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Sample records for human knee joint

  1. The volume of the human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Matziolis, Georg; Roehner, Eric; Windisch, Christoph; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Despite its clinical relevance, particularly in septic knee surgery, the volume of the human knee joint has not been established to date. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine knee joint volume and whether or not it is dependent on sex or body height. Sixty-one consecutive patients (joints) who were due to undergo endoprosthetic joint replacement were enrolled in this prospective study. During the operation, the joint volume was determined by injecting saline solution until a pressure of 200 mmHg was achieved in the joint. The average volume of all knee joints was 131 ± 53 (40-290) ml. The volume was not found to be dependent on sex, but it was dependent on the patients' height (R = 0.312, p = 0.014). This enabled an estimation of the joint volume according to V = 1.6 height - 135. The considerable inter-individual variance of the knee joint volume would suggest that it should be determined or at least estimated according to body height if the joint volume has consequences for the diagnostics or therapy of knee disorders.

  2. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  3. Mathematical modeling of the human knee joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ricafort, Juliet

    1996-05-01

    A model was developed to determine the forces exerted by several flexor and extensor muscles of the human knee under static conditions. The following muscles were studied: the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and the set of quadricep muscles. The tibia and fibula were each modeled as rigid bodies; muscles were modeled by their functional lines of action in space. Assumptions based on previous data were used to resolve the indeterminacy.

  4. Human knee joint anatomy revisited: morphometry in the light of sex-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dargel, Jens; Michael, Joern W P; Feiser, Janna; Ivo, Roland; Koebke, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates differences in the anatomy of male and female knee joints to contribute to the current debate on sex-specific total knee implants. Morphometric data were obtained from 60 human cadaver knees, and sex differences were calculated. All data were corrected for height, and male and female specimens presenting with an identical length of the femur were analyzed as matched pairs. Male linear knee joint dimensions were significantly larger when compared with females. When corrected for differences in height, medial-lateral dimensions of male knees were significantly larger than female; however, matched paired analysis did not prove these differences to be consistent. Although implant design should focus interindividual variations in knee joint anatomy, our data do not support the concept of a female-specific implant design.

  5. Immunolocalization of lymphatic vessels in human fetal knee joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Melrose, James; Little, Christopher B

    2010-08-01

    We immunolocalized lymphatic and vascular blood vessels in 12- and 14-week-old human fetal knee joint tissues using a polyclonal antibody to a lymphatic vascular endothelium specific hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and a monoclonal antibody to podoplanin (mAb D2-40). A number of lymphatic vessels were identified in the stratified connective tissues surrounding the cartilaginous knee joint femoral and tibial rudiments. These tissues also contained small vascular vessels with entrapped red blood cells which were imaged using Nomarsky DIC microscopy. Neither vascular nor lymphatic vessels were present in the knee joint cartilaginous rudiments. The menisci in 12-week-old fetal knees were incompletely demarcated from the adjacent tibial and femoral cartilaginous rudiments which was consistent with the ongoing joint cavitation process at the femoral-tibial junction. At 14 weeks of age the menisci were independent structural entities; they contained a major central blood vessel containing red blood cells and numerous communicating vessels at the base of the menisci but no lymphatic vessels. In contrast to the 12-week-old menisci, the 14-week meniscal rudiments contained abundant CD-31 and CD-34 positive but no lymphatic vessels. Isolated 14-week-old meniscal cells also were stained with the CD-31 and CD 34 antibodies; CD-68 +ve cells, also abundant in the 14-week-old menisci, were detectable to a far lesser degree in the 12-week menisci and were totally absent from the femoral and tibial rudiments. The distribution of lymphatic vessels and tissue macrophages in the fetal joint tissues was consistent with their roles in the clearance of metabolic waste and extracellular matrix breakdown products arising from the rapidly remodelling knee joint tissues.

  6. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  7. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  8. Recent advances in computational mechanics of the human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, M; Dabiri, Y; Li, L P

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling.

  9. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  10. [Chronic knee joint discomfort].

    PubMed

    Wittke, R

    2005-06-23

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is frequently a sign of arthrosis in adults. This must be clearly differentiated from other knee problems. Patellofemoral stress syndrome (occurs mostly in young people) and arthritis with effusion in the knee joint after long and mostly unusual stress also allow only a reduced function of the knee joint. However, even when the knee joint is still fully functional, chronic problems could already exist: For example, for joggers, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee) or after high unphysiological stress, patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee). These must be differentiated from pes anserinus syndrome and a plica mediopatellaris.

  11. Differences in type II collagen turnover of osteoarthritic human knee and ankle joints.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    We analysed hyaline cartilage of human knee and ankle joints for collagen and proteoglycan turnover in order to find differences in the metabolism and biochemical content of the extracellular matrix that could explain the higher prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee joint, compared to the ankle joint. Cartilage tissue from ankle and knee joints of OA patients were assessed for total collagen and proteoglycan content. For turnover, the aggrecan 846-epitope (CS 846), the type II collagen C-propeptide (CP2) and the collagenase-generated intrahelical cleavage neoepitope (C2C) were quantified. Molecular analyses showed that type II collagen turnover (CP2 and C2C) was significantly elevated in the ankle, whereas aggrecan turnover (CS 846), total proteoglycan and total collagen were comparable between both joints. Analysis of the inter-relationships in the components of cartilage matrix turnover showed a significant positive correlation of C2C vs CP2. The data suggest an increased type II collagen turnover in ankle vs knee OA cartilage but a comparable aggrecan turnover and comparable contents of type II collagen and proteoglycan. These findings point towards a focused attempt in advanced OA cartilage to structurally repair the collagen network that was more pronounced in the ankle joint and may explain in part the higher prevalence of OA in the knee as compared to the ankle joint.

  12. Examining the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Monk, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate history taking and examination can ensure accurate diagnosis of common knee problems, and rapid and effective interventions or referral to orthopaedic specialists. This article describes the anatomy of the knee joint and discusses relevant history taking, the examination process, special tests and radiology, as well as common knee injuries and their management.

  13. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... now use different materials, including metal on metal, ceramic on ceramic, or ceramic on plastic. Why the Procedure is Performed The ... people DO NOT need help walking after they fully recover. Most artificial knee joints last 10 to ...

  14. [Viscosity determination of synovial fluids from the canine hip and elbow joint as well as the human knee joint].

    PubMed

    Helms, Gabriele; Rittmann, Pia; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Windhagen, Henning; Pressel, Thomas; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    The development of pathological changes in both human and canine hip joints is mainly caused by a lack of synovial fluid lubrication. This results in an increased joint abrasion. Even after implantation of joint prosthesis, inadequate lubrication can lead to abrasion in the tribological pair. This can finally result in aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. In spite of the enormous number of studies that have been performed on human, only little knowledge about the tribological properties of the joints in dogs is available in the literature. For this reason the viscosities of synovial fluid, derived from physiological and pathologically changed canine elbow joints were measured. The viscosities were determined by the use of a cone-plate viscometer at different temperatures and shear rates. The obtained values were compared with the viscosity values of pathologically changed synovial fluids from human knee joints as well as with pathological samples from the canine hip joint. The results show that the viscosity values vary within a series of measurements and are inversely proportional to the temperature of the sample and the shear rate. The differences between the average viscosities of canine and human synovial fluids taken from pathologically changed joints are below 4% (22.5 s(-1) at theta1 = 25 degrees C). The findings of this study are being implemented in a FE-Model for the computation of actual forces in the hip joint during different movements. This would represent a contribution to an improved prosthetic treatment of canine and human hips.

  15. Evaluation of an intact, an ACL-deficient, and a reconstructed human knee joint finite element model.

    PubMed

    Vairis, Achilles; Stefanoudakis, George; Petousis, Markos; Vidakis, Nectarios; Tsainis, Andreas-Marios; Kandyla, Betina

    2016-02-01

    The human knee joint has a three-dimensional geometry with multiple body articulations that produce complex mechanical responses under loads that occur in everyday life and sports activities. Understanding the complex mechanical interactions of these load-bearing structures is of use when the treatment of relevant diseases is evaluated and assisting devices are designed. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of four main ligaments that connects the femur to the tibia and is often torn during sudden twisting motions, resulting in knee instability. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of the human knee joint and evaluate the differences in its response for three different states, i.e., intact, ACL-deficient, and surgically treated (reconstructed) knee. The finite element models corresponding to these states were developed. For the reconstructed model, a novel repair device was developed and patented by the author in previous work. Static load cases were applied, as have already been presented in a previous work, in order to compare the calculated results produced by the two models the ACL-deficient and the surgically reconstructed knee joint, under the exact same loading conditions. Displacements were calculated in different directions for the load cases studied and were found to be very close to those from previous modeling work and were in good agreement with experimental data presented in literature. The developed finite element model for both the intact and the ACL-deficient human knee joint is a reliable tool to study the kinematics of the human knee, as results of this study show. In addition, the reconstructed human knee joint model had kinematic behavior similar to the intact knee joint, showing that such reconstruction devices can restore human knee stability to an adequate extent.

  16. Modeling and simulating the neuromuscular mechanisms regulating ankle and knee joint stiffness during human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Maculan, Marco; Pizzolato, Claudio; Reggiani, Monica; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an electrophysiologically and dynamically consistent musculoskeletal model to predict stiffness in the human ankle and knee joints as derived from the joints constituent biological tissues (i.e., the spanning musculotendon units). The modeling method we propose uses electromyography (EMG) recordings from 13 muscle groups to drive forward dynamic simulations of the human leg in five healthy subjects during overground walking and running. The EMG-driven musculoskeletal model estimates musculotendon and resulting joint stiffness that is consistent with experimental EMG data as well as with the experimental joint moments. This provides a framework that allows for the first time observing 1) the elastic interplay between the knee and ankle joints, 2) the individual muscle contribution to joint stiffness, and 3) the underlying co-contraction strategies. It provides a theoretical description of how stiffness modulates as a function of muscle activation, fiber contraction, and interacting tendon dynamics. Furthermore, it describes how this differs from currently available stiffness definitions, including quasi-stiffness and short-range stiffness. This work offers a theoretical and computational basis for describing and investigating the neuromuscular mechanisms underlying human locomotion. PMID:26245321

  17. Behavioral effect of knee joint motion on body's center of mass during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akio; Sasagawa, Shun; Oba, Naoko; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The balance control mechanism during upright standing has often been investigated using single- or double-link inverted pendulum models, involving the ankle joint only or both the ankle and hip joints, respectively. Several studies, however, have reported that knee joint motion during quiet standing cannot be ignored. This study aimed to investigate the degree to which knee joint motion contributes to the center of mass (COM) kinematics during quiet standing. Eight healthy adults were asked to stand quietly for 30s on a force platform. Angular displacements and accelerations of the ankle, knee, and hip joints were calculated from kinematic data obtained by a motion capture system. We found that the amplitude of the angular acceleration was smallest in the ankle joint and largest in the hip joint (ankle < knee < hip). These angular accelerations were then substituted into three biomechanical models with or without the knee joint to estimate COM acceleration in the anterior-posterior direction. Although the "without-knee" models greatly overestimated the COM acceleration, the COM acceleration estimated by the "with-knee" model was similar to the actual acceleration obtained from force platform measurement. These results indicate substantial effects of knee joint motion on the COM kinematics during quiet standing. We suggest that investigations based on the multi-joint model, including the knee joint, are required to reveal the physiologically plausible balance control mechanism implemented by the central nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Principal component analysis in construction of 3D human knee joint models using a statistical shape model method.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Jing-Sheng; Wang, Shaobai; Li, Pingyue; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    The statistical shape model (SSM) method that uses 2D images of the knee joint to predict the three-dimensional (3D) joint surface model has been reported in the literature. In this study, we constructed a SSM database using 152 human computed tomography (CT) knee joint models, including the femur, tibia and patella and analysed the characteristics of each principal component of the SSM. The surface models of two in vivo knees were predicted using the SSM and their 2D bi-plane fluoroscopic images. The predicted models were compared to their CT joint models. The differences between the predicted 3D knee joint surfaces and the CT image-based surfaces were 0.30 ± 0.81 mm, 0.34 ± 0.79 mm and 0.36 ± 0.59 mm for the femur, tibia and patella, respectively (average ± standard deviation). The computational time for each bone of the knee joint was within 30 s using a personal computer. The analysis of this study indicated that the SSM method could be a useful tool to construct 3D surface models of the knee with sub-millimeter accuracy in real time. Thus, it may have a broad application in computer-assisted knee surgeries that require 3D surface models of the knee.

  19. Modelling the propagation of ultrasound in the joint space of a human knee.

    PubMed

    White, Derrick; Evans, Joseph A; Truscott, John G; Chivers, Robin A

    2010-10-01

    There is strong evidence to support the clinical use of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to augment fracture healing. A previous experimental study showed that ultrasound can propagate in the joint space of a single human cadaveric knee. A full experimental investigation of this propagation is not possible due to poor reproducibility, the scarcity of human cadaveric tissues and the practical difficulties in making ultrasound measurements in the knee. The aim of the present work is to investigate whether a computer simulation (Wave2000 Pro®; Cyberlogic Inc., New York, NY, USA) can give a good representation of the experimental model. The simulations provided a good agreement with the experimental data, giving some confidence in the application of this computer simulation method as a means of determining whether ultrasound can propagate through different anatomical regions where bone is present.

  20. Increased expression of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in osteoarthritis of human knee joint compared to hip joint.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, John H; Rai, Vikrant; Dilisio, Matthew F; Sekundiak, Todd D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by the destruction of cartilage. The greatest risk factors for the development of OA include age and obesity. Recent studies suggest the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of OA. The two most common locations for OA to occur are in the knee and hip joints. The knee joint experiences more mechanical stress, cartilage degeneration, and inflammation than the hip joint. This could contribute to the increased incidence of OA in the knee joint. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high-mobility group box-1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, and alarmins (S100A8 and S100A9), are released in the joint in response to stress-mediated chondrocyte and cartilage damage. This facilitates increased cartilage degradation and inflammation in the joint. Studies have documented the role of DAMPs in the pathogenesis of OA; however, the comparison of DAMPs and its influence on OA has not been discussed. In this study, we compared the DAMPs between OA knee and hip joints and found a significant difference in the levels of DAMPs expressed in the knee joint compared to the hip joint. The increased levels of DAMPs suggest a difference in the underlying pathogenesis of OA in the knee and the hip and highlights DAMPs as potential therapeutic targets for OA in the future.

  1. Anatomical study of the lateral collateral ligament and its circumference structures in the human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Sasaki, Wataru; Hitomi, Jiro

    2010-02-01

    Thirty-six cadavers (55 sides) were used to observe the innervation of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and its circumference structures with gross anatomical and histological methods to clarify the cause of indistinct pain in the lateral part of the knee joint. The innervating branches of the LCL could be divided into three types: (1) from the muscular branch of the biceps femoris muscle at lower 1/3 level of the thigh; (2) from the common fibular nerve (CFN) at the higher level of the fossa poplitea; (3) from the CFN at the level of the caput fibular. Furthermore, the three branches could singly or plurally distribute to the LCL (six types). Two of the connecting tissue membranes surrounding the surface of LCL formed an incomplete sheath structure, and a shutting "gap" was observed between the two membranes. Fine peripheral nervous branches were also observed in the two of the membranes. On the other hand, three types of nerve endings in the LCL (Type I/Ruffini mechanoreceptor; Type III/Golgi mechanoreceptor; Type IV/free nerve ending) were observed, and their presence was consistent with the ankle joint of humans. Therefore, the innervation of the two membranes (to form the shutting gap) in the surface of LCL may be associated with an indistinct pain when the knee joint is damaged.

  2. Repositioning the knee joint in human body FE models using a graphics-based technique.

    PubMed

    Jani, Dhaval; Chawla, Anoop; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Goyal, Rahul; Vusirikala, Nataraju; Jayaraman, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Human body finite element models (FE-HBMs) are available in standard occupant or pedestrian postures. There is a need to have FE-HBMs in the same posture as a crash victim or to be configured in varying postures. Developing FE models for all possible positions is not practically viable. The current work aims at obtaining a posture-specific human lower extremity model by reconfiguring an existing one. A graphics-based technique was developed to reposition the lower extremity of an FE-HBM by specifying the flexion-extension angle. Elements of the model were segregated into rigid (bones) and deformable components (soft tissues). The bones were rotated about the flexion-extension axis followed by rotation about the longitudinal axis to capture the twisting of the tibia. The desired knee joint movement was thus achieved. Geometric heuristics were then used to reposition the skin. A mapping defined over the space between bones and the skin was used to regenerate the soft tissues. Mesh smoothing was then done to augment mesh quality. The developed method permits control over the kinematics of the joint and maintains the initial mesh quality of the model. For some critical areas (in the joint vicinity) where element distortion is large, mesh smoothing is done to improve mesh quality. A method to reposition the knee joint of a human body FE model was developed. Repositions of a model from 9 degrees of flexion to 90 degrees of flexion in just a few seconds without subjective interventions was demonstrated. Because the mesh quality of the repositioned model was maintained to a predefined level (typically to the level of a well-made model in the initial configuration), the model was suitable for subsequent simulations.

  3. Improved dynamic model of the human knee joint and its response to impact loading on the lower leg.

    PubMed

    Engin, A E; Tümer, S T

    1993-05-01

    Almost a decade ago, three-dimensional formulation for the dynamic modeling of an articulating human joint was introduced. Two-dimensional version of this formulation was subsequently applied to the knee joint. However, because of the iterative nature of the solution technique, this model cannot handle impact conditions. In this paper, alternative solution methods are introduced which enable investigation of the response of the human knee to impact loading on the lower leg via an anatomically based model. In addition, the classical impact theory is applied to the same model and a closed-form solution is obtained. The shortcomings of the classical impact theory as applied to the impact problem of the knee joint are delineated.

  4. [Establishment of 3-dimensional finite element model of human knee joint and its biomechanics].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ping; Wang, Wanchun

    2010-01-01

    To establish a 3-dimensional (3-D) finite element knee model in healthy Chinese males, to verify the validity of the model, and to analyze the biomechanics of this model under axial load, flexion moment, varus/valgus torque, and internal/external axial torque. A set of consecutive transectional computerized tomography images of normal male knee joints in upright weight-bearing position was selected. With image processing and inversion technology, the 3-D finite element model of the normal knee joint was established through the software ABAQOUS/STANDARD Version-6.5.Biomechanical analysis of this model was processed under axial load, flexion moment, varus/valgus torque, and internal/external axial torque. A 3-D finite element model of healthy Chinese males was successfully established. The ranges of motion of varus and valgus were both small and the difference between them has no statistical significance (P>0.05). The motion of internal and external rotation of the knee took place only in flexion situation.The range of motion of external rotation was larger than that of internal rotation in the same knee (P<0.05). The 3-D geometrical model of the knee resembles the actual knee segments. It can imitate the knee response to different loads. This model could be used for further study on knee biomechanics.

  5. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  6. Moderate loading of the human osteoarthritic knee joint leads to lowering of intraarticular cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Helmark, Ida C; Petersen, Marie C H; Christensen, Helle E; Kjaer, Michael; Langberg, Henning

    2012-04-01

    The non-pharmacological treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) includes exercise therapy; however, little is known about the specific effect of exercise on the joint per se. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the direct effects of a load-bearing exercise upon cartilage in a single, human osteoarthritic joint determined by biochemical markers of cartilage turnover and inflammation in the synovial fluid (SF), serum and urine. Eleven subjects with OA of the knee(s), but with no other joint- or inflammatory disorders, volunteered for the study and had samples of blood, urine and synovial fluid drawn both at baseline and following 30-min one-legged knee-extension exercise. Workload: 60% of 1 RM (Repetition Maximum). Determination of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), aggrecan, C-terminal collagen II peptide (CTX-II) and interleukin (IL)-6 were performed in synovial fluid (SF), serum and urine. A significant decrease was found in SF concentration of COMP following exercise, whereas aggrecan, CTX-II and IL-6 remained unchanged. No differences in any of the tested markers were found in serum and urine between baseline and post-exercise. Thirty minutes of mechanical loading of a single knee joint in human subjects with knee OA resulted in a reduced COMP concentration in SF.

  7. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  8. Can ultrasound propagate in the joint space of a human knee?

    PubMed

    White, D; Evans, J A; Truscott, J G; Chivers, R A

    2007-07-01

    A large body of evidence supports the principle that the use of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound with a frequency of 1.5 MHz can reduce fracture healing time. It is hypothesized that similar therapeutic benefits may be achieved in damaged articular cartilage. This study looks specifically at a 22-mm circular ultrasound transducer delivering ultrasound with a frequency of 1.5 MHz. A human cadaver knee was imaged using CT, the resulting images were used to help map a number of hydrophone positions in the joint from which measurements were taken. The experimental results suggest that at best there is a 30-mm window in which to place the ultrasound transducer for ultrasound to propagate through the joint space. In terms of a clinical device delivering an I(SATA) of 30 mW cm(-2) to anterior regions of the joint, the I(SATA) in posterior regions will at best be in the region of 10 mW cm(-2). The clinical implications of this are not known and require further investigation.

  9. Computational stability of human knee joint at early stance in Gait: Effects of muscle coactivity and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2017-08-20

    As one of the most complex and vulnerable structures of body, the human knee joint should maintain dynamic equilibrium and stability in occupational and recreational activities. The evaluation of its stability and factors affecting it is vital in performance evaluation/enhancement, injury prevention and treatment managements. Knee stability often manifests itself by pain, hypermobility and giving-way sensations and is usually assessed by the passive joint laxity tests. Mechanical stability of both the human knee joint and the lower extremity at early stance periods of gait (0% and 5%) were quantified here for the first time using a hybrid musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. The roles of muscle coactivity, simulated by setting minimum muscle activation at 0-10% levels and ACL deficiency, simulated by reducing ACL resistance by up to 85%, on the stability margin as well as joint biomechanics (contact/muscle/ligament forces) were investigated. Dynamic stability was analyzed using both linear buckling and perturbation approaches at the final deformed configurations in gait. The knee joint was much more stable at 0% stance than at 5% due to smaller ground reaction and contact forces. Muscle coactivity, when at lower intensities (<3% of its maximum active force), increased dynamic stability margin. Greater minimum activation levels, however, acted asan ineffective strategy to enhance stability. Coactivation also substantially increased muscle forces, joint loads and ACL force and hence the risk of further injury and degeneration. A deficiency in ACL decreases total ACL force (by 31% at 85% reduced stiffness) and the stability margin of the knee joint at the heel strike. It also markedly diminishes forces in lateral hamstrings (by up to 39%) and contact forces on the lateral plateau (by up to 17%). Current work emphasizes the need for quantification of the lower extremity stability margin in gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling of Human Joint Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Radial Lateral " epicondyle Olecranon Radius Ulna Figure 3. Lateral aspect of the right elbow joint. -17- Annular Ligament This strong band encircles... elbow joint, knee joint, human joints, shoulder joint, ankle joint, joint models, hip joint, ligaments. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If...ligaments. -A rather extended discussion of the articulations and anatomical descriptions of the elbow , shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints are

  11. Arthroscopic Ultrasound Assessment of Articular Cartilage in the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kaleva, Erna; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Sahlman, Janne; Sirola, Joonas; Puhakka, Jani; Paatela, Teemu; Kröger, Heikki; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We tested whether an intra-articular ultrasound (IAUS) method could be used to evaluate cartilage status arthroscopically in human knee joints in vivo. Design: Seven patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery of the knee were enrolled in this study. An ultrasonic examination was conducted using the same portals as in the arthroscopic surgery. A high-frequency (40-MHz) ultrasound transducer (diameter = 1 mm) was directed to the desired location on the articular surface under arthroscopic control. In addition to ultrasound data, an IAUS video and optical video through the arthroscope were recorded. Classification of cartilage injuries according to International Cartilage Repair Society, as conducted by the orthopedic surgeon, provided reference data for comparison with the IAUS. Results: The IAUS method was successful in imaging different characteristics of the articular surfaces (e.g., intact surface, surface fibrillation, and lesions of varying depth). In some cases, also the subchondral bone and abnormal internal cartilage structure were visible in the IAUS images. Specifically, using the IAUS, a local cartilage lesion of 1 patient was found to be deeper than estimated arthroscopically. Conclusions: The IAUS method provided a novel arthroscopic method for quantitative imaging of articular cartilage lesions. The IAUS provided quantitative information about the cartilage integrity and thickness, which are not available in conventional arthroscopy. The present equipment is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for intravascular use and might be transferred to intra-articular use. The invasiveness of the IAUS method might restrict its wider clinical use but combined with arthroscopy, ultrasonic assessment may enlarge the diagnostic potential of arthroscopic surgery. PMID:26069583

  12. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  13. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of the human knee joint--Part I: Postmortem frequency domain analyses.

    PubMed

    Dortmans, L; Jans, H; Sauren, A; Huson, A

    1991-11-01

    Characteristics results of postmortem experiments on five knee-joint specimens are reported. The experiments were performed to investigate the applicability of a local linearization technique that would make it possible to describe the dynamic behavior of the joint in terms of transfer functions. The results indicate that the stiffness of the bracing wires, attached to muscle tendons to create a static equilibrium position, can be accounted for when determining the stiffness of the joint. Besides the static equilibrium configuration, the magnitude of the dynamic load and the type of dynamic load applied to the joint can be shown to have their influence. As the influence of the dynamic load is significant, it has to be concluded that in essence the knee joint has to be regarded as a nonlinear system, making application of a Local Linearization Technique questionable. However, when the magnitude of the dynamic load is included as an additional measurement parameter, an indication can be obtained about the behavior of the joint and the degree of nonlinearity.

  14. A self-aligning knee joint for walking assistance devices.

    PubMed

    Byungjune Choi; Younbaek Lee; Jeonghun Kim; Minhyung Lee; Jongwon Lee; Se-Gon Roh; Hyundo Choi; Yong-Jae Kim; Jung-Yun Choi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel self-aligning knee mechanism for walking assistance devices for the elderly to provide physical gait assistance. Self-aligning knee joints can assist in flexion/extension motions of the knee joint and compensate the knee's transitional movements in the sagittal plane. In order to compensate the center of rotation, which moves with the flexion/extension motion of the human knee joint, a self-aligning knee joint is proposed that adds redundant degrees of freedom (i.e., 2-DoF) to the 1-DoF revolute joint. The key idea of the proposed mechanism is to decouple joint rotations and translations for use in lower-extremity wearable devices. This paper describes the mechanical design of this self-aligning knee mechanism and its implementation on a wearable robot and in preliminary experiments. The performance of the proposed mechanism is verified by simulations and experiments.

  15. Development of a multi-modal virtual human knee joint for education and training in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Riener, R; Hoogen, J; Burgkart, R; Buss, M; Schmidt, G

    2001-01-01

    Due to limited simultaneous access to a greater pool of patients an effective training of medical students or young orthopedic physicians is difficult. A knee joint simulator that comprises the properties of a healthy or pathological knee can support medical education and training. In this paper a mechatronic system is presented that provides visual, acoustic, and haptic (force) feedback so that it allows a user to touch and move a virtual shank, bones or muscles within the leg, and simultaneously observe the generated movement, feel the contact force, and hear sounds. These and further features enable the user to study and assess the properties of the knee, e.g. by testing the joint laxity and end-point stiffness in six degrees-of-motion (DOF) and by grasping and pulling at muscles, rupturing ligaments or changing muscle/ligament paths. Such a tool can support training of physical knee evaluation required for diagnosis and therapeutic planning, since any kind of pathology of any subject type can be tested at any time. Furthermore, it can provide a better understanding of functional anatomy, e.g. for the education of medical students.

  16. Computational biomechanics of articular cartilage of human knee joint: effect of osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, R; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2009-11-13

    Articular cartilage and its supporting bone functional conditions are tightly coupled as injuries of either adversely affects joint mechanical environment. The objective of this study was set to quantitatively investigate the extent of alterations in the mechanical environment of cartilage and knee joint in presence of commonly observed osteochondral defects. An existing validated finite element model of a knee joint was used to construct a refined model of the tibial lateral compartment including proximal tibial bony structures. The response was computed under compression forces up to 2000 N while simulating localized bone damage, cartilage-bone horizontal split, bone overgrowth and absence of deep vertical collagen fibrils. Localized tibial bone damage increased overall joint compliance and substantially altered pattern and magnitude of contact pressures and cartilage strains in both tibia and femur. These alterations were further exacerbated when bone damage was combined with base cartilage split and absence of deep vertical collagen fibrils. Local bone boss markedly changed contact pressures and strain patterns in neighbouring cartilage. Bone bruise/fracture and overgrowth adversely perturbed the homeostatic balance in the mechanical environment of articulate cartilage surrounding and opposing the lesion as well as the joint compliance. As such, they potentially contribute to the initiation and development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

  17. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  18. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, Riccardo; Hansen, Uwe; Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F; Bruckner, Peter; Stolz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage.

  19. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Bruckner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage. PMID:27780246

  20. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-07

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect.

  1. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermoacoustic imaging of rabbit knee joints.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zihui; Zhao, Yuan; Huang, Lin; Zheng, Zhu; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-12-01

    Knee joint is one of the largest and most complex joints of the body. Knee joint diseases are common, and current clinical imaging technologies such as x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound imaging have limitations in the diagnosis of knee joint diseases. Emerging imaging technologies such as diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) have been applied to the detection of osteoarthritis (OA). However, they are limited to small joints such as the finger and difficult to be used for large joints such as the knee. Thermoacoustic imaging (TAI), also an emerging modality, provides high contrast and deep tissue penetration. Here, the authors apply TAI to the knee joint and demonstrate the potential of TAI for imaging large joints. Adult New Zealand male rabbits (average weight = 2 kg) were chosen for this study. In a TAI experiment, a rabbit was placed in a holder to keep in a genuflex position after being injected with pentobarbital through its ear margin intravenous (30 mg/kg). The holder and the rabbit were then positioned under the horn antenna of the TAI system for signal acquisition and image reconstruction. After the experiment, the imaged knee joint was dissected and photographed. Identical procedures were performed for several rabbits (n = 4). Finally, detailed comparative analyses between TAI images and anatomical pictures of the knee joint were conducted. There were high similarities between the reconstructed TAI images and anatomical pictures of the knee joint, in terms of the shape and size of various knee joint tissues. TAI could clearly image ligament, fat pad, and other joint tissues. The differences in appearance of TAI images due to motion effect of the knee joint were also discussed. TAI could reveal details of rabbit knee joint in high resolution. As the recovered TAI images represent the dielectric property distributions of joint tissues, TAI may offer a new tool for noninvasive detection of joint

  3. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  4. The elephant knee joint: morphological and biomechanical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Weissengruber, G E; Fuss, F K; Egger, G; Stanek, G; Hittmair, K M; Forstenpointner, G

    2006-01-01

    Elephant limbs display unique morphological features which are related mainly to supporting the enormous body weight of the animal. In elephants, the knee joint plays important roles in weight bearing and locomotion, but anatomical data are sparse and lacking in functional analyses. In addition, the knee joint is affected frequently by arthrosis. Here we examined structures of the knee joint by means of standard anatomical techniques in eight African (Loxodonta africana) and three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Furthermore, we performed radiography in five African and two Asian elephants and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in one African elephant. Macerated bones of 11 individuals (four African, seven Asian elephants) were measured with a pair of callipers to give standardized measurements of the articular parts. In one Asian and three African elephants, kinematic and functional analyses were carried out using a digitizer and according to the helical axis concept. Some peculiarities of healthy and arthrotic knee joints of elephants were compared with human knees. In contrast to those of other quadruped mammals, the knee joint of elephants displays an extended resting position. The femorotibial joint of elephants shows a high grade of congruency and the menisci are extremely narrow and thin. The four-bar mechanism of the cruciate ligaments exists also in the elephant. The main motion of the knee joint is extension–flexion with a range of motion of 142°. In elephants, arthrotic alterations of the knee joint can lead to injury or loss of the cranial (anterior) cruciate ligament. PMID:16420379

  5. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  6. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  7. [Ossifying bursitis praepatellaris of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Erler, M

    2009-01-01

    A 53-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with a tumour at the site of the left knee joint praepatellar. The diagnostic imaging, operative findings and histology showed a chronic ossifying bursitis praepatellaris of the knee joint. Aetiology and pathogenesis of the ossifying bursitis are discussed.

  8. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  9. Biomechanical Effects of Stiffness in Parallel With the Knee Joint During Walking.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Cenciarini, Massimo; Adams, Albert A; Gregorczyk, Karen N; Schiffman, Jeffrey M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-10-01

    The human knee behaves similarly to a linear torsional spring during the stance phase of walking with a stiffness referred to as the knee quasi-stiffness. The spring-like behavior of the knee joint led us to hypothesize that we might partially replace the knee joint contribution during stance by utilizing an external spring acting in parallel with the knee joint. We investigated the validity of this hypothesis using a pair of experimental robotic knee exoskeletons that provided an external stiffness in parallel with the knee joints in the stance phase. We conducted a series of experiments involving walking with the exoskeletons with four levels of stiffness, including 0%, 33%, 66%, and 100% of the estimated human knee quasi-stiffness, and a pair of joint-less replicas. The results indicated that the ankle and hip joints tend to retain relatively invariant moment and angle patterns under the effects of the exoskeleton mass, articulation, and stiffness. The results also showed that the knee joint responds in a way such that the moment and quasi-stiffness of the knee complex (knee joint and exoskeleton) remains mostly invariant. A careful analysis of the knee moment profile indicated that the knee moment could fully adapt to the assistive moment; whereas, the knee quasi-stiffness fully adapts to values of the assistive stiffness only up to ∼80%. Above this value, we found biarticular consequences emerge at the hip joint.

  10. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  11. The Morphological Anatomy of the Menisci of the Knee Joint in Human Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Esra; Özgüner, Gülnur; Öztürk, Kenan; Bilkay, Cemil; Dursun, Ahmet; Sulak, Osman

    2017-08-23

    Development of the fetal period of the meniscus has been reported in different studies. Evaluation of the lateral and the medial menisci development, typing and the relationship of the tibia during the fetal period. Anatomical dissection. We were evaluated 210 knee meniscus obtained from 105 human fetuses that in age from 9-40 weeks. Fetuses were divided into four groups. Intraarticular structure were exposed. This was followed by taking pictures (Samsung WB 100 26X Optical Zoom Wide, Pekin, China) of the intra-articular structures with the help of millimetric ruler. The pictures were digitized for morphometric analyses and analyzed by Netcad 5.1 Software (Ak Mühendislik Ltd, Şti, Ankara, Turkey). The lateral and the medial meniscal areas, the lateral and the medial articular surface areas of the tibia increased throughout the gestation. We found that the medial articular surface areas was larger than the lateral articular surface areas and the difference was statistically significant. The ratio of the mean lateral and medial meniscal area to the lateral and the medial articular surface areas of the tibia was decresed gradually from the first group towards to full term. The most common shape for the medial meniscus was crescentic (50%), the lateral meniscus was C-shaped (61%). The present study aims to clarify the development of fetal menisci by providing reliable data through anatomical dissection method in a large series. The study has revealed the development of the morphological changes and the morphometric measurement of the menisci. Key words: human fetus, meniscus, development, meniscal area.

  12. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  13. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  14. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. PMID:26481256

  15. Determination of representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints for knee joint implant design.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dai Soon; Tao, Quang Bang; Todo, Mitsugu; Jeon, Insu

    2012-05-01

    Knee joint implants developed by western companies have been imported to Korea and used for Korean patients. However, many clinical problems occur in knee joints of Korean patients after total knee joint replacement owing to the geometric mismatch between the western implants and Korean knee joint structures. To solve these problems, a method to determine the representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints is introduced to aid in the design of knee joint implants appropriate for Korean patients. Measurements of the dimension parameters of 88 male Korean knee joint subjects were carried out. The distribution of the subjects versus each measured parameter value was investigated. The measured dimension parameter values of each parameter were grouped by suitable intervals called the "size group," and average values of the size groups were calculated. The knee joint subjects were grouped as the "patient group" based on "size group numbers" of each parameter. From the iterative calculations to decrease the errors between the average dimension parameter values of each "patient group" and the dimension parameter values of the subjects, the average dimension parameter values that give less than the error criterion were determined to be the representative dimension parameter values for designing knee joint implants for Korean patients.

  16. [Research on point cloud smoothing in knee joint prosthesis modeling based on reverse engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoliang; Yao, Jin; Wei, Xing; Pei, Fuxing; Zhou, Zongke

    2008-10-01

    At present, foreign standard knee joint prosthesis is mostly used in clinical practice; it can well represent the biological characteristic of knee joint on human being. So this paper adopts the reverse engineering technology in that connexion, presents novel positioning method of acquiring the point data on the surface of knee joint prosthesis, puts forward the algorithm of three-point angle method for removing the noise error and correcting the noise error based on the least squares plane to smooth point cloud. And then, the surface of knee joint prosthesis with better accuracy and smoothness can be generated. Finally, the knee joint prosthesis model can be generated. Thus, a basis is provided for the localization of knee joint prosthesis. This new algorithm is mainly used for the surface modeling based on point cloud smoothing, including the surface of knee joint prosthesis, the surface of regular shape, and the surface with gentle change in curvature.

  17. External knee joint design based on normal motion.

    PubMed

    Walker, P S; Kurosawa, H; Rovick, J S; Zimmerman, R A

    1985-01-01

    There are several advantages to accurate reproduction of knee motion in an external joint assembly such as a knee brace: reduction of pistoning forces, better ligament protection, kinematic compatability. The geometry and kinematics of the normal human knee were studied and the results applied to external joint design. Geometrically, the posterior portions of the femoral condyles were found to be spherical in shape. These spherical surfaces are projected in sagittal plane radiographs as circles with center points coincident with those of the spheres. A line connecting these centers defines an axis system and enables three-dimensional orientation of the femur on the tibia to be determined using sagittal-plane radiographs. Knee kinematics was determined as a function of flexion angle for 14 fresh cadavers and 8 volunteers. Results were in the form of eulerian rotations and displacements. The data were normalized to the size of the average knee and the results from the 22 trials were averaged. The most obvious motion was internal rotation of the tibia with flexion; however, varus rotation and posterior translation of the origin were also evident. An external joint system was then designed to mimic "average" knee motion during flexion. The joints have been incorporated into a knee brace, and clinical evaluation has begun. Other applications include cast bracing and hinge distraction.

  18. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  19. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  1. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  2. Should a native depth-dependent distribution of human meniscus constitutive components be considered in FEA-models of the knee joint?

    PubMed

    Párraga Quiroga, J M; Emans, P; Wilson, W; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2014-10-01

    The depth-dependent matrix composition of articular cartilage is important for its mechanical behavior. It is unknown whether the depth-dependent matrix composition of a meniscus is similarly important for its load-bearing function. The present objective was to determine whether it is necessary to account for the native distribution of matrix components in the cross-sectional plane of the meniscus, when studying its mechanical behavior in numerical models. To address this objective, measured depth-dependent distribution of matrix contents in the human meniscus, and fitted visco-elastic mechanical properties of the collagen were used as input in FEA simulations of a knee joint. The importance of including the depth-dependent matrix component constitution in the meniscus was determined by comparing simulations with an axisymmetric representation of the knee joint, which incorporated either the depth-dependent matrix composition or homogenized matrix. Depth-dependent differences in water, collagen and proteoglycan contents were observed, but these were not significantly different. The anterior region, with significantly higher collagen content, was statistically stiffer than the posterior region. However, depth wise, stiffness did not correlate to the constitution of the tissue. GAG content was significantly higher in the posterior than in the anterior region. Visco-elastic properties of meniscus collagen were fitted against tensile test data. Simulations show that the distribution of stresses and strains in the cartilage is slightly low when the meniscus contains a depth-dependent constitution, but this difference is only modest. Therefore, this study suggests that knee joint mechanics is rather insensitive to the distribution of constitutive components in the cross section of the meniscus, and that the depth-dependent matrix distribution of the meniscus is not essential to be included in axisymmetric computational models of the knee joint.

