could influence the proliferation rate and survival of rat hepatocytes both during long-term culture and after in vivo transplantation. Cultures were evaluated by histological and morphological analysis, a proliferation assay and metabolic activity (albumin secretion). Hepatocytes cultured in extracellular matrix-enriched scaffolds exhibited a round cellular morphology and re-established cell-cell contacts, growing into aggregates of several cells along and/or among fibers in the fabric. Hepatocytes were able to secrete albumin up to 14 days in culture. In vivo results demonstrated the biocompatibility of HYAFF-11 implanted in nude mice, in which hepatocytes maintained small well-organised aggregates until the 35th day. In conclusion, the presence of a fibroblast-secreted extracellular matrix improved the biological properties of the hyaluronan scaffold, favoring the survival and morphological integrity of hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Gene expression analysis of primary normal human hepatocytes infected with human hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyun Mi; Park, Sung Gyoo; Yea, Sung Su; Jang, Won Hee; Yang, Young-Il; Jung, Guhung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatocytes during the initial state of infection by cDNA microarray. METHODS: Primary normal human hepatocytes (PNHHs) were isolated and infected with HBV. From the PNHHs, RNA was isolated and inverted into complement DNA (cDNA) with Cy3- or Cy5- labeled dUTP for microarray analysis. The labeled cDNA was hybridized with microarray chip, including 4224 cDNAs. From the image of the microarray, expression profiles were produced and some of them were confirmed by RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and NF-κB luciferase reporter assay. RESULTS: From the cDNA microarray, we obtained 98 differentially regulated genes. Of the 98 genes, 53 were up regulated and 45 down regulated. Interestingly, in the up regulated genes, we found the TNF signaling pathway-related genes: LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. By using RT-PCR, we confirmed the up-regulation of these genes in HepG2, Huh7, and Chang liver cells, which were transfected with pHBV1.2×, a plasmid encoding all HBV messages. Moreover, these three genes participated in HBV-mediated NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: During the initial state of HBV infection, hepatocytes facilitate the activation of NF-κB through up regulation of LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. PMID:16937494

  7. SIRT1 Disruption in Human Fetal Hepatocytes Leads to Increased Accumulation of Glucose and Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Takeishi, Kazuki; Nakao, Toshimasa; Wang, Yang; Meng, Fanying; Deng, Chu-Xia; Collin de l’Hortet, Alexandra; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There are unprecedented epidemics of obesity, such as type II diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) in developed countries. A concerning percentage of American children are being affected by obesity and NAFLD. Studies have suggested that the maternal environment in utero might play a role in the development of these diseases later in life. In this study, we documented that inhibiting SIRT1 signaling in human fetal hepatocytes rapidly led to an increase in intracellular glucose and lipids levels. More importantly, both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis related genes were upregulated upon SIRT1 inhibition. The AKT/FOXO1 pathway, a major negative regulator of gluconeogenesis, was decreased in the human fetal hepatocytes inhibited for SIRT1, consistent with the higher level of gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that SIRT1 is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolisms within human fetal hepatocytes, acting as an adaptive transcriptional response to environmental changes. PMID:26890260

  8. Methanethiol and dimethylsulfide formation from 3-methylthiopropionate in human and rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; van den Elzen, J P; Yap, S H; Tangerman, A

    1988-11-18

    This study was designed to investigate the metabolism of methanethiol, and the involvement of methanethiol and its metabolites in the transamination pathway of methionine. Gaseous methanethiol, methanethiol-mixed disulfides and dimethylsulfide were formed from 3-methylthiopropionate, a metabolite in the transamination pathway of methionine, during incubation with human and rat hepatocytes. An increase of the 3-methylthiopropionate concentration resulted in an increased formation of the products, up to a substrate concentration of 4.4 mM. Higher substrate levels resulted in a decreased methanethiol formation, probably due to poisoning of the system. However, in human hepatocytes the formation of dimethylsulfide increased up to a 3-methylthiopropionate concentration of 12.5 mM. The formation of methanethiol, dimethylsulfide and methanethiol-mixed disulfides from 3-methylthiopropionate in hepatocytes of both human and rat support the hypothesis that methanethiol can be formed from methionine via the transamination pathway.

  9. Automated detection of hepatotoxic compounds in human hepatocytes using HepaRG cells and image-based analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction with JC-1 dye

    SciTech Connect

    Pernelle, K.; Le Guevel, R.; Glaise, D.; Stasio, C. Gaucher-Di; Le Charpentier, T.; Bouaita, B.; Corlu, A.; Guguen-Guillouzo, C.

    2011-08-01

    In this study, our goal was to develop an efficient in situ test adapted to screen hepatotoxicity of various chemicals, a process which remains challenging during the early phase of drug development. The test was based on functional human hepatocytes using the HepaRG cell line, and automation of quantitative fluorescence microscopy coupled with automated imaging analysis. Differentiated HepaRG cells express most of the specific liver functions at levels close to those found in primary human hepatocytes, including detoxifying enzymes and drug transporters. A triparametric analysis was first used to evaluate hepatocyte purity and differentiation status, mainly detoxication capacity of cells before toxicity testing. We demonstrated that culturing HepaRG cells at high density maintained high hepatocyte purity and differentiation level. Moreover, evidence was found that isolating hepatocytes from 2-week-old confluent cultures limited variations associated with an ageing process occurring over time in confluent cells. Then, we designed a toxicity test based on detection of early mitochondrial depolarisation associated with permeability transition (MPT) pore opening, using JC-1 as a metachromatic fluorescent dye. Maximal dye dimerization that would have been strongly hampered by efficient efflux due to the active, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pump was overcome by coupling JC-1 with the MDR inhibitor verapamil. Specificity of this test was demonstrated and its usefulness appeared directly dependent on conditions supporting hepatic cell competence. This new hepatotoxicity test adapted to automated, image-based detection should be useful to evaluate the early MPT event common to cell apoptosis and necrosis and simultaneously to detect involvement of the multidrug resistant pump with target drugs in a human hepatocyte environment. - Highlights: > We define conditions to preserve differentiation of selective pure HepaRG hepatocyte cultures. > In these conditions, CYPs

  10. Establishment of human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells with overexpressed human hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Cheng, Hongjing; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Chronic liver disease has become a major health problem that causes serious damage to human health. Since the existing treatment effect was not ideal, we need to seek new treatment methods. We utilized the gene recombination technology to obtain the human hair mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression of human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). Furthermore, we verified the property of transfected cells through detecting surface marker by flow cytometry. We show here establishment of the hHGF-overexpressing lentivirus vector, and successfully transfection to human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells. The verified experiments could demonstrate the human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which have been transfected still have the properties of stem cells. We successfully constructed human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression hHGF, and maintain the same properties compared with pro-transfected cells.

  11. Photolytic degradation of benorylate: effects of the photoproducts on cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castell, J.V.; Gomez, M.J.; Mirabet, V.; Miranda, M.A.; Morera, I.M.

    1987-05-01

    The photodegradation of benorylate (4'-(acetamido)phenyl-2-acetoxybenzoate), a drug frequently used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy, has been examined under different sets of experimental conditions. Several photoproducts have been isolated and identified on the basis of their IR, NMR, and MS spectra. The most significant photochemical process is the photo-Fries rearrangement of benorylate, leading to 5-acetamido-2'-acetoxy-2-hydroxybenzophenone (1). This compound undergoes a rapid transacylation to the isomeric 5'-acetamido-2'-acetoxy-2-hydroxybenzophenone (2). A primary culture of rat hepatocytes has been used to evaluate the possible toxicity of these two benzophenones, keeping in mind the following criteria: leakage of cytosolic enzymes, attachment index to culture plates, gluconeogenesis from lactate and fructose, glycogen balance, and albumin synthesis. At the concentrations assayed, neither of the two major photoproducts of benorylate (benzophenones 1 and 2) had significant toxic effects on liver cells in culture.

  12. Photolytic degradation of benorylate: effects of the photoproducts on cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Castell, J V; Gomez, M J; Mirabet, V; Miranda, M A; Morera, I M

    1987-05-01

    The photodegradation of benorylate [4'-(acetamido)phenyl-2-acetoxybenzoate], a drug frequently used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy, has been examined under different sets of experimental conditions. Several photoproducts have been isolated and identified on the basis of their IR, NMR, and MS spectra. The most significant photochemical process is the photo-Fries rearrangement of benorylate, leading to 5-acetamido-2'-acetoxy-2-hydroxybenzophenone (1). This compound undergoes a rapid transacylation to the isomeric 5'-acetamido-2'-acetoxy-2-hydroxybenzophenone (2). A primary culture of rat hepatocytes has been used to evaluate the possible toxicity of these two benzophenones, keeping in mind the following criteria: leakage of cytosolic enzymes, attachment index to culture plates, gluconeogenesis from lactate and fructose, glycogen balance, and albumin synthesis. At the concentrations assayed, neither of the two major photoproducts of benorylate (benzophenones 1 and 2) had significant toxic effects on liver cells in culture.

  13. Spontaneous hepatic repopulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant human α1-antitrypsin by wild-type donor hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jianqiang; Yannam, Govardhana R; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Hidvegi, Tunda; Basma, Hesham; Rennard, Stephen I; Wong, Ronald J; Avsar, Yesim; Guha, Chandan; Perlmutter, David H; Fox, Ira J; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2011-05-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited condition that causes liver disease and emphysema. The normal function of this protein, which is synthesized by the liver, is to inhibit neutrophil elastase, a protease that degrades connective tissue of the lung. In the classical form of the disease, inefficient secretion of a mutant α1-antitrypsin protein (AAT-Z) results in its accumulation within hepatocytes and reduced protease inhibitor activity, resulting in liver injury and pulmonary emphysema. Because mutant protein accumulation increases hepatocyte cell stress, we investigated whether transplanted hepatocytes expressing wild-type AAT might have a competitive advantage relative to AAT-Z-expressing hepatocytes, using transgenic mice expressing human AAT-Z. Wild-type donor hepatocytes replaced 20%-98% of mutant host hepatocytes, and repopulation was accelerated by injection of an adenovector expressing hepatocyte growth factor. Spontaneous hepatic repopulation with engrafted hepatocytes occurred in the AAT-Z-expressing mice even in the absence of severe liver injury. Donor cells replaced both globule-containing and globule-devoid cells, indicating that both types of host hepatocytes display impaired proliferation relative to wild-type hepatocytes. These results suggest that wild-type hepatocyte transplantation may be therapeutic for AAT-Z liver disease and may provide an alternative to protein replacement for treating emphysema in AAT-ZZ individuals.

  14. Prediction of Differentiation Tendency Toward Hepatocytes from Gene Expression in Undifferentiated Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, Kana; Liu, Yujung; Kanie, Kei; Takayama, Kazuo; Kokunugi, Minako; Hirata, Mitsuhi; Fukuda, Takayuki; Suga, Mika; Nikawa, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Functional hepatocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have potential as tools for predicting drug-induced hepatotoxicity in the early phases of drug development. However, the propensity of hPSC lines to differentiate into specific lineages is reported to differ. The ability to predict low propensity of hPSCs to differentiate into hepatocytes would facilitate the selection of useful hPSC clones and substantially accelerate development of hPSC-derived hepatocytes for pharmaceutical research. In this study, we compared the expression of genes associated with hepatic differentiation in five hPSC lines including human ES cell line, H9, which is known to differentiate into hepatocytes, and an hPSC line reported with a poor propensity for hepatic differentiation. Genes distinguishing between undifferentiated hPSCs, hPSC-derived hepatoblast-like differentiated cells, and primary human hepatocytes were drawn by two-way cluster analysis. The order of expression levels of genes in undifferentiated hPSCs was compared with that in hPSC-derived hepatoblast-like cells. Three genes were selected as predictors of low propensity for hepatic differentiation. Expression of these genes was investigated in 23 hPSC clones. Review of representative cells by induction of hepatic differentiation suggested that low prediction scores were linked with low hepatic differentiation. Thus, our model using gene expression ranking and bioinformatic analysis could reasonably predict poor differentiation propensity of hPSC lines. PMID:27733097

  15. Prediction of Differentiation Tendency Toward Hepatocytes from Gene Expression in Undifferentiated Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Kana; Liu, Yujung; Kanie, Kei; Takayama, Kazuo; Kokunugi, Minako; Hirata, Mitsuhi; Fukuda, Takayuki; Suga, Mika; Nikawa, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Ryuji; Furue, Miho K

    2016-12-15

    Functional hepatocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have potential as tools for predicting drug-induced hepatotoxicity in the early phases of drug development. However, the propensity of hPSC lines to differentiate into specific lineages is reported to differ. The ability to predict low propensity of hPSCs to differentiate into hepatocytes would facilitate the selection of useful hPSC clones and substantially accelerate development of hPSC-derived hepatocytes for pharmaceutical research. In this study, we compared the expression of genes associated with hepatic differentiation in five hPSC lines including human ES cell line, H9, which is known to differentiate into hepatocytes, and an hPSC line reported with a poor propensity for hepatic differentiation. Genes distinguishing between undifferentiated hPSCs, hPSC-derived hepatoblast-like differentiated cells, and primary human hepatocytes were drawn by two-way cluster analysis. The order of expression levels of genes in undifferentiated hPSCs was compared with that in hPSC-derived hepatoblast-like cells. Three genes were selected as predictors of low propensity for hepatic differentiation. Expression of these genes was investigated in 23 hPSC clones. Review of representative cells by induction of hepatic differentiation suggested that low prediction scores were linked with low hepatic differentiation. Thus, our model using gene expression ranking and bioinformatic analysis could reasonably predict poor differentiation propensity of hPSC lines.

  16. Feasibility of direct oxygenation of primary-cultured rat hepatocytes using polyethylene glycol-decorated liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH).

    PubMed

    Naruto, Hirosuke; Huang, Hongyun; Nishikawa, Masaki; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Mizuno, Atsushi; Ohta, Katsuji; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2007-10-01

    We tested the short-term efficacy of liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) in cultured rat hepatocytes. Supplementation with LEH (20% of the hemoglobin concentration of blood) did not lower albumin production in static culture, and completely reversed the cell death and deterioration in albumin production caused by an oxygen shortage in 2D flat-plate perfusion bioreactors.

  17. Effect of curcumin analog on gamma-radiation-induced cellular changes in primary culture of isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, M; Sudheer, A Ram; Rajasekaran, K N; Menon, Venugopal P

    2008-10-22

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of curcumin analog, on gamma-radiation-induced toxicity in primary cultures of isolated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from the liver of rats by collagenase perfusion. The DNA damage was analysed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). An increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase in gamma-radiation dose at 1-4 Gy in cultured rat hepatocytes. The levels of lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) were increased significantly, whereas the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in gamma-irradiated groups. The maximum damage to hepatocytes was observed at 4Gy gamma-irradiation. Pretreatment with different concentrations of curcumin analog (1.38, 6.91 and 13.82 microM) shows a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. Pretreatment with curcumin analog prevents the loss of enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants like GSH upon gamma-irradiation. The maximum protection of hepatocytes was observed at 6.91 microM of curcumin analog pretreatment. Thus, our result shows that pretreatment with curcumin analog protects the hepatocytes against gamma-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  18. Epidermal growth factor counteracts the glycogenic effect of insulin in parenchymal hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, M H; Agius, L

    1987-01-01

    Rat parenchymal hepatocytes in monolayer culture were used to study the metabolic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin on ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. EGF, unlike insulin, did not inhibit ketogenesis from palmitate or gluconeogenesis from pyruvate in hepatocyte cultures. It also had no effect on these pathways in the presence of insulin. In contrast, EGF potently counteracted the stimulation of [14C]pyruvate incorporation into glycogen by insulin, and also glycogen deposition from both gluconeogenic precursors and glucose. The EGF concentration causing half-maximal effect was about 0.1 nM. The anti-glycogenic effect of EGF was observed after both long-term (24 h) and short-term (1 h) exposure to EGF, and was more marked in the presence of insulin than in its absence. EGF did not displace bound insulin, suggesting that it neither competes for the insulin receptor nor affects the affinity of the receptor for insulin. EGF did not alter cellular cyclic AMP; and inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity did not prevent the anti-glycogenic effect of EGF. In liver-derived dividing epithelial cells, Hep-G2 cells and fibroblasts, which have no capacity for gluconeogenesis, EGF did not counteract the stimulatory effect of insulin on [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen, and in the epithelial cells EGF increased [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen. The counter-effect of EGF on the glycogenic action of insulin in parenchymal hepatocytes may be due to a direct effect on glycogen metabolism or to an interaction with the post-receptor events in insulin action. PMID:2827626

  19. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Caperna, T J; Shannon, A E; Stoll, M; Blomberg, L A; Ramsay, T G

    2015-07-01

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP, orosomucoid, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute-phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute-phase protein in this species, and its circulating concentration appears to be associated with growth rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regulation of AGP synthesis in hepatocytes prepared from suckling piglets and to provide a framework to compare its regulation with that of haptoglobin (HP), a positive acute-phase protein. Hepatocytes were isolated from preweaned piglets and maintained in serum-free monolayer culture for up to 72 h. The influences of hormones, cytokines, and redox modifiers on the expression and secretion of AGP and HP were determined by relative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring the concentration of each protein secreted into culture medium. The messenger RNA abundance and/or secretion of AGP protein was enhanced by interleukin (IL)-17a, IL-1, and resveratrol and inhibited by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), oncostatin M, and thyroid hormone (P < 0.05). HP expression and synthesis were upregulated by oncostatin M, IL-6, and dexamethasone and downregulated by TNF (P < 0.01). The overall messenger RNA expression at 24 h was in agreement with the secreted protein patterns confirming that control of these proteins in hepatocytes is largely transcriptional. Moreover, these data support the consideration that AGP is a negative acute-phase reactant and appears to be regulated by cytokines (with the exception of TNF) and hormones primarily in a manner opposite to that of the positive acute-phase protein, HP.

  20. A novel ultrathin collagen nanolayer assembly for 3-D microtissue engineering: Layer-by-layer collagen deposition for long-term stable microfluidic hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    McCarty, William J; Usta, O Berk; Luitje, Martha; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Bhushan, Abhinav; Hegde, Manjunath; Golberg, Inna; Jindal, Rohit; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-03-01

    The creation of stable hepatocyte cultures using cell-matrix interactions has proven difficult in microdevices due to dimensional constraints limiting the utility of classic tissue culture techniques that involve the use of hydrogels such as the collagen "double gel" or "overlay". To translate the collagen overlay technique into microdevices, we modified collagen using succinylation and methylation reactions to create polyanionic and polycationic collagen solutions, and deposited them layer-by-layer to create ultrathin collagen nanolayers on hepatocytes. These ultrathin collagen layers covered hepatocytes in microdevices and 1) maintained cell morphology, viability, and polarity, 2) induced bile canalicular formation and actin reorganization, and 3) maintained albumin and urea secretions and CYP activity similar to those observed in hepatocytes in collagen double gel hepatocytes in plate cultures. Beyond the immediate applications of this technique to create stable, in vitro microfluidic hepatocyte cultures for drug toxicity testing, this technique is generally applicable as a thin biomaterial for other 3D microtissues.

