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Sample records for human intestinal smooth

  1. Otilonium bromide inhibits calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in human intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Strege, P R; Evangelista, S; Lyford, G L; Sarr, M G; Farrugia, G

    2004-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca(2+) entry into intestinal smooth muscle is required to trigger contractile activity, our hypothesis was that OB blocked Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of OB on Ca(2+), Na(+) and K(+) ion channels in human jejunal circular smooth muscle cells and on L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells. Whole cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide (0.09-9 micromol L(-1)) was used as this reproduced clinical intracellular concentrations. In human circular smooth muscle cells, OB inhibited L-type Ca(2+) current by 25% at 0.9 micromol L(-1) and 90% at 9 micromol L(-1). Otilonium bromide had no effect on Na(+) or K(+) currents. In HEK293 cells, 1 micromol L(-1) OB significantly inhibited the expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels. Truncation of the alpha(1C) subunit C and N termini did not block the inhibitory effects of OB. Otilonium bromide inhibited Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) at concentrations similar to intestinal tissue levels. This effect may underlie the observed muscle relaxant effects of the drug.

  2. Evidence against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as the relaxant neurotransmitter in human cavernosal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, R. S.; Powell, P. H.; Zar, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The putative role of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) as the relaxant neurotransmitter in human cavernosal smooth muscle has been studied in isolated tissue preparations. 2. Consistent neurogenic relaxations were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS; 2-64 pulses/train, 0.8 ms pulse duration, 10 Hz). VIP (0.1-3 microM) relaxed cavernosal smooth muscle in a dose-dependent fashion. Relaxant responses to both EFS and VIP were reduced in tissue from impotent men. 3. Neurogenic relaxant responses were not diminished in the presence of the VIP-inactivating peptidase, alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT, 2 units ml-1). In contrast VIP-induced relaxations were completely abolished. 4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by NG-nitro-L-arginine (30 microM), and of guanylate cyclase by methylene blue (50 microM) caused highly significant reductions of neurogenic relaxant responses whereas VIP-evoked relaxations were unaffected. 5. It is concluded that VIP-evoked relaxations are not mediated by the NO-guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) pathway and that VIP release is not essential for neurogenic relaxation of human cavernosal smooth muscle. VIP does not therefore act as the major relaxant neurotransmitter in this tissue. PMID:8095418

  3. Heparin induces the expression of specific matrix proteins by human intestinal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, D.L.; Perr, H.; Graham, M.F.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells have recently been identified as the major cell type responsible for stricture formation in Crohn's disease. Heparin, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to be a key modulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth both in vivo and in vitro and to affect the phenotypic expression of proteins made by VSMC. Heparin has also been shown to effect the growth of HISM cells and in this report the authors demonstrate that heparin also has very specific effects on proteins released by HISM cells in vitro. Examination of the proteins in the culture medium of heparin-treated HISM cells observed at 3 time points following sparse plating and proliferation revealed an increase in /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled 200, 37, and 35 kd proteins. A transient effect on a 48 kd protein was observed in substrate-attached material left on the culture dish after the cells were removed with EGTA. No effects on intracellular labeled proteins could be demonstrated. The protein phenotype of HISM cells exposed to heparin appears very similar to that observed in VSMC. The release of specific proteins following exposure to heparin does not appear to be species specific. This response to heparin may reflect a significant influence of this glycosaminoglycan on the phenotypic expression of these cells.

  4. Butyrate stimulates the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells by activation of Yes-Associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Na; Yan, Jun-Kai; Xiao, Yong-Tao; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Wang, Yang; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-23

    Intestinal smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the remodeling of intestinal structure and functional adaptation after bowel resection. Recent studies have shown that supplementation of butyrate (Bu) contributes to the compensatory expansion of a muscular layer of the residual intestine in a rodent model of short-bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we found that the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISMCs) was significantly stimulated by Bu via activation of Yes-Associated Protein (YAP). Incubation with 0.5 mM Bu induced a distinct proliferative effect on HISMCs, as indicated by the promotion of cell cycle progression and increased DNA replication. Notably, YAP silencing by RNA interference or its specific inhibitor significantly abolished the proliferative effect of Bu on HISMCs. Furthermore, Bu induced YAP expression and enhanced the translocation of YAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which led to changes in the expression of mitogenesis genes, including TEAD1, TEAD4, CTGF and Cyr61. These results provide evidence that Bu stimulates the growth of human intestinal muscle cells by activation of YAP, which may be a potential treatment for improving intestinal adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  6. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  7. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Danny; Wilson, Michael P.; Oliver, Daniel; Brosens, Erwin; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Han, Yu; Nanda, Vivek; Lyu, Qing; Doukas, Michael; Stoop, Hans; Brouwer, Rutger W. W.; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Burns, Alan J.; Christie, Christine K.; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Brooks, Alice S.; Tibboel, Dick; Xu, Suowen; Jin, Zheng Gen; Djuwantono, Tono; Yan, Wei; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2 (ACTG2), a smooth muscle contractile gene. However, evidence suggesting a recessive origin of the disease also exists. Using combined homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing, a genetically isolated family was found to carry a premature termination codon in Leiomodin1 (LMOD1), a gene preferentially expressed in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells. Parents heterozygous for the mutation exhibited no abnormalities, but a child homozygous for the premature termination codon displayed symptoms consistent with MMIHS. We used CRISPR-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein) genome editing of Lmod1 to generate a similar premature termination codon. Mice homozygous for the mutation showed loss of LMOD1 protein and pathology consistent with MMIHS, including late gestation expansion of the bladder, hydronephrosis, and rapid demise after parturition. Loss of LMOD1 resulted in a reduction of filamentous actin, elongated cytoskeletal dense bodies, and impaired intestinal smooth muscle contractility. These results define LMOD1 as a disease gene for MMIHS and suggest its role in establishing normal smooth muscle cytoskeletal–contractile coupling. PMID:28292896

  8. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Halim, Danny; Wilson, Michael P; Oliver, Daniel; Brosens, Erwin; Verheij, Joke B G M; Han, Yu; Nanda, Vivek; Lyu, Qing; Doukas, Michael; Stoop, Hans; Brouwer, Rutger W W; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Slivano, Orazio J; Burns, Alan J; Christie, Christine K; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Brooks, Alice S; Tibboel, Dick; Xu, Suowen; Jin, Zheng Gen; Djuwantono, Tono; Yan, Wei; Alves, Maria M; Hofstra, Robert M W; Miano, Joseph M

    2017-03-28

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2 (ACTG2), a smooth muscle contractile gene. However, evidence suggesting a recessive origin of the disease also exists. Using combined homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing, a genetically isolated family was found to carry a premature termination codon in Leiomodin1 (LMOD1), a gene preferentially expressed in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells. Parents heterozygous for the mutation exhibited no abnormalities, but a child homozygous for the premature termination codon displayed symptoms consistent with MMIHS. We used CRISPR-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein) genome editing of Lmod1 to generate a similar premature termination codon. Mice homozygous for the mutation showed loss of LMOD1 protein and pathology consistent with MMIHS, including late gestation expansion of the bladder, hydronephrosis, and rapid demise after parturition. Loss of LMOD1 resulted in a reduction of filamentous actin, elongated cytoskeletal dense bodies, and impaired intestinal smooth muscle contractility. These results define LMOD1 as a disease gene for MMIHS and suggest its role in establishing normal smooth muscle cytoskeletal-contractile coupling.

  9. Autonomic modification of intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Laura E A; Tansey, Etain A; Johnson, Chris D; Roe, Sean M; Quinn, Joe G

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe this spontaneous activity and its modification by agents associated with parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activity. A section of the rabbit small intestine is suspended in an organ bath, and the use of a pressure transducer and data-acquisition software allows the measurement of tension generated by the smooth muscle of intestinal walls. The application of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter ACh at varying concentrations allows students to observe an increase in intestinal smooth muscle tone with increasing concentrations of this muscarinic receptor agonist. Construction of a concentration-effect curve allows students to calculate an EC50 value for ACh and consider some basic concepts surrounding receptor occupancy and activation. Application of the hormone epinephrine to the precontracted intestine allows students to observe the inhibitory effects associated with sympathetic nerve activation. Introduction of the drug atropine to the preparation before a maximal concentration of ACh is applied allows students to observe the inhibitory effect of a competitive antagonist on the physiological response to a receptor agonist. The final experiment involves the observation of the depolarizing effect of K(+) on smooth muscle. Students are also invited to consider why the drugs atropine, codeine, loperamide, and botulinum toxin have medicinal uses in the management of gastrointestinal problems.

  10. In a non-human primate model, aging disrupts the neural control of intestinal smooth muscle contractility in a region-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Tran, L; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2014-01-01

    Background Incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders increase with age. However, there is a paucity of knowledge about the aging mechanisms leading to GI dysmotility. Motility in the GI tract is a function of smooth muscle contractility, which is modulated in part by the enteric nervous system (ENS). Evidence suggests that aging impairs the ENS, thus we tested the hypothesis that senescence in the GI tract precipitates abnormalities in smooth muscle and neurally mediated contractility in a region-specific manner. Methods Jejunal and colonic circular muscle strips were isolated from young (4–10 years) and old (18+ years) baboons. Myogenic responses were investigated using potassium chloride (KCl) and carbachol (CCh). Neurally mediated contractile responses were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and were recorded in the absence and presence of atropine (1 μM) or NG-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100 μM). Key Results The myogenic responses to KCl in the jejunum and colon were unaffected by age. In the colon, but not the jejunum, CCh-induced contractile responses were reduced in aged animals. Compared to young baboons, there was enhanced EFS-induced contractility of old baboon jejunal smooth muscle in contrast to the reduced contractility in the colon. The effect of atropine on the EFS response was lower in aged colonic tissue, suggesting reduced participation of acetylcholine. In aged jejunal tissue, higher contractile responses to EFS were found to be due to reduced nitregic inhibition. Conclusions & Inferences These findings provide key evidence for the importance of intestinal smooth muscle and ENS senescence in age-associated GI motility disorders. PMID:24548258

  11. Intestinal smooth muscle cell maintenance by basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M; Stelzner, Matthias; Reichardt, Holger M; Dunn, James C Y

    2008-08-01

    Intestinal tissue engineering is a potential therapy for patients with short bowel syndrome. Tissue engineering scaffolds that promote smooth muscle cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential toward the regeneration of functional smooth muscles for peristalsis and motility. Since basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can stimulate smooth muscle proliferation and angiogenesis, the delivery of bFGF was employed to stimulate proliferation and survival of primary intestinal smooth muscle cells. Two methods of local bFGF delivery were examined: the incorporation of bFGF into the collagen coating and the encapsulation of bFGF into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. Cell-seeded scaffolds were implanted into the omentum and were retrieved after 4, 14, and 28 days. The seeded cells proliferated from day 4 to day 14 in all implants; however, at 28 days, significantly higher density of implanted cells and blood vessels was observed, when 10 microg of bFGF was incorporated into the collagen coating of scaffolds as compared to scaffolds with either no bFGF or 1 microg of bFGF in collagen. Microsphere encapsulation of 1 microg of bFGF produced similar effects as 10 microg of bFGF mixed in collagen and was more effective than the delivery of 1 microg of bFGF by collagen incorporation. The majority of the implanted cells also expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Scaffolds coated with microsphere-encapsulated bFGF and seeded with smooth muscle cells may be a useful platform for the regeneration of the intestinal smooth muscle.

  12. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  13. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Intestinal smooth muscle phenotype determines enteric neuronal survival via GDNF expression.

    PubMed

    Han, T Y; Lourenssen, S; Miller, K G; Blennerhassett, M G

    2015-04-02

    Intestinal inflammation causes initial axonal degeneration and neuronal death, as well as the proliferation of intestinal smooth muscle cells (ISMC), but subsequent axonal outgrowth leads to re-innervation. We recently showed that expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the critical neurotrophin for the post-natal enteric nervous system (ENS) is upregulated in ISMC by inflammatory cytokines, leading us to explore the relationship between ISMC growth and GDNF expression. In co-cultures of myenteric neurons and ISMC, GDNF or fetal calf serum (FCS) was equally effective in supporting neuronal survival, with neurons forming extensive axonal networks among the ISMC. However, only GDNF was effective in low-density cultures where neurons lacked contact with ISMC. In early-passage cultures of colonic circular smooth muscle cells (CSMC), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting showed that proliferation was associated with expression of GDNF, and the successful survival of neonatal neurons co-cultured on CSMC was blocked by vandetanib or siGDNF. In tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, immunocytochemistry showed the selective expression of GDNF in proliferating CSMC, suggesting that smooth muscle proliferation supports the ENS in vivo as well as in vitro. However, high-passage CSMC expressed significantly less GDNF and failed to support neuronal survival, while expressing reduced amounts of smooth muscle marker proteins. We conclude that in the inflamed intestine, smooth muscle proliferation supports the ENS, and thus its own re-innervation, by expression of GDNF. In chronic inflammation, a compromised smooth muscle phenotype may lead to progressive neural damage. Intestinal stricture formation in human disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), may be an endpoint of failure of this homeostatic mechanism.

  15. Heterotrimeric G Stimulatory Protein α Subunit Is Required for Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoteng; Liu, Shangming; Lu, Qiulun; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Xiuxin; Hu, Sanyuan; Li, Jingxin; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Jiangang; Zhu, Min-Sheng; Feil, Robert; Li, Huashun; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Wencheng

    2017-04-01

    -obstruction, compared with tissues from controls. Gsa is required for intestinal smooth muscle contraction in mice, and its levels are reduced in ileum biopsies of patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Mice with disruption of Gnas might be used to study human chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A comprehensive mathematical framework for modeling intestinal smooth muscle cell contraction with applications to intestinal edema.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer; Ozisik, Sevtap; Riviere, Beatrice; Shamim, Muhammad

    2015-04-01

    The contraction of intestinal smooth muscle cells (ISMCs) involves many coordinated biochemical and mechanical processes. In this work, we present a framework for modeling ISMC contractility that begins with chemical models of calcium dynamics, continues with myosin light chain phosphorylation and force generation, and ends with a cell model of the ISMC undergoing contraction-relaxation. The motivation for developing this comprehensive framework is to study the effects of edema (excess fluid build-up in the muscle tissue) on ISMC contractility. The hypothesis is that more fluid equates to dilution of an external stimulis, eventually leading to reduced contractility. We compare our results to experimental data collected from normal versus edematous intestinal muscle tissue.

  17. Smooth Muscle Tension Induces Invasive Remodeling of the Zebrafish Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Christoph; Davuluri, Gangarao; Abrams, Joshua; Byfield, Fitzroy J.; Janmey, Paul A.; Pack, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The signals that initiate cell invasion are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that extracellular physical signals play an important role. Here we show that epithelial cell invasion in the intestine of zebrafish meltdown (mlt) mutants arises in response to unregulated contractile tone in the surrounding smooth muscle cell layer. Physical signaling in mlt drives formation of membrane protrusions within the epithelium that resemble invadopodia, matrix-degrading protrusions present in invasive cancer cells. Knockdown of Tks5, a Src substrate that is required for invadopodia formation in mammalian cells blocked formation of the protrusions and rescued invasion in mlt. Activation of Src-signaling induced invadopodia-like protrusions in wild type epithelial cells, however the cells did not migrate into the tissue stroma, thus indicating that the protrusions were required but not sufficient for invasion in this in vivo model. Transcriptional profiling experiments showed that genes responsive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were upregulated in mlt larvae. ROS generators induced invadopodia-like protrusions and invasion in heterozygous mlt larvae but had no effect in wild type larvae. Co-activation of oncogenic Ras and Wnt signaling enhanced the responsiveness of mlt heterozygotes to the ROS generators. These findings present the first direct evidence that invadopodia play a role in tissue cell invasion in vivo. In addition, they identify an inducible physical signaling pathway sensitive to redox and oncogenic signaling that can drive this process. PMID:22973180

  18. Biphasic regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation by p21-activated kinase modulates intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ji; Pham, Ngoc T; Olate, Nicole; Kislitsyna, Karina; Day, Mary-Clare; LeTourneau, Phillip A; Kots, Alexander; Stewart, Randolph H; Laine, Glen A; Cox, Charles S; Uray, Karen

    2013-01-11

    Supraphysiological mechanical stretching in smooth muscle results in decreased contractile activity. However, the mechanism is unclear. Previous studies indicated that intestinal motility dysfunction after edema development is associated with increased smooth muscle stress and decreased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in vivo, providing an ideal model for studying mechanical stress-mediated decrease in smooth muscle contraction. Primary human intestinal smooth muscle cells (hISMCs) were subjected to either control cyclical stretch (CCS) or edema (increasing) cyclical stretch (ECS), mimicking the biophysical forces in non-edematous and edematous intestinal smooth muscle in vivo. ECS induced significant decreases in phosphorylation of MLC and MLC phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and a significant increase in p21-activated kinase (PAK) activity compared with CCS. PAK regulated MLC phosphorylation in an activity-dependent biphasic manner. PAK activation increased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in CCS but decreased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in hISMCs subjected to ECS. PAK inhibition had the opposite results. siRNA studies showed that PAK1 plays a critical role in regulating MLC phosphorylation in hISMCs. PAK1 enhanced MLC phosphorylation via phosphorylating MYPT1 on Thr-696, whereas PAK1 inhibited MLC phosphorylation via decreasing MYPT1 on both Thr-696 and Thr-853. Importantly, in vivo data indicated that PAK activity increased in edematous tissue, and inhibition of PAK in edematous intestine improved intestinal motility. We conclude that PAK1 positively regulates MLC phosphorylation in intestinal smooth muscle through increasing inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 under physiologic conditions, whereas PAK1 negatively regulates MLC phosphorylation via inhibiting MYPT1 phosphorylation when PAK activity is increased under pathologic conditions.

  19. Intestinal smooth muscle is required for patterning the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Graham, Hannah K; Maina, Ivy; Goldstein, Allan M; Nagy, Nandor

    2017-04-01

    The development of the enteric nervous system (ENS) and intestinal smooth muscle occurs in a spatially and temporally correlated manner, but how they influence each other is unknown. In the developing mid-gut of the chick embryo, we find that α-smooth muscle actin expression, indicating early muscle differentiation, occurs after the arrival of migrating enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs). In contrast, hindgut smooth muscle develops prior to ENCC arrival. Smooth muscle development is normal in experimentally aganglionic hindguts, suggesting that proper development and patterning of the muscle layers does not rely on the ENS. However, inhibiting early smooth muscle development severely disrupts ENS patterning without affecting ENCC proliferation or apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that early intestinal smooth muscle differentiation is required for patterning the developing ENS. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  20. Nervous factors influencing the membrane activity of intestinal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, H.; Osa, T.; Toida, N.

    1967-01-01

    The effects of various chemical agents on the spontaneous membrane activities and those electrically elicited in the smooth muscles of small intestine were investigated. 1. The effects of various chemicals on the spontaneously active membrane might be summarized as follows. (a) Cholinergic agents; atropine slightly hyperpolarized the membrane and reduced the amplitude of slow potential changes even in aged preparations. Prostigmine depolarized the membrane, and enhanced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of the slow potential changes. Atropine prevented the actions of prostigmine on the membrane. (b) Ba2+ depolarized the membrane, and enhanced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of the slow potential changes. The spike frequency was initially increased, then reduced. Atropine and tetrodotoxin partially prevented the action of Ba2+ on the membrane activities. 2. Effects of chemical agents on the membrane activity elicited by electrical stimulation might be summarized as follows. (a) Short pulse stimulation (0·5-1 msec) generated the spike as a direct response of the muscle cell membrane, then it was followed by slow depolarization, delayed hyperpolarization, i.e. the `inhibitory potential', and post-inhibitory rebound successively. (b) The slow depolarization and the post-inhibitory rebound were reduced in amplitude by treatment with atropine, and enhanced by treatments with prostigmine and Ba2+. Tetrodotoxin blocked all activities except the spike. 3. When repetitive stimulation (20 c/s) was applied to the membrane, the membrane hyperpolarized; then, after 3-5 sec, it gradually depolarized even if the stimulation was continued, and triggered spikes. The hyperpolarization always preceded depolarization. The duration and the amplitude of the delayed depolarization was proportionally increased by the increased intensity and duration of stimulation. Atropine and tetrodotoxin blocked the generation of the post-inhibitory rebound. 4. Effects of repetitive

  1. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P receptors in human colon and small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Korman, L.Y.; Sayadi, H.; Bass, B.; Moody, T.W.; Harmon, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and substance P are found in neurons in the lamina propria and submucosa and muscularis propria of human small intestine and colon. VIP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on epithelial, smooth muscle, and mononuclear cells. This study analyzes the distribution of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding and (/sup 125/I)substance P in human colon and small intestine using autoradiographic techniques. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was present in high density in the mucosal layer of colon and small intestine. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was not significantly greater than nonspecific binding in smooth muscle layers or the lymphoid follicles. In contrast, (/sup 125/I)substance P binding was present in high density over the colonic muscle but was not present over the mucosal layer. In human colon cancer, (/sup 125/I)VIP grain density over the malignant tissue was only slightly higher than background. These autoradiographic studies of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding indicate that the highest density of VIP receptors was found in the small intestine and superficial colonic mucosa, whereas the density of substance P receptors was highest over the smooth muscle layers. These findings suggest a mismatch between immunochemical content of the peptide and autoradiographic density of the receptor.

  2. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  3. Contribution of Intestinal Smooth Muscle to Crohn’s Disease Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Severi, C.; Sferra, R.; Scirocco, A.; Vetuschi, A.; Pallotta, N.; Pronio, A.; Caronna, R.; Di Rocco, G.; Gaudio, E.; Corazziari, E.; Onori, P.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix deposition are involved in the fibrotic process of Crohn’s disease (CD). Mesenchymal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) de-differentiation, driven by Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) that counteracts Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) has been studied in vascular muscle. The role of SMCs in intestinal fibrogenesis is still not clearly elucidated. Aim of the study was to evaluate the possible myogenic contribution to CD fibrotic process through the comparative analysis of histological, morphometric and molecular alterations occurring in human smooth muscle. Full thickness specimens were obtained from CD (non-involved and stenotic tracts) and healthy (control) ileum. Tissues were processed for histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses and SMCs were isolated from the muscularis propria for morphofunctional and molecular (qPCR) analyses. CD stenotic ileum showed a significant increased thickness of all layers compared to CD non-involved and control ileum. IHC revealed an overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin and collagens I-III throughout all intestinal layers only in stenotic tracts. The two growth factors, PDGF and TGF-β, showed a progressive increase in expression in the muscle layer from CD non-involved to stenotic tracts. Freshly isolated SMCs presented alterations in CD non-involved tracts that progressively increased in the stenotic tracts consisting in a statistical increase in mRNA encoding for PDGF-β and collagen III, paralleled to a decrease in TGF-β and Tribbles-like protein-3 mRNA, and altered morphofunctional parameters consisting in progressive decreases in cell length and contraction to acetylcholine. These findings indicate that intrinsic myogenic alterations occur in CD ileum, that they likely precede stricture formation, and might represent suitable new targets for anti-fibrotic interventions. PMID:25578979

  4. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  5. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina

    2015-01-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. PMID:26428636

  6. Control of stomach smooth muscle development and intestinal rotation by transcription factor BARX1

    PubMed Central

    Jayewickreme, Chenura D.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse functions of the homeodomain transcription factor BARX1 include Wnt-dependent, non-cell autonomous specification of the stomach epithelium, tracheo-bronchial septation, and Wnt-independent expansion of the spleen primordium. Tight spatio-temporal regulation of Barx1 levels in the mesentery and stomach mesenchyme suggests additional roles. To determine these functions, we forced constitutive BARX1 expression in the Bapx1 expression domain, which includes the mesentery and intestinal mesenchyme, and also examined Barx1−/− embryos in further detail. Transgenic embryos invariably showed intestinal truncation and malrotation, in part reflecting abnormal left-right patterning. Ectopic BARX1 expression did not affect intestinal epithelium, but intestinal smooth muscle developed with features typical of the stomach wall. BARX1, which is normally restricted to the developing stomach, drives robust smooth muscle expansion in this organ by promoting proliferation of myogenic progenitors at the expense of other sub-epithelial cells. Undifferentiated embryonic stomach and intestinal mesenchyme showed modest differences in mRNA expression and BARX1 was sufficient to induce much of the stomach profile in intestinal cells. However, limited binding at cis-regulatory sites implies that BARX1 may act principally through other transcription factors. Genes expressed ectopically in BARX1+ intestinal mesenchyme and reduced in Barx1−/− stomach mesenchyme include Isl1, Pitx1, Six2 and Pitx2, transcription factors known to control left-right patterning and influence smooth muscle development. The sum of evidence suggests that potent BARX1 functions in intestinal rotation and stomach myogenesis occur through this small group of intermediary transcription factors. PMID:26057579

  7. Control of stomach smooth muscle development and intestinal rotation by transcription factor BARX1.

    PubMed

    Jayewickreme, Chenura D; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2015-09-01

    Diverse functions of the homeodomain transcription factor BARX1 include Wnt-dependent, non-cell autonomous specification of the stomach epithelium, tracheo-bronchial septation, and Wnt-independent expansion of the spleen primordium. Tight spatio-temporal regulation of Barx1 levels in the mesentery and stomach mesenchyme suggests additional roles. To determine these functions, we forced constitutive BARX1 expression in the Bapx1 expression domain, which includes the mesentery and intestinal mesenchyme, and also examined Barx1(-/)(-) embryos in further detail. Transgenic embryos invariably showed intestinal truncation and malrotation, in part reflecting abnormal left-right patterning. Ectopic BARX1 expression did not affect intestinal epithelium, but intestinal smooth muscle developed with features typical of the stomach wall. BARX1, which is normally restricted to the developing stomach, drives robust smooth muscle expansion in this organ by promoting proliferation of myogenic progenitors at the expense of other sub-epithelial cells. Undifferentiated embryonic stomach and intestinal mesenchyme showed modest differences in mRNA expression and BARX1 was sufficient to induce much of the stomach profile in intestinal cells. However, limited binding at cis-regulatory sites implies that BARX1 may act principally through other transcription factors. Genes expressed ectopically in BARX1(+) intestinal mesenchyme and reduced in Barx1(-/-) stomach mesenchyme include Isl1, Pitx1, Six2 and Pitx2, transcription factors known to control left-right patterning and influence smooth muscle development. The sum of evidence suggests that potent BARX1 functions in intestinal rotation and stomach myogenesis occur through this small group of intermediary transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neo-innervation of a bioengineered intestinal smooth muscle construct around chitosan scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zakhem, Elie; Raghavan, Shreya; Bitar, Khalil N

    2014-02-01

    Neuromuscular disorders of the gut result in disturbances in gastrointestinal transit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the neo-innervation of smooth muscle in an attempt to restore lost innervation. We have previously shown the potential use of composite chitosan scaffolds as support for intestinal smooth muscle constructs. However, the constructs lacked neuronal component. Here, we bioengineered innervated colonic smooth muscle constructs using rabbit colon smooth muscle and enteric neural progenitor cells. We also bioengineered smooth muscle only tissue constructs using colonic smooth muscle cells. The constructs were placed next to each other around tubular chitosan scaffolds and left in culture. Real time force generation conducted on the intrinsically innervated smooth muscle constructs showed differentiated functional neurons. The bioengineered smooth muscle only constructs became neo-innervated. The neo-innervation results were confirmed by immunostaining assays. Chitosan supported (1) the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in the constructs and (2) the neo-innervation of non-innervated smooth muscle around the same scaffold.

  9. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  10. Deletion of TRPC4 and TRPC6 in mice impairs smooth muscle contraction and intestinal motility in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr V.; Zholos, Alexander V.; Aberle, Thomas; Philipp, Stephan E.; Dietrich, Alexander; Zhu, Michael X.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Freichel, Marc; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Downstream effects of muscarinic receptor stimulation in intestinal smooth muscle include contraction and intestinal transit. We thought to determine whether classical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels integrate the intracellular signaling cascades evoked by the stimulated receptors and thereby contribute to the control of the membrane potential, Ca-influx and cell responses. Methods We created trpc4-, trpc6- and trpc4/trpc6-gene deficient mice and analyzed them for intestinal smooth muscle function in vitro and in vivo. Results In intestinal smooth muscle cells TRPC4 forms a 55 pS cation channel and underlies >80% of the muscarinic receptor-induced cation current or mICAT. The residual mICAT depends on the expression of TRPC6 indicating that TRPC6 and TRPC4 determine mICAT channel activity independent of other channel subunits. In TRPC4-deficient ileal mocytes the carbachol-induced membrane depolarizations are greatly diminished and the atropine sensitive contraction elicited by acetylcholine release from excitatory motor neurons is greatly reduced. Additional deletion of TRPC6 aggravates these effects. Intestinal transit is slowed down in mice lacking TRPC4 and TRPC6. Conclusions In intestinal smooth muscle cells TRPC4 and TRPC6 channels are gated by muscarinic receptors and are responsible for mICAT. They couple muscarinic receptors to depolarization of intestinal smooth muscle cells, voltage-activated Ca2+-influx and contraction and thereby accelerate small intestinal motility in vivo. PMID:19549525

  11. Chitosan-based scaffolds for the support of smooth muscle constructs in intestinal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zakhem, Elie; Raghavan, Shreya; Gilmont, Robert R; Bitar, Khalil N

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal tissue engineering is an emerging field due to a growing demand for intestinal lengthening and replacement procedures secondary to massive resections of the bowel. Here, we demonstrate the potential use of a chitosan/collagen scaffold as a 3D matrix to support the bioengineered circular muscle constructs maintain their physiological functionality. We investigated the biocompatibility of chitosan by growing rabbit colonic circular smooth muscle cells (RCSMCs) on chitosan-coated plates. The cells maintained their spindle-like morphology and preserved their smooth muscle phenotypic markers. We manufactured tubular scaffolds with central openings composed of chitosan and collagen in a 1:1 ratio. Concentrically-aligned 3D circular muscle constructs were bioengineered using fibrin-based hydrogel seeded with RCSMCs. The constructs were placed around the scaffold for 2 weeks, after which they were taken off and tested for their physiological functionality. The muscle constructs contracted in response to Acetylcholine (Ach) and potassium chloride (KCl) and they relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These results demonstrate that chitosan is a biomaterial possibly suitable for intestinal tissue engineering applications. PMID:22483012

  12. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina; Kuemmerle, John F

    2015-12-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  14. Suppression of intestinal smooth muscle contraction by 4-ethylguaiacol, a constituent of wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, M; Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    1993-11-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of phenolic compounds, suppresses in vitro contractions of rat intestine. To identify a compound in wood creosote able to inhibit intestinal motility, we screened its constituent phenolic compounds and found 4-ethylguaiacol (4-EG) as an active compound. It suppressed the spontaneous phasic (IC50 = 513 +/- 48 mumol/l) as well as spasmogenic-agent-induced tonic longitudinal contractions of isolated rat ileum in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. KCl-depolarization-induced tonic contraction, which was susceptible to a calcium channel blocking agent, was also suppressed by 4-EG with an IC50 of 433 +/- 41 mumol/l. Furthermore, calcium-ionophore-induced contraction, which was affected by an influx of extracellular calcium ion that bypassed calcium channels, was suppressed by 4-EG with an IC50 of 97 +/- 18 mumol/l. These results support the concept that the effect of wood creosote to suppress intestinal motility is attributable, partially or entirely, to its component 4-EG and that this effect of 4-EG on the intestinal muscle is produced at some stage(s) of the muscle contraction process after influx of extracellular calcium into the cytosol of smooth muscle.

  15. Resveratrol causes cell cycle arrest, decreased collagen synthesis, and apoptosis in rat intestinal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Mathias, Jason S.; Tang, Huaijing; Christman, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most difficult and treatment-resistant complications of Crohn's disease is the development of fibrotic intestinal strictures due to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, has been shown to inhibit fibrosis in vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models. Resveratrol has also been shown to inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and to decrease collagen synthesis in several cell types or animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol has antifibrotic effects on intestinal smooth muscle cells. Responses to resveratrol by cultured smooth muscle cells isolated from colons of untreated Lewis rats were examined; this rat strain is used in a model of Crohn's disease with prominent intestinal fibrosis. A relative decrease in cell numbers following treatment with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol was evident at 24 h (P ≤ 0.005). This effect was largely due to cell cycle arrest, with an increase in the percent of cells in S phase from 8 to 25–35% (P < 0.05). Cell viability was unchanged until 2–3 days of treatment when there was a 1.2- to 5.0-fold increase in the percent of apoptotic cells, depending on the assay (P < 0.05). Expression of collagen type I protein was decreased following treatment with resveratrol for 24 h (to 44 and 25% of control levels with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol, respectively; P < 0.05). Expression of procollagen types I and III mRNA was also decreased with resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol (50 μM) diminished the proliferative response to TGF-β1 (P = 0.02) as well as IGF-I-stimulated collagen production (P = 0.02). Thus resveratrol decreases intestinal smooth muscle cell numbers through its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and also decreases collagen synthesis by the cells. These effects could be useful in preventing the smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and collagen

  16. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Saichua, Prasert; Nithikathkul, Choosak; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. PMID:18203280

  17. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the crypt-villus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies.

  18. Visceral smooth muscle α-actin deficiency associated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a Bengal cat (Felis catus x Prionailurus bengalensis).

    PubMed

    Imai, D M; Miller, J L; Leonard, B C; Bach, J; Drees, R; Steinberg, H; Teixeira, L B C

    2014-05-01

    An adult Bengal cat (Felis catus × Prionailurus bengalensis) with a prolonged history of partial anorexia, regurgitation, and weight loss and a clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic diagnosis of persistent megaesophagus and gastrointestinal ileus was submitted for necropsy. The intestinal tract was diffusely distended by gas and fluid with appreciable loss of muscle tone and an absence of luminal obstruction, consistent with the clinical history of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologically, the autonomic nervous system was intact, but the smooth muscle within the gastrointestinal wall exhibited a marked basophilia that was most pronounced in the jejunum. Immunohistochemistry for neurofilament, synaptophysin, CD117, and desmin demonstrated that the number of myenteric ganglia, number of interstitial cells, and leiomyocyte desmin content were similar when compared with the unaffected age- and species-matched control. Immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle α-actin demonstrated a striking loss of immunoreactivity, predominantly in the circular layer of the jejunum, that corresponded with the tinctorial change in leiomyocytes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed loss of myofibrils, loss of organelle polarity, and significantly larger central mitochondria (megamitochondria) in affected leiomyocytes, as well as nonspecific degenerative changes. Although the presence of a primary leiomyopathy and a causal relationship could not be confirmed in this case, leiomyopathies are considered a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in human medicine, and loss of smooth muscle α-actin immunoreactivity is one recognized marker for intestinal dysmotility.

  19. Polyamines Transduce the Nongenomic, Androgen-Induced Calcium Sensitization in Intestinal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    González-Montelongo, María C.; Marín, Raquel; Pérez, José A.; Gómez, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    Androgens regulate body development and differentiation through a variety of genotropic mechanisms, mostly in reproductive organs. In recent years a different scenario for sex hormone actions has emerged: the intestinal muscle. Thus, although estrogens relax intestinal muscle, androgens are powerful inducers of mechanical potentiation. This effect of androgens was intriguing because it is observed at physiological concentrations, is mediated by nongenomic mechanisms, and involves a phenomenon of calcium sensitization of contractile machinery by stimulating phosphorylation of 20 kDa myosin light chain by Rho-associated kinase. Here we have deciphered the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium sensitization and mechanical potentiation by androgens in male intestinal muscle as well as its tight relationship to polyamine metabolism. Thus, androgens stimulate polyamine synthesis, and the inhibition of polyamine synthesis abolishes androgen-induced calcium sensitization and 20 kDa myosin light chain phosphorylation. We demonstrate that the first molecular step in the induction of calcium sensitization is a nonconventional activation of the adaptor protein RhoA, triggered by a transglutaminase-catalyzed polyamination of RhoA, which is then targeted to the membrane to activate Rho-associated kinase. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the physiological levels of androgens, through the modulation of polyamine metabolism and posttanslational modification of RhoA, activate a new signal transduction pathway in the intestinal smooth muscle to induce calcium sensitization. Furthermore, apart from being one of the few physiologically relevant nongenomic effects of androgens, these results might underlie the well-known gender differences in intestinal transits, thus expanding the nature's inventory of sex hormones effects. PMID:24002652

  20. Glucagon effects on the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, G K; Whalen, G E; Soergel, K H; Wu, W C; Meade, R C

    1979-07-01

    In healthy volunteers, the effects of intravenously administered glucagon on small intestinal function was investigated. Bolus doses resulting in plasma glucagon concentrations of greater than 800 pg/ml (5 min after injection) abolished jejunal contractions for 4.4 +/- 0.4 (SEM) min after a latency period of 49 +/- 4 sec. During continuous intravenous glucagon infusion, jejunal dilatation and increase in mean transit time (MTT) occurred at plasma levels greater than 720 pg/ml, while inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption was observed only with plasma glucagon concentrations of 1760 +/- 114 pg/ml. Under these conditions, the propulsion of fasting intestinal contents was slowed without change in flow rate. The observed effects cannot be attributed to the simultaneously occurring rise in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. Short-term increases in circulating glucagon concentration inhibit intestinal tone, contractions, and propulsion with only a minor effect on water and electrolyte absorption limited to a narrow concentration range of plasma glucagon. Neither effect occurs at glucagon levels likely to occur under physiologic concentrations. The latency period preceding the abolition of jejunal contractions suggests that glucagon does not act directly on intestinal smooth muscle cells.

  1. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  2. A geometric description of human intestine.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Ihsaniye; Yildiz, Hüseyin; Arslan, Kadri; Yildiz, Bahri

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical models of natural phenomena play a central role in the physical sciences. Moreover, modeling of the organs draws from some beautiful areas of mathematics, such as nonlinear dynamics, multiscale transforms and stability analysis. In this study, a geometric recognition of the separate intestine sections (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon) of the human is presented. The human intestine was considered a tubular shape along a special curve and two male Turkish men were used for the modeling study. The length (cm) and diameter (mm) of the intestines were measured with a digital compass and formulated. These models were compared with their original photographs. It has been concluded that the geometric modeling and experimental work were consistent. These kinds of organ modeling techniques will also profit to medical lecturers to show 3-D figures to their students.

  3. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications.

  4. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  5. IL-17A induces hypo-contraction of intestinal smooth muscle via induction of iNOS in muscularis macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kaminuma, Osamu; Murata, Takahisa; Hiroi, Takachika; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes disorder in bowel motility. Th17 cytokines are involved in intestinal inflammation. To understand the role of interleukin (IL)-17 in intestinal motility, we examined effects of IL-17A on contractile activities of organ-cultured ileum. Rat ileal smooth muscle strips were organ cultured with IL-17A. Muscle contraction was measured, and cells expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were identified with immunohistochemistry. Creating Th17-transferred colitis model mice, in vivo effects of IL-17 on contractile activities, and iNOS mRNA expression in colonic smooth muscle were investigated. Treatment with IL-17A for 12 h and 3 days attenuated carbachol- and membrane depolarization-induced contractions in organ-cultured rat ileum. N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100 μM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, completely reversed the IL-17A-induced inhibition of contractile force. Ileal tissue cultured in the presence of IL-17A showed increased expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Immunohistochemical analysis using an iNOS antibody revealed that iNOS protein was expressed on ED2-positive muscularis macrophages. The level of iNOS mRNA was also increased in inflamed colonic smooth muscle of Th17-transferred colitis model mice. In intestinal inflammation, IL-17A induces an intestinal motility disorder through iNOS expression in muscularis macrophages.

  6. Tipping elements in the human intestinal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Leo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Salonen, Anne; Scheffer, Marten; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-07-08

    The microbial communities living in the human intestine can have profound impact on our well-being and health. However, we have limited understanding of the mechanisms that control this complex ecosystem. Here, based on a deep phylogenetic analysis of the intestinal microbiota in a thousand western adults, we identify groups of bacteria that exhibit robust bistable abundance distributions. These bacteria are either abundant or nearly absent in most individuals, and exhibit decreased temporal stability at the intermediate abundance range. The abundances of these bimodally distributed bacteria vary independently, and their abundance distributions are not affected by short-term dietary interventions. However, their contrasting alternative states are associated with host factors such as ageing and overweight. We propose that the bistable groups reflect tipping elements of the intestinal microbiota, whose critical transitions may have profound health implications and diagnostic potential.

  7. Tipping elements in the human intestinal ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Leo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Salonen, Anne; Scheffer, Marten; de Vos, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial communities living in the human intestine can have profound impact on our well-being and health. However, we have limited understanding of the mechanisms that control this complex ecosystem. Here, based on a deep phylogenetic analysis of the intestinal microbiota in a thousand western adults, we identify groups of bacteria that exhibit robust bistable abundance distributions. These bacteria are either abundant or nearly absent in most individuals, and exhibit decreased temporal stability at the intermediate abundance range. The abundances of these bimodally distributed bacteria vary independently, and their abundance distributions are not affected by short-term dietary interventions. However, their contrasting alternative states are associated with host factors such as ageing and overweight. We propose that the bistable groups reflect tipping elements of the intestinal microbiota, whose critical transitions may have profound health implications and diagnostic potential. PMID:25003530

  8. Electrophysiological study of the intestinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, H.; Osa, T.; Toida, N.

    1967-01-01

    The membrane properties of single cells of intestinal smooth muscle of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and rectum of guinea-pig have been studied. 1. The membrane potentials of longitudinal muscles of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and rectum varied from 54 to 56 mV and those of circular muscles of jejunum, ileum, caecum and rectum varied from 57 to 60 mV. The ablated longitudinal muscle had a slightly lower value (50 mV) than the intact one. 2. The longitudinal muscle generated spontaneous discharges but these were rare in the circular muscles of the intestine except for the caecum. Overshoot potentials could be observed in all regions of the intestine. The maximum rate of rise of the spontaneously discharging longitudinal muscles varied from 11 to 18 V/sec. 3. Not all of the slow potential changes (but at least some) were generated by the nervous elements distributed between the muscle layers and in them. 4. The conduction velocities measured from the longitudinal muscles of jejunum and rectum in the presence of tetrodotoxin were 2·1 cm/sec and 4·0 cm/sec respectively. 5. Chronaxies of the longitudinal muscles of jejunum and rectum were 2-5 msec and 5-18 msec respectively. 6. Intracellular stimulation of the single cells of the duodenum and caecum could trigger a spike, similar to that observed in the taenia coli. The spikes were mostly graded ones; a spike of full size was rarely elicited. When the spikes were triggered, the after-hyperpolarization appeared consistently presumably caused by the increased potassium conductance. 7. The effective membrane resistance and the time constant were measured for the longitudinal muscles of the jejunum and rectum. When spikes were generated by intracellular stimulation the observed values were 40-50 MΩ and 3-5 msec in both tissues. These values were the same as those observed in the taenia coli. 8. When the time constant of the membrane was measured by the extracellular polarizing method, the longitudinal muscles

  9. Inflammatory cytokines promote growth of intestinal smooth muscle cells by induced expression of PDGF-Rβ.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dileep G; Miller, Kurtis G; Lourenssen, Sandra R; Blennerhassett, Michael G

    2014-03-01

    Thickening of the inflamed intestinal wall involves growth of smooth muscle cells (SMC), which contributes to stricture formation. Earlier, the growth factor platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB was identified as a key mitogen for SMC from the rat colon (CSMC), and CSMC growth in colitis was associated with both appearance of its receptor, PDGF-Rβ and modulation of phenotype. Here, we examined the role of inflammatory cytokines in inducing and modulating the growth response to PDGF-BB. CSMC were enzymatically isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, and the effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor (TGF), IL-17A and IL-2 on CSMC growth and responsiveness to PDGF-BB were assessed using proliferation assays, PCR and western blotting. Conditioned medium (CM) was obtained at 48 hrs of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis. Neither CM alone nor cytokines caused proliferation of early-passage CSMC. However, CM from inflamed, but not control colon significantly promoted the effect of PDGF-BB. IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-17A, but not other cytokines, increased the effect of PDGF-BB because of up-regulation of mRNA and protein for PDGF-Rβ without change in receptor phosphorylation. PDGF-BB was identified in adult rat serum (RS) and RS-induced CSMC proliferation was inhibited by imatinib, suggesting that blood-derived PDGF-BB is a local mitogen in vivo. In freshly isolated CSMC, CM from the inflamed colon as well as IL-1β and TNF-α induced the early expression of PDGF-Rβ, while imatinib blocked subsequent RS-induced cell proliferation. Thus, pro-inflammatory cytokines both initiate and maintain a growth response in CSMC via PDGF-Rβ and serum-derived PDGF-BB, and control of PDGF-Rβ expression may be beneficial in chronic intestinal inflammation.

  10. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  11. [Electrophysiology and calcium signalling in human bronchial smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Marthan, R; Hyvelin, J M; Roux, E; Savineau, J P

    1999-01-01

    Recently, cells isolated from airways have been used to characterize precisely the electrophysiological properties of this smooth muscle and to describe the changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) occurring upon agonist stimulation. Although most studies have produced consistent results in terms of types of ion channel and pathways of calcium signalling implicated in the mechanical activity of airways, there are differences according to (i) the site along the bronchial tree (trachea vs. bronchi); (ii) the proliferating status of the cells (freshly isolated vs. cultured) and (iii) the species (human vs. animals). With regard to the electrophysiological properties of airway smooth muscle, the contribution to [Ca2+]i rise of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels depends on the balance between depolarization related to non-specific cation channel and/or chloride channel activation and hyperpolarization related to activation of a variety of potassium channels. Most of the above-mentioned channels appear to be controlled, directly or indirectly, by agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle. With regard to calcium signalling, the pattern of agonist-induced [Ca2+]i responses, the so-called [Ca2+]i oscillations, has been observed recently in freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells. The role and the calcium sources involved in these oscillations in human bronchial smooth muscle are currently being investigated.

  12. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant1,2. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds3,4. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)5,6 that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the cryptvillus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response7–9. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies. PMID:25326803

  13. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M.; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R.; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments. PMID:26374193

  14. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R; Kumamoto, Carol A; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L

    2015-09-16

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments.