  3. 3D active-passive response of human knee joint in gait is markedly altered when simulated as a planar 2D joint.

    PubMed

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Adouni, M

    2017-04-01

    Musculoskeletal models of the lower extremity make a number of important assumptions when attempting to estimate muscle forces and tibiofemoral compartmental loads in activities such as gait. The knee is commonly idealized as a planar 2D joint in the sagittal plane with no consideration of motions and equilibrium in remaining planes. With muscle forces predicted, the static equilibrium in the frontal plane is then used to estimate compartmental loads neglecting also joint passive resistance and assuming condylar contact centers. We aimed here to comprehensively investigate the effects of such assumptions on predicted results. While simulating gait and using a hybrid lower extremity model that incorporates a detailed validated 3D finite element model of the knee joint, analyses are repeated with out-of-sagittal plane rotations and moment equilibrium equations neglected (2D model) and tibial compartmental forces estimated using equilibrium in the frontal plane while disregarding passive resistance and assuming fixed contact centers (1D model). Large unbalanced out-of-sagittal plane moments reaching peaks of 30 Nm abduction moment and 12 Nm internal moment at 25 % stance period are computed that are overlooked in the 2D model. Consideration of the knee as a planar 2D joint substantially diminishes muscle forces, anterior cruciate ligament force and tibiofemoral contact forces/stresses when compared to the 3D reference model. Total tibiofemoral contact force peaks at 25 % stance at 4.2 BW in the 3D model that drops to 3.0 BW in the 2D model. The location of contact centers on each plateau also noticeably alters (by as much as 5 mm). Tibiofemoral contact forces further change when the location of contact centers on each plateau is fixed. Results highlight the importance of accurate simulation of 3D motions and equilibrium equations as well as passive joint properties and contact centers.

  4. Articular Cartilage of the Human Knee Joint: In Vivo Multicomponent T2 Analysis at 3.0 T

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang Won; Samsonov, Alexey; Spencer, Richard G.; Wilson, John J.; Block, Walter F.; Kijowski, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare multicomponent T2 parameters of the articular cartilage of the knee joint measured by using multicomponent driven equilibrium single-shot observation of T1 and T2 (mcDESPOT) in asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods This prospective study was performed with institutional review board approval and with written informed consent from all subjects. The mcDESPOT sequence was performed in the knee joint of 13 asymptomatic volunteers and 14 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Single-component T2 (T2Single), T2 of the fast-relaxing water component (T2F) and of the slow-relaxing water component (T2S), and the fraction of the fast-relaxing water component (FF) of cartilage were measured. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and multivariate linear regression models were used to compare mcDESPOT parameters between volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess diagnostic performance with mcDESPOT parameters for distinguishing morphologically normal cartilage from morphologically degenerative cartilage identified at magnetic resonance imaging in eight cartilage subsections of the knee joint. Results Higher cartilage T2Single (P < .001), lower cartilage FF (P < .001), and similar cartilage T2F (P = .079) and T2S (P = .124) values were seen in patients with osteoarthritis compared with those in asymptomatic volunteers. Differences in T2Single and FF remained significant (P < .05) after consideration of age differences between groups of subjects. Diagnostic performance was higher with FF than with T2Single for distinguishing between normal and degenerative cartilage (P < .05), with greater areas under the curve at receiver operating characteristic analysis. Conclusion Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee had significantly higher cartilage T2Single and significantly lower cartilage FF than did asymptomatic volunteers, and receiver operating characteristic analysis

  5. [Application of interactive virtual reality technique in biomechanical analysis of knee joint stability].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-ping; Zhao, Wei-dong; Li, Yi-kai; Wu, Yu-feng; Jiang, Xue-mei; Lin, Si-ping; Zhong, Shi-zhen

    2005-09-01

    To test the feasibility of using interactive virtual reality technique for three-dimensional reconstruction and image segmentation for biomechanical analysis of the knee joint structures. The muscular and fat tissues along with the connective tissues were removed from the knee joint, and the femur and tibia were embedded in polymethacrylate gel. The knee joint was reconstructed with three-dimensional analysis system after calibration of the sequence of the three-dimensional markers attached to the femur and tibia. The knee joint model was reconstructed and verified by three-dimensional analysis. This model provided information of the motions of the internal and external knee joint structures. This method is useful for reconstructing human joints and provides a new and highly efficient experimental method for biomechanical simulation of human joints.

  6. Effects of knee joint angle on global and local strains within human triceps surae muscle: MRI analysis indicating in vivo myofascial force transmission between synergistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Huijing, Peter A; Yaman, Alper; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Yucesoy, Can A

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical interactions between muscles have been shown for in situ conditions. In vivo data for humans is unavailable. Global and local length changes of calf muscles were studied to test the hypothesis that local strains may occur also within muscle for which global strain equals zero. For determination of globally induced strain in m. gastrocnemius in dissected human cadavers several knee joint angles were imposed, while keeping ankle joint angle constant and measuring its muscle-tendon complex length changes. In vivo local strains in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were calculated using MRI techniques in healthy human volunteers comparing images taken at static knee angles of 173° and 150°. Imposed global strains on gastrocnemius were much smaller than local strains. High distributions of strains were encountered, e.g. overall lengthened muscle contains locally lengthened, as well as shortened areas within it. Substantial strains were not limited to gastrocnemius, but were found also in synergistic soleus muscle, despite the latter muscle-tendon complex length remaining isometric (constant ankle angle: i.e. global strain = 0), as it does not cross the knee. Based on results of animal experiments this effect is ascribed to myofascial connections between these synergistic muscles. The most likely pathway is the neurovascular tract within the anterior crural compartment (i.e. the collagen reinforcements of blood vessels, lymphatics and nerves). However, direct intermuscular transmission of force may also occur via the perimysium shared between the two muscles. Global strains imposed on muscle (joint movement) are not good estimators of in vivo local strains within it: differing in magnitude, as well as direction of length change. Substantial mechanical interaction occurs between calf muscles, which is mediated by myofascial force transmission between these synergistic muscles. This confirms conclusions of previous in situ studies in experimental animals

  7. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  8. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. 888.3580 Section 888.3580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. 888.3580 Section 888.3580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3590 Section 888.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. 888.3580 Section 888.3580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3590 Section 888.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3590 Section 888.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3590 Section 888.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  15. [Knee joint pain with signs of arthrosis].

    PubMed

    Bender, T T A; Marinova, M; Radbruch, L; Conrad, R; Jobst, D; Mücke, M

    2017-03-14

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is most commonly caused by osteoarthritis, especially in elderly patients but can be due to other causes, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnostics include an exact patient medical history and a clinical examination, which often already provide clear indications of the cause of the knee pain. Subsequently, further diagnostics can then be considered, such as radiological procedures and laboratory diagnostics. The treatment is determined by the cause and the individual patient and aims to reduce pain and to preserve the mobility of the joint. Generally, therapy consists of pain management and physiotherapy as well as alternative therapeutic procedures, mostly in combination. Proximal tibial opening wedge osteotomy can be useful; however, partial or total knee arthroplasty should only be considered when conservative treatment options have been exhausted.

  16. [Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Mannil, M; Andreisek, G; Weishaupt, D; Fischer, M A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint are common and mainly caused by repetitive (micro) trauma and exertion. Chronic insertion tendinopathies and avulsion fractures and symptoms related to entrapment, friction and impingement can be pathophysiologically distinguished in athletes. In this review, we depict the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the most commonly occurring pathologies.

  17. Differences in knee joint kinematics and forces after posterior cruciate retaining and stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wünschel, Markus; Leasure, Jeremi M; Dalheimer, Philipp; Kraft, Nicole; Wülker, Nikolaus; Müller, Otto

    2013-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining (CR) and -sacrificing (PS) total knee arthroplasties (TKA) are widely-used to treat osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The PS design substitutes the function of the PCL with a cam-spine mechanism which may produce adverse changes to joint kinematics and kinetics. CR- and PS-TKA were performed on 11 human knee specimens. Joint kinematics were measured with a dynamic knee simulator and motion tracking equipment. In-situ loads of the PCL and cam-spine were measured with a robotic force sensor system. Partial weight bearing flexions were simulated and external forces were applied. The PS-TKA rotated significantly less throughout the whole flexion range compared to the CR-TKA. Femoral roll back was greater in the PS-TKA; however, this was not correlated with lower quadriceps forces. Application of external loads produced significantly different in-situ force profiles between the TKA systems. Our data demonstrate that the PS-design significantly alters kinematics of the knee joint. Our data also suggest the cam-spine mechanism may have little influence on high flexion kinematics (such as femoral rollback) with most of the load burden shared by supporting implant and soft-tissue structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bursae around the knee joints

    PubMed Central

    Chatra, Priyank S

    2012-01-01

    A bursa is a fluid-filled structure that is present between the skin and tendon or tendon and bone. The main function of a bursa is to reduce friction between adjacent moving structures. Bursae around the knee can be classified as those around the patella and those that occur elsewhere. In this pictorial essay we describe the most commonly encountered lesions and their MRI appearance. PMID:22623812

  19. Review: Modelling of meniscus of knee joint during soccer kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azrul Hisham Mohd Adib, Mohd; Firdaus Jaafar, Mohd

    2013-12-01

    Knee is a part of the body that located between thigh and shank is one of the most complicated and largest joints in the human body. The common injuries that occur are ligaments, meniscus or bone fracture. During soccer games, the knee is the most critical part that will easily injure due to the shock from an external impact. Torn meniscus is one of the effects. This study will investigate the effect towards the meniscus within the knee joint during soccer ball kicking. We conduct a literary review of 14 journals that discuss the general view of meniscus and also soccer kicking. The selected topics for this review paper are meniscal function, meniscal movement, meniscal tears and also instep kick. As a finding, statistics show that most meniscal tears (73%) occurred in athletes who were soccer players, basketball players or skiers. The tear is frequently happening at the medial side rather than lateral side with a percentage of 70%.

  20. Knee joint motion: description and measurement.

    PubMed

    Bull, A M; Amis, A A

    1998-01-01

    Knee joint motion has been described in various ways in the literature. These are explained and commented on. Two methods for describing knee joint motion with 6 degrees of freedom (DOF)--Euler angle and the helical axis of motion--are discussed. Techniques to measure joint motion which can either approximate the motion to less than 6 DOF or fully measure the spatial motion are identified. These include electrical linkage methods, radiographic and video techniques, fluoroscopic techniques and electromagnetic devices. In those cases where the full spatial motion is measured, the data are available to describe the motion in simpler terms (or with less DOF) than three rotations with three translations. This is necessary for clinical application and to facilitate communication between the clinician and the engineer.

  1. Elastic properties of an intact and ACL-ruptured knee joint: measurement, mathematical modelling, and haptic rendering.

    PubMed

    Frey, Martin; Riener, Robert; Michas, Christian; Regenfelder, Felix; Burgkart, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    An analytical, dynamic model of the human knee joint has been developed to simulate the unloaded knee joint behaviour in 6 degrees of freedom. It is based on extensive robot-based measurements of the elastic properties of a human cadaver knee joint. The measured data are compared with data from the literature to ensure that a proper database for modelling is used. The analytical modelling of the passive elastic joint properties is done with Local Linear Model Trees. The deduced knee joint model incorporates passive elastic properties of the internal knee joint structures, passive elastic muscle forces, damping forces, gravitational forces, and external forces. There are two sets of parameters, one simulating the movement of the intact knee joint, and a second simulating the knee joint with ruptured anterior cruciate ligament. The dynamic model can be easily processed in real-time. It is implemented in the haptic display of the Munich Knee Joint Simulator (MKS), which enables a person to move a plastic leg driven by a robot manipulator and feel the simulated knee joint force. Orthopaedic physicians judged the performance of the dynamic knee joint model by executing physical knee joint tests at the MKS.

  2. A reciprocal connection factor for assessing knee-joint function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wangdo; Kohles, Sean S

    2012-01-01

    In the knee joint, interactions between instantaneous kinetics and kinematics associated with ligamentous and articular tissues are not fully understood. These structures may be represented by the instantaneous screw axis ($) (ISA) and static force vectors ($'). Geometric changes to the joint structure affecting motion have not been fully explained, especially after surgical reconstruction and replacement procedures. The ISA offers a joint-characterisation approach, which is dependent on the combined forces of ligaments, articular contacts and muscles. The standard four-bar linkage model in the sagittal plane demonstrates that the normal contact force and the lines of action of the cruciate ligaments always intersect at the centre of rotation of the joint. A kinematic knee model in which the articular surfaces in the lateral and medial compartments as well as the isometric fascicles in the engaged ligaments may be represented as five constraints in a one-degree-of-freedom parallel spatial mechanism. This study provides a theoretical foundation to elucidate the role of each of these elements in the control of the ISA. A recourse to the principle of virtual work explained through d'Alembert's principle for reducing a dynamics problem to an instantaneous static scenario allows screws to be applied to the biomechanics of human motion. The principle of reciprocity links these approaches together to explain the transmitting load between the tibia and the femur as well as the relative motion within the knee joint. A principal clinical implication of this study is the introduction of the reciprocal connection factor to evaluate knee kinematics and kinetics in one simple term, allowing the quantitative assessment of the outcome of knee-joint treatment and rehabilitation methods.

  3. A Novel Approach to the Dissection of the Human Knee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemente, F. Richard; Fabrizio, Philip A.; Shumaker, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The knee is one of the most frequently injured joints of the human body with injuries affecting the general population and the athletic population of many age groups. Dissection procedures for the knee joint typically do not allow unobstructed visualization of the anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligaments without sacrificing the collateral…

  4. A Novel Approach to the Dissection of the Human Knee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemente, F. Richard; Fabrizio, Philip A.; Shumaker, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The knee is one of the most frequently injured joints of the human body with injuries affecting the general population and the athletic population of many age groups. Dissection procedures for the knee joint typically do not allow unobstructed visualization of the anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligaments without sacrificing the collateral…

  5. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Prosthetic Knee Joint Using the Geared Five-Bar Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxi; Ge, Wenjie; Zheng, Jia; Dong, Dianbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, dynamics analysis and ankle trajectory analysis of a prosthetic knee joint using the geared five-bar mechanism. Compared with traditional four-bar or six-bar mechanisms, the geared five-bar mechanism is better at performing diverse movements and is easy to control. This prosthetic knee joint with the geared five-bar mechanism is capable of fine-tuning its relative instantaneous center of rotation and ankle trajectory. The centrode of this prosthetic knee joint, which is mechanically optimized according to the centrode of human knee joint, is better in the bionic performance than that of a prosthetic knee joint using the four-bar mechanism. Additionally, the stability control of this prosthetic knee joint during the swing and stance phase is achieved by a motor. By adjusting the gear ratio of this prosthetic knee joint, the ankle trajectories of both unilateral and bilateral amputees show less deviations from expected than that of the four-bar knee joint.

  7. Knee joint angle and vasti muscle electromyograms during fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryosuke; Tomita, Aya; Watanabe, Kohei; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-05-19

    We compared vasti muscle electromyograms for two knee joint angles during fatiguing tetanic contractions. Tetanic contraction of the knee extensors was evoked for 70 s by electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve at knee joint angles of 60° (extended, with 0° indicating full extension) and 110° (flexed) in eight healthy men. Surface electromyography was recorded from the vastus intermedius (VI), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. Knee extension force and M-wave amplitudes and durations were calculated every 7 s, which were normalized by the initial value. Normalized knee extension force was decreased at the flexed knee joint angle compared with that of the extended knee joint angle (P<0·05). Decreased normalized M-wave amplitude and increased normalized M-wave duration of the VI were greater at the flexed knee joint angle than the extended knee joint angle (P<0·05), whereas those for the VL and VM were similar (P>0·05). These results suggest that peripheral fatigue profiles of the VI might be greater at the flexed than the extended knee joint angles, but that of VL and VM might be similar in the tested range of knee joint angles (i.e. 60°-110°) during continuous tetanic contraction induced by electrical stimulation. Therefore, greater reduction of knee extension force at the flexed knee joint angle than the extended knee joint angle may reflect fatigue development of the VI more than other quadriceps femoris components. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Can generic knee joint models improve the measurement of osteoarthritic knee kinematics during squatting activity?

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint kinematics derived from multi-body optimisation (MBO) still requires evaluation. The objective of this study was to corroborate model-derived kinematics of osteoarthritic knees obtained using four generic knee joint models used in musculoskeletal modelling - spherical, hinge, degree-of-freedom coupling curves and parallel mechanism - against reference knee kinematics measured by stereo-radiography. Root mean square errors ranged from 0.7° to 23.4° for knee rotations and from 0.6 to 9.0 mm for knee displacements. Model-derived knee kinematics computed from generic knee joint models was inaccurate. Future developments and experiments should improve the reliability of osteoarthritic knee models in MBO and musculoskeletal modelling.

  9. Complex function of the knee joint: the current understanding of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, Michael T; Müller, Werner

    2015-10-01

    Since the early years of orthopaedics, it is a well-known fact that anatomy follows function. During the evolution of mankind, the knee has been optimally adapted to the forces and loads acting at and through the knee joint. However, anatomy of the knee joint is variable and the only constant is its complex function. In contrast to the time of open surgery, nowadays the majority of reconstructive knee surgery is done arthroscopically. Keyhole surgery is less invasive, but on the backside, the knee surgeon lacks daily visualisation of the complex open anatomy. As open anatomical knowledge is less present in our daily practice, it is even more important to highlight this complex anatomy and function of the knee. It is the purpose of this review to perform a systematic review of knee anatomy, highlight the complex function of the knee joint and present an overview about recent and current knowledge about knee function. Level of evidence Systematic review, Level IV.

  10. Individual muscle contributions to the axial knee joint contact force during normal walking.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Neptune, Richard R

    2010-10-19

    Muscles are significant contributors to the high joint forces developed in the knee during human walking. Not only do muscles contribute to the knee joint forces by acting to compress the joint, but they also develop joint forces indirectly through their contributions to the ground reaction forces via dynamic coupling. Thus, muscles can have significant contributions to forces at joints they do not span. However, few studies have investigated how the major lower-limb muscles contribute to the knee joint contact forces during walking. The goal of this study was to use a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation of walking to identify how individual muscles contribute to the axial tibio-femoral joint force. The simulation results showed that the vastii muscles are the primary contributors to the axial joint force in early stance while the gastrocnemius is the primary contributor in late stance. The tibio-femoral joint force generated by these muscles was at times greater than the muscle forces themselves. Muscles that do not cross the knee joint (e.g., the gluteus maximus and soleus) also have significant contributions to the tibio-femoral joint force through their contributions to the ground reaction forces. Further, small changes in walking kinematics (e.g., knee flexion angle) can have a significant effect on the magnitude of the knee joint forces. Thus, altering walking mechanics and muscle coordination patterns to utilize muscle groups that perform the same biomechanical function, yet contribute less to the knee joint forces may be an effective way to reduce knee joint loading during walking.

  11. Individual Muscle Contributions to the Axial Knee Joint Contact Force during Normal Walking

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Neptune, Richard R.

    2010-01-01

    Muscles are significant contributors to the high joint forces developed in the knee during human walking. Not only do muscles contribute to the knee joint forces by acting to compress the joint, but they also develop joint forces indirectly through their contributions to the ground reaction forces via dynamic coupling. Thus, muscles can have significant contributions to forces at joints they do not span. However, few studies have investigated how the major lower-limb muscles contribute to the knee joint contact forces during walking. The goal of this study was to use a muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulation of walking to identify how individual muscles contribute to the axial tibio-femoral joint force. The simulation results showed that the vastii muscles are the primary contributors to the axial joint force in early stance while the gastrocnemius is the primary contributor in late stance. The tibio-femoral joint force generated by these muscles was at times greater than the muscle forces themselves. Muscles that do not cross the knee joint (e.g., the gluteus maximus and soleus) also have significant contributions to the tibio-femoral joint force through their contributions to the ground reaction forces. Further, small changes in walking kinematics (e.g., knee flexion angle) can have a significant effect on the magnitude of the knee joint forces. Thus, altering walking mechanics and muscle coordination patterns to utilize muscle groups that perform the same biomechanical function, yet contribute less to the knee joint forces may be an effective way to reduce knee joint loading during walking. PMID:20655046

  12. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jen-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints.

  13. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Background Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). Methods An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. Results This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. Conclusion SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints. PMID:27583436

  14. Importance of material properties and porosity of bone on mechanical response of articular cartilage in human knee joint--a two-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Mikko S; Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha; Virén, Tuomas; Korhonen, Rami K

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical behavior of bone is determined by the structure and intrinsic, local material properties of the tissue. However, previously presented knee joint models for evaluation of stresses and strains in joints generally consider bones as rigid bodies or linearly elastic solid materials. The aim of this study was to estimate how different structural and mechanical properties of bone affect the mechanical response of articular cartilage within a knee joint. Based on a cadaver knee joint, a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) model of a knee joint including bone, cartilage, and meniscus geometries was constructed. Six different computational models with varying properties for cortical, trabecular, and subchondral bone were created, while the biphasic fibril-reinforced properties of cartilage and menisci were kept unaltered. The simplest model included rigid bones, while the most complex model included specific mechanical properties for different bone structures and anatomically accurate trabecular structure. Models with different porosities of trabecular bone were also constructed. All models were exposed to axial loading of 1.9 times body weight within 0.2 s (mimicking typical maximum knee joint forces during gait) while free varus-valgus rotation was allowed and all other rotations and translations were fixed. As compared to results obtained with the rigid bone model, stresses, strains, and pore pressures observed in cartilage decreased depending on the implemented properties of trabecular bone. Greatest changes in these parameters (up to -51% in maximum principal stresses) were observed when the lowest modulus for trabecular bone (measured at the structural level) was used. By increasing the trabecular bone porosity, stresses and strains were reduced substantially in the lateral tibial cartilage, while they remained relatively constant in the medial tibial plateau. The present results highlight the importance of long bones, in particular, their mechanical

  15. [Traumatic vascular lesions of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Markgraf, E; Clausner, G; Lungershausen, W

    1989-09-01

    The popliteal artery is a "critical" or key-artery, whose sudden occlusion leads to the ischemia-syndrome. The rate of amputation after missing or too late recovery is very high. The real time for the recovery runs to 3-6 hours. The reason for the injury of the vessel is the dorsal luxation of the knee-joint, the fracture of the lower thigh or the fracture of the tibial head with extreme dislocation of the fragments. The management of the diagnosis, the contents and the order of the surgical treatment are reported.

  16. Intra-Articular Knee Contact Force Estimation During Walking Using Force-Reaction Elements and Subject-Specific Joint Model.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yihwan; Phan, Cong-Bo; Koo, Seungbum

    2016-02-01

    Joint contact forces measured with instrumented knee implants have not only revealed general patterns of joint loading but also showed individual variations that could be due to differences in anatomy and joint kinematics. Musculoskeletal human models for dynamic simulation have been utilized to understand body kinetics including joint moments, muscle tension, and knee contact forces. The objectives of this study were to develop a knee contact model which can predict knee contact forces using an inverse dynamics-based optimization solver and to investigate the effect of joint constraints on knee contact force prediction. A knee contact model was developed to include 32 reaction force elements on the surface of a tibial insert of a total knee replacement (TKR), which was embedded in a full-body musculoskeletal model. Various external measurements including motion data and external force data during walking trials of a subject with an instrumented knee implant were provided from the Sixth Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Knee Loads. Knee contact forces in the medial and lateral portions of the instrumented knee implant were also provided for the same walking trials. A knee contact model with a hinge joint and normal alignment could predict knee contact forces with root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 165 N and 288 N for the medial and lateral portions of the knee, respectively, and coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.70 and -0.63. When the degrees-of-freedom (DOF) of the knee and locations of leg markers were adjusted to account for the valgus lower-limb alignment of the subject, RMSE values improved to 144 N and 179 N, and R2 values improved to 0.77 and 0.37, respectively. The proposed knee contact model with subject-specific joint model could predict in vivo knee contact forces with reasonable accuracy. This model may contribute to the development and improvement of knee arthroplasty.

  17. Tendonitis: the major cause of pain in osteoarthritis knee joint.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Syed Zahid Hussain

    2012-01-01

    The conventional concept of osteoarthritis is that it occurs as an aging and degenerative process resulting in reduction of the surface cartilage, narrowing of the joint space and reduction of the synovial fluid. The objective of this study was to introduce the new technique of unmasking and treating the underlying problem confirming lesions outside the knee joint being the cause of pain in osteoarthritic knee joint. Clinical work making the base of this paper was carried out at Pain and Plegia Centre, Dabgari Gardens Peshawar from 2005 to 2012. Patients reporting with knee pain were palpated deep around the knee joint and major tender spots identified upon Adductor tubercle on medial aspect and Gastrocnemius (lateral head) on lateral aspect proximal to the knee. These lesions were injected each with 20 mg of Triamcinolone Acetonide diluted in 2 ml of Xylocaine 2%. The lesions responded favourably to the simple treatment and patients of pain knee joint of various durations were completely pain free. The optimum healing time of the lesions was 10 days. Osteoarthritic changes inside the knee joint may not be the cause of painful knee, rather it can be a referred pain. Two lesions, Adductor tubercle on medical side and lateral head of Gastrocnemius on the lateral side proximal to the knee joint are identified to attribute to this pain.

  18. The Relationship between Knee Joint Loading Rate During Walking and Degenerative Changes on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Morgenroth, David C.; Medverd, Jonathan R.; Seyedali, Mahyo; Czerniecki, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While animal study and cadaveric study have demonstrated an association between knee joint loading rate and joint degeneration, the relationship between knee joint loading rate during walking and osteoarthritis has not yet been sufficiently studied in humans. Methods Twenty-eight participants (14 transfemoral amputees and 14 age and body mass matched controls) underwent knee MRI with subsequent assessment using the semiquantitative Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Image Score. Each subject also underwent gait analysis in order to determine knee adduction moment loading rate, peak, and impulse and an exploratory measure, knee adduction moment rate*magnitude. Findings Significant correlations were found between medial tibiofemoral joint degeneration and knee adduction moment peak (slope = 0.42 [SE 0.20]; P=.037), loading rate (slope = 12.3 [SE 3.2]; P=.0004), and rate*magnitude (slope = 437 [SE 100]; P<.0001). These relationships continued to be significant after adjusting for body mass or subject type. The relationship between medial knee semiquantitative MRI score and knee adduction moment loading rate and rate*magnitude continued to be significant even after adjusting for peak moment (P<.0001), however, the relationship between medial knee semiquantitative MRI score and peak moment was no longer significant after adjusting for either loading rate or rate*magnitude (P>.2 in both cases). Interpretation This study suggests an independent relationship between knee adduction moment loading rate and medial tibiofemoral joint degeneration. Our results support the hypothesis that rate of loading, represented by the knee adduction moment loading rate, is strongly associated with medial tibiofemoral joint degeneration independent of knee adduction moment peak and impulse. PMID:24820134

  19. Pathological Knee Joint Motion Analysis By High Speed Cinephotography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Jurg U.

    1985-02-01

    The use of cinephotography for evaluation of disturbed knee joint function was compared in three groups of patients. While a sampling rate of 50 images per second was adequate for patients with neuromuscular disorders, a higher frequency of around 300 i.p.s. is necessary in osteoarthritis and ligamentous knee joint injuries, but the task of digitizing is prohibitive unless automated.

  20. Predicting sagittal plane biomechanics that minimize the axial knee joint contact force during walking.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ross H; Brandon, Scott C E; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    Both development and progression of knee osteoarthritis have been associated with the loading of the knee joint during walking. We are, therefore, interested in developing strategies for changing walking biomechanics to offload the knee joint without resorting to surgery. In this study, simulations of human walking were performed using a 2D bipedal forward dynamics model. A simulation generated by minimizing the metabolic cost of transport (CoT) resembled data measured from normal human walking. Three simulations targeted at minimizing the peak axial knee joint contact force instead of the CoT reduced the peak force by 12-25% and increased the CoT by 11-14%. The strategies used by the simulations were (1) reduction in gastrocnemius muscle force, (2) avoidance of knee flexion during stance, and (3) reduced stride length. Reduced gastrocnemius force resulted from a combination of changes in activation and changes in the gastrocnemius contractile component kinematics. The simulations that reduced the peak contact force avoided flexing the knee during stance when knee motion was unrestricted and adopted a shorter stride length when the simulated knee motion was penalized if it deviated from the measured human knee motion. A higher metabolic cost in an offloading gait would be detrimental for covering a long distance without fatigue but beneficial for exercise and weight loss. The predicted changes in the peak axial knee joint contact force from the simulations were consistent with estimates of the joint contact force in a human subject who emulated the predicted kinematics. The results demonstrate the potential of using muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations to predict novel joint offloading interventions.

  1. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  6. Astym® Therapy for the Management of Recalcitrant Knee Joint Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Corcoran, James; Cherian, Jeffery J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Knee stiffness is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Despite studies published on the surgical management of reduced range of motion (ROM) after TKA, there is limited evidence on the nonoperative management of joint and soft tissue imbalances possibly contributing to reduced knee ROM. This report assesses changes in ROM, pain, function, and patellar tendon length after Astym® joint mobilization use. A 38-year-old male professional skier had a right TKA 3 months before presentation with 2 subsequent manipulations under anesthesia secondary to persistent knee stiffness. He had patellar baja on radiograph, a reduced arc of ROM, reduced patellar mobility and muscular extensibility, and pain to palpation along the patellar tendon. He had 12 visits of physical therapy with the use of Astym®, patellar mobilization, and tibio-femoral mobilizations with movement. The patient also used a customized knee device at home for prolonged knee extension stretching. The patient was treated for 12 visits, along with home use of customized bracing for knee extension. Significant improvements were seen in pain, function, and ROM. He returned to work full-time, ambulated prolonged distances, and negotiated stairs pain-free. He also demonstrated resolution of patellar baja radiographically. Conservative management of recalcitrant knee joint stiffness after primary TKA can be effective in restoring knee mobility and reducing pain and activity limitation. A multimodal approach using Astym® treatment, customized knee bracing, and targeted joint mobilization can be effective in resolving knee joint stiffness.

  7. Nitrogen gas exchange in the human knee

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, P.K.; Meyer, P.; Flynn, E.T.; Homer, L.D.; Survanshi, S.

    1986-10-01

    Human decompression sickness is presumed to result from excess inert gas in the body when ambient pressure is reduced. Although the most common symptom is pain in the skeletal joints, no direct study of nitrogen exchange in this region has been undertaken. For this study, nitrogen tagged with radioactive 13N was prepared in a linear accelerator. Nine human subjects rebreathed this gas from a closed circuit for 30 min, then completed a 40- to 100-min washout period breathing room air. The isotope 13N was monitored continuously in the subject's knee during the entire period using positron detectors. After correction for isotope decay (half-life = 9.96 min), the concentration in most knees continued to rise for at least 30 min into the washout period. Various causes of this unexpected result are discussed, the most likely of which is an extensive redistribution of gas within avascular knee tissues.

  8. An instrumented spatial linkage for measuring knee joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Rosvold, Joshua M; Atarod, Mohammad; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the design and development of a highly accurate instrumented spatial linkage (ISL) for kinematic analysis of the ovine stifle joint is described. The ovine knee is a promising biomechanical model of the human knee joint. The ISL consists of six digital rotational encoders providing six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) to its motion. The ISL makes use of the complete and parametrically continuous (CPC) kinematic modeling method to describe the kinematic relationship between encoder readings and the relative positions and orientation of its two ends. The CPC method is useful when calibrating the ISL, because a small change in parameters corresponds to a small change in calculated positions and orientations and thus a smaller optimization error, compared to other kinematic models. The ISL is attached rigidly to the femur and the tibia for motion capture, and the CPC kinematic model is then employed to transform the angle sensor readings to relative motion of the two ends of the linkage, and thereby, the stifle joint motion. The positional accuracy for ISL after calibration and optimization was 0.3±0.2mm (mean +/- standard deviation). The ISL was also evaluated dynamically to ensure that accurate results were maintained, and achieved an accuracy of 0.1mm. Compared to the traditional motion capture methods, this system provides increased accuracy, reduced processing time, and ease of use. Future work will be on the application of the ISL to the ovine gait and determination of in vivo joint motions and tissue loads. Accurate measurement of knee joint kinematics is essential in understanding injury mechanisms and development of potential preventive or treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Knee joint kinematics, fixation and function related to joint area design in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uvehammer, J

    2001-02-01

    The aim was to study the influence of different designs of the joint area on tibial component fixation, kinematics and clinical outcome after a cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The HSS score and a special questionnaire were used at the clinical examination. Conventional radiography was done to record the positioning of the implants and development of radiolucencies. The migration and inducible displacement were evaluated using radiostereometry (RSA). The kinematics of the knee during active extension was studied using dynamic RSA. In randomised and prospective studies 87 knees in 83 patients (28 male, 55 female, age 69, range 50-83) received an AMK (DePuy, Johnson & Johnson) TKA. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 the patients had varus/valgus deformities of < or = 5 degrees and the PCL was retained. The PCL was resected in group 2 where the patients had deformities exceeding 5 degrees and/or fixed flexion deformities of more than 10 degrees. In group 1 a flat (F, n = 20) or a concave (C, n = 20) design was implanted (study 3). In group 2 (study 4) the patients received a concave (n = 25) or a posterior-stabilised (PS, n = 22) tibial plateau. The migration of the tibial component, positioning of the prosthesis, development of radiolucencies and the clinical outcome was evaluated after 1 and 2 years. Twenty-two patients (11 F, 11 C) in group 1 (study 1) and 22 knees in 20 patients in group 2 (study 2, 11 C, 11 PS) were examined 1 year post-operatively to evaluate the kinematics of the knee. Eleven normals served as controls. During active extension of the knee the inducible displacements of the tibial component were recorded in 16 knees (15 patients). Based on successful RSA examinations 5 knees (4 F, 1 C) from group 1 and 11 knees (5 C, 6 PS) from group 2 were selected (study 5). Abnormal kinematics and especially increased AP translations compared to normals (p < 0.0005) were recorded in all designs. The concave design showed the widest

  10. A comparative evaluation of the Adaptive knee and Catech knee joints: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jepson, F; Datta, D; Harris, I; Heller, B; Howitt, J; McLean, J

    2008-03-01

    The Adaptive knee joint is a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee that incorporates both pneumatic and hydraulic control in one electronic unit. Pneumatic control is said to provide control during swing phase and the hydraulic control during the stance phase of the gait. This hybrid controller is triggered by a computer contained within the knee that responds to input from force, time and angle sensors. The microprocessor then selects an appropriate speed and stability setting. The Catech knee joint is a conventional hydraulic knee joint. The aim of this study was to compare the Adaptive and Catech knee joints in established trans-femoral amputees. The patients meeting the inclusion criteria were all established trans-femoral amputees using the Catech knee joint. The study was carried out by performing gait analysis, assessing energy requirements using the Physiological Cost Index (PCI) and using questionnaires. There was no significant benefit gained from the use of the Adaptive knee over the Catech knee joint in our small study group.

  11. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  12. Biomechanical measures of knee joint mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Silvernail, Jason L; Gill, Norman W; Teyhen, Deydre S; Allison, Stephen C

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the biomechanical properties of specific manual therapy techniques in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Methods Twenty subjects (7 female/13 male, age 54±8 years, ht 1·7±0·1 m, wt 94·2±21·8 kg) participated in this study. One physical therapist delivered joint mobilizations (tibiofemoral extension and flexion; patellofemoral medial–lateral and inferior glide) at two grades (Maitland’s grade III and grade IV). A capacitance-based pressure mat was used to capture biomechanical characteristics of force and frequency during 2 trials of 15 second mobilizations. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC3,1) for intrarater reliability and 2×4 repeated measures analyses of variance and post-hoc comparison tests. Results Force (Newtons) measurements (mean, max.) for grade III were: extension 45, 74; flexion 39, 61; medial–lateral glide 20, 34; inferior glide 16, 27. Force (Newtons) measurements (mean, max.) for grade IV were: extension 57, 76; flexion 47, 68; medial–lateral glide 23, 36; inferior glide 18, 35. Frequency (Hz) measurements were between 0·9 and 1·2 for grade III, and between 2·1 and 2·4 for grade IV. ICCs were above 0·90 for almost all measures. Discussion and conclusion Maximum force measures were between the ranges reported for cervical and lumbar mobilization at similar grades. Mean force measures were greater at grade IV than III. Oscillation frequency and peak-to-peak amplitude measures were consistent with the grade performed (i.e. greater frequency at grade IV, greater peak-to-peak amplitude at grade III). Intrarater reliability for force, peak-to-peak amplitude and oscillation frequency for knee joint mobilizations was excellent. PMID:22851879

  13. Arthroscopic Management of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Dwidmuthe, Samir; Barick, Devashis; Rathi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) of knee joint is a rare disorder of Synovium. Hip and knee joint are commonly affected joints. The knee PVNS presents as a localized or diffuse form. Diagnosis if often delayed and permanent joint damage occurs with advanced disease. Ultrasound examination shows fluid collection and synovial hypertrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging helps in clinching the diagnosis. Final confirmation of PVNS is done with histopathological examination of synovial tissue removed. Post operative radiation has shown to reduce the rate of recurrent disease. 25 years male presented to us with painless swelling of left knee joint of 3 months duration. Radiographs were normal. MRI showed synovial hypertrophy with changes suggestive of PVNS. We did arthroscopic six portal synovectomy. The patient regained his function and was asymptomatic at 2 year follow up. We want to emphasize that early diagnosis and well done arthroscopic Synovectomy gives good clinical outcome with low recurrence rate. Radiotherapy should be reserved for recurrent disease.

  14. Dynamic joint and muscle forces during knee isokinetic exercise.

    PubMed

    Wei, S H

    2000-10-01

    Isokinetic exercise has been commonly used in knee rehabilitation, conditioning and research in the past two decades. Although many investigators have used various experimental and theoretical approaches to study the muscle and joint force involved in isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercises, only a few of these studies have actually distinguished between the tibiofemoral joint forces and muscle forces. Therefore, the objective of this study was to specify, via an eletromyography(EMG)-driven muscle force model of the knee, the magnitude of the tibiofemoral joint and muscle forces acting during isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercises. Fifteen subjects ranging from 21 to 36 years of age volunteered to participate in this study. A Kin Com exercise machine (Chattecx Corporation, Chattanooga, TN, U.S.A.) was used as the loading device. An EMG-driven muscle force model was used to predict muscle forces, and a biomechanical model was used to analyze two knee joint constraint forces; compression and shear force. The methods used in this study were shown to be valid and reliable (r > 0.84 andp < 0.05). The effects on the tibiofemoral joint force during knee isokinetic exercises were compared with several functional activities that were investigated by earlier researchers. The muscle forces generated during knee isokinetic exercise were also obtained. Based on the findings obtained in this study, several therapeutic justifications for knee rehabilitation are proposed.