  1. Human biliary tree stem/progenitor cells immunomodulation: Role of hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Maraldi, Tullia; Guida, Marianna; Beretti, Francesca; Resca, Elisa; Carpino, Guido; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Gentile, Raffaele; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Murgia, Alba; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; De Pol, Anto

    2017-04-01

    Human biliary tree stem/progenitor cells (hBTSC) are multipotent epithelial stem cells with the potential for allogenic transplant in liver, biliary tree, and pancreatic diseases. Human mesenchymal stem cells, but also epithelial stem cells, are able to modulate immune responses with different types of secretion molecules. The initial aim of the present study was to develop for the first time a culture protocol in order to expand hBTSC in vitro through passages, allowing to maintain a similar stem cell and secretome profile. Furthermore, we investigated the secretome profile of the hBTSC to assess the production of molecules capable of affecting immune feedback. We found that hepatocyte growth factor produced by hBTSC exerts its cytoprotective role inducing apoptosis in human immune cells, such as lymphocytes. The present study, therefore, supports the hypothesis that hBTSC can be useful for the purpose of regenerative medicine, as they can be banked and expanded, and they can secrete immunoregulatory factors. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  2. Stimulation of the nitric oxide synthase pathway in human hepatocytes by cytokines and endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived biologic mediator that is shown to be induced in various cell types and to cause many metabolic changes in target cells. Inhibition of tumor cell growth and antimicrobial activity has been attributed to the stimulation of the inducible type of the NO synthase (NOS). However, there is limited evidence for the existence of such inducible NOS in a human cell type. We show here the induction of NO biosynthesis in freshly isolated human hepatocytes (HC) after stimulation with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IFN- gamma, and endotoxin. Increased levels of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) in culture supernatants were associated with NADPH-dependent NOS activity in the cell lysates. The production of NO2- and NO3- was inhibited by NG-monomethyl L-arginine and was associated with an increase in cyclic guanylate monophosphate release. The data presented here provide evidence for the existence of typical inducible NO biosynthesis in a human cell type. PMID:1377225

  3. Bis(hydroxyphenyl)methane-bisphenol F-metabolism by the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Coralie; Perdu, Elisabeth; de Sousa, Georges; Debrauwer, Laurent; Rahmani, Roger; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2011-10-01

    Bisphenol F (BPF) is present in the environment and as a contaminant of food. Humans may, therefore, be exposed to BPF, and an assessment of this risk is required. BPF has been shown to have genotoxic and endocrine-disruptor properties in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2), which is a model system for studies of xenobiotic toxicity. In this study, we investigated the ability of HepG2 cells to biotransform BPF, because metabolism may affect the observed effects of BPF, and we compared this metabolic capacity with that of human hepatocytes. Cells were incubated for 24 hours with [(3)H]-BPF. The culture medium was then concentrated and its metabolites were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. BPF was largely metabolized into the corresponding sulfate by the HepG2 cell line. BPF was metabolized into both sulfate and glucuronide by human hepatocytes, but with differences between individuals. The metabolism of BPF in both HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes suggests the existence of a detoxification pathway. Thus, these two cell models differ in metabolic capacity. It is, therefore, very important, when assessing the toxic effects of substances in vitro, to determine, in parallel, the biotransformation capacities of the model used to extrapolate in vivo.

  4. Environmental pollutants parathion, paraquat and bisphenol A show distinct effects towards nuclear receptors-mediated induction of xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim; Zenata, Ondrej; Doricakova, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2015-10-01

    Environmental pollutants parathion, bisphenol A and paraquat were not systematically studied towards the effects on the expression of phase I xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (CYPs). We monitored their effects on the expression of selected CYPs in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, we investigated their effects on the receptors regulating these CYPs, particularly arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by gene reporter assays. We found that parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of AhR. Moreover, they are the inducers of CYP1A1 mRNA in hepatoma cells HepG2 as well as in human hepatocytes by AhR-dependent mechanism via formation of AhR-DNA-binding complex, as revealed by gel shift assay. All three compounds possessed anti-glucocorticoid action as revealed by GR-dependent gene reporter assay and a decline in tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene expression in human hepatocytes. Moreover, parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of PXR and inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in the primary cultures of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, the studied compounds displayed distinct activities towards nuclear receptors involved in many biological processes and these findings may help us to better understand their adverse actions in pathological states followed after their exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypocholesterolaemic Activity of Lupin Peptides: Investigation on the Crosstalk between Human Enterocytes and Hepatocytes Using a Co-Culture System Including Caco-2 and HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Ferruzza, Simonetta; Ranaldi, Giulia; Sambuy, Yula; Arnoldi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Literature indicates that peptic and tryptic peptides derived from the enzymatic hydrolysis of lupin protein are able to modulate cholesterol metabolism in human hepatic HepG2 cells and that part of these peptides are absorbed in a small intestine model based on differentiated human Caco-2 cells. In this paper, a co-culture system, including Caco-2 and HepG2 cells, was investigated with two objectives: (a) to verify whether cholesterol metabolism in HepG2 cells was modified by the peptides absorption through Caco-2 cells; (b) to investigate how lupin peptides influence cholesterol metabolism in Caco-2 cells. The experiments showed that the absorbed peptides, not only maintained their bioactivity on HepG2 cells, but that this activity was improved by the crosstalk of the two cells systems in co-culture. In addition, lupin peptides showed a positive influence on cholesterol metabolism in Caco-2 cells, decreasing the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) secretion. PMID:27455315

  6. Thiol-disulfide effects on hepatic glutathione transport. Studies in cultured rat hepatocytes and perfused livers.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, S C; Ge, J L; Huang, H Y; Kuhlenkamp, J; Kaplowitz, N

    1993-01-01

    In cultured rat hepatocytes, cystine led to an inhibition of GSH efflux by lowering the Vmax by approximately 35% without affecting the Km. The cystine-mediated inhibition of GSH efflux was rapid in onset (< 1 h), with near maximum effect at 0.1 mM. Inhibition was still observed when cystine uptake was prevented. Cystine and sulfobromophthalein-GSH, a selective inhibitor of sinusoidal transport of GSH, did not exhibit additive inhibitory effects on GSH efflux. Depletion of ATP or membrane depolarization after cystine treatment were excluded as potential mechanisms. DTT not only reversed the cystine-mediated inhibition of GSH efflux, it stimulated GSH efflux up to 400-500%. The DTT effect was immediate in onset, reaching maximum after 30 min, and was partially reversed by cystine, suggesting that the two share a common site(s) of action. DTT treatment did not alter cellular ATP levels or change the membrane potential. In cultured hepatocytes, DTT treatment increased the Vmax of GSH efflux by approximately 500% without affecting the Km. Inhibition of microtubular function and vesicular acidification did not affect basal or DTT stimulated efflux. Both cystine and DTT effects on sinusoidal GSH efflux were confirmed in perfused livers. In summary, the capacity of the sinusoidal GSH transporter is markedly influenced by thiol-disulfide status. Images PMID:8376579

  7. Protective effect of butylated hydroxylanisole against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geun Hye; Jeon, Yu Jin; Han, Ho Jae; Park, Soo Hyun; Baek, Kyoung Min; Chang, Woochul; Kim, Joong Sun; Kim, Lark Kyun; Lee, You-Mie; Lee, Sangkyu; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, Min Young

    2015-01-01

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound consisting of a mixture of two isomeric organic compounds: 2-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole. We examined the effect of BHA against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes. Cell viability was significantly decreased by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, H2O2 treatment increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2, and promoted PARP-1 cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with BHA before exposure to H2O2 significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced decrease of cell viability. H2O2 exposure resulted in an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with BHA or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, an ROS scavenger). H2O2-induced decrease of cell viability was also attenuated by pretreatment with BHA and NAC. Furthermore, H2O2-induced increase of Bax, decrease of Bcl-2, and PARP-1 cleavage was also inhibited by BHA. Taken together, results of this investigation demonstrated that BHA protects primary cultured mouse hepatocytes against H2O2-induced apoptosis by inhibiting ROS generation.

  8. Antioxidant lignans from Machilus thunbergii protect CCl4-injured primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y U; Kang, S Y; Park, H Y; Sung, S H; Lee, E J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y C

    2000-09-01

    Eleven lignans (1-11) were isolated from the CH2Cl2 fraction of the bark of Machilus thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc. (Lauraceae). These were identified as (-)-acuminatin (1), (-)-isoguaiacin (2), meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (3), (+)-galbacin (4), (-)-sesamin (5), (+)-galbelgin (6), machilin A (7), machilin G (8), licarin A (9), and nectandrin A (10) and B (11). Primary cultures of rat hepatocytes were co-incubated for 90 min with the hepatotoxin CCl4 and each of the 11 lignans (50 microM). Hepatoprotective activity was determined by measuring the level of glutamic pyruvic transaminase released into the medium from the primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. (-)-Acuminatin, (-)-isoguaiacin and meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid all significantly reduced the level of glutamic pyruvic transaminase released. Further investigation revealed that these three compounds significantly preserved the levels and the activities of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase. (-)-Acuminatin, (-)-isoguaiacin and meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid also ameliorated lipid peroxidation as demonstrated by a reduction of malondialdehyde production. These results suggest that (-)-acuminatin, (-)-isoguaiacin and meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid exert diverse hepatoprotective activities, perhaps by serving as potent antioxidants.

  9. Protective effect of butylated hydroxylanisole against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Geun Hye; Jeon, Yu Jin; Han, Ho Jae; Park, Soo Hyun; Baek, Kyoung Min; Chang, Woochul; Kim, Joong Sun; Kim, Lark Kyun; Lee, You-Mie; Lee, Sangkyu; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jee, Jun-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound consisting of a mixture of two isomeric organic compounds: 2-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole. We examined the effect of BHA against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes. Cell viability was significantly decreased by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, H2O2 treatment increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2, and promoted PARP-1 cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with BHA before exposure to H2O2 significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced decrease of cell viability. H2O2 exposure resulted in an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with BHA or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, an ROS scavenger). H2O2-induced decrease of cell viability was also attenuated by pretreatment with BHA and NAC. Furthermore, H2O2-induced increase of Bax, decrease of Bcl-2, and PARP-1 cleavage was also inhibited by BHA. Taken together, results of this investigation demonstrated that BHA protects primary cultured mouse hepatocytes against H2O2-induced apoptosis by inhibiting ROS generation. PMID:25798044

  10. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on age-related hepatocyte changes in old male and female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carmen; Salazar, Veronica; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2004-10-01

    Aging induces changes in several organs, such as the liver, and this process might be due to damage caused by free radicals and inflammatory mediators. The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis shows a reduction with age, and this fact could be associated with some age-related changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of GH administration on age-induced alterations in hepatocytes. Two and twenty two month-old male and female Wistar rats were used. Old rats were treated with human recombinant GH for 10 wk. At the end of the treatment, hepatocytes were isolated from the liver and cultured, and different parameters were measured in cells and medium. Plasma IGF-1 was also measured. Aging significantly decreased plasma IGF-1 in males. In females, plasma IGF-1 was also reduced, but not significantly. GH treatment restored plasma IGF-1 levels to values similar to young males. Aging was associated with a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and cyclic guanosyl-monophosphate (cGMP), as well as a reduction in adenosyl triphosphate (ATP) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. GH administration partially prevented all these changes in males. In females, some of the parameters were significantly improved by GH (ATP, CO, cGMP), while others showed a tendency to improvement, although differences did not reach significance. In conclusion, GH administration could exert beneficial effects against age-related changes in hepatocytes, mainly in males.

  11. Screening for oestrogenic activity of plant and food extracts using in vitro trout hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bennetau-Pelissero, C; Latonnelle, K Gontier; Lamothe, V; Shinkaruk-Poix, S; Kaushik, S J

    2004-01-01

    The use of in vitro trout hepatocyte cultures is shown to provide a simple and effective way to screen plant and food products for oestrogenic activity. The relative oestrogenic activities of 0.1 g each of extracts of phytosterol, soy isoflavone, red clover, kudzu and soybean extracts were determined using this assay and found to be equivalent to 212, 1, 3.2, 132 and 1025 nM of 17beta-estradiol, respectively. Controls were performed on soybean and kudzu extracts using specific ELISAs for isoflavones and these confirmed the validity of the cell culture assay. The method described offers an advantage over current methods in that it can detect increased oestrogenic activity that may occur as a result of metabolic activation of pre- or pro-oestrogens liver cells.

  12. Defined and Scalable Generation of Hepatocyte-like Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Alhaque, Sharmin; Cameron, Kate; Meseguer-Ripolles, Jose; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Rashidi, Hassan; Hay, David C

    2017-03-02

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) possess great value for biomedical research. hPSCs can be scaled and differentiated to all cell types found in the human body. The differentiation of hPSCs to human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) has been extensively studied, and efficient differentiation protocols have been established. The combination of extracellular matrix and biological stimuli, including growth factors, cytokines, and small molecules, have made it possible to generate HLCs that resemble primary human hepatocytes. However, the majority of procedures still employ undefined components, giving rise to batch-to-batch variation. This serves as a significant barrier to the application of the technology. To tackle this issue, we developed a defined system for hepatocyte differentiation using human recombinant laminins as extracellular matrices in combination with a serum-free differentiation process. Highly efficient hepatocyte specification was achieved, with demonstrated improvements in both HLC function and phenotype. Importantly, this system is easy to scale up using research and GMP-grade hPSC lines promising advances in cell-based modelling and therapies.

  13. The Effect of Nitric Oxide on Ammonia Decomposition in Co-cultures of Hepatocytes and Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Sumii, Tateki; Nakano, Yohei; Abe, Takuma; Nakashima, Kazuhiro; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic functions, such as albumin secretion and ammonia metabolism, are upregulated in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) produced by hepatic stellate cells (HSC), as well as nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial cells under shear stress. However, the simultaneous effect of HSC and NO has not been previously investigated in a tri-co-culture model containing hepatocytes with HSC and endothelial cells under shear stress. We hypothesized that NO inhibits HGF production from HSC. To test this idea, we constructed a mono-culture model of hepatocytes and a co-culture model of hepatocytes and HSC and measured ammonia decomposition and HGF production in each model under NO load. Ammonia decomposition was significantly higher in the co-culture model under 0 ppm NO load, but no significant increase was observed under NO load. In the co-culture model, HGF was produced at 1.0 ng/mL under 0 ppm NO load and 0.3 ng/mL under NO load. Ammonia decomposition was increased by 1.0 ng/mL HGF, but not by 0.3 ng/mL HGF. These results indicated that NO inhibits HGF production from HSC; consequently, the effects of NO and co-culture with HSC cannot improve hepatic function simultaneously. Instead, the simultaneous effect of 1.0 ng/mL HGF and NO may further enhance hepatic function in vitro.

  14. Fluorometric assessment of acetaminophen-induced toxicity in rat hepatocyte spheroids seeded on micro-space cell culture plates.

    PubMed

    Sanoh, Seigo; Santoh, Masataka; Takagi, Masashi; Kanayama, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ejiri, Yoko; Horie, Toru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    Hepatotoxicity induced by the metabolic activation of drugs is a major concern in drug discovery and development. Three-dimensional (3-D) cultures of hepatocyte spheroids may be superior to monolayer cultures for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity because hepatocytes in spheroids maintain the expression of various metabolizing enzymes and transporters, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP). In this study, we examined the hepatotoxicity due to metabolic activation of acetaminophen (APAP) using fluorescent indicators of cell viability and intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH) in rat hepatocyte spheroids grown on micro-space cell culture plates. The mRNA expression levels of some drug-metabolizing enzymes were maintained during culture. Additionally, this culture system was compatible with microfluorometric imaging under confocal laser scanning microscopy. APAP induced a decrease in intracellular ATP at 10mM, which was blocked by the CYP inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT). APAP (10mM, 24h) decreased the levels of both intracellular ATP and GSH, and GSH-conjugated APAP (APAP-GSH) were formed. All three effects were blocked by ABT, confirming a contribution of APAP metabolic activation by CYP to spheroid toxicity. Fluorometric imaging of hepatocyte spheroids on micro-space cell culture plates may allow the screening of drug-induced hepatotoxicity during pharmaceutical development.

  15. Copper Nanoparticles and Copper Sulphate Induced Cytotoxicity in Hepatocyte Primary Cultures of Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiaoyan; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Yan, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) were widely used in various industrial and commercial applications. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytotoxicity of Cu-NPs on primary hepatocytes of E.coioides compared with copper sulphate (CuSO4). Cultured cells were exposed to 0 or 2.4 mg Cu L-1 as CuSO4or Cu-NPs for 24-h. Results showed either form of Cu caused a dramatic loss in cell viability, more so in the CuSO4 than Cu-NPs treatment. Compared to control, either CuSO4 or Cu-NPs significantly increased reactive oxygen species(ROS) and malondialdehyde(MDA) concentration in hepatocytes by overwhelming total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity, catalase(CAT) activity and glutathione(GSH) concentration. In addition, the antioxidative-related genes [SOD (Cu/Zn), SOD (Mn), CAT, GPx4] were also down-regulated. The apoptosis and necrosis percentage was significantly higher after the CuSO4 or Cu-NPs treatment than the control. The apoptosis was induced by the increased cytochrome c concentration in the cytosol and elevated caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 activities. Additionally, the apoptosis-related genes (p53, p38β and TNF-α) and protein (p53 protein) were up-regulated after the CuSO4 or Cu-NPs treatment, with CuSO4 exposure having a greater effect than Cu-NPs. In conclusion, Cu-NPs had similar types of toxic effects as CuSO4 on primary hepatocytes of E.coioides, but toxicity of CuSO4 was more severe than that of Cu-NPs.