  15. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds.

  16. [Effects of Honeysuckle flower and Scutellaria Baicalensis Georgi on constraction and electric activity of rabbit small intestine smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Song, Shi-jun; Li, Fang-fang; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Li-hua; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Yi

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the effect of Honeysuckle flower (HF) and Scutellaria Baicalensis Georgi (SBG) on contraction and electric activity of small intestine smooth muscle in rabbit and the underlying mechanisms. Using organ bath technique to observe the effect of HF and SBG on contractive and electric activity of small intestine smooth muscle in rabbit. HF and SBG significantly decreased the amplitude, frequency and area under the curve of contractive, as well as electric activity in a dose-depended manner. IC50 of the contractive amplitude was 6.30 g/L and 1.56 g/L by Logit Loglinear analysis. The inhibitive effect of HF and SBG on contractive activity could be partly decreased by beta-receptor blocker Propranolol, NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, and K+ channel blocker Glibenclamide. Also HF and SBG inhibited acetylcholine-induced both intracellular and extracellular calcium-depended contraction significantly. HF and SBG obviously inhibit the contractive and electric activity of small intestine smooth muscle of rabbit. The mechanisms are related to several pathways.

  17. Food-borne intestinal trematodiases in humans.

    PubMed

    Fried, Bernard; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Tamang, Leena

    2004-06-01

    Food-borne trematodiases still remain a public health problem world-wide, despite changes in eating habits, alterations in social and agricultural practices, health education, industrialization, environmental alteration, and broad-spectrum anthelmintics. Food-borne trematodiases usually occur focally, are still persistently endemic in some parts of the world, and are most prevalent in remote rural places among school-age children, low-wage earners, and women of child-bearing age. Intestinal fluke diseases are aggravated by socio-economic factors such as poverty, malnutrition, an explosively growing free-food market, a lack of sufficient food inspection and sanitation, other helminthiases, and declining economic conditions. Control programs implemented for food-borne zoonoses and sustained in endemic areas are not fully successful for intestinal food-borne trematodiases because of centuries-old traditions of eating raw or insufficiently cooked food, widespread zoonotic reservoirs, promiscuous defecation, and the use of "night soil" (human excrement collected from latrines) as fertilizer. This review examines food-borne intestinal trematodiases associated with species in families of the Digenea: Brachylaimidae, Diplostomidae, Echinostomatidae, Fasciolidae, Gastrodiscidae, Gymnophallidae, Heterophyidae, Lecithodendriidae, Microphallidae, Nanophyetidae, Paramphistomatidae, Plagiorchiidae, and Strigeidae. Because most of the implicated species are in the Echinostomatidae and Heterophyidae, emphasis in the review is placed on species in these families.

  18. Establishment of novel prediction system of intestinal absorption in humans using human intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Toguchi, Hajime; Nishibayashi, Toru; Higaki, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Koganei, Kazutaka; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Kitazume, Mina T; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Sato, Toshiro; Okamoto, Susumu; Kanai, Takanori; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a novel prediction system of drug absorption in humans by utilizing human intestinal tissues. Based on the transport index (TI), a newly defined parameter, calculated by taking account of the change in drug concentrations because of precipitation on the apical side and the amounts accumulated in the tissue and transported to the basal side, the absorbability of drugs in rank order as well as the fraction of dose absorbed (Fa) in humans were estimated. Human intestinal tissues taken from ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease patients were mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber and transport studies were performed to evaluate the permeation of drugs, including FD-4, a very low permeable marker, atenolol, a low permeable marker, and metoprolol, a high permeable marker. Although apparent permeability coefficients calculated by the conventional equation did not reflect human Fa values for FD-4, atenolol, and metoprolol, TI values were well correlated with Fa values, which are described by 100 · [1 - e (- f · (TI - α)) ]. Based on this equation, Fa values in humans for other test drugs were predicted successfully, indicating that our new system utilizing human intestinal tissues would be valuable for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

  19. Role of Rho proteins in carbachol-induced contractions in intact and permeabilized guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, B; Steusloff, A; Just, I; Aktories, K; Pfitzer, G

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to determine whether the low molecular mass GTPase RhoA or related proteins are involved in carbachol- and high-K(+)-induced contractions in intact intestinal smooth muscle as well as the carbachol-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments in permeabilized preparations. 2. The carbachol-induced increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of force production in beta-escin-permeabilized intestinal smooth muscle was enhanced in preparations that were loaded with the constitutively active mutant of RhoA, Val14RhoA, and was inhibited by exoenzyme C3 from Clostridium botulinum, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates small GTPases of the Rho family. The effect of C3 on Ca2+ sensitivity in the absence of the agonist was negligible, while the maximal Ca(2+)-activated force was inhibited by about 20%. 3. Inhibition of carbachol-induced force was associated with an increase in ADP-ribosylation of a protein band with a molecular mass of approximately 22 kDa, corresponding to Rho, and was partially reversed in the presence of Ile41RhoA, which is not a substrate for C3. Val14RhoA did not restore carbachol-induced Ca2+ sensitization in C3-treated smooth muscle. 4. In intact intestinal smooth muscle, toxin B from Clostridium difficile, which monoglucosylates members of the Rho family, inhibited high-K(+)-induced contractions and the initial phasic response to carbachol by about 30%. The delayed contractile response to carbachol was completely inhibited. 5. In smooth muscle preparations that were permeabilized with beta-escin after treatment with toxin B, carbachol-and GTP gamma S-induced Ca2+ sensitization was significantly inhibited. 6. These findings are consistent with a role for Rho or Rho-like proteins in agonist-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of force production in intact and permeabilized intestinal smooth muscle. Images Figure 2 PMID:8910218

  20. Dynamic efficiency of the human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Maccaferri, Simone; Figini, Paolo; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    The emerging dynamic dimensions of the human intestinal microbiota (IM) are challenging the traditional definition of healthy gut microbiota, principally based on the static concepts of phylogenetic and functional core. On the other hand, recent researches are revealing that the microbiota plasticity is strategic for several aspects of our biology, addressing the different immunological and metabolic needs at various ages, and adjusting the ecosystem services in response to different lifestyle, physiological states or diets. In light of these studies, we propose to revise the traditional concept of healthy human IM, including its degree of plasticity among the fundamental requisites for providing host health. In order to make a model taking into account the relative importance of IM core functions and plasticity for the maintenance of host health, we address to Economics, where the efficiency of a productive system is measured by computing static and dynamic parameters.

  1. Human milk oligosaccharides: the novel modulator of intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyunghun; Nguyen, Vi; Kim, Jaehan

    2012-08-01

    Human milk, which nourishes the early infants, is a source of bioactive components for the infant growth, development and commensal formulation as well. Human milk oligosaccharide is a group of complex and diverse glycans that is apparently not absorbed in human gastrointestinal tract. Although most mammalian milk contains oligosaccharides, oligosaccharides in human milk exhibit unique features in terms of their types, amounts, sizes, and functionalities. In addition to the prevention of infectious bacteria and the development of early immune system, human milk oligosaccharides are able to facilitate the healthy intestinal microbiota. Bifidobacterial intestinal microbiota appears to be established by the unilateral interaction between milk oligosaccharides, human intestinal activity and commensals. Digestibility, membrane transportation and catabolic activity by bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells, all of which are linked to the structural of human milk oligosaccharides, are crucial in determining intestinal microbiota.

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of human intestinal spirochetosis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sho; Shimizu, Ken; Oda, Tomohiro; Tominaga, Susumu; Nakanishi, Kuniaki

    2016-12-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is a colorectal infection by Brachyspira species of spiral bacteria. Immunohistochemical cross-reaction to an antibody for Treponema pallidum aids its histologic diagnosis. This study's aim was to analyze the immunohistochemical characteristics of HIS. In this analysis, on 223 specimens from 83 HIS cases, we focused on so-called fringe formation (a histologic hallmark of HIS), spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts, and strong immunopositive materials in the mucosa, together with their location and the types of lesions. Fringe formation was found in 81.6% of all specimens and spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts in 97.3% and 57.0%, respectively. Strong immunopositive materials were observed in the surface epithelial layer in 87.9%, in the subepithelial layer in 94.6%, and in deeper mucosa in 2.2% of all specimens. The positive rates in conventional adenomas (24.0%, n = 146) and hyperplastic nodules (100%, n = 17) were each different from that found in inflammation (70.8%, n = 24), and spiral organisms were seen more frequently in the right-side large intestine than in the left (within mucus, 100%, n = 104 versus 95.0%, n = 119; within crypts, 65.4%, n = 104 versus 49.6%, n = 119). Thus, immunohistochemistry was effective not only in supporting the diagnosis of HIS but also in highlighting spiral organisms within mucus or crypts that were invisible in routine histology. Possibly, these spiral organisms may spread throughout the entire large intestine, although there is a potential problem with antibody specificity.

  3. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Human intestinal lipoproteins. Studies in chyluric subjects.

    PubMed

    Green, P H; Glickman, R M; Saudek, C D; Blum, C B; Tall, A R

    1979-07-01

    To explore the role of the human intestine as a source of apolipoproteins, we have studied intestinal lipoproteins and apoprotein secretion in two subjects with chyluria (mesenteric lymphatic-urinary fistulae). After oral corn oil, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) output in urine increased in parallel to urinary triglyceride. One subject, on two occasions, after 40 g of corn oil, excreted 8.4 and 8.6 g of triglyceride together with 196 and 199 mg apoA-I and on one occasion, 56 mg apoA-II. The other subject, after 40 g corn oil, excreted 0.3 g triglyceride and 17.5 mg apoA-I, and, after 100 g of corn oil, excreted 44.8 mg apoA-I and 5.8 mg apoA-II. 14.5+/-2.1% of apoA-I and 17.7+/-4.3% of apoA-II in chylous urine was in the d < 1.006 fraction (chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein). Calculations based on the amount of apoA-I and apoA-II excreted on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins revealed that for these lipid loads, intestinal secretion could account for 50 and 33% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Similarly, subject 2 excreted 48-70% and 14% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Chylous urine contained chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins, all of which contained apoA-I. Chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins contained a previously unreported human apoprotein of 46,000 mol wt. We have called this apoprotein apoA-IV because of the similarity of its molecular weight and amino acid composition to rat apoA-IV. In sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, chylomicron apoproteins consisted of apoB 3.4+/-0.7%, apoA-IV 10.0+/-3.3%, apoE 4.4+/-0.3%, apoA-I 15.0+/-1.8%, and apoC and apoA-II 43.3+/-11.3%. Very low density lipoprotein contained more apoB and apoA-IV and less apoC than chylomicrons. Ouchterlony immunodiffusion of chylomicron apoproteins revealed the presence of apoC-I, apoC-II, and apoC-III. In contrast, plasma

  5. Anti-fibrogenic effect of PPAR-γ agonists in human intestinal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jun Bon; Nam, Myeong-Ok; Jung, Younshin; Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Duk Hwan; Kim, Gwangil; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Kee Myung; Hahm, Ki Baik; Kim, Jong Woo; Hong, Sung Pyo; Lee, Kwang Jae; Yoo, Jun Hwan

    2017-06-07

    Intestinal fibrosis is a serious complication of inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. There is no specific treatment for intestinal fibrosis. Studies have indicated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- γ (PPAR-γ) agonists have anti-fibrogenic properties in organs besides the gut; however, their effects on human intestinal fibrosis are poorly understood. This study investigated the anti-fibrogenic properties and mechanisms of PPAR-γ agonists on human primary intestinal myofibroblasts (HIFs). HIFs were isolated from normal colonic tissue of patients undergoing resection due to colorectal cancer. HIFs were treated with TGF-β1 and co-incubated with or without one of two synthetic PPAR-γ agonists, troglitazone or rosiglitazone. mRNA and protein expression of procollagen1A1, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin were determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. LY294002 (Akt inhibitor) was used to examine whether Akt phosphorylation was a downstream mechanism of TGF-β1 induced expression of procollagen1A1, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin in HIFs. The irreversible PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 was used to investigate whether the effect of PPAR-γ agonists was PPAR-γ dependent. Both PPAR-γ agonists reduced the TGF-β1-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin which was integrated into stress fibers in HIFs, as determined by actin microfilaments fluorescent staining and α-smooth muscle actin-specific immunocytochemistry. PPAR-γ agonists also inhibited TGF-β1-induced mRNA and protein expressions of procollagen1A1, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin. TGF-β1 stimulation increased phosphorylation of downstream signaling molecules Smad2, Akt, and ERK. TGF-β1 induced synthesis of procollagen1A1, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-dependent mechanism. PPAR-γ agonists down regulated fibrogenesis, as

  6. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation.

    PubMed

    Regadas, Rommel P; Moraes, Maria E A; Mesquita, Francisco J C; Cerqueira, Joao B G; Gonzaga-Silva, Lucio F

    2010-01-01

    To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra) was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm(3) were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA) and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. Phenylephrine (1 microM) was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3-5 g tension) and cavernous artery (0.5-1 g tension) until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10(-12) M to 10(-4) M). Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  7. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

  8. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Martos, F; Bellido, I; Marquez, E; Garcia, A J; Pavia, J; Sanchez de la Cuesta, F

    1992-06-09

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle homogenates were characterized with [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) by ligand binding studies. [3H]NMS saturation experiments show the existence of a homogeneous population of non-interacting binding sites with similar affinity (KD values of 1.38 +/- 0.20 nM in human colon smooth muscle and 1.48 +/- 0.47 nM in rat colon smooth muscle) and with Hill slopes close to unity in both samples of tissue. However, a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in muscarinic receptor density (Bmax) is found in human colon (29.9 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg protein) compared with rat colon (17.2 +/- 1.5 fmol/mg protein). Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by non-labelled compounds shows the following order in human colon: atropine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than pirenzepine. Whereas in rat colon the rank order obtained is atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Atropine and pirenzepine bind to a homogeneous population of binding sites, although pirenzepine shows higher affinity to bind to the sites present in rat colon (Ki = 1.08 +/- 0.08 microM) than those in human colon (Ki = 1.74 +/- 0.02 microM) (P less than 0.05). Similarly, IC50 values obtained in AF-DX 116 competition experiments were significantly different (P less than 0.01) in human colon (IC50 = 1.69 +/- 0.37 microM) than in rat colon (IC50 = 3.78 +/- 0.75 microM). Unlike atropine and pirenzepine, the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by AF-DX 116 did not yield a simple mass-action binding curve (nH less than 1, P less than 0.01) suggesting the presence of more than one subtype of muscarinic receptor in both species. Computer analysis of these curves with a two binding site model suggests the presence of two populations of receptor. The apparent Ki1 value for the high affinity binding site is 0.49 +/- 0.07 microM for human colon smooth muscle and 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM for rat colon smooth muscle. The apparent Ki2 for the low affinity binding site is 8

  9. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  10. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  11. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  12. Exploring food effects on indinavir absorption with human intestinal fluids in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Holmstock, Nico; De Bruyn, Tom; Bevernage, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Mols, Raf; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2013-04-11

    Food can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs, as it may affect drug solubility as well as permeability. Since fed state conditions cannot easily be implemented in the presently available permeability tools, including the frequently used Caco-2 system, exploring food effects during drug development can be quite challenging. In this study, we investigated the effect of fasted and fed state conditions on the intestinal absorption of the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir using simulated and human intestinal fluids in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice. Although the solubility of indinavir was 6-fold higher in fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) as compared to fasted state HIF (FaHIF), the intestinal permeation of indinavir was 22-fold lower in FeHIF as compared to FaHIF. Dialysis experiments showed that only a small fraction of indinavir is accessible for absorption in FeHIF due to micellar entrapment, possibly explaining its low intestinal permeation. The presence of ritonavir, a known P-gp inhibitor, increased the intestinal permeation of indinavir by 2-fold in FaHIF, while there was no increase when using FeHIF. These data confirm that drug-food interactions form a complex interplay between solubility and permeability effects. The use of HIF in in situ intestinal perfusions holds great promise for biorelevant absorption evaluation as it allows to directly explore this complex solubility/permeability interplay on drug absorption.

  13. Effects of lubiprostone on human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Malinowska, Danuta H; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Ueno, Ryuji

    2008-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derivative and member of a new class of compounds called prostones, locally activates ClC-2 Cl(-) channels without activation of prostaglandin receptors. The present study was specifically designed to test and compare lubiprostone and prostaglandin effects at the cellular level using human uterine smooth muscle cells. Effects on [Ca(2+)](i), membrane potential and [cAMP](i) in human uterine smooth muscle cells were measured. 10 nM lubiprostone significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i) from 188 to 27 nM, which was unaffected by 100 nM SC-51322, a prostaglandin EP receptor antagonist. In contrast 10nM PGE(2) and PGE(1) both increased [Ca(2+)](i) 3-5-fold which was blocked by SC-51322. Similarly, lubiprostone and prostaglandins had opposite/different effects on membrane potential and [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone caused SC-51322-insensitive membrane hyperpolarization and no effect on [cAMP](i). PGE(2) and PGE(1) both caused SC-51322-sensitive membrane depolarization and increased [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone has fundamentally different cellular effects from prostaglandins that are not mediated by EP receptors.

  14. Characterization of the EP receptor types that mediate longitudinal smooth muscle contraction of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, S E; Smith, J E; Borman, R A; Cox, H M

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) is an inflammatory mediator implicated in several gastrointestinal pathologies that affect normal intestinal transit. The aim was to establish the contribution of the four EP receptor types (EP(1-4) ), in human colon, that mediate PGE(2) -induced longitudinal smooth muscle contraction. Changes in isometric muscle tension of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum were measured in organ baths in response to receptor-specific agonists and antagonists. In addition, lidocaine was used to block neurogenic activity to investigate whether EP receptors were pre- or post-junctional. PGE(2) contracted longitudinal muscle from human and mouse colon and mouse ileum. These contractions were inhibited by the EP(1) receptor antagonist, EP(1) A in human colon, whereas a combination of EP(1) A and the EP(3) antagonist, L798106 inhibited agonist responses in both mouse preparations. The EP(3) agonist, sulprostone also increased muscle tension in both mouse tissues, and these responses were inhibited by lidocaine in the colon but not in the ileum. Although PGE(2) consistently contracted all three muscle preparations, butaprost decreased tension by activating smooth muscle EP(2) receptors in both colonic tissues. Alternatively, in mouse ileum, butaprost responses were lidocaine-sensitive, suggesting that it was activating prejunctional EP(2) receptors on inhibitory motor neurons. Conversely, EP(4) receptors were not functional in all the intestinal muscle preparations tested. PGE(2) -induced contraction of longitudinal smooth muscle is mediated by EP(1) receptors in human colon and by a combination of EP(1) and EP(3) receptors in mouse intestine, whereas EP(2) receptors modulate relaxation in all three preparations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Enantioselective oxidation of enterodiol to enterolactone by human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Hattori, Masao

    2007-11-01

    In the course of our experiments on the metabolic conversion of lignans to the estrogenic substances enterodiol (END) and enterolactone (ENL) by human intestinal flora, we isolated two anaerobes, Ruminococcus sp. END-1 and strain END-2, capable of oxidizing END. The former selectively converted (-)-END to (-)-ENL, while the latter selectively converted (+)-END to (+)-ENL, indicating enantioselective oxidation by intestinal bacteria.

  16. Intestinal fructose transport and malabsorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hilary F; Butler, Ross N; Brooks, Doug A

    2011-02-01

    Fructose is a hexose sugar that is being increasingly consumed in its monosaccharide form. Patients who exhibit fructose malabsorption can present with gastrointestinal symptoms that include chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain. However, with no clearly established gastrointestinal mechanism for fructose malabsorption, patient analysis by the proxy of a breath hydrogen test (BHT) is controversial. The major transporter for fructose in intestinal epithelial cells is thought to be the facilitative transporter GLUT5. Consistent with a facilitative transport system, we show here by analysis of past studies on healthy adults that there is a significant relationship between fructose malabsorption and fructose dose (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). Thus there is a dose-dependent and limited absorption capacity even in healthy individuals. Changes in fructose malabsorption with age have been observed in human infants, and this may parallel the developmental regulation of GLUT5 expression. Moreover, a GLUT5 knockout mouse has displayed the hallmarks associated with profound fructose malabsorption. Fructose malabsorption appears to be partially modulated by the amount of glucose ingested. Although solvent drag and passive diffusion have been proposed to explain the effect of glucose on fructose malabsorption, this could possibly be a result of the facilitative transporter GLUT2. GLUT5 and GLUT2 mRNA have been shown to be rapidly upregulated by the presence of fructose and GLUT2 mRNA is also upregulated by glucose, but in humans the distribution and role of GLUT2 in the brush border membrane are yet to be definitively decided. Understanding the relative roles of these transporters in humans will be crucial for establishing a mechanistic basis for fructose malabsorption in gastrointestinal patients.

  17. [Biotransformation of mogroside III by human intestinal bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu Wei; Zhang, Jian Ye; Xu, Wei

    2007-12-18

    To investigate the biotransformation of mogroside III, one of the main chemical constituent in the fruits of Momordica grosvenori Swingle, by the crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria, and determine the structure of biotransformation products and provide scientific basis for absorption evaluation of primary mogroside III in human intestine. The mogroside III was incubated with crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria under the anaerobic environment and 37 degrees C condition to transform mogroside III. The biotransformation products were isolated and purified by silica gel column chromatography, and structurally determined by infra-red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and mass spectroscopy (MS) techniques. Mogroside III was converted to mogroside II(A1) and mogrol by successive deglycosylation at C-3 of the glucosyl group and C-24 of the gentiobiosyl group. The human intestinal bacteria showed potent ability to transform mogroside III to release secondary glycoside mogroside II(A1) and aglycone mogrol.

  18. Efficient genetic engineering of human intestinal organoids using electroporation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masayuki; Matano, Mami; Nanki, Kosaku; Sato, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    Gene modification in untransformed human intestinal cells is an attractive approach for studying gene function in intestinal diseases. However, because of the lack of practical tools, such studies have largely depended upon surrogates, such as gene-engineered mice or immortalized human cell lines. By taking advantage of the recently developed intestinal organoid culture method, we developed a methodology for modulating genes of interest in untransformed human colonic organoids via electroporation of gene vectors. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the generation of intestinal organoids by culture with essential growth factors in a basement membrane matrix. We also describe how to stably integrate genes via the piggyBac transposon, as well as precise genome editing using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Beginning with crypt isolation from a human colon sample, genetically modified organoids can be obtained in 3 weeks.

  19. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  20. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  1. Relaxant effect of ethanol extract of Carum carvi on dispersed intestinal smooth muscle cells of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Al-Essa, Mohammed K; Shafagoj, Yanal A; Mohammed, Faysal I; Afifi, Fatma U

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the direct effects of Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae) ethanol extract on dispersed intestinal smooth muscle cells (SMC) of guinea pigs. Effects of the plant extract on SMC and of acetylcholine (Ach) on extract pretreated SMC were measured by micrometric scanning technique. Three different extract concentrations (2.5 mg/mL, 250 mug/mL, and 25 mug/mL) were used. Ethanol extract of C. carvi reduced significantly the response of dispersed SMC to Ach. Pretreatment of SMC with the highest concentration of C. carvi ethanol extract (2.5 mg/mL) has significantly inhibited the response of SMC to Ach. The data obtained indicate a dose-dependent inhibition of the contraction induced by Ach. This response may explain, in part, the beneficial effect of caraway in relieving gastrointestinal symptoms associated with dyspepsia.

  2. Intestinal and hepatic metabolism of glutamine and citrulline in humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Poll, Marcel C G; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C; Boelens, Petra G; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C

    2007-01-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in nitrogen homeostasis and intestinal substrate supply. It has been suggested that glutamine is a precursor for arginine through an intestinal–renal pathway involving inter-organ transport of citrulline. The importance of intestinal glutamine metabolism for endogenous arginine synthesis in humans, however, has remained unaddressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal conversion of glutamine to citrulline and the effect of the liver on splanchnic citrulline metabolism in humans. Eight patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of [2-15N]glutamine and [ureido-13C–2H2]citrulline. Arterial, portal venous and hepatic venous blood were sampled and portal and hepatic blood flows were measured. Organ specific amino acid uptake (disposal), production and net balance, as well as whole body rates of plasma appearance were calculated according to established methods. The intestines consumed glutamine at a rate that was dependent on glutamine supply. Approximately 13% of glutamine taken up by the intestines was converted to citrulline. Quantitatively glutamine was the only important precursor for intestinal citrulline release. Both glutamine and citrulline were consumed and produced by the liver, but net hepatic flux of both amino acids was not significantly different from zero. Plasma glutamine was the precursor of 80% of plasma citrulline and plasma citrulline in turn was the precursor of 10% of plasma arginine. In conclusion, glutamine is an important precursor for the synthesis of arginine after intestinal conversion to citrulline in humans. PMID:17347276

  3. Three-Dimensional Coculture Of Human Small-Intestine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David; Spaulding, Glen; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Prewett, Tracy

    1994-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional masses of normal human epithelial and mesenchymal small-intestine cells cocultured in process involving specially designed bioreactors. Useful as tissued models for studies of growth, regulatory, and differentiation processes in normal intestinal tissues; diseases of small intestine; and interactions between cells of small intestine and viruses causing disease both in small intestine and elsewhere in body. Process used to produce other tissue models, leading to advances in understanding of growth and differentiation in developing organisms, of renewal of tissue, and of treatment of myriad of clinical conditions. Prior articles describing design and use of rotating-wall culture vessels include "Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues" (MSC-21559), "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), and "In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids" (MSC-21843).

  4. Innervation of extraocular pulley smooth muscle in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Demer, J L; Poukens, V; Miller, J M; Micevych, P

    1997-08-01

    Soft pulleys stabilize paths and determine pulling directions of the extraocular muscles (EOMs). This study was conducted to characterize innervation of smooth muscles (SMs) supporting these pulleys. Cadaveric human and monkey orbits were step and serially sectioned for histochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Before perfusion, the superior cervical ganglia of one monkey had been injected with the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinin (PHA-L). Immunoperoxidase staining to human SM alpha-actin confirmed pulley SM. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate PHA-L, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and synaptophysin. The NADPH-diaphorase reaction was also used as a marker for NOS and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reaction for acetylcholine. Pulleys, consisting of collagen and elastin sleeves supported by connective tissue containing SM, were observed around rectus muscles of humans and monkeys. The human and monkey SM was richly innervated. Axons terminating in motor end plates within SM bundles were immunoreactive to PHA-L, tyrosine hydroxylase, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase, but not phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, indicating innervation of pulley SM from the superior cervical ganglion by projections using norepinephrine. Smaller axons and motor end plates were also demonstrated in SM, using NADPH-diaphorase and NOS immunoreactivity, indicating nitroxidergic innervation, and using AchE, indicating cholinergic parasympathetic innervation. The pterygopalatine and, to a lesser extent, the ciliary ganglia, but not the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, contained cells immunoreactive to NOS, suggesting that nitroxidergic innervation to pulley SM is mainly from the pterygopalatine ganglion. The SM suspensions of human and monkey EOM pulleys are similar and receive rich innervation involving multiple neurotransmitters. These complex

  5. Characterization of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Comparison with the isoenzymes from the adult intestine and human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, C M; Enns, C A; Sussman, H H

    1983-01-01

    The molecular structure of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase was defined by high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and amino acid inhibition studies. Comparison was made with the adult form of intestinal alkaline phosphatase, as well as with alkaline phosphatases isolated from cultured foetal amnion cells (FL) and a human tumour cell line (KB). Two non-identical subunits were isolated from the foetal intestinal isoenzyme, one having same molecular weight and isoelectric point as placental alkaline phosphatase, and the other corresponding to a glycosylated subunit of the adult intestinal enzyme. The FL-cell and KB-cell alkaline phosphatases were also found to contain two subunits similar to those of the foetal intestinal isoenzyme. Characterization of neuraminidase digests of the non-placental subunit showed it to be indistinguishable from the subunits of the adult intestinal isoenzyme. This implies that no new phosphatase structural gene is involved in the transition from the expression of foetal to adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase, but that the molecular changes involve suppression of the placental subunit and loss of neuraminic acid from the non-placental subunit. Enzyme-inhibition studies demonstrated an intermediate response to the inhibitors tested for the foetal intestinal, FL-cell and KB-cell isoenzymes when compared with the placental, adult intestinal and liver forms. This result is consistent with the mixed-subunit structure observed for the former set of isoenzymes. In summary, this study has defined the molecular subunit structure of the foetal intestinal form of alkaline phosphatase and has demonstrated its expression in a human tumour cell line. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882358

  6. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  7. Heparin inhibits human coronary artery smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Mandal, A K; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-09-01

    Heparin, an anticoagulant, has been shown to reduce neointimal proliferation and restenosis following vascular injury in experimental studies, but the clinical trials of heparin in coronary balloon angioplasty have been negative. The current study, therefore, examined the effect of heparin on basal or stimulated migration by serum and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by Boyden's chamber method. In addition, the reversibility of the heparin effect on human coronary artery SMC migration was examined. Fetal calf serum (FCS) and PDGF-BB stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Heparin in moderate to high concentration (10 to 100 U/mL) exhibited concentration-related inhibition of FCS- and PDGF-BB-stimulated SMC migration; however, a low concentration (1 U/mL) of heparin had no inhibitory effects. Heparin also had weak inhibitory effects on nonstimulated SMC migration. The SMCs that were exposed to a high concentration (100 U/mL) of heparin for 6 hours were capable of migrating after a short lag period of removal of heparin from the culture medium. These SMCs also showed recovery of responses to FCS and PDGF-BB by migrating significantly greater than the nonstimulated level. Furthermore, heparin-containing medium did not contain detached cells. These results indicate that heparin inhibits human coronary artery SMC migration, especially when stimulated by FCS or PDGF-BB, and that this inhibitory effect of heparin is reversible and not simply a function of killing cells.

  8. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  9. Neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of smooth pursuit in humans.

    PubMed

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved in its control. The maintenance of smooth pursuit is driven by a combination of the prediction of target velocity and visual feedback about performance quality, thus a combination of retinal and extraretinal information that has to be integrated in various networks. Different models of smooth pursuit with specific in- and output parameters have been developed for a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and to make quantitative predictions that can be tested in experiments. Functional brain imaging and neurophysiological studies have defined motion sensitive visual area V5, frontal (FEF) and supplementary (SEF) eye fields as core cortical smooth pursuit regions. In addition, a dense neural network is involved in the adjustment of an optimal smooth pursuit response by integrating also extraretinal information. These networks facilitate interaction of the smooth pursuit system with multiple other visual and non-visual sensorimotor systems on the cortical and subcortical level. Future studies with fMRI advanced techniques (e.g., event-related fMRI) promise to provide an insight into how smooth pursuit eye movements are linked to specific brain activation. Applying this approach to neurological and also mental illness can reveal distinct disturbances within neural networks being present in these disorders and also the impact of medication on this circuitry.

  10. Curcuminoid Demethylation as an Alternative Metabolism by Human Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Burapan, Supawadee; Kim, Mihyang; Han, Jaehong

    2017-04-14

    Curcumin and other curcuminoids from Curcuma longa are important bioactive compounds exhibiting various pharmacological activities. In addition to the known reductive metabolism of curcuminoids, an alternative biotransformation of curcuminoids by human gut microbiota is reported herein. A curcuminoid mixture, composed of curcumin (1), demethoxycurcumin (2), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (3), was metabolized by the human intestinal bacterium Blautia sp. MRG-PMF1. 1 and 2 were converted to new metabolites by the methyl aryl ether cleavage reaction. Two metabolites, demethylcurcumin (4) and bisdemethylcurcumin (5), were sequentially produced from 1, and demethyldemethoxycurcumin (6) was produced from 2. Until now, sequential reduction of the heptadienone backbone of curcuminoids was the only known metabolism to occur in the human intestine. In this study, a new intestinal metabolism of curcuminoids was discovered. Demethylation of curcuminoids produced three new colonic metabolites that were already known as promising synthetic curcumin analogues. The results could explain the observed beneficial effects of turmeric.

  11. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Campylobacter-induced interleukin-8 responses in human intestinal epithelial cells and primary intestinal chick cells.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, Erika; Berndt, Angela; Hänel, Ingrid; Köhler, Heike

    2007-09-20

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni and C. coli can cause gastrointestinal disorders in humans characterized by acute inflammation. Inflammatory signals are initiated during interaction between these pathogens and human intestinal cells, but nothing is known about the stimulation of avian intestinal cells by Campylobacter. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as a proinflammatory chemokine plays an important role in mobilizing cellular defence mechanism. IL-8 mRNA expression in both human intestinal cells (INT 407) and primary intestinal chick cells (PIC) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secretion of IL-8 protein by INT407 was measured using ELISA. Although C. jejuni and C. coli are considered to be harmless commensals in the gut of birds, the avian Campylobacter isolates investigated were able to induce the proinflammatory IL-8 in PIC as well as in INT407. In an in vitro system, C. jejuni as well as C. coli were able to induce IL-8 mRNA in PIC. Relation between the virulence properties like toxin production, the ability to invade and to survive in Caco-2 cells and the level of IL-8 mRNA produced by INT 407 and PIC after infection with Campylobacter strains was also investigated.

  13. TNFα decreases mitochondrial movement in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Delmotte, Philippe; Zavaletta, Vanessa A; Thompson, Michael A; Prakash, Y S; Sieck, Gary C

    2017-07-01

    In airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, excitation-contraction coupling is accomplished via a cascade of events that connect an elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) with cross-bridge attachment and ATP-consuming mechanical work. Excitation-energy coupling is mediated by linkage of the elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt to an increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, which in turn stimulates ATP production. Proximity of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and plasma membrane is thought to be an important mechanism to facilitate mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In this regard, mitochondrial movement in ASM cells may be key in establishing proximity. Mitochondria also move where ATP or Ca(2+) buffering is needed. Mitochondrial movement is mediated through interactions with the Miro-Milton molecular complex, which couples mitochondria to kinesin motors at microtubules. We examined mitochondrial movement in human ASM cells and hypothesized that, at basal [Ca(2+)]cyt levels, mitochondrial movement is necessary to establish proximity of mitochondria to the SR and that, during the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonist stimulation, mitochondrial movement is reduced, thereby promoting transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. We further hypothesized that airway inflammation disrupts basal mitochondrial movement via a reduction in Miro and Milton expression, thereby disrupting the ability of mitochondria to establish proximity to the SR and, thus, reducing transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during agonist activation. The reduced proximity of mitochondria to the SR may affect establishment of transient "hot spots" of higher [Ca(2+)]cyt at the sites of SR Ca(2+) release that are necessary for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake via the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montoudis, Alain; Delvin, Edgard; Menard, Daniel

    2006-01-06

    Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

  15. Peptide hydrolase activities of the mucosa of human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, William D.; Laster, Leonard

    1969-01-01

    Few studies have been published on peptide hydrolase activities of human small intestine mucosa. We developed methods to screen tissue extracts for such enzymes and to quantitate hydrolase activities for dipeptides containing the aromatic amino acid L-phenylalanine. The screening procedure indicated glycyl-L-proline hydrolase activity was reduced in biopsy specimens from patients with flattened intestinal mucosa. To explore this further, we established optimal assay conditions for hydrolase activities (a) glycyl-L-proline, (b) L-phenylalanyl-L-proline, (c) L-alanyl-L-phenylalanine, and (d) L-phenylalanylglycine. Biopsy specimens from patients with various intestinal disorders, but without flattened mucosa, and from three patients with flattened mucosa, showed a disproportionate reduction in activities (a) and (b), with the reduction being significantly more marked in the latter patients. We suggest that intestinal imidopeptide hydrolase activities, such as (a) and (b), are sensitive to changes in intestinal disease generally, particularly to the altered physiology associated with flattening of the mucosa, and are secondary to, rather than a cause of, the intestinal pathology. Our finding that intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity tended to parallel imidopeptide hydrolase activity, and that activity (a) was partially localized to the particulate fraction of mucosal homogenate, suggested that imidopeptide hydrolase activities may be located in the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium and that, like alkaline phosphatase activity, they may be reduced in flattened mucosae, in part at least because of the pathologic changes in the microvilli. In our studies of control subjects we did not detect peptide hydrolase activity deficiency analogous to asymptomatic disaccharidase deficiency. Images PMID:5765024

  16. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  17. Relationship between stimulated phosphatidic acid production and inositol lipid hydrolysis in intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle from guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Mallows, R S; Bolton, T B

    1987-06-15

    Accumulation of [32P]phosphatidic acid (PA) and total [3H]inositol phosphates (IPs) was measured in the longitudinal smooth-muscle layer from guinea-pig small intestine. Stimulation with carbachol, histamine and substance P produced increases in accumulation of both [3H]IPs and [32P]PA over the same concentration range. The increase in [32P]PA accumulation in response to carbachol (1 microM-0.1 mM) was inhibited in the presence of atropine (0.5 microM). Buffering the external free [Ca2+] to 10 nM did not prevent the carbachol-stimulated increase in [32P]PA accumulation. Carbachol and Ca2+ appear to act synergistically to increase accumulation of [32P]PA. In contrast, although incubation with noradrenaline also increased accumulation of [3H]IPs, no increase in accumulation of [32P]PA could be detected. These results suggest that an increase in formation of IPs is not necessarily accompanied by an increase in PA formation, and imply the existence of receptor-modulated pathways regulating PA concentrations other than by phospholipase-C-catalysed inositol phospholipid hydrolysis.

  18. The uptake of cardiac glycosides by intestinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig in relation to digitalis receptors

    PubMed Central

    Godfraind, T.; Lesne, M.

    1970-01-01

    1. The accumulation and release of 3H-digitoxin, 3H-digoxin and 3H-ouabain by isolated guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle has been studied and compared with a pharmacological action due to inhibition of the sodium pump. 2. The uptake of labelled cardiac glycosides can be described by means of an exponential function. The t of uptake was similar for the three compounds and did not depend on the concentration. 3. Analysis of the curve relating the uptake of cardiac glycosides at equilibrium to the bath concentration enabled a non-saturable and a saturable binding site to be distinguished. 4. In contrast to the uptake observations, the onset of the pharmacological effect was dependent on the concentration, and furthermore the t½ for this effect was shorter. 5. The release of cardiac glycosides proceeded more slowly than the uptake. 6. The uptake of a labelled glycoside was reduced in the presence of another glycoside. The amount of displaceable glycoside was nearly equivalent to the capacity of the saturable binding site. 7. The significance of these results is discussed. PMID:5417857

  19. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Intestinal Amoebas in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hooshyar, H; Rostamkhani, P; Rezaian, M

    2012-01-01

    Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran. PMID:23193500

  1. Intestinal parasites: a study of human appendices.

    PubMed

    Cerva, L; Schrottenbaum, M; Kliment, V

    1991-01-01

    Histological sections of 414 appendices were examined parasitologically. Enterobius vermicularis was found in 8.7%, eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides in 0.5%, trophozites of Dientamoeba fragilis in 4.8%, Endolimax nana in 2.2%, Entamoeba coli in 1% and cysts of Giardia intestinalis in 1.9% of cases. Appendicopathies associated with Enterobius were most frequent in the age group from 6 to 10 years (24.3%) and from 21 to 25 years (12.2%). Patients older than 15 years were practically women only. Dientamoeba was most frequent in the age group from 11 to 15 years (11.3%). In women D. fragilis was three times more frequent than in men. The coincidence of D. fragilis and E. vermicularis infections was 50%. No interactions were seen between the protozoans in the contents of the appendix and its mucous membrane. Statistical evaluation indicates possible etiologic role of E. vermicularis in the occurrence of acute appendicities. D. fragilis appears to be the most common intestinal protozoan parasite in Bohemia.

  2. Intravenous Glucose Acutely Stimulates Intestinal Lipoprotein Secretion in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2016-07-01

    Increased production of intestinal triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) contributes to dyslipidemia and increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We have previously demonstrated that enteral glucose enhances lipid-stimulated intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion. Here, we assessed whether glucose delivered systemically by intravenous infusion also enhances intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion in humans. On 2 occasions, 4 to 6 weeks apart and in random order, 10 healthy men received a constant 15-hour intravenous infusion of either 20% glucose to induce hyperglycemia or normal saline as control. Production of TRL-apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48, primary outcomes) and apoB100 (secondary outcomes) was assessed during hourly liquid-mixed macronutrient formula ingestion with stable isotope enrichment and multicompartmental modeling, under pancreatic clamp conditions to limit perturbations in pancreatic hormones (insulin and glucagon) and growth hormone. Compared with saline infusion, glucose infusion induced both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, increased plasma triglyceride levels, and increased TRL-apoB48 concentration and production rate (P<0.05), without affecting TRL-apoB48 fractional catabolic rate. No significant effect of hyperglycemia on TRL-apoB100 concentration and kinetic parameters was observed. Short-term intravenous infusion of glucose stimulates intestinal lipoprotein production. Hyperglycemia may contribute to intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in type 2 diabetes. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02607839. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. A model for Vibrio cholerae colonization of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Dirita, Victor; Kirschner, Denise

    2011-11-21

    Vibrio cholerae is a strict human pathogen that causes the disease cholera. It is an old-world pathogen that has re-emerged as a new threat since the early 1990s. V. cholerae colonizes the upper, small intestine where it produces a toxin that leads to watery diarrhea, characterizing the disease (Kahn et al., 1988). The dynamics of colonization by the bacteria of the intestines are largely unknown. Although a large initial infectious dose is required for infection, data suggests that only a smaller sub-population colonizes a portion of the small bowel leading to disease. There are many barriers to colonization in the intestines including peristalsis, fluid wash-out, viscosity of the mucus layer, and pH. We are interested in identifying the mechanisms that allow this sub-population of bacteria to survive and colonize the intestines when faced with these barriers. To elaborate the dynamics of V. cholerae infection, we have developed a mathematical model based on a convection-diffusion-reaction-swimming equation capturing bacterial dynamics coupled with Stokes equations governing fluid velocity where we developed a novel non-local boundary condition. Our results indicate that both host and bacterial factors contribute to bacterial density in the gut. Host factors include intestinal diffusion and convection rates while bacterial factors include adherence, motility and growth rates. This model can ultimately be used to test therapeutic strategies against V. cholerae.

  4. Toll like receptor-2 regulates production of glial-derived neurotrophic factors in murine intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Gobbo, Serena; Caputi, Valentina; Spagnol, Lisa; Schirato, Giulia; Pasqualin, Matteo; Levorato, Elia; Palù, Giorgio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Castagliuolo, Ignazio

    2015-09-01

    Gut microbiota-innate immunity axis is emerging as a key player to guarantee the structural and functional integrity of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota, derangement in signaling of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and modifications in the neurochemical coding of the ENS have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Indeed, TLR2 activation by microbial products controls the ENS structure and regulates intestinal neuromuscular function. However, the cellular populations and the molecular mechanisms shaping the plasticity of enteric neurons in response to gut microbes are largely unexplored. In this study, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), enteric glial cells (EGCs) and macrophages/dendritic cells (MΦ/DCs) were isolated and cultured from the ileal longitudinal muscle layer of wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor-2 deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. Quantification of mRNA levels of neurotrophins at baseline and following stimulation with TLR ligands was performed by RT-PCR. To determine the role of neurotrophins in supporting the neuronal phenotype, we performed co-culture experiments of enteric neurons with the conditioned media of cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle layer of WT or TLR2(-/-) mice. The neuronal phenotype was investigated evaluating the expression of βIII-tubulin, HuC/D, and nNOS by immunocytochemistry. As detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, SMCs expressed mRNA coding TLR1-9. Among the tested cell populations, un-stimulated SMCs were the most prominent sources of neurotrophins. Stimulation with TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9 ligands further increased Gdnf, Ngf, Bdnf and Lif mRNA levels in SMCs. Enteric neurons isolated from TLR2(-/-) mice exhibited smaller ganglia, fewer HuC/D(+ve) and nNOS(+ve) neurons and shorter βIII-tubulin axonal networks as compared to neurons cultured from WT mice. The co-culture with the conditioned media from WT-SMCs but not with

  5. Generating elastin-rich small intestinal submucosa-based smooth muscle constructs utilizing exogenous growth factors and cyclic mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heise, Rebecca Long; Ivanova, Julia; Parekh, Aron; Sacks, Michael S

    2009-12-01

    Successful approaches to tissue engineering smooth muscle tissues utilize biodegradable scaffolds seeded with autologous cells. One common problem in using biological scaffolds specifically is the difficulty of inducing cellular penetration and controlling de novo extracellular matrix deposition/remodeling in vitro. Our hypothesis was that small intestinal submucosa (SIS) exposed to specific mechanical stimulation regimes would modulate the synthesis of de novo collagen and elastin by bladder smooth muscle cells (BSMC) within the SIS matrix. We further hypothesized that the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), two key growth factors involved in epithelial mesenchymal signaling, will promote the cellular penetration into SIS necessary for mechanical stimulation. BSMC were seeded at 0.5 x 10(6) cells/cm(2) onto the luminal side of SIS specimens. VEGF (10 ng/mL) and FGF-2 (5 ng/mL) were added to each insert in the media every other day for up to 7 days in static culture. Following static culture, specimens were stretched strip-biaxially under 15% peak strain at either 0.5 or 0.1 Hz for an additional 7 days. Following the culture period, specimens were assayed histologically and biochemically for cellular penetration, proliferation, elastin, collagen, and protease activity. Histological analyses demonstrated that in standard culture media, BSMC remained on the surface of the SIS while both FGF-2 and VEGF profoundly promoted ingrowth of the BSMC into the SIS. The penetration of the cells in response to these cytokines was confirmed using a Transwell assay. Following cellular penetration, BSMC produced significant amounts of elastic fibers under cyclic mechanical stretching at 0.1 Hz under 15% stretch, as evidenced by colorimetric assay and histology using a Verhoeff-Van Gieson stain. Protease activity was assessed in the media and found to be statistically increased in static culture following FGF-2 treatment. These

  6. Review article: the human intestinal virome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carding, S R; Davis, N; Hoyles, L

    2017-09-04

    The human virome consists of animal-cell viruses causing transient infections, bacteriophage (phage) predators of bacteria and archaea, endogenous retroviruses and viruses causing persistent and latent infections. High-throughput, inexpensive, sensitive sequencing methods and metagenomics now make it possible to study the contribution dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA virus-like particles make to the human virome, and in particular the intestinal virome. To review and evaluate the pioneering studies that have attempted to characterise the human virome and generated an increased interest in understanding how the intestinal virome might contribute to maintaining health, and the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Relevant virome-related articles were selected for review following extensive language- and date-unrestricted, electronic searches of the literature. The human intestinal virome is personalised and stable, and dominated by phages. It develops soon after birth in parallel with prokaryotic communities of the microbiota, becoming established during the first few years of life. By infecting specific populations of bacteria, phages can alter microbiota structure by killing host cells or altering their phenotype, enabling phages to contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis or microbial imbalance (dysbiosis), and the development of chronic infectious and autoimmune diseases including HIV infection and Crohn's disease, respectively. Our understanding of the intestinal virome is fragmented and requires standardised methods for virus isolation and sequencing to provide a more complete picture of the virome, which is key to explaining the basis of virome-disease associations, and how enteric viruses can contribute to disease aetiologies and be rationalised as targets for interventions. © 2017 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  8. Regulation of human airway smooth muscle cell migration and relevance to asthma.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brittany; Pray, Cara; Radford, Katherine; Martin, James G; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-08-16

    Airway remodelling is an important feature of asthma pathogenesis. A key structural change inherent in airway remodelling is increased airway smooth muscle mass. There is emerging evidence to suggest that the migration of airway smooth muscle cells may contribute to cellular hyperplasia, and thus increased airway smooth muscle mass. The precise source of these cells remains unknown. Increased airway smooth muscle mass may be collectively due to airway infiltration of myofibroblasts, neighbouring airway smooth muscle cells in the bundle, or circulating hemopoietic progenitor cells. However, the relative contribution of each cell type is not well understood. In addition, although many studies have identified pro and anti-migratory agents of airway smooth muscle cells, whether these agents can impact airway remodelling in the context of human asthma, remains to be elucidated. As such, further research is required to determine the exact mechanism behind airway smooth muscle cell migration within the airways, how much this contributes to airway smooth muscle mass in asthma, and whether attenuating this migration may provide a therapeutic avenue for asthma. In this review article, we will discuss the current evidence with respect to the regulation of airway smooth muscle cell migration in asthma.