  15. Association of knee confidence with pain, knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Skou, Søren T; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-05-01

    To investigate associations between self-reported knee confidence and pain, self-reported knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 100 participants with symptomatic and radiographic medial tibiofemoral compartment osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment recruited for a randomized controlled trial. The extent of knee confidence, assessed using a 5-point Likert scale item from the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, was set as the dependent variable in univariable and multivariable ordinal regression, with pain during walking, self-reported knee instability, quadriceps strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking as independent variables. One percent of the participants were not troubled with lack of knee confidence, 17% were mildly troubled, 50% were moderately troubled, 26% were severely troubled, and 6% were extremely troubled. Significant associations were found between worse knee confidence and higher pain intensity, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion. The multivariable model consisting of the same variables significantly accounted for 24% of the variance in knee confidence (P < 0.001). Worse knee confidence is associated with higher pain, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps muscle strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. Since previous research has shown that worse knee confidence is predictive of functional decline in knee OA, addressing lack of knee confidence by treating these modifiable impairments could represent a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Knee osteoarthritis affects the distribution of joint moments during gait.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Joseph A; Higginson, Jill S

    2011-06-01

    Alterations in lower extremity kinetics have been shown to exist in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA), however few investigations have examined how the intersegmental coordination of the lower extremity kinetic chain varies in the presence of knee joint pathology. The objective of this study was to evaluate how knee OA and walking speed affect total support moment and individual joint contributions to the total support moment. Fifteen healthy subjects and 30 persons with knee OA participated in 3D walking analysis at constrained (1.0 m/s), self-selected and fastest tolerable walking speeds. Individual joint contributions to total support moment were analyzed using separate ANOVAs with one repeated measure (walking speed). Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution. Persons with knee OA reduced the contribution of the knee joint when walking at constrained (p = 0.04) and self-selected walking speeds (p = 0.009). There was a significant increase in the ankle contribution and a significant decrease in the hip contribution when walking speed was increased (p < 0.004), however individual walking speeds were not significantly related to joint contributions. This suggests that the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution is dependent on the individual's control strategy and we cannot estimate the joint contribution solely based on walking speed. The slower gait speed observed in persons with knee OA is not responsible for the reduction in knee joint moments, rather this change is likely due to alterations in the neuromuscular strategy of the lower extremity kinetic chain in response to joint pain or muscle weakness.

  17. Knee Osteoarthritis Affects the Distribution of Joint Moments During Gait

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Joseph A; Higginson, Jill S.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in lower extremity kinetics have been shown to exist in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA), however few investigations have examined how the intersegmental coordination of the lower extremity kinetic chain varies in the presence of knee joint pathology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the how knee OA and walking speed affect total support moment and individual joint contributions to the total support moment. Fifteen healthy subjects and 30 persons with knee OA participated in 3D walking analysis at constrained (1.0 m/s), self-selected and fastest tolerable walking speeds. Individual joint contributions to total support moment were analyzed using separate ANOVAs with one repeated measure (walking speed). Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution. Persons with knee OA reduced the contribution of the knee joint when walking at constrained (p=0.04) and self-selected walking speeds (p=0.009). There was a significant increase in the ankle contribution and a significant decrease in the hip contribution when walking speed was increased (P<0.004), however individual walking speeds were not significantly related to joint contributions. This suggests that the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution is dependent on the individual’s control strategy and we cannot estimate the joint contribution solely on walking speed. The slower gait speed observed in persons with knee OA is not responsible for the reduction in knee joint moments, rather this change is likely due to alterations in the neuromuscular strategy of the lower extremity kinetic chain in response to joint pain or muscle weakness. PMID:20510618

  18. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment.

  19. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment. PMID:26752228

  20. Multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Turcot, Katia; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suvà, Domizio; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated balance impairment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although it is currently accepted that postural control depends on multi-joint coordination, no study has previously considered this postural strategy in patients suffering from knee OA. The objectives of this study were to investigate the multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee OA and to evaluate the association with clinical outcomes. Eighty-seven patients with knee OA and twenty-five healthy elderly were recruited to the study. A motion analysis system and two force plates were used to investigate the joint kinematics (trunk and lower body segments), the lower body joint moments, the vertical ground reaction force ratio and the center of pressure (COP) during a quiet standing task. Pain, functional capacity and quality of life status were also recorded. Patients with symptomatic and severe knee OA adopt a more flexed posture at all joint levels in comparison with the control group. A significant difference in the mean ratio was found between groups, showing an asymmetric weight distribution in patients with knee OA. A significant decrease in the COP range in the anterior-posterior direction was also observed in the group of patients. Only small associations were observed between postural impairments and clinical outcomes. This study brings new insights regarding the postural behavior of patients with severe knee OA during a quiet standing task. The results confirm the multi-joint asymmetric posture adopted by this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. GSB knee joint: a further possibility, principle, results.

    PubMed

    Gschwend, N

    1978-05-01

    The GSB Knee joint is a nonconstrained hinge joint, which combines the advantages of the so-called condylar or surface prosthesis with those of the constrained hinge joints. This report is of observations on the results and complications in 150 arthroplasties performed over a 5 year period.

  2. Unusual lesions that distend the knee joint: pictorial essay*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luana T. Barros; de Albuquerque Filho, Eolo Santana; Batista, Laecio Leitão; de Moraes, Talita Peixoto; Pereira, Bruno Perez Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The high number of knee imaging exams at radiology clinics, together with the wide variety of knee disorders, calls for expanding the knowledge about the less common lesions seen in routine diagnostic practice. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to illustrate unusual lesions that distend the knee joint, selected by relevance and evaluated with multiple imaging modalities, including X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature. PMID:27818547

  3. Influence of Different Hip Joint Centre Locations on Hip and Knee Joint Kinetics and Kinematics During the Squat

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Vincent, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the hip joint centre (HJC) is important in the biomechanical examination of human movement. However, there is yet to be any published information regarding the influence of different HJC locations on hip and knee joint kinetics during functional tasks. This study aimed to examine the influence of four different HJC techniques on 3-D hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat. Hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics of the squat were obtained from fifteen male participants using an eight camera motion capture system. The 3-D kinetics/kinematics of the squat were quantified using four hip joint centre estimation techniques. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare the discrete parameters as a function of each HJC location. The results show that significant differences in joint angles and moment parameters were evident at both the hip and knee joint in the coronal and transverse planes. These observations indicate that when calculating non-sagittal joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat, researchers should carefully consider their HJC method as it may significantly affect the interpretation of their data. PMID:25713661

  4. The associations between quadriceps muscle strength, power, and knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Armstrong, Charles W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Tevald, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal knee joint mechanics have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Deficits in muscle function (i.e., strength and power) may contribute to abnormal knee joint loading. The associations between quadriceps strength, power and knee joint mechanics remain unclear in knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to collect peak knee joint angles and moments during the first 50% of stance phase of gait in 33 participants with knee osteoarthritis. Quadriceps strength and power were assessed using a knee extension machine. Strength was quantified as the one repetition maximum. Power was quantified as the peak power produced at 40-90% of the one repetition maximum. Quadriceps strength accounted for 15% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P=0.016). Quadriceps power accounted for 20-29% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P<0.05). Quadriceps power at 90% of one repetition maximum accounted for 9% of the variance in peak knee adduction moment (P=0.05). These data suggest that quadriceps power explains more variance in knee flexion angle and knee adduction moment during gait in knee osteoarthritis than quadriceps strength. Additionally, quadriceps power at multiple loads is associated with knee joint mechanics and therefore should be assessed at a variety of loads. Taken together, these results indicate that quadriceps power may be a potential target for interventions aimed at changing knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  6. Knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis: influence of abdominal and thigh fat.

    PubMed

    Messier, Stephen P; Beavers, Daniel P; Loeser, Richard F; Carr, J Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J; Hunter, David J; Devita, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography, and total lean and fat mass were determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age, 66.3 yr; body mass index, 33.5 kg·m) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Higher total body mass was significantly associated (P ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (P < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (P < 0.006), and knee extensor moments (P = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (P = 0.0001), shear (P < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (P = 0.01) and knee extension moment (P = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (P = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found that both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (P ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with knee abduction (P = 0.03) and knee extension moment (P = 0.02). Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA.

  7. Three-dimensional bioprinting of multilayered constructs containing human mesenchymal stromal cells for osteochondral tissue regeneration in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ki-Mo; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Hyuntae; Oh, Kyunghoon; Park, Kyeng Min; Yeom, Junseok; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-04

    The use of cell-rich hydrogels for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture has shown great potential for a variety of biomedical applications. However, the fabrication of appropriate constructs has been challenging. In this study, we describe a 3D printing process for the preparation of a multilayered 3D construct containing human mesenchymal stromal cells with a hydrogel comprised of atelocollagen and supramolecular hyaluronic acid (HA). This construct showed outstanding regenerative ability for the reconstruction of an osteochondral tissue in the knee joints of rabbits. We found that the use of a mechanically stable, host-guest chemistry-based hydrogel was essential and allowed two different types of extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels to be easily printed and stacked into one multilayered construct without requiring the use of potentially harmful chemical reagents or physical stimuli for post-crosslinking. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to validate the potential of a 3D printed multilayered construct consisting of two different ECM materials (atelocollagen and HA) for heterogeneous tissue regeneration using an in vivo animal model. We believe that this 3D printing-based platform technology can be effectively exploited for regeneration of various heterogeneous tissues as well as osteochondral tissue.

  8. Knee joint anatomy predicts high-risk in vivo dynamic landing knee biomechanics.

    PubMed

    McLean, Scott G; Lucey, Sarah M; Rohrer, Suzan; Brandon, Catherine

    2010-10-01

    With knee morphology being a non-modifiable anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factor, its consideration within injury prevention models is limited. Knee anatomy, however, directly influences joint mechanics and the potential for injurious loads. With this in mind, we explored associations between key knee anatomical and three-dimensional biomechanical parameters exhibited during landings. We hypothesized that lateral and medial posterior tibial slopes and their ratio, and tibial plateau width, intercondylar distance and their ratio, were proportional to peak stance anterior knee joint reaction force, knee abduction and internal rotation angles. Twenty recreationally active females (21.2 (1.7) years) had stance phase three-dimensional dominant limb knee biomechanics recorded during ten single leg land-and-cut tasks. Six anatomical indices were quantified for the same limb via a series of two dimensional (sagittal, transverse and coronal) magnetic resonance images. Linear stepwise regression analyses examined which of these anatomical factors were independently associated with each of the three mean subject-based peak knee biomechanical measures. Lateral tibial slope was significantly (P<0.0001) correlated with peak anterior knee joint reaction force, explaining 60.9% of the variance. Both tibial plateau width:intercondylar distance (P<0.0001) and medial tibial slope:lateral tibial slope (P<0.001) ratios were significantly correlated with peak knee abduction angle, explaining 75.4% of the variance. The medial tibial slope:lateral tibial slope ratio was also significantly (P<0.001) correlated with peak knee internal rotation angle, explaining 49.2% of the variance. Knee anatomy is directly associated with high-risk knee biomechanics exhibited during dynamic landings. Continued understanding of multifactorial contributions to the anterior cruciate ligament injury mechanism should dictate future injury screening and prevention efforts in order to successfully cater

  9. The effects of knee direction, physical activity and age on knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Relph, Nicola; Herrington, Lee

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has suggested a decline in knee proprioception with age. Furthermore, regular participation in physical activity may improve proprioceptive ability. However, there is no large scale data on uninjured populations to confirm these theories. The aim of this study was to provide normative knee joint position data (JPS) from healthy participants aged 18-82years to evaluate the effects of age, physical activity and knee direction. A sample of 116 participants across five age groups was used. The main outcome measures were knee JPS absolute error scores into flexion and extension, Tegner activity levels and General Practitioner Physical Activity Questionnaire results. Absolute error scores in to knee flexion were 3.6°, 3.9°, 3.5°, 3.7° and 3.1° and knee extension were 2.7°, 2.5°, 2.9°, 3.4° and 3.9° for ages 15-29, 30-44, 45-59, 60-74 and 75 years old respectively. Knee extension and flexion absolute error scores were significantly different when age group data were pooled. There was a significant effect of age and activity level on joint position sense into knee extension. Age and lower Tegner scores were also negatively correlated to joint position sense into knee extension. The results provide some evidence for a decline in knee joint position sense with age. Further, active populations may have heightened static proprioception compared to inactive groups. Normative knee joint position sense data is provided and may be used by practitioners to identify patients with reduced proprioceptive ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  11. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T.; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis. PMID:28339477

  12. The relationship between knee joint angle and knee flexor and extensor muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Ha, Misook; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between joint angle and muscular strength. In particular, this research investigated the differences in maximum muscular strength and average muscular strength at the knee-joint posture. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised eight female students in their 20s attending S University in Busan. None of the subjects had functional disabilities or had experienced damage to the lower extremities in terms of measurement of muscular strength. A BIODEX system III model (Biodex medical system, USA) was used to measure joint angles and muscular strength. The axis of the dynamometer was consistent with the axis of motion, and measurements were made at 25° and 67° to examine differences in maximum muscular strength according to joint angle. [Results] The maximum muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. The average muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. [Conclusion] The results of this study reveal that muscular strength does not reach maximum at particular range angles, such as the knee-joint resting posture angle or the knee-joint middle range angle. Rather, a stretched muscle is stronger than a contracted muscle. Therefore, it is considered that it will be necessary to study the effects of the joint change ratio on muscular strength on the basis of the maximum stretched muscle.

  13. Determining knee joint alignment using digital photographs.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Holger; Kappel, Hannes; Moser, Michael T; Cardenas-Montemayor, Eloy; Engelleiter, Karoly; Kuni, Benita; Clarius, Michael

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this work is to find out how reliably knee joint alignment can be measured from a standardized photograph and what influence changes in the standing position have on the angles measured. The interrater, intrarater, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. The influence of image-object distance, the distance between the legs and leg rotation on the measured angles was evaluated. In addition to the digital photographs, 10 full-length radiographs were obtained in an upright position to determine whether the measured angles represent the anatomic axis or mechanical axis. There was high correlation between the interrater (ICC 0.997), intrarater (ICC 0.989) and test-retest reliability (ICC 0.904). Only slight deviation was found with the changes in radiograph-object distance (0 degrees -1.8 degrees ). With feet together varus malalignment was greater. Leg rotation showed a strong influence on the measured results (ICC 0.658). The angle measured in the digital photographs reflects the mechanical axis with only slight deviation (0.12 degrees -1.9 degrees ). The measurement of the clinical axis using standardized radiography is highly reliable and can be used for individual follow-up of varus and valgus malalignments.

  14. Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA. PMID:22848225

  15. Effects of prophylactic knee bracing on knee joint kinetics and kinematics during netball specific movements.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan K; Vincent, Hayley; Richards, Jim D

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a prophylactic knee brace on knee joint kinetics and kinematics during netball specific movements. Repeated measures. Laboratory. Twenty university first team level female netball players. Participants performed three movements, run, cut and vertical jump under two conditions (brace and no-brace). 3-D knee joint kinetics and kinematics were measured using an eight-camera motion analysis system. Knee joint kinetics and kinematics were examined using 2 × 3 repeated measures ANOVA whilst the subjective ratings of comfort and stability were investigated using chi-squared tests. The results showed no differences (p > 0.05) in knee joint kinetics. However the internal/external rotation range of motion was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced when wearing the brace in all movements. The subjective ratings of stability revealed that netballers felt that the knee brace improved knee stability in all movements. Further study is required to determine whether reductions in transverse plane knee range of motion serve to attenuate the risk from injury in netballers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  17. Technical feasibility of personalized articulating knee joint distraction for treatment of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Struik, T; Jaspers, J E N; Besselink, N J; van Roermund, P M; Plomp, S; Rudert, M J; Lafeber, F P J G; Mastbergen, S C

    2017-08-12

    Knee osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent degenerative joint disorder characterized by joint tissue damage and pain. Knee joint distraction has been introduced as a joint preserving surgical procedure to postpone knee arthroplasty. An often used standard externally fixation device for distraction poses a burden to patients due to the absence of joint flexion during the 6weeks treatment. Therefore, a personalized articulating distraction device was developed. The aim of this study was to test technical feasibility of this device. Based on an often applied rigid device, using equal bone pin positions and connectors, a hinge mechanism was developed consisting of a cam-following system for reproducing the complex joint-specific knee kinematics. In support, a device was developed for capturing the joint-specific sagittal plane articulation. The obtained kinematic data were translated into joint-specific cam shapes that were installed bilaterally in the hinge mechanism of the distraction device, as such providing personalized knee motion. Distraction of 5mm was performed within a range of motion of 30deg. joint flexion. Pre-clinical evaluation of the working principle was performed on human cadaveric legs and system stiffness characteristics were biomechanically evaluated. The desired range of motion was obtained and distraction was maintained under physiologically representative loading. Moreover, the joint-specific approach demonstrated tolerance of deviations from anatomical and alignment origin during initial placement of the developed distraction device. Articulation during knee distraction is considered technically feasible and has potential to decrease burden and improve acceptance of distraction therapy. Testing of clinical feasibility is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A multi-scale finite element model for investigation of chondrocyte mechanics in normal and medial meniscectomy human knee joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Tanska, Petri; Mononen, Mika E; Korhonen, Rami K

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical signals experienced by chondrocytes (articular cartilage cells) modulate cell synthesis and cartilage health. Multi-scale modeling can be used to study how forces are transferred from joint surfaces through tissues to chondrocytes. Therefore, estimation of chondrocyte behavior during certain physical activities, such as walking, could provide information about how cells respond to normal and abnormal loading in joints. In this study, a 3D multi-scale model was developed for evaluating chondrocyte and surrounding peri- and extracellular matrix responses during gait loading within healthy and medial meniscectomy knee joints. The knee joint geometry was based on MRI, whereas the input used for gait loading was obtained from the literature. Femoral and tibial cartilages were modeled as fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic materials, whereas menisci were considered as transversely isotropic. Fluid pressures in the chondrocyte and cartilage tissue increased up to 2MPa (an increase of 30%) in the meniscectomy joint compared to the normal, healthy joint. The elevated level of fluid pressure was observed during the entire stance phase of gait. A medial meniscectomy caused substantially larger (up to 60%) changes in maximum principal strains in the chondrocyte compared to those in the peri- or extracellular matrices. Chondrocyte volume or morphology did not change substantially due to a medial meniscectomy. Current findings suggest that during walking chondrocyte deformations are not substantially altered due to a medial meniscectomy, while abnormal joint loading exposes chondrocytes to elevated levels of fluid pressure and maximum principal strains (compared to strains in the peri- or extracellular matrices). These might contribute to cell viability and the onset of osteoarthritis.

  19. Does the joint line matter in revision total knee replacement?

    PubMed

    Porteous, A J; Hassaballa, M A; Newman, J H

    2008-07-01

    We identified 148 patients who had undergone a revision total knee replacement using a single implant system between 1990 and 2000. Of these 18 patients had died, six had developed a peri-prosthetic fracture and ten had incomplete records or radiographs. This left 114 with prospectively-collected radiographs and Bristol knee scores available for study. The height of the joint line before and after revision total knee replacement was measured and classified as either restored to within 5 mm of the pre-operative height or elevated if it was positioned more than 5 mm above the pre-operative height. The joint line was elevated in 41 knees (36%) and restored in 73 (64%). Revision surgery significantly improved the mean Bristol knee score from 41.1 (SD 15.9) pre-operatively to 80.5 (SD 15) post-operatively (p < 0.001). At one year post-operatively both the total Bristol knee score and its functional component were significantly better in the restored group than in the elevated group (p < 0.01). Overall, revision from a unicondylar knee replacement required less use of bone graft, fewer component augments, restored the joint line more often and gave a significantly better total Bristol knee score (p < 0.02) and functional score (p < 0.01) than revision from total knee replacement. Our findings show that restoration of the joint line at revision total knee replacement gives a significantly better result than leaving it unrestored by more than 5 mm. We recommend the greater use of distal femoral augments to help to achieve this goal.

  20. Modelling of subject specific based segmental dynamics of knee joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. H. M.; Ibrahim, B. S. K. K.; Huq, M. S.; Ahmad, M. K. I.

    2017-09-01

    This study determines segmental dynamics parameters based on subject specific method. Five hemiplegic patients participated in the study, two men and three women. Their ages ranged from 50 to 60 years, weights from 60 to 70 kg and heights from 145 to 170 cm. Sample group included patients with different side of stroke. The parameters of the segmental dynamics resembling the knee joint functions measured via measurement of Winter and its model generated via the employment Kane's equation of motion. Inertial parameters in the form of the anthropometry can be identified and measured by employing Standard Human Dimension on the subjects who are in hemiplegia condition. The inertial parameters are the location of centre of mass (COM) at the length of the limb segment, inertia moment around the COM and masses of shank and foot to generate accurate motion equations. This investigation has also managed to dig out a few advantages of employing the table of anthropometry in movement biomechanics of Winter's and Kane's equation of motion. A general procedure is presented to yield accurate measurement of estimation for the inertial parameters for the joint of the knee of certain subjects with stroke history.

  1. Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments.

    PubMed

    Flaxman, Teresa E; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Benoit, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Knee muscles are commonly labeled as flexors or extensors and aptly stabilize the knee against sagittal plane loads. However, how these muscles stabilize the knee against adduction-abduction and rotational loads remains unclear. Our study sought 1) to classify muscle roles as they relate to joint stability by quantifying the relationship between individual muscle activation patterns and internal net joint moments in all three loading planes and 2) to determine whether these roles change with increasing force levels. A standing isometric force matching protocol required subjects to modulate ground reaction forces to elicit various combinations and magnitudes of sagittal, frontal, and transverse internal joint moments. Surface EMG measured activities of 10 lower limb muscles. Partial least squares regressions determined which internal moment(s) were significantly related to the activation of individual muscles. Rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae were classified as moment actuators for knee extension and hip flexion. Hamstrings were classified as moment actuators for hip extension and knee flexion. Gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles were classified as specific joint stabilizers for knee rotation. Vastii were classified as general joint stabilizers because activation was independent of moment generation. Muscle roles did not change with increasing effort levels. Our findings indicate muscle activation is not dependent on anatomical orientation but perhaps on its role in maintaining knee joint stability in the frontal and transverse loading planes. This is useful for delineating the roles of biarticular knee joint muscles and could have implications in robotics, musculoskeletal modeling, sports sciences, and rehabilitation.

  2. Analysis of Knee Joint Line Obliquity after High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Ko, Young Bong; Bae, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Suk Tae; Kim, Jae Gyoon

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate which lower extremity alignment (knee and ankle joint) parameters affect knee joint line obliquity (KJLO) in the coronal plane after open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). Overall, 69 knees of patients that underwent OWHTO were evaluated using radiographs obtained preoperatively and from 6 weeks to 3 months postoperatively. We measured multiple parameters of knee and ankle joint alignment (hip-knee-ankle angle [HKA], joint line height [JLH], posterior tibial slope [PS], femoral condyle-tibial plateau angle [FCTP], medial proximal tibial angle [MPTA], mechanical lateral distal femoral angle [mLDFA], KJLO, talar tilt angle [TTA], ankle joint obliquity [AJO], and the lateral distal tibial ground surface angle [LDTGA]; preoperative [-pre], postoperative [-post], and the difference between -pre and -post values [-Δ]). We categorized patients into two groups according to the KJLO-post value (the normal group [within ± 4 degrees, 56 knees] and the abnormal group [greater than ± 4 degrees, 13 knees]), and compared their -pre parameters. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the contribution of the -pre parameters to abnormal KJLO-post. The mean HKA-Δ (-9.4 ± 4.7 degrees) was larger than the mean KJLO-Δ (-2.1 ± 3.2 degrees). The knee joint alignment parameters (the HKA-pre, FCTP-pre) differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.05). In addition, the HKA-pre (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, p = 0.006) and FCTP-pre (OR = 2.13, p = 0.006) were significant predictors of abnormal KJLO-post. However, -pre ankle joint parameters (TTA, AJO, and LDTGA) did not differ significantly between the two groups and were not significantly associated with the abnormal KJLO-post. The -pre knee joint alignment and knee joint convergence angle evaluated by HKA-pre and FCTP-pre angle, respectively, were significant predictors of abnormal KJLO after OWHTO. However, -pre ankle joint parameters

  3. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Materials and Methods: Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm2 per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. Results: A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). After treatment, no significant differences were observed in the knee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee. PMID:25705083

  4. Self-reported knee joint instability is related to passive mechanical stiffness in medial knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-reported knee joint instability compromises function in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis and may be related to impaired joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported instability and the passive varus-valgus mechanical behaviour of the medial osteoarthritis knee. Methods Passive varus-valgus angular laxity and stiffness were assessed using a modified isokinetic dynamometer in 73 participants with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. All participants self-reported the absence or presence of knee instability symptoms and the degree to which instability affected daily activity on a 6-point likert scale. Results Forward linear regression modelling identified a significant inverse relationship between passive mid-range knee stiffness and symptoms of knee instability (r = 0.27; P < 0.05): reduced stiffness was indicative of more severe instability symptoms. Angular laxity and end-range stiffness were not related to instability symptoms (P > 0.05). Conclusions Conceivably, a stiffer passive system may contribute toward greater joint stability during functional activities. Importantly however, net joint stiffness is influenced by both active and passive stiffness, and thus the active neuromuscular system may compensate for reduced passive stiffness in order to maintain joint stability. Future work is merited to examine the role of active stiffness in symptomatic joint stability. PMID:24252592

  5. Effects of unloading bracing on knee and hip joints for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, Minoru; Deie, Masataka; Shimada, Noboru; Otani, Takuya; Shidahara, Hiroe; Maejima, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Hideki; Shibuya, Hayatoshi; Okuhara, Atsushi; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2011-06-01

    Osteoarthritis affects the whole body, thus biomechanical effects on other joints should be considered. Unloading knee braces could be effective for knee osteoarthritis, but their effects on the contralateral knee and bilateral hip joints remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of bracing on the kinematics and kinetics of involved and contralateral joints during gait. Nineteen patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were analysed. Kinematics and kinetics of the knee and hip joints in frontal and sagittal planes were measured during walking without and with bracing on the more symptomatic knee. The ipsilateral hip in the braced condition showed a lower adduction angle by an average of 2.58° (range, 1.05°-4.16°) during 1%-49% of the stance phase, and a lower abduction moment at the second peak during the stance phase than the hip in the unbraced condition (P<0.05 and P<0.005, respectively). With bracing, the contralateral hip showed a more marked peak extension moment and lower abduction moment at the first peak (P<0.05), and the contralateral knee adduction angle increased by an average of 0.32° (range, 0.21°-0.45°) during 46%-55% of the stance phase (P<0.05), compared to no bracing. Unloading bracing modified the contralateral knee adduction angle pattern at a specific time point during gait. It also affected the frontal plane on the ipsilateral hip and the frontal and sagittal planes on the contralateral hip joint. Consideration should be provided to other joints when treating knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of viscosupplementation in osteo-arthritis of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rajesh; Mahajan, Sumit

    2013-05-01

    Osteo-arthritis is the chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It is caused by 'wear and tear' on a joint. Knee is the most commonly Involved joint. Disease is so crippling that patient is unable to walk independently from bed to bathroom. The major causes of osteo-arthritis are age, gender, obesity, medical condition and hereditary. The signs and symptoms of osteo-arthritis are pain, joint stiffness, joint swelling, and loss of function. No blood tests are helpful in diagnosing osteo-arthritis. Management of osteo-arthritis includes non-pharmacological, pharmacological and surgical. A relatively new procedure is viscosupplementation, in which a preparation of hyaluronic acid is injected into the knee joint. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance found in the synovial fluid. It acts as a lubricant to enable bones to move smoothly over each other and a shock absorber for joint loads. The decrease in the elastic and viscous properties of synovial fluid in osteo-arthritis results from both a reduced molecular size and a reduced concentration of hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid. Viscosupplementation may be a therapeutic option for individuals with osteo-arthritis of the knee. Viscosupplementation has been shown to relieve pain in many patients who cannot get relief from non-medicinal measures or analgesic drugs. This article is to know the mechanism of action, patients' selection criteria, rationale and efficacy of viscosupplimentation in the management of osteo-arthritis of knee.

  7. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee Joint: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Soni, Rishit; Shah, Malkesh; Rathi, Parth; Golwala, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, benign, but potentially locally aggressive and recurrent condition characterized by synovial proliferation and hemosiderin deposition inside the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It usually affects the large joints such as hip, knee, and ankle. We report a case of PVNS of the knee joint in a young female which was treated by subtotal synovectomy alone without the use of adjuvants. At the 14-month follow-up, the patient was pain free and had no signs of disease recurrence. PMID:27843734

  8. [Studies of the neuromuscular system of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Börnert, K; Dippold, A

    1990-02-01

    The paper analysis the therapeutic effects of isometric training and electromechanic therapy (EMT) of the quadriceps muscles on subjects. The effects of the training practised with the knee joint bent was to be compared with previous results of training with the knee joint stretched. 36 subjects were trained and the increase in strength was measured with the help of a strain gauge dynamometer. Again a marked superiority of the EMT over sole isometric training could be demonstrated. More over, the results showed that the increase of the isometric maximal strength following an EMT is not influenced by the position of the angle of the joint.

  9. Abduction dislocation of the knee joint--a case study.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Krzysztof; Bielecki, Tomasz; Polak, Damian; Skowron, Lukasz

    2013-10-31

    The paper presents a case of untypical, not included in existing classifications, knee joint dislocation in a young man. An MRI scan confirmed a rupture of both cruciate ligaments and damage to the ligamento-capsular complex on the medial side of the knee joint. Two weeks after injury, an arthroscopy was performed with joint lavage followed by repair of the damaged ligamento-capsular complex. A very good functional result was obtained three years after the injury, in spite of the patient not having consented to an elective cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  10. [Empyema of the knee joint in adults: diagnosis and therapy.].

    PubMed

    Mrácek, D

    2000-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the current diagnostic procedures and the scheme used at the author's Department. The article also deals with therapeutical trends including arthroscopic treatment of empyema. Antibiotics necessary for the treatment of the disease are administered empirically. Most often as antibiotics of "the first choice" are recommended penicilin antibiotics with the inhibitor of beta-lactamase. The author points out the necessity of an early and adequate treatment of the empyema of the knee joint as a prevention of serious sequelae on the affected joint. Key words: empyema of the knee joint, diagnosis, therapy.

  11. [Knee joint distraction: a solution for young patients with osteoarthritis of the knee?

    PubMed

    Piscaer, T M; van der Jagt, O P; Gosens, T

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment for patients with end-stage generalised osteoarthritis of the knee is total knee replacement. In a recent paper in Plos One the authors examined an alternative approach, namely knee joint distraction. On the basis of a model, they claim that this treatment can postpone total knee replacement for about 20 years. This would reduce the costs for the healthcare services and improve quality of life for these patients. Although these claims seem promising, the model is only based on extrapolations of short-term results of small cohort studies. Furthermore, concerns about potential complications, e.g. osteomyelitis following pin-tract infections, are not mentioned. Further high quality studies in knee joint distraction are needed to prove its long-term efficacy and safety before this procedure can be implemented in standard clinical care.

  12. Associations of knee muscle force, bone malalignment, and knee-joint laxity with osteoarthritis in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kazumasa; Maeda, Misako

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] From the viewpoint of prevention of knee osteoarthritis, the aim of this study was to verify how muscle strength and joint laxity are related to knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects consisted of 90 community-dwelling elderly people aged more than 60 years (22 males, 68 females). Femorotibial angle alignment, knee joint laxity, knee extensors and flexor muscle strengths were measured in all subjects. In addition, the subjects were divided into four groups based on the presence of laxity and knee joint deformation, and the muscle strength values were compared. [Results] There was no significant difference in knee extensor muscle strength among the four groups. However, there was significant weakness of the knee flexor muscle in the group with deformation and laxity was compared with the group without deformation and laxity. [Conclusion] Decreased knee flexor muscle strengths may be involved in knee joint deformation. The importance of muscle strength balance was also considered. PMID:28356631

  13. Associations of knee muscle force, bone malalignment, and knee-joint laxity with osteoarthritis in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazumasa; Maeda, Misako

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] From the viewpoint of prevention of knee osteoarthritis, the aim of this study was to verify how muscle strength and joint laxity are related to knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects consisted of 90 community-dwelling elderly people aged more than 60 years (22 males, 68 females). Femorotibial angle alignment, knee joint laxity, knee extensors and flexor muscle strengths were measured in all subjects. In addition, the subjects were divided into four groups based on the presence of laxity and knee joint deformation, and the muscle strength values were compared. [Results] There was no significant difference in knee extensor muscle strength among the four groups. However, there was significant weakness of the knee flexor muscle in the group with deformation and laxity was compared with the group without deformation and laxity. [Conclusion] Decreased knee flexor muscle strengths may be involved in knee joint deformation. The importance of muscle strength balance was also considered.

  14. Evaluation of a variable resistance orthotic knee joint.

    PubMed

    Herbert-Copley, Andrew; Lemaire, Edward D; Baddour, Natalie

    2016-08-01

    Knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) are full leg braces for individuals with knee extensor weakness, designed to support the person during weight bearing activities by preventing knee flexion. KAFOs typically result in an unnatural gait pattern and are primarily used for level ground walking. A novel variable resistance orthotic knee joint, the Ottawalk-Variable Speed (OWVS), was designed to address these limitations. This paper presents a pilot test to evaluate the OWVS functional performance during walking and stair descent. A carbon-fiber KAFO was adjusted for an able-bodied participant by a certified orthotist, with a standard orthotic single axis knee joint on the medial side and the OWVS on the lateral side. The participant performed level ground walking (stance-control, open, closed) and stair descent tests. The operator was able to manually switch between closed mode in terminal swing to open mode in terminal stance for stance-control walking. Knee angle kinematics were similar between open and stance control modes. For stair descent, resistance settings supported the participant as they lowered their body to the next step, but with smaller range of motion compared to the open setting. The Ottawalk-Variable Speed design successfully controls knee flexion during stance and stair descent, with one lateral control joint. Mode switching was fast and appropriate. This microprocessor controlled SCKAFO has a low profile that fits beneath clothing and the variable resistance design will allow people to negotiate different terrain types.

  15. Effect of BMI on knee joint torques in ergometer rowing.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Karen; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Richter, Chris; Munoz-Maldonado, Yolanda; Hamilton, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Although an authoritative panel recommended the use of ergometer rowing as a non-weight-bearing form of exercise for obese adults, the biomechanical characterization of ergometer rowing is strikingly absent. We examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) relative to the lower extremity biomechanics during rowing in 10 normal weight (BMI 18-25), 10 overweight (BMI 25-30 kg·m⁻²), and 10 obese (BMI > 30 kg·m⁻²) participants. The results showed that BMI affects joint kinematics and primarily knee joint kinetics. The data revealed that high BMI leads to unfavorable knee joint torques, implying increased loads of the medial compartment in the knee joint that could be avoided by allowing more variable foot positioning on future designs of rowing ergometers.

  16. A micromechanical model to predict damage and failure in biological tissues. Application to the ligament-to-bone attachment in the human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Subit, D; Chabrand, P; Masson, C

    2009-02-09

    Computational models are developed in injury biomechanics to assess lesions in biological tissues based on mechanical measurements. The linear mechanics of fracture theory (LMFT) is a common approach to establish injuries based on thresholds (such as force or strain thresholds) which are straightforward to implement and computationally efficient. However, LMFT does not apply to non-linear heterogeneous materials and does not have the ability to predict failure onset. This paper proposes the cohesive zone model theory (CZMT) as an alternative. CZMT focuses on the development of behaviour laws for crack initiation and propagation at an interface that apply within a fibrous material or at the interface between materials. With the view of evaluating CZMT for biological tissues, the model developed by Raous et al. [1999. A consistent model coupling adhesion, friction and unilateral contact. Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 177, 383-399] was applied to the ligament-to-bone interface in the human knee joint. This model accounts for adhesion, friction and damage at the interface and provides a smooth transition from total adhesion to complete failure through the intensity of adhesion variable. A 2D finite element model was developed to mimic previous experiments, and the model parameters were determined using a dichotomy method. The model showed good results by its ability to predict damage. The extension to a 3D geometry, with an inverse problem approach, is, however, required to better estimate the model parameters values. Although it is computationally costly, CZMT supplements the improvements achieved in microimaging techniques to support the development of micro/macro approaches in biomechanical modelling.

  17. Measurement of knee joint motion using digital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of joint motion is common practice in many aspects of orthopaedic surgery. A number of techniques and instruments have been developed for this purpose. We describe a method of recording and measuring knee joint motion using digital imaging which demonstrated high inter-observer reliability (r > 0.948) and intra-observer repeatability (r > 0.906). This technique may offer some practical advantages over other methods of measuring joint motion. PMID:19037641

  18. Measurement of knee joint motion using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Damien; Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of joint motion is common practice in many aspects of orthopaedic surgery. A number of techniques and instruments have been developed for this purpose. We describe a method of recording and measuring knee joint motion using digital imaging which demonstrated high inter-observer reliability (r > 0.948) and intra-observer repeatability (r > 0.906). This technique may offer some practical advantages over other methods of measuring joint motion.

  19. Consideration of equilibrium equations at the hip joint alongside those at the knee and ankle joints has mixed effects on knee joint response during gait.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2013-02-01

    Accurate estimation of muscle forces during daily activities such as walking is critical for a reliable evaluation of loads on the knee joint. To evaluate knee joint muscle forces, the importance of the inclusion of the hip joint alongside the knee and ankle joints when treating the equilibrium equations remains yet unknown. An iterative kinematics-driven finite element model of the knee joint that accounts for the synergy between passive structures and active musculature is employed. The knee joint muscle forces and biomechanical response are predicted and compared with our earlier results that did not account for moment equilibrium equations at the hip joint. This study indicates that inclusion of the hip joint in the optimization along the knee and ankle joints only slightly (<10%) influences total forces in quadriceps, lateral hamstrings and medial hamstrings. As a consequence, even smaller differences are found in predicted ligament forces, contact forces/areas, and cartilage stresses/strains during the stance phase of gait. The distribution of total forces between the uni- and bi-articular muscle components in quadriceps and in lateral hamstrings; however, substantially alter at different stance phases.

  20. [Long-term results of unicompartmental knee joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Kankovský, V; Ptácek, Z; Kubát, P

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term results of unicompartmental knee joint alloplasty (UKA) in a group of 21 patients. On the basis of their own results and literature data, the authors discuss effective strategies for treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee joint. A group of 21 patients, who were implanted a total of 22 unicompartmental knee replacements, type St. Georg, Waldemar Link, between 1986 and 1992, were followed-up till 2002. Since two patients living permanently abroad were excluded, the group at the final evaluation consisted of 19 patients with a total of 20 knee replacements. In 2002, all patients were clinically and radiologically examined. They were interviewed about their subjective evaluation of the knee joint after alloplasty, and clinical and functional findings were assessed. The evaluation of long-term results was based on The Knee Society Clinical Rating System. The average Knee Score value was 84 points and average Function Score value was 78 points. Out of the 20 knee replacements evaluated, only one failure of UKA was recorded at 9 years after the primary implantation. The authors discuss the current state of treatment in unicompartmental knee arthritis and present several different views based on literature sources. Opinions on indications for specific surgical methods are still controversial. The authors draw attention to comparisons of long-term results between patients with UKA and patients who underwent high tibial valgus osteotomy or total knee replacement. They discuss the advantages and disadvantages of UKA in comparison with the other therapies. They also pay some attention to repeat surgery in failed UKA. UKA implantation is a surgical method of managing unicompartmental arthritis of the knee joint. The results presented by the authors and corroborated by many literature data provide evidence that UKA is of great importance in the treatment of unicompartmental knee arthritis. If a consistent selection of patients is

  1. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  2. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  3. [Treatment of knee joint pain with superficial needling].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang-yang; Liao, Jing-ping

    2005-04-01

    To compare therapeutic effects of superficial needling and body acupuncture on knee joint pain. Ninety-six cases of knee joint pain were randomly divided into a treatment group of 48 cases treated with superficial needling, and a control group of 48 cases treated with body acupuncture. The cured rate was 66.7% in the treatment group and 39.6% in the control group with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). The total effective rate was 100.0% in both the two groups. The needed therapeutic times of superficial needling was significantly less than that of the body acupuncture (P< 0.05). Superficial needling has a good therapeutic effect on knee joint pain with a shorter therapeutic course.