  16. Copper Nanoparticles and Copper Sulphate Induced Cytotoxicity in Hepatocyte Primary Cultures of Epinephelus coioides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiaoyan; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Yan, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) were widely used in various industrial and commercial applications. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytotoxicity of Cu-NPs on primary hepatocytes of E.coioides compared with copper sulphate (CuSO4). Cultured cells were exposed to 0 or 2.4 mg Cu L-1 as CuSO4or Cu-NPs for 24-h. Results showed either form of Cu caused a dramatic loss in cell viability, more so in the CuSO4 than Cu-NPs treatment. Compared to control, either CuSO4 or Cu-NPs significantly increased reactive oxygen species(ROS) and malondialdehyde(MDA) concentration in hepatocytes by overwhelming total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity, catalase(CAT) activity and glutathione(GSH) concentration. In addition, the antioxidative-related genes [SOD (Cu/Zn), SOD (Mn), CAT, GPx4] were also down-regulated. The apoptosis and necrosis percentage was significantly higher after the CuSO4 or Cu-NPs treatment than the control. The apoptosis was induced by the increased cytochrome c concentration in the cytosol and elevated caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 activities. Additionally, the apoptosis-related genes (p53, p38β and TNF-α) and protein (p53 protein) were up-regulated after the CuSO4 or Cu-NPs treatment, with CuSO4 exposure having a greater effect than Cu-NPs. In conclusion, Cu-NPs had similar types of toxic effects as CuSO4 on primary hepatocytes of E.coioides, but toxicity of CuSO4 was more severe than that of Cu-NPs. PMID:26890000

  17. Effect of elevated total CoA levels on metabolic pathways in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, C.A.; Smith, C.M.

    1987-05-01

    Livers from fasted rats have 30% higher total CoA levels than fed rats. To determine whether this increase of total CoA influences metabolism, the rates of gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis were measured in hepatocytes with cyanamide (CYM) or pantothenate (PA) deficient medium used to vary total CoA levels independently of hormonal status. Primary cultures of rat hepatocytes were incubated 14 hrs with Bt/sub 2/ cAMP, dexamethasone + theophylline in PA deficient medium or with CYM (500 ..mu..M) + PA, rinsed and preincubated 0.5 hr to remove the CYM. Hepatocytes treated with CYM had total CoA levels 10-24% higher than PA deficient cells and lower rates of glucose production from lactate + pyruvate (L/P) or from alanine (0.23 +/- 0.05 and 0.089 +/- 0.02 ..mu..m/mg protein, respectively in CYM treated cells compared to 0.33 +/- 0.06 and 0.130 +/- 0.006 in PA deficient cells). This decrease was not due to CYM per se, as the direct addition of CYM stimulated glucose production from L/P. CYM treated cells with 15-40% higher total CoA and 30% higher fatty acyl-CoA levels had the same rates of (/sup 14/C)-palmitate oxidation as PA deficient cells. However, rates of ketogenesis were lower in CYM treated cells (163 +/- 11 nm/mg compared to 217 +/- 14 nm/mg protein). These results suggest that physiological alterations of hepatic total CoA levels are not necessary for fasting rates of gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis.

  18. Antioxidant and cytoprotective properties of D-tagatose in cultured murine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Paterna, J C; Boess, F; Stäubli, A; Boelsterli, U A

    1998-01-01

    D-Tagatose is a zero-energy producing ketohexose that is a powerful cytoprotective agent against chemically induced cell injury. To further explore the underlying mechanisms of cytoprotection, we investigated the effects of D-tagatose on both the generation of superoxide anion radicals and the consequences of oxidative stress driven by prooxidant compounds in intact cells. Primary cultures of hepatocytes derived from male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the redox cycling drug nitrofurantoin (NFT). Lethal cell injury induced by 300 microM NFT was completely prevented by high concentrations (20 mM) of D-tagatose, whereas equimolar concentrations of glucose, mannitol, or xylose were ineffective. The extent of NFT-induced intracellular superoxide anion radical formation was not altered by D-tagatose, indicating that the ketohexose did not inhibit the reductive bioactivation of NFT. However, the NFT-induced decline of the intracellular GSH content was largely prevented by D-tagatose. The sugar also afforded complete protection against NFT toxicity in hepatocytes that had been chemically depleted of GSH. Furthermore, the ketohexose fully protected from increases in both membrane lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation. In addition, D-tagatose completely prevented oxidative cell injury inflicted by toxic iron overload with ferric nitrilotriacetate (100 microM). In contrast, D-tagatose did not protect against lethal cell injury induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, a prooxidant which acts by hydroxyl radical-independent mechanisms and which is partitioned in the lipid bilayer. These results indicate that D-tagatose, which is a weak iron chelator, can antagonize the iron-dependent toxic consequences of intracellular oxidative stress in hepatocytes. The antioxidant properties of D-tagatose may result from sequestering the redox-active iron, thereby protecting more critical targets from the damaging potential of hydroxyl radical.

  19. Primary human hepatocytes versus hepatic cell line: assessing their suitability for in vitro nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Gaiser, Birgit K; Ward, Michael B; Stone, Vicki

    2013-11-01

    The use of hepatocyte cell lines as a replacement for animal models have been heavily criticised mainly due to low expression of metabolism enzymes. This study compares primary human hepatocytes with the C3A cell line and with respect to their response to a panel of nanomaterials (NMs; two ZnO, two MWCNTs, one Ag and one positively functionalised TiO₂). The cell line was very comparable with the primary hepatocytes with regards to their cytotoxic response to the NMs (Ag > uncoated ZnO > coated ZnO). The LC₅₀ was not attained in the presence of the MWCNTs and the TiO₂ NMs. All NMs significantly increased IL-8 production, with no change in levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Albumin production was measured as an indicator of hepatic function. The authors found no change in levels of albumin with the exception of the coated ZnO NM at the LC₅₀ concentration. NM uptake was similar for both the primary hepatocytes and C3A cells as investigated by TEM. Meanwhile, the authors confirmed greater levels of CYP450 activity in untreated primary cells. This study demonstrates that the C3A cell line is a good model for investigating NM-induced hepatocyte responses with respect to uptake, cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and albumin production.

  20. Differentiation of hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xu; Lv, Shuang; He, Xia; Liu, Xiaomei; Sun, Meiyu; Li, Meiying; Chi, Guangfan; Li, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the limitations of organ donors and immune rejection in severe liver diseases, stem cell-based therapy presents a promising application for tissue repair and regeneration. As a novel cell source, mesenchymal stem cells separated from human hair follicles (HF-MSCs) are convenient to obtain and have no age limit. To date, the differentiation of HF-MSCs into hepatocytes has not been reported. In this study, we explored whether HF-MSCs and HF-MSC-derived-induced pluripotent stem cells (HF-iPS) could differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. Flow cytometry, Oil Red O stain and Alizarin Red stain were used to identify the characteristics of HF-MSCs. The expression of liver-specific gene was detected by immunofluorescence and Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. Periodic Acid-Schiff stain, Indocyanine Green stain and Low-Density Lipoprotein stain were performed to evaluate the functions of induced hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HF-MSCs were unable to differentiate into HLCs using previously reported procedures for MSCs from other tissues. However, HF-iPS efficiently induced the generation of HLCs that expressed hepatocyte markers and drug metabolism-related genes. HF-iPS can be used as novel and alternative cellular tools for inducing hepatocytes in vitro, simultaneously benefiting from utilizing HF-MSCs as a noninvasive and convenient cell source for reprogramming.

  1. APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES. M Styblo1, G A Hamilton1, E L LeCluyse1 and D J Thomas2. 1University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    The liver is considered a m...

  2. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  3. APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES. M Styblo1, G A Hamilton1, E L LeCluyse1 and D J Thomas2. 1University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    The liver is considered a m...

  4. Cultures of human liver cells in simulated microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Yoffe, B; Darlington, G J; Soriano, H E; Krishnan, B; Risin, D; Pellis, N R; Khaoustov, V I

    1999-01-01

    We used microgravity-simulated bioreactors that create the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer to establish long-term cultures of primary human liver cells (HLC). To assess the feasibility of establishing HLC cultures, human liver cells obtained either from cells dissociated by collagenase perfusion or minced tissues were cultured in rotating vessels. Formation of multidimensional tissue-like spheroids (up to 1.0 cm) comprised of hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells that arranged as bile duct-like structures along newly formed vascular sprouts were observed. Electron microscopy revealed clusters of round hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight junctions. Scanning EM revealed rounded hepatocytes that were organized in tight clusters surrounded by a complex mesh of extracellular matrix. Also, we observed that co-culture of hepatocytes with endothelial cells stimulate albumin mRNA expression. In summary, a simulated microgravity environment is conducive for the establishment of long-term HLC cultures and allows the dissection of the mechanism of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that resembles in vivo conditions.

  5. Cultures of human liver cells in simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, B.; Darlington, G. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Krishnan, B.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Khaoustov, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    We used microgravity-simulated bioreactors that create the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer to establish long-term cultures of primary human liver cells (HLC). To assess the feasibility of establishing HLC cultures, human liver cells obtained either from cells dissociated by collagenase perfusion or minced tissues were cultured in rotating vessels. Formation of multidimensional tissue-like spheroids (up to 1.0 cm) comprised of hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells that arranged as bile duct-like structures along newly formed vascular sprouts were observed. Electron microscopy revealed clusters of round hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight junctions. Scanning EM revealed rounded hepatocytes that were organized in tight clusters surrounded by a complex mesh of extracellular matrix. Also, we observed that co-culture of hepatocytes with endothelial cells stimulate albumin mRNA expression. In summary, a simulated microgravity environment is conducive for the establishment of long-term HLC cultures and allows the dissection of the mechanism of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that resembles in vivo conditions.

  6. Effect of multiple cytokines plus bacterial endotoxin on glucose and nitric oxide production by cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, E D; Smith, F S; Titheradge, M A

    1996-07-15

    Treatment of cultured hepatocytes with a combination of cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-1 beta, plus lipopolysaccharide resulted in a time-dependent induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (as measured by NO2- (+) NO3- production) and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen breakdown. The inhibition of glucose release was comparable with the observed following treatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide or treatment of isolated hepatocytes with artificial NO donors. In addition, this effect was also evident with all substrates tested that enter the gluconeogenic pathway below the level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, suggesting that this combination of cytokines may underlie the inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in endotoxic shock. The maximal inhibition of glucose output required the presence of all the cytokines plus lipopolysaccharide, whereas the induction of NO synthase was independent of the lipopolysaccharide when the cytokines were employed. Inclusion of interferon-gamma was essential to obtain a maximal response for either parameter. Inclusion of 1 mM N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine in the incubation abolished the increase in NO2- (+) NO3- observed with the complete cytokine mixture and various combinations; however, it failed to prevent the inhibition in glucose output, indicating that mechanisms other than NO underlie the cytokine-induced inhibition of glucose release.

  7. Transcriptional and metabolic flux profiling of triadimefon effects on cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Vidya V.; Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Roth, Charles M.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.

    2010-11-01

    Conazoles are a class of azole fungicides used to prevent fungal growth in agriculture, for treatment of fungal infections, and are found to be tumorigenic in rats and/or mice. In this study, cultured primary rat hepatocytes were treated to two different concentrations (0.3 and 0.15 mM) of triadimefon, which is a tumorigenic conazole in rat and mouse liver, on a temporal basis with daily media change. Following treatment, cells were harvested for microarray data ranging from 6 to 72 h. Supernatant was collected daily for three days, and the concentrations of various metabolites in the media and supernatant were quantified. Gene expression changes were most significant following exposure to 0.3 mM triadimefon and were characterized mainly by metabolic pathways related to carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Correspondingly, metabolic network flexibility analysis demonstrated a switch from fatty acid synthesis to fatty acid oxidation in cells exposed to triadimefon. It is likely that fatty acid oxidation is active in order to supply energy required for triadimefon detoxification. In 0.15 mM triadimefon treatment, the hepatocytes are able to detoxify the relatively low concentration of triadimefon with less pronounced changes in hepatic metabolism.

  8. Effects of metal ions on lipid peroxidation in cultured rat hepatocytes loaded with alpha-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Furono, K; Suetsuga, T; Sugihara, N

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the ability of various redox-active metal ions to induce lipid peroxidation in normal and alpha-linolenic acid-loaded (LNA-loaded) cultured rat hepatocytes. Lipid peroxidation was estimated by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the culture medium. At low concentrations induction was highest with ferrous ions (Fe), whereas at high concentrations, vanadium (V) and copper ions (Cu) had the greatest effect on both groups of hepatocytes. With any one of the three metal ions, the extent of lipid peroxidation in LNA-loaded hepatocytes was several times greater compared to normal cells. In addition, upon the addition of Fe or V, LNA-loaded hepatocytes were injured whereas normal cells were not. The addition of Cu caused substantial cell injury in normal hepatocytes, and even greater injury in LNA-loaded cells. The prevention of lipid peroxidation in LNA-loaded hepatocytes by addition of an antioxidant like N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DPPD) almost completely prevented Fe- and V-induced cell injury, and reduced Cu-induced cell injury. alpha-Tocopherol behaved in a way similar to but less effective than DPPD. .OH radical scavengers such as mannitol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) had no effect on lipid peroxidation induced by any metal ions in LNA-loaded hepatocytes. Addition of cadmium ions (Cd), which required the lowest concentration to cause cell injury, induced a slight increase in lipid peroxidation in normal hepatocytes, but did not induce lipid peroxidation to the same extent as seen in LNA-loaded cells treated with any of the three metal ions already mentioned. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation by DPPD scarcely protected LNA-loaded hepatocytes from Cd-induced cell injury. None of the other metal ions including aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and tin (Sn) ions, effectively induced lipid peroxidation in either group of hepatocytes, except cobalt ions (Co), which had a peroxidative effect in LNA

  9. Prediction of drug-induced immune-mediated hepatotoxicity using hepatocyte-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Eon; Jang, Mi-Jin; Kim, Young Ran; Lee, Joo-Young; Cho, Eun Byul; Kim, Eunha; Kim, Yeji; Kim, Mi Young; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2017-07-15

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of liver disease and a key safety factor during drug development. In addition to the initiation events of drug-specific hepatotoxicity, dysregulated immune responses have been proposed as major pathological events of DILI. Thus, there is a need for a reliable cell culture model with which to assess drug-induced immune reactions to predict hepatotoxicity for drug development. To this end, stem cell-derived hepatocytes have shown great potentials. Here we report that hepatocyte-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hES-HLCs) can be used to evaluate drug-induced hepatotoxic immunological events. Treatment with acetaminophen significantly elevated the levels of inflammatory cytokines by hES-HLCs. Moreover, three human immune cell lines, Jurkat, THP-1, and NK92MI, were activated when cultured in conditioned medium obtained from acetaminophen-treated hES-HLCs. To further validate, we tested thiazolidinedione (TZD) class, antidiabetic drugs, including troglitazone withdrawn from the market because of severe idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity. We found that TZD drug treatment to hES-HLCs resulted in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and eventually associated immune cell activation. In summary, our study demonstrates for the first time the potential of hES-HLCs as an in vitro model system for assessment of drug-induced as well as immune-mediated hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  11. Comparative metabolism of geranyl nitrile and citronellyl nitrile in mouse, rat, and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Raymond A; Nabb, Diane L; Gannon, Shawn A; Snow, Timothy A; Api, Anne Marie

    2006-06-01

    Geranyl nitrile (GN) and citronellyl nitrile (CN) are fragrance components used in consumer and personal care products. Differences in the clastogenicity of these two terpenes are postulated to result from differential biotransformation, presumably involving the conjugated nitrile moiety. The metabolic clearance and biotransformation of GN and CN were compared in primary hepatocytes from mice, rats, and humans. For determination of intrinsic clearance, GN and CN were incubated with hepatocytes in sealed vials, and the headspace was sampled periodically by solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For metabolite identification, GN and CN were incubated with hepatocytes from each species for 60 min, and reaction mixtures were extracted and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Both GN and CN were rapidly metabolized in hepatocytes from all species (T1/2, 0.7-11.6 min). Within a species, intrinsic clearance was similar for both compounds and increased in the order human < rat < mouse. Major common pathways for biotransformation of GN and CN involved 1) epoxidation of the 6-alkenyl moiety followed by conjugation with glutathione, 2) hydroxylation of the terminal methyl group(s) followed by direct conjugation with glucuronic acid in rodents or further oxidation to the corresponding acid in human cells, and 3) hydroxylation of the allylic C5 position. No evidence for either phase I or phase II metabolism of the conjugated nitrile moiety was obtained. Thus, the presumed metabolic basis for differences in genotoxicity remains elusive.

  12. Celsior solution compared with University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) in the protection of human hepatocytes against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Hermann; Janssen, Petra H E; Broelsch, Christoph E

    2003-07-01

    Celsior, a new preservation solution in thoracic organ transplantation was evaluated for efficacy in cold preservation of human hepatocytes and compared with University of Wisconsin solution (UW) and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK, Custodiol). Human hepatocyte cultures were preserved at 4 degrees C in Celsior, UW and HTK for 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h with 6 h of reperfusion. Levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; cell necrosis), 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT; mitochondrial function), and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP; loss of intracellular energy) were measured. Cell necrosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and loss of ATP were significantly ( P<0.001, P<0.001, P<0.002, respectively) lower in Celsior than in HTK. The amount of cell necrosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in Celsior solution (CS) and UW was equal ( P=n.s.) up to 24 h and significantly lower in UW after 48 h ( P<0.001). Additionally, the intracellular level of ATP was significantly higher after ischemia ( P<0.001) and reperfusion from long-term ischemia (24, 48 h) ( P<0.002). We can conclude that Celsior was superior to HTK and equal to UW in the protection of human hepatocytes against cold preservation injury from ischemia and reperfusion. Furthermore, Celsior was effective in long-term preservation of human hepatocytes.

  13. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  14. Primary cultured cells as sensitive in vitro model for assessment of toxicants--comparison to hepatocytes and gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingsheng; Liu, Chunsheng; Wang, Jingxian; Lam, Paul K S; Wu, Rudolf S S

    2006-11-16

    In an effort to develop cultured cell models for toxicity screening and environmental biomonitoring, we compared primary cultured gill epithelia and hepatocytes from freshwater tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to assess their sensitivity to AhR agonist toxicants. Epithelia were cultured on permeable supports (terephthalate membranes, "filters") and bathed on the apical with waterborne toxicants (pseudo in vivo asymmetrical culture conditions). Hepatocytes were cultured in multi-well plates and exposed to toxicants in culture medium. Cytochrome P4501A (measured as 7-Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, EROD) was selected as a biomarker. For cultured gill epithelia, the integrity of the epithelia remained unchanged on exposure to model toxicants, such as 1,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), benzo(a)pyrene B[a]P, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture (Aroclor 1254), and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixture (DE71). A good concentration-dependent response of EROD activity was clearly observed in both cultured gill epithelia and hepatocytes. The time-course response of EROD was measured as early as 3h, and was maximal after 6h of exposure to TCDD, B[a]P and Aroclor 1254. The estimated 6h EC50 for TCDD, B[a]P, and Aroclor 1254 was 1.2 x 10(-9), 5.7 x 10(-8) and 6.6 x 10(-6)M. For the cultured hepatocytes, time-course study showed that a significant induction of EROD took place at 18 h, and the maximal induction of EROD was observed at 24h after exposure. The estimated 24h EC50 for TCDD, B[a]P, and Aroclor 1254 was 1.4 x 10(-9), 8.1 x 10(-8) and 7.3 x 10(-6)M. There was no induction or inhibition of EROD in DE71 exposure to both gill epithelia and hepatocytes. The results show that cultured gill epithelia more rapidly induce EROD and are slightly more sensitive than cultured hepatocytes, and could be used as a rapid and sensitive tool for screening chemicals and monitoring environmental AhR agonist toxicants.