  9. Development of the Human Infant Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Chana; Bik, Elisabeth M; DiGiulio, Daniel B; Relman, David A; Brown, Patrick O

    2007-01-01

    Almost immediately after a human being is born, so too is a new microbial ecosystem, one that resides in that person's gastrointestinal tract. Although it is a universal and integral part of human biology, the temporal progression of this process, the sources of the microbes that make up the ecosystem, how and why it varies from one infant to another, and how the composition of this ecosystem influences human physiology, development, and disease are still poorly understood. As a step toward systematically investigating these questions, we designed a microarray to detect and quantitate the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequences of most currently recognized species and taxonomic groups of bacteria. We used this microarray, along with sequencing of cloned libraries of PCR-amplified SSU rDNA, to profile the microbial communities in an average of 26 stool samples each from 14 healthy, full-term human infants, including a pair of dizygotic twins, beginning with the first stool after birth and continuing at defined intervals throughout the first year of life. To investigate possible origins of the infant microbiota, we also profiled vaginal and milk samples from most of the mothers, and stool samples from all of the mothers, most of the fathers, and two siblings. The composition and temporal patterns of the microbial communities varied widely from baby to baby. Despite considerable temporal variation, the distinct features of each baby's microbial community were recognizable for intervals of weeks to months. The strikingly parallel temporal patterns of the twins suggested that incidental environmental exposures play a major role in determining the distinctive characteristics of the microbial community in each baby. By the end of the first year of life, the idiosyncratic microbial ecosystems in each baby, although still distinct, had converged toward a profile characteristic of the adult gastrointestinal tract. PMID:17594176

  10. Dual system of intestinal thiamine transport in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyumpa, A.M. Jr.; Strickland, R.; Sheehan, J.J.; Yarborough, G.; Nichols, S.

    1982-05-01

    The transport of thiamine across the intestine has been characterized in rats but has not been adequately studied in humans. To determine the kinetics of thiamine intestinal transport directly in humans, mucosal tissues were obtained during routine endoscopy from normal-appearing sites at the second portion of the duodenum. With 3H-dextran as the marker of adherent volume, the uptake of 14C-thiamine hydrochloride by the excised mucosa was measured in vitro. By this method thiamine uptake was linear with tissue weight and with incubation time up to 5 min. Results showed that at low thiamine concentrations (0.2 to 2.0 microM), uptake was saturable whereas at high concentrations (5 to 50 microM), uptake was linear with thiamine concentrations. Pyrithiamine, anoxia, N-ethylmaleimide, and replacement of sodium chloride by mannitol reduced the uptake of 0.5 microM thiamine by 42%, 37%, 32% and 35%, respectively (p less than 0.05) but had no effect on the uptake of 20 microM thiamine. These data suggest that, as in the rat, the intestinal transport of thiamine in humans proceeds by a coexistent dual system. At physiologic concentrations, thiamine is transported primarily by an energy-requiring, sodium-dependent active process, whereas at higher pharmacologic concentrations thiamine uptake is predominantly a passive process.

  11. Evolution of Symbiotic Bacteria in the Distal Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Ruth E; Lozupone, Catherine A; Hamady, Micah; Martens, Eric C; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Minx, Patrick; Latreille, Philippe; Cordum, Holland; Van Brunt, Andrew; Kim, Kyung; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Clifton, Sandra W; Wilson, Richard K; Knight, Robin D; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2007-01-01

    The adult human intestine contains trillions of bacteria, representing hundreds of species and thousands of subspecies. Little is known about the selective pressures that have shaped and are shaping this community's component species, which are dominated by members of the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes divisions. To examine how the intestinal environment affects microbial genome evolution, we have sequenced the genomes of two members of the normal distal human gut microbiota, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides distasonis, and by comparison with the few other sequenced gut and non-gut Bacteroidetes, analyzed their niche and habitat adaptations. The results show that lateral gene transfer, mobile elements, and gene amplification have played important roles in affecting the ability of gut-dwelling Bacteroidetes to vary their cell surface, sense their environment, and harvest nutrient resources present in the distal intestine. Our findings show that these processes have been a driving force in the adaptation of Bacteroidetes to the distal gut environment, and emphasize the importance of considering the evolution of humans from an additional perspective, namely the evolution of our microbiomes. PMID:17579514

  12. Dual system of intestinal thiamine transport in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoyumpa, A M; Strickland, R; Sheehan, J J; Yarborough, G; Nichols, S

    1982-05-01

    The transport of thiamine across the intestine has been characterized in rats but has not been adequately studied in humans. To determine the kinetics of thiamine intestinal transport directly in humans, mucosal tissues were obtained during routine endoscopy from normal-appearing sites at the second portion of the duodenum. With 3H-dextran as the marker of adherent volume, the uptake of 14C-thiamine hydrochloride by the excised mucosa was measured in vitro. By this method thiamine uptake was linear with tissue weight and with incubation time up to 5 min. Results showed that at low thiamine concentrations (0.2 to 2.0 microM), uptake was saturable whereas at high concentrations (5 to 50 microM), uptake was linear with thiamine concentrations. Pyrithiamine, anoxia, N-ethylmaleimide, and replacement of sodium chloride by mannitol reduced the uptake of 0.5 microM thiamine by 42%, 37%, 32% and 35%, respectively (p less than 0.05) but had no effect on the uptake of 20 microM thiamine. These data suggest that, as in the rat, the intestinal transport of thiamine in humans proceeds by a coexistent dual system. At physiologic concentrations, thiamine is transported primarily by an energy-requiring, sodium-dependent active process, whereas at higher pharmacologic concentrations thiamine uptake is predominantly a passive process.

  13. Adherence targets of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in human small intestines.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Yokota, T

    1989-01-01

    Formalin-fixed human small intestinal mucosa with mucus coating, villi, and lymphoid follicle epithelium at the mucosal surface was used to test the adherence sites of clinically isolated (Kanagawa phenomenon-positive) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 3 h at 37 degrees C possessed various levels of cell-associated hemagglutinins (HAs) which were detected with human or guinea pig erythrocytes. The observed adherence abilities of V. parahaemolyticus strains to human small intestinal mucosa correlated roughly with the HA levels of the strains. Under the test conditions, ileal lymphoid follicle epithelium (especially M cells) provided the best adherence target for V. parahaemolyticus. Adherence to villus absorptive cells or to mucus coating was observed at lower levels. In addition, all 3-h-grown V. parahaemolyticus strains tested produced high levels of HAs as detected with rabbit erythrocytes. The strains were all strikingly motile. In contrast, V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 20 h at 37 degrees C had much lower levels of HAs, adherence abilities, and motility. In contrast to the above observations, piliation of V. parahaemolyticus was more extensive at ca. 20 h of incubation at 37 degrees C than at ca. 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. The remarkable ability of V. parahaemolyticus to adhere to lymphoid follicle epithelium was also confirmed by using rabbit small intestinal mucosa. Images PMID:2568344

  14. Experimental evidence and mathematical modeling of thermal effects on human colonic smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Altomare, A; Gizzi, A; Guarino, M P L; Loppini, A; Cocca, S; Dipaola, M; Alloni, R; Cicala, M; Filippi, S

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown, in animal models, that gastrointestinal tract (GIT) motility is influenced by temperature; nevertheless, the basic mechanism governing thermal GIT smooth muscle responses has not been fully investigated. Studies based on physiologically tuned mathematical models have predicted that thermal inhomogeneity may induce an electrochemical destabilization of peristaltic activity. In the present study, the effect of thermal cooling on human colonic muscle strip (HCMS) contractility was studied. HCMSs were obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer. After removal of the mucosa and serosa layers, strips were mounted in separate chambers. After 30 min, spontaneous contractions developed, which were measured using force displacement transducers. Temperature was changed every hour (37, 34, and 31°C). The effect of cooling was analyzed on mean contractile activity, oscillation amplitude, frequency, and contraction to ACh (10(-5) M). At 37°C, HCMSs developed a stable phasic contraction (~0.02 Hz) with a significant ACh-elicited mean contractile response (31% and 22% compared with baseline in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively). At a lower bath temperature, higher mean contractile amplitude was observed, and it increased in the presence of ACh (78% and 43% higher than the basal tone in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively, at 31°C). A simplified thermochemomechanical model was tuned on experimental data characterizing the stress state coupling the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration to tissue temperature. In conclusion, acute thermal cooling affects colonic muscular function. Further studies are needed to establish the exact mechanisms involved to better understand clinical consequences of hypothermia on intestinal contractile activity.

  15. Cysteine-rich protein 2, a novel substrate for cGMP kinase I in enteric neurons and intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Huber, A; Neuhuber, W L; Klugbauer, N; Ruth, P; Allescher, H D

    2000-02-25

    Nitric oxide/cGMP/cGMP kinase I (cGKI) signaling causes relaxation of intestinal smooth muscle. In the gastrointestinal tract substrates of cGKI have not been identified yet. In the present study a protein interacting with cGKIbeta has been isolated from a rat intestinal cDNA library using the yeast two-hybrid system. The protein was identified as cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2), recently cloned from rat brain (Okano, I., Yamamoto, T., Kaji, A., Kimura, T., Mizuno, K., and Nakamura, T. (1993) FEBS Lett. 333, 51-55). Recombinant CRP2 is specifically phosphorylated by cGKs but not by cAMP kinase in vitro. Co-transfection of CRP2 and cGKIbeta into COS cells confirmed the phosphorylation of CRP2 in vivo. Cyclic GMP kinase I phosphorylated CRP2 at Ser-104, because the mutation to Ala completely prevented the in vivo phosphorylation. Immunohistochemical analysis using confocal laser scan microscopy showed a co-localization of CRP2 and cGKI in the inner part of the circular muscle layer, in the muscularis mucosae, and in specific neurons of the myenteric and submucosal plexus. The co-localization together with the specific phosphorylation of CRP2 by cGKI in vitro and in vivo suggests that CRP2 is a novel substrate of cGKI in neurons and smooth muscle of the small intestine.

  16. Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jarno; van Jaarsveld, Richard H; Ponsioen, Bas; Zimberlin, Cheryl; van Boxtel, Ruben; Buijs, Arjan; Sachs, Norman; Overmeer, René M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Begthel, Harry; Korving, Jeroen; van de Wetering, Marc; Schwank, Gerald; Logtenberg, Meike; Cuppen, Edwin; Snippert, Hugo J; Medema, Jan Paul; Kops, Geert J P L; Clevers, Hans

    2015-05-07

    Crypt stem cells represent the cells of origin for intestinal neoplasia. Both mouse and human intestinal stem cells can be cultured in medium containing the stem-cell-niche factors WNT, R-spondin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and noggin over long time periods as epithelial organoids that remain genetically and phenotypically stable. Here we utilize CRISPR/Cas9 technology for targeted gene modification of four of the most commonly mutated colorectal cancer genes (APC, P53 (also known as TP53), KRAS and SMAD4) in cultured human intestinal stem cells. Mutant organoids can be selected by removing individual growth factors from the culture medium. Quadruple mutants grow independently of all stem-cell-niche factors and tolerate the presence of the P53 stabilizer nutlin-3. Upon xenotransplantation into mice, quadruple mutants grow as tumours with features of invasive carcinoma. Finally, combined loss of APC and P53 is sufficient for the appearance of extensive aneuploidy, a hallmark of tumour progression.

  17. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  18. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Huan; Zhu, Lina; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Jingci

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI. PMID:26030918

  19. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Hu, Chen; Fang, Huan; Zhu, Lina; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Jingci

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI.

  20. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R.; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E.; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Cima, Robert R.; Larson, David W.; Dozois, Eric J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Mohler, Peter J.; Beyder, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na+ current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na+ current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na+ currents (−1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na+ peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na+ current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na+ current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  1. Alterations in intestinal microbial flora and human disease.

    PubMed

    Othman, Mohamed; Agüero, Roberto; Lin, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    To highlight the evidence supporting the role of altered commensal gut flora in human disease. While the contribution of the indigenous gut microbial community is widely recognized, only recently has there been evidence pointing to indigenous flora in disease. This review discusses recent evidence pointing to the role of altered commensal gut flora in such common conditions as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Recent studies document the intricate relationship between the vast population of microbes that live in our gut and the human host. Since increased intestinal permeability and immune activation are consequences of an altered host-gut microbial relationship, what are the clinical effects of this shift in relationship? We focus on the example of an abnormal expansion of gut microbial flora into the small bowel or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and discuss the effects of bacterial overgrowth on the human host in acute pancreatitis, bacterial gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatic encephalopathy, and fibromyalgia and burn injury. The identification of the underlying role of altered commensal gut microbiota in these and other human diseases could lead to novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that would improve clinical outcome.

  2. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  3. Differential regulation of smooth muscle markers in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hegner, Björn; Weber, Manfred; Dragun, Duska; Schulze-Lohoff, Eckhard

    2005-06-01

    To study smooth-muscle differentiation and de-differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been shown to enter the circulation and to contribute to vascular repair and atherosclerosis. Human MSCs from bone marrow were cultured with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS) or with 10% FCS and various concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Expression of smooth muscle markers was determined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. For signalling studies, involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was tested by treatment with rapamycin. MSCs cultured with 20% FCS acquired a smooth muscle-like appearance and expressed the smooth muscle (sm) markers sm-alpha-actin, desmin, sm-calponin and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). DMSO induced a spindle-like morphology with marked reduction of stress fibers. As judged by Western blot analysis, treatment with 2.5% DMSO strongly downregulated expression of sm-calponin (-85%), short MLCK (-98%) and sm-alpha-actin expression (-51%). Reduced calponin expression was detected by day 2 of treatment with 0.5-2.5% DMSO. After withdrawal of DMSO, MSCs regained high expression of sm-calponin. Treatment with 6 nmol/l rapamycin partly antagonized the effect of DMSO, indicating the involvement of mTOR in regulation of the smooth muscle phenotype of MSCs. DMSO strongly downregulates the smooth muscle markers sm-calponin, short MLCK and sm-alpha-actin in human MSCs, indicating a transition from a smooth muscle-like phenotype to an undifferentiated state by an mTOR-dependent mechanism. Regulating the phenotype of human MSCs may be of relevance for novel therapeutic approaches in atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury.

  4. Human milk hyaluronan enhances innate defense of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Rho, Hyunjin K; Kessler, Sean P; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2013-10-04

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn.

  5. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  6. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-induced intestinal inflammation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bjarnason, I.; Zanelli, G.; Smith, T.; Prouse, P.; Williams, P.; Smethurst, P.; Delacey, G.; Gumpel, M.J.; Levi, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    This study examines the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the small intestine in humans. Using an /sup 111/In-leukocyte technique in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 90) and osteoarthritis (n = 7), it appears that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs cause small intestinal inflammation in two-thirds of patients on long-term treatment and on discontinuation, the inflammation may persist for up to 16 mo. The prevalence and magnitude of the intestinal inflammation was unrelated to the type and dose of nonsteroidal drugs and previous or concomitant second-line drug treatment. There was a significant inverse correlation (r = -0.29, p less than 0.05) between fecal /sup 111/In excretion and hemoglobin levels in patients treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. The kinetics of fecal indium 111 excretion in patients treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs was almost identical to that of patients with small bowel Crohn's disease. Eighteen patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs underwent a radiologic examination of the small bowel and 3 were found to have asymptomatic ileal disease with ulceration and strictures. Nineteen patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, 20 healthy controls, and 13 patients with Crohn's ileitis underwent a dual radioisotopic ileal function test with tauro 23 (/sup 75/Se) selena-25-homocholic acid and cobalt 58-labeled cyanocobalamine. On day 4, more than half of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis had evidence of bile acid malabsorption, but the ileal dysfunction was much milder than seen in patients with Crohn's ileitis.

  7. Intestinal Microbiota Modulates Gluten-Induced Immunopathology in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Heather J.; McCarville, Justin L.; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A.; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G.; Verdu, Elena F.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk. PMID:26456581

  8. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  9. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  10. [Influencing factors on infections of human intestinal helminthes in suburb of Shangyu City].

    PubMed

    Song-Lin, Hu

    2011-06-01

    The infections of human intestinal helminthes and socioeconomic status were investigated in suburb of Shangyu City in 1990 and 2005, respectively. The results showed that the economic status, the save drinking water and latrines, working environment, and health habits and consciousness of the residents improved obviously. The infection rate of intestinal helminthes decreased significantly and the prevalence of intestinal helminthosis was controlled effectively.

  11. Human milk and infant intestinal mucosal glycans guide succession of the neonatal intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Infants begin acquiring intestinal microbiota at parturition. Initial colonization by pioneer bacteria is followed by active succession toward a dynamic ecosystem. Keystone microbes engage in reciprocal transkingdom communication with the host, which is essential for human homeostasis and health; therefore, these bacteria should be considered mutualists rather than commensals. This review discusses the maternal role in providing infants with functional and stable microbiota. The initial fecal inoculum of microbiota results from the proximity of the birth canal and anus; the biological significance of this anatomic proximity could underlie observed differences in microbiota between vaginal and cesarean birth. Secondary sources of inocula include mouths and skin of kin, animals and objects, and the human milk microbiome, but guiding microbial succession may be a primary role of human milk. The unique glycans of human milk cannot be digested by the infant, but are utilized by mutualist bacteria. These prebiotic glycans support expansion of mutualist microbiota, which manifests as differences in microbiota among breastfed and artificially fed infants. Human milk glycans vary by maternal genotype. Milks of genetically distinct mothers and variations in infant mucosal glycan expression support discrete microbiota. Early colonization may permanently influence microbiota composition and function, with ramifications for health.

  12. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  13. HUIEC, Human intestinal epithelial cell line with differentiated properties: process of isolation and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Gradisnik, Lidija; Trapecar, Martin; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Velnar, Tomaz

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal epithelium is composed of diverse cell types, most abundant being the enterocytes. Among other functions, they maintain the intestinal barrier and play a critical role in the absorption of nutrients, drugs and toxins. This study describes the development and characterization of human intestinal epithelial cells (HUIEC), a spontaneously arising cell line established by selective trypsinization and cloning of the intestinal epithelium, resulting in a uniform population of highly epithelial cells with a strong growth potential.

  14. Functional Characterization of Cholera Toxin Inhibitors Using Human Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Pukin, Aliaksei V; Fu, Ou; Quarles van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Pieters, Roland J

    2016-07-28

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of IC50 values over a wide range of potencies (15 pM to 9 mM). The results indicate for the first time that an organoid-based swelling assay is a useful preclinical method to evaluate inhibitor potencies of drugs that target pathogen-derived toxins.

  15. Morphology of myenteric plexuses in the human large intestine: comparison between large intestines with and without colonic diverticula.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Hirotada; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Mukoyama, Sayuri; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Yasuda, Masanori

    2005-09-01

    Large intestines with diverticula exhibit functionally abnormal peristaltic activity and elevated luminal pressure that may indicate functional changes in the myenteric plexus; however, no studies have investigated the characteristics of either normal or diverticula myenteric plexuses. Tissue specimens obtained from 93 colorectal cancer patients without diverticula, 14 patients with perforated diverticulitis, and 12 colorectal cancer patients with asymptomatic diverticula were included in this study. Myenteric plexuses and ganglion cells were counted per centimeter, and the area and maximum diameter of the nuclei of ganglion cells were measured using an image analyzer. The number of myenteric plexuses and ganglion cells per centimeter was significantly higher in the descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum than in the cecum, ascending colon, and transverse colon. The area of the nuclei of ganglion cells was significantly larger in the descending colon and sigmoid colon than in the cecum and ascending colon. Compared with large intestines without diverticula, the number of myenteric plexuses was significantly higher in large intestines with diverticula, whereas the number of ganglion cells decreased in both right-sided and left-sided large intestines with perforated diverticulitis or asymptomatic diverticula. The area of the nuclei of ganglion cells was significantly smaller in large intestines with diverticula. The morphology of myenteric plexuses and the ganglion cells differs significantly among segments of the human large intestine. Large intestines with diverticula had significantly more plexuses but significantly fewer ganglion cells than large intestines without diverticula. The area of the nuclei of ganglion cells was also significantly smaller in large intestines with diverticula. Further studies are required to clarify how these changes are related to intestinal function and how they are involved in the etiology of diverticulosis.

  16. [Progress in the knowledge of the intestinal human microbiota].

    PubMed

    Robles-Alonso, Virginia; Guarner, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    New sequencing technologies together with the development of bio-informatics allow a description of the full spectrum of the microbial communities that inhabit the human intestinal tract, as well as their functional contributions to host health. Most community members belong to the domain Bacteria, but Archaea, Eukaryotes (yeasts and protists), and Viruses are also present. Only 7 to 9 of the 55 known divisions or phyla of the domain Bacteria are detected in faecal or mucosal samples from the human gut. Most taxa belong to just two divisions: Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and the other divisions that have been consistently found are Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium and Bifidobacterium are the most abundant genera but their relative proportion is highly variable across individuals. Full metagenomic analysis has identified more than 5 million non-redundant microbial genes encoding up to 20,000 biological functions related with life in the intestinal habitat. The overall structure of predominant genera in the human gut can be assigned into three robust clusters, which are known as "enterotypes". Each of the three enterotypes is identifiable by the levels of one of three genera: Bacteroides (enterotype 1), Prevotella (enterotype 2) and Ruminococcus (enterotype 3). This suggests that microbiota variations across individuals are stratified, not continuous. Next steps include the identification of changes that may play a role in certain disease states. A better knowledge of the contributions of microbial symbionts to host health will help in the design of interventions to improve symbiosis and combat disease.

  17. Derivation of Intestinal Organoids from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Use as an Infection System.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Hannan, Nicholas; Vallier, Ludovic; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-08-31

    Intestinal human organoids (iHOs) provide an effective system for studying the intestinal epithelium and its interaction with various stimuli. By using combinations of different signaling factors, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) can be driven to differentiate down the intestinal lineage. Here, we describe the process for this differentiation, including the derivation of hindgut from hIPSCs, embedding hindgut into a pro-intestinal culture system and passaging the resulting iHOs. We then describe how to carry out microinjections to introduce bacteria to the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells (IECs).

  18. Human Intestinal M Cells Display the Sialyl Lewis A Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, Paul J.; Giannasca, Karen T.; Leichtner, Alan M.; Neutra, Marian R.

    1999-01-01

    The biochemical features that distinguish human M cells from other intestinal epithelial cell types are important for understanding microbial pathogenesis and for targeting vaccines to the mucosal immune system. We applied a large panel of carbohydrate-specific monoclonal antibodies and lectins to Peyer’s patch and cecum biopsy specimens from three normal individuals and a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The results show that human M-cell glycosylation patterns are distinct from those of other species examined and that human M cells preferentially display the sialyl Lewis A antigen. This carbohydrate epitope is also present in a small subpopulation of enterocytes in the follicle-associated epithelium and in goblet cell mucins. PMID:9916113

  19. Alpha2 adrenoceptors regulate proliferation of human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaak, S; Cussac, D; Cayla, C; Devedjian, J; Guyot, R; Paris, H; Denis, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Previous studies on rodents have suggested that catecholamines stimulate proliferation of the intestinal epithelium through activation of α2 adrenoceptors located on crypt cells. The occurrence of this effect awaits demonstration in humans and the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of α2 agonists on a clone of Caco2 cells expressing the human α2A adrenoceptor.
METHODS—Cells were transfected with a bicistronic plasmid containing the α2C10 and neomycin phosphotransferase genes. G418 resistant clones were assayed for receptor expression using radioligand binding. Receptor functionality was assessed by testing its ability to couple Gi proteins and to inhibit cAMP production. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was followed by western blot, and cell proliferation was estimated by measuring protein and DNA content.
RESULTS—Permanent transfection of Caco2 cells allowed us to obtain a clone (Caco2-3B) expressing α2A adrenoceptors at a density similar to that found in normal human intestinal epithelium. Caco2-3B retained morphological features and brush border enzyme expression characteristic of enterocytic differentiation. The receptor was coupled to Gi2/Gi3 proteins and its stimulation caused marked diminution of forskolin induced cAMP production. Treatment of Caco2-3B with UK14304 (α2 agonist) induced a rapid increase in the phosphorylation state of MAPK, extracellular regulated protein kinase 1 (Erk1), and 2 (Erk2). This event was totally abolished in pertussis toxin treated cells and in the presence of kinase inhibitors (genistein or PD98059). It was unaffected by protein kinase C downregulation but correlated with a transient increase in Shc tyrosine phosphorylation. Finally, sustained exposure of Caco2-3B to UK14304 resulted in modest but significant acceleration of cell proliferation. None of these effects was observed in the parental cell line Caco2.

  20. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  1. Multiscale analysis of the murine intestine for modeling human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jesse; Herring, Charles A.; Banerjee, Amrita; Simmons, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    When functioning properly, the intestine is one of the key interfaces between the human body and its environment. It is responsible for extracting nutrients from our food and excreting our waste products. It provides an environment for a host of healthful microbes and serves as a first defense against pathogenic ones. These processes require tight homeostatic controls, which are provided by the interactions of a complex mix of epithelial, stromal, neural and immune cells, as well as the resident microflora. This homeostasis can be disrupted by invasive microbes, genetic lesions, and carcinogens, resulting in diseases such Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer. Enormous strides have been made in understanding how this important organ functions in health and disease using everything from cell culture systems to animal models to human tissue samples. This has resulted in better therapies for all of these diseases, but there is still significant room for improvement. In the United States alone, 14000 people per year die of C. difficile, up to 1.6 million people suffer from IBD, and more than 50000 people die every year from colon cancer. Because these and other intestinal diseases arise from complex interactions between the different components of the gut ecosystem, we propose that systems approaches that address this complexity in an integrative manner may eventually lead to improved therapeutics that deliver lasting cures. This review will discuss the use of systems biology for studying intestinal diseases in vivo with particular emphasis on mouse models. Additionally, it will focus on established experimental techniques that have been used to drive this systems-level analysis, and emerging techniques that will push this field forward in the future. PMID:26040649

  2. Ovine intestinal adenocarcinomas: histologic and phenotypic comparison with human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Brennan, Moira M; Jaber, Azhar M; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-04-01

    Approximately 7% of old, unthrifty sheep (Ovis aries) in New Zealand have intestinal adenocarcinomas. To investigate whether these sheep might be used as a model of human colonic neoplasia, the biologic behavior and histologic appearance of ovine intestinal adenocarcinomas were compared with those reported for human colonic adenocarcinomas. We collected 50 intestinal tracts with grossly visible intestinal neoplasia from slaughtered sheep. Neoplasms were assessed using World Health Organization guidelines for assessment of human colonic adenocarcinomas. All ovine adenocarcinomas developed in the small intestine. In contrast, only 4% of human intestinal tumors develop at this location, whereas the majority develop in the colon. A visible polyp is present within 89% of human colonic adenocarcinomas, whereas polyps were present in only 46% of the ovine neoplasms. Intestinal wall infiltration by the neoplastic cells and rates of lymph node (84% in sheep; 61% in humans) and distant (52% in sheep; 17% in humans) metastases were comparable between ovine and human adenocarcinomas. However, ovine adenocarcinomas developed more peritoneal and fewer hepatic metastases than human adenocarcinomas. Histologic grading of ovine tumors revealed cell differentiation similar to that reported within human colonic adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, ovine intestinal adenocarcinomas, like human colonic adenocarcinomas, typically arise spontaneously and consistently develop widespread metastases. In addition, tumors appear histologically similar between these species. Therefore, sheep may provide a model of advanced human colonic cancer, possibly allowing evaluation of novel therapeutics and surgical procedures.

  3. First report of human intestinal sarcocystosis in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Khieu, Virak; Marti, Hanspeter; Chhay, Saomony; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Human intestinal sarcocystosis (HIS), caused by Sarcocystis species, is acquired by eating undercooked meat from sarcocyst-containing cattle (S. hominis, S. heydorni) and pigs (S. suihominis). We report on the detection of human intestinal Sarcocystis infections in a cross-sectional survey of Strongyloides stercoralis in early 2014, in Rovieng District, Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Among 1081 participants, 108 (10.0%) were diagnosed with Sarcocystis spp. oocysts in stool samples. Males had a significantly higher risk of infection than females (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9, p=0.001). None of the reported symptoms (abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, muscle pain and itching skin) occurring in the two weeks preceding the examinations were associated with a Sarcocystis infection. Many Sarcocystis cases were found among those who had participated in a wedding celebration and Chinese New Year festivities, where they had consumed raw or insufficiently cooked beef (83.3%) and pork (38.9%) based dishes. This report documents the first HIS cases in Cambodia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Michihiro; He, Peijian; Yun, C Chris

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG) human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  5. Prediction of drug intestinal absorption in human using the Ussing chamber system: A comparison of intestinal tissues from animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Koga, Toshihisa; Kondo, Satoshi; Yoda, Noriaki; Emoto, Chie; Mukai, Tadashi; Toguchi, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    An adequate evaluation system for drug intestinal absorption is essential in the pharmaceutical industry. Previously, we established a novel prediction system of drug intestinal absorption in humans, using the mini-Ussing chamber equipped with human intestinal tissues. In this system, the TI value was defined as the sum of drug amounts transported to the basal-side component (X(corr)) and drug amounts accumulated in the tissue (T(corr)), which are normalized by AUC of a drug in the apical compartment, as an index for drug absorption. In order to apply this system to the screening assay, it is important to understand the differences between animal and human tissues in the intestinal absorption of drugs. In this study, the transport index (TI) values of three drugs, with different levels of membrane permeability, were determined to evaluate the rank order of drug absorbability in intestinal tissues from rats, dogs, and monkeys. The TI values in small intestinal tissues in rats and dogs showed a good correlation with those in humans. On the other hand, the correlation of TI values in monkeys was lower compared to rats and dogs. The rank order of the correlation coefficient between human and investigated animal tissues was as follows: dog (r(2)=0.978), rat (r(2)=0.955), and monkey (r(2)=0.620). TI values in large intestinal tissues from rats (r(2)=0.929) and dogs (r(2)=0.808) also showed a good correlation. The obtained TI values in small intestinal tissues in rats and dogs were well correlated with the fraction of drug absorbed (Fa) in humans. From these results, the mini-Ussing chamber, equipped with intestinal tissues in rats and dogs, would be useful as a screening tool in the drug discovery stage. In addition, the obtained TI values can be used for the prediction of the Fa in humans.

  6. Model emulates human smooth pursuit system producing zero-latency target tracking.

    PubMed

    Bahill, A T; McDonald, J D

    1983-01-01

    Humans can overcome the 150 ms time delay of the smooth pursuit eye movement system and track smoothly moving visual targets with zero-latency. Our target-selective adaptive control model can also overcome an inherent time delay and produce zero-latency tracking. No other model or man-made system can do this. Our model is physically realizable and physiologically realistic. The technique used in our model should be useful for analyzing other time-delay systems, such as man-machine systems and robots.

  7. Metabolism of aspartame by human and pig intestinal microvillar peptidases.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N M; Hesp, R J; Tieku, S

    1994-03-15

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenyl-alanine-1-methyl ester; Nutrasweet), its decomposition product alpha Asp-Phe and the related peptide alpha Asp-PheNH2 were rapidly hydrolysed by microvillar membranes prepared from human duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and from pig duodenum and kidney. The metabolism of aspartame by the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations was inhibited significantly (> 78%) by amastatin or 1,10-phenanthroline, and partially (> 38%) by actinonin or bestatin, and was activated 2.9-4.5-fold by CaCl2. The inhibition by amastatin and 1,10-phenanthroline, and the activation by CaCl2 are characteristic of the cell-surface ectoenzyme aminopeptidase A (EC 3.4.11.7) and a purified preparation of this enzyme hydrolysed aspartame with a Km of 0.25 mM and a Vmax of 126 mumol/min per mg. A purified preparation of aminopeptidase W (EC 3.4.11.16) also hydrolysed aspartame but with a Km of 4.96 mM and a Vmax of 110 mumol/min per mg. However, rentiapril, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase W, caused only slight inhibition (maximally 19%) of the hydrolysis of aspartame by the microvillar membrane preparations. Similar patterns of inhibition and kinetic parameters were observed for alpha Asp-Phe and alpha Asp-PheNH2. Two other decomposition products of aspartame, beta Asp-PheMe and cyclo-Asp-Phe, were essentially resistant to hydrolysis by both the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations and the purified preparations of aminopeptidases A and W. Although the relatively selective inhibitor of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), actinonin, partially inhibited the metabolism of aspartame, alpha Asp-Phe and alpha Asp-PheNH2 by the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations, these peptides were not hydrolysed by a purified preparation of aminopeptidase N. Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) only hydrolysed the unblocked dipeptide, alpha Asp-Phe, but the selective inhibitor of this enzyme, cilastatin

  8. Metabolism of aspartame by human and pig intestinal microvillar peptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, N M; Hesp, R J; Tieku, S

    1994-01-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenyl-alanine-1-methyl ester; Nutrasweet), its decomposition product alpha Asp-Phe and the related peptide alpha Asp-PheNH2 were rapidly hydrolysed by microvillar membranes prepared from human duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and from pig duodenum and kidney. The metabolism of aspartame by the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations was inhibited significantly (> 78%) by amastatin or 1,10-phenanthroline, and partially (> 38%) by actinonin or bestatin, and was activated 2.9-4.5-fold by CaCl2. The inhibition by amastatin and 1,10-phenanthroline, and the activation by CaCl2 are characteristic of the cell-surface ectoenzyme aminopeptidase A (EC 3.4.11.7) and a purified preparation of this enzyme hydrolysed aspartame with a Km of 0.25 mM and a Vmax of 126 mumol/min per mg. A purified preparation of aminopeptidase W (EC 3.4.11.16) also hydrolysed aspartame but with a Km of 4.96 mM and a Vmax of 110 mumol/min per mg. However, rentiapril, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase W, caused only slight inhibition (maximally 19%) of the hydrolysis of aspartame by the microvillar membrane preparations. Similar patterns of inhibition and kinetic parameters were observed for alpha Asp-Phe and alpha Asp-PheNH2. Two other decomposition products of aspartame, beta Asp-PheMe and cyclo-Asp-Phe, were essentially resistant to hydrolysis by both the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations and the purified preparations of aminopeptidases A and W. Although the relatively selective inhibitor of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), actinonin, partially inhibited the metabolism of aspartame, alpha Asp-Phe and alpha Asp-PheNH2 by the human and pig intestinal microvillar membrane preparations, these peptides were not hydrolysed by a purified preparation of aminopeptidase N. Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) only hydrolysed the unblocked dipeptide, alpha Asp-Phe, but the selective inhibitor of this enzyme, cilastatin

  9. [Vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation and calcification in vitro].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong Ping; Sun, Ming Shu; Qian, Jia Qi; Ni, Zhao Hui

    2008-04-01

    To research if the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro. The growth curve of vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery was obtained by MTT method. The course of multicell nodule formation spontaneously by VSMCs was observed morphologically. The apoptosis of VSMCs in the nodules was detected by Hoechst 33258 and TUNEL methods respectively. The expression of alkaline phosphotase in the nodules was detected by immunohistochemical method. And the calcification was studied with transmission electron microscope and by alizarin red S respectively. We found that the umbilical artery smooth muscle cells confluenced after 7 days of passage and exhibited typical "hill and valley" pattern under light microscope. The cells grew into aggregation and formed nodules at the "hill" region with culture-time prolongation. After 4-5 weeks culture, these nodules built up and calcified spontaneously. We also found alkaline phosphotase expression and apoptosis of VSMCs in these nodules at the same time. We conclude that the vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery just like from aortic artery can undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro, and apoptosis participate this procedure probably.

  10. Smooth versus Textured Surfaces: Feature-Based Category Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tootell, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In fMRI studies, human lateral occipital (LO) cortex is thought to respond selectively to images of objects, compared with nonobjects. However, it remains unresolved whether all objects evoke equivalent levels of activity in LO, and, if not, which image features produce stronger activation. Here, we used an unbiased parametric texture model to predict preferred versus nonpreferred stimuli in LO. Observation and psychophysical results showed that predicted preferred stimuli (both objects and nonobjects) had smooth (rather than textured) surfaces. These predictions were confirmed using fMRI, for objects and nonobjects. Similar preferences were also found in the fusiform face area (FFA). Consistent with this: (1) FFA and LO responded more strongly to nonfreckled (smooth) faces, compared with otherwise identical freckled (textured) faces; and (2) strong functional connections were found between LO and FFA. Thus, LO and FFA may be part of an information-processing stream distinguished by feature-based category selectivity (smooth > textured). PMID:27699206

  11. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells.

  12. Influence of micropattern width on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoko; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, various approaches have been taken to generate functional muscle tissue by tissue engineering. However, in vitro methods to generate smooth muscle with physiologically aligned structure remains limited. In order to mimic the in vivo highly organized structure of smooth muscle cells, we used micropatterning technology for engineering parallel aligned cells. In this study, a gradient micropattern of different width of cell-adhesive polystyrene stripes (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000μm) was prepared and the effects of micropattern width on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation were investigated. The width of micropattern stripes showed obvious effect on cell orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation. The cells showed higher degree of orientation when the micropattern stripes became narrower. Higher expression of calponin and smooth muscle actin was observed among the narrow micropatterns ranging from 200μm to 20μm, compared to the non-patterned area and wide micropattern areas which showed similar levels of expression.

  13. Impact of gemifloxacin on the normal human intestinal microflora.

    PubMed

    Barker, P J; Sheehan, R; Teillol-Foo, M; Palmgren, A C; Nord, C E

    2001-02-01

    Gemifloxacin is a new fluoroquinolone that has been shown to possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms including methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant staphylococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and most members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of gemifloxacin on the human intestinal microflora. Gemifloxacin was given in oral doses of 320 mg for 7 days to 10 healthy subjects and 5 subjects received a once-daily dose of matched placebo for 7 days. Faecal samples were collected prior to administration (days -8 and -6), during the administration period (days 2 and 4) and after withdrawal of administration (days 8, 11, 21, 28 and 56). In the aerobic intestinal microflora the numbers of enterobacteria were suppressed during the gemifloxacin administration and the numbers of enterococci and streptococci were also decreased. No other aerobic microorganisms were affected. In the anaerobic microflora the numbers of anaerobic cocci and lactobacilli were suppressed during the gemifloxacin administration while no other changes occurred. The microflora was normalized 49 days after the administration of gemifloxacin had stopped. No selection or overgrowth of resistant bacterial strains or yeasts occurred. The ecological impact of gemifloxacin was shown to be selective and similar to that of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and ofloxacin.

  14. Excipient-mediated supersaturation stabilization in human intestinal fluids.

    PubMed

    Bevernage, Jan; Forier, Thomas; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2011-04-04

    It was the purpose of this study to investigate excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition upon induction of supersaturation of poorly water-soluble drugs in aspirated human intestinal fluids (HIF) representing both the fasted and fed state. Etravirine, ritonavir, loviride, danazol and fenofibrate were selected as model compounds. For comparative purposes, precipitation inhibition was also evaluated in simple aqueous buffer, and in intestinal simulation media representative for the fasted and fed state (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively). Supersaturation was induced in the test media containing predissolved excipient (HPMC-AS, HPMC-E5, HPMC-E50, HPMC-E4M, HPMC-P and PVP) at a defined degree of supersaturation (DS = 20) using the solvent shift method. The results illustrate that cellulosic polymers can reduce the precipitation rate and stabilize supersaturation in HIF. The extent of stabilization was compound and excipient dependent but independent of the nutritional state. Whenever excipient effects were observed, the predictive value of simple buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF was rather limited. In general, excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition was less pronounced in HIF compared to simple aqueous buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF. However, excipients showing no effect in simple aqueous buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF also proved to be ineffective in HIF, indicating the value of these simulation media in the elimination of excipients during formulation development.

  15. A new paradigm for the role of smooth muscle cells in the human cervix.

    PubMed

    Vink, Joy Y; Qin, Sisi; Brock, Clifton O; Zork, Noelia M; Feltovich, Helen M; Chen, Xiaowei; Urie, Paul; Myers, Kristin M; Hall, Timothy J; Wapner, Ronald; Kitajewski, Jan K; Shawber, Carrie J; Gallos, George

    2016-10-01

    Premature cervical remodeling resulting in spontaneous preterm birth may begin with premature failure or relaxation at the internal os (termed "funneling"). To date, we do not understand why the internal os fails or why funneling occurs in some cases of premature cervical remodeling. Although the human cervix is thought to be mostly collagen with minimal cellular content, cervical smooth muscle cells are present in the cervix and can cause cervical tissue contractility. To understand why the internal os relaxes or why funneling occurs in some cases of premature cervical remodeling, we sought to evaluate cervical smooth muscle cell content and distribution throughout human cervix and correlate if cervical smooth muscle organization influences regional cervical tissue contractility. Using institutional review board-approved protocols, nonpregnant women <50 years old undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications were consented. Cervical tissue from the internal and external os were immunostained for smooth muscle cell markers (α-smooth muscle actin, smooth muscle protein 22 calponin) and contraction-associated proteins (connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2, oxytocin receptor). To evaluate cervical smooth muscle cell morphology throughout the entire cervix, whole cervical slices were obtained from the internal os, midcervix, and external os and immunostained with smooth muscle actin. To correlate tissue structure with function, whole slices from the internal and external os were stimulated to contract with 1 μmol/L of oxytocin in organ baths. In separate samples, we tested if the cervix responds to a common tocolytic, nifedipine. Cervical slices from the internal os were treated with oxytocin alone or oxytocin + increasing doses of nifedipine to generate a dose response and half maximal inhibitory concentration. Student t test was used where appropriate. Cervical tissue was collected from 41 women. Immunohistochemistry showed cervical smooth muscle cells at the internal

  16. Distribution of the IgG Fc Receptor, FcRn, in the Human Fetal Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Uzma; Dickinson, Bonny L.; Blumberg, Richard S.; Simister, Neil E.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Walker, W. Allan

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal Fc receptor, FcRn, functions in the maternofetal transfer of gamma globulin (IgG) in the neonatal rodent. In humans, most of this transfer is presumed to occur in utero via the placenta. Although the fetus swallows amniotic fluid that contains immunoglobulin, it is unknown whether this transfer also occurs via the fetal intestine. A human FcRn has been identified in the syncytiotrophoblast that mediates the maternofetal transfer of antibody. It has also been identified in human fetal intestine and is postulated to function in IgG transport. We hypothesize that the human fetal intestinal FcRn may play a role in IgG transport from the amniotic fluid into the fetal circulation. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of the FcRn along the human fetal intestine. Lysates prepared from human fetal intestine and from a nonmalignant human fetal intestinal epithelial cell line (H4) were subjected to Western blot analysis and probed using anti-FcRn antibodies. A 42-kD band, consistent with the known molecular weight of the FcRn, was detected along the human fetal intestine and in H4 cells. Expression of the human FcRn was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. Our study demonstrates the expression of FcRn along the human fetal intestine and in a human nonmalignant fetal intestinal epithelial cell line (H4), which by location indicates that FcRn could play a role in the uptake and transport of IgG in the human fetus. PMID:12538789

  17. A Novel Model of P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor Screening Using Human Small Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfang; Zeng, Zhiyang; Sun, Jialiang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Dali; Zhang, Xueli; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an important efflux transporter in intestine, regulates the bioavailability of orally taken drugs. To develop an in vitro model that preferably mimics the physiological microenvironment of human intestine, we employed the three-dimensionally (3D) cultured organoids from human normal small intestinal epithelium. It was observed that the intestinal crypts could efficiently form cystic organoid structure with the extension of culture time. Furthermore, the physiological expression of ABCB1 was detected at both mRNA and protein levels in cultured organoids. Rhodamine 123 (Rh123), a typical substrate of P-gp, was actively transported across 3D organoids and accumulated in the luminal space. This transport process was also inhibited by verapamil and mitotane. In summary, the above-mentioned model based on human small intestinal 3D organoids is suitable to imitate the small intestinal epithelium and could be used as a novel in vitro model especially for P-gp inhibitor screening.