  4. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (P<0.01) and physical function scores (P<0.01) compared to the no pain and the mild pain groups. The moderate/severe pain group also walked with greater knee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interprofessional approach for teaching functional knee joint anatomy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jakob J; Obmann, Markus M; Gießler, Marianne; Schuldis, Dominik; Brückner, Ann-Kathrin; Strohm, Peter C; Sandeck, Florian; Spittau, Björn

    2017-03-01

    Profound knowledge in functional and clinical anatomy is a prerequisite for efficient diagnosis in medical practice. However, anatomy teaching does not always consider functional and clinical aspects. Here we introduce a new interprofessional approach to effectively teach the anatomy of the knee joint. The presented teaching approach involves anatomists, orthopaedists and physical therapists to teach anatomy of the knee joint in small groups under functional and clinical aspects. The knee joint courses were implemented during early stages of the medical curriculum and medical students were grouped with students of physical therapy to sensitize students to the importance of interprofessional work. Evaluation results clearly demonstrate that medical students and physical therapy students appreciated this teaching approach. First evaluations of following curricular anatomy exams suggest a benefit of course participants in knee-related multiple choice questions. Together, the interprofessional approach presented here proves to be a suitable approach to teach functional and clinical anatomy of the knee joint and further trains interprofessional work between prospective physicians and physical therapists as a basis for successful healthcare management. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Knee Joint Dysfunctions That Influence Gait in Cerebrovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Greve, Julia Maria D’Andrea

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is still no consensus among different specialists on the subject of kinematic variation during the hemiparetic gait, including the main changes that take place during the gait cycle and whether the gait velocity changes the patterns of joint mobility. One of the most frequently discussed joints is the knee. OBJECTIVES This study aims to evaluate the variables found in the angular kinematics of knee joint, and to describe the alterations found in the hemiparetic gait resulting from cerebrovascular injury. METHODS This study included 66 adult patients of both genders with a diagnosis of either right or left hemiparesis resulting from ischemic cerebrovascular injury. All the participants underwent three-dimensional gait evaluation, an the angular kinematics of the joint knee were selected for analysis. RESULTS The results were distributed into four groups formed based on the median of the gait speed and the side of hemiparesis. CONCLUSIONS The relevant clinical characteristics included the important mechanisms of loading response in the stance, knee hyperextension in single stance, and reduction of the peak flexion and movement amplitude of the knee in the swing phase. These mechanisms should be taken into account when choosing the best treatment. We believe that the findings presented here may aid in preventing the occurrence of the problems found, and also in identifying the origin of these problems. PMID:18719753

  7. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression.

  8. Material properties of the human posterior knee capsule.

    PubMed

    Rachmat, H H; Janssen, D; Verkerke, G J; Diercks, R L; Verdonschot, N

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest to develop accurate subject-specific biomechanical models of the knee. Most of the existing models currently do not include a representation of the posterior knee capsule. In order to incorporate the posterior capsule in knee models, data is needed on its mechanical properties. To quantify the mechanical properties of the human posterior knee capsule through semi-static tensile tests. Fifteen posterior knee capsule specimens (5 knees, 3 male, 2 female; age 79.2±7.9 years) were used to perform tensile tests. A medial, central and lateral specimen was taken from each knee. The cross-sectional area was measured, after which semi-static tensile tests were performed to quantify the material properties. The stiffness of the capsule was randomly distributed over the regions. The global Young's modulus and yield strength was 8.58±10.77 MPa and 1.75±1.89 MPa, respectively. A strong correlation (ρ=0.900) was found between Young's modulus and yield strength. The location of failure was not associated with smallest cross-sectional area or highest strain. The results suggest that the posterior knee capsule does not have a systematic (medial-central-lateral) distribution of material properties. The posterior capsule may play an important role in knee joint mechanics, particularly when in hyper extension.

  9. Modeling the Human Knee for Assistive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Massimo; Reggiani, Monica; Pagello, Enrico; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we use motion capture technology together with an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee joint to predict muscle behavior during human dynamic movements. We propose a muscle model based on infinitely stiff tendons and show this allows speeding up 250 times the computation of muscle force and the resulting joint moment calculation with no loss of accuracy with respect to the previously developed elastictendon model. We then integrate our previously developed method for the estimation of 3-D musculotendon kinematics in the proposed EMG-driven model. This new code enabled the creation of a standalone EMG-driven model that was implemented and run on an embedded system for applications in assistive technologies such as myoelectrically controlled prostheses and orthoses. PMID:22911539

  10. Robotic control in knee joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, B L; Rodriguez y Baena, F M; Barrett, A R W; Gomes, M P S F; Harris, S J; Jakopec, M; Cobb, J P

    2007-01-01

    A brief history of robotic systems in knee arthroplasty is provided. The place of autonomous robots is then discussed and compared to more recent 'hands-on' robotic systems that can be more cost effective. The case is made for robotic systems to have a clear justification, with improved benefits compared to those from cheaper navigation systems. A number of more recent, smaller, robot systems for knee arthroplasty are also described. A specific example is given of an active constraint medical robot, the ACROBOT system, used in a prospective randomized controlled trial of unicondylar robotic knee arthroplasty in which the robot was compared to conventional surgery. The results of the trial are presented together with a discussion of the need for measures of accuracy to be introduced so that the efficacy of the robotic surgery can be immediately identified, rather than have to wait for a number of years before long-term clinical improvements can be demonstrated.

  11. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue.

  12. Alpha 5 Integrin Mediates Osteoarthritic Changes in Mouse Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Maria Elena; Wang, Chao; Gunawardena, Aruni T.; Zhang, Kairui; Cantley, Leslie; Yasuhara, Rika; Usami, Yu; Francois, Noelle; Iwamoto, Masahiro; van der Flier, Arjan; Zhang, Yejia; Qin, Ling; Han, Lin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of most common skeletal disorders and can affect synovial joints such as knee and ankle joints. α5 integrin, a major fibronectin receptor, is expressed in articular cartilage and has been demonstrated to play roles in synovial joint development and in the regulation of chondrocyte survival and matrix degradation in articular cartilage. We hypothesized that α5 integrin signaling is involved in pathogenesis of OA. To test this, we generated compound mice that conditionally ablate α5 integrin in the synovial joints using the Gdf5Cre system. The compound mice were born normally and had an overall appearance similar to the control mice. However, when the mutant mice received the OA surgery, they showed stronger resistance to osteoarthritic changes than the control. Specifically the mutant knee joints presented lower levels of cartilage matrix and structure loss and synovial changes and showed stronger biomechanical properties than the control knee joints. These findings indicate that α5 integrin may not be essential for synovial joint development but play a causative role in induction of osteoarthritic changes. PMID:27280771

  13. Alpha 5 Integrin Mediates Osteoarthritic Changes in Mouse Knee Joints.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Wang, Chao; Gunawardena, Aruni T; Zhang, Kairui; Cantley, Leslie; Yasuhara, Rika; Usami, Yu; Francois, Noelle; Iwamoto, Masahiro; van der Flier, Arjan; Zhang, Yejia; Qin, Ling; Han, Lin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of most common skeletal disorders and can affect synovial joints such as knee and ankle joints. α5 integrin, a major fibronectin receptor, is expressed in articular cartilage and has been demonstrated to play roles in synovial joint development and in the regulation of chondrocyte survival and matrix degradation in articular cartilage. We hypothesized that α5 integrin signaling is involved in pathogenesis of OA. To test this, we generated compound mice that conditionally ablate α5 integrin in the synovial joints using the Gdf5Cre system. The compound mice were born normally and had an overall appearance similar to the control mice. However, when the mutant mice received the OA surgery, they showed stronger resistance to osteoarthritic changes than the control. Specifically the mutant knee joints presented lower levels of cartilage matrix and structure loss and synovial changes and showed stronger biomechanical properties than the control knee joints. These findings indicate that α5 integrin may not be essential for synovial joint development but play a causative role in induction of osteoarthritic changes.

  14. Experimental joint immobilization in guinea pigs. Effects on the knee joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcondesdesouza, J. P.; Machado, F. F.; Sesso, A.; Valeri, V.

    1980-01-01

    In young and adult guinea pigs, the aftermath experimentally induced by the immobilization of the knee joint in hyperextended forced position was studied. Joint immobilization which varied from one to nine weeks was attained by plaster. Eighty knee joints were examined macro and microscopically. Findings included: (1) muscular hypotrophy and joint stiffness in all animals, directly proportional to the length of immobilization; (2) haemoarthrosis in the first week; (3) intra-articular fibrous tissue proliferation ending up with fibrous ankylosis; (4) hyaline articular cartilage erosions; (5) various degrees of destructive menisci changes. A tentative explanation of the fibrous tissue proliferation and of the cartilage changes is offered.

  15. [Osteoarthritis of knee joint treated with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ru; Fu, Wen-Bin

    2010-05-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy of osteoarthritis of knee joint treated by acupuncture and moxibustion and simple acupuncture. Sixty-two cases were randomized into an observation group (32 cases) and a control group (30 cases). In the observation group, acupuncture and non-scarring moxibustion were applied. Acupuncture was applied on the local acupoints of knee and moxibustion was performed on Shenshu (BL 23) and Xuehai (SP 10). In the control group, only acupuncture was adopted. The clinical efficacy was observed after 2 courses of treatment. Lysholm knee joint motor function scale, visual analogue scale (VAS) and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) were used for the assessment of scores before and after treatment and the statistical analysis of clinical efficacy. The total effective rate (93.8%, 30/32) in the observation group was superior to that (87.7%, 26/30) in the control group (P < 0.05). The scores in Lysholm knee joint motor function scale and VAS were improved after treatment compared with those before treatment in two groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The degree of improvement in the observation group was superior to that in the control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). There was no statistical significance in the scores of WHOQOL-BREF before and after treatment in two groups as well as in intra-group comparison (all P > 0.05). Acupuncture and moxibustion in combination achieve the definite clinical efficacy on osteoarthritis of knee joint and this therapy is superior to simple acupuncture in the improvement of motor function of knee joint and the alleviation of pain.

  16. Rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures: the long-term natural history of motion loss and myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Sutherland, Craig; Zhang, Mei

    2004-03-01

    Our objective is to describe the natural history of motion loss with time and myofibroblast numbers in a rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures. Twenty-eight skeletally mature New Zealand White female rabbits had five-mm-squares of cortical bone removed from the medial and lateral femoral condyles of the right knee. A Kirschner wire (K-wire) was used to immobilize the knee joint in maximum flexion. A second operation was performed 8 weeks later to remove the K-wire. The rabbits were divided into four groups depending on the time of remobilization; 0, 8, 16 or 32 weeks. The average flexion contracture of the experimental knees in the 0-week and 8-week remobilization groups (38 degrees and 33 degrees, respectively) were significantly greater when compared with the values of the unoperated contralateral knees (8 degrees). The average flexion contractures of the experimental knees in the 16-week and 32-week remobilization groups were also greater than the unoperated contralateral knees, although they were not statistically significant. The average flexion contractures of the 16-week and 32-week groups were 19 degrees and 18 degrees, respectively, indicating a stabilization of the motion loss. Myofibroblast numbers in the posterior joint capsules were elevated 4-5x in the knees with contractures when compared to the contralateral knees. The initial decrease in severity followed by stabilization of motion loss and the association of motion loss with myofibroblasts mimics the human scenario of permanent post-traumatic joint contractures.

  17. Correlation Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Arthroscopic Findings in the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Ahad, Humayun; Sharma, Pradeep; Bajaj, Pankaj; Hassan, Nazia; Kamal, Younis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knee joint is the largest and the most complex joint of the human body. It is not covered by any thick muscular covering anteriorly. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic capabilities of clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopy in traumatic disorders of the knee joint, to seek correlation between clinical findings, MRI findings and arthroscopic. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 patients with a presentation suggestive of traumatic knee pathology were studied prospectively. A detailed history was taken and relevant clinical examination was done, which was followed by MRI of the knee. The patients were scheduled for arthroscopy under general/spinal anesthesia, whenever indicated. Results: Keeping arthroscopic examination as standard, the correlation between clinical and arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, accuracy of 63.16%, negative predictive value of 93.48%; whereas MRI vs. arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 74.42%, specificity of 93.10%, accuracy of 84.21%, and negative predictive value of 88.04%. Conclusions: The clinical examination is an important and accurate diagnostic modality for evaluation of traumatic derangement of the knee joint. It is noninvasive, easy, available, and valuable diagnostic modality. The MRI is an accurate diagnostic modality. It can be used whenever there is an uncertain indication for arthroscopy. However, costs have to be kept in mind, especially in patients with low socio-economic status. PMID:25825695

  18. Modelling and Simulation of the Knee Joint with a Depth Sensor Camera for Prosthetics and Movement Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risto, S.; Kallergi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to model and simulate the knee joint. A computer model of the knee joint was first created, which was controlled by Microsoft's Kinect for Windows. Kinect created a depth map of the knee and lower leg motion independent of lighting conditions through an infrared sensor. A combination of open source software such as Blender, Python, Kinect SDK and NI_Mate were implemented for the creation and control of the simulated knee based on movements of a live physical model. A physical size model of the knee and lower leg was also created, the movement of which was controlled remotely by the computer model and Kinect. The real time communication of the model and the robotic knee was achieved through programming in Python and Arduino language. The result of this study showed that Kinect in the modelling of human kinematics and can play a significant role in the development of prosthetics and other assistive technologies.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3550 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal... § 888.3550 Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3550 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal... § 888.3550 Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3550 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal... § 888.3550 Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3550 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal... § 888.3550 Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3530 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi... § 888.3530 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3540 - Knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi... § 888.3540 Knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3550 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal... § 888.3550 Knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial polymer/metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3530 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi... § 888.3530 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3540 - Knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi... § 888.3540 Knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemoral polymer/metal semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3520 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non... § 888.3520 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3520 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non... § 888.3520 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3530 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi... § 888.3530 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3520 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non... § 888.3520 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3520 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non... § 888.3520 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3530 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi... § 888.3530 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3520 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non... § 888.3520 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3530 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi... § 888.3530 Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3565 - Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer... Devices § 888.3565 Knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellofemorotibial metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device...

  10. Elbow and knee joint for hard space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    An elbow or knee joint for a hard space suit or similar usage is formed of three serially connected rigid sections which have truncated spherical configurations. The ends of each section form solid geometric angles, and the sections are interconnected by hermetically sealed ball bearings. The outer two sections are fixed together for rotation in a direction opposite to rotation of the center section. A preferred means to make the outer sections track each other in rotation comprises a rotatable continuous bead chain which engages sockets circumferentially spaced on the facing sides of the outer races of the bearings. The joint has a single pivot point and the bearing axes are always contained in a single plane for any articulation of the joint. Thus flexure of the joint simulates the coplanar flexure of the knee or elbow and is not susceptible to lockup.

  11. Electrical noise to a knee joint stabilizes quiet bipedal stance.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2013-04-01

    Studies have shown that a minute, noise-like electrical stimulation (ES) of a lower limb joint stabilizes one-legged standing (OS), possibly due to the noise-enhanced joint proprioception. To demonstrate the practical utility of this finding, we assessed whether the bipedal stance (BS), relatively stable and generally employed in daily activities, is also stabilized by the same ES method. Twelve volunteers maintained quiet BS with or without an unperceivable, noise-like ES of a knee joint. The results showed that the average amplitude, peak-to-peak amplitude, and standard deviation of the foot center of pressure in the anteroposterior direction were significantly attenuated by the ES (P<0.05). These results indicate that the BS also can be stabilized by an unperceivable, noise-like ES of a knee joint.

  12. Knee joint forces during downhill walking with hiking poles.

    PubMed

    Schwameder, H; Roithner, R; Müller, E; Niessen, W; Raschner, C

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine external and internal loads on the knee joint during downhill walking with and without hiking poles. Kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic data were collected from eight males during downhill walking on a ramp declined at 25 degrees. Planar knee joint moments and forces were calculated using a quasi-static knee model. The results were analysed for an entire pole-cycle as well as differentiated between single and double support phases and between each step of a pole-cycle. Significant differences between downhill walking with and without hiking poles were observed for peak and average magnitudes of ground reaction force, knee joint moment, and tibiofemoral compressive and shear forces (12-25%). Similar reductions were found in patellofemoral compressive force, the quadriceps tendon force and the activity of the vastus lateralis; however, because of a high variability, these differences were not significant. The reductions seen during downhill walking with hiking poles compared with unsupported downhill walking were caused primarily by the forces applied to the hiking poles and by a change in posture to a more forward leaning position of the upper body, with the effect of reducing the knee moment arm.

  13. Predictors of knee joint loading after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Khandha, Ashutosh; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury results in altered knee joint mechanics which frequently continue even after ACL reconstruction. The persistence of altered mechanical loading of the knee is of concern due to its likely role in the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). Joint contact forces are associated with post-traumatic OA development, but evaluation of factors influencing the magnitude of contact forces after ACL injury is needed to advance current strategies aimed at preventing post-traumatic OA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of knee joint contact forces after ACL reconstruction. Thirty athletes completed standard gait analysis with surface electromyography 6 months after ACL reconstruction. An electromyographic-driven musculoskeletal model was used to estimate joint contact forces. External knee adduction moment was a significant predictor of medial compartment contact forces in both limbs, while vertical ground reaction force and co-contraction only contributed significantly in the uninvolved limb. The large influence of the knee adduction moment on joint contact forces provides mechanistic clues to understanding the mechanical pathway of post-traumatic OA after ACL injury. Statement of Clinical Significance: This study provides critical information in improving the understanding of mechanisms influencing the development of post-traumatic OA after ACL injury. Further work is needed to identify additional driving factors of joint loading in the ACL-injured limb and develop treatment strategies to avert the deleterious consequences of post-traumatic OA. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:651-656, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Temporal gene expression profiling of the rat knee joint capsule during immobilization-induced joint contractures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kayleigh; Sun, Fangui; Trudel, Guy; Sebastiani, Paola; Laneuville, Odette

    2015-05-26

    Contractures of the knee joint cause disability and handicap. Recovering range of motion is recognized by arthritic patients as their preference for improved health outcome secondary only to pain management. Clinical and experimental studies provide evidence that the posterior knee capsule prevents the knee from achieving full extension. This study was undertaken to investigate the dynamic changes of the joint capsule transcriptome during the progression of knee joint contractures induced by immobilization. We performed a microarray analysis of genes expressed in the posterior knee joint capsule following induction of a flexion contracture by rigidly immobilizing the rat knee joint over a time-course of 16 weeks. Fold changes of expression values were measured and co-expressed genes were identified by clustering based on time-series analysis. Genes associated with immobilization were further analyzed to reveal pathways and biological significance and validated by immunohistochemistry on sagittal sections of knee joints. Changes in expression with a minimum of 1.5 fold changes were dominated by a decrease in expression for 7732 probe sets occurring at week 8 while the expression of 2251 probe sets increased. Clusters of genes with similar profiles of expression included a total of 162 genes displaying at least a 2 fold change compared to week 1. Functional analysis revealed ontology categories corresponding to triglyceride metabolism, extracellular matrix and muscle contraction. The altered expression of selected genes involved in the triglyceride biosynthesis pathway; AGPAT-9, and of the genes P4HB and HSP47, both involved in collagen synthesis, was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression in the knee joint capsule was sensitive to joint immobility and provided insights into molecular mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of knee flexion contractures. Capsule responses to immobilization was dynamic and characterized by modulation of at least three

  16. Effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on knee joint mechanics: a novel conservative treatment for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fantini Pagani, Cynthia H; Willwacher, Steffen; Benker, Rita; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Several conservative treatments for medial knee osteoarthritis such as knee orthosis and laterally wedged insoles have been shown to reduce the load in the medial knee compartment. However, those treatments also present limitations such as patient compliance and inconsistent results regarding the treatment success. To analyze the effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on the knee adduction moment and knee joint alignment in the frontal plane in subjects with knee varus alignment. Controlled laboratory study, repeated measurements. In total, 14 healthy subjects with knee varus alignment were analyzed in five different conditions: without orthotic, with laterally wedged insoles, and with an ankle-foot orthosis in three different adjustments. Three-dimensional kinetic and kinematic data were collected during gait analysis. Significant decreases in knee adduction moment, knee lever arm, and joint alignment in the frontal plane were observed with the ankle-foot orthosis in all three different adjustments. No significant differences could be found in any parameter while using the laterally wedged insoles. The ankle-foot orthosis was effective in reducing the knee adduction moment. The decreases in this parameter seem to be achieved by changing the knee joint alignment and thereby reducing the knee lever arm in the frontal plane. This study presents a novel approach for reducing the load in the medial knee compartment, which could be developed as a new treatment option for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  17. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  18. Implementation of a gait cycle loading into healthy and meniscectomised knee joint models with fibril-reinforced articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2015-01-01

    Computational models can be used to evaluate the functional properties of knee joints and possible risk locations within joints. Current models with fibril-reinforced cartilage layers do not provide information about realistic human movement during walking. This study aimed to evaluate stresses and strains within a knee joint by implementing load data from a gait cycle in healthy and meniscectomised knee joint models with fibril-reinforced cartilages. A 3D finite element model of a knee joint with cartilages and menisci was created from magnetic resonance images. The gait cycle data from varying joint rotations, translations and axial forces were taken from experimental studies and implemented into the model. Cartilage layers were modelled as a fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic material with the menisci considered as a transversely isotropic elastic material. In the normal knee joint model, relatively high maximum principal stresses were specifically predicted to occur in the medial condyle of the knee joint during the loading response. Bilateral meniscectomy increased stresses, strains and fluid pressures in cartilage on the lateral side, especially during the first 50% of the stance phase of the gait cycle. During the entire stance phase, the superficial collagen fibrils modulated stresses of cartilage, especially in the medial tibial cartilage. The present computational model with a gait cycle and fibril-reinforced biphasic cartilage revealed time- and location-dependent differences in stresses, strains and fluid pressures occurring in cartilage during walking. The lateral meniscus was observed to have a more significant role in distributing loads across the knee joint than the medial meniscus, suggesting that meniscectomy might initiate a post-traumatic process leading to osteoarthritis at the lateral compartment of the knee joint.

  19. Three-dimensional reconstruction of subject-specific knee joint using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging image data fusions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuefu; Mou, Zhifang; Huang, Zhenyu; Hu, Guanghong; Dong, Yinghai; Xu, Qingrong

    2013-10-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of human body from a living subject can be considered as the first step toward promoting virtual human project as a tool in clinical applications. This study proposes a detailed protocol for building subject-specific three-dimensional model of knee joint from a living subject. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging image data of knee joint were used to reconstruct knee structures, including bones, skin, muscles, cartilages, menisci, and ligaments. They were fused to assemble the complete three-dimensional knee joint. The procedure was repeated three times with respect to three different methods of reference landmarks. The accuracy of image fusion in accordance with different landmarks was evaluated and compared with each other. The complete three-dimensional knee joint, which included 21 knee structures, was accurately developed. The choice of external or anatomical landmarks was not crucial to improve image fusion accuracy for three-dimensional reconstruction. Further work needs to be done to explore the value of the reconstructed three-dimensional knee joint for its biomechanics and kinematics.

  20. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  1. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment.

  2. Soft tissue artifact compensation in knee kinematics by multi-body optimization: Performance of subject-specific knee joint models.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2015-11-05

    Soft tissue artifact (STA) distort marker-based knee kinematics measures and make them difficult to use in clinical practice. None of the current methods designed to compensate for STA is suitable, but multi-body optimization (MBO) has demonstrated encouraging results and can be improved. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the performance of knee joint models, with anatomical and subject-specific kinematic constraints, used in MBO to reduce STA errors. Twenty subjects were recruited: 10 healthy and 10 osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were evaluated by comparing dynamic knee kinematics recorded by a motion capture system (KneeKG™) and optimized with MBO to quasi-static knee kinematics measured by a low-dose, upright, biplanar radiographic imaging system (EOS(®)). Errors due to STA ranged from 1.6° to 22.4° for knee rotations and from 0.8 mm to 14.9 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were most effective in compensating for STA in terms of abduction-adduction, inter-external rotation and antero-posterior displacement. Root mean square errors with subject-specific knee joint models ranged from 2.2±1.2° to 6.0±3.9° for knee rotations and from 2.4±1.1 mm to 4.3±2.4 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects, respectively. Our study shows that MBO can be improved with subject-specific knee joint models, and that the quality of the motion capture calibration is critical. Future investigations should focus on more refined knee joint models to reproduce specific OA knee geometry and physiology.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of human lower extremity joint moments due to changes in joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh M; Moazen, Mehran; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-02-01

    Despite the widespread applications of human gait analysis, causal interactions between joint kinematics and joint moments have not been well documented. Typical gait studies are often limited to pure multi-body dynamics analysis of a few subjects which do not reveal the relative contributions of joint kinematics to joint moments. This study presented a computational approach to evaluate the sensitivity of joint moments due to variations of joint kinematics. A large data set of probabilistic joint kinematics and associated ground reaction forces were generated based on experimental data from literature. Multi-body dynamics analysis was then used to calculate joint moments with respect to the probabilistic gait cycles. Employing the principal component analysis (PCA), the relative contributions of individual joint kinematics to joint moments were computed in terms of sensitivity indices (SI). Results highlighted high sensitivity of (1) hip abduction moment due to changes in pelvis rotation (SI = 0.38) and hip abduction (SI = 0.4), (2) hip flexion moment due to changes in hip flexion (SI = 0.35) and knee flexion (SI = 0.26), (3) hip rotation moment due to changes in pelvis obliquity (SI = 0.28) and hip rotation (SI = 0.4), (4) knee adduction moment due to changes in pelvis rotation (SI = 0.35), hip abduction (SI = 0.32) and knee flexion (SI = 0.34), (5) knee flexion moment due to changes in pelvis rotation (SI = 0.29), hip flexion (SI = 0.28) and knee flexion (SI = 0.31), and (6) knee rotation moment due to changes in hip abduction (SI = 0.32), hip flexion and knee flexion (SI = 0.31). Highlighting the "cause-and-effect" relationships between joint kinematics and the resultant joint moments provides a fundamental understanding of human gait and can lead to design and optimization of current gait rehabilitation treatments. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Joint line restoration in a contemporary revision knee system.

    PubMed

    Hitt, Kirby; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Howard, Michael; Mittal, Yogesh; Heekin, R David; Jacofsky, David

    2015-02-01

    We investigated a new revision total knee arthroplasty device and associated instrumentation to determine if it could reduce intraoperative complexity and restore the joint line through the arc of motion. In a prospective multicenter study, a total of 95 consecutive patients undergoing a revision knee arthroplasty were evaluated. Medical history, functional health scores, and intraoperative data were collected. The joint line was restored to 28 mm ± 5 mm in full extension and 90-degree flexion. Significant improvements were noted in all functional and general health scores. The anatomic boss position may allow for a reduction in instrumentation, as the need for femoral offset adapters was limited. Joint line restoration with proper posterior condylar offset correlated with positive functional outcomes.

  5. [Rolling friction: a desing of artificial knee joint].

    PubMed

    He, Yujue; Yu, Zhongjia; Chen, Ming; Wang, Chengtao

    2005-08-01

    Resorption and osteolysis of periimplant bones resulting from the wear debris of artificial joint will cause long-term loosening. A new type of rolling knee artificial joint without UHMWPE based on the mechanics of rolling friction is designed for alleviating this problem. Because of low friction force, the resistance of extension and flexion is reduced strikingly and the stress on the interface between prosthesis and bone is reduced evidently. In addition, the bio-toxicity caused by the wear debris of UHMWPE will not occur absolutely. In consequence, the rolling artificial joint can prevent the trend of long-term loosening of the prosthesis efficiently.

  6. Relationship between leg extensor muscle strength and knee joint loading during gait before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vahtrik, Doris; Gapeyeva, Helena; Ereline, Jaan; Pääsuke, Mati

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the leg extensor muscles and its relationship with knee joint loading during gait prior and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Custom-made dynamometer was used to assess an isometric MVC force of the leg extensor muscles and 3-D motion analysis system was used to evaluate the knee joint loading during gait in 13 female patients (aged 49-68 years) with knee osteoarthritis. Patients were evaluated one day before, and three and six months following TKA in the operated and non-operated leg. Six months after TKA, MVC force of the leg extensor muscles for the operated leg did not differ significantly as compared to the preoperative level, whereas it remained significantly lower for the non-operated leg and controls. The knee flexion moment and the knee joint power during mid stance of gait was improved six months after TKA, remaining significantly lowered compared with controls. Negative moderate correlation between leg extensor muscles strength and knee joint loading for the operated leg during mid stance was noted three months after TKA. The correlation analysis indicates that due to weak leg extensor muscles, an excessive load is applied to knee joint during mid stance of gait in patients, whereas in healthy subjects stronger knee-surrounding muscles provide stronger knee joint loading during gait. III (correlational study). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Knee Power Is an Important Parameter in Understanding Medial Knee Joint Load in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Kristina M; Acker, Stacey M; Arora, Neha; Beattie, Karen A; Callaghan, Jack P; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which knee extensor strength and power explain variance in knee adduction moment (KAM) peak and impulse in clinical knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fifty-three adults (mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 6.3 years, 11 men) with clinical knee OA participated. The KAM waveform was calculated from motion and force data and ensemble averaged from 5 walking trials. The KAM peak was normalized to body mass (Nm/kg). The mean KAM impulse reflected the mean total medial knee load during stride (Nm × seconds). For strength, the maximum knee extensor moment attained from maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) was normalized to body mass (Nm/kg). For power, the maximum knee extensor power during isotonic contractions, with the resistance set at 25% of MVIC, was normalized to body mass (W/kg). Covariates included age, sex, knee pain on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, gait speed, and body mass index (BMI). Relationships of the KAM peak and impulse with strength and power were examined using sequential stepwise forward linear regressions. Results Covariates did not explain variance in the KAM peak. While extensor strength did not, peak knee extensor power explained 8% of the variance in the KAM peak (P = 0.02). Sex and BMI explained 24% of the variance in the KAM impulse (P < 0.05). Sex, BMI, and knee extensor power explained 31% of the variance in the KAM impulse (P = 0.02), with power contributing 7% (P < 0.05). Conclusion Knee extensor power was more important than isometric knee strength in understanding medial knee loads during gait. PMID:24920175

  8. The minimal effective dose of cis-9-cetylmyristoleate (CMO) in persons presenting with knee joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Chul; Jin, Hyun Seung; Joo, Young; Kim, Yong Chul; Moon, Jee Youn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nutraceuticals containing cis-9-cetylmyristoleate (CMO) are used to improve knee pain despite the lack of placebo-controlled studies in humans. The aim of the study was to explore the minimal effective dose of CMO for relieving knee joint pain. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects with mild degree arthritic knee joint pain were randomized into 4 groups; groups A, B, and C that contained 100%, 80%, and 62.4% of fatty acid component with 12.5% of CMO, and control group D (starch 100%). The pain intensity, functional disability, and the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) were assessed for a 12-week ingestion period. Results: Compared to group D (n = 6), there were significant differences in pain score in group A (n = 7, P = 0.005) and group C (n = 7, P = 0.012), but not significant in group B (n = 6, P = 0.180). Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) score decreased significantly in groups A and C. The PGIC was positive in the majority (>50%) in groups A, B, and C, whereas negative in 83.3% in group D (control). Conclusion: CMO is effective in alleviating knee pain in persons with mild degree arthritis of the knee joint, at an effective dose of 62.4%. PMID:28248869

  9. The influence of below-knee compression garments on knee-joint proprioception.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Shashank; Driller, Matthew W; Masters, Rich S W

    2016-08-09

    The purpose of the study was to assess the influence of below-knee compression garments on proprioception accuracy under, information processing constraints designed to cause high or low conscious attention to the task. In a counterbalanced, single-blinded, crossover trial, 44 healthy participants (26 male/18 female) with a mean age of 22.7±6.9 years performed an active joint repositioning task using their nondominant and their dominant leg, with and without below-knee compression and with and without conducting a secondary task. Analysis of variance revealed no main effect of leg dominance and no interactions (p's>0.05). However, a main effect was evident for both compression (F1, 43=84.23, p<0.001, ηp(2)=0.665) and secondary task (F1, 43=4.391, p=0.04, ηp(2)=0.093). The study is the first to evaluate the effects of a belowknee compression garment on knee proprioception under differential information processing constraints. We conclude that proprioception accuracy of the knee joint is significantly enhanced post application of below-knee compression garments and when a secondary task is conducted concurrently with active joint repositioning. The findings suggest that below-knee compression garments may improve proprioception of the knee, regardless of leg dominance, and that secondary tasks that direct attention away from proprioceptive judgments may also improve proprioception, regardless of the presence of compression. Clinical implications are discussed with respect to proprioception in modern.sports and rehabilitation settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex Differences in Proximal Control of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Ford, Kevin R.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Following the onset of maturation, female athletes have a significantly higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared with male athletes. While multiple sex differences in lower-extremity neuromuscular control and biomechanics have been identified as potential risk factors for ACL injury in females, the majority of these studies have focused specifically on the knee joint. However, increasing evidence in the literature indicates that lumbopelvic (core) control may have a large effect on knee-joint control and injury risk. This review examines the published evidence on the contributions of the trunk and hip to knee-joint control. Specifically, the sex differences in potential proximal controllers of the knee as risk factors for ACL injury are identified and discussed. Sex differences in trunk and hip biomechanics have been identified in all planes of motion (sagittal, coronal and transverse). Essentially, female athletes show greater lateral trunk displacement, altered trunk and hip flexion angles, greater ranges of trunk motion, and increased hip adduction and internal rotation during sport manoeuvres, compared with their male counterparts. These differences may increase the risk of ACL injury among female athletes. Prevention programmes targeted towards trunk and hip neuromuscular control may decrease the risk for ACL injuries. PMID:21688868

  11. Injury tolerance and moment response of the knee joint to combined valgus bending and shear loading.

    PubMed

    Bose, Dipan; Bhalla, Kavi S; Untaroiu, Costin D; Ivarsson, B Johan; Crandall, Jeff R; Hurwitz, Shepard

    2008-06-01

    Valgus bending and shearing of the knee have been identified as primary mechanisms of injuries in a lateral loading environment applicable to pedestrian-car collisions. Previous studies have reported on the structural response of the knee joint to pure valgus bending and lateral shearing, as well as the estimated injury thresholds for the knee bending angle and shear displacement based on experimental tests. However, epidemiological studies indicate that most knee injuries are due to the combined effects of bending and shear loading. Therefore, characterization of knee stiffness for combined loading and the associated injury tolerances is necessary for developing vehicle countermeasures to mitigate pedestrian injuries. Isolated knee joint specimens (n=40) from postmortem human subjects were tested in valgus bending at a loading rate representative of a pedestrian-car impact. The effect of lateral shear force combined with the bending moment on the stiffness response and the injury tolerances of the knee was concurrently evaluated. In addition to the knee moment-angle response, the bending angle and shear displacement corresponding to the first instance of primary ligament failure were determined in each test. The failure displacements were subsequently used to estimate an injury threshold function based on a simplified analytical model of the knee. The validity of the determined injury threshold function was subsequently verified using a finite element model. Post-test necropsy of the knees indicated medial collateral ligament injury consistent with the clinical injuries observed in pedestrian victims. The moment-angle response in valgus bending was determined at quasistatic and dynamic loading rates and compared to previously published test data. The peak bending moment values scaled to an average adult male showed no significant change with variation in the superimposed shear load. An injury threshold function for the knee in terms of bending angle and shear

  12. Effect of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of knee joint load in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Madden, Elizabeth G; Kean, Crystal O; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of the knee adduction moment (KAM) and pain in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 30 individuals (mean (SD): age, 61 (7) yr; 15 (50%) male) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA under three walking conditions in a randomized order: i) wearing rocker-soled shoes (Skechers Shape-ups), ii) wearing non-rocker-soled shoes (ASICS walking shoes), and iii) barefoot. Peak KAM and KAM angular impulse were measured as primary indicators of knee load distribution. Secondary measures included the knee flexion moment (KFM) and knee pain during walking. Peak KAM was significantly lower when wearing the rocker-soled shoes compared with that when wearing the non-rocker-soled shoes (mean difference (95% confidence interval), -0.27 (-0.42 to -0.12) N·m/BW × Ht%; P < 0.001). Post hoc tests revealed no significant difference in KAM impulse between rocker-soled and non-rocker-soled shoe conditions (P = 0.13). Both peak KAM and KAM impulse were significantly higher during both shoe conditions compared with those during the barefoot condition (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in KFM (P = 0.36) or knee pain (P = 0.89) between conditions. Rocker-soled shoes significantly reduced peak KAM when compared with non-rocker-soled shoes, without a concomitant change in KFM, and thus may potentially reduce medial knee joint loading. However, KAM parameters in the rocker-soled shoes remained significantly higher than those during barefoot walking. Wearing rocker-soled shoes did not have a significant immediate effect on walking pain. Further research is required to evaluate whether rocker-soled shoes can influence symptoms and progression of knee OA with prolonged wear.