  15. Hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor beta regulate 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase gene expression in rat hepatocyte primary cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Joaquin, M; Rosa, J L; Salvadó, C; López, S; Nakamura, T; Bartrons, R; Gil, J; Tauler, A

    1996-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) are believed to be of major importance for hepatic regeneration after liver damage. We have studied the effect of these growth factors on fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2) levels and the expression of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (6PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase) in rat hepatocyte primary cultures. Our results demonstrate that HGF activates the expression of the 6PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase gene by increasing the levels of its mRNA. As a consequence of this activation, the amount of 6PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase protein and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity increased, which was reflected by a rise in Fru-2,6-P2 levels. In contrast, TGF-beta decreased the levels of 6PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase mRNA, which led to a decrease in the amount of 6PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase protein and Fru-2,6-P2. The different actions of HGF and TGF-beta on 6PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase gene expression are concomitant with their effect on cell proliferation. Here we show that, in the absence of hormones, primary cultures of hepatocytes express the F-type isoenzyme. In addition, HGF increases the expression of this isoenzyme, and dexamethasone activates the L-type isoform. HGF and TGF-beta were able to inhibit this activation. PMID:8660288

  16. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases.

  17. Resveratrol Differentially Regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Damm, Georg; Gebhardt, Rolf; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells) and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382). Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells. PMID:24603648

  18. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases.

  19. Synergy between broccoli sprout extract and selenium in the upregulation of thioredoxin reductase in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wu, Kun; Howie, A Forbes; Beckett, Geoffrey J; Wang, Wei; Bao, Yongping

    2008-09-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates and selenium (Se) can up-regulate thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) in cultured human HepG2 and MCF-7 cells [Zhang et al. (2003). Synergy between sulforaphane and selenium in the induction of thioredoxin reductase 1 requires both transcriptional and translational modulation. Carcinogenesis, 24, 497-503; Wang et al. (2005). Sulforaphane, erucin and iberin up-regulate thioredoxin reductase expression in human MCF-7 cells. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53, 1417-1421] at both the protein and mRNA levels. In this study, broccoli sprout extract (a rich source of the isothiocyanates sulforaphane and iberin) and Se interacted synergistically to induce TR1 in immortalised human hepatocytes. Broccoli sprout extracts containing 1.6, 4 and 8μM isothiocyanates were tested for their ability to induce TR1 at the protein and mRNA level. Although induction of TR1 mRNA by broccoli sprout extract (1.6-8μM) was only 1.7-2.2-fold, co-treatment with Se (0.2-1μM) enhanced the expression of TR1 mRNA (3.0-3.3-fold). Moreover, broccoli sprout extract induced the cellular concentration of TR1 and TR enzymatic activity, an induction that was augmented by Se addition. Thus, broccoli sprout extract (8μM) and Se induced cellular TR1 concentration and enzymatic activity 3.7- and 5-fold respectively, whereas, Se or broccoli sprout extract alone produced an induction of only approximately 2-fold. These data suggest that dietary isothiocyanates from broccoli sprouts and Se are important agents in the regulation of redox status in human liver cells. The synergistic effect between isothiocyanates and Se at physiologically-relevant concentrations on the induction of TR1 may play an important role in protection against oxidative stress.

  20. Evidence of a DHA Signature in the Lipidome and Metabolome of Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ghini, Veronica; Di Nunzio, Mattia; Tenori, Leonardo; Valli, Veronica; Danesi, Francesca; Capozzi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Bordoni, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Cell supplementation with bioactive molecules often causes a perturbation in the whole intracellular environment. Omics techniques can be applied for the assessment of this perturbation. In this study, the overall effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on cultured human hepatocyte lipidome and metabolome has been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in combination with traditional techniques. The effect of two additional bioactives sharing with DHA the lipid-lowering effect—propionic acid (PRO) and protocatechuic acid (PCA)—has also been evaluated in the context of possible synergism. NMR analysis of the cell lipid extracts showed that DHA supplementation, alone or in combination with PCA or PRO, strongly altered the cell lipid profile. The perfect discrimination between cells receiving DHA (alone or in combination) and the other cells reinforced the idea of a global rearrangement of the lipid environment induced by DHA. Notably, gas chromatography and fluorimetric analyses confirmed the strong discrimination obtained by NMR. The DHA signature was evidenced not only in the cell lipidome, but also in the metabolome. Results reported herein indicate that NMR, combined with other techniques, represents a fundamental approach to studying the effect of bioactive supplementation, particularly in the case of molecules with a broad spectrum of mechanisms of action. PMID:28208746

  1. Activation-dependent mitochondrial translocation of Foxp3 in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Joselyn; Teran-Angel, Guillermo; Barbosa, Luisa; Peterson, Darrell L; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3 is considered to be the master regulator for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg). Recently Foxp3, has been detected in extra lymphoid tissue, and in hepatocytes and has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its role has not been defined. Since it is expected that there is a relationship between protein localization, activity and cellular function, the aim of this study was to explore the subcellular localization of Foxp3 in resting and stimulated human hepatocytes. Foxp3 expression was measured by flow cytometry, subcellular fractioning, and immunofluorescence, and this data was used to track the shuttling of Foxp3 in different subcellular compartments in hepatocytes (HepG2 cell line), stimulated by using the PKC activators (PMA), core and preS1/2 antigen from hepatitis B virus (HBV). Our data shows that besides the nuclear location, mitochondrial translocation was detected after stimulation with PMA and at to a lesser extent, with preS1/2. In addition, Foxp3 is localizes at outer mitochondrial membrane. These results suggest a non-canonical role of Foxp3 in the mitochondrial compartment in human hepatocytes, and opens a new field about their role in liver damages during HBV infection.

  2. Regulation of adiponectin receptor 1 in human hepatocytes by agonists of nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas; Kirchner, Stefan; Laberer, Sabine; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-09-02

    The adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 have been identified to mediate the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin. Although AdipoR2 was suggested to be the main receptor for this adipokine in hepatocytes, AdipoR1 protein is highly abundant in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocytic cell lines. Nuclear receptors are main regulators of lipid metabolism and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and {gamma}, retinoid X receptor (RXR), and liver X receptor (LXR) by specific ligands may influence AdipoR1 abundance. AdipoR1 protein is neither altered by RXR or LXR agonists nor by pioglitazone. In contrast, fenofibric acid reduces AdipoR1 whereas hepatotoxic troglitazone upregulates AdipoR1 protein in HepG2 cells. Taken together this work shows for the first time that AdipoR1 protein is expressed in human hepatocytes but that it is not a direct target gene of nuclear receptors. Elevated AdipoR1 induced by hepatotoxic troglitazone may indicate a role of this receptor in adiponectin-mediated beneficial effects in liver damage.

  3. Evaluation of estrogenic activities and mechanism of action of perfluorinated chemicals determined by vitellogenin induction in primary cultured tilapia hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Du, Yongbing; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2007-12-30

    Perfluorochemicals (PFCs) are emerging persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and are widely present in the environment, wildlife and humans. Recently, reports have suggested that PFCs may have endocrine-disrupting activities. In the present study, we have developed a non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method to investigate estrogenic activities of selected PFCs using vitellogenin (VTG) induction in primary cultured hepatocytes of freshwater male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Cultured hepatocytes were exposed to various concentrations of perfluorooctanyl sulfonate (PFOS), pentadecafluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-nonafluoro-1-hexanol (4:2 FTOH), 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctanol (6:2 FTOH) and 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluoro-1-decanol (8:2 FTOH) for 48 h, while 17beta-estradiol (E2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) were used as positive controls. A dose-dependent induction of VTG was observed in E2-, 4-NP-, PFOS-, PFOA- and 6:2 FTOH-treated cells, whereas VTG levels remained unchanged in the 4:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOH exposure groups at the concentrations tested. The estimated 48-h EC(50) values for E2, 4-NP, PFOS, PFOA and 6:2 FTOH were 4.7 x 10(-7), 7.1 x 10(-6), 1.5 x 10(-5), 2.9 x 10(-5) and 2.8 x 10(-5)M, respectively. In the time-course study, significant VTG induction took place at 24 h (E2), 6 h (4-NP), 48 h (PFOS), 48 h (PFOA), 72 h (4:2 FTOH), 12 h (6:2 FTOH), 72 h (8:2 FTOH), and increased further after 96 h of exposure. Co-exposure to binary mixtures of individual PFCs and E2 for 48 h significantly inhibited E2-induced hepatocellular VTG production in a dose-dependent manner except for 4:2 FTOH. The estimated 48-h IC(50) (concentration of a compound that elicits 50% inhibition of maximally E2-induced VTG) values for PFOS, PFOA, 6:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOH were 3.1 x 10(-7), 5.1 x 10(-7), 1.1 x 10(-6) and 7.5 x 10(-7)M, respectively. In order to further investigate the estrogenic mechanism of PFCs, the hepatocytes were co-exposed to binary mixtures

  4. Human Cord Blood Stem Cells Generate Human Cytokeratin 18-Negative Hepatocyte-Like Cells in Injured Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amar Deep; Cantz, Tobias; Richter, Rudolf; Eckert, Klaus; Henschler, Reinhard; Wilkens, Ludwig; Jochheim-Richter, Andrea; Arseniev, Lubomir; Ott, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Differentiation of adult bone marrow (BM) cells into nonhematopoietic cells is a rare phenomenon. Several reports, however, suggest that human umbilical cord blood (hUCB)-derived cells give rise to hepatocytes after transplantation into nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. Therefore, we analyzed the hepatic differentiation potential of hUCB cells and compared the frequency of newly formed hepatocyte-like cells in the livers of recipient NOD-SCID mice after transplantation of hUCB versus murine BM cells. Mononuclear cell preparations of hUCB cells or murine BM from enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic or wild-type mice were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD-SCID mice. Liver regeneration was induced by carbon tetrachloride injury with and without sub-sequent hepatocyte growth factor treatment. By immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction, we detected clusters of hepatocyte-like cells in the livers of hUCB-transplanted mice. These cells expressed human albumin and Hep Par 1 but mouse CK18, suggesting the formation of chimeric hepatocyte-like cells. Native fluorescence microscopy and double immunofluorescence failed to detect single hepatocytes derived from transplanted enhanced green fluorescent protein-transgenic mouse BM. Fluorescent in situ hybridization rarely revealed donor-derived hepatocyte-like cells after cross-gender mouse BM transplantation. Thus, hUCB cells have differentiation capabilities different from murine BM cells after transplantation into NOD-SCID mice, demonstrating the importance of further testing before hUCB cells can be used therapeutically. PMID:16049339

  5. Inhibition of hepatitis B viral entry by nucleic acid polymers in HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Clément; Martel, Nora; Berby, Françoise; Bordes, Isabelle; Hantz, Olivier; Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Vaillant, Andrew; Chemin, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health concern worldwide with 240 million individuals chronically infected and at risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatments rarely cure chronic hepatitis B infection, highlighting the need for new anti-HBV drugs. Nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) are phosphorothioated oligonucleotides that have demonstrated a great potential to inhibit infection with several viruses. In chronically infected human patients, NAPs administration lead to a decline of blood HBsAg and HBV DNA and to HBsAg seroconversion, the expected signs of functional cure. NAPs have also been shown to prevent infection of duck hepatocytes with the Avihepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and to exert an antiviral activity against established DHBV infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the specific anti-HBV antiviral activity of NAPs in the HepaRG human hepatoma cell line and primary cultures of human hepatocytes. NAPs with different chemical features (phosphorothioation, 2'O-methyl ribose, 5-methylcytidine) were assessed for antiviral activity when provided at the time of HBV inoculation or post-inoculation. NAPs dose-dependently inhibited HBV entry in a phosphorothioation-dependent, sequence-independent and size-dependent manner. This inhibition of HBV entry by NAPs was impaired by 2'O-methyl ribose modification. NAP treatment after viral inoculation did not elicit any antiviral activity.

  6. Characterization of Drug-Specific Signaling Between Primary Human Hepatocytes and Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Ogese, Monday O; Faulkner, Lee; Jenkins, Roz E; French, Neil S; Copple, Ian M; Antoine, Daniel J; Elmasry, Mohamed; Malik, Hasan; Goldring, Christopher E; Park, Brian Kevin; Betts, Catherine J; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2017-07-01

    It is now apparent that antigen-specific T-cells are activated in certain patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Since cross-talk between hepatocytes and immune cells is likely to be critical in determining the outcome of drug exposure, the aim of this study was to profile the signals released by drug-treated hepatocytes and to characterize the impact of these molecules on dendritic cells. Human hepatocytes were exposed to 3 drugs (flucloxacillin, amoxicillin, and isoniazid) associated with DILI potentially mediated by the adaptive immune system as drug-specific T-cells have been isolated from DILI patients, and the metabolite nitroso-sulfamethoxazole (SMX-NO). Hepatocyte toxicity, cytokine release and activation of oxidative stress pathways were measured. Supernatants were transferred to monocyte-derived dendritic cells and cell phenotype and function were assessed. High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and lactate dehydrogenase release as well as adenosine triphosphate depletion occurred in a drug-, time-, and concentration-dependent manner with SMX-NO and flucloxacillin, whereas isoniazid and amoxicillin were nontoxic. Furthermore, drug-induced activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 marker genes was observed when hepatocytes were exposed to test drugs. The disulfide isoform of HMGB1 stimulated dendritic cell cytokine release and enhanced the priming of naive T-cells. Incubation of dendritic cells with supernatant from drug-treated hepatocytes resulted in 2 distinct cytokine profiles. SMX-NO/flucloxacillin stimulated secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1-β. Isoniazid which did not induce significant hepatocyte toxicity, compared with SMX-NO and flucloxacillin, stimulated the release of a panel of cytokines including the above and IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-17A, IP-10, and IL-10. Collectively, our study identifies drug-specific signaling pathways between hepatocytes and immune cells that could influence whether drug exposure will

  7. Identification of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol metabolites in human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Li, Dan; Zhong, Dafang

    2011-03-01

    20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD, 1) is one of the aglycones of the ginsenosides and has a wide range of pharmacological activities. At present, PPD has progressed to early clinical trials as an antidepressant. In this study, its fate in mixed human liver microsomes (HLMs) and human hepatocytes was examined for the first time. By using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, 24 metabolites were found. Four metabolites were isolated, and their structures were elucidated as (20S,24S)-epoxydammarane-3,12,25-triol (2), (20S,24R)-epoxydammarane-3,12,25-triol (3), (20S,24S)-epoxydammarane-12,25-diol-3-one (4), and (20S,24R)-epoxydammarane-12,25-diol-3-one (5) based on a detailed analysis of their spectroscopic data. The predominant metabolic pathway of PPD observed was the oxidation of the 24,25-double bond to yield 24,25-epoxides, followed by hydrolysis and rearrangement to form the corresponding 24,25-vicinal diol derivatives (M6) and the 20,24-oxide form (2 and 3). Further sequential metabolites (M2-M5) were also detected through the hydroxylation and dehydrogenation of 2 and 3. All of the phase I metabolites except for M1-1 possess a hydroxyl group at C-25 of the side chain, which was newly formed by biotransformation. Two glucuronide conjugates (M7) attributed to 2 and 3 were detected in human hepatocyte incubations, and their conjugation sites were tentatively assigned to the 25-hydroxyl group. The findings of this study strongly suggested that the formation of the 25-hydroxyl group is very important for the elimination of PPD.

  8. Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes as a Tool to Study Drug Disposition and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    YANG, KYUNGHEE; GUO, CEN; WOODHEAD, JEFFREY L; CLAIRE, ROBERT LST.; WATKINS, PAUL B; SILER, SCOTT Q; HOWELL, BRETT A; BROUWER, KIM LR

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are metabolically competent and have proper localization of basolateral and canalicular transporters with functional bile networks. Therefore, this cellular model is a unique tool that can be used to estimate biliary excretion of compounds. SCH have been used widely to assess hepatobiliary disposition of endogenous and exogenous compounds and metabolites. Mechanistic modeling based on SCH data enables estimation of metabolic and transporter-mediated clearances, which can be employed to construct physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models for prediction of drug disposition and drug-drug interactions in humans. In addition to pharmacokinetic studies, SCH also have been employed to study cytotoxicity and perturbation of biological processes by drugs and hepatically-generated metabolites. Human SCH can provide mechanistic insights underlying clinical drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In addition, data generated in SCH can be integrated into systems pharmacology models to predict potential DILI in humans. In this review, applications of SCH in studying hepatobiliary drug disposition and bile acid-mediated DILI are discussed. An example is presented to show how data generated in the SCH model was used to establish a quantitative relationship between intracellular bile acids and cytotoxicity, and how this information was incorporated into a systems pharmacology model for DILI prediction. PMID:26869411

  9. Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes as a Tool to Study Drug Disposition and Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyunghee; Guo, Cen; Woodhead, Jeffrey L; St Claire, Robert L; Watkins, Paul B; Siler, Scott Q; Howell, Brett A; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2016-02-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are metabolically competent and have proper localization of basolateral and canalicular transporters with functional bile networks. Therefore, this cellular model is a unique tool that can be used to estimate biliary excretion of compounds. SCH have been used widely to assess hepatobiliary disposition of endogenous and exogenous compounds and metabolites. Mechanistic modeling based on SCH data enables estimation of metabolic and transporter-mediated clearances, which can be used to construct physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for prediction of drug disposition and drug-drug interactions in humans. In addition to pharmacokinetic studies, SCH also have been used to study cytotoxicity and perturbation of biological processes by drugs and hepatically generated metabolites. Human SCH can provide mechanistic insights underlying clinical drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In addition, data generated in SCH can be integrated into systems pharmacology models to predict potential DILI in humans. In this review, applications of SCH in studying hepatobiliary drug disposition and bile acid-mediated DILI are discussed. An example is presented to show how data generated in the SCH model were used to establish a quantitative relationship between intracellular bile acids and cytotoxicity, and how this information was incorporated into a systems pharmacology model for DILI prediction. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nitric oxide-mediated antiplasmodial activity in human and murine hepatocytes induced by gamma interferon and the parasite itself: enhancement by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed Central

    Mellouk, S; Hoffman, S L; Liu, Z Z; de la Vega, P; Billiar, T R; Nussler, A K

    1994-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase has been shown to inhibit the development of several pathogens, including fungi, bacteria, parasites, and viruses. However, there is still controversy as to whether this effector mechanism can inhibit the development of human pathogens. We now report that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes from cultures and that the antimalarial activity is dependent on NO. Infection with the parasite alone in the absence of added IFN-gamma caused a 10-fold increase in NO formation. Both spontaneous inhibition and IFN-gamma-induced inhibition of Plasmodium yoelii-infected murine hepatocytes were increased with the addition of the NO synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, or sepiapterin, which is converted to tetrahydrobiopterin. These results indicate that under in vitro conditions the parasite itself provides a signal that triggers induction of the NO pathway in human and murine hepatocytes and that NO formation in infected hepatocytes is limited by tetrahydrobiopterin availability. PMID:8063424

  11. Protective effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine against enzyme leakage from cultured hepatocytes and hypotonic hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Kodama, K; Oguchi, K

    1990-01-01

    Effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine disulfate tosylate salt (SAMe-ST) and L-methionine (L-Met) on rat erythrocytes and primary cultured hepatocytes were studied. SAMe-ST in concentrations of 0.2 to 5.0 mg/ml protected erythrocytes from hypotonic hemolysis. Almost an identical level of protection was provided by SAMe chloride, suggesting that this protective effect is due to the SAMe moiety itself but not its sulfate or tosylate moiety. L-Met also showed a slight protective effect, but at higher concentrations, it slightly enhanced hemolysis. When the cultured hepatocytes were treated with SAMe-ST, the leakage of enzymes from the hepatocytes were significantly decreased compared with that in the control. L-Met also showed similar protective effects, but to a lesser degree than in the case of SAMe-ST. SAMe-ST significantly increased Na+.K(+)-ATPase activity. The present results indicate that SAMe remarkably inhibits hypotonic hemolysis and enzyme leakage from cultured hepatocytes and that its mechanism is probably related to a change in the membrane property.