  18. Screening of Exopolysaccharide-Producing Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium Strains Isolated from the Human Intestinal Microbiota▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Moreno, José Antonio; Salazar, Nuria; Delgado, Susana; Mayo, Baltasar; Margolles, Abelardo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2007-01-01

    Using phenotypic approaches, we have detected that 17% of human intestinal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains could be exopolysaccharide (EPS) producers. However, PCR techniques showed that only 7% harbored genes related to the synthesis of heteropolysaccharides. This is the first work to screen the human intestinal ecosystem for the detection of EPS-producing strains. PMID:17483284

  19. Screening of exopolysaccharide-producing Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains isolated from the human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Moreno, José Antonio; Salazar, Nuria; Delgado, Susana; Mayo, Baltasar; Margolles, Abelardo; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G

    2007-07-01

    Using phenotypic approaches, we have detected that 17% of human intestinal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains could be exopolysaccharide (EPS) producers. However, PCR techniques showed that only 7% harbored genes related to the synthesis of heteropolysaccharides. This is the first work to screen the human intestinal ecosystem for the detection of EPS-producing strains.

  20. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Smooth Brucella strains invade and replicate in human lung epithelial cells without inducing cell death.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation is a common route for Brucella infection. We investigated whether Brucella species can invade and replicate within alveolar(A549) and bronchial (Calu-6 and 16HBE14o-) human epithelial cells. The number of adherent and intracellular bacteria was higher for rough strains (Brucella canis and Brucella abortus RB51) than for smooth strains (B. abortus 2308 and Brucella suis 1330). Only smooth strains exhibited efficient intracellular replication (1.5-3.5 log increase at 24 h p.i.). A B. abortus mutant with defective expression of the type IV secretion system did not replicate. B. abortus internalization was inhibited by specific inhibitors of microfilaments, microtubules and PI3-kinase activity. As assessed with fluorescent probes, B. abortus infection did not affect the viability of A549 and 16HBE14o- cells, but increased the percentage of injured cells (both strains) and dead cells (RB51) in Calu-6 cultures. LDH levels were increased in supernatants of Calu-6 and 16HBE14o- cells infected with B. abortus RB51, and to a lower extent in Calu-6 infected with B. abortus 2308. No apoptosis was detected by TUNEL upon infection with smooth or rough B. abortus. This study shows that smooth brucellae can infect and replicate in human respiratory epithelial cells inducing minimal or null cytotoxicity. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Studies on metabolism of total terpene ketones from Swertia mussotii with human intestinal bacteria].

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Tian, Cheng-Wang; Wu, Shuai; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Tie-Jun

    2012-12-01

    To study the metabolism of total terpene ketones from Swertia mussotii with human intestinal bacteria. Total terpene ketones were incubated with human intestinal bacteria under an anaerobic environment and at 37 degrees C. The metabolites were extracted by ethyl acetate processing, detected by HPLC-DAD method. A qualitative analysis was made for its metabolites by HPLC-MS. Eight metabolites were detected from total terpene ketones from S. mussotii with human intestinal bacteria, and two of them were preliminarily identified as gentianine and mangiferin aglycon. Total terpene ketones can be metabolized with human intestinal bacteria, which provides basis for experiments on the metabolism process total terpene ketones from S. mussotii with human intestinal bacteria.

  3. Changes in the inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation of intestinal smooth muscle from Trichinella spiralis infected rats.

    PubMed

    Tanovic, Adnan; Jiménez, Marcel; Fernández, Ester

    2002-11-15

    Functional motor changes and morphological alterations have been associated with intestinal inflammation. The aim of this work was to study functional motor changes in inflamed and non-inflamed intestinal segments of Trichinella spiralis infected rats. Thickness of muscle layers and cell infiltration during infection were also evaluated. Segments of rat jejunum and ileum were placed in organ bath and relaxations of the longitudinal muscle in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were recorded. During the post-infection (PI) period EFS-induced relaxations in ileum were decreased. Maximal decreases in relaxation were found on day 14-23 PI for ileum, whereas non significant changes were observed in jejunal samples throughout the experimental period. The sensitivity of the EFS-induced relaxations to the NO synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) and to the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor oxadiazolo-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) was decreased on day 14 PI for jejunum, whereas in the ileum it lasted from day 14-23 PI. The sensitivity of EFS-induced relaxations to apamin (a small conductance calcium activated potassium channel blocker) disappeared between day 6-23 PI for both jejunum and ileum. In contrast, the sensitivity of the EFS-induced relaxations to the K(+) channel blockers tetraethylamonium (TEA) and tetrapenthylammonium (TPEA) chloride was similar for healthy tissue and for tissue obtained form infected animals. Distribution and density of NADPH-diaphorase positive neurons was similar in tissue obtained form healthy and infected animals. In conclusion, intestinal inflammation induces functional and structural changes in both worm-free and worm-positive intestinal segments. Increased muscle thickness was similar for both inflamed and noninflamed segments but the most prominent functional changes i.e. a long-lasting decrease of EFS-induced relaxation was found in non-inflamed ileal segments.

  4. R1: Immunohistochemical study of mucins in human intestinal spirochetosis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sho; Shimizu, Ken; Tominaga, Susumu; Nakanishi, Kuniaki

    2017-02-08

    Most patients with human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS; a colorectal bacterial infection caused by Brachyspira species) seem asymptomatic, and its pathogenicity remains unclear. Recently, alterations in mucin expression were reported in animal Brachyspira infection. The present question was "Is mucin expression altered in HIS?". Using antibodies for MUCs 1, 2, 4, 5 AC, and 6, we immunohistochemically compared 215 specimens from 83 histology-confirmed HIS cases with 106 specimens from 26 non-HIS cases. Positive staining (which included even focal positive staining) was rated "high (+)" or "low (+)". Results were analysed for four categories of lesions, and associations between MUC expression and spirochetal presence were also analysed. In the "specimens without polyps or adenocarcinoma" category: high (+) MUC2-positivity was more frequent in HIS than in control. In the hyperplasia/serrated polyp category: in HIS (vs. control), the MUC5AC-positivity rate was lower, while high (+) MUC4-positivity was more frequent. In the conventional adenoma category: in HIS (vs. control), the MUC1-positivity rate was lower, while both high (+) MUC2-positivity and high (+) MUC5AC-positivity were less frequent. In the adenocarcinoma category: high (+) MUC2-positivity was more frequent in HIS than in control. Among the above mucins, only MUC1-positivity was significantly associated with an absence of the so-called fringe formation, an absence of spiral organisms within mucus, and an absence of strong immunopositive materials within the epithelial layer and within the subepithelial layer. The results suggest that Brachyspira infection or a related change in the microbiome may alter the large intestine mucin-expression profile in humans.

  5. Giardia duodenalis induces pathogenic dysbiosis of human intestinal microbiota biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Akierman, Sarah V; Motta, Jean-Paul; Muise, Stacy; Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Bhargava, Amol; Beck, Paul L; Rioux, Kevin P; McKnight, Gordon Webb; Wallace, John L; Buret, Andre G

    2017-02-22

    Giardia duodenalis is a prevalent cause of acute diarrheal disease worldwide. However, recent outbreaks in Italy and Norway have revealed a link between giardiasis and the subsequent development of chronic post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. While the mechanisms underlying the causation of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome remain obscure, recent findings suggest that alterations in gut microbiota communities are linked to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we use a laboratory biofilm system to culture and enrich mucosal microbiota from human intestinal biopsies. Subsequently, we show that co-culture with Giardia induces disturbances in biofilm species composition and biofilm structure resulting in microbiota communities that are intrinsically dysbiotic - even after the clearance of Giardia. These microbiota abnormalities were mediated in part by secretory-excretory Giardia cysteine proteases. Using in vitro cell culture and germ-free murine infection models, we show that Giardia-induced disruptions of microbiota promote bacterial invasion, resulting in epithelial apoptosis, tight junctional disruption, and bacterial translocation across an intestinal epithelial barrier. Additionally, these dysbiotic microbiota communities resulted in increased activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signalling pathway, and overproduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1beta in humanized germ-free mice. Previous studies that have sought explanations and risk factors for the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome have focused on features of enteropathogens and attributes of the infected host. We propose that polymicrobial interactions involving Giardia and gut microbiota may cause persistent dysbiosis, offering a new interpretation of the reasons why those afflicted with giardiasis are predisposed to gastrointestinal disorders post-infection.

  6. Galectin‑3 induces the phenotype transformation of human vascular smooth muscle cells via the canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Chen, Kan; Cao, Jiatian; Han, Zhihua; Wang, Yue; Gao, Lin; Fan, Yuqi; Wang, Changqian

    2017-06-01

    Galectin‑3, a galactoside‑binding protein, is highly expressed in carotid plaques and plays an important role in the atherosclerotic lesions. The phenotype transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells is the basic pathological change of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the effects of exogenous galectin‑3 on the function and phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC). In this study, we treated vascular smooth muscle cells with recombinant galectin‑3 and tested its effect on cell proliferation, migration, and phenotype transformation. Our results showed that exogenous galectin‑3 promoted human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC) proliferation and migration. Exogenous galectin‑3 enhanced the expression of the smooth muscle synthetic protein osteopontin, smooth muscle contractile proteins calponin and smooth muscle α‑actin. The galectin‑3‑induced change in cell phenotype was associated with the activation of canonical Wnt signaling, as measured by β‑catenin axin2 and cyclin D1 expression. β‑catenin inhibition by small interfering RNA reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell motility, and blocked galectin‑3‑induced phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC). Our data suggest galectin‑3 promotes the phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC) by activating Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway.

  7. Quantitative prediction of intestinal metabolism in humans from a simplified intestinal availability model and empirical scaling factor.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Keitaro; Akabane, Takafumi; Tabata, Kenji; Gato, Katsuhiko; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to establish a practical and convenient method of predicting intestinal availability (F(g)) in humans for highly permeable compounds at the drug discovery stage, with a focus on CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. We constructed a "simplified F(g) model," described using only metabolic parameters, assuming that passive diffusion is dominant when permeability is high and that the effect of transporters in epithelial cells is negligible. Five substrates for CYP3A4 (alprazolam, amlodipine, clonazepam, midazolam, and nifedipine) and four for both CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (nicardipine, quinidine, tacrolimus, and verapamil) were used as model compounds. Observed fraction of drug absorbed (F(a)F(g)) values for these compounds were calculated from in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, whereas in vitro intestinal intrinsic clearance (CL(int,intestine)) was determined using human intestinal microsomes. The CL(int,intestine) for the model compounds corrected with that of midazolam was defined as CL(m,index) and incorporated into a simplified F(g) model with empirical scaling factor. Regardless of whether the compound was a P-gp substrate, the F(a)F(g) could be reasonably fitted by the simplified F(g) model, and the value of the empirical scaling factor was well estimated. These results suggest that the effects of P-gp on F(a) and F(g) are substantially minor, at least in the case of highly permeable compounds. Furthermore, liver intrinsic clearance (CL(int,liver)) can be used as a surrogate index of intestinal metabolism based on the relationship between CL(int,liver) and CL(m,index). F(g) can be easily predicted using a simplified F(g) model with the empirical scaling factor, enabling more confident selection of drug candidates with desirable PK profiles in humans.

  8. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human gastrointestinal tract research is limited by the paucity of in vitro intestinal cell models that recapitulate the cellular diversity and complex functions of human physiology and disease pathology. Human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures contain multiple intestinal epithelial cell types that comprise the intestinal epithelium (enterocytes and goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cells) and are physiologically active based on responses to agonists. We evaluated these nontransformed, three-dimensional HIE cultures as models for pathogenic infections in the small intestine by examining whether HIEs from different regions of the small intestine from different patients are susceptible to human rotavirus (HRV) infection. Little is known about HRVs, as they generally replicate poorly in transformed cell lines, and host range restriction prevents their replication in many animal models, whereas many animal rotaviruses (ARVs) exhibit a broader host range and replicate in mice. Using HRVs, including the Rotarix RV1 vaccine strain, and ARVs, we evaluated host susceptibility, virus production, and cellular responses of HIEs. HRVs infect at higher rates and grow to higher titers than do ARVs. HRVs infect differentiated enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, and viroplasms and lipid droplets are induced. Heterogeneity in replication was seen in HIEs from different patients. HRV infection and RV enterotoxin treatment of HIEs caused physiological lumenal expansion detected by time-lapse microscopy, recapitulating one of the hallmarks of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. These results demonstrate that HIEs are a novel pathophysiological model that will allow the study of HRV biology, including host restriction, cell type restriction, and virus-induced fluid secretion. IMPORTANCE Our research establishes HIEs as nontransformed cell culture models to understand human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the epithelial response, including host restriction of

  9. Brucella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells elicits a weak proinflammatory response but a significant CCL20 secretion.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Rumbo, Martín; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells.

  10. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: quantitation using site-specific drug absorption data.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Lennernäs, Hans

    2015-06-01

    Application of information on regional intestinal permeability has been identified as a key aspect of successful pharmaceutical product development. This study presents the results and evaluation of an approach for the indirect estimation of site-specific in vivo intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in humans. Plasma concentration-time profiles from 15 clinical studies that administered drug solutions to specific intestinal regions were collected and analyzed. The intestinal absorption rate for each drug was acquired by deconvolution, using historical intravenous data as reference, and used with the intestinal surface area and the dose remaining in the lumen to estimate the Peff. Forty-three new Peff values were estimated (15 from the proximal small intestine, 11 from the distal small intestine, and 17 from the large intestine) for 14 active pharmaceutical ingredients representing a wide range of biopharmaceutical properties. A good correlation (r(2) = 0.96, slope = 1.24, intercept = 0.030) was established between these indirect jejunal Peff estimates and jejunal Peff measurements determined directly using the single-pass perfusion double balloon technique. On average, Peff estimates from the distal small intestine and large intestine were 90% and 40%, respectively, of those from the proximal small intestine. These results support the use of the evaluated deconvolution method for indirectly estimating regional intestinal Peff in humans. This study presents the first comprehensive data set of estimated human regional intestinal permeability values for a range of drugs. These biopharmaceutical data can be used to improve the accuracy of gastrointestinal absorption predictions used in drug development decision-making.

  11. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Beaulieu@USherbrooke.ca

    2006-03-31

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells.

  12. Tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenoceptor agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle: studies in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C; Conolly, M E

    1980-01-01

    In studies on human isolated peripheral airway smooth muscle; 1 A concentration dependent beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis was observed to isoprenaline. 2 Cross desensitization to other beta-adrenoceptor agonists was demonstrated. 3 The desensitization was reversible with time. Hydrocortisone appeared to accelerate the recovery from the desensitized state. Low concentration isoprenaline (10(-9) mol l-1) prevented recovery whereas cyclohexamide 1.8 x 10(-4) mol l-1 had no noticeable effect on recovery. Continued occupancy of the receptor appears to prevent recovery. The recovery from the desensitized state does not apparently require synthesis of new proteins. 4 Bronchial wall cyclic AMP response to isoprenaline was attenuated after isoprenaline induced desensitization whereas total phosphodiesterase activity of bronchial wall was not altered by desensitization. Thus by exclusion the adenylate cyclase receptor complex may be altered in human peripheral airway smooth muscle beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis. PMID:6108126

  13. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  14. Differential Effect of Zoledronic Acid on Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albadawi, Hassan; Haurani, Mounir J.; Oklu, Rahmi; Trubiano, Jordan P.; Laub, Peter J.; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Watkins, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The activation of human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, adhesion and migration is essential for intimal hyperplasia formation. These experiments were designed to test whether Zoledronic Acid (ZA) would modulate indices of human smooth muscle cell activation, exert differential effects on proliferating vs. quiescent cells and determine whether these effects were dependent on GTPase binding proteins prenylation. ZA was chosen for testing in these experiments because it is clinically used in humans with cancer, and has been shown to modulate rat smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Methods Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) were cultured under either proliferating or growth arrest (quiescent) conditions in the presence or absence of ZA for 48 hours, whereupon the effect of ZA on HASMC proliferation, cellular viability, metabolic activity and membrane integrity were compared. In addition, the effect of ZA on adhesion and migration were assessed in proliferating cells. The effect of increased concentration of ZA on the mevalonate pathway and genomic/cellular stress related poly ADP Ribose polymerase (PARP) enzyme activity were assessed using the relative prenylation of Rap-1A/B protein and the formation of poly ADP- ribosylated proteins (PAR) respectively. Results There was a dose dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation, adhesion and migration following ZA treatment. ZA treatment decreased indices of cellular viability and significantly increased membrane injury in proliferating vs. quiescent cells. This was correlated with the appearance of unprenylated Rap-1A protein and dose dependent down regulation of PARP activity. Conclusions These data suggest that ZA is effective in inhibiting HASMC proliferation, adhesion and migration which coincide with the appearance of unprenylated RAP-1A/B protein, thereby suggesting that the mevalonate pathway may play a role in the inhibition of HASMC activation. PMID:23164362

  15. The action of acetylcholine and other drugs on the efflux of potassium and rubidium from smooth muscle of the guinea-pig intestine

    PubMed Central

    Burgen, A S V; Spero, L

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for measuring continuously the efflux of potassium or rubidium from smooth muscle of the guinea-pig. Muscarinic drugs cause at maximum a 100-fold increase in the efflux rate, due to a direct increase in permeability and only to a minor extent secondary to depolarization. With acetylcholine the dose response curve for producing efflux is displaced to 1,000 times higher concentrations than that for contraction. The shift varies with different agonists. The efflux and contractile responses to agonists are antagonized to an equivalent extent by atropine and several other reversible antagonists but benzhexol has a relatively greater effect on efflux. An estimate of spare receptors was obtained with benzilylcholine mustard and was similar for both responses. Dibenamine and local anaesthetics led to a parallel shift of the contraction dose response curve but a depression without shift in the efflux response. The most satisfactory explanation of these results is that there are two types of the muscarinic receptor in the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig intestine. PMID:9142413

  16. Surgical Skin Markers Impair Human Saphenous Vein Graft Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    EAGLE, SUSAN; BROPHY, COLLEEN M.; KOMALAVILAS, PADMINI; HOCKING, KYLE; PUTUMBAKA, GOWTHAMI; OSGOOD, MICHAEL; SEXTON, KEVIN; LEACCHE, MARZIA; CHEUNG-FLYNN, JOYCE

    2012-01-01

    Marking human saphenous vein graft (HSV) with a surgical skin marker to prevent twisting on implantation is a common practice in peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. This study is designed to examine the effects of surgical skin markers on the HSV smooth muscle and endothelial functional responses. De-identified HSV remnants were collected during peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. Physiologic responses of the HSV were measured using a muscle bath. Veins that were marked with surgical skin markers intraoperatively generated significantly less contractile force to depolarizing KCl (110 mM) and receptor-mediated contractile agonists than unmarked HSV, suggesting that surgical skin markers impaired HSV smooth muscle contractility. To directly access the effects of chemical components in the surgical skin markers, unmarked HSV was exposed to isopropyl alcohol (a solvent commonly used in surgical skin markers) or methylene blue (a dye). Smooth muscle contractility was significantly reduced by isopropyl alcohol and methylene blue. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to carbachol was significantly reduced after exposure to surgical skin markers. Our data demonstrated that marking HSV with surgical skin markers reduces smooth muscle and endothelial functional viability. PMID:21944360

  17. Tocotrienols have potent antifibrogenic effects in human intestinal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jeroni; Masamunt, Maria Carme; Rickmann, Mariana; Mora, Rut; España, Carolina; Delgado, Salvadora; Llach, Josep; Vaquero, Eva; Sans, Miquel

    2011-03-01

    Excessive fibroblast expansion and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition are key events for the development of bowel stenosis in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Tocotrienols are vitamin E compounds with proven in vitro antifibrogenic effects on rat pancreatic fibroblasts. We aimed at investigating the effects of tocotrienols on human intestinal fibroblast (HIF) proliferation, apoptosis, autophagy, and synthesis of ECM. HIF isolated from CD, ulcerative colitis (UC), and normal intestine were treated with tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) from palm oil. HIF proliferation was quantified by (3) H-thymidine incorporation, apoptosis was studied by DNA fragmentation, propidium iodide staining, caspase activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, autophagy was analyzed by quantification of LC3 protein and identification of autophagic vesicles by immunofluorescence and production of ECM components was measured by Western blot. TRF significantly reduced HIF proliferation and prevented basic fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation in CD and UC, but not control HIF. TRF enhanced HIF death by promoting apoptosis and autophagy. HIF apoptosis, but not autophagy, was prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk, whereas both types of cell death were prevented when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore was blocked by cyclosporin A, demonstrating a key role of the mitochondria in these processes. TRF diminished procollagen type I and laminin γ-1 production by HIF. Tocotrienols exert multiple effects on HIF, reducing cell proliferation, enhancing programmed cell death through apoptosis and autophagy, and decreasing ECM production. Considering their in vitro antifibrogenic properties, tocotrienols could be useful to treat or prevent bowel fibrosis in CD patients. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  18. Effect of Ceftaroline on Normal Human Intestinal Microflora▿

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotidis, Georgios; Bäckström, Tobias; Asker-Hagelberg, Charlotte; Jandourek, Alena; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2010-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin being developed for the treatment of serious bacterial infections, including those caused by aerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of administration of ceftaroline on the intestinal flora of healthy subjects. Twelve healthy subjects (6 males and 6 females), 20 to 41 years of age, received ceftaroline (600 mg) by intravenous infusion every 12 h (q12h) for 7 days. Plasma and feces were collected for determination of ceftaroline concentration and analysis of fecal flora. Fecal specimens were cultured on nonselective and selective media. Different colony types were counted, isolated in pure culture, and identified to the genus level. All new strains of colonizing bacteria were tested for susceptibility to ceftaroline. The concentrations of ceftaroline in plasma were as follows: on day 2, 17.5 to 34.8 mg/liter; on day 5, 19.7 to 33.2 mg/liter; and on day 7, 18.0 to 29.8 mg/liter. No ceftaroline concentrations were found on day −1, 9, 14, or 21. No measurable concentrations in feces were found on day −1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, or 21. There was a minor impact on the numbers of Escherichia coli strains, while the numbers of enterococci and Candida albicans strains were not affected. There were moderate decreases in the numbers of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during the first 7 days, while the numbers of clostridia increased during the same period. No impact on the numbers of Bacteroides bacteria was noticed. No new colonizing aerobic or anaerobic bacteria resistant to ceftaroline (MIC ≥ 4 mg/liter) were found. Ceftaroline had no significant ecological impact on the human intestinal microflora. PMID:20231399

  19. Cloning and expression of the human vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Sreedharan, S P; Robichon, A; Peterson, K E; Goetzl, E J

    1991-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a neuroendocrine mediator found in the central and peripheral nervous system. Distinct subsets of neural, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and immune cells bear specific high-affinity receptors for VIP, which are associated with a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein capable of activating adenylate cyclase. A cDNA clone (GPRN1) encoding the human VIP receptor was identified in libraries prepared from the Nalm 6 line of leukemic pre-B lymphoblasts and the HT-29 line of colon carcinoma cells. The deduced 362-amino acid polypeptide sequence encoded by GPRN1 shares a seven-transmembrane-segment hydropathicity profile with other G protein-coupled receptors. Northern blot analyses identified a 2.7-kilobase transcript of the VIP receptor in Nalm 6 and HT-29 cells as well as in tissues from rat brain, colon, heart, lung, kidney, spleen, and small intestine. COS-6 cells transfected with GPRN1 bound 125I-labeled VIP specifically with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.5 nM. VIP--and less effectively secretin, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), and glucagon competitively displaced bound 125I-VIP from transfected COS-6 cells, with potencies in the order VIP greater than secretin = PHI much greater than glucagon. VIP stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, inducing a 3-fold increase in the intracellular level of cAMP. When the antisense orientation of the VIP receptor clone was introduced into HT-29 cells, there was a 50% suppression of the specific binding of 125I-VIP and of the VIP-induced increase in cAMP level, relative to untransfected cells. The VIP receptor cloned exhibits less than or equal to 24% homology with other receptors in the same superfamily and thus represents a subset of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands. Images PMID:1675791

  20. Human and simulated intestinal fluids as solvent systems to explore food effects on intestinal solubility and permeability.

    PubMed

    Stappaerts, Jef; Wuyts, Benjamin; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2014-10-15

    The mixed micelles and vesicles present in the intraluminal environment of the postprandial state exhibit suitable solubilizing capacities for lipophilic drugs. This increase in solubility, however, is accompanied by a decrease in the free fraction caused by micellar entrapment of these lipophilic compounds. In this study, both simulated and aspirated human intestinal fluids of fasted and fed state conditions were used to evaluate the influence of food on the intestinal disposition of a series of structurally related β-blockers, with varying logP values. Using the in situ intestinal perfusion technique with mesenteric blood sampling in rats, it was demonstrated that fed state conditions significantly decreased the absorptive flux of the more lipophilic compounds metoprolol, propranolol and carvedilol, whereas the influence on the flux of the hydrophilic β-blocker atenolol was limited. The solubility of BCS class II compound carvedilol was found to increase significantly in simulated and aspirated media of the fed state. Intestinal perfusions using intestinal media saturated with carvedilol, revealed a higher flux in the fasted state compared to the fed state, despite the higher solubility in the fed state. This study underscores the importance of addressing the complex nature of the behavior of compounds in the intraluminal environment in fasted and fed state conditions. Moreover, our data point out the value of studying the effect of food on both solubility and permeability using biorelevant experimental conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Human colostrum oligosaccharides modulate major immunologic pathways of immature human intestine

    PubMed Central

    He, YingYing; Liu, ShuBai; Leone, Serena; Newburg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The immature neonatal intestinal immune system hyperreacts to newly colonizing unfamiliar bacteria. The hypothesis that human milk oligosaccharides from colostrum (cHMOS) can directly modulate the signaling pathways of the immature mucosa was tested. Modulation of cytokine immune signaling by HMOS was measured ex vivo in intact immature (fetal) human intestinal mucosa. From the genes whose transcription was modulated by colostrum HMOS (cHMOS), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified networks controlling immune cell communication, intestinal mucosal immune system differentiation, and homeostasis. cHMOS attenuate pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-stimulated acute phase inflammatory cytokine protein levels (IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1/2, IL-1β), while elevating cytokines involved in tissue repair and homeostasis. 3’-, 4-, and 6’-galactosyllactoses of cHMOS account for specific immunomodulation of PIC-induced IL-8 levels. cHMOS attenuate mucosal responses to surface inflammatory stimuli during early development, while enhancing signals that support maturation of the intestinal mucosal immune system. PMID:24691111

  2. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  3. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  4. Comparison of human bronchiolar smooth muscle responsiveness in vitro with histological signs of inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    de Jongste, J C; Mons, H; Van Strik, R; Bonta, I L; Kerrebijn, K F

    1987-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that chronic inflammation is associated with increased sensitivity or contractility of human airway smooth muscle. Bronchiolar strips from 30 patients, 12 of whom had chronic bronchitis, were examined in the organ bath for their responses to histamine, methacholine, and leukotriene (LT) C4. The same airways were also studied histologically and small airway disease was quantified by subjective grading of the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration, smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia. The degree of small airway disease varied widely among patients both with and without chronic bronchitis. Multiple regression analysis failed to show increased sensitivity (-log EC50) to histamine, methacholine, or LTC4 in relation to small airway disease. In contrast, the only significant correlations found were between a decreased -log EC50 to histamine and methacholine and an increased small airway disease score. Contractile responses (Tmax) to histamine and methacholine in peripheral airways tended to be higher in patients with chronic bronchitis than in those without. Tmax was not related to small airway disease scores. These results suggest that chronic airway inflammation does not cause in vitro hyperresponsiveness of human small airway smooth muscle. Images PMID:3321543

  5. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    In, Julie G; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human 'mini-guts' has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5(+) intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt-villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    In, Julie G.; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K.; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human ‘mini-guts’ has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5+ intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt–villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host pathogen interactions. PMID:27677718

  7. Premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile smooth muscle cells in human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Roffino, S; Lamy, E; Foucault-Bertaud, A; Risso, F; Reboul, R; Tellier, E; Chareyre, C; Dignat-George, F; Simeoni, U; Charpiot, P

    2012-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) participate to the regulation of peripheral arterial resistance and blood pressure. To assume their function, SMCs differentiate throughout the normal vascular development from a synthetic phenotype towards a fully differentiated contractile phenotype by acquiring a repertoire of proteins involved in contraction. In human fetal muscular arteries and umbilical arteries (UAs), no data are available regarding the differentiation of SMCs during the last trimester of gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of SMCs during this gestation period in human UAs. We investigated the phenotype of SMCs in human UAs from very preterm (28-31 weeks of gestation), late preterm (32-35 weeks) and term (37-41 weeks) newborns using biochemical and immunohistochemical detection of α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smoothelin, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain. We found that the number of SMCs positive for smoothelin in UAs increased with gestational age. Western blot analysis revealed a higher content of smoothelin in term compared to very preterm UAs. These results show that SMCs in human UAs gradually acquire a fully differentiated contractile phenotype during the last trimester of gestation and thus that premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile SMCs in human UAs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Permeability of rhynchophylline across human intestinal cell in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jing; Li, Ming; Xu, Huibo; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Rhynchophylline (Rhy) is the major component of Uncaria species, which is used in Chinese traditional medicine for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. However, its oral bioavailability has not been known. This study aims to investigate the intestinal permeability and related mechanisms of Rhy using cultured human epithelial Caco-2 cells. The cytotoxicity of Rhy on Caco-2 cells was evaluated with MTT assay. The effect of Rhy on the integrity of Caco-2 cell monolayer was assayed with transepithelial electrical resistance. The permeability of Rhy across cell monolayer was assayed by measuring Rhy quantity in received side with HPLC. The effect of Rhy on the expression of P-glycoprotein and MDR1 was detected with Western blot and flow cytometry, respectively. In the concentration of Rhy, which did not produce toxicity on cell viability and integrity of Caco-2 cell monolayer, Rhy crossed the monolayer with velocity 2.76~5.57×10^-6 cm/sec and 10.68~15.66×10^-6 cm/sec from apical to basolateral side and from basolateral to apical side, respectively. The permeability of Rhy was increased by verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, or rhodamine123, a P-glycoprotein substrate. Rhy revealed an induction effect on P-glycoprotein expression in Caco-2 cells. These results demonstrate the low permeability of Rhy in intro, and suggest that P-glycoprotein may underlie the mechanism. PMID:24966905

  10. Human intestinal absorption--neutral molecules and ionic species.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of percentage human intestinal absorption (%HIA) for 280 drugs shows that an excellent fit can be obtained using only three descriptors for neutral molecules with a SD of 13.9%. Use of descriptors for individual cations and anions does not lead to any better goodness-of-fit. It is noted that diffusion coefficients in water for ionized molecules are almost identical to those for the corresponding neutral molecules. Comparison of equation coefficients for HIA with those for other processes shows that HIA resembles diffusion in water but does not resemble permeation through biological bilayers. It is shown that compound substituent effects on HIA are near those for diffusion but are far away from substituent effects on permeation through a typical bilayer. Calculations indicate that rates of permeation through an unstirred mucosal layer are of the same order as experimental rates of permeation in HIA. It is concluded that for the 280 compound set, diffusion through the unstirred mucosal layer is the rate determining step. The effect on pK(a) in transfer of acids and bases from water to another solvent, and of diffusion past a negative charge in a phase/bilayer is also considered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor.

    PubMed

    Lartey, Jon; Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non-pregnant, pregnant and in

  12. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. Objectives We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non

  13. Macropinocytosis in Shiga toxin 1 uptake by human intestinal epithelial cells and transcellular transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Malyukova, Irina; Murray, Karen F; Zhu, Chengru; Boedeker, Edgar; Kane, Anne; Patterson, Kathleen; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Donowitz, Mark; Kovbasnjuk, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Shiga toxin 1 and 2 production is a cardinal virulence trait of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection that causes a spectrum of intestinal and systemic pathology. However, intestinal sites of enterohemorrhagic E. coli colonization during the human infection and how the Shiga toxins are taken up and cross the globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor-negative intestinal epithelial cells remain largely uncharacterized. We used samples of human intestinal tissue from patients with E. coli O157:H7 infection to detect the intestinal sites of bacterial colonization and characterize the distribution of Shiga toxins. We further used a model of largely Gb3-negative T84 intestinal epithelial monolayers treated with B-subunit of Shiga toxin 1 to determine the mechanisms of non-receptor-mediated toxin uptake. We now report that E. coli O157:H7 were found at the apical surface of epithelial cells only in the ileocecal valve area and that both toxins were present in large amounts inside surface and crypt epithelial cells in all tested intestinal samples. Our in vitro data suggest that macropinocytosis mediated through Src activation significantly increases toxin endocytosis by intestinal epithelial cells and also stimulates toxin transcellular transcytosis. We conclude that Shiga toxin is taken up by human intestinal epithelial cells during E. coli O157:H7 infection regardless of the presence of bacterial colonies. Macropinocytosis might be responsible for toxin uptake by Gb3-free intestinal epithelial cells and transcytosis. These observations provide new insights into the understanding of Shiga toxin contribution to enterohemorrhagic E. coli-related intestinal and systemic diseases.

  14. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  15. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G.; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  16. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  17. Human intestinal parasites in primary school children in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kabatereine, N B; Kemijumbi, J; Kazibwe, F; Onapa, A W

    1997-05-01

    A cross sectional survey on intestinal parasite infections was carried out in 5,313 pupils between the ages of ten and fifteen years in 98 primary schools in Kampala. The aim was to identify the types and distribution of intestinal parasites and to estimate the prevalence in school children. Trichuris trichiura (28%), Ascaris lumbricoides (17%) and hookworms (12.9%) were common infections among the children. Other less commonly found parasites were S.mansoni, Strongyloides stercolaris, Taenia sp, Enterobius vermicularis, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba coli and E. histolytica. Refuse dumps are probably a significant source of transmission of intestinal helminthic infections in Kampala.

  18. Inhibitory effects of SKF96365 on the activities of K+ channels in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    TANAHASHI, Yasuyuki; WANG, Ban; MURAKAMI, Yuri; UNNO, Toshihiro; MATSUYAMA, Hayato; NAGANO, Hiroshi; KOMORI, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of SKF96365 (SKF), which is a non-selective cationic channel blocker, on K+ channel currents, we recorded currents through ATP sensitive K+ (IKATP), voltage-gated K+ (IKv) and Ca2+ activated K+ channels (IBK) in the absence and presence of SKF in single small intestinal myocytes of mice with patch-clamp techniques. SKF (10 µM) reversibly abolished IKATP that was induced by cromakalim (10 µM), which is a selective ATP sensitive K+ channel opener. These inhibitory effects were induced in a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.85 µM, which was obviously lower than that reported for the muscarinic cationic current. In addition, SKF (1 µM ≈ the IC50 value in IKATP suppression) reversibly inhibited the IKv that was induced by repetitive depolarizing pulses from −80 to 20 mV. However, the extent of the inhibitory effects was only ~30%. In contrast, SKF (1 µM) had no significant effects on spontaneous transient IBK and caffeine-induced IBK. These results indicated that SKF inhibited ATP sensitive K+ channels and voltage-gated K+ channels, with the ATP sensitive K+ channels being more sensitive than the voltage-gated K+ channels. These inhibitory effects on K+ channels should be considered when SKF is used as a cationic channel blocker. PMID:26498720

  19. Inhibitory effects of SKF96365 on the activities of K(+) channels in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Yasuyuki; Wang, Ban; Murakami, Yuri; Unno, Toshihiro; Matsuyama, Hayato; Nagano, Hiroshi; Komori, Seiichi

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the effects of SKF96365 (SKF), which is a non-selective cationic channel blocker, on K(+) channel currents, we recorded currents through ATP sensitive K(+) (IKATP), voltage-gated K(+) (IKv) and Ca(2+) activated K(+) channels (IBK) in the absence and presence of SKF in single small intestinal myocytes of mice with patch-clamp techniques. SKF (10 µM) reversibly abolished IKATP that was induced by cromakalim (10 µM), which is a selective ATP sensitive K(+) channel opener. These inhibitory effects were induced in a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.85 µM, which was obviously lower than that reported for the muscarinic cationic current. In addition, SKF (1 µM ≈ the IC50 value in IKATP suppression) reversibly inhibited the IKv that was induced by repetitive depolarizing pulses from -80 to 20 mV. However, the extent of the inhibitory effects was only ~30%. In contrast, SKF (1 µM) had no significant effects on spontaneous transient IBK and caffeine-induced IBK. These results indicated that SKF inhibited ATP sensitive K(+) channels and voltage-gated K(+) channels, with the ATP sensitive K(+) channels being more sensitive than the voltage-gated K(+) channels. These inhibitory effects on K(+) channels should be considered when SKF is used as a cationic channel blocker.

  20. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshaw, Shona R; Henderson, Neil; Knox, Alan J; Watson, Susan A; Buttle, David J; Johnson, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of chronic asthma comprising smooth muscle hypertrophy and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) breakdown ECM, are involved in tissue remodelling and have been implicated in airway remodelling. Although mesenchymal cells are an important source of MMPs, little data are available on airway smooth muscle (ASM) derived MMPs. We therefore investigated MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production and activity in human ASM cells.MMPs and TIMPs were examined using quantitative real-time RT–PCR, Western blotting, zymography and a quench fluorescence (QF) assay of total MMP activity.The most abundant MMPs were pro-MMP-2, pro- MMP-3, active MMP-3 and MT1-MMP. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression was low in cell lysates but high in conditioned medium. High TIMP secretion was confirmed by the ability of ASM-conditioned medium to inhibit recombinant MMP-2 in a QF assay. Thrombin increased MMP activity by activation of pro-MMP-2 independent of the conventional smooth muscle thrombin receptors PAR 1 and 4.In conclusion, ASM cells express pro-MMP-2, pro and active MMP-3, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP. Unstimulated cells secrete excess TIMP 1 and 2, preventing proteolytic activity. MMP-2 can be activated by thrombin which may contribute to airway remodelling. PMID:15265805

  2. The metabolic profile of acteoside produced by human or rat intestinal bacteria or intestinal enzyme in vitro employed UPLC-Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingling; Pan, Yingni; Xu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Wenjie; Wu, Xiao; Qu, Shouhe; Liu, Xiaoqiu

    2016-03-01

    Acteoside, the main and representative phenylethanoid glycosides of Herba Cistanches, possesses wide bioactivities but low oral bioavailability. It may serve as the prodrug and be converted into the active forms in gastrointestinal tract, which mainly occurred in intestinal tract composed of intestinal bacteria and intestinal enzyme. Intestinal bacteria, a new drug target, take a significant role on exerting pharmacological effects of drugs by oral administration. In this paper, acteoside was incubated with human or rat intestinal bacteria or rat intestinal enzyme for 36 h to seek metabolites responsible for pharmacodynamics. The samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Besides the parent compound, 14 metabolites were detected and identified based on their retention times and fragmentation patterns in their MS spectra including 8 degradation metabolites, 2 isomers in intestinal bacteria and intestinal enzyme samples and 4 parent metabolites only found in intestinal enzymes. The metabolic pathway of acteoside was thus proposed. Identification of these metabolites of acteoside by the intestinal bacteria or intestinal enzyme gave an insight to clarify pharmacological mechanism of traditional Chinese medicines and identify the real active molecules.

  3. Bioengineered internal anal sphincter derived from isolated human internal anal sphincter smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Somara, Sita; Gilmont, Robert R; Dennis, Robert G; Bitar, Khalil N

    2009-07-01

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a specialized circular smooth muscle that maintains rectoanal continence. In vitro models are needed to study the pathophysiology of human IAS disorders. We bioengineered sphincteric rings from human IAS smooth muscle cells (SMC) and investigated their response to cholinergic stimulation as well as investigated whether protein kinase C (PKC) and Rho kinase signaling pathways remain functional. 3-Dimensional bioengineered ring (3DBR) model of the human IAS was constructed from isolated human IAS SMC obtained from surgery. Contractile properties and force generation in response to acetylcholine, PKC inhibitor calphostin-C, Rho/ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, permeable Rho/ROCK inhibitor c3-exoenzyme, and PKC activator PdBU was measured. The human IAS 3DBR has the essential characteristics of physiologically functional IAS; it generated a spontaneous myogenic basal tone, and the constructs were able to relax in response to relaxants and contract in response to contractile agents. The constructs generated dose-dependent force in response to acetylcholine. Basal tone was significantly reduced by calphostin-C but not with Y-27632. Acetylcholine-induced force generation was also significantly reduced by calphostin-C but not with Y-27632. PdBU generated force that was equal in magnitude to acetylcholine. Thus, calphostin-C inhibited PdBU-induced force generation, whereas Y-27632 and c3 exoenzyme did not. These data indicate that basal tone and acetylcholine-induced force generation depend on signaling through the PKC pathway in human IAS; PKC-mediated force generation is independent of the Rho/ROCK pathway. This human IAS 3DBR model can be used to study the pathophysiology associated with IAS malfunctions.

  4. Nitric oxide and vasoactive intestinal peptide as co-transmitters of airway smooth-muscle relaxation: analysis in neuronal nitric oxide synthase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Foda, Hussein D; Said, Sami I

    2003-09-01

    Both vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and nitric oxide (NO) relax airway smooth muscle and are potential co-transmitters of neurogenic airway relaxation. The availability of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) knockout mice (nNOS-/-) provides a unique opportunity for evaluating NO. To evaluate the relative importance of NO, especially that generated by nNOS, and VIP as transmitters of the inhibitory nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) system. In this study, we compared the neurogenic (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) NANC relaxation of tracheal segments from nNOS-/- mice and control wild-type mice (nNOS(+/+)), induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS). We also examined the tracheal contractile response to methacholine and its relaxant response to VIP. EFS (at 60 V for 2 ms, at 10, 15, or 20 Hz) dose-dependently reduced tracheal tension, and the relaxations were consistently smaller (approximately 40%) in trachea from nNOS-/- mice than from control wild-type mice (p < 0.001). VIP (10(- 8) to 10(-6) mol/L) induced concentration-dependent relaxations that were approximately 50% smaller in nNOS-/- tracheas than in control tracheas. Methacholine induced concentration-dependent contractions that were consistently higher in the nNOS-/- tracheas relative to wild-type mice tracheas (p > 0.05). Our data suggest that, in mouse trachea, NO is probably responsible for mediating a large (approximately 60%) component of neurogenic NANC relaxation, and a similar (approximately 50%) component of the relaxant effect of VIP. The results imply that NO contributes significantly to neurogenic relaxation of mouse airway smooth muscle, whether due to neurogenic stimulation or to the neuropeptide VIP.

  5. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  6. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  7. Type 1 diabetes: role of intestinal microbiome in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Brian P; Sarvetnick, Nora E

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a disease involving autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells in genetically predisposed individuals. Identifying factors that trigger initiation and progression of autoimmunity may provide opportunities for directed prophylactic and therapeutic measures to prevent and/or treat type 1 diabetes. The human intestinal microbiome is a complex, symbiotic ecological community that influences human health and development, including the development and maintenance of the human immune system. The role of the intestinal microbiome in autoimmunity has garnered significant attention, and evidence suggests a particular role for intestinal microbiome alterations in autoimmune disease development, including type 1 diabetes. This review will examine the role of the intestinal microbiome in the development and function of the immune system and how this relates to the development of autoimmunity. Data from animal and human studies linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome and intestinal integrity with type 1 diabetes will be closely examined. Finally, we will examine the interactions between the intestinal microbiome and dietary exposures and how these interactions may further influence autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes development.

  8. In vitro patterning of pluripotent stem cell-derived intestine recapitulates in vivo human development

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Nattiv, Roy; Dedhia, Priya H.; Nagy, Melinda S.; Chin, Alana M.; Thomson, Matthew; Klein, Ophir D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestine plays a central role in digestion, nutrient absorption and metabolism, with individual regions of the intestine having distinct functional roles. Many examples of region-specific gene expression in the adult intestine are known, but how intestinal regional identity is established during development is a largely unresolved issue. Here, we have identified several genes that are expressed in a region-specific manner in the developing human intestine. Using human embryonic stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, we demonstrate that the duration of exposure to active FGF and WNT signaling controls regional identity. Short-term exposure to FGF4 and CHIR99021 (a GSK3β inhibitor that stabilizes β-catenin) resulted in organoids with gene expression patterns similar to developing human duodenum, whereas longer exposure resulted in organoids similar to ileum. When region-specific organoids were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, duodenum-like organoids and ileum-like organoids retained their regional identity, demonstrating that regional identity of organoids is stable after initial patterning occurs. This work provides insights into the mechanisms that control regional specification of the developing human intestine and provides new tools for basic and translational research. PMID:27927684

  9. In vitro patterning of pluripotent stem cell-derived intestine recapitulates in vivo human development.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Nattiv, Roy; Dedhia, Priya H; Nagy, Melinda S; Chin, Alana M; Thomson, Matthew; Klein, Ophir D; Spence, Jason R

    2017-03-15

    The intestine plays a central role in digestion, nutrient absorption and metabolism, with individual regions of the intestine having distinct functional roles. Many examples of region-specific gene expression in the adult intestine are known, but how intestinal regional identity is established during development is a largely unresolved issue. Here, we have identified several genes that are expressed in a region-specific manner in the developing human intestine. Using human embryonic stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, we demonstrate that the duration of exposure to active FGF and WNT signaling controls regional identity. Short-term exposure to FGF4 and CHIR99021 (a GSK3β inhibitor that stabilizes β-catenin) resulted in organoids with gene expression patterns similar to developing human duodenum, whereas longer exposure resulted in organoids similar to ileum. When region-specific organoids were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, duodenum-like organoids and ileum-like organoids retained their regional identity, demonstrating that regional identity of organoids is stable after initial patterning occurs. This work provides insights into the mechanisms that control regional specification of the developing human intestine and provides new tools for basic and translational research.