  13. Knee joint distraction compared with total knee arthroplasty: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, J A D; Wiegant, K; van Heerwaarden, R J; Spruijt, S; Emans, P J; Mastbergen, S C; Lafeber, F P J G

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint distraction (KJD) is a relatively new, knee-joint preserving procedure with the goal of delaying total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in young and middle-aged patients. We present a randomised controlled trial comparing the two. The 60 patients ≤ 65 years with end-stage knee osteoarthritis were randomised to either KJD (n = 20) or TKA (n = 40). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, three, six, nine, and 12 months. In the KJD group, the joint space width (JSW) was radiologically assessed, representing a surrogate marker of cartilage thickness. In total 56 patients completed their allocated treatment (TKA = 36, KJD = 20). All patient reported outcome measures improved significantly over one year (p < 0.02) in both groups. At one year, the TKA group showed a greater improvement in only one of the 16 patient-related outcome measures assessed (p = 0.034). Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-Osteoarthritis Research Society International clinical response was 83% after TKA and 80% after KJD. A total of 12 patients (60%) in the KJD group sustained pin track infections. In the KJD group both mean minimum (0.9 mm, standard deviation (sd) 1.1) and mean JSW (1.2 mm, sd 1.1) increased significantly (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003). In relatively young patients with end-stage knee osteoarthritis, KJD did not demonstrate inferiority of outcomes at one year when compared with TKA. However, there is a high incidence of pin track infection associated with KJD. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:51-8. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer; Olsen, Marie; Bandholm, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were obtained using a universal goniometer and a tape measure, respectively. To establish reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and smallest real difference (SRD) were calculated. The knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were generally reliable (ICC > 0.8) within and between physiotherapists (except passive knee extension). Changes in knee joint ROM of more than 6.6 degrees and 10 degrees (except active knee flexion) and knee joint circumference of more than 1.0 cm and 1.63 cm represent a real clinical improvement (SRD) or deterioration for a single individual within and between physiotherapists, respectively. Generally, the experienced tester recorded larger knee joint ROM and lower circumference values than that of the inexperienced tester. In clinical practice, we suggest that repeated knee goniometric and circumferential measurements should be recorded by the same physiotherapist in individual patients with TKA. Tester experience appears not to influence the degree of reliability. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Ultrasonographic depiction of knee joint alterations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ossandon, A; Iagnocco, A; Alessandri, C; Priori, R; Conti, F; Valesini, G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess inflammatory changes within the knee joint of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by using ultrasound (US). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthy subjects (HS) were evaluated as controls. US findings were correlated with disease activity parameters. Twenty-six SLE patients were enrolled in the study, 25 RA patients and 15 HS were selected as controls. US was performed by two different experienced operators, using an Agilent-HP Image point Hx machine equipped with a 10 MHz linear transducer. Power Doppler (PD) was used to determine local synovial perfusion (PFR 700-1100 Hz; gain 60-65dB; low filter). Knee joints were examined bilaterally. US findings, expressed after consensus of the 2 operators, were correlated to clinical and serological parameters of disease activity. Statistical analysis was performed by the EPISTAT program. In SLE, synovitis was found in 21 knees (40%), joint effusion in 12 (23%), synovial proliferation in 12 (23%), positive PD signal in 5 (10%) and gastrocnemius-semimembranosus bursitis in 5 (10%). No erosions were detected. There was a significant difference respect to RA for synovitis (p<0.003), synovial proliferation (p<0.002) and positive PD signal (p<0.01). No correlation was found between US alterations and SLE disease activity parameters. In the HS group 1 patient showed mild synovial proliferation. This is the first study that investigates knee joint involvement in SLE by ultrasonography. US was able to depict inflammatory alterations in the articular tissues of SLE patients, revealing some common characteristics with RA, except for the presence of erosions. We believe that US might be of help in the global evaluation of SLE patients with inflammatory joint involvement, providing relevant information to the clinician.

  16. Fatigue Effects on Knee Joint Stability During Two Jump Tasks in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexis; Olson, Sharon L.; Etnyre, Bruce; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine E.; Bartlett, William; Venegas-Rios, Heidi L.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic knee joint stability may be affected by the onset of metabolic fatigue during sports participation that could increase the risk for knee injury. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of metabolic fatigue on knee muscle activation, peak knee joint angles, and peak knee internal moments in young women during 2 jumping tasks. Fifteen women (mean age: 24.6 ± 2.6 years) participated in one nonfatigued session and one fatigued session. During both sessions, peak knee landing flexion and valgus joint angles, peak knee extension and varus/valgus internal moments, electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and quadriceps/hamstring EMG cocontraction ratio were measured. The tasks consisted of a single-legged drop jump from a 40-cm box and a 20-cm, up-down, repeated hop task. The fatigued session included a Wingate anaerobic protocol followed by performance of the 2 tasks. Although participants exhibited greater knee injury–predisposing factors during the fatigued session, such as lesser knee flexion joint angles, greater knee valgus joint angles, and greater varus/valgus internal joint moments for both tasks, only knee flexion during the up-down task was statistically significant (p = 0.028). Metabolic fatigue may perhaps predispose young women to knee injuries by impairing dynamic knee joint stability. Training strength-endurance components and the ability to maintain control of body movements in either rested or fatigued situations might help reduce injuries in young women athletes. PMID:20300024

  17. Fatigue effects on knee joint stability during two jump tasks in women.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexis; Olson, Sharon L; Etnyre, Bruce; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine E; Bartlett, William; Venegas-Rios, Heidi L

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic knee joint stability may be affected by the onset of metabolic fatigue during sports participation that could increase the risk for knee injury. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of metabolic fatigue on knee muscle activation, peak knee joint angles, and peak knee internal moments in young women during 2 jumping tasks. Fifteen women (mean age: 24.6 +/- 2.6 years) participated in one nonfatigued session and one fatigued session. During both sessions, peak knee landing flexion and valgus joint angles, peak knee extension and varus/valgus internal moments, electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and quadriceps/hamstring EMG cocontraction ratio were measured. The tasks consisted of a single-legged drop jump from a 40-cm box and a 20-cm, up-down, repeated hop task. The fatigued session included a Wingate anaerobic protocol followed by performance of the 2 tasks. Although participants exhibited greater knee injury-predisposing factors during the fatigued session, such as lesser knee flexion joint angles, greater knee valgus joint angles, and greater varus/valgus internal joint moments for both tasks, only knee flexion during the up-down task was statistically significant (p = 0.028). Metabolic fatigue may perhaps predispose young women to knee injuries by impairing dynamic knee joint stability. Training strength-endurance components and the ability to maintain control of body movements in either rested or fatigued situations might help reduce injuries in young women athletes.

  18. Ultrasonographic evaluation of knee joint cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Batalov, A Z; Kuzmanova, S I; Penev, D P

    2000-01-01

    The non-invasive methods used to study joint cartilage are restricted in their scope. No direct visualization of the joint cartilage is possible in conventional radiology and tomography and the decrease in joint space is only indirect evidence for joint destruction. CT is a radiologic method for direct visualization of joint cartilage but its diagnostic precision in the evaluation of early cartilage lesions is limited because it can not produce an image in a plane other than the transversal plane perpendicular to the direction of the main axis of the body and because it has limited spatial resolution. Other methods for direct visualization of joint cartilage are arthrography and arthroscopy which are little used in clinical practice because of their invasiveness and limited indications. MRI is a promising technique but its usage is limited by the high price and limited accessibility. Our object in the present study was to evaluate the significance of arthro-sonography in the diagnosis of early arthritic lesions of knee cartilage, based on the ultrasonographic assessment of the joint surface and cartilage thickness. Femoral cartilage was our choice for the study as there is statistically well documented high incidence of early arthritic changes in this area; moreover, the area is easily accessible for ultrasound evaluation using a scan perpendicular to the articular surface, incl. the cases with complete flexion of the knee joint, where the pressure areas of the condyles are apositioned to the tibial plateau. Using a 7.5 MHz transducer we managed to measure and document early arthritic changes in joint thickness and the contour of the joint surfaces before they can be detected using routine radiologic methods.

  19. Role of Agnikarma in Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint)

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Nilesh G.; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sandhigata Vata is one of Vata Vyadhi characterized by the symptoms such as Sandhishoola (joint pain) and Sandhishopha (swelling of joint). Osteoarthritis (OA) is degenerative joint disorder, represents failure of the diarthrodial (movable, synovial-lined) joint. OA of knee joint comes under the inflammatory group which is almost identical to Sandhigata Vata described in Ayurveda with respect to etiology, pathology, and clinical features. Agnikarma (therapeutic heat burn) is one which gives instant relief from pain by balancing local Vata and Kapha Dosha without any untoward effects. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of Agnikarma with Rajata and Loha Dhatu Shalaka in the management of Janugata Sandhivata (OA of knee joint). Materials and Methods: A total of 28 diagnosed patients of Janugata Sandhivata were registered and randomly divided into two groups. In Group-A, Agnikarma was done with Rajata Shalaka while in Group-B Agnikarma was performed by Loha Shalaka in four sittings. Assessment in relief of signs and symptoms was done by weekly interval, and Student's t-test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: Group-A provided 76.31% relief in pain while Group-B provided 83.77% relief. Relief from crepitus was observed in 57.13% of patients of Group-A, while 57.92% of patients of Group-B. There was statistically insignificant difference between both the groups. Loha Shalaka provided better result in pain relief than Rajata Shalaka. Conclusion: Agnikarma is effective nonpharmacological, parasurgical procedure for pain management in Sandhigata Vata (OA of knee joint). PMID:26730134

  20. [Dynamic loads at knee joint of trans-tibial amputee on different terrains].

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Rencheng

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic loads at knee joint of amputee are fundamental for rehabilitation of knee injury and prosthesis design. In this paper, a 3-D model for calculation of dynamic load at knee joint of trans-tibial amputee was developed. Gait analysis was done on three terrains including normal level walking, upstairs and downstairs. Dynamic loads at knee joint were calculated during one gait cycle. The results show that gait patterns and dynamic loads at knee joint were different among these three terrains. Although the general waveforms were about the same, the motion range of knee joint, ground reaction forces and loads at knee joint when walking upstairs or downstairs were larger than those in a normal level walking. The quantitative findings provide the theoretical basis of gait analysis and prosthesis design for trans-tibial amputee.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of dried synovial fluid droplets as a rapid diagnostic for knee joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2008-02-01

    Human synovial fluid droplets were investigated using drop deposition in combination with Raman spectroscopy. Following informed consent, synovial fluid was obtained from forty human patients with various severities of knee pain and/or osteoarthritis at the time of knee arthroscopy or total joint replacement. Synovial fluid was aspirated from the knee joint of each patient and stored at -80°C until examination by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Synovial fluid aspirates from the knee joint of each patient were deposited onto a clean fused silica microscope slide and the droplet dried under ambient laboratory conditions. Each droplet was illuminated by a line-focused or a ring-focused 785 nm laser. As the droplet dries, biofluid components segregated based on solubility differences and a deposit that is spatially heterogeneous was made. Spectra taken from the droplet edges and center were dominated by protein bands and showed the presence of at least two protein moieties in the droplet. Band area and band height ratios (1410 cm -1/1450 cm -1) showed the greatest change between specimens from patients with mild/early osteoarthritis compared to those with severe/late stage osteoarthritis. The greatest differences were found in the center of the droplet, which contains more soluble protein components than the edges.

  2. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome with knee joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takehiko; Masumoto, Natsuko; Sonoda, Motoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuno, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) involves cutaneous vascular malformation characterized by multiple venous malformations. This commonly affects the skin and gastrointestinal tract. BRBNS is associated with anemia and occasionally involves orthopedic manifestations. A 6-year-old boy was referred to hospital for evaluation of anemia. He presented with a rubber-like soft-tissue mass in the left knee and the right side of the neck, recurrent pain, and fixed flexion contracture of the knee. Blood examination indicated consumption coagulopathy and anemia caused by not only iron-deficiency anemia but also microangiopathy. Endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract indicated multiple bluish-black sessile venous malformations. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the knee showed intra-articular and intramuscular involvement. Based on these findings, BRBNS with knee joint disorder was diagnosed. With regard to vascular malformations, like other diseases such as inflammatory arthropathy, ultrasonography of the joint may become a new diagnostic approach for evaluating orthopedic manifestations. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Designing prosthetic knee joints with bio-inspired bearing surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Mingfeng; Chyr, Anthony; Sanders, Anthony P.; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that articular cartilage exhibits a surface microtexture with shallow indentations. By contrast, prosthetic joints consist of ultra-smooth bearing surfaces, the longevity of which does not reach that of natural cartilage. We show that adding a microtexture to the smooth femoral component of a prosthetic knee joint reduces friction by increasing the lubricant film thickness between the bearing surfaces of the knee. We have implemented an elastohydrodynamic lubrication model to optimize the geometry of the microtexture, while taking into account the deformation of the polyethylene tibial insert. We have manufactured several microtexture designs on a surrogate femoral component, and experimentally demonstrate that the microtexture reduces friction between the surrogate femoral component and tibial insert. PMID:25049441

  4. Designing prosthetic knee joints with bio-inspired bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingfeng; Chyr, Anthony; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known that articular cartilage exhibits a surface microtexture with shallow indentations. By contrast, prosthetic joints consist of ultra-smooth bearing surfaces, the longevity of which does not reach that of natural cartilage. We show that adding a microtexture to the smooth femoral component of a prosthetic knee joint reduces friction by increasing the lubricant film thickness between the bearing surfaces of the knee. We have implemented an elastohydrodynamic lubrication model to optimize the geometry of the microtexture, while taking into account the deformation of the polyethylene tibial insert. We have manufactured several microtexture designs on a surrogate femoral component, and experimentally demonstrate that the microtexture reduces friction between the surrogate femoral component and tibial insert.

  5. On the Role of the Patella, ACL and Joint Contact Forces in the Extension of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Cleather, Daniel J.; Southgate, Dominic F. L.; Bull, Anthony M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional descriptions of the knee suggest that the function of the patella is to facilitate knee extension by increasing the moment arm of the quadriceps muscles. Through modelling and evidence from the literature it is shown in this paper that the presence of the patella makes the ability of the quadriceps to rotate the thigh greater than their ability to rotate the tibia. Furthermore, this difference increases as the knee is flexed, thus demonstrating a pattern that is consistent with many human movements. This paper also shows that the anterior cruciate ligament plays a previously unheralded role in extending the shank and that translation at the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints is important in improving the capacity for thigh rotation when the knee is flexed. This study provides new insights as to how the structure of the knee is adapted to its purpose and illustrates how the functional anatomy of the knee contributes to its extension function. PMID:25536067

  6. Knee joint changes in patients with neglected developmental hip dysplasia: a prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiwei; Kadhim, Muayad; Zhang, Lijun; Cheng, Xiangjun; Zhao, Qun; Li, Lianyong

    2014-12-01

    Few reports are available describing knee changes in neglected developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiographic morphology of knee joints in adults with neglected DDH. Thirty-seven patients (35 females and two males) with neglected DDH were prospectively recruited with an average age of 32.6 years. Twenty-three patients had unilateral and 14 patients had bilateral neglected DDH. Thirty-seven healthy individuals were recruited to form a matched control group. Three groups of knee joints were examined: affected knees (on the same side of the neglected DDH), unaffected knees (contralateral to the neglected DDH in patients with unilateral involvement), and control knees. A series of radiographic parameters of the knee joint were measured in the coronal and sagittal plane, and they were compared between patients and normal controls. In the coronal plane, the affected knees had increased valgus angulation related to increased height of the medial femoral condyle, decreased height of the lateral femoral condyle and decreased lateral distal femoral angle compared to control knees. In the sagittal plane, both distal femoral and proximal tibial joints of the affected knees developed a decrease in posterior angles. Additionally, the unaffected knees also developed radiographic changes compared to control knees. Patients with neglected DDH may develop changes in both knee joints. These changes should be considered during surgery to the hip, femur and knee to prevent potential complications. Level 2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The reliability of knee joint position testing using electrogoniometry

    PubMed Central

    Piriyaprasarth, Pagamas; Morris, Meg E; Winter, Adele; Bialocerkowski, Andrea E

    2008-01-01

    Background The current investigation examined the inter- and intra-tester reliability of knee joint angle measurements using a flexible Penny and Giles Biometric® electrogoniometer. The clinical utility of electrogoniometry was also addressed. Methods The first study examined the inter- and intra-tester reliability of measurements of knee joint angles in supine, sitting and standing in 35 healthy adults. The second study evaluated inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of knee joint angle measurements in standing and after walking 10 metres in 20 healthy adults, using an enhanced measurement protocol with a more detailed electrogoniometer attachment procedure. Both inter-tester reliability studies involved two testers. Results In the first study, inter-tester reliability (ICC[2,10]) ranged from 0.58–0.71 in supine, 0.68–0.79 in sitting and 0.57–0.80 in standing. The standard error of measurement between testers was less than 3.55° and the limits of agreement ranged from -12.51° to 12.21°. Reliability coefficients for intra-tester reliability (ICC[3,10]) ranged from 0.75–0.76 in supine, 0.86–0.87 in sitting and 0.87–0.88 in standing. The standard error of measurement for repeated measures by the same tester was less than 1.7° and the limits of agreement ranged from -8.13° to 7.90°. The second study showed that using a more detailed electrogoniometer attachment protocol reduced the error of measurement between testers to 0.5°. Conclusion Using a standardised protocol, reliable measures of knee joint angles can be gained in standing, supine and sitting by using a flexible goniometer. PMID:18211714

  8. The effect of foot progression angle on knee joint compression force during walking.

    PubMed

    Koblauch, Henrik; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Henriksen, Marius

    2013-06-01

    It is unclear how rotations of the lower limb affect the knee joint compression forces during walking. Increases in the frontal plane knee moment have been reported when walking with internally rotated feet and a decrease when walking with externally rotated feet. The aim of this study was to investigate the knee joint compressive forces during walking with internal, external and normal foot rotation and to determine if the frontal plane knee joint moment is an adequate surrogate for the compression forces in the medial and lateral knee joint compartments under such gait modifications. Ten healthy males walked at a fixed speed of 4.5 km/h under three conditions: Normal walking, internally rotated and externally rotated. All gait trials were recorded by six infrared cameras. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. The results revealed that the medial knee joint compartment compression force increased during external foot rotation and the lateral knee joint compartment compression force increased during internal foot rotation. The increases in joint loads may be a result of increased knee flexion angles. Further, these data suggest that the frontal plane knee joint moment is not a valid surrogate measure for knee joint compression forces but rather indicates the medial- to-lateral load distribution.

  9. Is it possible to reduce the knee joint compression force during level walking with hiking poles?

    PubMed

    Jensen, S B; Henriksen, M; Aaboe, J; Hansen, L; Simonsen, E B; Alkjaer, T

    2011-12-01

    Walking with hiking poles has become a popular way of exercising. Walking with poles is advocated as a physical activity that significantly reduces the loading of the hip, knee and ankle joints. We have previously observed that pole walking does not lead to a reduction of the load on the knee joint. However, it is unclear whether an increased force transmitted through the poles can reduce the load on the knee joint. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate if an increased load transmitted through the arms to the poles could reduce the knee joint compression force during level walking with poles. We hypothesized that an increased pole force would result in a reduction of the knee joint compression force. Gait analyses from 10 healthy subjects walking with poles were obtained. The pole force was measured simultaneously during the gait analyses. The knee joint compression forces were estimated by using a biomechanical knee joint model. The results showed that the subjects were able to increase the pole force by 2.4 times the normal pole force. However, this did not lead to a reduction in the knee joint compressive force and we rejected our hypothesis. In conclusion, the use of poles during level walking does not seem to reduce knee joint compressive loads. However, it is possible that the use of poles in other populations (e.g. osteoarthritis patients) and in terrain would unload the knee joint. This should be investigated in the future.

  10. Delayed Computed Tomography Arthrography of Human Knee Cartilage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Aula, Antti S.; Kröger, Heikki; Suomalainen, Juha-Sampo; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mervaala, Esa; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the feasibility of delayed computed tomography (CT) arthrography for evaluation of human knee cartilage in vivo. Especially, the diffusion of contrast agent out of the joint space and the optimal time points for imaging were determined. Design: Two patients were imaged using delayed CT arthrography and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) techniques. Results: Two hours after injection, the concentration of contrast agent in the joint space was still high enough (20% to 24.5% of the initial concentration at 0 minutes) to allow delayed CT arthrography. The half-life of the contrast agent in the joint space varied from 30 to 60 minutes. The contrast agent concentration in patellar and femoral cartilage reached the maximum after 30 and 60 minutes, respectively. According to dGEMRIC, there were no differences between patients. However, in delayed CT arthrography, the penetration of the contrast agent was higher in the osteoarthritic knee cartilage. Conclusions: Contrast agent remained in the joint space long enough to enable delayed CT arthrography of cartilage. After 30 minutes, the normalized contrast agent concentration was higher in the cartilage of the osteoarthritic knee in comparison with the healthy knee. To conclude, delayed CT arthrography exhibited potential for use in the clinical evaluation of cartilage integrity. PMID:26069643

  11. Design and evaluation of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton for investigation of motor adaptation in lower extremity joints.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Cenciarini, Massimo; Adams, Albert A; Gregorczyk, Karen N; Schiffman, Jeffrey M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we describe the mechanical design and control scheme of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton intended to investigate the biomechanical behavior of the knee joint during interaction with externally applied impedances. As the human knee behaves much like a linear spring during the stance phase of normal walking gait, the exoskeleton implements a spring across the knee in the weight acceptance (WA) phase of the gait while allowing free motion throughout the rest of the gait cycle, accomplished via an electromechanical clutch. The stiffness of the device is able to be varied by swapping springs, and the timing of engagement/disengagement changed to accommodate different loading profiles. After describing the design and control, we validate the mechanical performance and reliability of the exoskeleton through cyclic testing on a mechanical knee simulator. We then describe a preliminary experiment on three healthy adults to evaluate the functionality of the device on both left and right legs. The kinetic and kinematic analyses of these subjects show that the exoskeleton assistance can partially/fully replace the function of the knee joint and obtain nearly invariant moment and angle profiles for the hip and ankle joints, and the overall knee joint and exoskeleton complex under the applied moments of the exoskeleton versus the control condition, implying that the subjects undergo a considerable amount of motor adaptation in their lower extremities to the exoskeletal impedances, and encouraging more in-depth future experiments with the device.

  12. Who should have knee joint replacement surgery for osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Dieppe, Paul; Lim, Keith; Lohmander, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10-20% of people who have this surgery are unhappy with the outcome, and have persistent pain. In this article we briefly discuss the variations in utilization of knee joint replacement, and then outline four different approaches to the selection and prioritisation of patients for this procedure. Consensus criteria, including appropriateness criteria are available, but if produced by professionals alone, they may conflict with the views of patients and the public. Databases and cohort studies can be used to attempt relating outcomes to baseline characteristics, but at present we can only account for a small percentage of the variance with this technique. Finally, we propose use of the 'capacity to benefit framework' to attempt providing guidance to both patients and healthcare professionals.

  13. Auditory display of knee-joint vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Sridhar; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bell, G. Douglas; Frank, Cyril B.

    2001-12-01

    Sounds generated due to rubbing of knee-joint surfaces may lead to a potential tool for noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage degeneration. In the work reported in the present paper, an attempt is made to perform computer-assisted auscultation of knee joints by auditory display (AD) of vibration signals (also known as vibroarthrographic or VAG signals) emitted during active movement of the leg. Two types of AD methods are considered: audification and sonification. In audification, the VAG signals are scaled in time and frequency using a time-frequency distribution to facilitate aural analysis. In sonification, the instantaneous mean frequency and envelope of the VAG signals are derived and used to synthesize sounds that are expected to facilitate more accurate diagnosis than the original signals by improving their aural quality. Auditory classification experiments were performed by two orthopedic surgeons with 37 VAG signals including 19 normal and 18 abnormal cases. Sensitivity values (correct detection of abnormality) of 31%, 44%, and 83%, and overall classification accuracies of 53%, 40%, and 57% were obtained with the direct playback, audification, and sonification methods, respectively. The corresponding d' scores were estimated to be 1.10, -0.36, and 0.55. The high sensitivity of the sonification method indicates that the technique could lead to improved detection of knee-joint abnormalities; however, additional work is required to improve its specificity and achieve better overall performance.

  14. Design, analysis and verification of a knee joint oncological prosthesis finite element model.

    PubMed

    Zach, Lukáš; Kunčická, Lenka; Růžička, Pavel; Kocich, Radim

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to design a finite element model for a hinged PROSPON oncological knee endoprosthesis and to verify the model by comparison with ankle flexion angle using knee-bending experimental data obtained previously. Visible Human Project CT scans were used to create a general lower extremity bones model and to compose a 3D CAD knee joint model to which muscles and ligaments were added. Into the assembly the designed finite element PROSPON prosthesis model was integrated and an analysis focused on the PEEK-OPTIMA hinge pin bushing stress state was carried out. To confirm the stress state analysis results, contact pressure was investigated. The analysis was performed in the knee-bending position within 15.4-69.4° hip joint flexion range. The results showed that the maximum stress achieved during the analysis (46.6 MPa) did not exceed the yield strength of the material (90 MPa); the condition of plastic stability was therefore met. The stress state analysis results were confirmed by the distribution of contact pressure during knee-bending. The applicability of our designed finite element model for the real implant behaviour prediction was proven on the basis of good correlation of the analytical and experimental ankle flexion angle data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glass foreign bodies inside the knee joint following intra-articular injection.

    PubMed

    Hafez, M A; Al-Dars, A M

    2012-01-01

    Foreign bodies inside the knee joint are not uncommon. However, the literature has no reports of a foreign body inside the knee joint, with no history of trauma. Glass foreign bodies were found embedded inside the knee joint during arthroscopic washout for a middle aged male patient with knee osteoarthritis. The patient had no history of trauma and no scars or sign of entry of foreign bodies. It was found that these foreign bodies originated from glass vials broken while withdrawing medication for intra-articular injection of this knee in the past. To avoid similar incidents, the authors recommend using filter needles to withdraw medications from glass vials.

  16. Effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Tae; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. [Methods] The repositioning error of the knee joint was measured using a digital goniometer when the subjects extended their dominant-side knee to a random target angle (30°, 45°, or 60°) with their eyes closed, before and after a quadriceps muscle fatigue protocol, and after application of kinesiology tape. [Results] We found that repositioning errors of the dominant-side knee joint increased after quadriceps fatigue compared with no-fatigue conditions. However, kinesiology taping of the quadriceps muscle and patella after quadriceps fatigue significantly decreased repositioning errors of the knee joint. [Conclusion] These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue increases the repositioning error of the knee joint, whereas application of kinesiology tape decreases fatigue-induced joint repositioning error.

  17. Calculating the Position of the Joint Line of the Knee Using Anatomical Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gavin C; von Kaeppler, Ericka; Alaia, Michael J; Montini, Kenneth; Lopez, Matthew J; Di Cesare, Paul E; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2016-11-01

    Restoration of the joint line of the knee during primary and revision total knee arthroplasty is a step that directly influences patient outcomes. In revision total knee arthroplasty, necessary bony landmarks may be missing or obscured, so there remains a lack of consensus on how to accurately identify and restore the joint line of the knee. In this study, 50 magnetic resonance images of normal knees were analyzed to determine a quantitative relationship between the joint line of the knee and 6 bony landmarks: medial and lateral femoral epicondyles, medial and lateral femoral metaphyseal flares, tibial tubercle, and proximal tibio-fibular joint. Wide variability was found in the absolute distance from each landmark to the joint line of the knee, including significant differences between the sexes. Normalization of the absolute distances to femoral or tibial diameters revealed reliable spatial relationships to the joint line of the knee. The joint line was found to be equidistant from the lateral femoral epicondyle and the proximal tibio-fibular joint, representing a reproducible point of reference for joint line restoration. The authors propose a simple 3-step algorithm that can be used with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, or radiography to reliably determine the anatomical location of the joint line of the knee relative to the surrounding bony anatomy. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):381-386.].

  18. Is latero-medial patellar mobility related to the range of motion of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Ota, Susumu; Nakashima, Takeshi; Morisaka, Ayako; Omachi, Takaaki; Ida, Kunio; Kawamura, Morio

    2010-12-01

    Diminished range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is thought to be related to reduced patellar mobility. This has not been confirmed clinically due to a lack of quantitative methods adequate for measuring patellar mobility. We investigated the relationship between patellar mobility by a reported quantitative method and knee joint ROM after TKA. Forty-nine patients [osteoarthritis--OA: 29 knees; rheumatoid arthritis--RA: 20 knees] were examined after TKA. Respective medial and lateral patellar mobility was measured 1 and 6 months postoperatively using a patellofemoral arthrometer (PFA). Knee joint ROM was also measured in each of those 2 sessions. Although the flexion and extension of the knee joints improved significantly from 1 to 6 months after TKA, the medial and lateral patellar displacements (LPDs) failed to improve during that same period. Moreover, only the changes in knee flexion and medial patellar displacement (MPD) between the two sessions were positively correlated (r = 0.31, p < 0.05). However, our findings demonstrated that medial and lateral patellar mobility had no sufficient longitudinal relationship with knee ROM after TKA.

  19. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  20. A Novel Method of Evaluating Knee Joint Stability of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Multiscale Entropy Analysis with A Knee-Aiming Task.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Diange; Zhang, Shijie; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Long; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-03-23

    Deteriorating knee stability is a local risk factor that reflects the occurrence and aggregative of osteoarthritis (OA). Despite the many biomechanics-based methods for assessing the structural stability of knee joints in clinics, these methods have many limitations. The stability of the knee joint relies on not only biomechanical factors, but also proprioception and the central nervous system. In this study, we attempt to depict the stability of knee joint from a holistic viewpoint, and a novel index of knee joint stability (IKJS) was thus extracted. We compared the differences of IKJS in 57 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with OA before and after total knee replacement (TKR). Analysis of Variance results demonstrated that there existed significant differences in IKJS among the three participating groups (<0.0001). Also, the IKJS of the operated leg in patients with knee OA increased remarkably after TKR (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the results of the experiment suggested that the IKJS has sufficient reproducibility (ICC = 0.80). In conclusion, the proposed IKJS that employs the knee-aiming task is feasible for quantitatively determining knee stability. It can provide a potentially valuable and convenient tool to evaluate the effect of postoperative rehabilitation for patients with knee OA.

  1. Interlimb symmetry of dynamic knee joint stiffness and co-contraction is maintained in early stage knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A.T.; Richardson, R.T.; Higginson, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with knee OA often exhibit greater co-contraction of antagonistic muscle groups surrounding the affected joint which may lead to increases in dynamic joint stiffness. These detrimental changes in the symptomatic limb may also exist in the contralateral limb, thus contributing to its risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interlimb symmetry of dynamic knee joint stiffness and muscular co-contraction in knee osteoarthritis. Muscular co-contraction and dynamic knee joint stiffness were assessed in 17 subjects with mild to moderate unilateral medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and 17 healthy control subjects while walking at a controlled speed (1.0 m/s). Paired and independent t-tests determined whether significant differences exist between groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in dynamic joint stiffness or co-contraction between the OA symptomatic and OA contralateral group (p = 0.247, p = 0.874, respectively) or between the OA contralateral and healthy group (p = 0.635, p = 0.078, respectively). There was no significant difference in stiffness between the OA symptomatic and healthy group (p = 0.600); however, there was a slight trend toward enhanced co-contraction in the symptomatic knees compared to the healthy group (p = 0.051). Subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis maintain symmetric control strategies during gait. PMID:24768278

  2. Interlimb symmetry of dynamic knee joint stiffness and co-contraction is maintained in early stage knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Collins, A T; Richardson, R T; Higginson, J S

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with knee OA often exhibit greater co-contraction of antagonistic muscle groups surrounding the affected joint which may lead to increases in dynamic joint stiffness. These detrimental changes in the symptomatic limb may also exist in the contralateral limb, thus contributing to its risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the interlimb symmetry of dynamic knee joint stiffness and muscular co-contraction in knee osteoarthritis. Muscular co-contraction and dynamic knee joint stiffness were assessed in 17 subjects with mild to moderate unilateral medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and 17 healthy control subjects while walking at a controlled speed (1.0m/s). Paired and independent t-tests determined whether significant differences exist between groups (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in dynamic joint stiffness or co-contraction between the OA symptomatic and OA contralateral group (p=0.247, p=0.874, respectively) or between the OA contralateral and healthy group (p=0.635, p=0.078, respectively). There was no significant difference in stiffness between the OA symptomatic and healthy group (p=0.600); however, there was a slight trend toward enhanced co-contraction in the symptomatic knees compared to the healthy group (p=0.051). Subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis maintain symmetric control strategies during gait.

  3. Automated planning of MRI scans of knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystrov, Daniel; Pekar, Vladimir; Young, Stewart; Dries, Sebastian P. M.; Heese, Harald S.; van Muiswinkel, Arianne M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel and robust method for automatic scan planning of MRI examinations of knee joints is presented. Clinical knee examinations require acquisition of a 'scout' image, in which the operator manually specifies the scan volume orientations (off-centres, angulations, field-of-view) for the subsequent diagnostic scans. This planning task is time-consuming and requires skilled operators. The proposed automated planning system determines orientations for the diagnostic scan by using a set of anatomical landmarks derived by adapting active shape models of the femur, patella and tibia to the acquired scout images. The expert knowledge required to position scan geometries is learned from previous manually planned scans, allowing individual preferences to be taken into account. The system is able to automatically discriminate between left and right knees. This allows to use and merge training data from both left and right knees, and to automatically transform all learned scan geometries to the side for which a plan is required, providing a convenient integration of the automated scan planning system in the clinical routine. Assessment of the method on the basis of 88 images from 31 different individuals, exhibiting strong anatomical and positional variability demonstrates success, robustness and efficiency of all parts of the proposed approach, which thus has the potential to significantly improve the clinical workflow.

  4. Knee joint functional range of movement prior to and following total knee arthroplasty measured using flexible electrogoniometry.

    PubMed

    Myles, Christine M; Rowe, Philip J; Walker, Colin R C; Nutton, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    The functional ranges of movement of the knee were investigated in a group of patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 42, mean age 70 years) before, 4 months and at 18-24 months after total knee arthroplasty and then compared with age matched normal subjects (n = 20, mean age 67 years). Flexible electrogoniometry was used to record the maximum flexion-extension angle, the minimum flexion-extension angle and flexion-extension excursions of both knees during eleven functional activities along with the active and passive knee joint range of motion measured using a manual goniometer. Over the eleven functional activities the patients pre-operatively exhibited 28% less knee joint excursion than normal age matched subjects. By 18-24 months following total knee arthroplasty only 2% of this deficit was recovered. Statistically this recovery was only significant in level walking, slope ascent and slope descent. A greater range of movement was measured in a non-weight bearing position than was used in weight bearing functional activity. It is concluded that total knee arthroplasty gives rise to little improvement in knee motion during functional activities and that functional range of movement of the knee remains limited when compared to normal knee function for a minimum of 18 months following operation.

  5. Type II collagen fragment HELIX-II is a marker for early cartilage lesions but does not predict the progression of cartilage destruction in human knee joint synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaochun; Yin, Kun; Li, Pengcui; Wang, Huan; Ding, Juan; Duan, Wangping; Wei, Lei

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether there is a direct correlation between the concentration of type II collagen fragment HELIX-II in synovial fluid and the severity of cartilage damage at the knee joint, 83 patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or total knee replacement were enrolled in this study (49% women, mean ± SD age 49.5 ± 19). The content of HELIX-II in the synovial fluid samples was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cartilage damage at the knee joint was classified during arthroscopy or direct surgical observation, using the Outerbridge cartilage damage scoring system. The maximum damage score was defined as the highest score among the six areas of the knee joint, and the cumulative score was defined as the sum of the scores of the six areas of the knee joint. The intra-assay and inter-assay variations of the HELIX-II ELISA were lower than 13 and 15%, respectively. The level of HELIX-II in the severely damaged cartilage groups (cumulative scores = 11-24 or maximum score = 2-4) was much higher than in the slightly damaged cartilage groups (cumulative scores = 0-10 or maximum score = 0-1). The level of HELIX-II in cartilage from severely damaged cartilage groups was significantly higher than in the slightly damaged groups, but no significant difference was detected in the level of HELIX-II among the severely damaged cartilage sub-groups. There was a significant correlation between the HELIX-II concentration in the synovial fluid and the cumulative (r = 0.807) and maximum scores (r = 0.794). Thus, elevated HELIX-II level is correlated with early cartilage lesions, but does not have the sensitivity to predict the progression of severity of cartilage damage in the knee joint.

  6. The effect of knee joint angle on plantar flexor power in young and old men.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian H; Allen, Matti D; Power, Geoffrey A; Vandervoort, Anthony A; Rice, Charles L

    2014-04-01

    Human adult aging is associated with a loss of strength, contractile velocity and hence, power. The principal plantar flexors, consisting of the bi-articular gastrocnemeii and the mono-articular soleus, appear to be affected differently by the aging process. However, the age-related effect of knee joint angle on the torque-angular velocity relationship and power production of this functionally important muscle group is unknown. The purpose was to determine whether flexing the knee, thereby reducing the gastrocnemius contribution to plantar flexion, would exacerbate the age-related decrements in plantar flexion power, or shift the torque-angular velocity relationship differently in older compared with young men. Neuromuscular properties were recorded from 10 young (~25 y) and 10 old (~78 y) men with the knee extended (170°) and flexed (90°), in a randomized order. Participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs), followed by maximal velocity-dependent shortening contractions at pre-set loads, ranging from 15 to 75% MVC. The young men were ~20-25% stronger, ~12% faster and ~30% more powerful than the old for both knee angles (P<0.05). In both age groups, isometric MVC torque was ~17% greater in the extended than flexed knee position, with no differences in voluntary activation (>95%). The young men produced 7-12% faster angular velocities in the extended knee position for loads ≤30% MVC, but no differences at higher loads; whereas there were no detectable differences in angular velocity between knee positions in the old across all relative loads. For both knee angles, young men produced peak power at 43.3±9.0% MVC, whereas the old men produced peak power at 54.8±7.9% MVC. These data indicate that the young, who have faster contracting muscles compared with the old, can rely more on velocity than torque for generating maximal power. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Foot motion may alter the load on the medial tibiofemoral joint and hence affect the KAM. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and the KAM in people with medial compartment knee OA. Method Motion of the knee, tibia, rearfoot and forefoot and knee moments were evaluated in 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA, predominantly in the medial compartment. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between peak values of tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and 1st peak KAM, 2nd peak KAM, and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). Results Lateral tilt of the tibia was significantly associated with increased 1st peak KAM (r = 0.60, p < 0.001), 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.67, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.82, p = 0.001). Increased peak rearfoot eversion was significantly correlated with decreased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.50, p = 0.004). Decreased rearfoot internal rotation was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.44, p = 0.01) and KAAI (r = −0.38, p = 0.02), while decreased rearfoot internal rotation relative to the tibia was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.43, p = 0.01). Significant negative correlations were found between peak forefoot eversion relative to the rearfoot and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.53, p = 0.002) and KAAI (r = −0.51, p = 0.003) and between peak forefoot inversion and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.54, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = −0.48, p = 0.005). Conclusion Increased rearfoot

  8. Focal cartilage defect compromises fluid-pressure dependent load support in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Yaghoub; Li, LePing

    2015-06-01

    A focal cartilage defect involves tissue loss or rupture. Altered mechanics in the affected joint may play an essential role in the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to determine the compromised load support in the human knee joint during defect progression from the cartilage surface to the cartilage-bone interface. Ten normal and defect cases were simulated with a previously tested 3D finite element model of the knee. The focal defects were considered in both condyles within high load-bearing regions. Fluid pressurization, anisotropic fibril-reinforcement, and depth-dependent mechanical properties were considered for the articular cartilages and menisci. The results showed that a small cartilage defect could cause 25% reduction in the load support of the knee joint due to a reduced capacity of fluid pressurization in the defect cartilage. A partial-thickness defect could cause a fluid pressure decrease or increase in the remaining underlying cartilage depending on the defect depth. A cartilage defect also increased the shear strain at the cartilage-bone interface, which was more significant with a full-thickness defect. The effect of cartilage defect on the fluid pressurization also depended on the defect sites and contact conditions. In conclusion, a focal cartilage defect causes a fluid-pressure dependent load reallocation and a compromised load support in the joint, which depend on the defect depth, site, and contact condition.

  9. Effects of wearing ankle weight on knee joint repositioning sense in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooyoung; Jung, Daeun; Han, Jintae; Jung, Jaemin

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of different ankle weights on knee joint repositioning sense in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects were divided for assessment as follows: young (20-30 years, n=10) and elderly (60-70 years, n=11). Knee joint repositioning error was measured by asking the subjects to reposition the target angle of their knee joints while wearing different ankle weights (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) in an open kinetic chain. The Hawk Digital System (60 Hz; Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) was used to measure knee joint repositioning error. Differences in knee joint repositioning error between the young and elderly groups according to ankle weight load were examined by using two-way mixed repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The knee joint repositioning error was lower with than without ankle weights in both groups. The error value was lowest with the 1.0% weight, though not significantly. Knee joint repositioning error was significantly higher in the elderly under all the ankle weight conditions. [Conclusion] Knee joint repositioning sense can be improved in elderly individuals by wearing proper ankle weights. However, weights that are too heavy might disturb knee joint positioning sense.