  12. In vitro evaluation of major in vivo drug metabolic pathways using primary human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells in suspension and a dynamic three-dimensional bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Malin; Ulvestad, Maria; Ellis, Ewa; Weidolf, Lars; Andersson, Tommy B

    2012-10-01

    Major human specific metabolites, not detected during in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies, may cause unexpected drug interactions and toxicity in human and delays in clinical programs. Thus, reliable preclinical tools for the detection of major human metabolites are of high importance. The aim of this study was to compare major drug metabolic pathways in HepaRG cells, a human hepatoma cell line, to fresh human hepatocytes, cryopreserved human hepatocytes, and human in vivo data. Furthermore, the maintenance of cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities in a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) bioreactor were evaluated over time by using HepaRG cells and human hepatocytes. (14)C-diclofenac and a candidate from AstraZeneca's drug development program, (14)C-AZD6610, which are metabolized by P450 and UGT in vivo, were used as model substrates. The proportion of relevant biotransformation pathways of the investigated drug was clearly different in the various cell systems. The hydroxylation route was favored in primary human hepatocytes, whereas the glucuronidation route was favored in HepaRG cells. The human in vivo metabolite profile of AZD6610 was best represented by human hepatocytes, whereas all major diclofenac metabolites were detected in HepaRG cells. Moreover, the metabolite profiles in cryopreserved and fresh human hepatocytes were essentially the same. The liver bioreactor using both fresh human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells retained biotransformation capacity over 1 week. Thus, the incubation time can be increased from a few hours in suspension to several days in 3D cultures, which opens up for detection of metabolites from slowly metabolized drugs.

  13. 3D co-culturing model of primary pancreatic islets and hepatocytes in hybrid spheroid to overcome pancreatic cell shortage.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yesl; Kang, Ah Ran; Lee, Jae Seo; Jeong, Gi Seok; Ju, Jongil; Lee, Dong Yun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2013-05-01

    Here, a spheroidal 3D co-culture model of primary (rat) pancreatic islets and hepatocytes with uniform size and shape was developed using hemispheric concave microwell arrays. We conducted morphological and functional analyses of hybrid spheroids versus mono-cultures of islets or hepatocytes (controls). For the establishment of a 3D hybrid model, a broad range of cell ratios - 1:1, 1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 3:1, 5:1 and 7:1 mixture - of hepatocytes and pancreatic islets were used. As control, each hepatocyte and pancreatic islet were mono-cultured forming 3D spheroids. The transient morphology of spheroid formation in 9 culture models was observed using optical microscopy. Cell viability under these culture environments was assessed, and the morphologies of the outer and inner porous cell-spheroid structures were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and imaging of stained spheroid sections. The pancreatic islet-specific function of hybrid spheroids was evaluated by measuring insulin secretion and in vivo test by xenotransplantation of encapsulated spheroids in microfibers with a consistent maintenance of normal blood glucose levels over 4 weeks, while liver-specific functions were measured in terms of albumin secretion, urea secretion and cytochrome P450 activity. These diverse observations and evaluations validated the positive and bidirectional effects of co-cultured 3D spheroids. The proposed 3D co-culture model demonstrated that both cells appeared to support each other's functions strongly in spheroids, even though smaller proportions of each cell type was evaluated compared to mono-culture models, suggesting that the proposed model could help overcome the problem of cell shortages in clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tracking of primary human hepatocytes with clinical MRI: initial results with Tat-peptide modified superparamagnetic iron oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Morgul, M H; Raschzok, N; Schwartlander, R; Vondran, F W; Michel, R; Stelter, L; Pinkernelle, J; Jordan, A; Teichgraber, U; Sauer, I M

    2008-03-01

    The transplantation of primary human hepatocytes is a promising approach in the treatment of specific liver diseases. However, little is known about the fate of the cells following application. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable real-time tracking and long-term detection of transplanted hepatocytes. The use of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles as cellular contrast agents should allow for the non-invasive detection of labelled cells on high-resolution magnetic resonance images. Experiments were performed on primary human hepatocytes to transfer the method of detecting labelled cells via clinical MRI into human hepatocyte transplantation. For labelling, Tat-peptide modified nano-sized superparamagnetic MagForce particles were used. Cells were investigated via a clinical MR scanner at 3.0 Tesla and the particle uptake within single hepatocytes was estimated using microscopic examinations. The labelled primary human hepatocytes were clearly detectable by MRI, proving the feasibility of this new concept. Therefore, this method is a useful tool to investigate the effects of human hepatocyte transplantation and to improve safety aspects of this method.

  15. Upcyte Human Hepatocytes: a Potent In Vitro Tool for the Prediction of Hepatic Clearance of Metabolically Stable Compounds.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michelle; Schänzle, Gerhard; Bischoff, Daniel; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2016-03-01

    In vitro models based on primary human hepatocytes (PHH) have been advanced for clearance (CL) prediction of metabolically stable compounds, representing state-of-the-art assay systems for drug discovery and development. Yet, limited cell availability and large interindividual variability of metabolic profiles remain shortcomings of PHH. Upcyte human hepatocytes (UHH) represent a novel hepatic cell system derived from PHH, exhibiting proliferative capacity for approximately 35 population doublings. UHH from three donors were evaluated during culture for up to 18 days, investigating relative mRNA expression and in situ enzyme activity of cytochrome P450s (P450s), UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, and sulfotransferases. Furthermore, UHH were used for predicting hepatic CL of 21 marketed low to intermediate CL drugs. In a typical experiment, expansion from 3.9 × 10(6) up to 8.5 × 10(7) cells was achieved during subculture. When maintained at confluence, transcripts of major P450s were expressed at donor-specific levels with sustained activities for the majority of isoforms, showing generally low CYP1A2 and high CYP2B6 activity levels. For donor 151-03, CL prediction based on depletion experiments resulted in an average fold error of 2.0, and 80% of compounds being predicted within twofold to in vivo CL for a subset of 10 low CL drugs. UHH showed sustained and consistent activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DME), resulting in highly reproducible CL prediction performance. In conclusion, UHH show promising potential as alternative to PHH for standardized in vitro applications in discovery research based on their stable, hepatocyte-like DME phenotype and virtually unlimited cell availability. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-01-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  17. Layered long-term co-culture of hepatocytes and endothelial cells on a transwell membrane: toward engineering the liver sinusoid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young Bok Abraham; Rawat, Siddhartha; Cirillo, Joseph; Bouchard, Michael; Noh, Hongseok Moses

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel liver model that mimics the liver sinusoid where most liver activities occur. A key aspect of our current liver model is a layered co-culture of primary rat hepatocytes (PRHs) and primary rat liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) or bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) on a transwell membrane. When a layered co-culture was attempted with a thin Matrigel layer placed between hepatocytes and endothelial cells to mimic the space of Disse, the cells did not form completely separated monolayers. However, when hepatocytes and endothelial cells were cultured on the opposite sides of a transwell membrane, PRHs co-cultured with LSECs or BAECs maintained their viability and normal morphology for 39 and 57 days, respectively. We assessed the presence of hepatocyte-specific differentiation markers to verify that PRHs remained differentiated in the long-term co-culture and analyzed hepatocyte function by monitoring urea synthesis. We also noted that the expression of cytochrome P-450 remained similar in the co-cultured system from day 1 to day 48. Thus, our novel liver model system demonstrated that primary hepatocytes can be cultured for extended times and retain their hepatocyte-specific functions when layered with endothelial cells.

  18. Utility of human hepatocyte spheroids without feeder cells for evaluation of hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Takuo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Jomura, Tomoko; Idota, Yoko; Koyama, Satoshi; Yano, Kentaro; Kojima, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the utility of three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes (spheroids) without feeder cells (Sph(f-)) for the prediction of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans. Sph(f-) and spheroids cultured on feeder cells (Sph(f+)) were exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs flutamide, diclofenac, isoniazid and chlorpromazine at various concentrations for 14 days, and albumin secretion and cumulative leakages of toxicity marker enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP), were measured. The cumulative AST, LDH or γ-GTP leakages from Sph(f-) were similar to or greater than those from Sph(f+) for all drugs tested, although ALT leakages showed no consistent difference between Sph(f+) and Sph(f-). In the case of Sph(f-), significant correlations among all the toxicity markers except for γ-GTP were observed. As regards the drug concentrations causing 1.2-fold elevation of enzyme leakage (F1.2), no consistent difference between Sph(f+) and Sph(f-) was found, although several F1.2 values were undetermined, especially in Sph(f+). The IC50 of albumin secretion and F1.2 of AST leakage from Sph(f-) were equal to or lower than those of Sph(f+) for all the tested drugs. These results indicate that feeder cells might contribute to resistance to hepatotoxicity, suggesting DILI could be evaluated more accurately by using Sph(f-). We suggest that long-term exposure of Sph(f-) to drugs might be a versatile method to predict and reproduce clinical chronic toxicity, especially in response to repeated drug administration.

  19. Potential hepatoprotective effects of new Cuban natural products in rat hepatocytes culture.

    PubMed

    Rodeiro, I; Donato, M T; Martínez, I; Hernández, I; Garrido, G; González-Lavaut, J A; Menéndez, R; Laguna, A; Castell, J V; Gómez-Lechón, M J

    2008-08-01

    The protective effects of five Cuban natural products (Mangifera indica L. (MSBE), Erythroxylum minutifolium, Erythroxylum confusum, Thalassia testudinum and Dictyota pinnatifida extracts and mangiferin) on the oxidative damage induced by model toxicants in rat hepatocyte cultures were studied. Cells were pre-incubated with the natural products (5-200 microg/mL) for 24 h. Then hepatotoxins (tert-butyl hydroperoxide, ethanol, carbon tetrachloride and lipopolysaccharide) were individually added and post-incubated for another 24 h. After treatments, cell viability was determined using the MTT assay. Mangiferin and MSBE exhibited the highest cytoprotective potential (EC50 between 50 and 125 microg/mL), followed by T. testudinum and Erythroxylum extracts, whereas no significant protective effects was produced by Dictyota extract treatment. Antioxidant properties of the natural products against lipid peroxidation and GSH depletion induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide were then investigated. The results show that at 36 h pre-treatment of cells with mangiferin or MSBE, concentrations of T. testudinum and Erythroxylum extracts ranging from 25 to 100 microg/mL significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (100 and 250 microM) and increased the GSH levels reduced by the toxicant. D. pinnatifida inhibited lipid peroxidation, but did not preserve GSH levels. In conclusion, MSBE, E. minutifolium, E. confusum and T. testudinum extracts and mangiferin showed hepatoprotective activity against induced damage in all the experimental series, where mangiferin and the extracts of MSBE and T. testudinum were the best candidates to inhibit "in vitro" damage to rat hepatocytes. This hepatoprotective effect found could be associated with the antioxidant properties observed for the products.

  20. Protective effect of dieckol against chemical hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yu Jin; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Song, Kyung-Sik; Han, Ho Jae; Park, Soo Hyun; Chang, Woochul; Lee, Min Young

    2015-04-01

    Hepatic ischemic injury is a major complication arising from liver surgery, transplantation, or other ischemic diseases, and both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory mediators play the role of key mediators in hepatic ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of dieckol in chemical hypoxia-induced injury in mouse hepatocytes. Cell viability was significantly decreased after treatment with cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a well-known hypoxia mimetic agent in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with dieckol before exposure to CoCl2 significantly attenuated the CoCl2-induced decrease of cell viability. Additionally, pretreatment with dieckol potentiated the CoCl2-induced decrease of Bcl-2 expression and attenuated the CoCl2-induced increase in the expression of Bax and caspase-3. Treatment with CoCl2 resulted in an increased intracellular ROS generation, which is inhibited by dieckol or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger), and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which is also blocked by dieckol or NAC. In addition, dieckol and SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) increased the CoCl2-induced decrease of Bcl-2 expression and decreased the CoCl2-induced increase of Bax and caspase-3 expressions. CoCl2-induced decrease of cell viability was attenuated by pretreatment with dieckol, NAC, and SB203580. Furthermore, dieckol attenuated CoCl2-induced COX-2 expression. Similar to the effect of dieckol, NAC also blocked CoCl2-induced COX-2 expression. Additionally, CoCl2-induced decrease of cell viability was attenuated not only by dieckol and NAC but also by NS-398 (a selective COX-2 inhibitor). In conclusion, dieckol protects primary cultured mouse hepatocytes against CoCl2-induced cell injury through inhibition of ROS-activated p38 MAPK and COX-2 pathway.

  1. Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized normal human liver epithelial cells express hepatocyte characteristics and metabolize chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Cole, K E; Smoot, D T; Weston, A; Groopman, J D; Shields, P G; Vignaud, J M; Juillerat, M; Lipsky, M M; Trump, B F

    1993-01-01

    Normal human liver tissue and cultured human hepatocytes are valuable models to study xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity, but they only have a limited in vitro life-span and are not readily available. This report describes the establishment of replicative cultures of human adult liver epithelial cells in serum-free medium. The longevity of three of these cultures, derived from different donors, was extended by introduction of the simian virus 40 large T antigen gene. Two cell lines, THLE-2 and -3, established with a recombinant simian virus 40 large T antigen virus have undergone > 100 population doublings, are nontumorigenic when injected into athymic nude mice, have near-diploid karyotypes, and do not express alpha-fetoprotein. The cells express cytokeratin 18 and albumin in early passage, whereas higher-passage cells in logarithmic-phase growth also express cytokeratin 19. THLE-2 and -3 cells metabolize benzo[a]pyrene, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and aflatoxin B1 to their ultimate carcinogenic metabolites that adduct DNA, which indicates functional cytochrome P450 pathways. Other enzymes involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens, such as epoxide hydrolase, NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferases, and glutathione peroxidase are also retained by THLE cells. Thus, these immortalized human liver cells constitute an in vitro model for pharmacotoxicological studies and for the investigation of etiology and pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685115

  2. Use of mRNA expression to detect the induction of drug metabolising enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, L. Tuschl, G.; Pekthong, D.; Mantion, G.; Weber, J.-C.; Mueller, S.O.

    2009-02-15

    It is important to investigate the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes by drugs. The most relevant end point is enzyme activity; however, this requires many cells and is low throughput. We have compared the CYP1A, CYP2B and CYP3A induction response to eight inducers in rat and human hepatocytes using enzyme activities (CYP1A2 (ethoxyresorufin), 2B (benzoxyresorufin for rat and bupropion for human) and CYP3A (testosterone)) and Taqman{sup TM} Low Density Array (TLDA) analysis. There was a good correlation between the induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 enzyme activities and mRNA expression in human hepatocytes. In contrast, BROD activities and mRNA expression in rat hepatocytes correlated poorly. However, bupropion hydroxylation correlated well with Cyp2b1 expression in rat hepatocytes. TLDA analysis of a panel of mRNAs encoding for CYPs, phase 2 enzymes, nuclear receptors and transporters revealed that the main genes induced by the 8 compounds tested were the CYPs. AhR ligands also induced UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and glutathione S-transferases in rat and human hepatocytes. The transporters, MDR1, MDR3 and OATPA were the only transporter genes significantly up-regulated in human hepatocytes. In rat hepatocytes Bsep, Mdr2, Mrp2, Mrp3 and Oatp2 were up-regulated. We could then show a good in vivo:in vitro correlation in the induction response of isolated rat hepatocytes and ex-vivo hepatic microsomes for the drug development candidate, EMD392949. In conclusion, application of TLDA methodology to investigate the potential of compounds to induce enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes increases the throughput and information gained from one assay, without reducing the predictive capacity.

  3. Spongy polyethersulfone membrane for hepatocyte cultivation: studies on human hepatoma C3A cells.

    PubMed

    Kinasiewicz, Andrzej; Smietanka, Anna; Dudziński, Konrad; Chwojnowski, Andrzej; Gajkowska, Barbara; Weryński, Andrzej

    2008-09-01

    There are different types of membranes used for hepatocyte cultivation. In our studies, spongy polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were examined as a support for hepatic cell cultivation in vitro. The extended surface of the membranes allows to introduce a high cell number especially in three-dimensional gel structure. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that C3A cells used in our experiments grew well on PES membranes forming microvilli characteristic for normal hepatocytes. Analysis of cell viability proved that spongy PES membrane is well tolerated by J774 macrophages and did not stimulate nitric oxide synthesis. Bile canalicular structures were observed in fluorescence microscopy after F-actin staining with tetramethyl rhodamine iso-thiocyanate (TRITC)-phalloidin. The C3A cells showed high affinity to the PES membranes and adhered to almost 90% during the initial 24 h of incubation. Albumin production increased during static culture from the value of 805.2 +/- 284.4 (ng/24 h/initial 10(6) cells) during the first days, to 2017.6 +/- 505.9 (ng/24 h/initial 10(6) cells) after 10 days of culture. In conclusion, the spongy PES membranes can be used as scaffold for hepatocyte cultivation, especially for the creation of three-dimensional environments.