  10. Human Intestinal Barrier Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    König, Julia; Wells, Jerry; Cani, Patrice D; García-Ródenas, Clara L; MacDonald, Tom; Mercenier, Annick; Whyte, Jacqueline; Troost, Freddy; Brummer, Robert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract consists of an enormous surface area that is optimized to efficiently absorb nutrients, water, and electrolytes from food. At the same time, it needs to provide a tight barrier against the ingress of harmful substances, and protect against a reaction to omnipresent harmless compounds. A dysfunctional intestinal barrier is associated with various diseases and disorders. In this review, the role of intestinal permeability in common disorders such as infections with intestinal pathogens, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and food allergies will be discussed. In addition, the effect of the frequently prescribed drugs proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability, as well as commonly used methods to assess barrier function will be reviewed. PMID:27763627

  11. Vascular anatomy of the small intestine-a comparative anatomic study on humans and pigs.

    PubMed

    von Trotha, Klaus-Thilo; Butz, Nick; Grommes, Jochen; Binnebösel, Marcel; Charalambakis, Natascha; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Schumpelick, Volker; Klinge, Uwe; Neumann, Ulf P; Prescher, Andreas; Krones, Carsten J

    2015-05-01

    Porcine models are well established for studying intestinal anastomotic healing. In this study, we aimed to clarify the anatomic differences between human and porcine small intestines. Additionally, we investigated the influences of longitudinal and circular sutures on human small intestine perfusion. Intestines were obtained from human cadavers (n = 8; small intestine, n = 51) and from pigs (n = 10; small intestine, n = 60). Vascularization was visualized with mennige gelatin perfusion and high-resolution mammography. Endothelial cell density was analyzed with immunohistochemistry and factor VIII antibodies. We also investigated the influence of suture techniques (circular anastomoses, n = 19; longitudinal sutures, n = 15) on vascular perfusion. Only human samples showed branching of mesenteric vessels. Compared to the pig, human vessels showed closer connections at the entrance to the bowel wall (p = 0.045) and higher numbers of intramural anastomoses (p < 0.001). Porcine main vessels formed in multifilament-like vessel bundles and displayed few intramural vessel anastomoses. Circular anastomoses induced a circular perfusion defect at the bowel wall; longitudinal anastomoses induced significantly smaller perfusion defects (p < 0.001). Both species showed higher vascular density in the jejunum than in the ileum (p < 0.001). Human samples showed similar vascular density within the jejunum (p = 0.583) and higher density in the ileum (p < 0.001) compared to pig samples. The results showed significant differences between human and porcine intestines. The porcine model remains the standard for studies on anastomotic healing because it is currently the only viable model for studying anastomosis and wound healing. Nevertheless, scientific interpretations must consider the anatomic differences between humans and porcine intestines.

  12. Metabolism of puerarin and daidzin by human intestinal bacteria and their relation to in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Yu, K U; Bae, E A; Han, M J

    1998-06-01

    When puerarin or daidzin were incubated for 24 h with human intestinal bacteria, two metabolites, daidzein and calycosin, were produced from them, respectively. The metabolic time course of puerarin was as follows: at an early time, puerarin was converted to daidzin, and then calycosin. The metabolic time course of daidzin by human intestinal bacteria was also similar to that of puerarin. The in vitro cytotoxicities of these metabolites, calycosin and daidzein, were superior to those of puerarin and daidzein.

  13. An electrophysiological study of the smooth muscle of the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, D.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical recordings were made in vitro from preparations of human colonic smooth muscle from surgically resected specimens. The behaviour of the taenia consisted of regular spike action potentials based on a slow wave rhythm (22 +/- 5 c.p.m.), with tetanic contractions of the muscle. The actions of cholinergic drugs were studied and experiments performed to investigate the mechanism of the action potentials. The circular muscle produced clusters of spikes with solitary contractions. The differences between the two muscle layers may be of relevance to understanding the colonic electromyogram as recorded in vivo. PMID:7294682

  14. Remeshed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs.

    PubMed

    Hieber, Simone E; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    In computer aided surgery the accurate simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs is essential for the development of surgical simulators. In this paper we introduce particle based simulations of two different human organ materials modeled as linear viscoelastic solids. The constitutive equations for the material behavior are discretized using a particle approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method while the body surface is tracked using level sets. A key aspect of this approach is its flexibility which allows the simulation of complex time varying topologies with large deformations. The accuracy of the original formulation is significantly enhanced by using a particle reinitialization technique resulting in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The mechanical parameters of the systems used in the simulations are derived from experimental measurements on human cadaver organs. We compare the mechanical behavior of liver- and kidney-like materials based on the dynamic simulations of a tensile test case. Moreover, we present a particle based reconstruction of the liver topology and its strain distribution under a small local load. Finally, we demonstrate a unified formulation of fluid structure interaction based on particle methods.

  15. Biovolatilization of metal(loid)s by intestinal microorganisms in the simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Bone, Roland A; van de Wiele, Tom R

    2009-07-15

    Methylation and hydrogenation of metal(loid)s by microorganisms are widespread and well-known processes in the environment by which mobility and in most cases toxicity are significantly enhanced in comparison to inorganic species. The human gut contains highly diverse and active microbiocenosis, yet little is known about the occurrence and importance of microbial metal(loid) methylation and hydrogenation. In this study, an in vitro gastrointestinal model, the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME),was used for investigating volatilization of metal(loid)s by intestinal microbiota. Suspensions from different compartments of the SHIME system analogous to different parts of the human intestinal tract were incubated with different concentrations of inorganic Ge, As, Se, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Pb, and Bi and analyzed by gas chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). Significant volatilization was found for Se, As, and Te (maximal hourly production rates relative to the amount spiked; 0.6, 2, and 9 ng/mg/h, respectively). In addition, volatile species of Sb and Bi were detected. The occurrence of AsH3 and (CH3)2Te was toxicologically important. Furthermore, mixed Se/S and mixed As/S metabolites were detected in significant amounts in the gas phase of the incubation experiments of which two metabolites, (CH3)2AsSSCH3 and CH3As(SCH3)2, are described for the first time in environmental matrices. The toxicology of these species is unknown. These data show that the intestinal microbiota may increase the mobility of metal(loid)s, suggesting a significant modulation of their toxicity. Our research warrants further studies to investigate the extent of this process as well as the availability of metal(loid)s from different sources for microbial transformations.

  16. Diet and the development of the human intestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Voreades, Noah; Kozil, Anne; Weir, Tiffany L.

    2014-01-01

    The important role of the gut microbiome in maintaining human health has necessitated a better understanding of the temporal dynamics of intestinal microbial communities as well as the host and environmental factors driving these dynamics. Genetics, mode of birth, infant feeding patterns, antibiotic usage, sanitary living conditions and long term dietary habits contribute to shaping the composition of the gut microbiome. This review focuses primarily on diet, as it is one of the most pivotal factors in the development of the human gut microbiome from infancy to the elderly. The infant gut microbiota is characterized by a high degree of instability, only reaching a state similar to that of adults by 2–3 years of age; consistent with the establishment of a varied solid food diet. The diet-related factors influencing the development of the infant gut microbiome include whether the child is breast or formula-fed as well as how and when solid foods are introduced. In contrast to the infant gut, the adult gut microbiome is resilient to large shifts in community structure. Several studies have shown that dietary changes induce transient fluctuations in the adult microbiome, sometimes in as little as 24 h; however, the microbial community rapidly returns to its stable state. Current knowledge of how long-term dietary habits shape the gut microbiome is limited by the lack of long-term feeding studies coupled with temporal gut microbiota characterization. However, long-term weight loss studies have been shown to alter the ratio of the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, the two major bacterial phyla residing in the human gastrointestinal tract. With aging, diet-related factors such as malnutrition are associated with microbiome shifts, although the cause and effect relationship between these factors has not been established. Increased pharmaceutical usage is also more prevalent in the elderly and can contribute to reduced gut microbiota stability and diversity. Foods containing

  17. Transformation of trollioside and isoquercetin by human intestinal flora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Shi, Duo-Zhi; Wang, Teng-Yu; Zheng, Shi-Qi; Liu, Li-Jia; Sun, Zhen-Xiao; Wang, Ru-Feng; Ding, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to determine the intestinal bacterial metabolites of trollioside and isoquercetin and their antibacterial activities. A systematic in vitro biotransformation investigation on trollioside and isoquercetin, including metabolite identification, metabolic pathway deduction, and time course, was accomplished using a human intestinal bacterial model. The metabolites were analyzed and identified by HPLC and HPLC-MS. The antibacterial activities of trollioside, isoquercetin, and their metabolites were evaluated using the broth microdilution method with berberine as a positive control, and their potency was measured as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Our results indicated that trollioside and isoquercetin were metabolized by human intestinal flora through O-deglycosylation, yielding aglycones proglobeflowery acid and quercetin, respectively The antibacterial activities of both metabolites were more potent than that of their parent compounds. In conclusion, trollioside and isoquercetin are totally and rapidly transformed by human intestinal bacteria in vitro and the transformation favors the improvement of the antibacterial activities of the parent compounds.

  18. SOX9 is expressed in normal stomach, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Sashikawa Kimura, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroyuki; Sugano, Kentaro

    2011-11-01

    SOX9 is a marker for stem cells in the intestine and overexpression of SOX9 is found in some types of cancer. However, the expression of SOX9 in normal stomach, precancerous intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma has not yet been clarified. This study aimed to investigate SOX9 expression in the corpus and pyloric regions of the normal human stomach, premalignant intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma by using immunohistochemistry. We evaluated SOX9 expression in 46 clinical samples (early gastric well-differentiated adenocarcinoma including surrounding intestinal metaplasia) resected under esophagogastroduodenoscopy. A small amount of SOX9 was expressed in the neck/isthmus of the corpus region and SOX9 expression was predominantly restricted to the neck/isthmus of the pyloric region in normal human stomach. In the intestinal metaplastic mucosa, SOX9- and PCNA-positive cells were located at the base of the intestinal metaplastic mucosa. Almost all of the gastric carcinoma cells expressed SOX9. SOX9 is expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric carcinoma in humans.

  19. The effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on Candida albicans-infected human intestinal cell lines Caco-2 and Intestin 407.

    PubMed

    Murzyn, Anna; Krasowska, Anna; Augustyniak, Daria; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Łukaszewicz, Marcin; Dziadkowiec, Dorota

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic strain that confers many benefits to human enterocolopathies and is used against a number of enteric pathogens. Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that causes intestinal infections in immunocompromised patients, and after translocation into the bloodstream, is responsible for serious systemic candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the influence of S. boulardii cells and its culture extract on C. albicans adhesion to Caco-2 and Intestin 407 cell lines. We also tested the proinflammatory IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 cytokine expression by C. albicans-infected Caco-2 cells, using real-time RT-PCR. We found that both S. boulardii and its extract significantly inhibited C. albicans adhesion to epithelial cell lines. The IL-8 gene expression by C. albicans-infected Caco-2 cells was suppressed by the addition of S. boulardii extract. Our results indicate that S. boulardii affects C. albicans adhesion and reduces cytokine-mediated inflammatory host response.

  20. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  1. Contribution of human smooth muscle cells to amyloid angiopathy in AL (light-chain) amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Vora, Moiz; Kevil, Christopher G; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a disease process that often compromises the peripheral vascular system and leads to systemic end-organ dysfunction. Although amyloid formation in vessel walls is a multifaceted process, the assembly of the native light chains (LCs) into amyloid fibrils is central to its pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that endocytosis and endolysosomal processing of immunoglobin LCs by host cells is essential to the formation of amyloid fibrils that are deposited in at least some tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of vascular smooth muscle in amyloid angiopathy. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were grown on coverslips, four chamber glass slides, and growth factor-reduced Matrigel matrix in the presence of 10 µg/ml of ALs (λ and κ isotypes), nonamyloidogenic LCs, and culture medium (negative control) for 48 and 72 hours. Thereafter, a detailed light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural evaluation was conducted to verify amyloid deposition and characterize the role of SMCs in the formation of amyloid deposits in the various experimental conditions. Amyloid deposits were detected extracellulary as early as 48 hours after exposure of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to AL-LCs (amyloidogenic light chains) as confirmed by affinity to Congo red dye, thioflavin T fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. No amyloid was present in the cultures of SMCs treated with medium alone or nonamyloidogenic LCs. SMCs associated with amyloid deposits exhibited CD68, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1-1, and intracellular lambda light chain expression and only focal smooth muscle actin and muscle-specific actin positivity. Electron microscopy revealed these cells to have an expanded mature lysosomal compartment closely associated with deposits of newly formed amyloid fibrils. The interaction of amyloidogenic LCs with VSMCs is necessary for the formation of amyloid fibrils that are

  2. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  3. Expression of smooth muscle-specific proteins in myoepithelium and stromal myofibroblasts of normal and malignant human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Sastre, X; Frid, M G; Glukhova, M A; Thiery, J P; Koteliansky, V E

    1993-01-01

    The expression of several differentiation markers in normal human mammary gland myoepithelium and in certain stromal fibroblasts ("myofibroblasts") associated with breast carcinomas was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy of frozen sections. Several antibodies to smooth muscle-specific proteins (smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chains, calponin, alpha 1-integrin, and high molecular weight caldesmon) and to epithelial-specific proteins (cytokeratins, E-cadherin, and desmoplakin) were used to show that myoepithelial cells concomitantly express epithelial and smooth muscle markers whereas adjacent luminal cells express only epithelial markers. The same antibodies were used to establish that stromal myofibroblasts exhibit smooth muscle phenotypic properties characterized by the expression of all the smooth muscle markers examined except for high molecular weight caldesmon. In addition, both myoepithelium and myofibroblasts show a significant degree of heterogeneity in smooth muscle protein expression. Thus, myoepithelial cells and stromal myofibroblasts are epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, which coordinately express a set of smooth muscle markers while maintaining their specific original features. The dual nature of myoepithelial cells and the phenotypic transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts are examples of the plasticity of the differentiated cell phenotype. Images PMID:8430113

  4. Proteomic network analysis of human uterine smooth muscle in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human uterine quiescence during gestation and the induction of labor at term or preterm are not completely known. Preterm delivery is associated with major morbidity and mortality and current efforts to prevent delivery until term are largely ineffective. Identification and semi-quantification of proteomic changes in uterine smooth muscle during pregnancy will allow for targeted research into how quiescence is maintained and what changes are associated with induction of labor. Examining preterm labor in this context will provide potential therapeutic targets for the management of preterm labor. We have recently performed two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on myometrial proteins isolated from pregnant patients in labor, pregnant patients not in labor, and pregnant patients in labor preterm. Using a conservative false discovery rate of 1% we have identified 2132 protein groups using this method and semi-quantitative spectral counting shows 201 proteins that have disparate levels of expression in preterm laboring samples. To our knowledge this is the first large scale proteomic study examining human uterine smooth muscle and this initial work has provided a target list for future experiments that can address how changing protein levels are involved in the induction of labor at term and preterm. PMID:26413312

  5. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK1 receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK1-receptor antagonist, [3H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (nH values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77±0.07, 2-NAP=0.73±0.03, YM220=0.70±0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83±0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK1 receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. PMID:12110612

  6. Anatomy of the human penis: the relationship of the architecture between skeletal and smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Geng-Long; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Wen, Hsien-Sheng; Hsu, Wen-Long; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Tseng, Guo-Fang

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the anatomy of the ischiocavernosus muscle, bulbospongiosus muscle, and tunica albuginea and to determine their relationships to smooth muscle, which is a key element of penile sinusoids, we performed cadaveric dissection and histologic examinations of 35 adult human male cadavers. The tunica of the corpora cavernosa is a bilayered structure that can be divided into an inner circular layer and an outer longitudinal layer. The outer longitudinal layer is an incomplete coat that is absent between the 5-o'clock and 7-o'clock positions where 2 triangular ligamentous structures form. These structures, termed the ventral thickening, are a continuation of the anterior fibers of the left and right bulbospongiosus muscles. On the dorsal aspect, between the 1-o'clock and 11-o'clock positions, is a region called the dorsal thickening, a radiating aspect of the bilateral ischiocavernosus muscles. In the corpora cavernosa, skeletal muscle contains and supports smooth muscle, which is an essential element in the sinusoids. This relationship plays an important part in the blood vessels' ability to supply the blood to meet the requirements for erection, whereas in the corpus spongiosum, skeletal muscle partially entraps the smooth muscle to allow ejaculation when erect. In the glans penis, however, the distal ligament, a continuation of the outer longitudinal layer of the tunica, is arranged centrally and acts as a trunk of the glans penis. Without this strong ligament, the glans would be too weak to bear the buckling pressure generated during coitus. A significant difference exists in the thickness of the dorsal thickening, the ventral thickening, and the distal ligament between the potent and impotent groups (P < or =.01). Together, the anatomic relationships between skeletal muscle and smooth muscle within the human penis explain many physiologic phenomena, such as erection, ejaculation, the intracavernous pressure surge during ejaculation, and the pull

  7. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN

    PubMed Central

    PEI, CHANGAN; QIN, SHIYONG; WANG, MINGHAI; ZHANG, SHUGUANG

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN-overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN-VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV-NELIN-siRNA-VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN-VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α-actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra-nuclear translocation of SMα-actin-serum response factor (SMα-actin-SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y-27632, SRF and SMα-actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV-NELIN-siRNA-VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα-actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra-nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα-actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN-induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling diseases, including varicosity and

  8. Activation properties of chemically skinned fibres from human isolated bronchial smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Savineau, J P; Marthan, R

    1994-01-01

    1. The contractile activation properties of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle were investigated using chemically (beta-escin) skinned strips. 2. Concentration-dependent contractions were induced by free ion concentrations of Ca2+ (0.5-3 microM), Sr2+ (2-200 microM) and Ba2+ (50-1000 microM). The resulting -log[cation]-tension relationships were fitted by sigmoidal curves with EC50 values (cation concentration required to produce half-maximal tension) and co-operativity factors (Hill coefficient, nH) of, respectively, 0.25 microM and 3.4 for Ca2+, 12 microM and 2.64 for Sr2+ and 100 microM and 1.73 for Ba2+. Maximal responses to Sr2+ and Ba2+ were 125.5 +/- 15.4 and 96 +/- 8.1% (n = 5) respectively of the maximum tension induced by Ca2+. 3. Trifluoperazine (5-100 microM), cyclic AMP (50-300 microM) and cyclic GMP (50-100 microM) each antagonized Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, okadaic acid (OA, 0.2-1 microM) potentiated Ca2+ and increased the maximum response to Ca2+ (+25 +/- 5.4%, n = 5, for 1 microM OA). 4. This study has demonstrated the high Ca2+ sensitivity of the activation mechanism of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. It also suggests that control of the contractile machinery in the human bronchus involves processes of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The beta-escin-treated human bronchus may be a useful model for investigating the cellular basis of some pathophysiological processes such as bronchial hyper-responsiveness. PMID:8014904

  9. Practical techniques for detection of Toll-like receptor-4 in the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Ryan; Abreu, Maria T; Fukata, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    The human intestine has evolved in the presence of a diverse array of luminal microorganisms. In order to maintain intestinal homeostasis, mucosal immune responses to theses microorganisms must be tightly regulated. The intestine needs to be able to respond to pathogenic organisms while at the same time maintain tolerance to normal commensal flora. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in this delicate balance. TLRs are transmembrane noncatalytic receptor proteins that induce activation of innate and adaptive immune responses to microorganisms by recognizing structurally conserved molecular patterns of microbes. Expression of TLRs by intestinal epithelial cell is normally down-regulated to maintain immune tolerance to the luminal microorganisms.One of the challenges of TLR research in the human intestine is that it is difficult for many experimental methods to detect very low expression of TLRs within the intestinal mucosa. Quantitative methods such as PCR are limited in their ability to detect TLR expression by specific cell types within a tissue sample, which can be important when studying the contribution of TLR signaling to pathological conditions. In this regard, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is advantageous in that one can visualize the distribution and localization of target proteins within both normal and pathologic parts of a given tissue sample. We found that a subset of human colorectal cancers over-express TLR4 by means of immunofluorescence (IF) and IHC methods. Localization of TLR4 within cancer tissue often appears to be patchy, making IHC an appropriate way to examine these changes. We will describe our current techniques to detect TLR4 in paraffin-embedded human large intestine sections. Establishing a practical IHC technique that may provide consistent results between laboratories will significantly enhance understanding of the role of TLRs in human intestinal health and disease.

  10. Immunological quantitation and localization of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in human liver and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Sakashita, N; Ornvold, K; Lee, O; Chang, E T; Dong, R; Lin, S; Lee, C Y; Strom, S C; Kashyap, R; Fung, J J; Farese, R V; Patoiseau, J F; Delhon, A; Chang, T Y

    2000-09-08

    By using specific anti-ACAT-1 antibodies in immunodepletion studies, we previously found that ACAT-1, a 50-kDa protein, plays a major catalytic role in the adult human liver, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys but not in the intestine. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the intestine may be largely derived from a different ACAT protein. To test this hypothesis, we produced specific polyclonal anti-ACAT-2 antibodies that quantitatively immunodepleted human ACAT-2, a 46-kDa protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In hepatocyte-like HepG2 cells, ACAT-1 comprises 85-90% of the total ACAT activity, with the remainder attributed to ACAT-2. In adult intestines, most of the ACAT activity can be immunodepleted by anti-ACAT-2. ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 do not form hetero-oligomeric complexes. In differentiating intestinal enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ACAT-2 protein content increases by 5-10-fold in 6 days, whereas ACAT-1 protein content remains relatively constant. In the small intestine, ACAT-2 is concentrated at the apices of the villi, whereas ACAT-1 is uniformly distributed along the villus-crypt axis. In the human liver, ACAT-1 is present in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. In contrast, ACAT-2 is evident in fetal but not adult hepatocytes. Our results collectively suggest that in humans, ACAT-2 performs significant catalytic roles in the fetal liver and in intestinal enterocytes.

  11. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Booijink, Carien CGM; Troost, Freddy J; Bork, Peer; Wels, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) harbors a complex community of microbes. The microbiota composition varies between different locations in the GI tract, but most studies focus on the fecal microbiota, and that inhabiting the colonic mucosa. Consequently, little is known about the microbiota at other parts of the GI tract, which is especially true for the small intestine because of its limited accessibility. Here we deduce an ecological model of the microbiota composition and function in the small intestine, using complementing culture-independent approaches. Phylogenetic microarray analyses demonstrated that microbiota compositions that are typically found in effluent samples from ileostomists (subjects without a colon) can also be encountered in the small intestine of healthy individuals. Phylogenetic mapping of small intestinal metagenome of three different ileostomy effluent samples from a single individual indicated that Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli, Clostridium sp. and high G+C organisms are most abundant in the small intestine. The compositions of these populations fluctuated in time and correlated to the short-chain fatty acids profiles that were determined in parallel. Comparative functional analysis with fecal metagenomes identified functions that are overrepresented in the small intestine, including simple carbohydrate transport phosphotransferase systems (PTS), central metabolism and biotin production. Moreover, metatranscriptome analysis supported high level in-situ expression of PTS and carbohydrate metabolic genes, especially those belonging to Streptococcus sp. Overall, our findings suggest that rapid uptake and fermentation of available carbohydrates contribute to maintaining the microbiota in the human small intestine. PMID:22258098

  12. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  13. The human neonatal small intestine has the potential for arginine synthesis; developmental changes in the expression of arginine-synthesizing and -catabolizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Eleonore S; Sankaranarayanan, Selvakumari; van Ginneken, Christa J; van Dijk, Paul; Vermeulen, Jacqueline LM; Ruijter, Jan M; Lamers, Wouter H; Bruder, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background Milk contains too little arginine for normal growth, but its precursors proline and glutamine are abundant; the small intestine of rodents and piglets produces arginine from proline during the suckling period; and parenterally fed premature human neonates frequently suffer from hypoargininemia. These findings raise the question whether the neonatal human small intestine also expresses the enzymes that enable the synthesis of arginine from proline and/or glutamine. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), arginase-1 (ARG1), arginase-2 (ARG2), and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) were visualized by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in 89 small-intestinal specimens. Results Between 23 weeks of gestation and 3 years after birth, CPS- and ASS-protein content in enterocytes was high and then declined to reach adult levels at 5 years. OAT levels declined more gradually, whereas ARG-1 was not expressed. ARG-2 expression increased neonatally to adult levels. Neurons in the enteric plexus strongly expressed ASS, OAT, NOS1 and ARG2, while varicose nerve fibers in the circular layer of the muscularis propria stained for ASS and NOS1 only. The endothelium of small arterioles expressed ASS and NOS3, while their smooth-muscle layer expressed OAT and ARG2. Conclusion The human small intestine acquires the potential to produce arginine well before fetuses become viable outside the uterus. The perinatal human intestine therefore resembles that of rodents and pigs. Enteral ASS behaves as a typical suckling enzyme because its expression all but disappears in the putative weaning period of human infants. PMID:19000307

  14. Intestinal absorption, metabolism, and excretion of (-)-epicatechin in healthy humans assessed by using an intestinal perfusion technique.

    PubMed

    Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Lévèques, Antoine; Rein, Maarit; Teml, Alexander; Schäfer, Christian; Hofmann, Ute; Li, Hequn; Schwab, Matthias; Eichelbaum, Michel; Williamson, Gary

    2013-10-01

    (-)-Epicatechin is a dietary flavonoid present in many foods that affects vascular function, but its action is limited by incomplete absorption, conjugation, and metabolism. Factors that influence this activity may be attributed to instability in the gastrointestinal lumen, low permeability across the intestinal wall, or active efflux from enterocytes and extensive conjugation. With the use of a multilumen perfusion catheter, we investigated the jejunal absorption, systemic availability, metabolism, and intestinal, biliary, and urinary excretion of (-)-epicatechin in humans. In a single-center, randomized, open, controlled study in 8 healthy volunteers, 50 mg purified (-)-epicatechin was perfused into an isolated jejunal segment together with antipyrine as a marker for absorption. (-)-Epicatechin and conjugates were measured in intestinal perfusates, bile, plasma, and urine. Forty-six percent of the dose was recovered in the perfusate either as unchanged (-)-epicatechin (22 mg) or conjugates (0.8 mg); with stability taken into account, this result indicates that ∼46% of the dose had apparently been absorbed. The conjugates were predominantly sulfates, which indicated conjugation by sulfotransferases followed by efflux from the enterocytes. In contrast, epicatechin glucuronides were dominant in plasma, bile, and urine. Almost one-half of the (-)-epicatechin is apparently absorbed in the jejunum but with substantial interindividual differences in the extent of absorption. The data suggest that the nature and substitution position of (-)-epicatechin conjugation are major determinants of the metabolic fate in the body, influencing whether the compound is effluxed into the lumen or absorbed into the blood and subsequently excreted.

  15. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders.

  16. A General O-Glycosylation System Important to the Physiology of a Major Human Intestinal Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C. Mark; Coyne, Michael J.; Villa, Otto F.; Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The Bacteroides are a numerically dominant genus of the human intestinal microbiota. These organisms harbor a rare bacterial pathway for incorporation of exogenous fucose into capsular polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The infrequency of glycoprotein synthesis by bacteria prompted a more detailed analysis of this process. Here, we demonstrate that Bacteroides fragilis has a general O-glycosylation system. The proteins targeted for glycosylation include those predicted to be involved in protein folding, protein-protein interactions, peptide degradation, as well as surface lipoproteins. Protein glycosylation is central to the physiology of B. fragilis and is necessary for the organism to competitively colonize the mammalian intestine. We provide evidence that general O-glycosylation systems are conserved among intestinal Bacteroides species and likely contribute to the predominance of Bacteroides in the human intestine. PMID:19379697

  17. Engineered human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived intestinal tissues with a functional enteric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Michael J; Mahe, Maxime M; Trisno, Stephen; Poling, Holly M; Watson, Carey L; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Chang, Ching-Fang; Schiesser, Jacqueline; Aubert, Philippe; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Conklin, Bruce R; Neunlist, Michel; Brugmann, Samantha A; Helmrath, Michael A; Wells, James M

    2017-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract controls many diverse functions, including motility and epithelial permeability. Perturbations in ENS development or function are common, yet there is no human model for studying ENS-intestinal biology and disease. We used a tissue-engineering approach with embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to generate human intestinal tissue containing a functional ENS. We recapitulated normal intestinal ENS development by combining human-PSC-derived neural crest cells (NCCs) and developing human intestinal organoids (HIOs). NCCs recombined with HIOs in vitro migrated into the mesenchyme, differentiated into neurons and glial cells and showed neuronal activity, as measured by rhythmic waves of calcium transients. ENS-containing HIOs grown in vivo formed neuroglial structures similar to a myenteric and submucosal plexus, had functional interstitial cells of Cajal and had an electromechanical coupling that regulated waves of propagating contraction. Finally, we used this system to investigate the cellular and molecular basis for Hirschsprung's disease caused by a mutation in the gene PHOX2B. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of human-PSC-derived intestinal tissue with a functional ENS and how this system can be used to study motility disorders of the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27869805

  18. Growth inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by cellular extracts of human intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Miyakawa, H; Hasegawa, A; Takazoe, I; Kawai, Y

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro growth of Streptococcus mutans was completely inhibited by water-soluble extracts from cells of various intestinal lactic acid bacteria identified as Streptococcus faecium, Streptococcus equinus, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus salivarius. The growth inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of the extracts. In contrast, the extracts did not inhibit the growth of the major indigenous intestinal lactic acid bacteria isolated from humans. These lactic acid bacteria were not acutely toxic in mice. PMID:4030098

  19. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  20. Little ROCK is a ROCK1 pseudogene expressed in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing of the human genome has identified numerous chromosome copy number additions and subtractions that include stable partial gene duplications and pseudogenes that when not properly annotated can interfere with genetic analysis. As an example of this problem, an evolutionary chromosome event in the primate ancestral chromosome 18 produced a partial duplication and inversion of rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 -18q11.1, 33 exons) in the subtelomeric region of the p arm of chromosome 18 detectable only in humans. ROCK1 and the partial gene copy, which the gene databases also currently call ROCK1, include non-unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results Here, we characterize this partial gene copy of the human ROCK1, termed Little ROCK, located at 18p11.32. Little ROCK includes five exons, four of which share 99% identity with the terminal four exons of ROCK1 and one of which is unique to Little ROCK. In human while ROCK1 is expressed in many organs, Little ROCK expression is restricted to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lines and organs rich in smooth muscle. The single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) lists multiple variants contained in the region shared by ROCK1 and Little ROCK. Using gene and cDNA sequence analysis we clarified the origins of two non-synonymous SNPs annotated in the genome to actually be fixed differences between the ROCK1 and the Little ROCK gene sequences. Two additional coding SNPs were valid polymorphisms selectively within Little ROCK. Little ROCK-Green Fluorescent fusion proteins were highly unstable and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vitro. Conclusion In this report we have characterized Little ROCK (ROCK1P1), a human expressed pseudogene derived from partial duplication of ROCK1. The large number of pseudogenes in the human genome creates significant genetic diversity. Our findings emphasize the importance of taking into consideration pseudogenes in all candidate gene and

  1. Little ROCK is a ROCK1 pseudogene expressed in human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, Maria Claudia; Merlo, Kristen; Bryan, Crystal D; Surks, Howard K; Reis, Steven E; Mendelsohn, Michael E; Huggins, Gordon S

    2010-04-14

    Sequencing of the human genome has identified numerous chromosome copy number additions and subtractions that include stable partial gene duplications and pseudogenes that when not properly annotated can interfere with genetic analysis. As an example of this problem, an evolutionary chromosome event in the primate ancestral chromosome 18 produced a partial duplication and inversion of rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 -18q11.1, 33 exons) in the subtelomeric region of the p arm of chromosome 18 detectable only in humans. ROCK1 and the partial gene copy, which the gene databases also currently call ROCK1, include non-unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we characterize this partial gene copy of the human ROCK1, termed Little ROCK, located at 18p11.32. Little ROCK includes five exons, four of which share 99% identity with the terminal four exons of ROCK1 and one of which is unique to Little ROCK. In human while ROCK1 is expressed in many organs, Little ROCK expression is restricted to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lines and organs rich in smooth muscle. The single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) lists multiple variants contained in the region shared by ROCK1 and Little ROCK. Using gene and cDNA sequence analysis we clarified the origins of two non-synonymous SNPs annotated in the genome to actually be fixed differences between the ROCK1 and the Little ROCK gene sequences. Two additional coding SNPs were valid polymorphisms selectively within Little ROCK. Little ROCK-Green Fluorescent fusion proteins were highly unstable and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vitro. In this report we have characterized Little ROCK (ROCK1P1), a human expressed pseudogene derived from partial duplication of ROCK1. The large number of pseudogenes in the human genome creates significant genetic diversity. Our findings emphasize the importance of taking into consideration pseudogenes in all candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, as

  2. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  3. Co-cultivation of human aortic smooth muscle cells with epicardial adipocytes affects their proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Ždychová, J; Čejková, S; Králová Lesná, I; Králová, A; Malušková, J; Janoušek, L; Kazdová, L

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Adipocytes produce several bioactive paracrine substances that can affect the growth and migration of VSMCs. Our study focuses on the direct effect of the bioactive substances in conditioned media (CM) that was obtained by incubation with primary adipocyte-derived cell lines, including cell lines derived from both preadipocytes and from more mature cells, on the proliferation rate of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs). We used a Luminex assay to measure the adipokine content of the CM and showed that there was a higher concentration of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in renal preadipocyte-CM compared with the HAoSMC control (p<0.5). The addition of both renal preadipocyte- and epicardial adipocyte- CM resulted in the elevated production of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with the control HASoSMC CM (p<0.001). The adiponectin content in renal adipocyte-CM was increased compared to all the remaining adipocyte-CM (p<0.01). Moreover, the results showed a higher proliferation rate of HAoSMCs after co-culture with epicardial adipocyte-CM compared to the HAoSMC control (p<0.05). These results suggest that bioactive substances produced by adipocytes have a stimulatory effect on the proliferation of VSMCs.

  4. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  6. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  7. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  8. Hypercontractility of intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle induced by cytokines is mediated by the nuclear factor-κB/AMP-activated kinase/myosin light chain kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Mahavadi, Sunila; Al-Shboul, Othman; Alkahtani, Reem; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have identified AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) as a target of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ) and a negative regulator of myosin light-chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK). The present study examined whether a change in expression or activity of AMPK is responsible for hypercontractility of intestinal longitudinal muscle during inflammation or in response to proinflammatory cytokines. In mouse colonic longitudinal muscle cells, acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated AMPK and MLCK phosphorylation and activity and induced MLC20 phosphorylation and muscle contraction. Blockade of CaMKKβ with STO609 (7-oxo-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benz[de]isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid acetate) inhibited AMPK and MLCK phosphorylation and augmented MLCK activity, MLC20 phosphorylation, and smooth muscle cell contraction. In muscle cells isolated from the colon of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid)-treated mice or from strips treated with interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor κB was activated as indicated by an increase in p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation, and AMPK was phosphorylated at a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-specific site (Ser(485)) that is distinct from the stimulatory CaMKKβ site (Thr(172)), resulting in attenuation of ACh-stimulated AMPK activity and augmentation of MLCK activity and muscle cell contraction. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activity with MG-132 (carbobenzoxy-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucinal Z-LLL-CHO) or PKA activity with myristoylated PKA inhibitor 14-22 amide blocked phosphorylation of AMPK at Ser(485) and restored MLCK activity and muscle cell contraction to control levels. The results imply that PKA released from IκBα complex phosphorylated AMPK at a PKA-specific site and inhibited its activity, thereby relieving the inhibitory effect of AMPK on MLCK and increasing MLCK activity and muscle cell contraction. We conclude that hypercontractility of intestinal longitudinal muscle induced by inflammation

  9. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Obtaining robust, mature elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Human induced-pluripotent stem cells have

  10. Certain canine weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes are phenotypically and genotypically related to spirochetes associated with human and porcine intestinal spirochetosis.

    PubMed Central

    Duhamel, G E; Muniappa, N; Mathiesen, M R; Johnson, J L; Toth, J; Elder, R O; Doster, A R

    1995-01-01

    Four canine weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes associated with intestinal spirochetosis (IS-associated WBHIS) were compared with IS-associated human and porcine WBHIS and the type species for Serpulina hyodysenteriae and S. innocens by using phenotypic and genotypic parameters. The IS-associated canine, human, and porcine WBHIS belonged to a phyletic group distinct from but related to previously described Serpulina type species. PMID:7559984

  11. Monitoring and survival of Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 in the human intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Fujita, Takashi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Benno, Yoshimi

    2006-01-01

    The monitoring and survival of Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 in the human intestinal tract was investigated with seven healthy subjects having a low number of fecal lactobacilli. An increase of fecal lactobacilli (10(3.2-5.2) CFU/g feces) was recognized after ingestion of yogurt with SBT2055 by the subjects. A high positive rate of L. gasseri in fecal lactobacilli detected from the subjects (over 70% at 2nd weeks of feeding) was also observed during the ingestion period using the species-specific PCR system. These findings indicate that the SBT2055 strain in yogurt survived in the human intestinal tract and was recovered from human feces.

  12. Smooth enlargement of human standing sway by instability due to weak reaction floor and noise

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Tetsuro; Aoi, Shinya; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Human quiet standing is accompanied by body sway. The amplitude of this body sway is known to be larger than would be predicted from simple noise effects, and sway characteristics are changed by neurological disorders. This large sway is thought to arise from nonlinear control with prolonged periods of no control (intermittent control), and a nonlinear control system of this kind has been predicted to exhibit bifurcation. The presence of stability-dependent transition enables dynamic reaction that depends on the stability of the environment, and can explain the change in sway characteristics that accompanies some neurological disorders. This research analyses the characteristics of a system model that induces transition, and discusses whether human standing reflects such a mechanism. In mathematical analysis of system models, (intermittent control-like) nonlinear control with integral control is shown to exhibit Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, from the analytical solution of the system model with noise, noise is shown to work to smooth the enlargement of sway around the bifurcation point. This solution is compared with measured human standing sway on floors with different stabilities. By quantitatively comparing the control parameters between human observation and model prediction, enlargement of sway is shown to appear as predicted by the model analysis. PMID:26909186

  13. High taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota by Ligase Detection Reaction - Universal Array approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Affecting the core functional microbiome, peculiar high level taxonomic unbalances of the human intestinal microbiota have been recently associated with specific diseases, such as obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and intestinal inflammation. Results In order to specifically monitor microbiota unbalances that impact human physiology, here we develop and validate an original DNA-microarray (HTF-Microbi.Array) for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota. Based on the Ligase Detection Reaction-Universal Array (LDR-UA) approach, the HTF-Microbi.Array enables specific detection and approximate relative quantification of 16S rRNAs from 30 phylogenetically related groups of the human intestinal microbiota. The HTF-Microbi.Array was used in a pilot study of the faecal microbiota of eight young adults. Cluster analysis revealed the good reproducibility of the high level taxonomic microbiota fingerprint obtained for each of the subject. Conclusion The HTF-Microbi.Array is a fast and sensitive tool for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota in terms of presence/absence of the principal groups. Moreover, analysis of the relative fluorescence intensity for each probe pair of our LDR-UA platform can provide estimation of the relative abundance of the microbial target groups within each samples. Focusing the phylogenetic resolution at division, order and cluster levels, the HTF-Microbi.Array is blind with respect to the inter-individual variability at the species level. PMID:20398430

  14. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  15. The rhythmic expression of clock genes attenuated in human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changpo; Tang, Xiao; Zhu, Zhu; Liao, Xiaohong; Zhao, Ran; Fu, Weiguo; Chen, Bin; Jiang, Junhao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Daqiao

    2014-01-13

    Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are more likely to occur in the early morning. Circadian pacemakers are considered to be involved in the process. Many peripheral tissues and cells also contain clock systems. In this study, we examined whether the primary cultured human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) process circadian rhythmicity; furthermore, we investigated the expression difference of clock genes between normal human carotid VSMCs and human plaque-derived VSMCs. Fifty-six human carotid plaques provided the atherosclerotic tissue, and 21 samples yielded viable cultured primary VSMCs. The normal carotid VSMCs were cultured from donors' normal carotids. The mRNA levels of the target genes were measured by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). After serum shock, both types of cells showed clear circadian expressions of Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, Per3 and Rev-erbα mRNA; meanwhile the Clock mRNA show a rhythmic expression in plaque-derived SMCs but not in normal carotid VSMCs. The expression levels of these main clock genes were significantly attenuated in human plaque-derived VSMCs compared with normal human carotid VSMCs. The rhythm of Bmal1 mRNA in plaque-derived VSMCs was changed. The present results demonstrate that the human plaque-derived VSMCs possess different circadian rhythmicity from that of normal carotid VSMCs. The rhythm changes of clock genes in plaque-derived VSMCs may be involved in the process of atherosclerosis and finally promote the rupture of plaque.

  16. Inhibition of delayed rectifier K(+)-current by levcromakalim in single intestinal smooth muscle cells: effects of cations and dependence on K(+)-flux.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, D; Beech, D J

    1995-01-01

    1. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from single smooth muscle cells isolated from the longitudinal layer of the guinea-pig small intestine. 2. Levcromakalim ((-)Ckm) inhibited delayed rectifier K-current (IK(DR)) and induced a voltage-independent K-current (IK(-Ckm)). Both effects were inhibited similarly by glibenclamide. In some cells, however, IK(-Ckm) could be induced without any effect on IK(DR). 3. Ba2+ caused a voltage-dependent block of IK(-Ckm). The IC50 was 0.2 mM at -40 mV (6 cells), but at 0 mV 2 mM Ba2+ caused only a 26 +/- 7% inhibition (n = 5). Ba2+ had much less effect on IK(DR), 2 mM Ba2+ having no inhibitory effect on current elicited by depolarization to -30 mV (n = 6) or 0 mV (n = 5). 4. Low concentrations of Zn2+ blocked IK(-Ckm) while having little effect on IK(DR). Zn2+ (40 microM) caused a 77 +/- 1% reduction of IK(-Ckm) at -30 mV (n = 4) but IK(DR) was inhibited by only 10 +/- 3% at the same voltage (n = 4). 5. Inward current amplitudes were compared in 135 mM Rb+ and 135 mM K+ bath solutions. (-)Ckm-activated Rb(+)-current was only 4% of the K(+)-current, whereas delayed rectifier Rb(+)-current was larger than K(+)-current. 6. (-)Ckm did not inhibit IK(DR) if IK(-Ckm) was blocked. In the presence of 2 mM Ba2+ or 135 mM Rb+, (-)Ckm did not induce current nor did it inhibit the delayed rectifier.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7881739

  17. Muscarinic agonist potencies at three different effector systems linked to the M(2) or M(3) receptor in longitudinal smooth muscle of guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, H; Prestwich, S A; Asai, S; Unno, T; Bolton, T B; Komori, S

    2002-04-01

    1. The abilities of muscarinic agonists (arecoline, bethanechol, carbachol, McN-A343, methacholine, pilocarpine) to inhibit isoprenaline-induced cyclic AMP production in chopped fragments (via M(2) receptors), and to evoke cationic current (I(cat)) (via M(2) receptors) or calcium store release (via M3 receptors) in enzyme-dispersed, single voltage-clamped cells from longitudinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig small intestine were examined. 2. All muscarinic agonists (1 - 300 microM) examined inhibited isoprenaline (1 microM)-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP, the IC(50) varying from 52 to 248 microM. However, their relative potencies to evoke this M(2) effect were not significantly correlated with their ability to evoke I(cat), also a M(2) effect, whether or not calcium stores were depleted; pilocarpine and McN-A343 inhibited the I(cat) response to carbachol. 3. Muscarinic agonists (concentration 300 or 1000 microM), except pilocarpine and McN-A343 which were ineffective, evoked Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current (I(K-Ca)) resulting from Ca(2+) store release (M(3) effect). Their effectiveness was tested by estimating residual stored calcium by subsequent application of caffeine (10 mM). The relative potencies to evoke Ca(2+) store release (M(3)) and for I(cat) activation (M(2)) were closely correlated (P<0.001). 4. These data might be explained if M(2)-mediated adenylyl cyclase inhibition and I(cat) activation involve different G proteins, or involve different populations of M(2) receptors. The observed correlation of agonist potency between I(cat) activation and Ca(2+) store release supports the proposal (Zholos & Bolton, 1997) that M(3) activation can potentiate M(2)-cationic channel coupling through Ca(2+)-independent mechanisms.

  18. Glycosaminoglycans and Glucose Prevent Apoptosis in 4-Methylumbelliferone-treated Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Rizzi, Manuela; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Hascall, Vincent C.; Ramoni, Marco F.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and are responsible for hyaluronan (HA) deposition in thickening vessel walls. HA regulates SMC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, which accelerates neointima formation. We used the HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) to reduce HA production in human aortic SMCs and found a significant increase of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the exogenous addition of HA together with 4-MU reduced apoptosis. A similar anti-apoptotic effect was observed also by adding other glycosaminoglycans and glucose to 4-MU-treated cells. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of HA was mediated by Toll-like receptor 4, CD44, and PI3K but not by ERK1/2. PMID:21768115

  19. Glycosaminoglycans and glucose prevent apoptosis in 4-methylumbelliferone-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vigetti, Davide; Rizzi, Manuela; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Hascall, Vincent C; Ramoni, Marco F; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2011-10-07

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and are responsible for hyaluronan (HA) deposition in thickening vessel walls. HA regulates SMC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, which accelerates neointima formation. We used the HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) to reduce HA production in human aortic SMCs and found a significant increase of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the exogenous addition of HA together with 4-MU reduced apoptosis. A similar anti-apoptotic effect was observed also by adding other glycosaminoglycans and glucose to 4-MU-treated cells. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of HA was mediated by Toll-like receptor 4, CD44, and PI3K but not by ERK1/2.