  10. Effects of wearing ankle weight on knee joint repositioning sense in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyoung; Jung, Daeun; Han, Jintae; Jung, Jaemin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of different ankle weights on knee joint repositioning sense in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects were divided for assessment as follows: young (20–30 years, n=10) and elderly (60–70 years, n=11). Knee joint repositioning error was measured by asking the subjects to reposition the target angle of their knee joints while wearing different ankle weights (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) in an open kinetic chain. The Hawk Digital System (60 Hz; Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) was used to measure knee joint repositioning error. Differences in knee joint repositioning error between the young and elderly groups according to ankle weight load were examined by using two-way mixed repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The knee joint repositioning error was lower with than without ankle weights in both groups. The error value was lowest with the 1.0% weight, though not significantly. Knee joint repositioning error was significantly higher in the elderly under all the ankle weight conditions. [Conclusion] Knee joint repositioning sense can be improved in elderly individuals by wearing proper ankle weights. However, weights that are too heavy might disturb knee joint positioning sense. PMID:27799664

  11. Design of a Model of Knee Joint for Educational Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jastaniah, Saddig; Alganmi, Ohud

    2016-01-01

    Uses of models play an important role by simulating the bone, obviating the need to experiment on humans or animals. The aim of the present study was to access local materials as gypsum and wax is to be tested for performing a knee model matching bone in the density also to explore how students can come to understand function through a model-based…

  12. Design and quantitative evaluation of a stance-phase controlled prosthetic knee joint for children.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Naumann, Stephen; Cleghorn, William L

    2005-12-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate a theoretical basis for the design of a stance-phase controlled paediatric prosthetic knee joint, clinically test prototypes of the knee, and use a questionnaire to evaluate its efficacy. Biomechanical models were used to analyze the stance-phase control characteristics of the proposed knee, and those of three other commonly prescribed paediatric knee joint mechanisms, which were also the conventional knee joints used by the six participants of this study (mean age 10.8 years). A questionnaire pertaining to stance-phase control was designed and administered twice to each child; once for the evaluation of the prototype knee joint and once for the conventional knee joint. Stance-phase modeling results indicated decreased zones of instability for the new knee as compared to other paediatric knee joints. Questionnaire results revealed a decrease in the frequency of falls with the prototype compared to other knees, especially in highly active children. The children also reported worrying less about the knee collapsing during walking. No differences were evident for stance-phase stability during running, walking on uneven terrain, ambulating up and down stairs and inclines, fatigue, and types of activities performed.

  13. Torsional syndromes about the knee joint in classical ballet

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, Donald G.; Kinsman, John G.

    1982-01-01

    Dance-related pain of the lower limb is often treated symptomatically, without consideration of the chronic strains placed on the joints due to improper technique and alignment. Three pathomechanical syndromes of the knee which produce knee, ankle and foot pain are described. Clinical therapeutic approaches are proposed which emphasize the biomechanical nature of the etiology. Much information in regards to the basis of dance-related pain need be elicited before the pain-producing phenomena and its treatment can be definitively described. This paper makes no attempt to outline proper ballet technique but rather to make the chiropractor aware that insufficiencies in dance technique can and do lead to problems in the dancer. ImagesFigure 1aFigure 1bFigure 2aFigure 2bFigure 5aFigure 5bFigure 6Figure 7Figures 7c-7d

  14. Knee joint distraction compared with high tibial osteotomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, J A D; Wiegant, K; van Heerwaarden, R J; Spruijt, S; van Roermund, P M; Custers, R J H; Mastbergen, S C; Lafeber, F P J G

    2017-03-01

    Both, knee joint distraction as a relatively new approach and valgus-producing opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO), are knee-preserving treatments for knee osteoarthritis (OA). The efficacy of knee joint distraction compared to HTO has not been reported. Sixty-nine patients with medial knee joint OA with a varus axis deviation of <10° were randomized to either knee joint distraction (n = 23) or HTO (n = 46). Questionnaires were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months. Joint space width (JSW) as a surrogate measure for cartilage thickness was determined on standardized semi-flexed radiographs at baseline and 1-year follow-up. All patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) improved significantly over 1 year (at 1 year p < 0.02) in both groups. At 1 year, the HTO group showed slightly greater improvement in 4 of the 16 PROMS (p < 0.05). The minimum medial compartment JSW increased 0.8 ± 1.0 mm in the knee joint distraction group (p = 0.001) and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm in the HTO group (p < 0.001), with minimum JSW improvement in favour of knee joint distraction (p = 0.05). The lateral compartment showed a small increase in the knee joint distraction group and a small decrease in the HTO group, leading to a significant increase in mean JSW for knee joint distraction only (p < 0.02). Cartilaginous repair activity, as indicated by JSW, and clinical outcome improvement occurred with both, knee joint distraction and HTO. These findings suggest that knee joint distraction may be an alternative therapy for medial compartmental OA with a limited mechanical leg malalignment. Randomized controlled trial, Level I.

  15. Lower extremity joint position sense in runners with and without a history of knee overuse injury.

    PubMed

    Foch, Eric; Milner, Clare E

    2012-07-01

    Kinematic and kinetic analyses are routinely implemented to determine if gait differences exist between runners with and without a history of knee injury. Hip and knee kinematic differences have been reported between knee injured and non-injured runners. Yet, there is no consensus on whether these differences are the primary variables contributing to knee injury. Furthermore, there may be additional underlying factors that contribute to the development of injury that cannot be determined by gait analysis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if joint position sense differences exist in runners with and without a history of knee overuse injury. Sagittal plane knee and hip joint position sense was measured in 13 runners with a history of knee overuse injury and 13 runners with no history of knee overuse injury. Absolute joint position replication error was measured during both a weight bearing and a non-weight bearing condition. Joint position replication errors at each joint were compared among groups and task using a two-way ANOVA with joint task as the repeated measure. Knee and hip joint replication errors were similar between both groups. The weight bearing and non-weight bearing tasks resulted in similar joint position replication errors. There were no interaction effects. In conclusion, knee flexion and hip adduction joint position sense is similar in runners with and without a history of knee overuse injury. Therefore, joint position sense measured via weight bearing and non-weight bearing joint position replication tasks may not play an important role in the development of knee overuse injury.

  16. Quantitation of articular surface topography and cartilage thickness in knee joints using stereophotogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, G A; Soslowsky, L J; Mow, V C

    1991-01-01

    An analytical stereophotogrammetry (SPG) technique has been developed based upon some of the pioneering work of Selvik [Ph.D. thesis, University of Lund, Sweden (1974)] and Huiskes and coworkers [J. Biomechanics 18, 559-570 (1985)], and represents a fundamental step in the construction of biomechanical models of diarthrodial joints. Using this technique, the precise three-dimensional topography of the cartilage surfaces of various diarthrodial joints has been obtained. The system presented in this paper delivers an accuracy of 90 microns in the least favorable conditions with 95% coverage using the same calibration method as Huiskes et al. (1985). In addition, a method has been developed, using SPG, to quantitatively map the cartilage thickness over the entire articular surface of a joint with a precision of 134 microns (95% coverage). In the present study, our SPG system has been used to quantify the topography, including surface area, of the articular surfaces of the patella, distal femur, tibial plateau, and menisci of the human knee. Furthermore, examples of cartilage thickness maps and corresponding thickness data including coefficient of variation, minimum, maximum, and mean cartilage thickness are also provided for the cartilage surfaces of the knee. These maps illustrate significant variations over the joint surfaces which are important in the determination of the stresses and strains within the cartilage during diarthrodial joint function. In addition, these cartilage surface topographies and thickness data are essential for the development of anatomically accurate finite element models of diarthrodial joints.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Dynamic simulation of knee-joint loading during gait using force-feedback control and surrogate contact modelling.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jonathan P; Pandy, Marcus G

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform multi-body, muscle-driven, forward-dynamics simulations of human gait using a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) model of the knee in tandem with a surrogate model of articular contact and force control. A forward-dynamics simulation incorporating position, velocity and contact force-feedback control (FFC) was used to track full-body motion capture data recorded for multiple trials of level walking and stair descent performed by two individuals with instrumented knee implants. Tibiofemoral contact force errors for FFC were compared against those obtained from a standard computed muscle control algorithm (CMC) with a 6-DOF knee contact model (CMC6); CMC with a 1-DOF translating hinge-knee model (CMC1); and static optimization with a 1-DOF translating hinge-knee model (SO). Tibiofemoral joint loads predicted by FFC and CMC6 were comparable for level walking, however FFC produced more accurate results for stair descent. SO yielded reasonable predictions of joint contact loading for level walking but significant differences between model and experiment were observed for stair descent. CMC1 produced the least accurate predictions of tibiofemoral contact loads for both tasks. Our findings suggest that reliable estimates of knee-joint loading may be obtained by incorporating position, velocity and force-feedback control with a multi-DOF model of joint contact in a forward-dynamics simulation of gait. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of continuous versus interval walking exercise on knee joint loading and pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Jayabalan, Prakash; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Klatt, Brian A; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Piva, Sara R

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether knee contact force and knee pain are different between continuous and interval walking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty seven patients with unilateral symptomatic knee OA completed two separate walking exercise sessions on a treadmill at 1.3m/s on two different days: 1) a continuous 45min walking exercise session, and 2) three 15min bouts of walking exercise separated by 1h rest periods for a total of 45min of exercise in an interval format. Estimated knee contact forces using the OpenSim software and knee pain were evaluated at baseline (1st minute of walking) and after every 15min between the continuous and interval walking conditions. A significant increase from baseline was observed in peak knee contact force during the weight-acceptance phase of gait after 30 and 45min of walking, irrespective of the walking exercise condition. Additionally, whereas continuous walking resulted in an increase in knee pain, interval walking did not lead to increased knee pain. Walking exercise durations of 30min or greater may lead to undesirable knee joint loading in patients with knee OA, while performing the same volume of exercise in multiple bouts as opposed to one continuous bout may be beneficial for limiting knee pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing.

    PubMed

    Yulou, Si; Yanqin, Xue; Yongjun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients' indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients' flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients' joint recovery.

  20. Method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing

    PubMed Central

    Yulou, Si; Yanqin, Xue; Yongjun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the method and effect of total knee arthroplasty osteotomy and soft tissue release for serious knee joint space narrowing. Clinical data of 80 patients from October 2013 to December 2014 was selected with a retrospective method. All patients have undergone total knee arthroplasty. Then the X-rays plain film in weight loading was measured before and after operation and osteotomy was performed accurately according to the knee joint scores and the conditions of lower limb alignments. The average angle of tibial plateau osteotomy of postoperative patients was 4.3°, and the corrective angle of soft tissue balancing was 10.7°; the postoperative patients’ indicies including range of joint motion, knee joint HSS score, angle between articular surfaces, tibial angle, femoral-tibial angle and flexion contracture were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant; the postoperative patients’ flexion contracture and range of joint motion were distinctly better than the preoperative indicies (p<0.05) and the differences were statistically significant. The effective release of the soft tissue of the posterior joint capsule under direct vision can avoid excess osteotomy and get satisfactory knee replacement space without influencing the patients’ joint recovery. PMID:28352736

  1. Reliability of digital compass goniometer in knee joint range of motion measurement.

    PubMed

    Yaikwawongs, Nammond; Limpaphayom, Noppachart; Wilairatana, Vajara

    2009-04-01

    To compare the reliability of range of motion measurement in the knee joint using a digital compass goniometer combined with inclinometer with standard range of motion measurement from roentgenographic picture. Range of flexion and extension of the knee joint in volunteer participants was measured by the newly developed digital compass goniometer combined with inclinometer (DCG). The results were compared with range of knee joint motion obtained from standard roentgenographic picture by intraclass correlation coefficient. Range of motion of knee joint measured by DCG correlated very well with the data obtained from standard knee roentgenographic picture. The intraclass correlation coefficient equals 0.973. The digital compass goniometer was a reliable tool to measure knee joint range of motion in flexion and extension plane.

  2. [Value of ultrasound after endoprosthesis implantation of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Gaulrapp, H; Eckstein, S

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasound is often applied in the course of treatment after knee arthroplasty, although sonographic normal findings have not been described so far. Characterising these and comparing them to clinical disorders was the purpose of this study. Intra- and extra-articular hematoma and the imaging of the traumatised extension apparatus of the knee joint were of special interest. During 4 weeks all consecutive patients after knee arthroplasty were examined clinically and sonographically. Furthermore, the blood parameters were controlled for signs of inflammation or coagulation disorders. These findings were then re-checked before the end of hospital rehabilitation treatment. In all of the patients, ultrasound revealed intra-articular fluid at the beginning and at the end of hospital treatment. The fluid area, differing in extension, was markedly reduced or showed less echogenicity concomitant with an organisation. The patellar tendon in all of the patients showed a loss of echogenicity at the site of operative incision, mostly at the patellar insertion, and a thickening extending throughout the middle part of the tendon even at control. Dynamic ultrasound examination displayed one case of a major defect which had to be revised. Blood parameters of inflammation were decreased, coagulation parameters were normal. After knee arthoplasty, extended intra-articular knee hematomas are not rare, only being resorbed or organised to a small degree during a rehabilitation period of three weeks, therefore not yielding relevant information for the course of treatment. The patellar ligaments show alterations comparable to acute tendopathy, thus not recommending use of maximal forces or too high stretching of the tendon tissue. Soft tissue defects with the need for interruption of the rehabilitation programme may be detected sonographically. Further studies will be necessary to explore the course of restructuring. Disorders of patellar sliding movement and signs of prosthetic loosening

  3. Joint awareness in different types of knee arthroplasty evaluated with the Forgotten Joint score.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Opsomer, Gaetan; Koninckx, Angelique; Houssiau, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the 'Forgotten Joint' score (FJS-12), a 12-item questionnaire designed to analyze the patient's ability to forget the joint in everyday life, in French and to compare the results of this Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) score in patients who had other than total joint arthroplasties. The score was compared in 122 patients that had either medial unicompartmental (N=51), patellofemoral (N=21) or total knee arthroplasty (N=50). After having validated the FJS-12 in French, a similar PRO was observed in unicompartmental and postero-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. Patellofemoral resurfacing had a significantly lower score than the two other types of arthroplasty, which can be explained by a significantly younger and smaller patient group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  5. Medial knee joint loading increases in those who respond to hyaluronan injection for medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Briem, Kristin; Axe, Michael J; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause of decline in function and the medial compartment is often affected. Intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) is indicated as a symptom modifying treatment with at least 6 months passing between consecutive injection series. The effects of HA injection on gait variables have not been extensively examined. Therefore, our objective was to investigate the effects of HA injection on gait in people with medial knee OA. Twenty-seven subjects were included; each was tested prior to treatment (baseline), no later than 3 weeks following the last injection (post-HA), and again 5 months after treatment ended (follow-up). Responder criteria were defined to identify responders and non-responders. Subjects underwent 3D gait analysis, muscle activity was sampled, and co-contraction indices were calculated. Responders experienced increased peak knee adduction moments post-HA, whereas non-responders did not. Improved self-report scores were associated with increased knee adduction moments and increased medial co-contraction. Pain relief may result in higher loading onto the already vulnerable medial compartment due to changes in lower limb mechanics and muscle activation patterns. Eventually this may result in a more rapid progression of joint deterioration.

  6. A predictive model for knee joint replacement in older women.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joshua R; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Zhu, Kun; Prince, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Knee replacement (KR) is expensive and invasive. To date no predictive algorithms have been developed to identify individuals at high risk of surgery. This study assessed whether patient self-reported risk factors predict 10-year KR in a population-based study of 1,462 women aged over 70 years recruited for the Calcium Intake Fracture Outcome Study (CAIFOS). Complete hospital records of prevalent (1980-1998) and incident (1998-2008) total knee replacement were available via the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Potential risk factors were assessed for predicative ability using a modeling approach based on a pre-planned selection of risk factors prior to model evaluation. There were 129 (8.8%) participants that underwent KR over the 10 year period. Baseline factors including; body mass index, knee pain, previous knee replacement and analgesia use for joint pain were all associated with increased risk, (P < 0.001). These factors in addition to age demonstrated good discrimination with a C-statistic of 0.79 ± 0.02 as well as calibration determined by the Hosmer-Lemeshow Goodness-of-Fit test. For clinical recommendations, three categories of risk for 10-year knee replacement were selected; low < 5%; moderate 5 to < 10% and high ≥ 10% predicted risk. The actual risk of knee replacement was; low 16 / 741 (2.2%); moderate 32 / 330 (9.7%) and high 81 / 391 (20.7%), P < 0.001. Internal validation of this 5-variable model on 6-year knee replacements yielded a similar C-statistic of 0.81 ± 0.02, comparable to the WOMAC weighted score; C-statistic 0.75 ± 0.03, P = 0.064. In conclusion 5 easily obtained patient self-reported risk factors predict 10-year KR risk well in this population. This algorithm should be considered as the basis for a patient-based risk calculator to assist in the development of treatment regimens to reduce the necessity for surgery in high risk groups such as the elderly.

  7. Effects of eccentric strength training on biceps femoris muscle architecture and knee joint range of movement.

    PubMed

    Potier, Tara G; Alexander, Caroline M; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2009-04-01

    The aim was to determine whether eccentric strengthening changed the muscle architecture of human biceps femoris and consequently, knee range of motion. Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. The experimental group completed an eccentric strengthening programme for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included hamstring muscle strength (one repetition maximum), the passive knee extension test (PKE) (knee joint angle at which the onset of passive tension occurs), fascicle length (FL) and pennation angle (PA). One repetition maximum increased by 34% (P < 0.01), the PKE test revealed a 5% increase in joint range of motion (P = 0.01), FL increased by 34% (P = 0.01) and PA did not change (P = 0.38). This is the first report of an increase in FL in the biceps femoris following eccentric resistance training. In addition, the results might imply that this fascicle lengthening could lead to an increase in the range of motion of the knee. Clinical implications for rehabilitation and injury prevention are discussed.

  8. Design of a knee joint mechanism that adapts to individual physiology.

    PubMed

    Jiun-Yih Kuan; Pasch, Kenneth A; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a new knee joint mechanism, called the Adaptive Coupling Joint (ACJ). The new mechanism has an adaptive trajectory of the center of rotations (COR) that automatically matches those of the attached biological joint. The detailed design is presented as well as characterization results of the ACJ. Conventional exoskeleton and assistive devices usually consider limb joints as a one to three degrees of freedom (DOFs) joint synthesized by multiple one-DOF hinge joints in a single plane. However, the biological joints are complex and usually rotate with respect to a changing COR. As a result, the mismatch between limb joint motion and mechanical interface motion can lead to forces that cause undesired ligament and muscle length changes and internal mechanical changes. These undesired changes contribute to discomfort, as well as to the slippage and sluggish interaction between humans and devices. It is shown that the ACJ can transmit planetary torques from either active or passive devices to the limbs without altering the normal biological joint motion.

  9. Involvement of the proximal tibiofibular joint in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Oztuna, Volkan; Yildiz, Altan; Ozer, Caner; Milcan, Abtullah; Kuyurtar, Fehmi; Turgut, Akin

    2003-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the possible involvement of the proximal tibiofibular joint in primary osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 40 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee who had magnetic resonance imaging scans were reexamined for proximal tibiofibular joint involvement. The patient was questioned if pain was present in the proximal tibiofibular joint while at rest, when walking and climbing stairs. Symptoms were evaluated by applying moderate compression over the proximal tibiofibular joint during active ankle and knee motions. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were reexamined by two radiologists. Three of the 40 patients had minimal or moderate pain in the proximal tibiofibular joint during stair-climbing and on clinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of these three patients revealed osteophyte or subchondral cyst formation, or both. Degenerative changes in the proximal tibiofibular joint may be evident in association with osteoarthritis of the knee and may result in lateral-sided pain at the knee.

  10. Estimating total knee replacement joint load ratios from kinematics.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2014-09-22

    Accurate prediction of loads acting at the joint in total knee replacement (TKR) patients is key to developing experimental or computational simulations which evaluate implant designs under physiological loading conditions. In vivo joint loads have been measured for a small number of telemetric TKR patients, but in order to assess device performance across the entire patient population, a larger patient cohort is necessary. This study investigates the accuracy of predicting joint loads from joint kinematics. Specifically, the objective of the study was to assess the accuracy of internal-external (I-E) and anterior-posterior (A-P) joint load predictions from I-E and A-P motions under a given compressive load, and to evaluate the repeatability of joint load ratios (I-E torque to compressive force (I-E:C), and A-P force to compressive force (A-P:C)) for a range of compressive loading profiles. A tibiofemoral finite element model was developed and used to simulate deep knee bend, chair-rise and step-up activities for five patients. Root-mean-square (RMS) differences in I-E:C and A-P:C load ratios between telemetric measurements and model predictions were less than 1.10e-3 Nm/N and 0.035 N/N for all activities. I-E:C and A-P:C load ratios were consistently reproduced regardless of the compressive force profile applied (RMS differences less than 0.53e-3 Nm/N and 0.010 N/N, respectively). When error in kinematic measurement was introduced to the model, joint load predictions were forgiving to kinematic measurement error when conformity between femoral and tibial components was low. The prevalence of kinematic data, in conjunction with the analysis presented here, facilitates determining the scope of A-P and I-E joint loading ratios experienced by the TKR population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effects of Knee Joint Effusion on Quadriceps Electromyography During Jogging

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Decker, Michael J.; Millett, Peter J.; Steadman, J. Richard; Sterett, William I.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate and describe the influence of intra-articular effusion on knee joint kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) profiles during jogging. Thirteen individuals underwent a 20 cc 0.9% saline insufflation of the knee joint capsule and completed 8 jogging trials. Stance phase, sagittal plane knee joint kinematics and thigh muscular EMG profiles were compared pre- and post-insufflation utilizing a paired t-test ( = 0.05). Mild knee effusion caused a reduction in vastus medialis (p = 0.005) and lateralis (p = 0.006) EMG activity. The rectus femoris, biceps femoris and medial hamstring muscles did not exhibit changes due to this protocol. There were no changes in the sagittal plane knee joint kinematic pattern. Twenty cc effusion can cause quadriceps inhibition in the vastus medialis and the vastus lateralis in otherwise healthy individuals during jogging. This study provides baseline data for the effects of mild knee joint effusion on thigh musculature during jogging. Key Points 20 cc of knee effusion can cause vastus medialis and lateralis inhibition as noted by decreases in EMG amplitude. This effusion does not appear to alter sagittal plane knee joint kinematics during jogging. This finding if different from previous work investigating knee joint kinematic changes during a less dynamic activity (gait) with 20 cc of effusion. PMID:24431955

  12. In vivo six-degree-of-freedom knee-joint kinematics in overground and treadmill walking following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Schache, Anthony G; Feller, Julian; de Steiger, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2017-08-01

    No data are available to describe six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) knee-joint kinematics for one complete cycle of overground walking following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aims of this study were firstly, to measure 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics and condylar motion for overground walking following TKA; and secondly, to determine whether such data differed between overground and treadmill gait when participants walked at the same speed during both tasks. A unique mobile biplane X-ray imaging system enabled accurate measurement of 6-DOF TKA knee kinematics during overground walking by simultaneously tracking and imaging the joint. The largest rotations occurred for flexion-extension and internal-external rotation whereas the largest translations were associated with joint distraction and anterior-posterior drawer. Strong associations were found between flexion-extension and adduction-abduction (R(2)  = 0.92), joint distraction (R(2)  = 1.00), and anterior-posterior translation (R(2)  = 0.77), providing evidence of kinematic coupling in the TKA knee. Although the measured kinematic profiles for overground walking were grossly similar to those for treadmill walking, several statistically significant differences were observed between the two conditions with respect to temporo-spatial parameters, 6-DOF knee-joint kinematics, and condylar contact locations and sliding. Thus, caution is advised when making recommendations regarding knee implant performance based on treadmill-measured knee-joint kinematic data. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1634-1643, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Skin movement artefact assessment and compensation in the estimation of knee-joint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti, L; Cappozzo, A; Cappello, A; Della Croce, U

    1998-11-01

    In three dimensional (3-D) human movement analysis using close-range photogrammetry, surface marker clusters deform and rigidly move relative to the underlying bone. This introduces an important artefact (skin movement artefact) which propagates to bone position and orientation and joint kinematics estimates. This occurs to the extent that those joint attitude components that undergo small variations result in totally unreliable values. This paper presents an experimental and analytical procedure, to be included in a subject-specific movement analysis protocol, which allows for the assessment of skin movement artefacts and, based on this knowledge, for their compensation. The effectiveness of this procedure was verified with reference to knee-joint kinematics and to the artefacts caused by the hip movements on markers located on the thigh surface. Quantitative validation was achieved through experimental paradigms whereby prior reliable information on the target joint kinematics was available. When position and orientation of bones were determined during the execution of a motor task, using a least-squares optimal estimator, but the rigid artefactual marker cluster movement was not dealt with, then knee joint translations and rotations were affected by root mean square errors (r.m.s.) up to 14 mm and 6 degrees, respectively. When the rigid artefactual movement was also compensated for, then r.m.s errors were reduced to less than 4 mm and 3 degrees, respectively. In addition, errors originally strongly correlated with hip rotations, after compensation, lost this correlation.

  14. Design, construction, and evaluation of "sensor lock": an electromechanical stance control knee joint.

    PubMed

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Ahmadi Bani, Monireh; Baniasad, Mina; Samadian, Mohammad; Golchin, Navid

    2017-03-28

    Most currently-available stance control knee ankle foot orthoses (SCKAFOs) still need full knee extension to lock the knee joint, and they are still noisy, bulky, and heavy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to design, construct, and evaluate an original electromechanical SCKAFO knee joint that could feasibly solve these problems, and thus address the problems of current stance control knee joints with regards to their structure, function, cosmesis, and cost. Ten able-bodied (AB) participants and two (knee ankle foot orthosis) KAFO users were recruited to participate in the study. A custom SCKAFO with the same set of components was constructed for each participant. Lower limb kinematics were captured using a 6-camera, video-based motion analysis system. For AB participants, significant differences were found between normal walking and walking with the SCKAFO for temporal-spatial parameters and between orthoses with two modes of knee joints in the healthy subjects. Walking with stance control mode produced greater walking speed and step length, greater knee flexion during swing, and less pelvic obliquity than walking with a locked knee, for both AB and KAFO users. The feasibility of this new knee joint with AB people was demonstrated. Implications for rehabilitation Stance control knee ankle foot orthoses (SCKAFOs) are designed to stop knee flexion in stance phase and provide free knee movement during swing phase of walking. Due to their high cost, size, excessive weight, and poor performance, few SCKAFO were optimal clinically and commercially. The feasibility of the new knee joint with able-bodied people and poliomyelitis subjects was demonstrated.

  15. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  16. A New Method to Measure Post-Traumatic Joint Contractures in the Rabbit Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Kevin A.; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg ± 1.5 deg (mean ± sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg ± 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg ± 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  17. Unusual multicentric angiomyolipoma of knee joint and soft tissue foot.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Manish Kumar; Jain, Manjula; Sud, Alok; Agarwal, Savita; Nain, Manupriya

    2011-01-01

    To report unusual occurrence of angiomyolipoma at intraarticular location with another lesion in the same side foot. A 12-year-old girl was referred to us after initial inconclusive work-up done elsewhere for swelling of left knee joint. There was a 15 × 12 cm swelling in the knee joint partially encasing patella while also a similar hourglass shaped swelling measuring 9 × 4 cm was noted in the same side foot. After clinical and radiological evaluation an excision biopsy was planned for both sites. The specimen sent for histopathological evaluation revealed angiomyolipoma with identical characteristics in the two locations and was HMB45 immunostain negative. Patient was evaluated for possibility of tuberous sclerosis but there was no contributory evidence. Angiomyolipoma is typically a solitary renal tumor with rare occurrence at musculoskeletal sites. Multicentric variety is still infrequent. Intraarticular occurrence of angiomyolipoma presents a diagnostic challenge not only in terms of unfamiliarity but also unusual presentation with absence of characteristic immunostaining and multicentricity requiring careful exclusion of other lesions that may require a more radical approach for treatment. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. gamma. -Aminobutyric acid in synovial membrane of rat knee joint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, A.; Kondo, M.; Taniyama, K.; Tanaka, S.

    1988-01-01

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) content was measured, and the release of GABA was studied in the synovial membrane of the rat knee joint. GABA content of the synovial membrane was 20.1 nmol/g tissue. Ten days after unilateral dissection of the sciatic nerve, femoral nerve or both nerves, the GABA contents of the ipsilateral membrane were 13.8, 14.6 and 7.8 nmol/g tissue, respectively. High K/sup +/ evoked the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release of (/sup 3/H) GABA from the synovial membranes of intact rats preloaded with (/sup 3/H) GABA, but did not evoke release from the membrane ipsilateral to the dissection of both sciatic and femoral nerves. Evoked release of (/sup 3/H) GABA was obtained in the synovial membrane preloaded with (/sup 3/H) GABA in the presence of ..beta..-alanine, but not in the presence of 2,4L-diaminobutyric acid. These results indicate that GABA is present in the neuronal elements of the synovial membrane of the rat knee joint.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3500 Section 888.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3490 Section 888.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3480 Section 888.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3500 Section 888.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3480 Section 888.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3480 Section 888.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3490 Section 888.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3480 Section 888.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3500 Section 888.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3490 Section 888.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  9. Intraoperative joint gaps and mediolateral balance affect postoperative knee kinematics in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshifumi; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro; Banks, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Adjusting joint gaps and establishing mediolateral (ML) soft tissue balance are considered essential interventions for better outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the relationship between intraoperative laxity measurements and weightbearing knee kinematics has not been well explored. This study aimed to quantify the effect of intraoperative joint gaps and ML soft tissue balance on postoperative knee kinematics in posterior-stabilized (PS)-TKA. We investigated 44 knees in 34 patients who underwent primary PS-TKA by a single surgeon. The central joint gaps and ML tilting angles at 0°, 10°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120° and 135° flexion were measured during surgery. At a minimum of two year follow-up, we analyzed in vivo kinematics of these knees and examined the influence of intraoperative measurements on postoperative kinematics. Gap difference of knee flexion at 135° minus 0° was correlated with the total posterior translation of lateral femoral condyle (r=0.336, p=0.042) and femoral external rotation (r=0.488, p=0.002) during squatting, anteroposterior position of lateral femoral condyle (r=-0.510, p=0.001) and maximum knee flexion (r=0.355, p=0.031) in kneeling. Similar correlations were observed between deep flexion gap differences with respect to the 90° reference and postoperative knee kinematics. Well-balanced knees showed less anterior translation of medial femoral condyle in mid- to deep flexion, consistent femoral external rotation, and the most neutral valgus/varus rotation compared with unbalanced knees. These findings indicate the importance of adequate intraoperative joint gaps in deep flexion and ML soft tissue balance throughout the range of motion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Knee Joint Effusion Synovitis and Knee Pain in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Han, Weiyu; Cao, Yuelong; Halliday, Andrew; Blizzard, Leigh; Pan, Faming; Antony, Benny; Cicuttini, Flavia; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    To describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between knee regional effusion synovitis and knee pain in older adults. Data from a population-based random sample (n = 880, mean age 62 yrs, 50% women) were used. Baseline knee joint effusion synovitis was graded (0-3) using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the suprapatellar pouch, central portion, posterior femoral recess, and subpopliteal recess. Effusion synovitis of the whole joint was defined as a score of ≥ 2 in any subregion. Other knee structural (including cartilage, bone marrow, and menisci) lesions were assessed by MRI at baseline. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire at baseline and 2.6 years later. Multivariable analyses were performed after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and other structural lesions. The prevalence of effusion synovitis was 67%. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis was significantly and independently associated with increased total and nonweight-bearing knee pain in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses (for an increase in total knee pain of ≥ 5, RR 1.26 per grade, 95% CI 1.04-1.52), and increased weight-bearing knee pain in longitudinal analysis only. Effusion synovitis in posterior femoral recess and central portion were independently associated with increases in nonweight-bearing pain (RR 1.63 per grade, 95% CI 1.32-2.01 and RR 1.29 per grade, 95% CI 1.01-1.65, respectively) in longitudinal analyses only. Knee joint effusion synovitis has independent associations with knee pain in older adults. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis is associated with nonweight-bearing and weight-bearing knee pain, while posterior femoral recess and central portion effusion synovitis are only associated with nonweight-bearing pain.

  11. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium abscessus in a prosthetic knee joint: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Chang-Jen; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is an infrequent cause of prosthetic knee joint infections. Simultaneous infection with different NTM species in a prosthetic knee joint has not been previously reported. A case of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus and M. fortuitum is described in this report. The patient was successfully treated with adequate antibiotics and surgery. The clinical features of sixteen previously reported cases of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by NTM are reviewed.

  12. Intra-articular pressures and joint mechanics: should we pay attention to effusion in knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Derek James

    2014-09-01

    What factors play a role to ensure a knee joint does what it should given the demands of moving through the physical environment? This paper aims to probe the hypothesis that intra-articular joint pressures, once a topic of interest, have been left aside in contemporary frameworks in which we now view knee joint function. The focus on ligamentous deficiencies and the chondrocentric view of osteoarthritis, while important, have left little attention to the consideration of other factors that can impair joint function across the lifespan. Dynamic knee stability is required during every step we take. While there is much known about the role that passive structures and muscular activation play in maintaining a healthy knee joint, this framework does not account for the role that intra-articular joint pressures may have in providing joint stability during motion and how these factors interact. Joint injuries invariably result in some form of intra-articular fluid accumulation. Ultimately, it may be how the knee mechanically responds to this fluid, of which pressure plays a significant role that provides the mechanisms for continued function. Do joint pressures provide an important foundation for maintaining knee function? This hypothesis is unique and argues that we are missing an important piece of the puzzle when attempting to understand implications that joint injury and disease have for joint function.

  13. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a "soft" constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of "hard" constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO.

  14. Modelling knee flexion effects on joint power absorption and adduction moment.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Tatsumi, Ichiroh; Sarashina, Eri; Sparrow, W A; Begg, Rezaul K

    2015-12-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is commonly associated with ageing and long-term walking. In this study the effects of flexing motions on knee kinetics during stance were simulated. Extended knees do not facilitate efficient loading. It was therefore, hypothesised that knee flexion would promote power absorption and negative work, while possibly reducing knee adduction moment. Three-dimensional (3D) position and ground reaction forces were collected from the right lower limb stance phase of one healthy young male subject. 3D position was sampled at 100 Hz using three Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) motion analysis camera units, set up around an eight metre walkway. Force plates (AMTI) recorded ground reaction forces for inverse dynamics calculations. The Visual 3D (C-motion) 'Landmark' function was used to change knee joint positions to simulate three knee flexion angles during static standing. Effects of the flexion angles on joint kinetics during the stance phase were then modelled. The static modelling showed that each 2.7° increment in knee flexion angle produced 2.74°-2.76° increments in knee flexion during stance. Increased peak extension moment was 6.61 Nm per 2.7° of increased knee flexion. Knee flexion enhanced peak power absorption and negative work, while decreasing adduction moment. Excessive knee extension impairs quadriceps' power absorption and reduces eccentric muscle activity, potentially leading to knee osteoarthritis. A more flexed knee is accompanied by reduced adduction moment. Research is required to determine the optimum knee flexion to prevent further damage to knee-joint structures affected by osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sagittal plane joint loading is related to knee flexion in osteoarthritic gait.

    PubMed

    Creaby, Mark W; Hunt, Michael A; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-10-01

    High mechanical loading has been consistently linked with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, and is considered to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Evidence from healthy adults indicates that knee flexion kinematics may influence knee load. The purpose of this study therefore, was to investigate the association between knee flexion kinematics and indicators of joint loading during walking (peak moments and vertical ground reaction force), in individuals with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In this cross-sectional study, 89 participants with painful medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis completed three-dimensional walking gait analysis to measure stance phase ground reaction forces, knee joint moments, and knee flexion kinematics. In stepwise regression, greater knee flexion excursion was associated with higher peak vertical ground reaction force, accounting for 10% of its variance (B=0.62 [95% CI 0.34, 0.89], P<0.001). Greater peak knee flexion was associated with a higher flexion moment, accounting for 44% of its variance (B=0.12 [95% CI 0.09, 0.15], P<0.001). No association was found between the knee adduction moment and knee flexion kinematics during walking. Our data suggest that greater knee flexion is associated with higher joint loads in the sagittal plane (i.e. a higher peak knee flexion moment). However, knee flexion kinematics were not associated with the knee adduction moment - a proxy measure of medial compartment knee load. Thus, high knee flexion should be considered an undesirable gait characteristic with respect to knee load in individuals with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. © 2013.

  16. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System: an implantable joint-unloading prosthesis for treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Anton G; Gabriel, Stefan M; O’Connell, Mary; Lowe, David; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in adults. Therapies intended to unload the medial knee compartment have yielded unsatisfactory results due to low patient compliance with conservative treatments and high complication rates with surgical options. There is no widely available joint-unloading treatment for medial knee OA that offers clinically important symptom alleviation, low complication risk, and high patient acceptance. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System (Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA) is a first-of-its-kind, implantable, extra-articular, extra-capsular prosthesis intended to alleviate knee OA-related symptoms by reducing medial knee compartment loading while overcoming the limitations of traditional joint-unloading therapies. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated excellent prosthesis durability, substantial reductions in medial compartment and total joint loads, and clinically important improvements in OA-related pain and function. The purpose of this report is to describe the KineSpring System, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The KineSpring System has potential to bridge the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and irreversible surgical interventions for medial compartment knee OA. PMID:23717052

  17. DINAMICS OF KNEE JOINT SPACE ASYMMETRY ON X-RAY AS A MARKER OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS REHABILITATION EFFICACY.

    PubMed

    Sheveleva, N; Minbayeva, L; Belyayeva, Y

    2017-03-01

    Reducing of articular cartilage functional volume in knee joint osteoarthritis occurs unevenly and accompanied with pathological changes of lower limb axis as a result of connective tissue and muscle structures dysfunction. Evaluation of X-ray knee joint space asymmetry seems to be informative to analyze the dynamics of lower extremities biomechanical imbalances characteristic for knee joint osteoarthritis. However, standardized method of X-ray joint space determining does not include its symmetry calculation. The purpose of the study was optimization of knee joint radiological examination by developing of X-ray knee joint space asymmetry index calculation method. The proposed method was used for comparative analysis of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy efficacy in 30 patients with knee joint osteoarthritis of 2-3 degrees (Kellgren-Lawrence, 1957). As a result of the conducted treatment statistically significant decrease of the X-ray knee joint space asymmetry index was observed (Me(Q1;Q3): Z=5.20, p<0.001) and amounted as 0.22 (0.18;0.24) before treatment and 0.12 (0.10;0.14) after. Also, statistically significant (Z=5.10; p=0.00001) changes of load asymmetry on front and rear foot sections were observed by the results of podometric survey in comparative assessment before (Me(Q1;Q3)=24(12;30)) and after (Me(Q1;Q3)=6(4;30)) course therapy. 30% (n=9) of the patients evaluated the outcome of the treatment as "excellent" (1 point), 63% (n=19) - as "good" (2 points) and only 7% (n=2) - as "acceptable" (3 points) according to the Roles and Maudsley score. The listed above data was regarded as an X-ray positive dynamics comparable with clinical improvement. Thus, the X-ray knee joint space asymmetry index, calculated according to the proposed method, allows to evaluate dynamics of articular surfaces congruency changes and provide differentiated approach to the treatment of knee joint osteoarthritis.