  4. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affects distinct molecular signalling pathways in human primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Buhrke, Thorsten; Krüger, Eileen; Pevny, Sophie; Rößler, Manuela; Bitter, Katja; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-07-03

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was shown to damage the liver of rodents and to impair embryonic development. At the molecular level, the hepatotoxic effects were attributed to the PFOA-mediated activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). In general, PPARα-dependent effects are less pronounced in humans than in rodents, and the hazard potential of PFOA for humans is controversially discussed. To analyse the effects of PFOA in human hepatocytes, a microarray analysis was conducted to screen for PFOA-mediated alterations in the transcriptome of human primary hepatocytes. A subsequent network analysis revealed that PFOA had an impact on several signalling pathways in addition to the well-known activation of PPARα. The microarray data confirmed earlier findings that PFOA: (i) affects the estrogen receptor ERα, (ii) activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and (iii) inhibits the function of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) which is an essential factor for liver development and embryogenesis. Finally, as a novel finding, PFOA was shown to stimulate gene expression of the proto-oncogenes c-Jun and c-Fos. This was confirmed by using the HepG2 cell line as a model for human hepatocytes. PFOA stimulated cellular proliferation and the metabolic activity of the cells, and upregulated the expression of various cyclins which have a central function in the regulation of cell cycle control. Functional studies, however, indicated that PFOA had no impact on c-Jun and c-Fos phosphorylation and on AP-1-dependent gene transcription, thus demonstrating that PFOA-induced proliferation occurs largely independent of c-Jun and c-Fos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of a micropatterned hepatocyte coculture system to generate major human excretory and circulating drug metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendy WeiWei; Khetani, Salman R; Krzyzewski, Stacy; Duignan, David B; Obach, R Scott

    2010-10-01

    Metabolism is one of the important determinants of the overall disposition of drugs, and the profile of metabolites can have an impact on efficacy and safety. Predicting which drug metabolites will be quantitatively predominant in humans has become increasingly important in the research and development of new drugs. In this study, a novel micropatterned hepatocyte coculture system was evaluated for its ability to generate human in vivo metabolites. Twenty-seven compounds of diverse chemical structure and subject to a range of drug biotransformation reactions were assessed for metabolite profiles in the micropatterned coculture system using pooled cryopreserved human hepatocytes. The ability of this system to generate metabolites that are >10% of dose in excreta or >10% of total drug-related material in circulation was assessed and compared to previously reported data obtained in human hepatocyte suspensions, liver S-9 fraction, and liver microsomes. The micropatterned coculture system was incubated for up to 7 days without a change in medium, which offered an ability to generate metabolites for slowly metabolized compounds. The micropatterned coculture system generated 82% of the excretory metabolites that exceed 10% of dose and 75% of the circulating metabolites that exceed 10% of total circulating drug-related material, exceeds the performance of hepatocyte suspension incubations and other in vitro systems. Phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites were generated, as well as metabolites that arise via two or more sequential reactions. These results suggest that this in vitro system offers the highest performance among in vitro metabolism systems to predict major human in vivo metabolites.

  6. Hepatocyte-Like Cells Derived from Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells Can Be Encapsulated Without Loss of Viability or Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Saraswati, Indah; Sali, Adnan; Murthi, Padma; Kalionis, Bill; Tuch, Bernard E.

    2014-01-01

    Placenta derived human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) are an attractive source of stem cells for the generation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) for therapeutic applications to treat liver diseases. During hAEC differentiation into HLC, they become increasingly immunogenic, which may result in immune cell-mediated rejection upon transplantation into allogeneic recipients. Placing cells within devices such as alginate microcapsules can prevent immune cell-mediated rejection. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of HLC generated from hAEC and to examine the effects of encapsulation on HLC viability, gene expression, and function. hAEC were differentiated for 4 weeks and evaluated for hepatocyte-specific gene expression and function. Differentiated cells were encapsulated in barium alginate microcapsules and cultured for 7 days and the effect of encapsulation on cell viability, function, and hepatocyte related gene expression was determined. Differentiated cells performed key functions of hepatocytes including urea synthesis, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 activity, indocyanine green (ICG) uptake, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, and exhibited glutathione antioxidant capacity. A number of hepatocyte-related genes involved in fat, cholesterol, bile acid synthesis, and xenobiotic metabolism were also expressed showing that the hAEC had differentiated into HLC. Upon encapsulation, the HLC remained viable for at least 7 days in culture, continued to express genes involved in fat, cholesterol, bile acid, and xenobiotic metabolism and had glutathione antioxidant capacity. CYP3A4 activity and urea synthesis by the encapsulated HLC were higher than that of monolayer HLC cultures. Functional HLC can be derived from hAEC, and HLC can be encapsulated within alginate microcapsules without losing viability or function in vitro. PMID:24295364

  7. Switch from type II to I Fas/CD95 death signaling upon in vitro culturing of primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Dorothée; Schmich, Kathrin; Vogel, Sandra; Pick, Robert; Kaufmann, Thomas; Hochmuth, Florian Christoph; Haber, Angelika; Neubert, Karin; McNelly, Sabine; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Merfort, Irmgard; Maurer, Ulrich; Strasser, Andreas; Borner, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Fas/CD95-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes in vivo proceeds through the so-called type II pathway, requiring the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid for mitochondrial death signaling. Consequently, Bid-deficient mice are protected from anti-Fas antibody injection induced fatal hepatitis. Here we report the unexpected finding that freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes, cultured on collagen or Matrigel™, become independent of Bid for Fas-induced apoptosis, thereby switching death signaling from type II to type I. In such in vitro cultures, FasL activates caspase-3 without Bid cleavage, Bax/Bak activation or cytochrome c release, and neither Bid ablation nor Bcl-2 overexpression is protective. The type II to type I switch depends on extracellular matrix adhesion, as primary hepatocytes in suspension die in a Bid-dependent manner. Moreover, the switch is specific for FasL-induced apoptosis as collagen-plated Bid-deficient hepatocytes are protected from TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. Conclusion Our data suggest a selective crosstalk between extracellular matrix and Fas-mediated signaling which favours mitochondria-independent type I apoptosis induction. PMID:19003879

  8. Modulation of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number to Induce Hepatocytic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Cain, Jason E; Lee, William; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Tuch, Bernard E; St John, Justin C

    2017-09-05

    Mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) copy number is tightly regulated during pluripotency and differentiation. There is increased demand of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during differentiation for energy-intensive cell types such as hepatocytes and neurons to meet the cell's functional requirements. During hepatocyte differentiation, mtDNA copy number should be synchronously increased to generate sufficient ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Unlike bone marrow mesenchymal cells, mtDNA copy number failed to increase by 28 days of differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) into hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) despite their expression of some end-stage hepatic markers. This was due to higher levels of DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, the mtDNA-specific replication factor. Treatment with a DNA demethylation agent, 5-azacytidine, resulted in increased mtDNA copy number, reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, and reduced hepatic gene expression. Depletion of mtDNA followed by subsequent differentiation did not increase mtDNA copy number, but reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA and increased expression of hepatic and pluripotency genes. We encapsulated hAEC in barium alginate microcapsules and subsequently differentiated them into HLC. Encapsulation resulted in no net increase of mtDNA copy number but a significant reduction in DNA methylation of POLGA. RNAseq analysis showed that differentiated HLC express hepatocyte-specific genes but also increased expression of inflammatory interferon genes. Differentiation in encapsulated cells showed suppression of inflammatory genes as well as increased expression of genes associated with hepatocyte function pathways and networks. This study demonstrates that an increase in classical hepatic gene expression can be achieved in HLC through encapsulation, although they fail to effectively regulate mtDNA copy number.

  9. CRISPR-Cas9 Targeting of PCSK9 in Human Hepatocytes In Vivo-Brief Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Raghavan, Avanthi; Chen, Tao; Qiao, Lyon; Zhang, Yongxian; Ding, Qiurong; Musunuru, Kiran

    2016-05-01

    Although early proof-of-concept studies of somatic in vivo genome editing of the mouse ortholog of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) in mice have established its therapeutic potential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, the unique nature of genome-editing technology-permanent alteration of genomic DNA sequences-mandates that it be tested in vivo against human genes in normal human cells with human genomes to give reliable preclinical insights into the efficacy (on-target mutagenesis) and safety (lack of off-target mutagenesis) of genome-editing therapy before it can be used in patients. We used a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 genome-editing system to target the human PCSK9 gene in chimeric liver-humanized mice bearing human hepatocytes. We demonstrated high on-target mutagenesis (approaching 50%), greatly reduced blood levels of human PCSK9 protein, and minimal off-target mutagenesis. This work yields important information on the efficacy and safety of CRISPR-Cas9 therapy targeting the human PCSK9 gene in human hepatocytes in vivo, and it establishes humanized mice as a useful platform for the preclinical assessment of applications of somatic in vivo genome editing. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Entry of hepatitis B virus into immortalized human primary hepatocytes by clathrin-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Chun-Chi; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Tao, Mi-Hua; Huang, Cheng

    2012-09-01

    The lack of a suitable in vitro hepatitis B virus (HBV) infectivity model has limited examination of the early stages of the virus-cell interaction. In this study, we used an immortalized cell line derived from human primary hepatocytes, HuS-E/2, to study the mechanism of HBV infection. HBV infection efficiency was markedly increased after dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-induced differentiation of the cells. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of intact HBV particles in DMSO-treated HBV-infected HuS-E/2 cells, which could be infected with HBV for up to at least 50 passages. The pre-S1 domain of the large HBsAg (LHBsAg) protein specifically interacted with clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and clathrin adaptor protein AP-2. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of CHC or AP-2 in HuS-E/2 cells significantly reduced their susceptibility to HBV, indicating that both are necessary for HBV infection. Furthermore, HBV entry was inhibited by chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. LHBsAg also interfered with the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin by human hepatocytes. This infection system using an immortalized human primary hepatocyte cell line will facilitate investigations into HBV entry and in devising therapeutic strategies for manipulating HBV-associated liver disorders.

  11. Entry of Hepatitis B Virus into Immortalized Human Primary Hepatocytes by Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Chun-Chi; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2012-01-01

    The lack of a suitable in vitro hepatitis B virus (HBV) infectivity model has limited examination of the early stages of the virus-cell interaction. In this study, we used an immortalized cell line derived from human primary hepatocytes, HuS-E/2, to study the mechanism of HBV infection. HBV infection efficiency was markedly increased after dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-induced differentiation of the cells. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of intact HBV particles in DMSO-treated HBV-infected HuS-E/2 cells, which could be infected with HBV for up to at least 50 passages. The pre-S1 domain of the large HBsAg (LHBsAg) protein specifically interacted with clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and clathrin adaptor protein AP-2. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of CHC or AP-2 in HuS-E/2 cells significantly reduced their susceptibility to HBV, indicating that both are necessary for HBV infection. Furthermore, HBV entry was inhibited by chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. LHBsAg also interfered with the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin by human hepatocytes. This infection system using an immortalized human primary hepatocyte cell line will facilitate investigations into HBV entry and in devising therapeutic strategies for manipulating HBV-associated liver disorders. PMID:22740403

  12. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived hepatocytes express tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 4 and follistatin.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jiaojiao; Ding, Wenchao; Hao, Shaorui; Jiang, Longyan; Zhou, Qian; Wu, Tianzhou; Shi, Dongyan; Cao, Hongcui; Li, Lanjuan; Li, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) transplantation is expected to become an alternative regenerative technique for liver diseases. However, the mechanism by which hBMSCs differentiate into hepatocytes is still unclear. The aim of this study was to establish the specific characteristics of hBMSC-derived hepatocytes (hBMSC-Heps) for future clinical applications. Potential hBMSC-Hep biomarkers were screened using cytokine arrays. Significant biomarkers were then validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in vitro and in an in vivo xenotransplantation model in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) pigs. After 20 days of differentiation, the expression levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 4 (TIMP-4) and follistatin (FST) in functional hBMSC-Heps were significantly increased, whereas those of activin A, osteoprotegerin and platelet-derived growth factor α polypeptide (PDGF-A) were significantly decreased. The high levels of TIMP-4 and FST were validated by ELISA in hBMSC-Heps grown in differentiation medium. The in vivo xenotransplantation model in FHF pigs showed that the serum levels of TIMP-4 and FST were significantly increased 6 h after hBMSC transplantation and reached their highest levels at 24 and 48 h, respectively, after hBMSC transplantation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that TIMP-4 and FST were expressed in cultured hBMSC-Heps and in implanted hBMSC-Heps in pig livers. The transdifferentiation of hBMSCs into hepatocytes is associated with the expression of TIMP-4 and FST. TIMP-4 and FST represent potential novel biomarkers for the characterisation of hBMSC-Heps and may be useful for future clinical applications. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Flame Retardant BDE-47 Effectively Activates Nuclear Receptor CAR in Human Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether BDE-47 (2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) is a thyroid hormone disruptor in mice; hepatic induction of various metabolic enzymes and transporters has been suggested as the mechanism for this disruption. Utilizing Car −/− and Pxr −/− mice as well as human primary hepatocytes, here we have demonstrated that BDE-47 activated both mouse and human nuclear receptor constitutive activated/androstane receptor (CAR). In mouse livers, CAR, not PXR, was responsible for Cyp2b10 mRNA induction by BDE-47. In human primary hepatocytes, BDE-47 was able to induce translocation of YFP-tagged human CAR from the cytoplasm to the nucleus andCYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNAs expressions. BDE-47 activated human CAR in a manner akin to the human CAR ligand CITCO (6-(4-Chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime) in luciferase-reporter assays using Huh-7 cells. In contrast, mouse CAR was not potently activated by BDE-47 in the same reporter assays. Furthermore, human pregnane X receptor (PXR) was effectively activated by BDE-47 while mouse PXR was weakly activated in luciferase-reporter assays. Our results indicate that BDE-47 induces CYP genes through activation of human CAR in addition to the previously identified pathway through human PXR. PMID:24218150

  14. HUMAN SARCOMAS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Gaetano; Beth, Elke; Hirshaut, Yashar; Aoki, Tadao; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.; Chopra, Harish C.

    1971-01-01

    In a study of human sarcomas maintained in culture for periods up to two years, the following observations were made. The most prominent cell type in serially cultured osteosarcomas was fibroblastic in appearance. After 16–20 wk in culture some lines spontaneously developed foci of altered cells resembling the foci produced in monolayer cultures by oncogenic viruses. The presence of these foci in the sarcoma cultures was transient, and usually they did not reappear; but in one instance they recurred with a characteristic periodicity of several weeks. From one of the sarcoma lines, in which foci appeared after 5 months in culture, two subcultures were established from stored frozen cells and these both exhibited foci after approximately the same lapse of time. The same phenomenon has been seen with another line, suggesting that the time of appearance of foci is characteristic for particular sarcomas. Foci of similar type could sometimes be induced in monolayer cultures of human fibroblasts by filtered medium from cultured sarcomas; this bore no relation to the presence or absence of foci in the sarcoma cultures at the time the filtrate was prepared. Electron microscopy of the spontaneous and induced foci, and of the sarcoma cultures, revealed no demonstrable virus. 12 out of 15 sarcoma cultures contained an antigen (S) demonstrable by indirect immunofluorescence with human sera. It was not present in any of the original sarcoma specimens, nor in any culture lines other than sarcomas. At least 3–4 wk in culture appear to be required for its demonstration. The antigen was cytoplasmic, occurred in only a small proportion of the cells, and was unpredictably variable in its expression, even in the same culture line. It could be induced in monolayer cultures of human fibroblasts by filtrates of medium from sarcoma cultures. As with the foci, the induction of S antigen in indicator cultures was not dependent upon the expression of antigen in the sarcoma line from which

  15. Generation of Endoderm derived Human iPS cells from Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Ye, Zhaohui; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sharkis, Saul; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research significantly changed our perspective on regenerative medicine. Patient specific iPS cells have been derived not only for disease modeling but also as sources for cell replacement therapy. However, there have been insufficient data to prove that iPS cells are functionally equivalent to hES cells or safer than hES cells. There are several important issues which need to be addressed and foremost are the safety and efficacy of human iPS cells from different origins. Human iPS cells have been derived mostly from cells originated from mesoderm, with a few cases from ectoderm. So far there has been no report of endoderm derived human iPS cells, preventing comprehensive comparative investigations on the quality of human iPS cells from different origins. Here we show for the first time reprogramming of human endoderm derived cells (i.e. primary hepatocytes) to pluripotency. Hepatocyte-derived iPS cells appear indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells in colony morphology, growth properties, expression of pluripotency-associated transcription factors and surface markers, and differentiation potential in embryoid body formation and teratoma assays. In addition, these cells were able to directly differentiate into definitive endoderm, hepatic progenitors, and mature hepatocytes. The technology to develop endoderm derived human iPS cell lines, together with other established cell lines, will provide a foundation to elucidate the mechanisms of cellular reprogramming and to study the safety and efficacy of differentially originated human iPS cells for cell therapy. For studying liver disease pathogenesis, this technology also provides a potentially more amenable system to generate liver disease specific iPS cells. PMID:20432258

  16. New markers for tracking endoderm induction and hepatocyte differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Holtzinger, Audrey; Streeter, Philip R.; Sarangi, Farida; Hillborn, Scott; Niapour, Maryam; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Keller, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    The efficient generation of hepatocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) requires the induction of a proper endoderm population, broadly characterized by the expression of the cell surface marker CXCR4. Strategies to identify and isolate endoderm subpopulations predisposed to the liver fate do not exist. In this study, we generated mouse monoclonal antibodies against human embryonic stem cell-derived definitive endoderm with the goal of identifying cell surface markers that can be used to track the development of this germ layer and its specification to a hepatic fate. Through this approach, we identified two endoderm-specific antibodies, HDE1 and HDE2, which stain different stages of endoderm development and distinct derivative cell types. HDE1 marks a definitive endoderm population with high hepatic potential, whereas staining of HDE2 tracks with developing hepatocyte progenitors and hepatocytes. When used in combination, the staining patterns of these antibodies enable one to optimize endoderm induction and hepatic specification from any hPSC line. PMID:26493401

  17. Experimental hepatocyte xenotransplantation--a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huidong; Liu, Hong; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Schmelzer, Eva; Wang, Yi; Gerlach, Jörg; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K C