  20. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-01-01

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1–11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines. PMID:27589719

  1. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-08-29

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1-11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  2. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  3. [mRNA-binding protein Human-antigen R regulates α-SMA expression in human bronchia smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Gu, Xianmin; Jiang, Shujuan; Wang, Yuhong

    2015-10-13

    To investigate the role of mRNA binding protein Human-antigen R (HuR) in the over-expression of α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) stimulated by Platelet-derived Growth Factor (PDGF) in cultured human bronchia smooth muscle cells. Human bronchia smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were divided into 0, 6, 12 and 24 h groups according to the time of PDGF treatment. Total HuR protein and total α-SMA protein expression were detected by Western blot. Total HuR mRNA and total α-SMA mRNA level were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference technology was used to down-regulate HuR protein level to study the protective effect of HuR in PDGF-stimulated α-SMA protein expression. PDGF up-regulated the expression of HuR in a time-dependent manner. The relative expression levels of whole-cell HuR protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h groups were 0.23±0.09, 0.42±0.11, 0.93±0.21, 1.37±0.28; 1.00±0.00, 1.09±0.03, 1.16±0.03, 1.27±0.02 (all P<0.05). The relative expression levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h group also showed an increase trend marked in a time-dependent manner (1.03±0.08, 1.20±0.09, 1.39±0.11, 1.58±0.10; 1.00±0.00, 1.17±0.02, 1.23±0.02, 1.45±0.03; all P<0.05). Using RNA interference technology to down-regulate HuR protein level, there was a decrease in α-SMA protein expression. PDGF stimulation can increase the expression of HuR and α-SMA in the smooth muscle cells, and HuR protein is involved in the expression of α-SMA protein stimulated by PDGF.

  4. Effect of dexamethasone on voltage-gated Na+ channel in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Jo, Taisuke; Meguro, Kentaro; Oonuma, Hitoshi; Ma, Ji; Kubota, Nami; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Nagase, Takahide; Nagata, Taiji

    2008-06-06

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) encoded by SCN9A mRNA is expressed in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone on I(Na), by using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques, reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Acute application of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) did not affect I(Na). However, the percentage of the cells with I(Na) was significantly less in cells pretreated with dexamethasone for 48 h, and the current-density of I(Na) adjusted by cell capacitance in cells with I(Na) was also decreased in cells treated with dexamethasone. RT-PCR analysis showed that alpha and beta subunits mRNA of I(Na) mainly consisted of SCN9A and SCN1beta, respectively. Treatment with dexamethasone for 24-48 h inhibited the expression of SCN9A mRNA. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was concentration-dependent, and was observed at a concentration higher than 0.1 nM. The effect of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA was not blocked by spironolactone, but inhibited by mifepristone. The inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA could not be explained by the changes of the stabilization of mRNA measured by using actinomycin D. These results suggest that dexamethasone inhibited I(Na) encoded by SCN9A mRNA in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells by inhibiting the transcription via the glucocorticoid receptor.

  5. Effects of menthol on circular smooth muscle of human colon: analysis of the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonella; Liotta, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-10-05

    Menthol is the major constituent of peppermint oil, an herbal preparation commonly used to treat nausea, spasms during colonoscopy and irritable bowel disease. The mechanism responsible for its spasmolytic action remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by menthol on the human distal colon mechanical activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of action. The spontaneous or evoked-contractions of the circular smooth muscle were recorded using vertical organ bath. Menthol (0.1 mM-30 mM) reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. The inhibitory effect was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine (1 μM), a transient receptor potential-melastatin8 channel antagonist, or tetrodotoxin (1 μM), a neural blocker, or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase, or tetraethylammonium (10 mM), a blocker of potassium (K+)-channels. On the contrary, nifedipine (3 nM), a voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, significantly reduced the inhibitory menthol actions. Menthol also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the contractile responses caused by exogenous application of Ca2+ (75-375 μM) in a Ca2+-free solution, or induced by potassium chloride (KCl; 40 mM). Moreover menthol (1-3 mM) strongly reduced the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked atropine-sensitive contractions and the carbachol-contractile responses. The present results suggest that menthol induces spasmolytic effects in human colon circular muscle inhibiting directly the gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility, through the block of Ca2+ influx through sarcolemma L-type Ca2+ channels.

  6. IL-22 modulates inflammatory properties of human primary aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gorzelak-Pabis, Paulina; Chałubiński, Maciej; Wojdan, Katarzyna; Łuczak, Emilia; Borowiec, Maciej; Broncel, Marlena

    2017-01-01

    IL-22 is expressed at barrier surfaces, which suggests its critical role in the maintenance of normal barrier homeostasis and tissue repair. IL-22 can both promote pathological inflammation and prevent the destruction of tissues. The functional outcomes of IL-22 on vascular smooth muscle cells, which are shown to regulate immune processes within the vascular wall and which are involved in certain pathologies, have not been analyzed. The effect of IL-22 on the expression of novel antiand pro-inflammatory and barrier disrupting cytokines, apoptosis and the expression of adhesive molecules in human primary aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC) was investigated. Human AoSMC were induced with IL-22 for 24 h in vitro. The influence of IL-22 on IL-35 subunits EBI3 and p35, IL-33, IFN-γ and VEGF mRNA expression in Ao-SMC were assessed using real-time PCR. Additionally, the surface expression of ICAM-1 and apoptosis of AoSMC were analyzed in the flow cytometer. IL-22 caused a 2- and 3-fold increase of mRNA expression of the EBI3 and p35 IL-35 subunits, and a 40% decrease of IL-33 mRNA expression in AoSMC. Additionally, IL-22 decreased ICAM-1 expression on the surface of AoSMC by 30%. However, IL-22 affected neither IFN-γ and VEGF mRNA expression in AoSMC nor their apoptosis and viability. Our data suggest that IL-22, which is released by Th22 and NK cells, may be an agent affecting the inflammatory response of AoSMC, and thus it may regulate immune homeostasis of the vascular wall.

  7. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-06

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases.

  8. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  9. Human intestinal anisakiosis due to consumption of raw salmon.

    PubMed

    Couture, Christian; Measures, Lena; Gagnon, Joël; Desbiens, Christine

    2003-08-01

    Anisakiosis is a parasitic infection that follows consumption of raw or insufficiently pickled, salted, smoked, or cooked wild marine fish infected with Anisakis sp. larvae. We report a case of intestinal anisakiosis in a 50-year-old man from Quebec who presented with abdominal pain and peripheral eosinophilia after eating raw wild-caught salmon from the Pacific Ocean off Canada. Abdominal CT scan showed bowel distension proximal to a segmental jejunal wall thickening, which was resected. The jejunum segment showed a localized area of serositis with mucosal edema and a submucosal abscess rich in eosinophils surrounding a parasite consistent with the third larval stage of Anisakis sp. Diagnostic morphologic characteristics included an unpaired excretory gland (renette cell), Y-shaped lateral epidermal cords, no apparent reproductive system, and a ventriculus (glandular esophagus). These features and the absence of lateral alae excluded Ascaris sp. The absence of ventricular appendage and intestinal cecum excluded other anisakids of the genera Pseudoterranova and Contracaecum. As the popularity of eating raw fish is growing in North America, anisakiosis may be diagnosed more frequently in surgical specimens. This parasitic infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal syndromes and eosinophilic infiltrates of the stomach, small intestine, colon, omentum, and mesentery, especially with a history of raw marine fish consumption.

  10. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-07-01

    1. The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK(1) receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. 2. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK(1)-receptor antagonist, [(3)H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. 3. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (n(H) values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77+/-0.07, 2-NAP=0.73+/-0.03, YM220=0.70+/-0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83+/-0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. 4. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK(1) receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. British Journal of Pharmacology (2002) 136, 873-882

  11. SIRT1 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis reprogramming in hypoxic human pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Liu, Yan; Burns, Nana; Zhao, Ke-Seng; Song, Rui

    2017-03-22

    Although recent studies have reported that mitochondria are putative oxygen sensors underlying hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, little is known concerning the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory program in pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). We investigated the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in human PASMCs during H/R. Human PASMCs were exposed to hypoxia of 24-48 h and reoxygenation of 24-48 h. The expression of SIRT1 was reduced in a time-dependent manner. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) expression was increased during hypoxia and decreased during reoxygenation, while the release of TFAM was increased in a time-dependent manner. Lentiviral overexpression of SIRT1 preserved SIRT3 deacetylase activity in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of PGC-1α suppressed the effect of SIRT1 on SIRT3 activity. Knockdown of SIRT3 abrogated SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of cyclophilin D (CyPD). Notably, knockdown of SIRT3 or PGC-1α suppressed the incremental effect of SIRT1 on mitochondrial TFAM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cellular ATP levels. Importantly, polydatin restored SIRT1 levels in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed the effect of polydatin on mitochondrial TFAM, mtDNA content and cellular ATP levels. In conclusion, SIRT1 expression is decreased in human PASMCs during H/R. TFAM expression in mitochondria is reduced and the release of TFAM is increased by H/R. PGC-1α/SIRT3/CyPD mediates the protective effect of SIRT1 on expression and release of TFAM and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Polydatin improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function by enhancing SIRT1 expression in hypoxic human PASMCs.

  12. Circulating intestine-derived exosomal miR-328 in plasma, a possible biomarker for estimating BCRP function in the human intestines.

    PubMed

    Gotanda, Keisuke; Hirota, Takeshi; Saito, Jumpei; Fukae, Masato; Egashira, Yu; Izumi, Noritomo; Deguchi, Mariko; Kimura, Miyuki; Matsuki, Shunji; Irie, Shin; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2016-08-30

    A variant in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) gene, 421C> A is a useful biomarker for describing large inter-individual differences in the pharmacokinetics of sulfasalazine (SASP), a BCRP substrate. However, large intra-genotypic variability still exists in spite of the incorporation of this variant into the pharmacokinetics of SASP. Since miR-328 negatively regulates BCRP expression in human tissues, we hypothesized that exosomal miR-328 in plasma, which leaks from the intestines, is a possible biomarker for estimating BCRP activity in the human intestines. We established an immunoprecipitation-based quantitative method for circulating intestine-derived miR-328 in plasma using an anti-glycoprotein A33 antibody. A clinical study was conducted with an open-label, non-randomized, and single-arm design involving 33 healthy participants. Intestine-derived exosomal miR-328 levels positively correlated (P < 0.05) with SASP AUC0-48, suggesting that subjects with high miR-328 levels have low intestinal BCRP activity, resulting in the high AUC of SASP. Circulating intestine-derived exosomal miR-328 in plasma has potential as a possible biomarker for estimating BCRP function in the human intestines.

  13. Study of the Biotransformation of Tongmai Formula by Human Intestinal Flora and Its Intestinal Permeability across the Caco-2 Cell Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Wang, Fu-Rong; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2015-10-15

    Tongmai formula (TMF) is a well-known Chinese medicinal preparation that contains isoflavones as its major bioactive constituents. As traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are usually used by oral administration, their fate inside the intestinal lumen, including their biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF) and intestinal absorption deserves study. In this work TMF extract was incubated with human intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions and the changes in the twelve main constituents of TMF were then investigated. Their intestinal permeabilities, i.e., the transport capability across the intestinal brush border were investigated with a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cell monolayer model to predict the absorption mechanism. Meanwhile, rapid HPLC-DAD methods were established for the assay. According to the biotransformation curves of the twelve constituents and the permeability coefficients, the intestinal absorption capacity of the typical compounds was elevated from the levels of 10(-7) cm/s to 10(-5) cm/s from those of the original compounds in TMF. Among them the main isoflavone glycosides puerarin (4), mirificin (6) and daidzin (7) were transformed into the same aglycone, daidzein (10). Therefore it was predicted that the aglycone compounds might be the real active ingredients in TMF. The models used can represent a novel path for the TCM studies.

  14. Transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin modulates the intestinal flora in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Yu, Tian; Wang, Jing; Li, Ning

    2012-06-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a beneficial multifunctional protein in milk. The objective of this study was to determine whether bovine transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) can modulate intestinal flora in the neonatal pig as an animal model for the human infant. We fed 7-day-old piglets (i) ordinary whole milk (OM), (ii) a 1:1 mixture of OM and rhLF milk (MM), or (iii) rhLF milk (LFM). LFM provided better average daily mass gain than OM (P = 0.007). PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the LFM piglets exhibited more diversity of the intestinal flora than the OM group. Except for the colon in the LFM group, an increasing trend in microbial diversity occurred from the duodenum to the colon. Fecal flora was not different across different ages or different treatment groups, but a cluster analysis showed that the fecal flora of OM- and MM-fed piglets had a higher degree of similarity than that of LFM-fed piglets. Based on culture-based bacterial counts of intestinal content samples, concentrations of Salmonella spp. in the colon and of Escherichia coli throughout the intestine were reduced with LFM (P < 0.01). Concentrations of Bifidobacterium spp. in the ileum and of Lactobacillus spp. throughout the intestine were also increased with LFM (P ≤ 0.01). We suggest that rhLF can modulate the intestinal flora in piglets.

  15. The human milk oligosaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose augments the adaptive response to extensive intestinal

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jennifer A.; Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Karns, Rebekah; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Helmrath, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal resection resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS) carries a heavy burden of long-term morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, which can be attenuated with strategies that improve intestinal adaptation. SBS infants fed human milk, compared with formula, have more rapid intestinal adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that the major noncaloric human milk oligosaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) contributes to the adaptive response after intestinal resection. Using a previously described murine model of intestinal adaptation, we demonstrated increased weight gain from 21 to 56 days (P < 0.001) and crypt depth at 56 days (P < 0.0095) with 2′-FL supplementation after ileocecal resection. Furthermore, 2′-FL increased small bowel luminal content microbial alpha diversity following resection (P < 0.005) and stimulated a bloom in organisms of the genus Parabacteroides (log2-fold = 4.1, P = 0.035). Finally, transcriptional analysis of the intestine revealed enriched ontologies and pathways related to antimicrobial peptides, metabolism, and energy processing. We conclude that 2′-FL supplementation following ileocecal resection increases weight gain, energy availability through microbial community modulation, and histological changes consistent with improved adaptation. PMID:26702137

  16. Butyrate modulating effects on pro-inflammatory pathways in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elce, A; Amato, F; Zarrilli, F; Calignano, A; Troncone, R; Castaldo, G; Canani, R B

    2017-08-31

    Butyrate acts as energy source for intestinal epithelial cells and as key mediator of several immune processes, modulating gene expression mainly through histone deacetylation inhibition. Thanks to these effects, butyrate has been proposed for the treatment of many intestinal diseases. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of butyrate on the expression of a large series of target genes encoding proteins involved in pro-inflammatory pathways. We performed quantitative real-time-PCR analysis of the expression of 86 genes encoding proteins bearing to pro-inflammatory pathways, before and after butyrate exposure, in primary epithelial cells derived from human small intestine and colon. Butyrate significantly down-regulated the expression of genes involved in inflammatory response, among which nuclear factor kappa beta, interferon-gamma, Toll like 2 receptor and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Further confirmations of these data, including studies at protein level, would support the use of butyrate as effective therapeutic strategy in intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  17. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

    PubMed

    Heimesaat, Markus M; Boelke, Silvia; Fischer, André; Haag, Lea-Maxie; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A; Göbel, Ulf B; Bereswill, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa) applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help to distinguish between relevant bacteria and secondary contaminants thus providing

  18. Expression and function of K(V)2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A Y; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2012-06-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and the electrically silent K(V)9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)4.2 homotetrameric channels and of K(V)2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3 (but not K(V)4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced K(V) current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5-30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive K(V)2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction.

  19. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  20. P-gp activity and inhibition in the different regions of human intestine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-03-01

    Although intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been extensively studied in vitro and in animals, its activity and the consequences of P-gp inhibition for drug disposition and toxicity in humans are still difficult to accurately extrapolate from these studies. Moreover, existing in vitro models do not take into consideration that the intestine is heterogeneous with respect to P-gp expression. Recently, we reported rat precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) as a physiological ex vivo model to study the regional gradient of P-gp activity and inhibition. Here we extended the application of PCIS to the human intestine. For this purpose rhodamine 123 (R123) accumulation in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, cyclosporine A, quinidine, ketoconazole, PSC833 and CP100356 was measured in PCIS of human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. R123 accumulation in the presence of the P-gp inhibitors appeared to be most enhanced in the ileum compared to the other regions. Moreover, the regional differences in accumulation are in line with published differences in abundance of P-gp. The rank order of the potency of the P-gp inhibitors, reflected by their IC50 , was comparable to that in rat PCIS. However, the increase in accumulation of the P-gp substrate R123 by the inhibitors was larger in human ileum PCIS than in rat PCIS, indicating species difference in P-gp abundance. These data show that human PCIS are an appropriate ex vivo model to study the activity of intestinal P-gp and predict the inhibitory effect of drugs and of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in the human intestine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Isolation and Identification of Intestinal CYP3A Inhibitors from Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) using Human Intestinal Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunkyung; Sy-Cordero, Arlene; Graf, Tyler N.; Brantley, Scott J.; Paine, Mary F.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2010-01-01

    Cranberry juice is used routinely, especially among women and the elderly, to prevent and treat urinary tract infections. These individuals are likely to be taking medications concomitantly with cranberry juice, leading to concern about potential drug-dietary substance interactions, particularly in the intestine, which, along with the liver, is rich in expression of the prominent drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Using a systematic in vitro-in vivo approach, a cranberry juice product was identified recently that elicited a pharmacokinetic interaction with the CYP3A probe substrate midazolam in 16 healthy volunteers. Relative to water, a cranberry juice inhibited intestinal first-pass midazolam metabolism. In vitro studies were initiated to identify potential enteric CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry via a bioactivity-directed fractionation approach involving dried whole cranberry [Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae)], midazolam, and human intestinal microsomes (HIM). Three triterpenes (maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid) were isolated. The inhibitory potency (IC50) of maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid was 7.4, 8.8, and <10 μM, respectively, using HIM as the enzyme source and was 2.8, 4.3, and <10 μM, respectively, using recombinant CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. These in vitro inhibitory potencies, which are within the range of those reported for two CYP3A inhibitory components in grapefruit juice, suggest that these triterpenes may have contributed to the midazolam-cranberry juice interaction observed in the clinical study. PMID:20717876

  2. Association of germ-free mice with a simplified human intestinal microbiota results in a shortened intestine.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Kathleen; Krupova, Zuzana; Rabot, Sylvie; Loh, Gunnar; Levenez, Florence; Descamps, Amandine; Lepage, Patricia; Doré, Joël; Bellier, Sylvain; Blaut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Genetic, nutritional, and gut microbiota-derived factors have been proposed to play a role in the development of the whole intestine that is around 40% longer in PRM/Alf mice compared with other mouse strains. The PRM/Alf genotype explains 60% of this length difference. The remaining 40% are due to a maternal effect that could depend on the gut microbiota transmitted by the mother to their pups. Germ-free PRM/Alf mice and C3H/He mice were associated with a simplified human microbiota (SIHUMI) to study its impact on gut length. The small intestines of the SIHUMI-associated mice were 16.4% (PRM/Alf) and 9.7% (C3H/He) shorter than those of the corresponding germ-free counterparts. Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative real-time PCR revealed differences in microbiota composition between both SIHUMI-associated mouse strains. Anaerostipes caccae was one log lower in PRM/Alf mice than in C3H/He mice. Since polyamines and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are important intestinal growth factors, their concentrations were explored. Cecal concentrations of putrescine, spermine, spermidine, and N-acetylspermine were 1.5-fold, 3.7-fold, 2.2-fold, and 1.4-fold higher, respectively, in the SIHUMI-C3H/He mice compared with the SIHUMI-PRM/Alf mice. In addition, cecal acetate, propionate, and butyrate concentrations in SIHUMI-C3H/He mice were 1.4-fold, 1.1-fold, and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in SIHUMI-PRM/Alf mice. These results indicate that polyamines and SCFAs did not promote gut lengthening in any of the two mouse strains. This suggests that as yet unknown factors provided by the SIHUMI prevented gut lengthening in the SIHUMI-associated mice compared with the germfree mice.

  3. Isolation and identification of intestinal CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) using human intestinal microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyung; Sy-Cordero, Arlene; Graf, Tyler N; Brantley, Scott J; Paine, Mary F; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2011-02-01

    Cranberry juice is used routinely, especially among women and the elderly, to prevent and treat urinary tract infections. These individuals are likely to be taking medications concomitantly with cranberry juice, leading to concern about potential drug-dietary substance interactions, particularly in the intestine, which, along with the liver, is rich in expression of the prominent drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Using a systematic in vitro-in vivo approach, a cranberry juice product was identified recently that elicited a pharmacokinetic interaction with the CYP3A probe substrate midazolam in 16 healthy volunteers. Relative to water, cranberry juice inhibited intestinal first-pass midazolam metabolism. In vitro studies were initiated to identify potential enteric CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry via a bioactivity-directed fractionation approach involving dried whole cranberry [Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae)], midazolam, and human intestinal microsomes (HIM). Three triterpenes (maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid) were isolated. The inhibitory potency (IC(50)) of maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid was 7.4, 8.8, and < 10 µM, respectively, using HIM as the enzyme source and 2.8, 4.3, and < 10 µM, respectively, using recombinant CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. These in vitro inhibitory potencies, which are within the range of those reported for two CYP3A inhibitory components in grapefruit juice, suggest that these triterpenes may have contributed to the midazolam-cranberry juice interaction observed in the clinical study. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Human isolated bronchial smooth muscle contains functional ryanodine/caffeine-sensitive Ca-release channels.

    PubMed

    Hyvelin, J M; Martin, C; Roux, E; Marthan, R; Savineau, J P

    2000-08-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle (HBSM) contraction is implicated in a variety of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Yet, the presence of an operative calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) mechanism, identified in various smooth muscles, has not been established in HBSM. We therefore studied Ca-releasing mechanisms in HBSM obtained at thoracotomy with special attention to ryanodine-sensitive receptor channels (RyRs). In freshly isolated bronchial myocytes, ryanodine (0.5 to 50 microM) and caffeine (1 to 25 mM) induced transient increases in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Higher ryanodine concentrations (> 100 microM) inhibited the caffeine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response, which was also blocked in the presence of tetracaine (300 microM) or ruthenium red (200 microM), two potent CICR inhibitors. In HBSM strips, caffeine induced a transient contraction which, likewise, was inhibited by ryanodine and tetracaine. However, ryanodine (200 microM) modified neither the [Ca(2+)](i) response nor the contraction induced by K(+)-rich (110 mM) solution. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNase protection assay performed in HBSM have revealed the existence of mRNAs encoding only the type 3 RyR. We also characterized acetylcholine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) and contractile responses. None of these responses was altered by ryanodine or by tetracaine. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of functional RyRs in HBSM cells which, owing to the type of isoform or the amount of protein expressed, are not involved, under physiologic conditions, in depolarization- or agonist-induced contraction.

  5. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  6. Distinct Effects of Inorganic Phosphate on Cell Cycle and Apoptosis in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Rahabi-Layachi, Haifa; Ourouda, Roger; Boullier, Agnes; Massy, Ziad A; Amant, Carole

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential nutrient to all living organisms. Nevertheless, hyperphosphatemia is now recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. To our knowledge, the mechanisms by which elevated Pi alters smooth muscle cell proliferation have been poorly addressed. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of Pi on cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC). HAoSMC were treated with physiologic (1 mM) or high (2 and 3 mM) Pi concentrations. We showed that Pi not only decreased significantly cell viability (P < 0.001) but also induced apoptosis of HAoSMC. Moreover, Pi treatment blocked G1/S cell cycle progression by increasing cell number in G0/G1 phase up to 82.4 ± 3.4% for 3 mM vs 76.2 ± 3.1% for control (P < 0.01) while decreasing cell number in S phase. Accordingly, this was associated with a decrease protein expression of cyclin E and its associated CDK (CDK2), and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, we observed an increase of protein expression of cell cycle inhibitors p15, p21, and p27. Interestingly, we also found that induction of cell cycle arrest was partially dependent on phosphate uptake. Our results demonstrated that Pi reduced HAoSMC proliferation by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Indeed, we showed for the first time that Pi affected HAoSMC cell cycle by blocking G1/S progression. These findings would be useful for a better understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in vascular complications observed in CKD patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Phagocytosis and cytokine response to rough and smooth colony variants of Mycobacterium abscessus by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Bodil; Ridell, Malin; Wold, Agnes E

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a non-tuberculous mycobacteria able to cause opportunistic infections in selected patient groups. During the last decades it has emerged as a cause of chronic pulmonary infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). M. abscessus strains exhibit either smooth or rough colony morphology. Strains exhibiting the rough phenotype more often cause pulmonary infections in CF patients than did the smooth ones. Here, we examined phagocytosis and production of cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, in response to M. abscessus strains with smooth and rough colony phenotype. The rough isolates all formed multicellular cords, similar to what is observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Monocytes were generally unable to internalize these rough cord isolates, in contrast with the smooth ones. Furthermore, the rough M. abscessus strains induced a distinct cytokine profile differing from that induced by the smooth ones. Rough isolates induced significantly less IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor compared to smooth strains, but more IL-1β. Both varieties induced equal amounts of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, IL-8 and equally little IL-12. The ability to withstand phagocytosis might be a virulence factor contributing to the capacity of rough M. abscessus strains to give persistent pulmonary infections. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  8. Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinagoga, Katie L; Wells, James M

    2015-01-01

    As one of the largest and most functionally complex organs of the human body, the intestines are primarily responsible for the breakdown and uptake of macromolecules from the lumen and the subsequent excretion of waste from the body. However, the intestine is also an endocrine organ, regulating digestion, metabolism, and feeding behavior. Intricate neuronal, lymphatic, immune, and vascular systems are integrated into the intestine and are required for its digestive and endocrine functions. In addition, the gut houses an extensive population of microbes that play roles in digestion, global metabolism, barrier function, and host–parasite interactions. With such an extensive array of cell types working and performing in one essential organ, derivation of functional intestinal tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represents a significant challenge. Here we will discuss the intricate developmental processes and cell types that are required for assembly of this highly complex organ and how embryonic processes, particularly morphogenesis, have been harnessed to direct differentiation of PSCs into 3-dimensional human intestinal organoids (HIOs) in vitro. We will further describe current uses of HIOs in development and disease research and how additional tissue complexity might be engineered into HIOs for better functionality and disease modeling. PMID:25792515

  9. Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease.

    PubMed

    Sinagoga, Katie L; Wells, James M

    2015-05-05

    As one of the largest and most functionally complex organs of the human body, the intestines are primarily responsible for the breakdown and uptake of macromolecules from the lumen and the subsequent excretion of waste from the body. However, the intestine is also an endocrine organ, regulating digestion, metabolism, and feeding behavior. Intricate neuronal, lymphatic, immune, and vascular systems are integrated into the intestine and are required for its digestive and endocrine functions. In addition, the gut houses an extensive population of microbes that play roles in digestion, global metabolism, barrier function, and host-parasite interactions. With such an extensive array of cell types working and performing in one essential organ, derivation of functional intestinal tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represents a significant challenge. Here we will discuss the intricate developmental processes and cell types that are required for assembly of this highly complex organ and how embryonic processes, particularly morphogenesis, have been harnessed to direct differentiation of PSCs into 3-dimensional human intestinal organoids (HIOs) in vitro. We will further describe current uses of HIOs in development and disease research and how additional tissue complexity might be engineered into HIOs for better functionality and disease modeling.

  10. [Effects of human tissue kallikrein gene transfer on the migration of vascular smooth muscule cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-zhen; Xie, Liang-di; Zhu, Peng-li; Xu, Chang-sheng

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated human tissue kallikrein (Ad-hKLK1) gene transfer on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (VSMC(SHR)). A bicistronic recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-hKLK1) carrying the target hKLK1 gene and the reporter gene EGFP was constructed. VSMCs isolated from the thoracic aorta of male SHR were passaged, and the quiescent VSMC(SHR) in passages 3-6 seeded in 6-well plates were treated with Ad-hKLK1 and control virus. Human PDGF-BB or icatibant Hoe140, a BK B2 antagonistat, was used as the chemoattractant and placed in the bottom chamber of the Boyden chamber. The mRNA expressions of bradykinin B1 receptor and B2 receptor were detected by RT-PCR in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration of VSMC(SHR), with the peak inhibition rate of 34.6% (P<0.001). PDGF-BB significantly increased the mRNA expression of B2 receptor but not B1 receptor in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer can inhibit the migration of VSMC(SHR) induced by PDGF-BB, and the inhibitory effects may be not mediated by bradykinin B2 receptor.

  11. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  12. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  13. Monocyte prostaglandins inhibit procollagen secretion by human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for plaque stability.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, C; Proudfoot, D; Bowyer, D E

    1999-02-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling occurs during atherosclerosis dictating the structure of the plaque and thus the resistance to rupture. Monocytes and macrophages are believed to play a role in this remodelling. In the present study, filter-separated co-culture has been used to study the effect of monocytes on procollagen turnover by human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this system, freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes inhibited procollagen secretion from VSMC without affecting either degradation of procollagen, or DNA synthesis by the VSMC. Insertion of a 12 kDa dialysis membrane between the two cell types and treatment with indomethacin showed that the inhibitory factor was of low molecular weight and was cyclooxygenase-dependent. Pre-incubation of each cell type with indomethacin demonstrated that monocyte, but not VSMC cyclooxygenase was required. Thus, the inhibitory effect on procollagen secretion was due, most likely, to monocyte prostaglandins. Neither inhibition of thromboxane synthetase, nor blocking IL-1 activity, reduced the inhibitory activity. Addition of prostaglandins PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2alpha to VSMC cultures caused a reduction in procollagen secretion which was equivalent to, but was not additive with, the maximal effect achieved by monocytes. Monocytes and macrophages are a major source of prostaglandins and these molecules are likely to play an important role in collagen turnover within lesions.

  14. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D; Pabelick, Christine M; Prakash, Y S; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C

    2015-12-01

    Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0-20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases.

  15. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  16. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  17. Dihydrotestosterone alters cyclooxygenase-2 levels in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Osterlund, Kristen L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Both protective and nonprotective effects of androgens on the cardiovascular system have been reported. Our previous studies show that the potent androgen receptor (AR) agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increases levels of the vascular inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in rodent cerebral arteries independent of an inflammatory stimulus. Little is known about the effects of androgens on inflammation in human vascular tissues. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DHT alters COX-2 levels in the absence and presence of induced inflammation in primary human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Furthermore, we tested the ancillary hypothesis that DHT's effects on COX-2 levels are AR-dependent. Cells were treated with DHT (10 nM) or vehicle for 6 h in the presence or absence of LPS or IL-1β. Similar to previous observations in rodent arteries, in HCASMC, DHT alone increased COX-2 levels compared with vehicle. This effect of DHT was attenuated in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide. Conversely, in the presence of LPS or IL-1β, increases in COX-2 were attenuated by cotreatment with DHT. Bicalutamide did not affect this response, suggesting that DHT-induced decreases in COX-2 levels occur independent of AR stimulation. Thus we conclude that DHT differentially influences COX-2 levels under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in HCASMC. This effect of DHT on COX-2 involves AR-dependent and- independent mechanisms, depending on the physiological state of the cell. PMID:20103743

  18. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  19. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  20. Effects of valsartan on angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Ohmori, K; Nozaki, S; Mizushige, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-11-01

    The migration as well as proliferation of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist valsartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMC using Boyden's chamber methods. Ang II significantly stimulated human coronary artery SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-8) mol/l when cells of passage 4 to 6 were used. However, the migration response to Ang II was moderately decreased in cells of passage 10 to 12, and was markedly decreased in cells of passage 15 to 17, compared to that of passage 4 to 6. Ang II-induced migration was blocked by the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist valsartan in a concentration-dependent manner. By contrast, the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 did not affect Ang II-induced migration. Ang II modestly increased the cell number of human coronary artery SMC after a 24-h incubation. This increase in cell numbers was also clearly blocked by valsartan, but not by PD 123319. These results indicate that Ang II stimulates migration as well as proliferation via AT1 receptors in human coronary artery SMC when cells of passage 4 to 6 are used. Valsartan may prevent the progression of coronary atherosclerosis through an inhibition of Ang II-induced migration and proliferation in these cells, although in vivo evidence is lacking.

  1. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  2. Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Matesanz, Nuria; Nevado, Julián; Lafuente, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Azcutia, Verónica; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic vessels undergo structural changes that are linked to a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell signalling in the vasculature, where they can promote cell growth and activate redox-regulated transcription factors, like activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are involved in remodelling and inflammation processes. Amadori adducts, formed through nonenzymatic glycosylation, can contribute to ROS formation in diabetes. In this study, we analysed whether Amadori-modified human oxyhaemoglobin, glycosylated at either normal (N-Hb) or elevated (E-Hb) levels, can induce cell growth and activate AP-1 and NF-κB in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). E-Hb (1 nM–1 μM), but not N-Hb, promoted a concentration-dependent increase in cell size from nanomolar concentrations, although it failed to stimulate HASMC proliferation. At 10 nM, E-Hb stimulated both AP-1 and NF-κB activity, as assessed by transient transfection, electromobility shift assays or immunofluorescence staining. The effects of E-Hb resembled those of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). E-Hb enhanced intracellular superoxide anions content and its effects on HASMC were abolished by different ROS scavengers. In conclusion, E-Hb stimulates growth and activates AP-1 and NF-κB in human vascular smooth muscle by redox-sensitive pathways, thus suggesting a possible direct role for Amadori adducts in diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:14504138

  3. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data.

  4. A review of drug solubility in human intestinal fluids: implications for the prediction of oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Augustijns, Patrick; Wuyts, Benjamin; Hens, Bart; Annaert, Pieter; Butler, James; Brouwers, Joachim

    2014-06-16

    The purpose of this paper is to collate all recently published solubility data of orally administered drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF) that were aspirated from the upper small intestine (duodenum and jejunum). The data set comprises in total 102 solubility values in fasted state HIF and 37 solubility values in fed state HIF, covering 59 different drugs. Despite differences in the protocol for HIF sampling and subsequent handling, this summary of HIF solubilities provides a critical reference data set to judge the value of simulated media for intestinal solubility estimation. In this regard, the review includes correlations between the reported solubilizing capacity of HIF and fasted or fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF/FeSSIF). Correlating with HIF solubilities enables the optimal use of solubility measurements in simulated biorelevant media to obtain accurate estimates of intestinal solubility during drug development. Considering the fraction of poorly soluble new molecular entities in contemporary drug discovery, adequate prediction of intestinal solubility is critical for efficient lead optimization, early candidate profiling, and further development.

  5. Heparan sulfate and syndecan-1 are essential in maintaining murine and human intestinal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Lars; Salvestrini, Camilla; Park, Pyong Woo; Li, Jin-Ping; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Murch, Simon; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) fail to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function and develop an excessive and potentially fatal efflux of plasma proteins. PLE occurs in ostensibly unrelated diseases, but emerging commonalities in clinical observations recently led us to identify key players in PLE pathogenesis. These include elevated IFN-γ, TNF-α, venous hypertension, and the specific loss of heparan sulfate proteoglycans from the basolateral surface of intestinal epithelial cells during PLE episodes. Here we show that heparan sulfate and syndecan-1, the predominant intestinal epithelial heparan sulfate proteoglycan, are essential in maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier function. Heparan sulfate– or syndecan-1–deficient mice and mice with intestinal-specific loss of heparan sulfate had increased basal protein leakage and were far more susceptible to protein loss induced by combinations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased venous pressure. Similarly, knockdown of syndecan-1 in human epithelial cells resulted in increased basal and cytokine-induced protein leakage. Clinical application of heparin has been known to alleviate PLE in some patients but its unknown mechanism and severe side effects due to its anticoagulant activity limit its usefulness. We demonstrate here that non-anticoagulant 2,3-de-O-sulfated heparin could prevent intestinal protein leakage in syndecan-deficient mice, suggesting that this may be a safe and effective therapy for PLE patients. PMID:18064305

  6. High-throughput analysis of the impact of antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Ladirat, S E; Schols, H A; Nauta, A; Schoterman, M H C; Keijser, B J F; Montijn, R C; Gruppen, H; Schuren, F H J

    2013-03-01

    Antibiotic treatments can lead to a disruption of the human microbiota. In this in-vitro study, the impact of antibiotics on adult intestinal microbiota was monitored in a new high-throughput approach: a fermentation screening-platform was coupled with a phylogenetic microarray analysis (Intestinal-chip). Fecal inoculum from healthy adults was exposed in a fermentation screening-platform to seven widely-used antibiotics during 24h in-vitro fermentation and the microbiota composition was subsequently determined with the Intestinal-chip. Phylogenetic microarray analysis was first verified to be reliable with respect to variations in the total number of bacteria and presence of dead (or inactive) cells. Intestinal-chip analysis was then used to identify and compare shifts in the intestinal microbial composition after exposure to low and high dose (1μgml(-1) and 10μgml(-1)) antibiotics. Observed shifts on family, genus and species level were both antibiotic and dose dependent. Stronger changes in microbiota composition were observed with higher doses. Shifts mainly concerned the bacterial groups Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacillus. Within bacterial groups, specific antibiotics were shown to differentially impact related species. The combination of the in-vitro fermentation screening platform with the phylogenetic microarray read-outs has shown to be reliable to simultaneously analyze the effects of several antibiotics on intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intestinal Microbiota Distinguish Gout Patients from Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhuang; Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Zhanli; Ang, Kay Ying; Huang, Shi; Hou, Qiangchuan; Su, Xiaoquan; Qiao, Jianmin; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Lifeng; Koh, Eileen; Danliang, Ho; Xu, Jian; Lee, Yuan Kun; Zhang, Heping

    2016-02-08

    Current blood-based approach for gout diagnosis can be of low sensitivity and hysteretic. Here via a 68-member cohort of 33 healthy and 35 diseased individuals, we reported that the intestinal microbiota of gout patients are highly distinct from healthy individuals in both organismal and functional structures. In gout, Bacteroides caccae and Bacteroides xylanisolvens are enriched yet Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum depleted. The established reference microbial gene catalogue for gout revealed disorder in purine degradation and butyric acid biosynthesis in gout patients. In an additional 15-member validation-group, a diagnosis model via 17 gout-associated bacteria reached 88.9% accuracy, higher than the blood-uric-acid based approach. Intestinal microbiota of gout are more similar to those of type-2 diabetes than to liver cirrhosis, whereas depletion of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and reduced butyrate biosynthesis are shared in each of the metabolic syndromes. Thus the Microbial Index of Gout was proposed as a novel, sensitive and non-invasive strategy for diagnosing gout via fecal microbiota.

  8. Insights from human congenital disorders of intestinal lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    The intestine must challenge the profuse daily flux of dietary fat that serves as a vital source of energy and as an essential component of cell membranes. The fat absorption process takes place in a series of orderly and interrelated steps, including the uptake and translocation of lipolytic products from the brush border membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, lipid esterification, Apo synthesis, and ultimately the packaging of lipid and Apo components into chylomicrons (CMs). Deciphering inherited disorders of intracellular CM elaboration afforded new insight into the key functions of crucial intracellular proteins, such as Apo B, microsomal TG transfer protein, and Sar1b GTPase, the defects of which lead to hypobetalipoproteinemia, abetalipoproteinemia, and CM retention disease, respectively. These “experiments of nature” are characterized by fat malabsorption, steatorrhea, failure to thrive, low plasma levels of TGs and cholesterol, and deficiency of liposoluble vitamins and essential FAs. After summarizing and discussing the functions and regulation of these proteins for reader’s comprehension, the current review focuses on their specific roles in malabsorptions and dyslipidemia-related intestinal fat hyperabsorption while dissecting the spectrum of clinical manifestations and managements. The influence of newly discovered proteins (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 and angiopoietin-like 3 protein) on fat absorption has also been provided. Finally, it is stressed how the overexpression or polymorphism status of the critical intracellular proteins promotes dyslipidemia and cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:25387865

  9. Intestinal Microbiota Distinguish Gout Patients from Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhuang; Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Zhanli; Ang, Kay Ying; Huang, Shi; Hou, Qiangchuan; Su, Xiaoquan; Qiao, Jianmin; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Lifeng; Koh, Eileen; Danliang, Ho; Xu, Jian; Lee, Yuan Kun; Zhang, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Current blood-based approach for gout diagnosis can be of low sensitivity and hysteretic. Here via a 68-member cohort of 33 healthy and 35 diseased individuals, we reported that the intestinal microbiota of gout patients are highly distinct from healthy individuals in both organismal and functional structures. In gout, Bacteroides caccae and Bacteroides xylanisolvens are enriched yet Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum depleted. The established reference microbial gene catalogue for gout revealed disorder in purine degradation and butyric acid biosynthesis in gout patients. In an additional 15-member validation-group, a diagnosis model via 17 gout-associated bacteria reached 88.9% accuracy, higher than the blood-uric-acid based approach. Intestinal microbiota of gout are more similar to those of type-2 diabetes than to liver cirrhosis, whereas depletion of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and reduced butyrate biosynthesis are shared in each of the metabolic syndromes. Thus the Microbial Index of Gout was proposed as a novel, sensitive and non-invasive strategy for diagnosing gout via fecal microbiota. PMID:26852926

  10. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression in human vascular intimal smooth muscle cells detected by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Barath, P.; Fishbein, M. C.; Cao, J.; Berenson, J.; Helfant, R. H.; Forrester, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    We used immunohistochemistry to detect tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and in situ hybridization to detect TNF messenger RNA (mRNA) in the intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells and in the medial smooth muscle cells of human atherosclerotic arteries. Medial smooth muscle cells showed localization of immunoreactive TNF on the cell surface and did not express TNF mRNA. Conversely, in intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells, TNF was localized in the cytoplasm and TNF mRNA was expressed by in situ hybridization. Thus 89% of intimal cells were immunohistochemically positive for TNF, 96% of them were positive by in situ hybridization, and 76% were positive for the smooth muscle cell marker, HHF35. Our results suggest that intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells are mostly, but not exclusively, derived from smooth muscle cells. These cells express TNF, whereas the medial smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic human arteries do not. The expression of TNF by these mesenchymal-appearing cells may have implications regarding the evolution of the atherosclerotic plaque. Images Figure 1 to Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1698022

  11. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  12. Expression and membrane localization of MCT isoforms along the length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ravinder K; Saksena, Seema; Alrefai, Waddah A; Sarwar, Zaheer; Goldstein, Jay L; Carroll, Robert E; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2005-10-01

    Recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated the involvement of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1 in the luminal uptake of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the human intestine. Functional studies from our laboratory previously demonstrated kinetically distinct SCFA transporters on the apical and basolateral membranes of human colonocytes. Although apical SCFA uptake is mediated by the MCT1 isoform, the molecular identity of the basolateral membrane SCFA transporter(s) and whether this transporter is encoded by another MCT isoform is not known. The present studies were designed to assess the expression and membrane localization of different MCT isoforms in human small intestine and colon. Immunoblotting was performed with the purified apical and basolateral membranes from human intestinal mucosa obtained from organ donor intestine. Immunohistochemistry studies were done on paraffin-embedded sections of human colonic biopsy samples. Immunoblotting studies detected a protein band of approximately 39 kDa for MCT1, predominantly in the apical membranes. The relative abundance of MCT1 mRNA and protein increased along the length of the human intestine. MCT4 (54 kDa) and MCT5 (54 kDa) isoforms showed basolateral localization and were highly expressed in the distal colon. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that human MCT1 antibody labeling was confined to the apical membranes, whereas MCT5 antibody staining was restricted to the basolateral membranes of the colonocytes. We speculate that distinct MCT isoforms may be involved in SCFA transport across the apical or basolateral membranes in polarized colonic epithelial cells.