  18. The extent and risk of knee injuries in children aged 9-14 with Generalised Joint Hypermobility and knee joint hypermobility - the CHAMPS-study Denmark.

    PubMed

    Junge, Tina; Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2015-06-12

    Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is suggested as an aetiological factor for knee injuries in adolescents and adults. It is presumed that GJH causes decreased joint stability, thereby increasing the risk of knee injuries during challenging situations like jumping and landing. The aim was to study the extent and risk of knee injuries in children with GJH and knee hypermobility. In total, 999 children (9-14 years) were tested twice during spring 2012 and 2013 with Beighton's Tests (BT) for hypermobility, a 0-9 scoring system. GJH was classified with cut-point ≥5/9 on both test rounds. On basis of weekly cell phone surveys of knee pain, children requiring clinical examination were seen. Traumatic and overuse knee injuries were registered by WHO ICD-10 diagnoses. Logistic regression and Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to examine the association between GJH and knee injuries, taking into account clustering on school class levels. Totally, 36 children were classified GJH on both test rounds. Overuse knee injuries were the most frequent injury type (86 %), mainly apophysitis for both groups (61 %), other than patella-femoral pain syndrome for the control group (13 %). For traumatic knee injuries, distortions and contusions were most frequent in both groups (51 % resp. 36 %), besides traumatic lesions of knee tendons and muscles for the control group (5 %). No significant association was found between overuse knee injuries and GJH with/without knee hypermobility (OR 0.69, p = 0.407 resp. OR 0.75, p = 0.576) or traumatic knee injuries and GJH with/without knee hypermobility (OR 1.56, p = 0.495 resp. OR 2.22, p = 0.231). Apophysitis, distortions and contusions were the most frequent knee injuries. Despite the relatively large study, the number of children with GJH and knee injuries was low, with no significant increased risk for knee injuries for this group. This questions whether GJH is a clinically relevant risk factor for knee

  19. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  20. Effects of methods of descending stairs forwards versus backwards on knee joint force in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a clinical controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masaki; Chin, Takaaki; Oki, Sadaaki; Kanai, Shusaku; Shimatani, Koji; Shimada, Tomoaki

    2010-06-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetic characteristics of compensatory backward descending movement performed by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Using a three-dimensional motion analysis system, we investigated lower extremity joint angles, joint moments, joint force of the support leg in forward and backward descending movements on stairs, and joint force of the leading leg at landing in 7 female patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Compared with the forward descending movement, knee joint angle, joint moment and joint force of the support leg all decreased in the backward descending movement. Joint force of the leading leg at landing was also reduced in the backward descending movement. In addition, we confirmed that the center of body mass was mainly controlled by the knee and ankle joints in the forward descending movement, and by the hip joint in the backward descending movement. Since it has been reported that knee flexion angle and extensor muscle strength are decreased in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, we believe that backward descending movement is an effective method to use the hip joint to compensate for these functional defects. In addition, due to the decreased knee joint force both in the leading and support legs in backward descending movement, the effectiveness of compensatory motion for pain control and knee joint protection was also suggested.

  1. Knee-Extension Training with a Single-Joint Hybrid Assistive Limb during the Early Postoperative Period after Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Kubota, Shigeki; Onishi, Mio; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The knee range of motion is an important outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to previous studies, the knee range of motion temporarily decreases for approximately 1 month after TKA due to postoperative pain and quadriceps dysfunction following surgical invasion into the knee extensor mechanism. We describe our experience with a knee-extension training program based on a single-joint hybrid assistive limb (HAL-SJ, Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after TKA. HAL-SJ is a wearable robot suit that facilitates the voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 76-year-old man underwent HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training, which enabled him to perform knee function training during the acute phase after TKA without causing increased pain. Thus, he regained the ability to fully extend his knee postoperatively. HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training can be used as a novel post-TKA rehabilitation modality. PMID:27774330

  2. Designs and performance of microprocessor-controlled knee joints.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Julius; Westebbe, Bettina; Bellmann, Malte; Kraft, Marc

    2014-02-01

    In this comparative study, three transfemoral amputee subjects were fitted with four different microprocessor-controlled exoprosthetic knee joints (MPK): C-Leg, Orion, Plié2.0, and Rel-K. In a motion analysis laboratory, objective gait measures were acquired during level walking at different velocities. Subsequent technical analyses, which involved X-ray computed tomography, identified the functional mechanisms of each device and enabled corroboration of the performance in the gait laboratory by the engineering design of the MPK. Gait measures showed that the mean increase of the maximum knee flexion angle at different walking velocities was closest in value to the unaffected contralateral knee (6.2°/m/s) with C-Leg (3.5°/m/s; Rel-K 17.0°/m/s, Orion 18.3°/m/s, and Plié2.0 28.1°/m/s). Technical analyses corroborated that only with Plié2.0 the flexion resistances were not regulated by microprocessor control at different walking velocities. The muscular effort for the initiation of the swing phase, measured by the minimum hip moment, was found to be lowest with C-Leg (-82.1±14.1 Nm; Rel-K -83.59±17.8 Nm, Orion -88.0±16.3 Nm, and Plié2.0 -91.6±16.5 Nm). Reaching the extension stop at the end of swing phase was reliably executed with both Plié2.0 and C-Leg. Abrupt terminal stance phase extension observed with Plié2.0 and Rel-K could be attributed to the absence of microprocessor control of extension resistance.

  3. Differences in hip-knee joint coupling during gait after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gribbin, Timothy C; Slater, Lindsay V; Herb, C Collin; Hart, Joseph M; Chapman, Ryan M; Hertel, Jay; Kuenze, Christopher M

    2016-02-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament injury, patients have increased risk for developing degenerative osteoarthritis, potentially due to the kinematic changes that persist after surgical reconstruction. Current research only describes single joint kinematic differences rather than the way in which two joints behave concurrently, termed joint coupling. The purpose of this study was to compare knee motion relative to hip motion in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and healthy limbs during walking and jogging. Thirty-seven recreationally active volunteers (22 reconstructed, 15 healthy) walked and jogged at 4.83 km/h and 9.66 km/h respectively. Vector coding methods were used to calculate stride-to-stride variability, magnitude, and vector angle of 6 joint couples during walking and jogging: hip frontal-knee frontal planes, hip frontal-knee sagittal, hip frontal-knee transverse, hip sagittal-knee frontal, hip sagittal-knee transverse, and hip transverse-knee frontal planes. The hip sagittal-knee frontal and hip sagittal-knee transverse joint couples had decreased variability during mid-stance, and all other couples had increased variability during the stance phase in the reconstructed group. The reconstructed group had decreased magnitude of joint excursion in the hip frontal-knee sagittal couple during all phases of gait during walking. Vector angles of the hip frontal-knee transverse couple increased in the reconstructed group during the loading, middle, and terminal stance phases, and swing phase of gait during walking. The increased variability and decreased magnitude of joint excursion indicate that movement patterns were less consistent during walking gait despite employing a more constrained system during movement in the reconstructed limb compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of the knee joint-line balancer to control patella position in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    ten Ham, Arno M; Wymenga, Ate B; Jacobs, Wilco C H

    2005-04-01

    In revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA), control of the patellar height and the joint line is difficult. Therefore, we developed an adjustable flexion-extension spacer, the Knee Joint-line Balancer (KJB(R)). This device simulates femur component sizes, polyethylene sizes, the joint-line level, and distal femur wedges. The goal of this study is to evaluate the use of an adjustable knee spacer to control patellar height and joint-line during revision total knee surgery. The subjects of the study were the first 10 consecutive patients who had undergone revision of a primary TKA where the KJB was used. A reference group composed of the last 10 patients treated without the use of the KJB was also evaluated. The joint-line position and the patellar height were determined before and after revision TKA. The method described by Figgie et al. was used. The patellar height in the reference group averaged 7.7 mm. Seven of 10 patients had a patella baja, and two of these patients had patellar impingement. One patient needed a proximalisation of the tuberositas. The patellar height in the KJB group averaged 14.6 mm after revision, with only one patient having a patella baja. This new device, adjustable kneespacer for revision TKA ("the KJB"), seems to provide better control of the patellar position in total knee revision.

  5. Structural Simulation of a Bone-Prosthesis System of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Andrä, Heiko; Battiato, Sebastiano; Bilotta, Giuseppe; Farinella, Giovanni M.; Impoco, Gaetano; Orlik, Julia; Russo, Giovanni; Zemitis, Aivars

    2008-01-01

    In surgical knee replacement, the damaged knee joint is replaced with artificial prostheses. An accurate clinical evaluation must be carried out before applying knee prosthe-ses to ensure optimal outcome from surgical operations and to reduce the probability of having long-term problems. Useful information can be inferred from estimates of the stress acting onto the bone-prosthesis system of the knee joint. This information can be exploited to tailor the prosthesis to the patient's anatomy. We present a compound system for pre-operative surgical planning based on structural simulation of the bone-prosthesis system, exploiting patient-specific data. PMID:27873848

  6. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  7. [Disability due to traumas and diseases of a knee joint].

    PubMed

    Strafun, S S; Kostogryz, O A; Rygan, M M; Ilyin, Yu V; Kostogryz, Yu O; Nechyporenko, R V

    2015-02-01

    The invalidism structure was analyzed for patients, suffering consequences of traumas and diseases of a knee joint (KJ). The primary invalidism level because of traumas and diseases of a KJ have constituted in 2013 yr 12.4%. The cause of invalidism in men is predominantly a one-side gonarthrosis, and in women--a bilateral one--due to concurrent aggravating causes (dishormonal changes, excessive body mass). The invalidism indices enhancement is caused by absence of a dispensary follow-up, insufficient treatment on various stages of the disease course, severity and irreversibility of pathological process in a KJ, socio-economic factors, low rehabilitational potential, prognosticated impossibility to conduct a professional-labour rehabilitation in a prepensionable and pensionable age.

  8. Altered Tibiofemoral Joint Contact Mechanics and Kinematics in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Episodic Complaints of Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Klatt, Brian A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Tashman, Scott; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. Methods Forty-three subjects, 11 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), 7 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), and 25 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a downhill gait task on a treadmill. Findings The medial compartment contact point excursions were longer in the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.046) and the control groups (p=0.016). The peak medial compartment contact point velocity was also greater for the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.047) and control groups (p=0.022). Additionally, the unstable group demonstrated a coupled movement pattern of knee extension and external rotation after heel contact which was different than the coupled motion of knee flexion and internal rotation demonstrated by stable and control groups. Interpretation Our findings suggest that knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics are altered during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. The observed longer medial compartment contact point excursions and higher velocities represent objective signs of mechanical instability that may place the arthritic knee joint at increased risk for disease progression. Further research is indicated to explore the clinical relevance of altered contact mechanics and kinematics during other common daily activities and to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation programs to improve altered joint biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. PMID:24856791

  9. Knee joint laxity and neuromuscular characteristics of male and female soccer and basketball players.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, S L; Lephart, S M; Gear, W S; Fu, F H

    1999-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are occurring at a higher rate in female athletes compared with their male counterparts. Research in the area of anterior cruciate ligament injury has increasingly focused on the role of joint proprioception and muscle activity in promoting knee joint stability. We measured knee joint laxity, joint kinesthesia, lower extremity balance, the amount of time required to generate peak torque of the knee flexor and extensor musculature, and electromyographically assessed muscle activity in 34 healthy, collegiate-level athletes (average age, 19.6 +/- 1.5 years) who played soccer or basketball or both. Independent t-tests were used to determine significant sex differences. Results revealed that women inherently possess significantly greater knee joint laxity values, demonstrate a significantly longer time to detect the knee joint motion moving into extension, possess significantly superior single-legged balance ability, and produce significantly greater electromyographic peak amplitude and area of the lateral hamstring muscle subsequent to landing a jump. The excessive joint laxity of women appears to contribute to diminished joint proprioception, rendering the knee less sensitive to potentially damaging forces and possibly at risk for injury. Unable to rely on ligamentous structures, healthy female athletes appear to have adopted compensatory mechanisms of increased hamstring activity to achieve functional joint stabilization.

  10. Joint awareness after total knee arthroplasty is affected by pain and quadriceps strength.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Y; Wada, O; Nakakita, S; Mizuno, K

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of patient-reported outcomes to provide a more patient-centered view on treatment. Forgetting the artificial joint can be regarded as the goal in joint arthroplasty. The goals of the study were to describe changes in joint awareness in the artificial joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to determine which factors among pain, knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and functional ability affect joint awareness after TKA. Patients undergoing TKA demonstrate changes in joint awareness and joint awareness is associated with pain, knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and functional ability. This prospective cohort study comprised 63 individuals undergoing TKA, evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Outcomes included joint awareness assessed using the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS), pain score, knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and functional ability. Fifty-eight individuals completed all postoperative assessments. All measures except for knee extension ROM improved from 1 to 6 months. However, there were no differences in any measures from 6 to 12 months. FJS was affected most greatly by pain at 1 month and by quadriceps strength at 6 and 12 months. Patients following TKA demonstrate improvements in joint awareness and function within 6 months after surgery, but reach a plateau from 6 to 12 months. Quadriceps strength could contribute to this plateau of joint awareness. Prospective cohort study, IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control during gait before and after total knee arthroplasty are sex-specific.

    PubMed

    Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    The future of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery will involve planning that incorporates more patient-specific characteristics. Despite known biological, morphological, and functional differences between men and women, there has been little investigation into knee joint biomechanical and neuromuscular differences between men and women with osteoarthritis, and none that have examined sex-specific biomechanical and neuromuscular responses to TKA surgery. The objective of this study was to examine sex-associated differences in knee kinematics, kinetics and neuromuscular patterns during gait before and after TKA. Fifty-two patients with end-stage knee OA (28 women, 24 men) underwent gait and neuromuscular analysis within the week prior to and one year after surgery. A number of sex-specific differences were identified which suggest a different manifestation of end-stage knee OA between the sexes.

  12. Dissipation of disturbances seen in the knee joint kinematics of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Arpin, David J; Davies, Brenda L; Gehringer, James E

    2015-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often use a crouch gait pattern that has disturbances in the knee joint kinematics. Although the length and rate of lengthening of the hamstring musculature have been speculated to be the reason that these disturbances are not adequately dissipated, this relationship has not been adequately explored. The purpose of this exploratory investigation was to use simulations of a musculoskeletal model and Floquet analysis to evaluate how the performance of hamstrings musculature during gait may be related to the knee joint instabilities seen in children with CP. Children with CP and typically developing (TD) children walked on a treadmill as a motion capture system assessed the knee joint kinematics. Floquet analysis was used to quantify the rate that disturbances present at the knee joint were dissipated, and simulations of a musculoskeletal model were used to estimate the in vivo length and velocity of the hamstrings. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to determine if there was a relationship between the rate that the disturbances were dissipated and the performance of the hamstring musculature. The children with CP had hamstrings that lengthened more slowly than TD children, and required more strides to dissipate disturbances in the knee joint kinematics. There was negative correlation between the rate that the hamstrings lengthened and the rate that the knee joint disturbances were dissipated. Our results suggest that the ability of children with CP to dissipate the knee joint disturbances may be related to the inability to properly control the hamstring musculature.

  13. Joint awareness in osteoarthritis of the hip and knee evaluated with the 'Forgotten Joint' Score before and after joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, E; Vanden Berghe, A; Schwab, P E; Forthomme, J P; Cornu, O

    2016-10-01

    To utilize the 'Forgotten Joint' Score (FJS), a 12-item questionnaire analysing the ability to forget the joint, for comparing preoperative status in osteoarthritic patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Higher scores represent a better result with a maximum of 100. The hypothesis of this study was that a preoperative difference in favour of hip arthritis could eventually explain why THA is cited more often as a forgotten joint than TKA. A prospective cohort study was conducted in 150 patients with either tricompartmental knee (n = 75) or hip osteoarthritis (n = 75). Patients completed FJS-12 scores preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. A similar preoperative FJS-12 was observed for hip (22 (15)) and knee osteoarthritis (24 (17)) (n.s.). The postoperative FJS-12 score was significantly higher for THA (80 (24)) than for TKA (70 (27)) (p < 0.05). High reliability after 6 weeks was observed for the preoperative FJS-12 test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.87) in TKA. A preoperative floor effect of 15 % in THA and 0 % in TKA was found as well as a postoperative ceiling effect of 33 % in THA and 9 % in TKA. The clinical relevance of utilizing the FJS-12 as an instrument to evaluate outcome is strongly proposed for knee arthroplasty. In general, one is not aware of a healthy joint during the ADL, and it can therefore be regarded as 'forgotten'. The preoperative FJS-12 Score is a powerful tool to provide patients with clearer insights into their positive evolution after surgery. The use of the FJS-12 in THA is a topic for further research, as this study found that floor and ceiling effects limit its usefulness in studies evaluating clinical outcome in this area. II.

  14. Tribology studies of the natural knee using an animal model in a new whole joint natural knee simulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Jennings, Louise M; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2015-09-18

    The successful development of early-stage cartilage and meniscus repair interventions in the knee requires biomechanical and biotribological understanding of the design of the therapeutic interventions and their tribological function in the natural joint. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a porcine knee model using a whole joint knee simulator for investigation of the tribological function and biomechanical properties of the natural knee, which could then be used to pre-clinically assess the tribological performance of cartilage and meniscal repair interventions prior to in vivo studies. The tribological performance of standard artificial bearings in terms of anterior-posterior (A/P) shear force was determined in a newly developed six degrees of freedom tribological joint simulator. The porcine knee model was then developed and the tribological properties in terms of shear force measurements were determined for the first time for three levels of biomechanical constraints including A/P constrained, spring force semi-constrained and A/P unconstrained conditions. The shear force measurements showed higher values under the A/P constrained condition (predominantly sliding motion) compared to the A/P unconstrained condition (predominantly rolling motion). This indicated that the shear force simulation model was able to differentiate between tribological behaviours when the femoral and tibial bearing was constrained to slide or/and roll. Therefore, this porcine knee model showed the potential capability to investigate the effect of knee structural, biomechanical and kinematic changes, as well as different cartilage substitution therapies on the tribological function of natural knee joints.

  15. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of (177)Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K; Thirumalaisamy, S G; Karthik, S; Nagaprabhu, V N; Vimalnath, K V; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using (177)Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite ((177)Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of (177)Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS < 25), fair (VAS ≥ 25-50), good (VAS ≥ 50-75) and excellent (VAS ≥ 75), with excellent and good results considered to be success, while fair and poor as failure and also by range of motion. Three phase bone scan (BS) was repeated after 6 months and changes in the second phase of BS3 were assessed visually, using a four-degree scale and in the third phase, semiquantitatively with J/B ratio to see the response. Biochemical analysis of C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen was repeated after 48 h, 4 and 24 weeks. In all 10 patients, no leakage of administered activity to nontarget organs was visible in the whole-body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of (177)Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than those

  16. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of 177Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Shinto, Ajit S.; Kamaleshwaran, K. K.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K.; Thirumalaisamy, S. G.; Karthik, S.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Vimalnath, K. V.; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using 177Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite (177Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of 177Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS < 25), fair (VAS ≥ 25-50), good (VAS ≥ 50-75) and excellent (VAS ≥ 75), with excellent and good results considered to be success, while fair and poor as failure and also by range of motion. Three phase bone scan (BS) was repeated after 6 months and changes in the second phase of BS3 were assessed visually, using a four-degree scale and in the third phase, semiquantitatively with J/B ratio to see the response. Biochemical analysis of C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen was repeated after 48 h, 4 and 24 weeks. In all 10 patients, no leakage of administered activity to nontarget organs was visible in the whole-body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of 177Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than those with more

  17. The effect of functional knee brace design and hinge misalignment on lower limb joint mechanics.

    PubMed

    Singer, Jonathan C; Lamontagne, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Knee bracing has been shown to alter lower limb joint mechanics, which may protect the anterior cruciate ligament. The effect of brace alignment and brace type, however, remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to determine whether the use of a functional knee brace, the type of brace used or its alignment relative to the knee causes biomechanical alterations to gait. Ten healthy participants took part in two walking conditions (aligned brace and misaligned brace) for two different types of brace (sleeve brace with bilateral hinges and hinge-post-shell). A non-braced condition was included as a baseline measure. Three-dimensional kinematics and force platform data were used to calculate the joint intersegmental forces and net joint moments of the ankle, knee and hip. In comparison to non-braced walking, the shell brace in its aligned position significantly reduced the peak ankle plantarflexor moment. There was a decreased peak knee flexion angle with both the aligned shell and sleeve braces. The shell brace in its aligned position significantly increased peak knee adduction and reduced peak knee internal rotation. In this sample of healthy participants, functional knee bracing failed to alter lower limb mechanics in such a way that would reduce the force transmitted to the anterior cruciate ligament. In addition, although there were brace induced changes in lower limb kinematics with 2cm of distal hinge misalignment, it is unlikely that hinge misalignment of this magnitude is detrimental to an uninjured knee joint during walking.

  18. Knee Arthritis Without Other Joint Symptoms in the Elderly With Seronegative Elderly Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Ryutaro; Date, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Elderly onset Rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) has important clinical distinctions when compared with younger onset RA (YORA). In knee arthritis of elderly patients, infection, crystal-induced arthritis or EORA should be suspected if elevation of CRP in the preoperative examination and turbid joint effusion in their knee joint are found. Furthermore, if joint swelling and effusion remain after performing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the infection after TKA, implant debris-related arthritis and EORA should be considered. However, it is difficult to diagnose patients as EORA if Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) are negative. The differential diagnosis is very important. PMID:28217205

  19. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes.

  20. Characterisation of a knee-joint energy harvester powering a wireless communication sensing node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yang; Zhu, Meiling

    2016-05-01

    Human-based energy harvesters are attractive as sustainable replacements for batteries to power wearable or implantable devices and body sensor networks. In the work presented here, a knee-joint energy harvester (KEH) was introduced to power a customer-built wireless communication sensing node (WCSN). The KEH used a mechanical plucking technique to provide sufficient frequency up-conversion—from a few Hz to the resonant frequency of the KEH—so as to generate the high power required. It was actuated by a knee-joint simulator, which reproduced the knee-joint motion of human gaits at a walking frequency of 0.9 Hz. The energy generated was first stored in a reservoir capacitor and then released to the WCSN in a burst mode with the help of an energy aware interface. The WCSN was deployed with a three-axis accelerometer, a temperature sensor, and a light detector for data sensing. A Jennic microcontroller was utilised to collect and transmit the measured data to a base station placed at a distance of 4 m. The energy generation by the KEH and the energy distribution in the system was characterised in real time by an in-house-built set-up. The results showed that the KEH generated an average power output of 1.76 mW when powering the WCSN. After charging the reservoir capacitor for 28.4 s, the KEH can power the WCSN for a 46 ms period every 1.25 s. The results also clearly illustrated how the energy generated by the KEH was distributed in the system and highlighted the importance of using a high performance power management approach to improve the performance of the whole system.

  1. Validation of a computational knee joint model using an alignment method for the knee laxity test and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Son, Juhyun; Lee, Young Han; Koh, Yong-Gon

    2017-01-01

    Computational models have been identified as efficient techniques in the clinical decision-making process. However, computational model was validated using published data in most previous studies, and the kinematic validation of such models still remains a challenge. Recently, studies using medical imaging have provided a more accurate visualization of knee joint kinematics. The purpose of the present study was to perform kinematic validation for the subject-specific computational knee joint model by comparison with subject's medical imaging under identical laxity condition. The laxity test was applied to the anterior-posterior drawer under 90° flexion and the varus-valgus under 20° flexion with a series of stress radiographs, a Telos device, and computed tomography. The loading condition in the computational subject-specific knee joint model was identical to the laxity test condition in the medical image. Our computational model showed knee laxity kinematic trends that were consistent with the computed tomography images, except for negligible differences because of the indirect application of the subject's in vivo material properties. Medical imaging based on computed tomography with the laxity test allowed us to measure not only the precise translation but also the rotation of the knee joint. This methodology will be beneficial in the validation of laxity tests for subject- or patient-specific computational models.

  2. Factors Predicting the Forgotten Joint Score After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Behrend, Henrik; Zdravkovic, Vilijam; Giesinger, Johannes; Giesinger, Karlmeinrad

    2016-09-01

    We recently developed the forgotten joint score 12 (FJS-12), a tool to assess joint awareness in everyday life. It is unknown whether patient factors predicting the outcome of the FJS-12 after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) exist. Five hundred forty cases of TKA were analyzed. Objective clinical results were obtained for range of motion, stability, and alignment. Patient-reported outcome was assessed using the FJS-12. Baseline data and complications were recorded. Cluster analysis based on FJS-12, postoperative flexion, and age resulted in 3 groups: poor outcome (88 patients), good outcome (340 patients), and excellent outcome (118 patients). The characteristics of "poor" compared to "excellent" clusters were studied more closely using bivariate comparative tests and logistic regression. We could find that male patients around 63 years with a lower body mass index were most likely to be allocated to the cluster "excellent" (defined as high FJS-12 and high postoperative flexion). Preoperative extension and flexion, stability, varus/valgus alignment, surgery prior TKA, or comorbidities were not predictive for the FJS-12 at 1 year follow-up. We identified 3 preoperative patient-related factors that may predict the FJS-12 after TKA: body mass index, age, and gender. These findings can be used to guide decision-making and important preoperative discussions on expectations after TKA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tendon and fascial structure contributions to knee muscle excursions and knee joint displacement.

    PubMed

    Snoeck, O; Beyer, B; Feipel, V; Salvia, P; Sterckx, J-L; Rooze, M; Van Sint Jan, S

    2014-11-01

    Semitendinosus and gracilis muscles whose tendons are used in surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament maintain their contractile ability, and a limited decrease of hamstring muscles force is observed postoperatively despite important changes. The goal was to quantify the influence of the myofascial structures on excursions and moment arms of knee muscles to attempt explaining the above-mentioned post-surgical observations. Hamstring harvesting procedures were performed by a senior orthopaedic surgeon on seven lower limbs from fresh-frozen specimens. Femoro-tibial kinematics and tendons excursion were simultaneously recorded at each steps of the surgery. No significant difference was demonstrated for excursions and moment arms after tenotomies and gracilis tendon harvesting (P≥0.05). The first significant semitendinosus excursion (P<1.17×10(-4)) and moment arm (P<6.88×10(-5)) decrease was observed after semitendinosus tendon harvesting (46% of the initial excursion). Gracilis and semitendinosus myofascial pathway is crucial for force transmission towards the knee joint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations between serum ghrelin and knee symptoms, joint structures and cartilage or bone biomarkers in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Wang, K; Xu, J; Ruan, G; Zhu, Q; Cai, J; Ren, J; Zheng, S; Zhu, Z; Otahal, P; Ding, C

    2017-09-01

    The roles of ghrelin in knee osteoarthritis (OA) are unclear. This study aimed to examine cross-sectional associations of ghrelin with knee symptoms, joint structures and cartilage or bone biomarkers in patients with knee OA. This study included 146 patients with symptomatic knee OA. Serum levels of ghrelin and cartilage or bone biomarkers including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), cross linked C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTXI), cross linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTXI), N-terminal procollagen III propeptide (PIIINP), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, 10, 13 were measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Knee symptoms were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) volume, IPFP signal intensity alternation, cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and effusion-synovitis were assessed using the (MRI). Osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN) were assessed using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International atlas. After adjustment for potential confounders, ghrelin quartiles were positively associated with knee symptoms including pain, stiffness, dysfunction and total score (quartile 4 vs 1: β 24.19, 95% CI 8.13-40.25). Ghrelin quartiles were also significantly associated with increased IPFP signal intensity alteration (quartile 4 vs 1: OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.55-8.25) and NTXI, PIIINP, MMP3 and MMP13. Ghrelin was not significantly associated with other joint structures and biomarkers. Serum levels of ghrelin were significantly associated with increased knee symptoms, IPFP signal intensity alteration and serum levels of MMP3, MMP13, NTXI and PIIINP, suggesting that ghrelin may have a role to play in knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Joint immobilization induced hypoxic and inflammatory conditions in rat knee joints.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Suda, Hideaki; Ando, Akira; Onoda, Yoshito; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hatori, Kouki; Itoi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hypoxic and inflammatory conditions after immobilization in the joint capsule of rat knees. The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were immobilized with an internal fixator (Im group) for 1 day, 3 days, and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and tibia and screws inserted without a plate (control group). The number of cells and blood vessels in the capsule were histologically examined. The hypoxic condition in the capsule was histologically examined with a Hypoxyprobe™-1. The gene expressions related to the hypoxic (hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and fibroblast growth factor 2) and inflammatory conditions [interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and tumor necrosis factor-β] were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The number of cells was unchanged at 1 day in the two groups; however, the number significantly increased at 3 days in the Im group. The number of blood vessels in the Im group gradually decreased. Strong immunostaining of Hypoxyprobe™-1 around the blood vessels was observed in the Im group. The gene expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and fibroblast growth factor 2 were significantly higher in the Im group compared with those in the control group. The gene expressions of IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-β were significantly higher in the Im group compared with those in the control group. These data indicated that joint immobilization induced hypoxic and inflammatory conditions in the joint capsule, which might be an initiating factor for joint contracture.

  6. Are the Kinematics of the Knee Joint Altered during the Loading Response Phase of Gait in Individuals with Concurrent Knee Osteoarthritis and Complaints of Joint Instability? A Dynamic Stereo X-ray Study

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B.; Klatt, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Background Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional declines in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Methods Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Findings Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (P < 0.01), while the total abduction/adduction range of motion was increased (P < 0.05). In addition, the coronal and transverse plane alignment of the knee joint at initial contact was significantly different (P < 0.05) for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. Interpretations The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics. PMID:22071429

  7. Ambulatory estimation of knee-joint kinematics in anatomical coordinate system using accelerometers and magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Kun, Liu; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko; Enguo, Cao

    2011-02-01

    Knee-joint kinematics analysis using an optimal sensor set and a reliable algorithm would be useful in the gait analysis. An original approach for ambulatory estimation of knee-joint angles in anatomical coordinate system is presented, which is composed of a physical-sensor-difference-based algorithm and virtual-sensor-difference-based algorithm. To test the approach, a wearable monitoring system composed of accelerometers and magnetometers was developed and evaluated on lower limb. The flexion/extension (f/e), abduction/adduction (a/a), and inversion/extension (i/e) rotation angles of the knee joint in the anatomical joint coordinate system were estimated. In this method, since there is no integration of angular acceleration or angular velocity, the result is not distorted by offset and drift. The three knee-joint angles within the anatomical coordinate system are independent of the orders, which must be considered when Euler angles are used. Besides, since there are no physical sensors implanted in the knee joint based on the virtual-sensor-difference-based algorithm, it is feasible to analyze knee-joint kinematics with less numbers and types of sensors than those mentioned in some others methods. Compared with results from the reference system, the developed wearable sensor system is available to do gait analysis with fewer sensors and high degree of accuracy.

  8. Radiological characteristics of the knee joint in nail patella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, S; Rooy, J de; Hannink, G; Koëter, S; van Kampen, A; Bongers, E

    2016-04-01

    Nail patella syndrome (NPS) is a skeletal dysplasia with patellofemoral dysfunction as a key symptom. We present the first in-depth radiological evaluation of the knee in a large series of NPS patients and describe the typical malformations. Conventional radiological examination of 95 skeletally mature patients with NPS was performed. Patellar morphology was classified according to the Wiberg classification as modified by Baumgartl and Ficat criteria, and trochlear shape was classified according to the Dejour classification. Patellar aplasia was present in 4/90 (4%), and patellar hypoplasia in 77/90 (86%) of patients. The prevailing patellar shapes were type III, type IV and Hunter's cap. No patellar shape genotype-phenotype association could be found. The malformations of the distal femur comprised shortening of the lateral femoral condyle in 46 out of 84 patients (55%), with a prominent anterior surface of the lateral femoral condyle in 47 out of 84 patients (56%) and a flat anterior surface of the medial femoral condyle in 78 out of 85 patients (92%). The trochlea was type A1 according to the Dejour classification in 79 out of 85 patients (93%). An easily recognisable characteristic quartet of malformations consisting of patellar aplasiaor hypoplasia and the malformations of the distal femur was found in 22 out of 81 patients (27%), with the majority displaying at least three malformations. The distinct malformations of the knee in nail patella syndrome are easily recognisable on conventional radiographs and lead to the correct interpretation of the aberrant morphology which is essential in the treatment of these patellofemoral disorders. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Joint-preserving surgical treatment of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Duany, Nyagon G; Zywiel, Michael G; McGrath, Mike S; Siddiqui, Junaed A; Jones, Lynne C; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    To date, reports of surgical treatment of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) refractory to non-operative treatment have primarily focused on knee arthroplasty. This report presents an overview of the characteristics of SPONK and reports our experience with joint-preserving surgical treatment of this condition. Fifteen patients who had joint-preserving surgery after failed non-operative modalities were studied. These patients were treated at a single center between January 1998 and September 2006 with a combination of arthroscopy and core decompression, or osteochondral autograft transfers. Thirteen of the 15 knees (87%) had knee joint survival with a mean Knee Society Score of 81 points (range 45–100 points) at a mean follow-up of 40 months (range 9–120 months). Five of seven knees treated with core decompression had a successful clinical outcome. One of the patients who failed core decompression later underwent osteochondral autograft transfer, and eight of nine knees treated with this modality had a successful outcome. Overall, these results demonstrate that joint-preserving surgical treatment can successfully postpone the need for knee arthroplasty in selected patients with pre-collapse SPONK.

  10. Obesity is not associated with increased knee joint torque and power during level walking.

    PubMed

    DeVita, Paul; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2003-09-01

    While it is widely speculated that obesity causes increased loads on the knee leading to joint degeneration, this concept is untested. The purpose of the study was to identify the effects of obesity on lower extremity joint kinetics and energetics during walking. Twenty-one obese adults were tested at self-selected (1.29m/s) and standard speeds (1.50m/s) and 18 lean adults were tested at the standard speed. Motion analysis and force platform data were combined to calculate joint torques and powers during the stance phase of walking. Obese participants were more erect with 12% less knee flexion and 11% more ankle plantarflexion in self-selected compared to standard speeds (both p<0.02). Obese participants were still more erect than lean adults with approximately 6 degrees more extension at all joints (p<0.05, for each joint) at the standard speed. Knee and ankle torques were 17% and 11% higher (p<0.034 and p<0.041) and negative knee work and positive ankle work were 68% and 11% higher (p<0.000 and p<0.048) in obese participants at the standard speed compared to the slower speed. Joint torques and powers were statistically identical at the hip and knee but were 88% and 61% higher (both p<0.000) at the ankle in obese compared to lean participants at the standard speed. Obese participants used altered gait biomechanics and despite their greater weight, they had less knee torque and power at their self-selected walking speed and equal knee torque and power while walking at the same speed as lean individuals. We propose that the ability to reorganize neuromuscular function during gait may enable some obese individuals to maintain skeletal health of the knee joint and this ability may also be a more accurate risk indicator for knee osteoarthritis than body weight.

  11. Mechanical characterization and validation of poly (methyl methacrylate)/multi walled carbon nanotube composite for the polycentric knee joint.

    PubMed

    Arun, S; Kanagaraj, S

    2015-10-01

    Trans femoral amputation is one of the most uncomfortable surgeries in patient׳s life, where the prosthesis consisting of a socket, knee joint, pylon and foot is used to do the walking activities. The artificial prosthetic knee joint imitates the functions of human knee to achieve the flexion-extension for the above knee amputee. The objective of present work is to develop a light weight composite material for the knee joint to reduce the metabolic cost of an amputee. Hence, an attempt was made to study the mechanical properties of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforced Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) prepared through melt mixing technique and optimize the concentration of reinforcement. The PMMA nanocomposites were prepared by reinforcing 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3 and 0.4 wt% of MWCNT using injection moulding machine via twin screw extruder. It is observed that the tensile and flexural strength of PMMA, which were studied as per ASTM D638 and D790, respectively, were increased by 32.9% and 26.3% till 0.25 wt% reinforcement of MWCNT. The experimental results of strength and modulus were compared with theoretical prediction, where a good correlation was noted. It is concluded that the mechanical properties of PMMA were found to be increased to maximum at 0.25 wt% reinforcement of MWCNT, where the Pukanszky model and modified Halpin-Tsai model are suggested to predict the strength and modulus, respectively, of the PMMA/MWCNT composite, which can be opted as a suitable materiel for the development of polycentric knee joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Abdominal muscle activity according to knee joint angle during sit-to-stand

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Juri; Rhee, Min-Hyung; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the activity of the abdominal muscles according to the angle of the knee joints during sit-to-stand. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy adult males participated in this study. Subjects initiated sit-to-stand at knee joint angles of 60°, 90°, or 120°. An electromyography system was used to measure the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of the rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique and transverse abdominis muscles. [Results] Percent contraction differed significantly among the three knee joint angles, most notably for the internal oblique and transverse abdominis muscles. [Conclusion] Wider knee joint angles more effectively activate the abdominal muscles, especially those in the deep abdomen, than do narrower angles. PMID:27390431

  13. Effect of Alpine ski boot cuff release on knee joint force during the backward fall.

    PubMed

    Benoit, D L; Lamontagne, M; Greaves, C; Liti, A; Cerulli, G

    2005-01-01

    The modern rigid alpine ski boot has been associated with an increase in severe knee joint injuries. A new design that allows the rear portion of the upper cuff of the boot (rear spoiler) to open when a posterior directed force is applied to it (similar to when a skier falls back on the ski) is investigated. Motion analysis was combined with kinetic measures to estimate the shear and compressive forces at the knee joint using a link-segment model while subjects fell backward to provoke ski boot cuff release. The rear spoiler opening was found to reduce anterior cruciate ligament directed shear force while increasing compressive force at the joint. We conclude that both compressive force and reduced anterior cruciate directed shear force have been associated with protective mechanisms at the knee joint. This occurred over a very brief period of time, however, and the influence this may have on knee injury prevention is discussed.

  14. [Bone development trend in the knee joint of Tibetan teenagers in Aba Prefecture of Sichuan Province].

    PubMed

    Ding, Shi-Rong; Ying, Chong-Liang; Wan, Lei; Wei, Hua; Wang, Ya-Hui; Zhu, Guang-You

    2013-08-01

    To discuss bone development trend in the knee joint of Tibetan teenagers in Sichuan province and to effectively update the database for estimating the living age of Tibetan teenagers in terms of bone age of the knee joint. Radiographs including epiphysis of distal femur, proximal tibia and proximal fibula were taken from 483 Tibetan male and female teenagers aged from 14 to 19 years old in Aba prefecture of Sichuan province in order to observe epiphyseal growth situation. The descriptive data of the epiphyseal closure ages of these teenagers' knee joints were statistically analyzed by SPSS 16.0 software. The distal femur epiphyseal closure occurred earliest, while the proximal fibula epiphyseal closure occurred latest. The epiphyseal growth of knee joints of females occurred about one year earlier than that of males. The forensic information and data related to Tibetan teenagers' bone age identification should be updated regularly. These results provide potential value for the practice of forensic medicine, anthropology and clinical medicine.