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (Tx) is a potential therapy for certain diseases of the liver, including hepatic failure. However, there is a limited supply of human livers as a source of cells and, after isolation, human hepatocytes can be difficult to expand in culture, limiting the number available for Tx. Hepatocytes from other species, for example, the pig, have therefore emerged as a potential alternative source. We searched the literature through the end of 2014 to assess the current status of experimental research into hepatocyte xenoTx. The literature search identified 51 reports of in vivo cross-species Tx of hepatocytes in a variety of experimental models. Most studies investigated the Tx of human (n = 23) or pig (n = 19) hepatocytes. No studies explored hepatocytes from genetically engineered pigs. The spleen was the most common site of Tx (n = 23), followed by the liver (through the portal vein [n = 6]) and peritoneal cavity (n = 19). In 47 studies (92%), there was evidence of hepatocyte engraftment and function across a species barrier. The data provided by this literature search strengthen the hypothesis that xenoTx of hepatocytes is feasible and potentially successful as a clinical therapy for certain liver diseases, including hepatic failure. By excluding vascular structures, hepatocytes isolated from genetically engineered pig livers may address some of the immunological problems of xenoTx.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL HEPATOCYTE XENOTRANSPLANTATION – A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huidong; Liu, Hong; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Schmelzer, Eva; Wang, Yi; Gerlach, Jörg; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation is a potential therapy for certain diseases of the liver, including hepatic failure. However, there is a limited supply of human livers as a source of cells and, after isolation, human hepatocytes can be difficult to expand in culture, limiting the number available for transplantation. Hepatocytes from other species, e.g., the pig, have therefore emerged as a potential alternative source. We searched the literature through the end of 2014 to assess the current status of experimental research into hepatocyte xenotransplantation. Literature search and results The literature search identified 51 reports of in vivo cross-species transplantation of hepatocytes in a variety of experimental models. Most studies investigated the transplantation of human (n=23) or pig (n=19) hepatocytes. No studies explored hepatocytes from genetically-engineered pigs. The spleen was the most common site of transplantation (n=23), followed by the liver (through the portal vein [n=6]) and peritoneal cavity (n=19). In 47 studies (92%), there was evidence of hepatocyte engraftment and function across a species barrier. Conclusions The data provided by this literature search strengthen the hypothesis that xenotransplantation of hepatocytes is feasible and potentially successful as a clinical therapy for certain liver diseases, including hepatic failure. By excluding vascular structures, hepatocytes isolated from genetically-engineered pig livers may address some of the immunological problems of xenotransplantation. PMID:25950141

  19. Challenging small human hepatocytes with opiates: further characterization of a novel prototype bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Martin; Woess, Claudia; Libiseller, Kathrin; Beer, Beate; Pavlic, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Bioartificial liver (BAL) systems can take over liver functions in patients undergoing liver failure until transplantation. Recently, a novel prototype rotary BAL has been developed using small human hepatocytes (SH). This study investigated the metabolism of opiates morphine and methadone in the BAL and their influence on the basic cell culture parameters, viability, and growth of SH. Opiates may be present in patients due to pain therapy, anticancer treatment, or drug abuse. Cells were cultivated in the BAL for a total of 12 days and exposed twice to 100 microg/L of morphine or methadone. Morphine and methadone concentrations were analyzed using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometry detector. Further, the production of albumin, lactate dehydrogenase release, lactate release, urea production, and glucose consumption were measured. Cell viability and growth were determined by confocal microscopy. Cytochrome P 3A4 and uridindiphosphat (UDP) glucuronosyl transferase 2B7 in SH were analyzed by western blot. The mean cell density during treatment was 5.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(6) cells/mL (n = 6) and was not altered significantly by the opiates. Cell viability stayed above 90%. Morphine was not reduced by SH and was a stress factor as determined by decreased metabolic activity. On the other hand, SH metabolized methadone showing first-order kinetics: the first-order rate constant k = 0,019, half-life t(1/2) = 36 h. Methadone metabolism led to decreased urea and albumin production. The expression of cytochrome P 3A4, mainly responsible for methadone metabolism, was proved in SH. The prototype BAL is basically suited to support liver functions, provided patients receive therapy with methadone.

  20. Defect of hepatocyte growth factor production by fibroblasts in human pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Marchal-Sommé, Joëlle; Lesèche, Guy; Fournier, Michel; Dehoux, Monique; Aubier, Michel; Crestani, Bruno

    2005-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema results from an excessive degradation of lung parenchyma associated with a failure of alveolar repair. Secretion by pulmonary fibroblasts of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is crucial to an effective epithelial repair after lung injury. We hypothesized that abnormal HGF or KGF secretion by pulmonary fibroblasts could play a role in the development of emphysema. We measured in vitro production of HGF and KGF by human fibroblasts cultured from emphysematous and normal lung samples. HGF and KGF production was quantified at basal state and after stimulation. Intracellular content of HGF was lower in emphysema (1.52 pg/mug, range of 0.15-7.40 pg/mug) than in control fibroblasts (14.16 pg/mug, range of 2.50-47.62 pg/mug; P = 0.047). HGF production by emphysema fibroblasts (19.3 pg/mug protein, range of 10.4-39.2 pg/mug) was lower than that of controls at baseline (57.5 pg/mug, range of 20.4-116 pg/mug; P = 0.019) and after stimulation with interleukin-1beta or prostaglandin E(2). Neither retinoic acids (all-trans and 9-cis) nor N-acetylcysteine could reverse this abnormality. KGF production by emphysema fibroblasts (5.3 pg/mug, range of 2.2-9.3 pg/mug) was similar to that of controls at baseline (2.6 pg/mug, range of 1-6.1 pg/mug; P = 0.14) but could not be stimulated with interleukin-1beta. A decreased secretion of HGF by pulmonary fibroblasts could contribute to the insufficient alveolar repair in pulmonary emphysema.

  1. The effect of oleic and palmitic acid on induction of steatosis and cytotoxicity on rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Moravcová, A; Červinková, Z; Kučera, O; Mezera, V; Rychtrmoc, D; Lotková, H

    2015-01-01

    In vitro models serve as a tool for studies of steatosis. Palmitic and oleic acids can induce steatosis in cultured hepatocytes. The aim of our study was to verify steatogenic and cytotoxic effects of palmitic acid (PA), oleic acid (OA) and their combinations as well as their impact on functional capacity of rat primary hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were exposed to OA or PA (0.125-2 mmol/l) or their combination at ratios of 3:1, 2:1 or 1:1 at the final concentrations of 0.5-1 mmol/l. Both OA and PA caused a dose-dependent increase in triacylglycerol content in hepatocytes. PA was more steatogenic at 0.25 and 0.5 mmol/l while OA at 0.75 and 1 mmol/l. PA exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect associated with ROS production, present markers of apoptosis and necrosis and a decrease in albumin production. OA induced a damage of the cytoplasmic membrane from 1 mM concentration. Mixture of OA and PA induced lower cytotoxicity with less weakened functional capacity than did PA alone. Extent of steatosis was comparable to that after exposure to OA alone. In conclusion, OA or combination of OA with PA is more suitable for simulation of simple steatosis than PA alone.

  2. Toxicity monitoring with primary cultured hepatocytes underestimates the acetaminophen-induced inflammatory responses of the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Shinjiro; Shimomura, Akiko; Inadera, Hidekuni

    2011-01-01

    In vitro gene expression profiling with isolated hepatocytes has been used to assess the hepatotoxicity of certain chemicals because of animal welfare issues. However, whether an in vitro system can completely replace the in vivo system has yet to be elucidated in detail. Using a focused microarray established in our laboratory, we examined gene expression profiles in the mouse liver and primary cultured hepatocytes after treatment with different doses of acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic that frequently causes liver injury. The acute hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen was confirmed by showing the induction of an oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1, elevated levels of serum transaminase, and histopathological findings. In vivo microarray and network analysis showed that acetaminophen treatment provoked alterations in relation to the inflammatory response, and that tumor necrosis factor-α plays a central role in related pathway alterations. By contrast, pathway analyses in in vitro isolated hepatocytes did not find such prominent changes in the inflammation-related networks compared with the in vivo situation. Thus, although in vitro gene expression profiles are useful for evaluating the direct toxicity of chemicals, indirect toxicities including inflammatory responses mediated by cell-cell interactions or secondary toxicity due to pathophysiological changes in the whole body may be overlooked. Our results indicate that the in vitro hepatotoxicity prediction system using isolated hepatocytes does not fully reflect the in vivo cellular response. An in vitro system may be appropriate, therefore, for high throughput screening to detect the direct hepatotoxicity of a test compound.

  3. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jenny M.; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices – RealBio® and QuasiVivo® (QV) – and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  4. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jenny M; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices - RealBio(®) and QuasiVivo(®) (QV) - and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  5. Explanted diseased livers - a possible source of metabolic competent primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Moritz; Riemer, Marc; Krech, Till; DeTemple, Daphne; Jäger, Mark D; Lehner, Frank; Manns, Michael P; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Borlak, Jürgen; Bektas, Hueseyin; Vondran, Florian W R

    2014-01-01

    Being an integral part of basic, translational and clinical research, the demand for primary human hepatocytes (PHH) is continuously growing while the availability of tissue resection material for the isolation of metabolically competent PHH remains limited. To overcome current shortcomings, this study evaluated the use of explanted diseased organs from liver transplantation patients as a potential source of PHH. Therefore, PHH were isolated from resected surgical specimens (Rx-group; n = 60) and explanted diseased livers obtained from graft recipients with low labMELD-score (Ex-group; n = 5). Using established protocols PHH were subsequently cultured for a period of 7 days. The viability and metabolic competence of cultured PHH was assessed by the following parameters: morphology and cell count (CyQuant assay), albumin synthesis, urea production, AST-leakage, and phase I and II metabolism. Both groups were compared in terms of cell yield and metabolic function, and results were correlated with clinical parameters of tissue donors. Notably, cellular yields and viabilities were comparable between the Rx- and Ex-group and were 5.3±0.5 and 2.9±0.7×106 cells/g liver tissue with 84.3±1.3 and 76.0±8.6% viability, respectively. Moreover, PHH isolated from the Rx- or Ex-group did not differ in regards to loss of cell number in culture, albumin synthesis, urea production, AST-leakage, and phase I and II metabolism (measured by the 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase and uracil-5'-diphosphate-glucuronyltransferase activity). Likewise, basal transcript expressions of the CYP monooxygenases 1A1, 2C8 and 3A4 were comparable as was their induction when treated with a cocktail that consisted of 3-methylcholantren, rifampicin and phenobarbital, with increased expression of CYP 1A1 and 3A4 mRNA while transcript expression of CYP 2C8 was only marginally changed. In conclusion, the use of explanted diseased livers obtained from recipients with low labMELD-score might represent

  6. Statins alter the hepatobiliary transport of unconjugated and conjugated bilirubin in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Mónika; Veres, Zsuzsa; Bátai-Konczos, Attila; Kékesi, Orsolya; Kis, Emese; Szabó, Kitti; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have reported that statins occasionally cause impairment of liver functions characterized by elevated serum bilirubin levels, which might be due to altered function of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp2/3). We aimed to study the modulation of the hepatobiliary transport of bilirubin by four statin derivatives, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes. All statins except pravastatin significantly inhibited the uptake of bilirubin. The biliary efflux of bilirubin conjugates was increased by pravastatin and rosuvastatin concentration dependently. Rosuvastatin stimulated not only the Mrp2 mediated biliary, but the Mrp3 mediated sinusoidal elimination, resulting in decreased intracellular bilirubin accumulation. The significantly induced Mrp2/3 protein levels (ranging from 1.5 to 1.8-fold) accounted for the elevated efflux. Cell polarization, the formation of biliary network was also significantly increased by fluvastatin, pravastatin and rosuvastatin (151%, 216% and 275% of the control, respectively). The simultaneous inhibition of the uptake and the stimulation of the sinusoidal and canalicular elimination may explain, at least in part, the clinical observation of elevated serum bilirubin levels. In conclusion, our results suggest that in spite of the elevated serum bilirubin levels, the altered Mrp2 and Mrp3 functions by statins is probably not associated with hepatotoxic effects.

  7. Measuring Changes in Cytosolic Calcium Levels in HBV- and HBx-Expressing Cultured Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Casciano, Jessica C; Bouchard, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major worldwide health concern and is the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV X protein (HBx) is the only regulatory protein encoded in the HBV genome; HBx stimulates HBV replication in vivo and in vitro. HBx also regulates cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling, and altered Ca(2+) signaling is associated with the development of many diseases, including HCC. Importantly, many HBx functions, including HBx modulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and transcription pathways, have been linked to changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling. Additionally, several stages of HBV replication, including capsid formation and activation of the HBV polymerase, are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Consequently, defining the molecular mechanism that underlies HBV and HBx modulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels is important for understanding HBV pathogenesis and the role of HBx in HBV replication. Here, we describe a single-cell Ca(2+)-imaging protocol that we use to investigate HBV and HBx effects on the level of cytosolic Ca(2+). We specifically outline two methods that we use to evaluate HBV and HBx regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cultured primary hepatocytes. This protocol can also be adapted for use in liver cell lines.

  8. Involvement of Reactive Metabolites of Diclofenac in Cytotoxicity in Sandwich-Cultured Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Ryota; Shibata, Mai; Shimada, Hiroaki; Iwaki, Masahiro

    Diclofenac (DIC) is metabolized to reactive metabolites such as diclofenac acyl-β-d-glucuronide (DIC-AG). It is possible that such reactive metabolites could cause tissue damage by formation of covalent protein adducts and other modification of cellular proteins or by induction of immune responses against its covalent protein adducts. However, the detailed mechanisms of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have been unclear. The objective is to clarify the involvement of DIC-AG and 4'hydroxydiclofenac (4'OH-DIC) in acute DILI. We examined the effects of inhibiting DIC-AG and 4'OH-DIC production on covalent protein adduct formation and lactate dehydrogenase leakage using sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRHs). After pretreatment of SCRH with (-)-borneol (BOR, a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase inhibitor) or sulfaphenazole (SUL, a cytochrome P450 2C9 inhibitor) for 30 minutes, intracellular concentrations of DIC, DIC-AG, and 4'OH-DIC were determined after further treating cells with 300 μM DIC for 3 hours. The decreased levels of reactive metabolites caused by BOR or SUL pretreatment resulted in decreased lactate dehydrogenase leakage from SCRH, although the formation of covalent protein adducts was not affected. These results suggested that both DIC-AG and 4'OH-DIC may be involved in acute cytotoxicity by DIC.

  9. Relationship between autophagy and the intracellular degradation of asialoglycoproteins in cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kindberg, G.M.; Refsnes, M.; Christoffersen, T.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.

    1987-05-25

    The relationship between autophagy and the intracellular distribution of endocytosed asialoorosomucoid was studied in cultured rat hepatocytes. Overt autophagy was induced by shifting the cells to a minimal salt medium. Incubation in minimal salt medium led to the formation of buoyant lysosomes at the expense of denser lysosomes manifested as a dual distribution of these organelles in Nycodenz gradients. Asialoorosomucoid was labeled with /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose. The labeled degradation products formed from this ligand are trapped at the site of degradation and may therefore serve as markers for the subgroup of lysosomes involved in the degradation. In control cells the degradation of the ligand was initiated in a light prelysosomal compartment and continued in denser lysosomes. In cells with high autophagic activity, the degradation of labeled asialoorosomucoid took place exclusively in a buoyant group of lysosomes. These results suggest that degradation of endocytosed ligand takes place in the same secondary lysosomes as substrate sequestered by autophagic mechanisms. These light lysosomes represent a subgroup of active lysosomes which are gradually recruited from dense bodies. Data are also presented that indicate that insulin may prevent the change in buoyant density brought about by incubation in deficient medium.

  10. Dexamethasone blocks arachidonate biosynthesis in isolated hepatocytes and cultured hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, C.A.; de Alaniz, M.J.; Brenner, R.R.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of dexamethasone on the incorporation and conversion of (1-14C)eicosa-8,11,14-trienoic acid to arachidonic acid in isolated hepatocytes and in hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells was studied. In both kinds of cells, no changes in the exogenous acid incorporation were found when the hormone was added to the incubation media at 0.1 or 0.2 mM concentration, while the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid was significantly depressed. The effect on the biosynthesis was faster in isolated normal liver cells (60 min) than in tumoral cells (120 min) and reached an inhibition of ca. 50% after 3 hr of treatment. The addition of cycloheximide (10(-6) M) also caused a marked decrease in the biosynthesis of this polyunsaturated fatty acid, but when dexamethasone was added to the media simultaneously with cycloheximide, a synergistic action was not observed. The results obtained show that protein synthesis would be involved in the modulation of the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid by glucocorticoids. The changes in the delta 5 desaturation of labeled 20:3 omega 6 to arachidonic acid correlated with changes in the fatty acid composition in isolated cells.

  11. Cross-species transmission of gibbon and orangutan hepatitis B virus to uPA/SCID mice with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Sugiyama, Masaya; Murakami, Shuko; Payungporn, Sunchai; Sommanustweechai, Angkana; Mizokami, Masashi; Poovorawan, Yong

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the potential of cross-species transmission of non-human primate HBV to humans, severe combined immunodeficiency mice transgenic for urokinase-type plasminogen activator, in which the mouse liver has been engrafted with human hepatocytes, were inoculated with non-human primate HBV. HBV-DNA positive serum samples from a gibbon or orangutan were inoculated into 6 chimeric mice. HBV-DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and HB core-related antigen in sera and HBV cccDNA in liver were detectable in 2 of 3 mice each from the gibbon and orangutan. Likewise, applying immunofluorescence HBV core protein was only found in human hepatocytes expressing human albumin. The HBV sequences from mouse sera were identical to those from orangutan and gibbon sera determined prior to inoculation. In conclusion, human hepatocytes have been infected with gibbon/orangutan HBV.

  12. Pathway Analysis and Modeling of the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-like Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalaki, Andriani; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James; Wierling, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    A more detailed understanding of the differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells can help to improve therapies for liver diseases, like steatohepatitis. In this work we used microarray-based expression data to analyze the in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into hepatocytes. Pathway analysis has been carried out on gene expression data of different stages of the differentiation process from embryonic stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells via definitive endoderm and hepatic endoderm. Based on pathway analysis we identified signaling pathways, like the GPCR signaling pathway as well as FOXA2 regulatory networks. Based on these highly enriched pathways we constructed a model prototype to better understand and study the differentiation of stem cells into hepatocytes.