  13. Identification of the transcriptional response of human intestinal mucosa to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Troost, Freddy J; van Baarlen, Peter; Lindsey, Patrick; Kodde, Andrea; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert-Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge on the extent and dynamics of the mucosal response to commensal and probiotic species in the human intestinal lumen. This study aimed to identify the acute, time-dependent responses of intestinal mucosa to commensal Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo in two placebo-controlled human intervention studies in healthy volunteers. Transcriptional changes in duodenal mucosa upon continuous intraduodenal infusion of L. plantarum WCFS1 for one- and six h, respectively, were studied using oro- and nasogastric intubations with dedicated orogastric catheters and tissue sampling by standard flexible gastroduodenoscopy. Results One- and six-h exposure of small intestinal mucosa to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced differential expression of 669 and 424 gene reporters, respectively. While short-term exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 inhibited fatty acid metabolism and cell cycle progression, cells switched to a more proliferative phase after prolonged exposure with an overall expression profile characterized by upregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, cellular growth and development. Cell death and immune responses were triggered, but cell death-executing genes or inflammatory signals were not expressed. Proteome analysis showed differential expression of several proteins. Only the microsomal protein 'microsomal triglyceride transfer protein' was regulated on both the transcriptional and the protein level in all subjects. Conclusion Overall, this study showed that intestinal exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced consistent, time-dependent transcriptional responses in healthy intestinal mucosa. This extensive exploration of the human response to L. plantarum WCFS1 could eventually provide molecular support for specific or probiotic activity of this strain or species, and exemplifies the strength of the applied technology to identify the potential bio-activity of microbes in the human intestine. PMID:18681965

  14. Correlation Between Intraluminal Oxygen Gradient and Radial Partitioning of Intestinal Microbiota in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Albenberg, L; Esipova, TV; Judge, CP; Bittinger, K; Chen, J; Laughlin, A; Grunberg, S; Baldassano, RN; Lewis, JD; Li, H; Thom, SR; Bushman, FD; Vinogradov, SA; Wu, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims The gut microbiota is a complex and densely populated community in a dynamic environment determined by host physiology. We investigated how intestinal oxygen levels affect the composition of the fecal and mucosally adherent microbiota. Methods We used the phosphorescence quenching method and a specially designed intraluminal oxygen probe to dynamically quantify gut luminal oxygen levels in mice. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the microbiota in intestines of mice exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, human rectal biopsy and mucosal swab samples, and paired human stool samples. Results Average pO2 values in the lumen of the cecum were extremely low (<1 mmHg). In altering oxygenation of intestines of mice, we observed that oxygen diffused from intestinal tissue and established a radial gradient the extended from the tissue interface into the lumen. Increasing tissue oxygenation with hyperbaric oxygen altered the composition of the gut microbioita in mice. In humans, 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed an increased proportion of oxygen-tolerant organisms of the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla associated with the rectal mucosa, compared with the feces, indicating an effect of oxygenation on the microbiota. A consortium of asaccharolytic bacteria of the Firmicute and Bacteroidetes phyla, which primarily metabolize peptones and amino acids, was associated primarily with mucus. This could be due to the presence of proteinaceous substrates provided by mucus and the shedding of the intestinal epithelium. Conclusions In an analysis of intestinal microbiota of mice and humans, we observed a radial gradient of microbes linked to distribution of oxygen and nutrients provided by host tissue. PMID:25046162

  15. Ca2+ inhibition of inositol trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release in single smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, A V; Komori, S; Ohashi, H; Bolton, T B

    1994-01-01

    1. Single smooth muscle cells from the longitudinal muscle layer of guinea-pig small intestine were voltage clamped using patch pipettes in the whole-cell mode. 2. When D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) was released at intervals, by photolysis of 'caged' InsP3 within the cell, increases in [Ca2+]i in many cells, as judged from Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-current, were all-or-none; release of InsP3 before a critical interval had elapsed, which was quite stable for an individual cell, resulted in no response. After Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release had been evoked by depolarization, the InsP3 response was inhibited. Oscillations in [Ca2+]i evoked by muscarinic receptor activation were unaffected by Ruthenium Red; during these oscillations exogenous InsP3 was not effective close to, or shortly after, peak [Ca2+]i but was effective at other times. 3. Reproducible release of Ca2+ and elevation of [Ca2+]i could be produced by brief (up to 0.5 s) pressure applications of 10 mM caffeine at intervals of 10 s or greater but caffeine itself rarely evoked oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Responses to flash release of InsP3 were reduced after caffeine-induced responses and recovery of caffeine-induced Ca2+ release was faster than recovery of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release. 4. The results support the idea that InsP3-induced Ca(2+)-store release can be inhibited by a certain level of [Ca2+]i at a time when Ca2+ stores have refilled and can be released by caffeine; they also support the suggestion that during oscillations of [Ca2+]i evoked by muscarinic receptor activation, Ca2+ inhibition of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release at some critical level of [Ca2+]i allows Ca2+ stores to refill and leads to a fall in [Ca2+]i so contributing to the oscillations which are observed. PMID:7531770

  16. hPSC-derived lung and intestinal organoids as models of human fetal tissue.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Megan; Spence, Jason R

    2016-12-15

    In vitro human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived tissues are excellent models to study certain aspects of normal human development. Current research in the field of hPSC derived tissues reveals these models to be inherently fetal-like on both a morphological and gene expression level. In this review we briefly discuss current methods for differentiating lung and intestinal tissue from hPSCs into individual 3-dimensional units called organoids. We discuss how these methods mirror what is known about in vivo signaling pathways of the developing embryo. Additionally, we will review how the inherent immaturity of these models lends them to be particularly valuable in the study of immature human tissues in the clinical setting of premature birth. Human lung organoids (HLOs) and human intestinal organoids (HIOs) not only model normal development, but can also be utilized to study several important diseases of prematurity such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

  17. Activation of AMPK Inhibits Cholera Toxin Stimulated Chloride Secretion in Human and Murine Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Nadia; Collins, Danielle; Collaco, Anne; Baird, Alan W.; Winter, Desmond C.; Ameen, Nadia; Geibel, John P.; Kopic, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Increased intestinal chloride secretion through chloride channels, such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), is one of the major molecular mechanisms underlying enterotoxigenic diarrhea. It has been demonstrated in the past that the intracellular energy sensing kinase, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), can inhibit CFTR opening. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of AMPK can abrogate the increased chloride flux through CFTR occurring during cholera toxin (CTX) mediated diarrhea. Chloride efflux was measured in isolated rat colonic crypts using real-time fluorescence imaging. AICAR and metformin were used to activate AMPK in the presence of the secretagogues CTX or forskolin (FSK). In order to substantiate our findings on the whole tissue level, short-circuit current (SCC) was monitored in human and murine colonic mucosa using Ussing chambers. Furthermore, fluid accumulation was measured in excised intestinal loops. CTX and forskolin (FSK) significantly increased chloride efflux in isolated colonic crypts. The increase in chloride efflux could be offset by using the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin. In human and mouse mucosal sheets, CTX and FSK increased SCC. AICAR and metformin inhibited the secretagogue induced rise in SCC, thereby confirming the findings made in isolated crypts. Moreover, AICAR decreased CTX stimulated fluid accumulation in excised intestinal segments. The present study suggests that pharmacological activation of AMPK effectively reduces CTX mediated increases in intestinal chloride secretion, which is a key factor for intestinal water accumulation. AMPK activators may therefore represent a supplemental treatment strategy for acute diarrheal illness. PMID:23935921

  18. Effect of the endothelin family of peptides on human coronary artery smooth-muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) is one of the key events in the process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether any of the three isoforms of endothelin (ET), ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, or an intermediate form of ET, big ET-1, induces migration of human coronary artery SMCs, and to investigate the possible interaction of ET peptides and well-known migration-stimulatory factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and angiotensin II (Ang II), on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. None of the ET peptides alone induced SMC migration between 10(-9) and 10(-7) mol/L. In contrast, ET-1 and ET-2 significantly induced SMC migration in the presence of low concentrations of PDGF-BB (0.5 ng/mL) or Ang II (10(-9) mol/L), although ET-3 was less active (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). In contrast, big ET-1 was without significant activity on PDGF-BB-or Ang II-induced SMC migration. The potentiation of SMC migration by ET peptides was clearly inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BG-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that the ET family of peptides, especially ET-1 and ET-2, can induce human coronary artery SMC migration in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II, probably via ETA receptors. Taken together with the finding that the concentrations of ET, PDGF-BB and Ang II are locally increased at sites of endothelial injury, this indicates that ET may be an initial stimulus for human coronary artery medial SMC recruitment during coronary atherosclerosis, possibly in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II.

  19. Human Intestinal Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (RKIP) Catalyzes Prasugrel as a Bioactivation Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kazui, Miho; Ogura, Yuji; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Prasugrel is a thienopyridine antiplatelet prodrug that undergoes rapid hydrolysis in vivo to a thiolactone metabolite by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCE2) during gastrointestinal absorption. The thiolactone metabolite is further converted to a pharmacologically active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoforms. The aim of the current study was to elucidate hydrolases other than hCE2 involved in the bioactivation step of prasugrel in human intestine. Using size-exclusion column chromatography of a human small intestinal S9 fraction, another peak besides the hCE2 peak was observed to have prasugrel hydrolyzing activity, and this protein was found to have a molecular weight of about 20 kDa. This prasugrel hydrolyzing protein was successfully purified from a monkey small intestinal cytosolic fraction by successive four-step column chromatography and identified as Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Second, we evaluated the enzymatic kinetic parameters for prasugrel hydrolysis using recombinant human RKIP and hCE2 and estimated the contributions of these two hydrolyzing enzymes to the prasugrel hydrolysis reaction in human intestine, which were approximately 40% for hRKIP and 60% for hCE2. Moreover, prasugrel hydrolysis was inhibited by anti-hRKIP antibody and carboxylesterase-specific chemical inhibitor (bis p-nitrophenyl phosphate) by 30% and 60%, respectively. In conclusion, another protein capable of hydrolyzing prasugrel to its thiolactone metabolite was identified as RKIP, and this protein may play a significant role with hCE2 in prasugrel bioactivation in human intestine. RKIP is known to have diverse functions in many intracellular signaling cascades, but this is the first report describing RKIP as a hydrolase involved in drug metabolism.

  20. Attaching and effacing activities of rabbit and human enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in pig and rabbit intestines.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H W; Whipp, S C; Argenzio, R A; Levine, M M; Giannella, R A

    1983-01-01

    Three strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), originally isolated from humans and previously shown to cause diarrhea in human volunteers by unknown mechanisms, and one rabbit EPEC strain were shown to attach intimately to and efface microvilli and cytoplasm from intestinal epithelial cells in both the pig and rabbit intestine. The attaching and effacing activities of these EPEC were demonstrable by light microscopic examination of routine histological sections and by transmission electron microscopy. It was suggested that intact colostrum-deprived newborn pigs and ligated intestinal loops in pigs and rabbits may be useful systems to detect EPEC that have attaching and effacing activities and for studying the pathogenesis of such infections. The lesions (attachment and effacement) produced by EPEC in these systems were multifocal, with considerable animal-to-animal variation in response to the same strain of EPEC. The EPEC strains also varied in the frequency and extent of lesion production. For example, three human EPEC strains usually caused extensive lesions in rabbit intestinal loops, whereas two other human EPEC strains usually did not produce lesions in this system. Images PMID:6350186

  1. Consensus hologram QSAR modeling for the prediction of human intestinal absorption.

    PubMed

    Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2012-04-15

    Consistent in silico models for ADME properties are useful tools in early drug discovery. Here, we report the hologram QSAR modeling of human intestinal absorption using a dataset of 638 compounds with experimental data associated. The final validated models are consistent and robust for the consensus prediction of this important pharmacokinetic property and are suitable for virtual screening applications.

  2. Production of a mutagen from ponceau 3R by a human intestinal anaerobe.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, C P; Andrews, A W; Chung, K T

    1979-01-01

    Ponceau 3R was reduced in vitro by Fusobacterium sp. 2, a human intestinal anaerobe, to a product which is mutagenic when metabolically activated by liver S9 preparations in the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test. This mutagenic metabolite has been identified as 2,4,5-trimethylaniline. PMID:457255

  3. In Silico Prediction for Intestinal Absorption and Brain Penetration of Chemical Pesticides in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chedik, Lisa; Mias-Lucquin, Dominique; Bruyere, Arnaud; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal absorption and brain permeation constitute key parameters of toxicokinetics for pesticides, conditioning their toxicity, including neurotoxicity. However, they remain poorly characterized in humans. The present study was therefore designed to evaluate human intestine and brain permeation for a large set of pesticides (n = 338) belonging to various chemical classes, using an in silico graphical BOILED-Egg/SwissADME online method based on lipophilicity and polarity that was initially developed for drugs. A high percentage of the pesticides (81.4%) was predicted to exhibit high intestinal absorption, with a high accuracy (96%), whereas a lower, but substantial, percentage (38.5%) displayed brain permeation. Among the pesticide classes, organochlorines (n = 30) constitute the class with the lowest percentage of intestine-permeant members (40%), whereas that of the organophosphorus compounds (n = 99) has the lowest percentage of brain-permeant chemicals (9%). The predictions of the permeations for the pesticides were additionally shown to be significantly associated with various molecular descriptors well-known to discriminate between permeant and non-permeant drugs. Overall, our in silico data suggest that human exposure to pesticides through the oral way is likely to result in an intake of these dietary contaminants for most of them and brain permeation for some of them, thus supporting the idea that they have toxic effects on human health, including neurotoxic effects. PMID:28665355

  4. Investigation of the interactions between Chrysanthemum morifolium flowers extract and intestinal bacteria from human and rat.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin-Hua; Duan, Jin-Ao; Qian, Yi-Yun; Qian, Da-Wei; Guo, Jian-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Flos Chrysanthemi, dried flower of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat, has drawn much attention recently owing to its potential beneficial health effects for human. Flos Chrysanthemi products are usually taken orally and metabolized by intestinal microflora. However, there has been no investigation of the comprehensive metabolic profile of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora owing to its chemical complexity and the limitations of analytical methods. In this paper, a rapid, sensitive and automated analysis method, ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry including MS(E) technology and automated data processing Metabolynx™ software, was developed and successfully applied for the biotransformation and metabolic profile of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora from human and rat. A total of 32 metabolites were detected and tentatively identified in human and rat intestinal bacterial samples. These metabolites indicated that hydrolysis, hydroxylation, acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation and deoxygenation were the major conversion pathways of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract on the growth of different intestinal bacteria were detected using an Emax precision microplate reader. Certain pathogenic bacteria such as Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides were significantly inhibited by Flos Chrysanthemi, while commensal probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were moderately promoted. Our observation provided further evidence for the importance of intestinal bacteria in the metabolism and potential activity of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract. The results will also be helpful for the further pharmacokinetic study of Flos Chrysanthemi and to unravel how it works in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Intestinal drug transporter expression and the impact of grapefruit juice in humans.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, H; Bailey, D G; Dresser, G K; Gregor, J C; Schwarz, U I; McGrath, J S; Jolicoeur, E; Lee, W; Leake, B F; Tirona, R G; Kim, R B

    2007-03-01

    The goals of this study were to assess the extent of human intestinal drug transporter expression, determine the subcellular localization of the drug uptake transporter OATP1A2, and then to assess the effect of grapefruit juice consumption on OATP1A2 expression relative to cytochrome P450 3A4 and MDR1. Expression of drug uptake and efflux transporters was assessed using human duodenal biopsy samples. Fexofenadine uptake by different transporters was measured in a transporter-transfected cell line. We investigated the influence of grapefruit juice on pharmacokinetics of orally administered fexofenadine. The effect of grapefruit juice on the expression of intestinal transporters was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. In the duodenum of healthy volunteers, an array of CYP enzymes as well as uptake and efflux transporters was expressed. Importantly, uptake transporters thought to be liver-specific, such as OATP1B1 and 1B3, as well as OATP2B1 and 1A2 were expressed in the intestine. However, among OATP transporters, only OATP1A2 was capable of fexofenadine uptake when assessed in vitro. OATP1A2 colocalized with MDR1 to the brush border domain of enterocytes. Consumption of grapefruit juice concomitantly or 2 h before fexofenadine administration was associated with reduced oral fexofenadine plasma exposure, whereas intestinal expression of either OATP1A2 or MDR1 remained unaffected. In conclusion, an array of drug uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in the human intestine. OATP1A2 is likely the key intestinal uptake transporter for fexofenadine absorption whose inhibition results in the grapefruit juice effect. Although short-term grapefruit juice ingestion was associated with reduced fexofenadine availability, OATP1A2 or MDR1 expression was unaffected.

  6. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  7. On the Visual Input Driving Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Lorenceau, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Current computational models of smooth-pursuit eye movements assume that the primary visual input is local retinal-image motion (often referred to as retinal slip). However, we show that humans can pursue object motion with considerable accuracy, even in the presence of conflicting local image motion. This finding indicates that the visual cortical area(s) controlling pursuit must be able to perform a spatio-temporal integration of local image motion into a signal related to object motion. We also provide evidence that the object-motion signal that drives pursuit is related to the signal that supports perception. We conclude that current models of pursuit should be modified to include a visual input that encodes perceived object motion and not merely retinal image motion. Finally, our findings suggest that the measurement of eye movements can be used to monitor visual perception, with particular value in applied settings as this non-intrusive approach would not require interrupting ongoing work or training.

  8. Modeling the human development index and the percentage of poor people using quantile smoothing splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyani, Sri; Andriyana, Yudhie; Sudartianto

    2017-03-01

    Mean regression is a statistical method to explain the relationship between the response variable and the predictor variable based on the central tendency of the data (mean) of the response variable. The parameter estimation in mean regression (with Ordinary Least Square or OLS) generates a problem if we apply it to the data with a symmetric, fat-tailed, or containing outlier. Hence, an alternative method is necessary to be used to that kind of data, for example quantile regression method. The quantile regression is a robust technique to the outlier. This model can explain the relationship between the response variable and the predictor variable, not only on the central tendency of the data (median) but also on various quantile, in order to obtain complete information about that relationship. In this study, a quantile regression is developed with a nonparametric approach such as smoothing spline. Nonparametric approach is used if the prespecification model is difficult to determine, the relation between two variables follow the unknown function. We will apply that proposed method to poverty data. Here, we want to estimate the Percentage of Poor People as the response variable involving the Human Development Index (HDI) as the predictor variable.

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  10. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  11. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  12. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  13. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2014-05-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases.

  14. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  15. Bioengineering functional human aortic vascular smooth-muscle strips in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Louise; Khait, Luda; Welsh, Michael J; Birla, Ravi

    2008-07-01

    The contraction and relaxation of VSM (vascular smooth muscle) are responsible for the maintenance of vascular tone, which is a major determinant of blood pressure. However, the molecular events leading to the contraction and relaxation of VSM are poorly understood. The development of three-dimensional bioengineered tissues provides an opportunity to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone in vitro. In the present study we used fibrin-gel casting to bioengineer functional VSM strips from primary human aortic VSM cells. Our bioengineered VSM strips are functionally similar to VSM in vivo and remained viable in culture for up to 5 weeks. VSM strips demonstrate spontaneous basal tone and can generate an active force (contraction) of up to 85.2 microN on stimulation with phenylephrine. Bioengineered VSM strips exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent contraction and calcium-independent relaxation. The development of functional bioengineered VSM tissue provides a new in vitro model system that can be used to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone.

  16. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD.

  17. Physiological effects of androgens on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Nheu, Lina; Nazareth, Lester; Xu, Guo-Ying; Xiao, Fu-Ying; Luo, Rui-Zhi; Komesaroff, Paul; Ling, Shanhong

    2011-12-20

    Androgenic hormones are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study examines the impact of androgens on the physiology of human vascular endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in culture. Cells were incubated with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) at various physiological concentrations (5-50 nM) in the present or absence of an androgen receptor (AR) blocker flutamide (100 nM). Cell growth and death, DNA and collagen synthesis, and gene protein expression were assessed. It was shown that: (1) DHEA protected EC from superoxide injury via AR-independent mechanisms; (2) testosterone induced DNA synthesis and growth in EC via an AR-independent manner with activation of ERK1/2 activity; (3) DHT inhibited DNA synthesis and growth in EC in an AR-dependent manner; (4) testosterone and DHT enhanced ERK1/2 activation and proliferation in SMC via AR-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively; and (5) these androgens did not significantly affect collagen synthesis in SMC. We conclude that androgens possess multiple effects on vascular cells via either AR-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Testosterone and DHEA may be "beneficial" in preventing atherosclerosis by improving EC growth and survival; in contrast, stimulation of VSMC proliferation by testosterone and DHT is potentially "harmful". The relationship of these in vitro effects by androgens to in vivo vascular function and atherogenesis needs to be further clarified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  19. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells: differentiation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Ayoubi, Sohrab; Sheikh, Søren P; Eskildsen, Tilde V

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide and current treatment strategies have limited effect of disease progression. It would be desirable to have better models to study developmental and pathological processes and model vascular diseases in laboratory settings. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have generated great enthusiasm, and have been a driving force for development of novel strategies in drug discovery and regenerative cell-therapy for the last decade. Hence, investigating the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of hiPSCs into specialized cell types such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) may lead to a better understanding of developmental cardiovascular processes and potentiate progress of safe autologous regenerative therapies in pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the latest trends on differentiation protocols of hiPSC-derived VSMCs and their potential application in vascular research and regenerative therapy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C.; Pabelick, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  1. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  2. Inhibition of human arterial smooth muscle cell growth by human monocyte/macrophages: a co-culture study.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Fitzsimmons, C; Torzewski, J; Bowyer, D E

    1999-07-01

    Monocyte/macrophages produce a variety of substances which may influence the function of smooth muscle cells (SMC). During atherogenesis, macrophages are thought to modulate SMC migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Such modulation is the balance between stimulatory and inhibitory influences. Thus, for example, our earlier studies have shown that macrophages not only secrete mitogens, but also produce small molecular weight inhibitors of SMC proliferation. In the present study, we have used a co-culture system in which human monocyte/macrophages were separated from human arterial SMC (hSMC) by a filter with the optional addition of a 12 kDa cut-off dialysis membrane, in order to assess their effect on hSMC growth. We have found that human peripheral blood-derived monocytes produced a substance of < 12 kDa that inhibited hSMC growth in the co-culture system. The monocyte-derived factor causing this effect was completely blocked by indomethacin, indicating that growth-inhibitory factors produced by the monocytes were cyclooxygenase products. We have shown that PGE1 and PGE2 inhibit hSMC growth, making them likely candidates for the effector molecules released from monocytes in our co-culture system.

  3. Human intestinal microbiota: cross-talk with the host and its potential role in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Guidotti, Marco; Fabbri, Alessia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Fiorentini, Carla

    2011-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer. The peculiar metabolism of dietary compounds of the individual microbiota complement, its overall immunostimulation and immunomodulatory activity, and eventually the production of toxins that perturb the regulation of cell growth, define the balance of positive and negative risk factors for colorectal cancer development. Moreover, shaping the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, diet has an indirect impact in determining the balance between health and disease. The integration of diet, microbial, and host factors in a system approach is mandatory to determine the overall balance of risk and protective factors for colorectal cancer onset.

  4. Human milk oligosaccharides influence maturation of human intestinal Caco-2Bbe and HT-29 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Holscher, Hannah D; Davis, Steven R; Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of gastrointestinal tract maturation is 1 of the many benefits of human milk. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are abundant in human milk and are reported to promote enterocyte differentiation in vitro. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of 3 predominant HMOs on multiple aspects of enterocyte maturation in vitro. Ranging from crypt-like to differentiated enterocytes, we used the well-characterized intestinal cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2Bbe to model early and late stages of differentiation, respectively. With this model of the crypt-villus axis made up of preconfluent HT-29, preconfluent Caco-2Bbe, and postconfluent Caco-2Bbe cultures, we characterized the impact of lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT), 2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), and 6'-sialyllactose on epithelial cell kinetics and function. All 3 HMOs dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation in undifferentiated HT-29 and Caco-2Bbe cultures (P < 0.05). In contrast to previous reports, only treatment with 2'FL at concentrations similar to human milk increased alkaline phosphatase activity by 31% (P = 0.044) in HT-29 cultures and increased sucrase activity by 54% (P = 0.005) in well-differentiated Caco-2Bbe cultures. LNnT at concentrations similar to that reported for human milk increased transepithelial resistance by 21% (P = 0.002) in well-differentiated Caco-2Bbe cells. In summary, all 3 HMOs reduced cell proliferation in an epithelial cell model of the crypt-villus axis. However, effects on differentiation, digestive function, and epithelial barrier function differed between the HMOs tested. These results suggest differential roles for specific HMOs in maturation of the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Lipoprotein(a) Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Dedifferentiation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Human Apo(a) Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Unoki, Hiroyuki; Sun, Huijun; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Marcovina, Santica; Shikama, Hisataka; Watanabe, Teruo; Fan, Jianglin

    2002-01-01

    Elevated plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels constitute an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying Lp(a) atherogenicity is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that Lp(a) may potentially be proatherogenic in transgenic rabbits expressing human apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. In this study, we further investigated atherosclerotic lesions of transgenic rabbits by morphometry and immunohistochemistry. On a cholesterol diet, human apo(a) transgenic rabbits had more extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, carotid artery, iliac artery, and coronary artery than did nontransgenic littermate rabbits as defined by increased intimal lesion area. Enhanced lesion development in transgenic rabbits was characterized by increased accumulation of smooth muscle cells, that was often associated with the Lp(a) deposition. To explore the possibility that Lp(a) may be involved in the smooth-muscle cell phenotypic modulation, we stained the lesions using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against smooth-muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms (SM1, SM2, and SMemb) and basic transcriptional element binding protein-2 (BTEB2). We found that a large number of smooth muscle cells located in the apo(a)-containing areas of transgenic rabbits were positive for SMemb and BTEB2, suggesting that these smooth muscle cells were either immature or in the state of activation. In addition, transgenic rabbits showed delayed fibrinolytic activity accompanied by increased plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We conclude that Lp(a) may enhance the lesion development by mediating smooth muscle cell proliferation and dedifferentiation possibly because of impaired fibrinolytic activity. PMID:11786416

  6. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  7. BKCa channel regulates calcium oscillations induced by alpha-2-macroglobulin in human myometrial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakle-Prabagaran, Monali; Lorca, Ramón A.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Stamnes, Susan J.; Amazu, Chinwendu; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Wright, Michael E.; England, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, voltage-gated, calcium (Ca2+)-activated potassium channel (BKCa) plays an important role in regulating Ca2+ signaling and is implicated in the maintenance of uterine quiescence during pregnancy. We used immunopurification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that interact with BKCa in myometrium samples from term pregnant (≥37 wk gestation) women. From this screen, we identified alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M). We then used immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot and the proximity ligation assay to confirm the interaction between BKCa and both α2M and its receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), in cultured primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells (hMSMCs). Single-channel electrophysiological recordings in the cell-attached configuration demonstrated that activated α2M (α2M*) increased the open probability of BKCa in an oscillatory pattern in hMSMCs. Furthermore, α2M* caused intracellular levels of Ca2+ to oscillate in oxytocin-primed hMSMCs. The initiation of oscillations required an interaction between α2M* and LRP1. By using Ca2+-free medium and inhibitors of various Ca2+ signaling pathways, we demonstrated that the oscillations required entry of extracellular Ca2+ through store-operated Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that the specific BKCa blocker paxilline inhibited the oscillations, whereas the channel opener NS11021 increased the rate of these oscillations. These data demonstrate that α2M* and LRP1 modulate the BKCa channel in human myometrium and that BKCa and its immunomodulatory interacting partners regulate Ca2+ dynamics in hMSMCs during pregnancy. PMID:27044074

  8. Heterogeneity of smooth muscle cells in atheromatous plaque of human aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, V. R.; Bobryshev, Y. V.; Stenina, O. V.; Tararak, E. M.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and the ultrastructure of cells in normal intima and atheromatous plaque of human aorta. It has been established, using double-labeling immunofluorescence, that smooth muscle cells (SMC) in normal aortic intima contain myosin, vimentin, and alpha-actin but do not react with antibodies against desmin. In contrast, 7 of 28 atherosclerotic plaques contained many cells expressing desmin in addition to the other cytoskeletal proteins characteristic of normal intima SMC. These cells were localized predominantly in the plaque cap and had the ultrastructural features of modulated SMC, ie, well-developed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Besides, some cells in the 13 atherosclerotic plaques proved to be myosin, alpha actin, and desmin negative but contained vimentin and actin as revealed by fluorescent phalloidin. These cells were found in the immediate proximity of atheromatous material and reacted with a monoclonal antibody specific to SMC surface protein (11G10) but not with monoclonal anti-muscle actin (HHF35) and anti-macrophage (HAM56) antibodies. Electron microscopy of this plaque zone revealed that the cytoplasm of these cells was filled with rough endoplasmic reticulum and a developed Golgi complex. At the same time, a certain proportion of cells in this region retained morphologic features of differentiated SMC such as the presence of a basal lamina and myofilament bundles. The revealed peculiarities of cytoskeletal protein expression and the ultrastructure of cells in human aortic atherosclerotic plaques may be explained by a phenotypic modulation of vascular SMC. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2190471

  9. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R; Schlauch, Karen A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2013-10-15

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor.

  10. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor. PMID:23948706

  11. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Than, BLN; Linnekamp, JF; Starr, TK; Largaespada, DA; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O’Sullivan, MG; Medema, JP; Fijneman, RJA; Meijer, GA; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, CA; Scott, PM; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, RT

    2016-01-01

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid–base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated ApcMin mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc+/+ mice aged to ~ 1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc+/+ Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  12. Human-derived probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains differentially reduce intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuying; Fatheree, Nicole Y; Mangalat, Nisha; Rhoads, Jon Marc

    2010-11-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) is a probiotic that inhibits the severity of enteric infections and modulates the immune system. Human-derived L. reuteri strains DSM17938, ATCC PTA4659, ATCC PTA 5289, and ATCC PTA 6475 have demonstrated strain-specific immunomodulation in cultured monocytoid cells, but information about how these strains affect inflammation in intestinal epithelium is limited. We determined the effects of the four different L. reuteri strains on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in small intestinal epithelial cells and in the ileum of newborn rats. IPEC-J2 cells (derived from the jejunal epithelium of a neonatal piglet) and IEC-6 cells (derived from the rat crypt) were treated with L. reuteri. Newborn rat pups were gavaged cow milk formula supplemented with L. reuteri strains in the presence or absence of LPS. Protein and mRNA levels of cytokines and histological changes were measured. We demonstrate that even though one L. reuteri strain (DSM 17938) did not inhibit LPS-induced IL-8 production in cultured intestinal cells, all strains significantly reduced intestinal mucosal levels of KC/GRO (∼IL-8) and IFN-γ when newborn rat pups were fed formula containing LPS ± L. reuteri. Intestinal histological damage produced by LPS plus cow milk formula was also significantly reduced by all four strains. Cow milk formula feeding (without LPS) produced mild gut inflammation, evidenced by elevated mucosal IFN-γ and IL-13 levels, a process that could be suppressed by strain 17938. Other cytokines and chemokines were variably affected by the different strains, and there was no toxic effect of L. reuteri on intestinal cells or mucosa. In conclusion, L. reuteri strains differentially modulate LPS-induced inflammation. Probiotic interactions with both epithelial and nonepithelial cells in vivo must be instrumental in modulating intrinsic anti-inflammatory effects in the intestine. We suggest that the terms anti- and proinflammatory be used only

  13. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  14. Reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor and DDT by human intestinal bacterium Eubacterium limosum under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yim, You-Jin; Seo, Jiyoung; Kang, Su-Il; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2008-04-01

    Methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)ethane], a substitute for 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), is a compound of environmental concern because of potential long-term health risks related to its endocrine-disrupting and carcinogenic potency. In order to determine the metabolic fate of methoxychlor and DDT in the human intestinal gut, Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486), a strict anaerobe isolated from the human intestine that is capable of O-demethylation toward O-methylated isoflavones, was used as a model intestinal microbial organism. Under anaerobic incubation conditions, E. limosum completely transformed methoxychlor and DDT in 16 days. Based on gas chromatography-mass chromatography analyses, the metabolites produced from methoxychlor and DDT by E. limosum were confirmed to be 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)ethane (methoxydichlor) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD), respectively. This study suggests that E. limosum in the human intestinal gut might be a participant in the reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor to the more antiandrogenic active methoxydichlor.

  15. Identification of a human intestinal myeloid cell subset that regulates gut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Kayama, Hisako; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ogino, Takayuki; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Mori, Masaki; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Inappropriate activation of T helper (Th) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). CX3CR1(high) macrophages contribute to intestinal homeostasis through various mechanisms in mice. However, whether mononuclear phagocytes with regulatory functions are present in the human colon is not clearly defined. We investigated whether innate myeloid cells that suppress activation of effector T cells exist in the human intestinal mucosa. Among intestinal lamina propria cells, Lin(-) HLA-DR(high) CD14(+) CD163(high) cells were subdivided into CD160(low) and CD160(high) cells. Both subsets produced high levels of IL-10. CD163(high) CD160(high) cells suppressed effector T cell proliferation, whereas CD163(high) CD160(low) cells induced Th17 differentiation. Patients with UC exhibited increased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(low) cells, while showing profoundly decreased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(high) cells. In this context, CD163(high) CD160(high) cells had higher CD80/CD86 expression and lower IL10RB expression, and these cells did not suppress effector T cell proliferation. The CD163(high) CD160(high) subset in normal intestinal mucosa inhibits inappropriate Th1/Th17 responses through suppression of their proliferation, and its number and suppressive activity are impaired in patients with UC. These findings indicate how human innate immune cells might prevent UC development.

  16. Influence of the human intestinal microbiome on obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Adolph, Timon E

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there may be a strong link between the gut microbiota, energy extraction and body metabolism. Evidence is accumulating that the intestinal microbiota, in addition to other major factors such as diet and host genetics, contributes to obesity, metabolic dysfunction and diabetes. Both preclinical experimental and human studies have shown that obesity and metabolic dysfunction are characterized by a profound dysbiosis. Several human metagenome-wide association studies have demonstrated highly significant correlations of certain members of intestinal microbiota with obesity and type 2 diabetes. In addition dietary factors that substantially affect microbial composition, microbiota disruption, and the consequence of early-life antibiotic use, may contribute to childhood obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Further evidence for an association between microbiota and metabolic dysfunction has been derived from studies in pregnancy demonstrating that major gut microbial shifts occur during pregnancy thereby affecting host metabolism. In particular, the high rate of obesity following caesarean section could be partially explained by functional alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction emerge from disturbed interactions between the intestinal microbiota, dietary changes and host immune functions. A better understanding of this relationship might lead to better therapies for human metabolic and inflammatory diseases in the future.

  17. Metabolism of Isoflavones Found in the Pueraria thomsonii Flower by Human Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Matsuzuka, Yuki; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Takagaki, Kinya; Itoh, Kikuji

    2011-01-01

    Isoflavones contained in the root and flower of Kudzu (Pueraria lobata and related species) are suggested to be the critical component for its effects. Although metabolism of soy isoflavones has been well studied, the composition of isoflavones found in Kudzu is completely different from that of soy isoflavones. In the present study, we investigated whether isoflavones found in the flower of Pueraria thomsonii, a species of Kudzu, were metabolized by human fecal microbiota and murine small intestinal enzymes. Among 5 glycosidic isoflavones of the Pueraria thomsonii flower, tectorigenin 7-O-xylosylglucoside, tectoridin, genistin and glycitin were completely hydrolyzed by a homogenate of germfree mouse small intestine without contribution of bacteria. Released aglycones were not further metabolized, except that up to half of glycitein disappeared. Mouse small intestinal enzymes did not metabolize 6-hydroxygenistein 6,7-di-O-glucoside. Isoflavone aglycones as well as 6-hydroxygenistein 6,7-di-O-glucoside were highly metabolized by most of the human fecal suspensions. Metabolites were not detected with the present analytical methods in most cases. Although further investigations of the pharmacokinetics of Pueraria thomsonii flower isoflavones are needed, the results of the present study indicate active metabolism of Pueraria thomsonii flower isoflavones in the human intestine.

  18. Metabolism of heme and bilirubin in rat and human small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, F; Bissell, D M

    1982-01-01

    Formation of heme, bilirubin, and bilirubin conjugates has been examined in mucosal cells isolated from the rat upper small intestine. Intact, viable cells were prepared by enzymatic dissociation using a combined vascular and luminal perfusion and incubated with an isotopically labeled precursor, delta-amino-[2,3-3H]levulinic acid. Labeled heme and bile pigment were formed with kinetics similar to those exhibited by hepatocytes. Moreover, the newly formed bilirubin was converted rapidly to both mono- and diglucuronide conjugates. In addition, cell-free extracts of small intestinal mucosa from rats or humans exhibited a bilirubin-UDP-glucuronyl transferase activity that was qualitatively similar to that present in liver. The data suggest that the small intestinal mucosa normally contributes to bilirubin metabolism. PMID:6806320

  19. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  20. A wireless capsule robot with spiral legs for human intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenwen; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Hua

    2014-06-01

    As an attractive alternative to traditional diagnostic techniques, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) can be considered a disruptive technology. This paper presents a wirelessly powered micro-robot based on the Archimedes spiral with high integration of an active locomotion module. A WCE prototype was fabricated and tested. Including the video camera and end cap, the outer dimensions of the capsule were diameter (Φ) 16 mm, length 45 mm. Experiments demonstrated that the anchoring force can overcome 2.6 N wrap force on each leg. The anchoring force was improved to 1.486 with textured legs. A series of ex vivo experiments evaluated capsule performance and ability to traverse the intestine at an average speed of 2.3 cm/min. The wireless power transmission utilized a cylinder ferrite-core in the receiving coil-set, which significantly improved the coupling efficiency (to 12%) in the direction close (and parallel) to the transmitting coil. Although improvements of the wireless power transmission should target increased stability, this WCE device is both safe and practical for endoscopy. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cytokine response of human mononuclear cells induced by intestinal Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Elina; Keto, Joni; Nikkilä, Janne; Mättö, Jaana; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina

    2013-02-01

    Altered composition of intestinal microbiota has been associated with various immunological disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Although Clostridium species are major inhabitants of the intestinal tract, their interaction with the host immunological system is yet poorly characterized. In this study, cytokine responses of human monocytic cell line THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to six type strains representing common intestinal clostridial species were determined. The strains induced diverse cytokine responses in both THP-1 cells and PBMC. Clostridium perfringens was the most potent inducer of both tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), as compared to Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium clostridioforme, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium sporosphaeroides and Blautia coccoides. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in PBMC was most efficiently stimulated by C. sporosphaeroides. The same PBMC preparations that responded strongly to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) also responded strongly to bacterial stimulation. This indicates that the level of responsiveness is an individual feature of mononuclear cell preparations, and that the overall cytokine response is composed by a combination of host factors and microbial structures affecting them. This work supports the idea that the composition of the intestinal clostridial population influences immune responses and is likely to play an important role in intestinal homeostasis.

  2. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  3. Detection of fastidious mycobacteria in human intestines by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J M; Van Gossum, A; Adler, M; Van Vooren, J P; Fonteyne, P A; De Beenhouwer, H; Portaels, F

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether difficult-to-grow mycobacteria are present in human intestines. Intestinal tissue samples were subjected to both mycobacterial culture and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. After detection by PCR, species identity was determined by hybridizing the amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments with species-specific oligonucleotides. Intestinal biopsies from 63 patients with noninflammatory bowel diseases (n = 22), Crohn's disease (n = 31), or ulcerative colitis (n = 10) were analyzed. Culture and PCR revealed mycobacteria in four (6%) and 25 (40%) samples, respectively. Samples positive by PCR were negative with all probes specific to nine common cultivable species but were positive with Mycobacterium genavense-specific probe in 68% of cases. Mycobacterial isolates were identified as Mycobacterium gordonae and Mycobacterium chelonae. Findings were similar in Crohn's disease samples compared to non-Chron's disease samples. This study shows that difficult-to-grow mycobacteria can be detected by PCR in large and similar proportions of inflamed intestinal tissue from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal tissue that appears normal from patients with noninflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-06

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  5. Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Histologic Changes in Injured Urethral Sphincter.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Wen, Yan; Wang, Zhe; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Green, Morgaine; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Ramamurthi, Anand; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-12-01

    : Data suggest that myoblasts from various sources, including bone marrow, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, can restore muscle function in patients with urinary incontinence. Animal data have indicated that these progenitor cells exert mostly a paracrine effect on the native tissues rather than cell regeneration. Limited knowledge is available on the in vivo effect of human stem cells or muscle progenitors on injured muscles. We examined in vivo integration of smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). pSMCs were derived from a human embryonic stem cell line (H9-ESCs) and two induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. pSMCs were injected periurethrally into urethral injury rat models (2 × 10(6) cells per rat) or intramuscularly into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Histologic and quantitative image analysis revealed that the urethras in pSMC-treated rats contained abundant elastic fibers and thicker muscle layers compared with the control rats. Western blot confirmed increased elastin/collagen III content in the urethra and bladder of the H9-pSMC-treated rats compared with controls. iPSC-pSMC treatment also showed similar trends in elastin and collagen III. Human elastin gene expression was not detectable in rodent tissues, suggesting that the extracellular matrix synthesis resulted from the native rodent tissues rather than from the implanted human cells. Immunofluorescence staining and in vivo bioluminescence imaging confirmed long-term engraftment of pSMCs into the host urethra and the persistence of the smooth muscle phenotype. Taken together, the data suggest that hPSC-derived pSMCs facilitate restoration of urethral sphincter function by direct smooth muscle cell regeneration and by inducing native tissue elastin/collagen III remodeling. The present study provides evidence that a pure population of human smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (human

  6. Human, rat and chicken small intestinal Na+-Cl−-creatine transporter: functional, molecular characterization and localization

    PubMed Central

    Peral, M J; García-Delgado, M; Calonge, M L; Durán, J M; De La Horra, M C; Wallimann, T; Speer, O; Ilundáin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In spite of all the fascinating properties of oral creatine supplementation, the mechanism(s) mediating its intestinal absorption has(have) not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize intestinal creatine transport. [14C]Creatine uptake was measured in chicken enterocytes and rat ileum, and expression of the creatine transporter CRT was examined in human, rat and chicken small intestine by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results show that enterocytes accumulate creatine against its concentration gradient. This accumulation was electrogenic, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, with a probable stoichiometry of 2 Na+: 1 Cl−: 1 creatine, and inhibited by ouabain and iodoacetic acid. The kinetic study revealed a Km for creatine of 29 μm. [14C]Creatine uptake was efficiently antagonized by non-labelled creatine, guanidinopropionic acid and cyclocreatine. More distant structural analogues of creatine, such as GABA, choline, glycine, β-alanine, taurine and betaine, had no effect on intestinal creatine uptake, indicating a high substrate specificity of the creatine transporter. Consistent with these functional data, messenger RNA for CRT was detected only in the cells lining the intestinal villus. The sequences of partial clones, and of the full-length cDNA clone, isolated from human and rat small intestine were identical to previously cloned CRT cDNAs. Immunological analysis revealed that CRT protein was mainly associated with the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This study reports for the first time that mammalian and avian enterocytes express CRT along the villus, where it mediates high-affinity, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, apical creatine uptake. PMID:12433955

  7. Overloading human aortic smooth muscle cells with low density lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters reproduces features of atherosclerosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Anderson, R G; Buja, L M; Basu, S K; Brown, M S

    1977-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells accumulate only small amounts of cholesteryl esters in tissue culture, even when incubated for prolonged periods with high levels of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). This failure to overaccumulate LDL-cholesteryl esters is due to an LDL-mediated feedback suppression of the activity of the cell surface LDL receptor, a regulatory action that limits the rate at which the cells take up LDL. This regulatory system can be bypassed by incubating smooth muscle cells with LDL that has been given a strong positive charge by covalent linkage with N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPA-LDL). The unregulated uptake of DMPA-LDL produces a massive deposition of cholesteryl esters in the form of inclusions within the cell. These inclusions take up lipid stains and exhibit positive birefringence with formée crosses that are typical of liquid crystals of cholesteryl esters. By electron microscopy, the cholesteryl ester inclusions appear as homogeneous gray cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The current studies demonstrate that the unregulated uptake of LDL-cholesteryl esters by human aortic smooth muscle cells can reproduce in vitro the major biochemical and morphological alterations that occur within smooth muscle cells in vivo during the process of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:193874

  8. Human milk mucin 1 and mucin 4 inhibit Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhuoteng; Chen, Ceng; Kling, David E; Newburg, David S

    2012-08-01

    Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogen binding to host receptors and their consumption by infants is associated with reduced risk of disease. Salmonella infection is more frequent among infants than among the general population, but the incidence is lower in breast-fed babies, suggesting that human milk could contain components that inhibit Salmonella. This study aimed to test whether human milk per se inhibits Salmonella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and, if so, to identify the milk components responsible for inhibition. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 (SL1344) invasion of FHs 74 Int and Caco-2 cells were the models of human intestinal epithelium infection. Internalization of fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled SL1344 into intestinal cells was measured by flow cytometry to quantify infection. Human milk and its fractions inhibited infection; the inhibitory activity localized to the high molecular weight glycans. Mucin 1 and mucin 4 were isolated to homogeneity. At 150 μg/L, a typical concentration in milk, human milk mucin 1 and mucin 4 inhibited SL1344 invasion of both target cell types. These mucins inhibited SL1344 invasion of epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, mucins may prove useful as a basis for developing novel oral prophylactic and therapeutic agents that inhibit infant diseases caused by Salmonella and related pathogens.

  9. Human small intestinal epithelial cells differentiated from adult intestinal stem cells as a novel system for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Toru; Harada, Naomoto; Kuze, Jiro; Chiba, Masato; Iwao, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2014-11-01

    Adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) possess both a long-term proliferation ability and differentiation capability into enterocytes. As a novel in vitro system for the evaluation of drug absorption, we characterized a human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer that differentiated from adult ISCs. Continuous proliferation/differentiation from ISCs consistently conferred the capability of maturation of enterocytes to HIECs over 25 passages. The morphologically matured HIEC monolayer consisted of polarized columnar epithelia with dense microvilli, tight junctions, and desmosomes 8 days after seeding onto culture inserts. Transepithelial electrical resistance across the monolayer was 9-fold lower in HIECs (98.9 Ω × cm(2)) than in Caco-2 cells (900 Ω × cm(2)), which indicated that the looseness of the tight junctions in the HIEC monolayer was similar to that in the human small intestine (approximately 40 Ω × cm(2)). No significant differences were observed in the overall gene expression patterns of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters between the HIEC and Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, the functions of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in the HIEC monolayer were confirmed by the vectorial transport of marker substrates and their disappearance in the presence of specific inhibitors. The apparent drug permeability values of paracellularly transported compounds (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000, atenolol, and terbutaline) and nucleoside transporter substrates (didanosine, ribavirin, and doxifluridine) in the HIEC monolayer were markedly higher than those of Caco-2 cells, whereas transcellularly transported drugs (pindolol and midazolam) were equally well permeated. In conclusion, the HIEC monolayer can serve as a novel and superior alternative to the conventional Caco-2 cell monolayer for predicting oral absorption in humans.

  10. Expression of myosin isoforms in the smooth muscle of human corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Koi, P T; Milhoua, P M; Monrose, V; Melman, A; DiSanto, M E

    2007-01-01

    The molecular interaction between smooth muscle (SM) myosin and actin in the corpus cavernosum (CC) determines the erectile state of the penis. A key mechanism regulating this interaction and subsequent development and maintenance of force is alternative splicing of SM myosin heavy chain (MHC) and 17 kDa essential SM myosin light chain (MLC) pre-mRNAs. Our aim was to examine the relative SM myosin isoform composition in human CC. Tissue samples were obtained from 18 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), Peyronie's disease, or both. One specimen was obtained during a transgender operation. Patients then were stratified according to presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ED, or Peyronie's disease, as well as failure of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors and history of previous pelvic or penile surgeries, radiation, or both. Our results revealed that all human CC samples expressed only the SM-A isoform. There was a predominance of SM2 isoform mRNA relative to SM1 across all samples, with a mean of 63.8%, which correlated with protein analysis by gel electrophoresis. A statistically significant difference was found between patients who had undergone previous pelvic surgery, radiation, or both and those who did not. The ratio of LC(17b) to LC(17a) was approximately 1:1 for all patients, with a mean of 48.9% LC(17b). Statistical difference was seen in the relative ratio of LC(17b) to LC(17a) among the group who failed conservative therapy with PDE5 inhibitors compared with all others. In conclusion, we determined the SM myosin isoform composition of human CC and present for the first time differences in relative myosin isoform expression among patients with several risk factors contributing to their cause of ED. Our data reflect the fact that alternative splicing events in the MHC and 17 kDa MLC pre-mRNA may be a possible molecular mechanism involved in the altered contractility of the CCSM in patients with ED.

  11. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  12. Pharmacologic characterization of the oxytocin receptor in human uterine smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Atsuo; Tsukada, Junko; Tomura, Yuichi; Wada, Koh-ichi; Kusayama, Toshiyuki; Ishii, Noe; Yatsu, Takeyuki; Uchida, Wataru; Tanaka, Akihiro

    2000-01-01

    [3H]-oxytocin was used to characterize the oxytocin receptor found in human uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC). Specific binding of [3H]-oxytocin to USMC plasma membranes was dependent upon time, temperature and membrane protein concentration. Scatchard plot analysis of equilibrium binding data revealed the existence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.76 nM and a maximum receptor density (Bmax) of 153 fmol mg−1 protein. The Hill coefficient (nH) did not differ significantly from unity, suggesting binding to homogenous, non-interacting receptor populations. Competitive inhibition of [3H]-oxytocin binding showed that oxytocin and vasopressin (AVP) receptor agonists and antagonists displaced [3H]-oxytocin in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potencies for peptide agonists and antagonists was: oxytocin>[Asu1,6]-oxytocin>AVP= atosiban>d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP>[Thr4,Gly7]-oxytocin>dDAVP, and for nonpeptide antagonists was: L-371257>YM087>SR 49059>OPC-21268>SR 121463A>OPC-31260. Oxytocin significantly induced concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and hyperplasia in USMC. The oxytocin receptor antagonists, atosiban and L-371257, potently and concentration-dependently inhibited oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia. In contrast, the V1A receptor selective antagonist, SR 49059, and the V2 receptor selective antagonist, SR 121463A, did not potently inhibit oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia. The potency order of antagonists in inhibiting oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia was similar to that observed in radioligand binding assays. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that the high-affinity [3H]-oxytocin binding site found in human USMC is a functional oxytocin receptor coupled to [Ca2+]i increase and cell growth. Thus human USMC may prove to be a valuable tool in further investigation of the

  13. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado–Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. Objective The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05), and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes. Conclusions 10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and

  14. Human Intestinal Parasite Burden and Poor Sanitation in Rural Alabama.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Megan L; McAtee, Shannon; Bryan, Patricia E; Jeun, Rebecca; Ward, Tabitha; Kraus, Jacob; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Flowers, Catherine C; Mejia, Rojelio

    2017-09-05

    Hookworm infection affects 430 million people worldwide, causing iron deficiency, impaired cognitive development, and stunting in children. Because of the environmental conditions needed for the hookworm life-cycle, this parasite is endemic to resource-limited countries. Necator americanus was endemic in the southern United States before improvement of sewage disposal systems and eradication programs. With continued poverty, poor sanitation, and an environment suitable for the hookworm life-cycle in some regions of the southern United States, a current prevalence study using modern molecular diagnostics is warranted. Lowndes County, Alabama, was chosen as the study site given previous high hookworm burdens, degree of poverty, and use of open-sewage systems. Participants were interviewed, and stool, serum, and soil samples were tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multiparallel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays . We found that, among 24 households, 42.4% reported exposure to raw sewage within their home, and from 55 stool samples, 19 (34.5%) tested positive for N. americanus, four (7.3%) for Strongyloides stercoralis, and one (1.8%) for Entamoeba histolytica. Stool tested positive for N. americanus contained low levels of parasite DNA (geometric mean 0.0302 fg/µL). Soil studies detected one (2.9%) Cryptosporidium species, and Toxocara serology assay detected one (5.2%) positive in this population. Individuals living in this high-risk environment within the United States continue to have stool samples positive for N. americanus. Gastrointestinal parasites known to be endemic to developing countries are identifiable in American poverty regions, and areas with lower disease burden are more likely to be identified by using qPCR.

  15. Diversity of halophilic archaea in fermented foods and human intestines and their application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung

    2013-12-01

    Archaea are prokaryotic organisms distinct from bacteria in the structural and molecular biological sense, and these microorganisms are known to thrive mostly at extreme environments. In particular, most studies on halophilic archaea have been focused on environmental and ecological researches. However, new species of halophilic archaea are being isolated and identified from high salt-fermented foods consumed by humans, and it has been found that various types of halophilic archaea exist in food products by culture-independent molecular biological methods. In addition, even if the numbers are not quite high, DNAs of various halophilic archaea are being detected in human intestines and much interest is given to their possible roles. This review aims to summarize the types and characteristics of halophilic archaea reported to be present in foods and human intestines and to discuss their application as well.

  16. Absorption and Effect of Azaspiracid-1 Over the Human Intestinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Abal, Paula; Louzao, M Carmen; Fraga, María; Vilariño, Natalia; Ferreiro, Sara; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2017-08-28

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are marine biotoxins produced by the dinoflagellates genera Azadinium and Amphidoma. These toxins cause azaspiracid poisoning (AZP), characterized by severe gastrointestinal illness in humans after the consumption of bivalve molluscs contaminated with AZAs. The main aim of the present study was to examine the consequences of human exposure to AZA1 by the study of absorption and effects of the toxin on Caco-2 cells, a reliable model of the human intestine. The ability of AZA1 to cross the human intestinal epithelium has been evaluated by the Caco-2 transepithelial permeability assay. The toxin has been detected and quantified using a microsphere-based immunoassay. Cell alterations and ultrastructural effects has been observed with confocal and transmission electron microscopy Results: AZA1 was absorbed by Caco-2 cells in a dose-dependent way without affecting cell viability. However, modifications on occludin distribution detected by confocal microscopy imaging indicated a possible monolayer integrity disruption. Nevertheless, transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed ultrastructural damages at the nucleus and mitochondria with autophagosomes in the cytoplasm, however, tight junctions and microvilli remained unaffected. After the ingestion of molluscs with the AZA1, the toxin will be transported through the human intestinal barrier to blood causing damage on epithelial cells. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer.

  18. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Sex-specific pharmacological modulation of autophagic process in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Capobianco, Giampiero; Fois, Marco; Montella, Andrea; Dessole, Salvatore; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-11-01

    Sex has largely been neglected in cell studies. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of sexual dimorphism in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). In particular, we investigated the existence of sex differences in basal and in drug-induced autophagy, a process involved in cardiovascular diseases. HUASMCs were isolated from healthy and normal weight male and female newborns (MHUASMCs and FHUASMCs, respectively). Expression of the primary molecules involved in the autophagic process [beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)], and PmTOR were detected using western blotting in basal conditions, after serum starvation, rapamycin and verapamil treatments. The level of constitutive autophagy, measured as the LC3II/I ratio, was similar in male and female HUASMCs in the basal condition. Serum starvation promoted autophagy in both cell types, but the increase was more pronounced in FHUASMCs, while 250nM rapamycin induced autophagy only in female cells. Moreover, the level of verapamil-induced autophagy was not different between the two sexes. Notably, in the basal condition, Beclin-1 was more elevated in MHUASMCs than in FHUASMCs, and the difference disappeared after serum starvation and exposure to rapamycin. After exposure to verapamil, the differences in Beclin-1 increased, with more elevated expression levels in female cells. PmTor did not differ in basal conditions, but it was significantly down-regulated by starvation only in FHUASMCs and by rapamycin both in male and female cells. Finally, a strong negative correlation was observed between the newborn's weight and basal autophagy in female cells and between the newborn's weight and the LC3II/I ratio in male verapamil-treated cells. These results indicate that sex-differences begin in utero, are parameter-specific and drug specific suggesting that HUASMCs are a suitable model for the screening of drugs and to study the influence of sex. The sex differences in the autophagy

  20. Calcium Phosphate Crystals from Uremic Serum Promote Osteogenic Differentiation in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaorong; Zhang, Lin; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi; Fang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Recent study demonstrated that calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals isolated from high phosphate medium were a key contributor to arterial calcification. The present study further investigated the effects of CaP crystals induced by uremic serum on calcification of human aortic smooth muscle cells. This may provide a new insight for the development of uremic cardiovascular calcification. We tested the effects of uremic serum or normal serum on cell calcification. Calcification was visualized by staining and calcium deposition quantified. Expression of various bone-calcifying genes was detected by real-time PCR, and protein levels were quantified by western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Pyrophosphate was used to investigate the effects of CaP crystals' inhibition. Finally, CaP crystals were separated from uremic serum to determine its specific pro-calcification effects. Uremic serum incubation resulted in progressively increased calcification staining and increased calcium deposition in HASMCs after 4, 8 and 12 days (P vs 0 day <0.001 for all). Compared to cells incubated in control serum, uremic serum significantly induced the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic factor-2, osteopontin and RUNX2, and increased their protein levels as well (P < 0.05 for all). Inhibition of CaP crystals with pyrophosphate incubation prevented calcium deposition and bone-calcifying gene over-expression increased by uremic serum. CaP crystals, rather than the rest of uremic serum, were responsible for these effects. Uremic serum accelerates arterial calcification by mediating osteogenic differentiation. This effect might be mainly attributed to the CaP crystal content.

  1. A phospholipase Cγ1-activated pathway regulates transcription in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Irene; Mascall, Keith S; Ramos, Joe W; Nixon, Graeme F

    2011-06-01

    Growth factor-induced repression of smooth muscle (SM) cell marker genes is an integral part of vascular SM (VSM) cell proliferation. This is partly regulated via translocation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) to the nucleus which activates the transcription factor Elk-1. The mediators involved in ERK1/2 nuclear translocation in VSM cells are unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms which regulate growth factor-induced nuclear translocation of ERK1/2 and gene expression in VSM cells. In cultured human VSM cells, phospholipase C (PLC)γ1 expression was required for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced ERK1/2 nuclear translocation, Elk-1 phosphorylation, and subsequent repression of SM α-actin gene expression. The mechanisms of a role for PLCγ1 in ERK1/2 nuclear localization were further examined by investigating interacting proteins. The ERK1/2-binding phosphoprotein, protein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15), was phosphorylated by PDGF and this phosphorylation required activation of PLCγ1. In cells pre-treated with PEA-15 siRNA, ERK1/2 distribution significantly increased in the nucleus and resulted in decreased SM α-actin expression and increased VSM cell proliferation. Overexpression of PEA-15 increased ERK1/2 localization in the cytoplasm. The regulatory role of PEA-15 phosphorylation was assessed. In VSM cells overexpressing a non-phosphorylatable form of PEA-15, PDGF-induced ERK1/2 nuclear localization was inhibited. These results suggest that PEA-15 phosphorylation by PLCγ1 is required for PDGF-induced ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. This represents an important level of phenotypic control by directly affecting Elk-1-dependent transcription and ultimately SM cell marker protein expression in VSM cells.

  2. Keratose Hydrogels Promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Differentiation from C-kit Positive Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Benjamin T; Simmons, Jamelle; Chen, Miao; Fan, Huimin; Barron, Catherine; Liu, Zhongmin; Van Dyke, Mark; He, Jia-Qiang

    2017-03-28

    Stem cell-based therapies have demonstrated great potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases, e.g., myocardial infarction; however, low cell viability, low retention/engraftment, and uncontrollable in vivo differentiation after transplantation are still major limitations, which lead low therapeutic efficiency. Biomaterials provide a promising solution to overcome these issues due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low/non-immunogenicity, and low/non-cytotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the impacts of Keratose (KOS) hydrogel biomaterial on cellular viability, proliferation, and differentiation of c-kit+ human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs). Briefly, hCSCs were cultured on both KOS hydrogel-coated dishes and regular tissue culture dishes (Blank control). Cell viability, stemness, proliferation, cellular morphology, and cardiac lineage differentiation were compared between KOS hydrogel and the Blank control at different time points. We found that KOS hydrogel is effective in maintaining hCSCs without any observable toxic effects, although cell size and proliferation rate appeared smaller on the KOS hydrogel compared to the Blank control. To our surprise, KOS hydrogel significantly promoted vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation (~72%), while on the Blank control dishes, most of the hCSCs (~78%) became cardiomyocytes. Further, we also observed "endothelial cell tube-like" microstructures formed by differentiated VSMCs only on KOS hydrogel, suggesting a potential capability of the hCSC-derived VSMCs for in vitro angiogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to discover the preferred differentiation of hCSCs toward VSMCs on KOS hydrogel. The underlying mechanism remains unknown. This innovative methodology may offer a new approach to generate a robust number of VSMCs simply by culturing hCSCs on KOS hydrogel, and the resulting VSMCs may be used in animal studies and clinical trials in

  3. Soluble guanylate cyclase modulators blunt hyperoxia effects on calcium responses of developing human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A; Kuipers, Ine; Stewart, Alecia; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thu, James; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-09-15

    Exposure to moderate hyperoxia in prematurity contributes to subsequent airway dysfunction and increases the risk of developing recurrent wheeze and asthma. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cyclic GMP (cGMP) axis modulates airway tone by regulating airway smooth muscle (ASM) intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and contractility. However, the effects of hyperoxia on this axis in the context of Ca(2+)/contractility are not known. In developing human ASM, we explored the effects of novel drugs that activate sGC independent of NO on alleviating hyperoxia (50% oxygen)-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) responses to bronchoconstrictor agonists. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 (sGC stimulator) and BAY 60-2770 (sGC activator) increased cGMP levels during exposure to 50% O2. Although 50% O2 did not alter sGCα1 or sGCβ1 expression, BAY 60-2770 did increase sGCβ1 expression. BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 blunted Ca(2+) responses to histamine in cells exposed to 50% O2. The effects of BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 were reversed by protein kinase G inhibition. These novel data demonstrate that BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 stimulate production of cGMP and blunt hyperoxia-induced increases in Ca(2+) responses in developing ASM. Accordingly, sGC stimulators/activators may be a useful therapeutic strategy in improving bronchodilation in preterm infants.

  4. Mechanical stretch is a highly selective regulator of gene expression in human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rosalyn M; Eaton, Samuel H; Estrada, Carlos; Nimgaonkar, Ashish; Shih, Shu-Ching; Smith, Lois E H; Kohane, Isaac S; Bägli, Darius; Freeman, Michael R

    2004-12-15

    Application of mechanical stimuli has been shown to alter gene expression in bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC). To date, only a limited number of "stretch-responsive" genes in this cell type have been reported. We employed oligonucleotide arrays to identify stretch-sensitive genes in primary culture human bladder SMC subjected to repetitive mechanical stimulation for 4 h. Differential gene expression between stretched and nonstretched cells was assessed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Expression of 20 out of 11,731 expressed genes ( approximately 0.17%) was altered >2-fold following stretch, with 19 genes induced and one gene (FGF-9) repressed. Using real-time RT-PCR, we tested independently the responsiveness of 15 genes to stretch and to platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), another hypertrophic stimulus for bladder SMC. In response to both stimuli, expression of 13 genes increased, 1 gene (FGF-9) decreased, and 1 gene was unchanged. Six transcripts (HB-EGF, BMP-2, COX-2, LIF, PAR-2, and FGF-9) were evaluated using an ex vivo rat model of bladder distension. HB-EGF, BMP-2, COX-2, LIF, and PAR-2 increased with bladder stretch ex vivo, whereas FGF-9 decreased, consistent with expression changes observed in vitro. In silico analysis of microarray data using the FIRED algorithm identified c-jun, AP-1, ATF-2, and neurofibromin-1 (NF-1) as potential transcriptional mediators of stretch signals. Furthermore, the promoters of 9 of 13 stretch-responsive genes contained AP-1 binding sites. These observations identify stretch as a highly selective regulator of gene expression in bladder SMC. Moreover, they suggest that mechanical and growth factor signals converge on common transcriptional regulators that include members of the AP-1 family.

  5. [Effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells: experiment in vitro].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian-Zhu; Fu, Song-Bin; Zhou, Li-Jun; Li, Wei-Min; Huang, Yong-Lin

    2009-01-13

    To study the apoptotic effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMCs). HCSMCs were cultured and randomly divided into 5 groups to be treated by arsenic trioxide of the concentrations 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 micromol/L for 48 h. Cell growth curve was drawn by MTT method. DNA electrophoresis was used to observe the apoptosis. Western blotting was conducted to examine the protein expression of Bax, an apoptosis-promoting gene, and Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibiting gene. Other HCSMCs were cultured with 4.0 micromol/L arsenic trioxide for 48 h, then transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultra-structure and TUNEL was used to detect the percentage of apoptotic cells. HCSMCs not treated with arsenic trioxide were used as control group. Arsenic trioxide of different concentrations inhibited the proliferation of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. When the concentration of arsenic trioxide was 5.0 micromol/L the number of living cells was (4.41 +/- 0.10) x 10(5)/ml, significantly lower than that of the control group [(30.11 +/- 0.93) x 10(5)/ml, P < 0.05]. Apoptosis bodies were observed under the transmission electron microscope. DNA electrophoresis showed hazy ladders, especially when the concentrations were 3.0 - 4.0 micromol/L. When the concentration was 5.0 micromol/L the number of necrotic cells increased remarkably and apoptosis became less significant. TUNEL showed that the apoptotic cells increased from 16.0% +/- 3.1% to 38.7% +/- 2.7% (P < 0.05). MTT test showed that arsenic trioxide decreased the absorbance of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. Western blotting showed that the Bcl-2 expression was decreased and the expression of Bax increased after treatment of arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide exerts an apoptotic effect on HCSMCs.

  6. Concerted upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin protein expression in human endometrium during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Miehe, Ulrich; Neumaier-Wagner, Peruka; Kadyrov, Mamed; Goyal, Pankaj; Alfer, Joachim; Rath, Werner; Huppertz, Berthold

    2005-01-01

    The human endometrium prepares for implantation of the blastocyst by reorganization of its whole cellular network. Endometrial stroma cells change their phenotype starting around the 23rd day of the menstrual cycle. These predecidual stroma cells first appear next to spiral arteries, and after implantation these cells further differentiate into decidual stroma cells. The phenotypical changes in these cells during decidualization are characterized by distinct changes in the actin filaments and filament-related proteins such as alpha-actinin. The carboxy-terminal LIM domain protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa (CLP36) is a cytoskeletal component that has been shown to associate with contractile actin filaments and to bind to alpha-actinin supporting a role for CLP36 in cytoskeletal reorganization and signal transduction by binding to signaling proteins. The expression patterns of CLP36, alpha-actinin and actin were studied in endometrial stroma cells from different stages of the menstrual cycle and in decidual stroma cells from the 6th week of gestation until the end of pregnancy. During the menstrual cycle, CLP36 is only expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelium but not in endometrial stroma cells. During decidualization and throughout pregnancy, a parallel upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin, an early marker of decidualization in the baboon, was observed in endometrial decidual cells. Since both proteins maintain a high expression level throughout pregnancy, a role of both proteins is suggested in the stabilization of the cytoskeleton of these cells that come into close contact with invading trophoblast cells.

  7. Doublecortin-like kinase 1-positive enterocyte - a new cell type in human intestine.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Joni; Helminen, Olli; Huhta, Heikki; Kauppila, Joonas H; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Ronkainen, Veli-Pekka; Saarnio, Juha; Lehenkari, Petri P; Karttunen, Tuomo J

    2016-11-01

    Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is a microtubule-associated kinase. In murine intestine, DCLK1 marks tuft cells with characteristic microvilli, features of neuroendocrine cells and also quiescent stem cell-like properties. The occurrence and pathological role of DCLK1-positive cells in human intestinal mucosa is unknown. We analysed DCLK1 expression in healthy duodenal, jejunal and colorectal mucosa samples (n = 35), and in duodenal specimens from patients with coeliac disease (n = 20). The samples were immunohistochemically double-stained with DCLK1, and synaptophysin, chromogranin A and Ki-67. Ultrastructure of DCLK1-expressing duodenal cells was assessed using correlative light and electron microscopy. DCLK1 expression was seen in about 1% of epithelial cells diffusely scattered through the intestinal epithelium. Electron microscopy showed that the duodenal DCLK1-positive cells had short apical microvilli similar to neighbouring enterocytes and cytoplasmic granules on the basal side. DCLK1-positive cells were stained with synaptophysin. The number of DCLK1-positive cells was decreased in villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Our findings indicate that in human intestinal epithelium, DLCK1-positive cells form a subpopulation of non-proliferating neuroendocrine cells with apical brush border similar to that in enterocytes, and their number is decreased in untreated coeliac disease.

  8. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  9. Extrathymic T cell differentiation in the human intestine early in life.

    PubMed

    Howie, D; Spencer, J; DeLord, D; Pitzalis, C; Wathen, N C; Dogan, A; Akbar, A; MacDonald, T T

    1998-12-01

    It is clear from experimental studies in mice that T cell maturation can occur outside the thymus, especially in the intestine. There is little sound evidence so far that extrathymic T cell maturation occurs to any significant extent in human gut, and, postnatally, there is abundant evidence that the gut mucosa is an immune effector organ. Here, we describe a large population of T lymphocytes in human fetal intestinal mucosa that are proliferating (Ki67+) in the absence of foreign Ag (CD3+, Ki67+ lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) 22 +/- 1.8% and CD3+, Ki67+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) 9.1 +/- 1.4%), that express the T cell activation markers CD103, HLA-DR, and L-selectin(low), and that express mRNA transcripts for pre-TCR-alpha. There is also a substantial proportion of CD7+ LPLs that do not express CD3 (CD3-7+, 14 +/- 7% of all LPLs) in the fetal gut that may be differentiating into CD3+ cells. Rearranged TCR-beta transcripts of fetal LPLs, IELs, and paired blood lymphocytes were cloned and sequenced, and virtually no overlap of clonality was observed between blood and intestine, suggesting that gut T cells may not be derived from the blood. In addition, 30 days after engraftment of SCID mice with fetal intestine, CD3-7+ cells, proliferating T cells, and pre-TCR-alpha transcripts were abundant, and there is a threefold increase in CD3+ IELs. These data show that in the human intestine before birth a population of precursor T cells exists that may be differentiating into mature T cells in situ.

  10. Short- and long-term effects of oral vancomycin on the human intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Sandrine; Scher, Jose U.; Djukovic, Ana; Jiménez, Nuria; Littman, Dan R.; Abramson, Steven B.; Pamer, Eric G.; Ubeda, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral vancomycin remains the mainstay of therapy for severe infections produced by Clostridium difficile, the most prevalent cause of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhoea in developed countries. However, its short- and long-term effects on the human intestinal microbiota remain largely unknown. Methods We utilized high-throughput sequencing to analyse the effects of vancomycin on the faecal human microbiota up to 22 weeks post-antibiotic cessation. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota perturbations was studied in mice. Results During vancomycin therapy, most intestinal microbiota genera and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were depleted in all analysed subjects, including all baseline OTUs from the phylum Bacteroidetes. This was accompanied by a vast expansion of genera associated with infections, including Klebsiella and Escherichia/Shigella. Following antibiotic cessation, marked differences in microbiota resilience were observed among subjects. While some individuals recovered a microbiota close to baseline composition, in others, up to 89% of abundant OTUs could no longer be detected. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota changes was further demonstrated in mice, which developed analogous microbiota alterations. During vancomycin treatment, mice were highly susceptible to intestinal colonization by an antibiotic-resistant pathogen and, upon antibiotic cessation, a less-resilient microbiota allowed higher levels of pathogen colonization. Conclusions Oral vancomycin induces drastic and consistent changes in the human intestinal microbiota. Upon vancomycin cessation, the microbiota recovery rate varied considerably among subjects, which could influence, as validated in mice, the level of susceptibility to pathogen intestinal colonization. Our results demonstrate the negative long-term effects of vancomycin, which should be considered as a fundamental aspect of the cost–benefit equation for antibiotic prescription. PMID

  11. Short- and long-term effects of oral vancomycin on the human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Sandrine; Scher, Jose U; Djukovic, Ana; Jiménez, Nuria; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B; Pamer, Eric G; Ubeda, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Oral vancomycin remains the mainstay of therapy for severe infections produced by Clostridium difficile, the most prevalent cause of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhoea in developed countries. However, its short- and long-term effects on the human intestinal microbiota remain largely unknown. We utilized high-throughput sequencing to analyse the effects of vancomycin on the faecal human microbiota up to 22 weeks post-antibiotic cessation. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota perturbations was studied in mice. During vancomycin therapy, most intestinal microbiota genera and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were depleted in all analysed subjects, including all baseline OTUs from the phylum Bacteroidetes. This was accompanied by a vast expansion of genera associated with infections, including Klebsiella and Escherichia/Shigella. Following antibiotic cessation, marked differences in microbiota resilience were observed among subjects. While some individuals recovered a microbiota close to baseline composition, in others, up to 89% of abundant OTUs could no longer be detected. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota changes was further demonstrated in mice, which developed analogous microbiota alterations. During vancomycin treatment, mice were highly susceptible to intestinal colonization by an antibiotic-resistant pathogen and, upon antibiotic cessation, a less-resilient microbiota allowed higher levels of pathogen colonization. Oral vancomycin induces drastic and consistent changes in the human intestinal microbiota. Upon vancomycin cessation, the microbiota recovery rate varied considerably among subjects, which could influence, as validated in mice, the level of susceptibility to pathogen intestinal colonization. Our results demonstrate the negative long-term effects of vancomycin, which should be considered as a fundamental aspect of the cost-benefit equation for antibiotic prescription. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  12. Megaselia scalaris causing human intestinal myiasis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mazayad, Said A M; Rifaat, Manal M A

    2005-04-01

    Megaselia scalaris is a worldwide distributed insect of medical importance. In a laboratory-based study, stool samples with undefined maggot infestation were examined and the presence of M. scalaris maggots was confirmed. Binocular stereo-microscopy was used for identification of the maggots. Larvae were allowed to develop into adults onto a human stool culture. The larvae and the emerged flies were identified using standard keys. This may be the first report of M. scalaris as a causative agent of human myiasis in Egypt. Details of the third instar larva, pupa and adults were given.

  13. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  14. The mechanism and spread of pacemaker activity through myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Tai; Hennig, Grant W; Fleming, Neal W; Keef, Kathleen D; Spencer, Nick J; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M; Smith, Terence K

    2007-05-01

    It has been generally assumed that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the human gastrointestinal tract have similar functions to those in rodents, but no direct experimental evidence exists to date for this assumption. This is an important question because pathologists have noted decreased numbers of ICC in patients with a variety of motility disorders, and some have speculated that loss of ICC could be responsible for motor dysfunction. Our aims were to determine whether myenteric ICC (ICC-MY) in human jejunum are pacemaker cells and whether these cells actively propagate pacemaker activity. The mucosa and submucosa were removed, and strips of longitudinal muscle were peeled away to reveal the ICC-MY network. ICC networks were loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-4, and pacemaker activity was recorded via high-speed video imaging at 36.5 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C. Rhythmic, biphasic Ca(2+) transients (6.03 +/- 0.33 cycles/min) occurred in Kit-positive ICC-MY. These consisted of a rapidly propagating upstroke phase that initiated a sustained plateau phase, which was associated with Ca(2+) spikes in neighboring smooth muscle. Pacemaker activity was dependent on inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-operated stores and mitochondrial function. The upstroke phase of Ca(2+) transients in ICC-MY appeared to result from Ca(2+) influx through dihydropyridine-resistant Ca(2+) channels, whereas the plateau phase was attributed to Ca(2+) release from inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-operated Ca(2+) stores. Each ICC-MY in human jejunum generates spontaneous pacemaker activity that actively propagates through the ICC network. Loss of these cells could severely disrupt the normal function of the human small intestine.

  15. Modeling colorectal cancer using CRISPR-Cas9-mediated engineering of human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Matano, Mami; Date, Shoichi; Shimokawa, Mariko; Takano, Ai; Fujii, Masayuki; Ohta, Yuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kanai, Takanori; Sato, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    Human colorectal tumors bear recurrent mutations in genes encoding proteins operative in the WNT, MAPK, TGF-β, TP53 and PI3K pathways. Although these pathways influence intestinal stem cell niche signaling, the extent to which mutations in these pathways contribute to human colorectal carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing system to introduce multiple such mutations into organoids derived from normal human intestinal epithelium. By modulating the culture conditions to mimic that of the intestinal niche, we selected isogenic organoids harboring mutations in the tumor suppressor genes APC, SMAD4 and TP53, and in the oncogenes KRAS and/or PIK3CA. Organoids engineered to express all five mutations grew independently of niche factors in vitro, and they formed tumors after implantation under the kidney subcapsule in mice. Although they formed micrometastases containing dormant tumor-initiating cells after injection into the spleen of mice, they failed to colonize in the liver. In contrast, engineered organoids derived from chromosome-instable human adenomas formed macrometastatic colonies. These results suggest that 'driver' pathway mutations enable stem cell maintenance in the hostile tumor microenvironment, but that additional molecular lesions are required for invasive behavior.

  16. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: Examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K. . E-mail: mross@cvm.msstate.edu

    2007-05-15

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are {approx} 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts ({approx} 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be

  17. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Crow, J Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M; Ross, Matthew K

    2007-05-15

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are approximately 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (approximately 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products

  18. Hydrolysis of Pyrethroids by Human and Rat Tissues: Examination of Intestinal, Liver and Serum Carboxylesterases

    PubMed Central

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver, and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are ~2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (~40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin, and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be detected. Together

  19. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  20. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  1. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  2. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  3. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  4. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  5. Biorelevant media resistant co-culture model mimicking permeability of human intestine.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Delphine; Pellequer, Yann; Tempesta, Camille; Lorscheidt, Stefan; Kettel, Bernadette; Tamaddon, Lana; Jannin, Vincent; Demarne, Frédéric; Lamprecht, Alf; Béduneau, Arnaud

    2015-03-15

    Cell culture models are currently used to predict absorption pattern of new compounds and formulations in the human gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). One major drawback is the lack of relevant apical incubation fluids allowing mimicking luminal conditions in the GIT. Here, we suggest a culture model compatible with biorelevant media, namely Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) and Fed State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FeSSIF). Co-culture was set up from Caco-2 and mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells using an original seeding procedure. Viability and cytotoxicity assays were performed following incubation of FeSSIF and FaSSIF with co-culture. Influence of biorelevant fluids on paracellular permeability or transporter proteins were also evaluated. Results were compared with Caco-2 and HT29-MTX monocultures. While Caco-2 viability was strongly affected with FeSSIF, no toxic effect was detected for the co-cultures in terms of viability and lactate dehydrogenase release. The addition of FeSSIF to the basolateral compartment of the co-culture induced cytotoxic effects which suggested the apical mucus barrier being cell protective. In contrast to FeSSIF, FaSSIF induced a slight increase of the paracellular transport and both tested media inhibited partially the P-gp-mediated efflux in the co-culture. Additionally, the absorptive transport of propranolol hydrochloride, a lipophilic β-blocker, was strongly affected by biorelevant fluids. This study demonstrated the compatibility of the Caco-2/HT29-MTX model with some of the current biorelevant media. Combining biorelevant intestinal fluids with features such as mucus secretion, adjustable paracellular and P-gp mediated transports, is a step forward to more realistic in-vitro models of the human intestine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells. PMID:22523469

  7. Human intestinal gas measurement systems: in vitro fermentation and gas capsules.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jian Zhen; Yao, C K; Rotbart, Asaf; Muir, Jane G; Gibson, Peter R; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-04-01

    The biological and clinical significance of the human gut microbiome is currently attracting worldwide attention. While rRNA and DNA technologies led to a quantum leap in our understanding of the numbers and types of gut microorganisms, much less is known about these microorganisms' activity in situ and in real time. Accurately measuring their byproducts, including intestinal gases, may offer unique biomarkers for specific gut microbiota, accelerating our understanding of the relationships among intestinal gases, the metabolic activity of the gut microbiome, and human health states. Here we present two novel techniques, namely in vitro fermentation and gas capsule systems, for measuring and assessing selected gas species. We discuss new developments with these technologies and the methods of their implementation and provide an overall review of their operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis of edema and inflammation in human intestines using ultrawideband radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.; Messaris, Evangelos

    2015-05-01

    Human intestines are vital organs, which are often subjected to chronic issues. In particular, Crohn's disease is a bowel aliment resulting in inflammation along the lining of one's digestive tract. Moreover, such an inflammatory condition causes changes in the thickness of the intestines; and we posit induce changes in the dielectric properties detectable by radar. This detection hinges on the increase in fluid content in the afflicted area, which is described by effective medium approximations (EMA). In this paper, we consider one of the constitutive parameters (i.e. relative permittivity) of different human tissues and introduce a simple numerical, electromagnetic multilayer model. We observe how the increase in water content in one layer can be approximated to predict the effective permittivity of that layer. Moreover, we note trends in how such an accumulation can influence the total effective reflection coefficient of the multiple layers.

  9. Metabolomics analysis of Cistus monspeliensis leaf extract on energy metabolism activation in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells.

  10. Generation of L cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina; Farin, Henner F; Ringnalda, Femke C; Vries, Robert G J; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; Gribble, Fiona M; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2014-02-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate functional L cells from three-dimensional cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids selectively increase the number of L cells, resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by the upregulation of transcription factors associated with the endocrine lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Differential effects of blinks on horizontal saccade and smooth pursuit initiation in humans.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger; El Baz, Ieman; Helmchen, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Blinks executed during eye movements affect kinetic eye movement parameters, e.g., peak velocity of saccades is decreased, their duration is increased, but their amplitude is not altered. This effect is mainly explained by the decreased activity of premotor neurons in the brainstem: omni-pause neurons (OPN) in the nucleus raphe interpositus. Previous studies examined the immediate effect of blinks directly on eye movements but not their effect when they are elicited several hundred milliseconds before the eye movements. In order to address this question we tested blinks elicited before the target onset of saccades and pursuit and compared the results to the gap effect: if a fixation light is extinguished for several hundred milliseconds, the reaction time (latency) for subsequent saccades or smooth pursuit eye movements is decreased. Monocular eye and lid movements were recorded in nine healthy subjects using the scleral search-coil system. Laser stimuli were front-projected onto a tangent screen in front of the subjects. Horizontal step-ramp smooth pursuit of 20 deg/s was elicited in one session, or 5 deg horizontal visually guided saccades in another experimental session. In one-third of the trials (smooth pursuit or saccades) the fixation light was extinguished for 200 ms before stimulus onset (gap condition), and in another third of the trials reflexive blinks were elicited by a short airpuff before the stimulus onset (blink condition). The last third of the trials served as controls (control condition). Stimulus direction and the three conditions were randomized for saccades and smooth pursuit separately. The latency of the step-ramp smooth pursuit in the blink condition was found to be decreased by 10 ms, which was less than in the gap condition (38 ms). However, the initial acceleration and steady-state velocity of smooth pursuit did not differ in the three conditions. In contrast, the latency of the saccades in the gap condition was decreased by 39 ms, but

  12. Human Enteroids as a Model of Upper Small Intestinal Ion Transport Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Yin, Jianyi; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Estes, Mary K; de Jonge, Hugo; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Human intestinal crypt-derived enteroids are a model of intestinal ion transport that require validation by comparison with cell culture and animal models. We used human small intestinal enteroids to study neutral Na(+) absorption and stimulated fluid and anion secretion under basal and regulated conditions in undifferentiated and differentiated cultures to show their functional relevance to ion transport physiology and pathophysiology. Human intestinal tissue specimens were obtained from an endoscopic biopsy or surgical resections performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Crypts were isolated, enteroids were propagated in culture, induced to undergo differentiation, and transduced with lentiviral vectors. Crypt markers, surface cell enzymes, and membrane ion transporters were characterized using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, or immunofluorescence analyses. We used multiphoton and time-lapse confocal microscopy to monitor intracellular pH and luminal dilatation in enteroids under basal and regulated conditions. Enteroids differentiated upon withdrawal of WNT3A, yielding decreased crypt markers and increased villus-like characteristics. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 activity was similar in undifferentiated and differentiated enteroids, and was affected by known inhibitors, second messengers, and bacterial enterotoxins. Forskolin-induced swelling was completely dependent on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and partially dependent on Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 inhibition in undifferentiated and differentiated enteroids. Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate with forskolin caused enteroid intracellular acidification in HCO3(-)-free buffer. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-induced enteroid intracellular pH acidification as part of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion appears to require cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and electrogenic Na(+)/HCO3(-) cotransporter 1

  13. Metabolism of liriodendrin and syringin by human intestinal bacteria and their relation to in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Lee, K T; Bae, E A; Han, M J; Park, H J

    1999-02-01

    When liriodendrin or syringin was incubated for 24 h with human intestinal bacteria, two metabolites, (+)-syringaresinol-beta-D-glucopyranoside and (+)-syringaresinol, from liriodendrin and one metabolite, synapyl alcohol, from syringin were produced. The metabolic time course of liriodendrin was as follows: at early time, liriodendrin was converted to (+)-syringaresinol-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and then (+)-syringaresinol. The in vitro cytotoxicities of these metabolites, (+)-syringaresinol and synapyl alcohol, were superior to those of liriodendrin and syringin.

  14. A bioassay using intestinal organoids to measure CFTR modulators in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, R; Vijftigschild, L A W; Vonk, A M; Kruisselbrink, E; de Winter-de Groot, K M; Janssens, H M; van der Ent, C K; Beekman, J M

    2015-03-01

    Treatment efficacies of drugs depend on patient-specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Here, we developed an assay to measure functional levels of the CFTR potentiator VX-770 in human plasma and observed that VX-770 in plasma from different donors induced variable CFTR function in intestinal organoids. This assay can help to understand variability in treatment response to CFTR potentiators by functionally modeling individual pharmacokinetics.

  15. Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis of Human Intestinal Spirochetosis by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedel, Dinah; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Ignatius, Ralf; Wagner, Jutta; Hammer, Bettina; Petrich, Annett; Stein, Harald; Göbel, Ulf B.; Schneider, Thomas; Moter, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is associated with overgrowth of the large intestine by spirochetes of the genus Brachyspira. The microbiological diagnosis of HIS is hampered by the fastidious nature and slow growth of Brachyspira spp. In clinical practice, HIS is diagnosed histopathologically, and a significant portion of cases may be missed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular method that allows the visualization and identification of single bacteria within tissue sections. In this study, we analyzed intestinal biopsy samples from five patients with possible HIS. All specimens yielded positive results by histopathological techniques. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were performed. Sequences of two isolates clustered in the group of Brachyspira aalborgi, whereas in three cases, the sequences were highly similar to that of Brachyspira pilosicoli. Three phylotypes showed mismatches at distinct nucleotide positions with Brachyspira sp. sequences published previously. In addition, culture for Brachyspira was successful in three cases. On the basis of these data, we designed and evaluated a Brachyspira genus-specific 16S rRNA-directed FISH probe that detects all of the Brachyspira spp. published to date. FISH of biopsy samples resulted in strong, unequivocal signals of brush-like formations at the crypt surfaces. This technique allowed simultaneous visualization of single spirochetes and their identification as Brachyspira spp. In conclusion, FISH provides a fast and accurate technique for the visualization and identification of intestinal spirochetes in tissue sections. It therefore represents a valuable tool for routine diagnosis of HIS. PMID:19279178

  16. Prebiotic effects of almonds and almond skins on intestinal microbiota in healthy adult humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Lin, Xiuchun; Huang, Guangwei; Zhang, Wen; Rao, Pingfan; Ni, Li

    2014-04-01

    Almonds and almond skins are rich in fiber and other components that have potential prebiotic properties. In this study we investigated the prebiotic effects of almond and almond skin intake in healthy humans. A total of 48 healthy adult volunteers consumed a daily dose of roasted almonds (56 g), almond skins (10 g), or commercial fructooligosaccharides (8 g) (as positive control) for 6 weeks. Fecal samples were collected at defined time points and analyzed for microbiota composition and selected indicators of microbial activity. Different strains of intestinal bacteria had varying degrees of growth sensitivity to almonds or almond skins. Significant increases in the populations of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were observed in fecal samples as a consequence of almond or almond skin supplementation. However, the populations of Escherichia coli did not change significantly, while the growth of the pathogen Clostridum perfringens was significantly repressed. Modification of the intestinal microbiota composition induced changes in bacterial enzyme activities, specifically a significant increase in fecal β-galactosidase activity and decreases in fecal β-glucuronidase, nitroreductase and azoreductase activities. Our observations suggest that almond and almond skin ingestion may lead to an improvement in the intestinal microbiota profile and a modification of the intestinal bacterial activities, which would induce the promotion of health beneficial factors and the inhibition of harmful factors. Thus we believe that almonds and almond skins possess potential prebiotic properties.

  17. Identification of astilbin metabolites produced by human intestinal bacteria using UPLC-Q-TOF/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Xu, Jun; Qian, Dawei; Guo, Jianming; Jiang, Shu; Shang, Er-xin; Duan, Jin-ao

    2014-07-01

    Astilbin, mainly isolated from a commonly used herbal medicine, Smilax glabra Roxb (SGR), exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities and biological effects. It is metabolized by intestinal bacteria after oral administration which leads to the variation of ethnopharmacological profile of this traditional medicine. However, little is known on the interactions of this active compound with intestinal bacteria, which would be very helpful in unravelling how SGR works. In this study, different pure bacteria from human feces were isolated and were used to investigate their conversion capability of astilbin. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS) technique combined with Metabolynx(TM) software was used to analyze astilbin and its metabolites. The parent compound and two metabolites (quercetin and eriodictyol) were detected in the isolated bacterial samples compared with blank samples. Quercetin was present in Enterococcus sp. 8B, 8-2 and 9-2 samples. Eriodictyol was only identified in Enterococcus sp. 8B sample. The metabolic routes and metabolites of astilbin produced by the different intestinal bacteria are reported for the first time. This will be useful for the investigation of the pharmacokinetic study of astilbin in vivo and the role of different intestinal bacteria in the metabolism of natural compounds.

  18. Iptakalim influences the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGLIN; YAN, XIAOPEI; KONG, HUI; XIE, WEIPING; WANG, HONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), and examine the potential value of IPT to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) at a cellular level. HPASMCs were divided into the control, ET-1, ET-1+IPT and ET-1+IPT+glibenclamide (GLI) groups. GLI was administered 30 min prior to ET-1 and IPT. The 4 groups were incubated with corresponding reagents for 24 h. Cell viability was evaluated using a CCK-8 assay, cell proliferation by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, and cell apoptosis via the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, i.e., Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) using western blotting. We incubated HPASMCs with varying concentrations of ET-1 for 24, 48 and 72 h, and found that cell survival rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) rather than in a time-dependent manner (P>0.05). After co-incubation of HPASMCs with varying concentrations of IPT and ET-1 for 24 h, the cell survival rate was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival rate in the IPT+ET-1 group was significantly lower than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1 group were higher than those in the control group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than the control group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT group were lower than those in the ET-1 group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was higher than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT+GLI group were higher than those in the ET-1+IPT group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than that in the ET-1+IPT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, IPT inhibited ET-1-induced HPASMC proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Thus, it may play an

  19. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  20. Free Fatty Acid Palmitate Impairs the Vitality and Function of Cultured Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Till, Holger; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6) in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i) palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii) direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii) in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv) further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v) increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. Conclusions/Significance Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate) cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby, certain

  1. Mutagenicity of arbutin in mammalian cells after activation by human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blaut, Michael; Braune, Annett; Wunderlich, Sandra; Sauer, Patrick; Schneider, Heiko; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2006-11-01

    Arbutin (hydroquinone-beta-D-glucopyranoside) is present in various food plants. Its aglycone, hydroquinone, is mutagenic and carcinogenic. We investigated whether hydroquinone may be released under conditions encountered in the human gastrointestinal tract. Arbutin was stable in artificial gastric juice. Fecal slurries from nine human subjects completely converted arbutin (2 mM) into hydroquinone. Four of nine representative human intestinal species investigated, namely Eubacterium ramulus, Enterococcus casseliflavus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bifidobacterium adolescentis, deglycosylated arbutin at rates of 21.08, 16.62, 8.43 and 3.59 nmol x min(-1) x (mg protein)(-1), respectively. In contrast, homogenates from small intestinal mucosa and cytosolic fractions from colon mucosa deglycosylated arbutin at substantially lower rates: 0.50 and 0.09 nmol x min(-1) x (mg protein)(-1), respectively. Arbutin, unlike hydroquinone, did not induce gene mutations in Chinese hamster V79 cells in the absence of an activating system. However, in the presence of cytosolic fractions from E. ramulus or B. distasonis, arbutin was strongly mutagenic. Cytosolic fraction from Escherichia coli, showing no arbutin glycosidase activity, was not able to activate arbutin in this model system. The release of the proximate mutagen hydroquinone from arbutin by intestinal bacteria in the immediate vicinity of the colon mucosa may pose a potential risk.

  2. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  3. Evidence of native starch degradation with human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (recombinant).

    PubMed

    Ao, Zihua; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Sim, Lyann; Nichols, Buford L; Rose, David R; Sterchi, Erwin E; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2007-05-29

    Action of human small intestinal brush border carbohydrate digesting enzymes is thought to involve only final hydrolysis reactions of oligosaccharides to monosaccharides. In vitro starch digestibility assays use fungal amyloglucosidase to provide this function. In this study, recombinant N-terminal subunit enzyme of human small intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (rhMGAM-N) was used to explore digestion of native starches from different botanical sources. The susceptibilities to enzyme hydrolysis varied among the starches. The rate and extent of hydrolysis of amylomaize-5 and amylomaize-7 into glucose were greater than for other starches. Such was not observed with fungal amyloglucosidase or pancreatic alpha-amylase. The degradation of native starch granules showed a surface furrowed pattern in random, radial, or tree-like arrangements that differed substantially from the erosion patterns of amyloglucosidase or alpha-amylase. The evidence of raw starch granule degradation with rhMGAM-N indicates that pancreatic alpha-amylase hydrolysis is not a requirement for native starch digestion in the human small intestine.

  4. Human amniotic membrane as an intestinal patch for neomucosal growth in the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Barlas, M; Gökçora, H; Erekul, S; Dindar, H; Yücesan, S

    1992-05-01

    This experiment was carried out as a preliminary study, an attempt to grow new intestinal mucosa on human amniotic membrane in the terminal ileum in 37 rabbits. After ketamin sulfate anesthesia at laparatomy, 5-cm ileal defects were patched with human amniotic membrane (5 x 2 cm). These patched intestines were investigated on the first postoperative day and the 2nd, 5th, 10th, and 20th weeks corresponding to 4, 5, 5, 10, and 10 rabbits, respectively. Only three rabbits died in the early postoperative period. There was no evidence of intestinal obstruction or dilatation with barium meal. Microscopically, the neomucosa consisted of a thin layer of columnar epithelial cells at 2 weeks with more maturity of the villi and less irregularity and branching by 20 weeks. All patches were covered with neomucosa commencing at 2 weeks and covering the whole patch area by 20 weeks. This technique's advantages are the large size and the ease of the availability of the human amniotic membrane for neonates at risk without jeopardizing the neonates tis