  13. Amylin impairment of insulin effects on glycogen synthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat primary cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Baqué, S; Guinovart, J J; Gómez-Foix, A M

    1994-01-01

    The ability of amylin to impair hepatic insulin action is controversial. We have found that the effect of amylin in primary cultured hepatocytes is strongly dependent on the culture conditions. Only in hepatocytes preincubated in the presence of fetal serum did amylin, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, reduce insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis rate and glycogen accumulation without showing direct effects. Neither basal glycogen synthase nor glycogen phosphorylase activity was modified by amylin treatment. Nevertheless, amylin (100 nM) blocked the activation of glycogen synthase by insulin. Amylin also proved capable of opposing the reduction in the expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene induced by insulin, whereas the basal mRNA level of PEPCK was unaffected by amylin treatment. Thus, these results show that, in cultured rat hepatocytes, amylin is indeed able to interfere with insulin regulation of glycogenesis and PEPCK gene expression, favouring the hypothesis that amylin may modulate liver sensitivity to insulin. Images Figure 3 PMID:7998979

  14. Co-culture of Hepatocytes and Kupffer Cells as an In Vitro Model of Inflammation and Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kelly A.; Holman, Natalie S.; Green, Angela M.; Andersen, Melvin E.; LeCluyse, Edward L.

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated drug-induced hepatotoxicity is often unrecognized as a potential mode of action due to the lack of appropriate in vitro models. We have established an in vitro rat donor-matched hepatocyte and Kupffer cell co-culture (HKCC) model to study immune-related responses to drug exposure. Optimal cell culture conditions were identified for the maintenance of co-cultures based on cell longevity, monolayer integrity, and cytokine response after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. Hepatocyte monocultures and HKCCs were then used to test a subset of compounds associated with hepatotoxic effects with or without LPS. Cytokine levels and metabolic activity (cytochrome P450 3A [Cyp3A]) were measured after a 48-h exposure to monitor endotoxin-induced changes in acute phase and functional end points. LPS-activated HKCCs, but not hepatocyte monocultures, treated with trovafloxacin or acetaminophen, compounds associated with immune-mediated hepatotoxicity, showed LPS-dependent decreases in interleukin-6 production with concomitant increases in Cyp3A activity. Differential endotoxinand model-dependent alterations were observed in cytokine profiles and Cyp3A activity levels that corresponded to specific compounds. These results indicate the utility of the HKCC model system to discern compound-specific effects that may lead to enhanced or mitigate hepatocellular injury due to innate or adaptive immune responses. PMID:26869439

  15. Evaluation of transcriptomic signature as a valuable tool to study drug-induced cholestasis in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Céline; Couttet, Philippe; Wolf, Armin; Zaccharias, Thomas; Heyd, Bruno; Bachellier, Philippe; Uteng, Marianne; Richert, Lysiane

    2017-02-10

    Primary human hepatocyte (PHH) sandwich cultures from five different donors were daily exposed to cyclosporine A (CsA), ibuprofen (IBU), chlorpromazine (CPZ), amiodarone (AMI) and paracetamol (APAP) at their respective Cmax (total) for short-term (1-3 days) and long-term treatment (14 days). Whole genome mRNA profiles (34,693 genes in total) were conducted using an Illumina microarray platform. The impact of compound treatments on gene signatures involved in liver differentiation, cholestasis and in bile acid homeostasis was evaluated. Notably, PHH from the five donors showed a highly comparable phenotype of terminally differentiated hepatocytes. As expected, PHH exposed to 100 µM APAP showed no signs of hepatotoxicity both after short- and long-term treatment. CsA at 0.7 µM, IBU at 100 µM, AMI at 2.5 µM and CPZ at 0.1-0.2 µM presented, in line with their cholestatic syndromes reported at therapeutic doses, transcriptomic signatures of cholestasis in PHH cultures; deregulation of genes involved in bile acid homeostasis further confirmed this finding. The strength of the cholestasis signature obtained after treatment with CsA, IBU and AMI could be directly related to the basal expression of the respective drug metabolizing enzymes in the various PHH cultures from different individuals. Our data show that the PHH model system combined with transcriptomics carries the future promise to identify individual gene expression profiles predictive of increased cholestasis risk. As the present work suggests possible correlation between mRNA levels of ADME relevant genes and a transcriptomic signature of cholestasis, particular focus on this research question could be the emphasis of additional data collection.

  16. Foxa1 Reduces Lipid Accumulation in Human Hepatocytes and Is Down-Regulated in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Marta; Benet, Marta; Guzmán, Carla; Tolosa, Laia; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Pareja, Eugenia; Castell, José Vicente; Jover, Ramiro

    2012-01-01

    Triglyceride accumulation in nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) results from unbalanced lipid metabolism which, in the liver, is controlled by several transcription factors. The Foxa subfamily of winged helix/forkhead box (Fox) transcription factors comprises three members which play important roles in controlling both metabolism and homeostasis through the regulation of multiple target genes in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. In the mouse liver, Foxa2 is repressed by insulin and mediates fasting responses. Unlike Foxa2 however, the role of Foxa1 in the liver has not yet been investigated in detail. In this study, we evaluate the role of Foxa1 in two human liver cell models, primary cultured hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, by adenoviral infection. Moreover, human and rat livers were analyzed to determine Foxa1 regulation in NAFL. Results demonstrate that Foxa1 is a potent inhibitor of hepatic triglyceride synthesis, accumulation and secretion by repressing the expression of multiple target genes of these pathways (e.g., GPAM, DGAT2, MTP, APOB). Moreover, Foxa1 represses the fatty acid transporter protein FATP2 and lowers fatty acid uptake. Foxa1 also increases the breakdown of fatty acids by inducing peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and ketone body synthesis. Finally, Foxa1 is able to largely up-regulate UCP1, thereby dissipating energy and consistently decreasing the mitochondria membrane potential. We also report that human and rat NAFL have a reduced Foxa1 expression, possibly through a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. We conclude that Foxa1 is an antisteatotic factor that coordinately tunes several lipid metabolic pathways to block triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes. However, Foxa1 is down-regulated in human and rat NAFL and, therefore, increasing Foxa1 levels could protect from steatosis. Altogether, we suggest that Foxa1 could be a novel therapeutic target for NAFL disease and insulin resistance. PMID:22238690

  17. Mechanistic insights from comparing intrinsic clearance values between human liver microsomes and hepatocytes to guide drug design.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Keefer, Christopher; Scott, Dennis O; Strelevitz, Timothy J; Chang, George; Bi, Yi-An; Lai, Yurong; Duckworth, Jonathon; Fenner, Katherine; Troutman, Matthew D; Obach, R Scott

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic stability of drug candidates are often determined in both liver microsome and hepatocyte assays. Comparison of intrinsic clearance values between the two assays provides additional information to guide drug design. Intrinsic clearance values from human liver microsomes and hepatocytes were compared for a set of commercial drugs with known metabolic pathways and transporter characteristics. The results showed that for compounds that were predominately metabolized by CYP mediated mechanisms, the intrinsic clearance values from the two assays were comparable. For compounds with non-CYP pathways, such as UGT and AO, intrinsic clearance was faster in hepatocytes than in microsomes. Substrates of uptake or efflux transporters in this study did not have significant differences of intrinsic clearance between microsomes and hepatocytes, when uptake into the hepatocytes was not the rate-limiting step. When hepatic uptake was rate limiting, intrinsic clearance in microsomes was faster than that in hepatocytes, which was more prevalent for compounds with rapid metabolism. Low passive permeability can limit the exposure to drug molecules to the metabolizing enzymes in the hepatocytes in relationship to the rate of metabolism. The faster the rate of metabolism, the higher permeability is needed for molecule to enter the cells and not becoming rate-limiting. The findings are very useful for drug discovery programs to gain additional insights on mechanistic information to help drug design without added experiments. Follow-up studies can then be designed to address specific questions.

  18. Proliferation of primary human hepatocytes and prevention of hepatitis B virus reinfection efficiently deplete nuclear cccDNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Allweiss, Lena; Volz, Tassilo; Giersch, Katja; Kah, Janine; Raffa, Giuseppina; Petersen, Joerg; Lohse, Ansgar W; Beninati, Concetta; Pollicino, Teresa; Urban, Stephan; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Dandri, Maura

    2017-04-20

    The stability of the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in nuclei of non-dividing hepatocytes represents a key determinant of HBV persistence. Contrarily, studies with animal hepadnaviruses indicated that hepatocyte turnover can reduce cccDNA loads but knowledge on the proliferative capacity of HBV-infected primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) in vivo and the fate of cccDNA in dividing PHHs is still lacking. This study aimed to determine the impact of human hepatocyte division on cccDNA stability in vivo. PHH proliferation was triggered by serially transplanting hepatocytes from HBV-infected humanised mice into naïve recipients. Cell proliferation and virological changes were assessed by quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and RNA in situ hybridisation. Viral integrations were analysed by gel separation and deep sequencing. PHH proliferation strongly reduced all infection markers, including cccDNA (median 2.4 log/PHH). Remarkably, cell division appeared to cause cccDNA dilution among daughter cells and intrahepatic cccDNA loss. Nevertheless, HBV survived in sporadic non-proliferating human hepatocytes, so that virological markers rebounded as hepatocyte expansion relented. This was due to reinfection of quiescent PHHs since treatment with the entry inhibitor myrcludex-B or nucleoside analogues blocked viral spread and intrahepatic cccDNA accumulation. Viral integrations were detected both in donors and recipient mice but did not appear to contribute to antigen production. We demonstrate that human hepatocyte division even without involvement of cytolytic mechanisms triggers substantial cccDNA loss. This process may be fundamental to resolve self-limiting acute infection and should be considered in future therapeutic interventions along with entry inhibition strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Insulin resistance in uremia. Characterization of lipid metabolism in freshly isolated and primary cultures of hepatocytes from chronic uremic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Caro, J F; Lanza-Jacoby, S

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism(s) of hyperlipidemia and liver insulin sensitivity in a rat model of severe chronic uremia (U). Basal lipid synthesis was decreased in freshly isolated hepatocytes from U when compared with sham-operated ad lib.-fed controls (alfC). Basal lipid synthesis in pair-fed controls (pfC) was in between U and alfC. Similarly, the activity of liver acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthetase, citrate cleavage enzyme, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was diminished in U. Muscle and adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase was also decreased. Insulin stimulated lipid synthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes from alfC. Hepatocytes from U and pfC were resistant to this effect of insulin. To ascertain if the insulin resistance in U was due to starvation (chow intake 50% of alfC) or to uremia itself, the U and pfC were intragastrically fed an isocaloric diet via a Holter pump the last week of the experimental period. Hepatocytes from orally fed U and pfC were also cultured for 24 h in serum-free medium. While freshly isolated and cultured U hepatocytes remained insulin resistant, those from pfC normalized, in vivo and in vitro, when they were provided with enough nutrients. Conclusions: (a) Hyperlipidemia in uremia is not due to increased synthesis, but to defect(s) in clearance. (b) Insulin does not stimulate lipid synthesis in uremia. This finding, along with our recent demonstration that insulin binding and internalization are not decreased in the uremic liver, suggests that a post-binding defect(s) in the liver plays an important role in the mechanism(s) of insulin resistance in uremia. (c) Cultured hepatocytes from uremic rats remain insulin resistant. This quality renders these cells useful in studying the postinsulin binding events responsible for the insulin-resistant state in the absence of complicating hormonal and substrate changes that occur in vivo. PMID:6350367

  20. Metabolism of Oxycodone in Human Hepatocytes from Different Age Groups and Prediction of Hepatic Plasma Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Korjamo, Timo; Tolonen, Ari; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Turpeinen, Miia; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool) and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 h, and 1 μM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 μM). Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. The data suggests that there are no children-specific metabolites of oxycodone. Moreover, CYP3A activity seems to be the major determinant in metabolic clearance of oxycodone regardless of age group or individual variability in hepatocyte batches. PMID:22291644

  1. Lack of formic acid production in rat hepatocytes and human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to chloral hydrate or trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Reed, Celia J; McMillan, Joellyn M; Oatis, John E; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2007-02-12

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and its major metabolites have been shown to cause formic aciduria in male rats. We have examined whether chloral hydrate (CH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), known metabolites of TCE, produce an increase in formic acid in vitro in cultures of rat hepatocytes or human renal proximal tubule cells (HRPTC). The metabolism and cytotoxicity of CH was also examined to establish that the cells were metabolically active and not compromised by toxicity. Rat hepatocytes and HRPTC were cultured in serum-free medium and then treated with 0.3-3mM CH for 3 days or 0.03-3mM CH for 10 days, respectively and formic acid production, metabolism to trichloroethanol (TCE-OH) and TCA and cytotoxicity determined. No increase in formic acid production in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to CH was observed over and above that due to chemical degradation, neither was formic acid production observed in rat hepatocytes exposed to TCA. HRPTC metabolized CH to TCE-OH and TCA with a 12-fold greater capacity to form TCE-OH versus TCA. Rat hepatocytes exhibited a 1.6-fold and three-fold greater capacity than HRPTC to form TCE-OH and TCA, respectively. CH and TCA were not cytotoxic to rat hepatocytes at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 3 days. With HRPTC, one sample showed no cytotoxicity to CH at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 10 days, while in another cytotoxicity was seen at 1mM/day for 3 days. In summary, increased formic acid production was not observed in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to TCE metabolites, suggesting that the in vivo response cannot be modelled in vitro. CH was toxic to HRPTC at millimolar concentrations/day over 10 days, while glutathione derived metabolites of TCE were toxic at micromolar concentrations/day over 10 days [Lock, E.A., Reed, C.J., 2006. Trichloroethylene: mechanisms of renal toxicity and renal cancer and relevance to risk assessment. Toxicol. Sci. 19, 313-331] supporting the view that glutathione derived

  2. Altered CYP2C9 Activity Following Modulation of CYP3A4 Levels in Human Hepatocytes: an Example of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, Donald J.; Chan, Tom S.; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) protein-protein interactions resulting in modulation of enzyme activities have been well documented using recombinant isoforms. This interaction has been less clearly demonstrated in a more physiologic in vitro system such as human hepatocytes. As an expansion of earlier work (Subramanian et al., 2010), in which recombinant CYP2C9 activity decreased with increasing levels of CYP3A4, the current study modulated CYP3A4 content in human hepatocytes to determine the impact on CYP2C9. Modulation of CYP3A4 levels in situ was enabled by the use of a long-term human hepatocyte culture model (HepatoPac) shown to retain phenotypic hepatocyte function over a number of weeks. The extended period of culture allowed time for knockdown of CYP3A4 protein by small interfering RNA (siRNA) with subsequent recovery, as well as upregulation through induction with a recovery period. CYP3A4 gene silencing resulted in a 60% decrease in CYP3A4 activity and protein levels with a concomitant 74% increase in CYP2C9 activity, with no change in CYP2C9 mRNA levels. Upon removal of siRNA, both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 activities returned to pre-knockdown levels. Importantly, modulation of CYP3A4 protein levels had no impact on cytochrome P450 reductase activities or levels. However, the possibility for competition for limiting reductase cannot be ruled out. Interestingly, lowering CYP3A4 levels also increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 activity. These studies clearly demonstrate that alterations in CYP3A4 levels can modulate CYP2C9 activity in situ and suggest that further studies are warranted to evaluate the possible clinical consequences of these findings. PMID:25157098

  3. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-04

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model.

  4. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model. PMID:28374759

  5. Hepatoprotective effects of Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase] on alcohol-damaged primary rat hepatocyte culture in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenhua; Bian, Yuzhu; Wang, Zhenghui; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2017-02-01

    We have prepared a novel nanobiotherapeutic, Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase], which not only transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide but also a therapeutic antioxidant. Our previous study in a severe sustained 90 min hemorrhagic shock rat model shows that it has a hepatoprotective effect. We investigate its hepatoprotective effect further in this present report using an alcohol-damaged primary hepatocyte culture model. Results show that it significantly reduced ethanol-induced AST release, lipid peroxidation, and ROS production in rat primary hepatocytes culture. It also significantly enhanced the viability of ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Thus, the result shows that Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase] also has some hepatoprotective effects against alcohol-induced injury in in vitro rat primary hepatocytes cell culture. This collaborate our previous observation of its hepatoprotective effect in a severe sustained 90-min hemorrhagic shock rat model.

  6. Human nature, human culture: the case of cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Lewens, Tim

    2017-10-06

    In recent years, far from arguing that evolutionary approaches to our own species permit us to describe the fundamental character of human nature, a prominent group of cultural evolutionary theorists has instead argued that the very idea of 'human nature' is one we should reject. It makes no sense, they argue, to speak of human nature in opposition to human culture. The very same sceptical arguments have also led some thinkers-usually from social anthropology-to dismiss the intimately related idea that we can talk of human culture in opposition to human nature. How, then, are we supposed to understand the cultural evolutionary project itself, whose proponents seem to deny the distinction between human nature and human culture, while simultaneously relying on a closely allied distinction between 'genetic' (or sometimes 'organic') evolution and 'cultural' evolution? This paper defends the cultural evolutionary project against the charge that, in refusing to endorse the concept of human nature, it has inadvertently sabotaged itself.

  7. Decreased hepatocyte membrane potential differences and GABAA-beta3 expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minuk, Gerald Y; Zhang, Manna; Gong, Yuewen; Minuk, Leonard; Dienes, Hans; Pettigrew, Norman; Kew, Michael; Lipschitz, Jeremy; Sun, Dongfeng

    2007-03-01

    To determine whether hepatocyte membrane potential differences (PDs) are depolarized in human HCC and whether depolarization is associated with changes in GABAA receptor expression, hepatocyte PDs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were documented in HCC tissues via microelectrode impalement, real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis, respectively. HCC tissues were significantly depolarized (-19.8+/-1.3 versus -25.9+/-3.2 mV, respectively [P<0.05]), and GABAA-beta3 expression was down-regulated (GABAA-beta3 mRNA and protein expression in HCC; 5,693+/-1,385 and 0.29+/-0.11 versus 11,046+/-4,979 copies/100 mg RNA and 0.62+/-0.16 optical density in adjacent tumor tissues, respectively [P=0.002 and P<0.0001, respectively]) when compared with adjacent nontumor tissues. To determine the physiological relevance of the down-regulation, human malignant hepatocytes deficient in GABAA-beta3 receptor expression (Huh-7 cells) were transfected with GABAA-beta3 complementary DNA (cDNA) or vector alone and injected into nu/nu nude mice (n=16-17 group). Tumors developed after a mean (+/-SD) of 51+/-6 days (range: 41-60 days) in 7/16 (44%) mice injected with vector-transfected cells and 70+/-12 days (range: 59-86 days) in 4/17 (24%) mice injected with GABAA-beta3 cDNA-transfected cells (P<0.005). The results of this study indicate that (1) human HCC tissues are depolarized compared with adjacent nontumor tissues, (2) hepatic GABAA-beta3 receptor expression is down-regulated in human HCC, and (3) restoration of GABAA-beta3 receptor expression results in attenuated in vivo tumor growth in nude mice.

  8. HCV-Mediated Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Culture and Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Erica; Ulitzky, Laura; Lima, Livia Alves; Cehan, Nicoleta; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Roingeard, Philippe; Taylor, Deborah R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is associated with progressive live