  15. Mechanics of the knee. A study of joint and muscle load with clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Nisell, R

    1985-01-01

    The load moment of force about the knee joint during machine milking and when lifting a 12.8 kg box was quantified using a computerized static sagittal plane body model. Surface electromyography of quadriceps and hamstrings muscles was normalized and expressed as a percentage of an isometric maximum voluntary test contraction. Working with straight knees and the trunk flexed forwards induced extending knee load moments of maximum 55 Nm. Lifting the box with flexed knees gave flexing moments of 50 Nm at the beginning of the lift, irrespective of whether the burden was between or in front of the feet. During machine milking, a level difference between operator and cow of 0.70 m - 1.0 m significantly lowered the knee extending moments. To quantify the force magnitudes acting in the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral joints, a local biomechanical model of the knee was developed using a combination of cadaver knee dissections and lateral knee radiographs of healthy subjects. The moment arm of the knee extensor was significantly shorter for women than for men, which resulted in higher knee joint forces in women if the same moment was produced. A diagram for quantifying patellar forces was worked out. The force magnitudes given by the knee joint biomechanical model correlated well with experimentally forces measured by others. During the parallel squat in powerlifting, the maximum flexing knee load moment was estimated to 335-550 Nm when carrying a 382.5 kg burden and the in vivo force of a complete quadriceps tendon-muscle rupture to between 10,900 and 18,300 N. During isokinetic knee extension, the tibio-femoral compressive force reached peak magnitudes of 9 times body weight and the anteroposterior shear force was close to 1 body weight at knee angles straighter than 60 degrees, indicating that high forces stress the anterior cruciate ligament. A proximal resistance pad position decreased the shear force considerably, and this position is recommended in early

  16. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  17. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern.

  18. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A.; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. Methods A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. Findings The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Interpretation Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. PMID:26298706

  19. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait.

    PubMed

    Samaan, Michael A; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2015-12-01

    Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation, and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of elastic bandages on human knee proprioception in the uninjured population.

    PubMed

    Perlau, R; Frank, C; Fick, G

    1995-01-01

    Elastic bandages are often used to treat musculoskeletal disorders, even though there is little scientific evidence currently to support this generalized practice. We tested the hypothesis that elastic bandages improve proprioception of the bandaged joint during their use, and that this benefit was more than temporary. The uninjured human knee was used as a model. Fifty-four volunteers (54 knees), aged 22 to 40 years, were asked to identify a prior set joint angle as their knee was passively extended. Each knee was tested without the elastic bandage, immediately after bandage application, after 1 hour of bandage wear, and finally after removal of the bandage. Results showed that elastic bandages significantly improved knee joint proprioception in the uninjured knee during the entire interval of their use (mean decrease in inaccuracy of 1.0 degree, equivalent to 25% improvement, P < 0.05), and that this benefit was lost when the bandage was removed. The magnitude of the improvement, or the potential beneficial effect of the bandage, was inversely related to the participant's inherent knee proprioceptive ability, which was demonstrated in the test group before the initial application of the bandage.

  1. Phantom-based multimodal interactions for medical education and training: the Munich Knee Joint Simulator.

    PubMed

    Riener, Robert; Frey, Martin; Pröll, Thomas; Regenfelder, Felix; Burgkart, Rainer

    2004-06-01

    Simulation environments based on virtual reality technologies can support medical education and training. In this paper, the novel approach of an "interactive phantom" is presented that allows a realistic display of haptic contact information typically generated when touching and moving human organs or segments. The key idea of the haptic interface is to attach passive phantom objects to a mechanical actuator. The phantoms look and feel as real anatomical objects. Additional visualization of internal anatomical and physiological information and sound generated during the interaction with the phantom yield a multimodal approach that can increase performance, didactic value, and immersion into the virtual environment. Compared to classical approaches, this multimodal display is convenient to use, provides realistic tactile properties, and can be partly adjusted to different, e.g., pathological properties. The interactive phantom is exemplified by a virtual human knee joint that can support orthopedic education, especially for the training of clinical knee joint evaluation. It is suggested that the technical principle can be transferred to many other fields of medical education and training such as obstetrics and dentistry.

  2. Post traumatic osteoma of tibial insertion of medial collateral ligament of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Shanker, V S; Gadikoppula, S; Loeffler, M D

    1998-03-01

    Two cases are presented of post traumatic para-articular osteoma developing at the site of tibial attachment of the medial collateral ligament of knee joint. These occurred after injuries sustained while playing football and in one case the ossified mass was treated with surgical excision for unresolved symptoms after conservative measures. A comparison is made with Pellegrini Stieda disease, which is a similar affection of the femoral insertion of the medial ligament of the knee joint.

  3. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  4. Effects of exercise therapy on knee joint function and synovial fluid cytokine levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Lan; Liu, Hong-Qi; Xu, Xiao-Zu; Zhi, Juan; Geng, Jiao-Jiao; Chen, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to observe the effect of exercise therapy on the function of the knee joint and the levels of cytokines and cytokine-related genes, specifically tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), in the synovial joints of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and to explore its mechanism of action. A total of 100 KOA patients were divided into a treatment group (n=50) and a control group (n=50) according to the order of admission. The patients in the treatment group were treated with diclofenac sodium combined with exercise therapy and the patients in the control group were treated with diclofenac sodium only. The function of the knee joint and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid were measured following 4 weeks of treatment. The results revealed that the knee joint index score and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid decreased significantly in the KOA patients of the two groups following treatment (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the knee joint index score and the TNF-α, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial joints were lower and the therapeutic efficacy was increased in the patients of the treatment group (P<0.05). In brief, exercise therapy may decrease cytokine and cytokine-related gene levels in the synovial fluid and inhibit inflammatory factor-mediated cartilage degradation in KOA patients, thus, effectively improving the clinical symptoms of KOA.

  5. Footwear affects the gearing at the ankle and knee joints during running.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Bjoern; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Eysel, Peer; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-08-10

    The objective of the study was to investigate the adjustment of running mechanics by wearing five different types of running shoes on tartan compared to barefoot running on grass focusing on the gearing at the ankle and knee joints. The gear ratio, defined as the ratio of the moment arm of the ground reaction force (GRF) to the moment arm of the counteracting muscle tendon unit, is considered to be an indicator of joint loading and mechanical efficiency. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics of 14 healthy volunteers were quantified three dimensionally and compared between running in shoes on tartan and barefoot on grass. Results showed no differences for the gear ratios and resultant joint moments for the ankle and knee joints across the five different shoes, but showed that wearing running shoes affects the gearing at the ankle and knee joints due to changes in the moment arm of the GRF. During barefoot running the ankle joint showed a higher gear ratio in early stance and a lower ratio in the late stance, while the gear ratio at the knee joint was lower during midstance compared to shod running. Because the moment arms of the counteracting muscle tendon units did not change, the determinants of the gear ratios were the moment arms of the GRF's. The results imply higher mechanical stress in shod running for the knee joint structures during midstance but also indicate an improved mechanical advantage in force generation for the ankle extensors during the push-off phase.

  6. Knee joint laxity and passive stiffness in meniscectomized patients compared with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Creaby, Mark W; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-10-01

    Passive mechanical behavior of the knee in the frontal plane, measured as angular laxity and mechanical stiffness, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Little is known about knee laxity and stiffness prior to knee OA onset. We investigated knee joint angular laxity and passive stiffness in meniscectomized patients at high risk of knee OA compared with healthy controls. Sixty patients meniscectomized for a medial meniscal tear (52 men, 41.4 ± 5.5 years, 175.3 ± 7.9 cm, 83.6 ± 12.8 kg, mean ± SD) and 21 healthy controls (18 men, 42.0 ± 6.7 years, 176.8 ± 5.7 cm, 77.8 ± 13.4 kg) had their knee joint angular laxity and passive stiffness assessed twice ~2.3 years apart. Linear regression models including age, sex, height and body mass as covariates in the adjusted model were used to assess differences between groups. Greater knee joint varus (-10.1 vs. -7.3°, p<0.001), valgus (7.1 vs. 5.6°, p=0.001) and total (17.2 vs. 12.9°, p<0.001) angular laxity together with reduced midrange passive stiffness (1.71 vs. 2.36 Nm/°, p<0.001) were observed in patients vs. healthy controls. No differences were observed in change in stiffness over time between patients and controls, however a tendency towards increased laxity in patients was seen. Meniscectomized patients showed increased knee joint angular laxity and reduced passive stiffness ~3 months post surgery compared with controls. In addition, the results indicated that knee joint laxity may increase over time in meniscectomized patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lower-limb multi-joint stiffness of knee and ankle.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Ren, Yupeng; Xu, Dali; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Lower-limb multi-joint (knee and ankle) stiffness may play an important role in functional activities such as walking, and may be significantly altered post stroke. Thus, determination of lower-limb multi joint stiffness matrix is important for better understanding of gait and of pathological changes post stroke. In this study, using novel dynamics decomposition, the knee and ankle joint stiffness matrix including cross-coupled stiffness terms between the two joints were determined and reported ever first. The determined stiffness matrix may be useful for gait studies, and can be served as a baseline for studying pathophysiological changes post stroke.

  8. Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: an unusual cause of knee pain in a 14-month old girl.

    PubMed

    Wen, D W; Tan, T J; Rasheed, S

    2016-06-01

    We report a histologically proven case of synovial haemangioma of the knee in a 14-month old girl who presented to the emergency department with an acute 1-day history of refusing to weight-bear on the right leg and a preceding 3-week history of a right knee lump. Physical examination revealed a non-tender, soft lump over the lateral infrapatellar region. Radiographs revealed a poorly defined soft tissue density over the infrapatellar fat pad and a suprapatellar joint effusion. Ultrasound was used to confirm the presence of a vascular soft tissue mass compatible with a synovial haemangioma within the infrapatellar fat pad which showed both intra-articular and extra-articular extension. There was good correlation of the ultrasound findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), highlighting the potential clinical utility of ultrasound as an alternative imaging modality in establishing the pre-operative diagnosis and extent of a synovial haemangioma about the knee joint.

  9. Soldier-relevant body borne loads increase knee joint contact force during a run-to-stop maneuver.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, John W; Hancock, Clifford L; O'Donovan, Meghan P; Brown, Tyler N

    2016-12-08

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of load carriage on human performance, specifically during a run-to-stop (RTS) task. Using OpenSim analysis tools, knee joint contact force, grounds reaction force, leg stiffness and lower extremity joint angles and moments were determined for nine male military personnel performing a RTS under three load configurations (light, ~6kg, medium, ~20kg, and heavy, ~40kg). Subject-based means for each biomechanical variable were submitted to repeated measures ANOVA to test the effects of load. During the RTS, body borne load significantly increased peak knee joint contact force by 1.2 BW (p<0.001) and peak vertical (p<0.001) and anterior-posterior (p=0.002) ground reaction forces by 0.6 BW and 0.3 BW, respectively. Body borne load also had a significant effect on hip (p=0.026) posture with the medium load and knee (p=0.046) posture with the heavy load. With the heavy load, participants exhibited a substantial, albeit non-significant increase in leg stiffness (p=0.073 and d=0.615). Increases in joint contact force exhibited during the RTS were primarily due to greater GRFs that impact the soldier with each incremental addition of body borne load. The stiff leg, extended knee and large braking force the soldiers exhibited with the heavy load suggests their injury risk may be greatest with that specific load configuration. Further work is needed to determine if the biomechanical profile exhibited with the heavy load configuration translates to unsafe shear forces at the knee joint and consequently, a higher likelihood of injury. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Associations between proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) types and knee osteoarthritic changes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Lu, M; Han, W; Wang, K; Zhu, Z; Antony, B; Cicuttini, F; Yin, Z; Jones, G; Ding, C

    2017-09-01

    To describe the cross-sectional associations between proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) type configurations and knee joint structural abnormalities in older adults. A total of 967 community-based participants were studied. T1-weighted fat-suppressed magnetic resonance image (MRI) with spoiled gradient recalled echo sequence was utilized to assess the PTFJ type configurations. Knee cartilage volume, cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions and osteophytes were measured. Linear regression and binary logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between PTFJ type configurations and knee joint cartilage volume as well as knee structural abnormalities, respectively, after adjustment for potential confounders. Seven PTFJ types including plane (49.4%), trochoid (31.9%), double trochoid (4.3%), saddle (5.4%), condylar (5.3%), trochlear (3.5%) and ball & socket (0.2%) were observed. Plane type was used as the comparator. In multivariable analyses, irregular joint types (comprising the five uncommon joint types) were associated negatively with cartilage volume, and positively with knee cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions and osteophytes in the lateral (but not medial) compartments. In contrast, trochoid type was only associated with reduced femoral cartilage volume, but not with knee cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions and osteophytes. Irregular PTFJ joint shapes are associated with osteoarthritic changes in the lateral, but not medial, tibiofemoral compartment in older adults. The causal relationship needs to be examined in future longitudinal studies. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Kinesiology Taping on Repositioning Error of the Knee Joint after Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin Tae; Lee, Jung-hoon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. [Methods] The repositioning error of the knee joint was measured using a digital goniometer when the subjects extended their dominant-side knee to a random target angle (30°, 45°, or 60°) with their eyes closed, before and after a quadriceps muscle fatigue protocol, and after application of kinesiology tape. [Results] We found that repositioning errors of the dominant-side knee joint increased after quadriceps fatigue compared with no-fatigue conditions. However, kinesiology taping of the quadriceps muscle and patella after quadriceps fatigue significantly decreased repositioning errors of the knee joint. [Conclusion] These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue increases the repositioning error of the knee joint, whereas application of kinesiology tape decreases fatigue-induced joint repositioning error. PMID:25013297

  12. The use of a neoprene knee sleeve to compensate the deficit in knee joint position sense caused by muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Van Tiggelen, D; Coorevits, P; Witvrouw, E

    2008-02-01

    The importance of good proprioceptive abilities is stressed in many rehabilitation protocols. In contrast, it has been shown that muscle fatigue has a negative influence on proprioception. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a neoprene knee sleeve (NKS) on the joint position sense in a fatigued knee joint. Sixty-four healthy subjects underwent four successive assessments of the same active joint repositioning test (AJRT) in an open kinetic chain setting under different conditions. First, each subject performed the AJRT without brace. One knee was braced during the second assessment. Subjects wore the brace for 6 h and were submitted to a fatigue protocol, followed by the third assessment under the same conditions as the previous one. The fourth and last AJRT was performed immediately after the third one but both knees were non-braced. When the subjects wore an NKS, significant differences in repositioning error were demonstrated between both sides. On the braced side, no significant differences were observed between the baseline assessment and the third assessment. NKS compensate the deficit in joint position sense due to fatigue. The use of NKS could be justified as a preventive measure or treatment in subjects to enhance proprioception.

  13. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    PubMed

    Kotti, Margarita; Duffell, Lynsey D; Faisal, Aldo A; McGregor, Alison H

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis subjects exhibit more

  14. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a “soft” constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of “hard” constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO. PMID:27314586

  15. First Case Report of a Late Onset Knee Periprosthetic Joint Infection Caused by Lactococcus garvieae

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is known as a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, and facultatively anaerobic fish pathogen. The association between Lactococcus spp. and human infectious diseases is described as being mainly associated with lumbar osteomyelitis, hepatic abscess, and infective endocarditis. In the literature of orthopedic post-prosthetic infections, L. garvieae was associated with a case of hip prosthetic infection in a fishmonger woman. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities, who is admitted to our center with a 5-day history of pain, swelling, and motility disorder of the right knee by the presence of a bicondylar knee replacement surgery, which was performed due to gonarthrosis 17 years ago. The radiographies of the right knee revealed no signs of displacement or loosening of the prothesis. After multiple radical debridements including VAC therapy and targeted antibiotic therapy we have managed to defeat the infection without exchange arthroplasty. Although we could not demonstrate the source of infection, we can only presume that in our case the source of infection was represented by the ingestion of possibly contaminated food. The patient had a habit of eating Nile perch fish (Lates niloticus) every 4 weeks. We illustrated once more the possibility of a late onset L. garvieae related orthopedic periprosthetic joint infection by multiple comorbidities. PMID:27833769

  16. Knee joint proprioception in ballet dancers and non-dancers.

    PubMed

    Dieling, Simone; van der Esch, Martin; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of upper-leg muscle fatigue on knee joint proprioception in 13 ballet dancers and 13 non-dancer controls. Proprioception acuity, expressed as position and motion sense, was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. The position and motion sense assessments were prior to and immediately after an isokinetic upper-leg muscle fatigue protocol. Participants wore blindfolds for both tasks to eliminate vision, an inflated air splint on their lower leg to neutralize cutaneous sensation, and headphones with white noise during the motion sense task to eliminate auditory cues. Results showed no significant differences in position and motion sense between dancers and controls in the non-fatigued state. In the fatigued state no significant differences were found in position sense between dancers and controls, while controls increased significantly in motion sense error (p = 0.030) and ballet dancers showed no change in motion sense. It is concluded that position sense and motion sense acuity are not affected by muscle fatigue in dancers, but motion sense is affected by muscle fatigue in non-dancers.

  17. Intra-articular injection of dexketoprofen in rat knee joint : Histopathologic assessment of cartilage & synovium

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Aycan Guner; Akyol, Onat; Ekici, Murat; Sitilci, Tolga; Topacoglu, Hakan; Ozyuvaci, Emine

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Effective pain control following outpatient surgical procedures is an important aspect of patient discharge. This study was carried out with an aim to investigate the histopathological effects of intra-articular dexketoprofen trometamol injection in knee joint on synovium and cartilage in an experimental rat model. Methods: In each of 40 rats, the right knee was designated as the study group and the left knee as the control group (NS group). Under aseptic conditions, 35 rats received an injection of 0.25 ml (6.25 mg) dexketoprofen trometamol into the right knee joint and an injection of 0.25 ml 0.9 per cent normal saline solution into the left knee joint. On the 1st, 2nd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days after intra-articular injection, rats in specified groups were sacrificed by intraperitoneal injection of 120 mg/kg sodium thiopental. Knee joints were separated and sectioned for histopathological examination. Inflammatory changes in the joints were recorded according to a grade scale. Results: No significant difference in terms of pathological changes both in synovium and cartilage was observed between the NS group and the study group on days 1, 2, 7, 14 and 21 after intra-articular injection of dexketoprofen or saline in the knee joint. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings showed no evidence of significant histopathological damage to the cartilage and synovia for a period up to 21 days following intra-articular administration of dexketoprofen trometamol in the knee joints of rats. PMID:25297355

  18. The effect of sustained static kneeling on kinetic and kinematic knee joint gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Kajaks, Tara; Costigan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Despite epidemiological evidence for kneeling as an occupational risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, biomechanical evidence is lacking. Gait knee joint mechanics, a common measure used to study knee osteoarthritis initiation, were used in the present study to investigate the effect of sustained static kneeling on the knee. Ten healthy male subjects (24.1 years ± 3.5) performed ten baseline walking trials, followed by a 30-min kneeling protocol and a second set of walking trials. Knee joint moments and angles were calculated during the stance phase. Within-subject root mean squared differences were compared within and between the pre- and post-kneeling gait trials. Differences were observed between the pre-kneeling and post-kneeling walking trails for flexion and adduction knee moments (0.12 Nm/kg ± 0.03, 0.07 Nm/kg ± 0.02) and angles (3.18° ± 1.22 and 1.64° ± 1.15), indicating that sustained static deep-knee flexion kneeling does acutely alter knee joint gait parameters.

  19. Decision making and experience level influence frontal plane knee joint biomechanics during a cutting maneuver.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Brown, Tyler N; McLean, Scott G; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the combined impact of experience and decision making on frontal plane knee joint biomechanics during a cutting maneuver. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 12 recreationally active and 18 NCAA Division I female athletes during execution of anticipated and unanticipated single-leg land-and-cut maneuvers. Knee joint abduction angles and external knee joint abduction torques were calculated and discrete peak stance-phase variables were extracted. Angle and torque time-series data were also submitted to separate functional data analyses. Variables derived from the functional data analyses indicated that decision making influenced knee abduction angle and torque time series in the recreational group only. Specifically, these variables pointed to greater knee abduction at the end of stance as well as a greater, albeit delayed peak in knee abduction torque at the beginning of landing in the recreational athletes during the unanticipated condition. In addition, the recreational athletes displayed greater discrete peak knee abduction angles than the Division I athletes regardless of condition. Discrete peak knee abduction torque did not differ between groups or conditions.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the sympathetic innervation of the rat knee joint

    PubMed Central

    CATRE, MEL G.; SALO, PAUL T.

    1999-01-01

    Retrograde tracing with Fluoro-Gold (FG) was used to identify the complete population of knee joint sympathetic postganglionic efferents in the lumbar sympathetic chain of adult female Wistar rats. In 6 rats, the total number and distribution of FG-labelled neurons in the lumbar sympathetic chain was determined. The rat knee joint is supplied by an average of 187±57 sympathetic afferents with the majority at the L3 and L4 levels. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), somatostatin (SS) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) revealed that 33% of knee joint sympathetic afferents contained TH, 42% contained VIP, and none contained somatostatin. Retrograde tracing with FG provided accurate and reproducible labelling of the joint-innervating subpopulation of sympathetic efferent neurons. This model lends itself to the further study of the molecular responses of this neuronal population in the various disorders and conditions affecting joints. PMID:10337955

  1. Coupling motion between rearfoot and hip and knee joints during walking and single-leg landing.

    PubMed

    Koshino, Yuta; Yamanaka, Masanori; Ezawa, Yuya; Okunuki, Takumi; Ishida, Tomoya; Samukawa, Mina; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2017-09-22

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the kinematic relationships between the rearfoot and hip/knee joint during walking and single-leg landing. Kinematics of the rearfoot relative to the shank, knee and hip joints during walking and single-leg landing were analyzed in 22 healthy university students. Kinematic relationships between two types of angular data were assessed by zero-lag cross-correlation coefficients and coupling angles, and were compared between joints and between tasks. During walking, rearfoot eversion/inversion and external/internal rotation were strongly correlated with hip adduction/abduction (R=0.69 and R=0.84), whereas correlations with knee kinematics were not strong (R≤0.51) and varied between subjects. The correlations with hip adduction/abduction were stronger than those with knee kinematics (P<0.001). Most coefficients during single-leg landing were strong (R≥0.70), and greater than those during walking (P<0.001). Coupling angles indicated that hip motion relative to rearfoot motion was greater than knee motion relative to rearfoot motion during both tasks (P<0.001). Interventions to control rearfoot kinematics may affect hip kinematics during dynamic tasks. The coupling motion between the rearfoot and hip/knee joints, especially in the knee, should be considered individually. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Age-related changes in kinematics of the knee joint during deep squat.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Shingo; Leardini, Alberto; Callewaert, Barbara; Wong, Pius D; Labey, Luc; Desloovere, Kaat; Matsuda, Shuichi; Bellemans, Johan

    2012-06-01

    Researchers frequently use the deep knee squat as a motor task in order to evaluate the kinematic performance after total knee arthroplasty. Many authors reported about the kinematics of a normal squatting motion, however, little is known on what the influence of aging is. Twenty-two healthy volunteers in various age groups (range 21-75 years) performed a deep knee squat activity while undergoing motion analysis using an optical tracking system. The influence of aging was evaluated with respect to kinematics of the trunk, hip, knee and ankle joints. Older subjects required significantly more time to perform a deep squat, especially during the descending phase. They also had more knee abduction and delayed peak knee flexion. Older subjects were slower in descend than ascend during the squat. Although older subjects had a trend towards less maximal flexion and less internal rotation of the knee compared to younger subjects, this difference was not significant. Older subjects also showed a trend towards more forward leaning of the trunk, resulting in increased hip flexion and anterior thoracic tilt. This study confirmed that some aspects of squat kinematics vary significantly with age, and that the basic methodology employed here can successfully detect these age-related trends. Older subjects had more abduction of the knee joint, and this may indicate the load distribution of the medial and lateral condyles could be different amongst ages. Age-matched control data are therefore required whenever the performance of an implant is evaluated during a deep knee squat.

  3. Effect of intraarticular tramadol administration in the rat model of knee joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Garlicki, Jarosław; Dorazil-Dudzik, Magdalena; Wordliczek, Jerzy; Przewłocka, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Local administration of exogenous opioids may cause effective analgesia without adverse symptoms from the central nervous system. Experiments show that peripheral antinociceptive effect of opioids is observed especially in inflammatory pain. The aim of the research was to estimate the effect of tramadol on nociceptive process at the level of peripheral nervous system, after its local administration in the model of knee joint inflammation. Tramadol was administered intraarticulary into the rat knee joint, before the inflammation as a preemptive analgesia and, for comparison, after the intraarticular injection of carrageenan. The research determined the influence of tramadol injection on pain threshold for thermal stimuli, development of inflammatory processes using the measurement of joint edema and motor function following the induction of knee joint inflammation in the rat. Functional assessment of knee joint with inflammation, in terms of rats' mobility and body position as well as joint loading and mobility were studied. The results of the experiments show that local administration of tramadol induces antinociceptive effect. The effect of tramadol, which elicits also a decrease in inflammatory edema, appears not only after its administration after carrageenan when inflammation was already present, but also in the case of its injection prior to carrageenan in the scheme of preemptive analgesia. The results of the described research show that not only morphine but also another opioid, tramadol, widely used in clinical practice, inhibits nociception, edema and functional impairment of the paw after its local application directly to the inflamed knee joint.

  4. Knee and hip joint biomechanics are gender-specific in runners with high running mileage.

    PubMed

    Gehring, D; Mornieux, G; Fleischmann, J; Gollhofer, A

    2014-02-01

    Female runners are reported to be more prone to develop specific knee joint injuries than males. It has been suggested that increased frontal plane joint loading might be related to the incidence of these knee injuries in running. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if frontal plane knee and hip joint kinematics and kinetics are gender-specific in runners with high mileage. 3D-kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 16 female and 16 male runners at a speed of 3 m/s, 4 m/s, and 5 m/s. Frontal plane joint angles and joint moments were ascertained and compared between genders among speed conditions. Across all speed conditions, females showed increased hip adduction and reduced knee adduction angles compared to males (p < 0.003). The initial peak in the hip adduction moment was enhanced in females (p = 0.003). Additionally, the hip adduction impulse showed a trend towards an increase in females at slow running speed (p = 0.07). Hip and knee frontal plane joint kinematics are gender-specific. In addition, there are indications that frontal plane joint loading is increased in female runners. Future research should focus on the relationship of these observations regarding overuse running injuries.

  5. The test-retest reliability of knee joint center location techniques.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Hebron, Jack; Taylor, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    The principal source of measurement error in three-dimensional analyses is the definition of the joint center about which segmental rotations occur. The hip joint has received considerable attention in three-dimensional modeling analyses yet the reliability of the different techniques for the definition of the knee joint center has yet to be established. This study investigated the reliability of five different knee joint center estimation techniques: femoral epicondyle, femoral condyle, tibial ridge, plugin- gait, and functional. Twelve male participants walked at 1.25 m·s-1 and three-dimensional kinetics/kinematics of the knee and ankle were collected. The knee joint center was defined twice using each technique (test-and-retest) and the joint kinetic/kinematic data were applied to both. Wilcoxon rank tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to compare test and retest angular parameters and kinematic waveforms. The results show significant differences in coronal and transverse planes angulation using the tibial ridge, plug-in-gait, and functional methods. The strongest test-retest ICCs were observed for the femoral epicondyle and femoral condyle configurations. The findings from the current investigation advocate that the femoral epicondyle and femoral condyle techniques for the estimation of the knee joint center are currently the most reliable techniques.

  6. Controlled trial of synovectomy of knee and metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Arthritis and Rheumatism Council and British Orthopaedic Association (1976).Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 35, 437-442. Controlled trial of synovectomy of knee and metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis. In a multicentre study patients with rheumatoid arthritis judged by prevailing criteria to be suitable for synovectomy of the knee or metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were randomly allocated to one of two groups. One group had the operation, the other was observed without operation from a notional corresponding date. 3 years later the outcome of synovectomy was compared with that of observation without synovectomy. Synovectomy of the knee was followed by significantly less pain and tenderness, smaller effusions, and smaller and less frequent erosions and geodes. By contrast, MCP joints were no better clinically or radiographically than those treated conservatively. The results have been compared with those of two other controlled trials, one concerned with the knee and MCP joints, the other only with MCP joints. In the present trial results were more favourable in the knee but comparable in the MCP joints with those reported in the first of these two trials but less favourable in the MCP joints than those observed in the second. PMID:1234410

  7. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    PubMed

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes.

  8. An exploratory study into the effects of a 20 minute crushed ice application on knee joint position sense during a small knee bend.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jill; Selfe, James; Oliver, Ben; Mee, Daniel; Carter, Alexandra; Scott, Michelle; Richards, Jim; May, Karen

    2016-03-01

    The effect of cryotherapy on joint positioning presents conflicting debates as to whether individuals are at an increased risk of injury when returning to play or activity immediately following cryotherapy application at the knee. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 20 min application of crushed ice at the knee immediately affects knee joint position sense during a small knee bend. Pre- and post-intervention. University movement analysis laboratory. Eleven healthy male participants. Kinematics of the knee were measured during a weight bearing functional task pre and post cryotherapy intervention using three-dimensional motion analysis (Qualisys Medical AB Gothenburg, Sweden). Tissue cooling was measured via a digital thermometer at the knee. Results demonstrated significant reductions in the ability to accurately replicate knee joint positioning in both sagittal (P = .035) and coronal (P = .011) planes during the descent phase of a small knee bend following cryotherapy. In conclusion a 20 min application of crushed ice to the knee has an adverse effect on knee joint repositioning. Team doctors, clinicians, therapists and athletes should consider these findings when deciding to return an athlete to functional weight bearing tasks immediately following ice application at the knee, due to the potential increase risk of injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The association between knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control and moderate knee osteoarthritis radiographic and pain severity.

    PubMed

    Astephen Wilson, J L; Deluzio, K J; Dunbar, M J; Caldwell, G E; Hubley-Kozey, C L

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between biomechanical and neuromuscular factors of clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) with radiographic severity and pain severity separately. Three-dimensional gait analysis and electromyography were performed on a group of 40 participants with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate medial knee OA. Associations between radiographic severity, defined using a visual analog radiographic score, and pain severity, defined with the pain subscale of the WOMAC osteoarthritis index, with knee joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography patterns of periarticular knee muscles, BMI and gait speed were determined with correlation analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses of radiographic and pain severity were also explored. Statistically significant correlations between radiographic severity and the overall magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance (r²=21.4%, P=0.003) and the magnitude of the knee flexion angle during the gait cycle (r²=11.4%, P=0.03) were found. Significant correlations between pain and gait speed (r²=28.2%, P<0.0001), the activation patterns of the lateral gastrocnemius (r²=16.6%, P=0.009) and the medial hamstring (r²=10.3%, P=0.04) during gait were found. The combination of the magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance and BMI explained a significant portion of the variability in radiographic severity (R(2)=27.1%, P<0.0001). No multivariate model explained pain severity better than gait speed alone. This study suggests that some knee joint biomechanical variables are associated with structural knee OA severity measured from radiographs in clinically diagnosed mild to moderate levels of disease, but that pain severity is only reflected in gait speed and neuromuscular activation patterns. A combination of the knee adduction moment and BMI better explained structural knee OA severity than any individual factor alone. Copyright © 2010

  10. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Joint space narrowing, body mass index, and knee pain: the ROAD study (OAC1839R1).

    PubMed

    Muraki, S; Akune, T; En-Yo, Y; Yoshida, M; Suzuki, T; Yoshida, H; Ishibashi, H; Tokimura, F; Yamamoto, S; Tanaka, S; Nakamura, K; Kawaguchi, H; Oka, H; Yoshimura, N

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the association of joint space narrowing with knee pain in Japanese men and women using a large-scale population-based cohort of the Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD) study. This study examined the association between minimum joint space width (mJSW) in the medial compartment and pain at the knee. mJSW was measured in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee using a knee osteoarthritis (OA) computer-aided diagnosis system. From the 3040 participants in the ROAD study, the present study analyzed 2733 participants who completed the radiographic examinations and questionnaires regarding knee pain (975 men and 1758 women; mean age, 69.9 ± 11.2 years). Subjects with lateral knee OA were excluded. After adjustment for age and Body mass index (BMI), medial mJSW, as well as medial mJSW/lateral mJSW, was significantly associated with knee pain. Sex and BMI affected the association of medial mJSW with knee pain. The threshold of medial mJSW was approximately 3 mm in men and 2 mm in women, while that of medial mJSW/lateral mJSW was approximately 60% in both men and women. BMI was found to have a distinct effect on the association of mJSW with pain. The present cross-sectional study using a large-scale population from the ROAD study showed that joint space narrowing had a significant association with knee pain. The thresholds of joint space narrowing for knee pain were also established. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical effects of robot assisted walking on knee joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Pavithra; Vidhya, S; Li, Junhua; Chew, Effie; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-07-01

    Since manual rehabilitation therapy can be taxing for both the patient and the physiotherapist, a gait rehabilitation robot has been built to reduce the physical strain and increase the efficacy of the rehabilitation therapy. The prototype of the gait rehabilitation robot is designed to provide assistance while walking for patients with abnormal gait pattern and it can also be used for rehabilitation therapy to restore an individual's normal gait pattern by aiding motor recovery. The Gait Rehabilitation Robot uses gait event based synchronization, which enables the exoskeleton to provide synchronous assistance during walking that aims to reduce the lower-limb muscle activation. This study emphasizes on the biomechanical effects of assisted walking on the lower limb by analyzing the EMG signal, knee joint kinematics data that was collected from the right leg during the various experimental conditions. The analysis of the measured data shows an improved knee joint trajectory and reduction in muscle activity with assistance. The result of this study does not only assess the functionality of the exoskeleton but also provides a profound understanding of the human-robot interaction by studying the effects of assistance on the lower limb.

  13. Whole-body vibration does not influence knee joint neuromuscular function or proprioception.

    PubMed

    Hannah, R; Minshull, C; Folland, J P

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on knee joint position sense and indices of neuromuscular function, specifically strength, electromechanical delay and the rate of force development. Electromyography and electrically evoked contractions were used to investigate neural and contractile responses to WBV. Fourteen healthy males completed two treatment conditions on separate occasions: (1) 5 × 1 min of unilateral isometric squat exercise on a synchronous vibrating platform [30 Hz, 4 mm peak-to-peak amplitude] (WBV) and (2) a control condition (CON) of the same exercise without WBV. Knee joint position sense (joint angle replication task) and quadriceps neuromuscular function were assessed pre-, immediately-post and 1 h post-exercise. During maximum voluntary knee extensions, the peak force (PF(V)), electromechanical delay (EMD(V)), rate of force development (RFD(V)) and EMG of the quadriceps were measured. Twitch contractions of the knee extensors were electrically evoked to assess EMD(E) and RFD(E). The results showed no influence of WBV on knee joint position, EMD(V), PF(V) and RFD(V) during the initial 50, 100 or 150 ms of contraction. Similarly, electrically evoked neuromuscular function and neural activation remained unchanged following the vibration exercise. A single session of unilateral WBV did not influence any indices of thigh muscle neuromuscular performance or knee joint proprioception.

  14. Knee joint angle affects EMG-force relationship in the vastus intermedius muscle.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    It is not understood how the knee joint angle affects the relationship between electromyography (EMG) and force of four individual quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the knee joint angle on the EMG-force relationship of the four individual QF muscles, particularly the vastus intermedius (VI), during isometric knee extensions. Eleven healthy men performed 20-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at knee joint angles of 90°, 120° and 150°. Surface EMG of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized by the root mean square during MVC. The normalized EMG of the four QF synergists at a knee joint angle of 150° was significantly lower than that at 90° and 120° (P < 0.05). Comparing the normalized EMG among the four QF synergists, a significantly lower normalized EMG was observed in the VI at 150° as compared with the other three QF muscles (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the EMG-force relationship of the four QF synergists shifted downward at an extended knee joint angle of 150°. Furthermore, the neuromuscular activation of the VI was the most sensitive to change in muscle length among the four QF synergistic muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative biomechanical analysis of current microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, Malte; Schmalz, Thomas; Blumentritt, Siegmar

    2010-04-01

    To investigate and identify functional differences of 4 microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (C-Leg, Hybrid Knee [also called Energy Knee], Rheo Knee, Adaptive 2). Tested situations were walking on level ground, on stairs and ramps; additionally, the fall prevention potentials for each design were examined. The measuring technology used included an optoelectronic camera system combined with 2 forceplates as well as a mobile spiroergometric system. The study was conducted in a gait laboratory. Subjects with unilateral transfemoral amputations (N=9; mobility grade, 3-4; age, 22-49y) were tested. Participants were fitted and tested with 4 different microprocessor-controlled knee joints. Static prosthetic alignment, time distance parameters, kinematic and kinetic data and metabolic energy consumption. Compared with the Hybrid Knee and the Adaptive 2, the C-Leg offers clear advantages in the provision of adequate swing phase flexion resistances and terminal extension damping during level walking at various speeds, especially at higher walking speeds. The Rheo Knee provides sufficient terminal extension; however, swing phase flexion resistances seem to be too low. The values for metabolic energy consumption show only slight differences during level walking. The joint resistances generated for descending stairs and ramps relieve the contralateral side to varying degrees. When walking on stairs, safety-relevant technical differences between the investigated joint types can be observed. Designs with adequate internal resistances offer stability advantages when the foot is positioned on the step. Stumble recovery tests reveal that the different knee joint designs vary in their effectiveness in preventing the patient from falling. The patient benefits provided by the investigated electronic prosthetic knee joints differ considerably. The C-Leg appears to offer the amputee greater functional and safety-related advantages than the other tested knee joints. Reduced

  16. Influence of a mono-centric knee brace on the tension of the collateral ligaments in knee joints after sectioning of the anterior cruciate ligament--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hinterwimmer, S; Graichen, H; Baumgart, R; Plitz, W

    2004-08-01

    To analyze the influence of knee bracing on the tension of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. The tension of the collateral ligaments in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees was measured with and without knee bracing using an in vitro model. Anterior cruciate ligament deficiency increases the tension in both collateral ligaments at the knee joint. Therefore knee braces should reduce that tension increase. However, that effect has never been proven quantitatively. After anterior cruciate ligament-transection, the forces of the medial (anterior/posterior part) and lateral collateral ligament were measured in ten fresh human cadaver knees at 0 degrees, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, 60 degrees, 80 degrees and 100 degrees of flexion, with and without application of a mono-centric knee brace. To quantify the ligament forces, strain gauges were fixed at the bony origins of the ligaments. Bracing led to a significant decrease of ligament forces (20-100 degrees: P < 0.0001) in the anterior part of the medial collateral ligament in all joint positions. In the posterior aspect, this effect was observed only at 40 degrees (P < 0.0001) and 80 degrees (P = 0.001) of flexion. In the lateral collateral ligament, bracing caused a strain reduction from 60 degrees to 100 degrees of flexion (P < 0.0001). Therefore a flexion angle dependent effect of knee bracing on the strain was seen in the posterior aspect of the medial and in the lateral collateral ligament in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee joints. Application of a mono-centric knee brace leads to a significant position dependent reduction of collateral ligament tension after anterior cruciate ligament-rupture.

  17. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

    PubMed Central

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  18. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F; Fregly, Benjamin J; Delp, Scott L; Banks, Scott A; Pandy, Marcus G; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lloyd, David G

    2013-11-15

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Efficacy of Direct Injection of Etanercept into Knee Joints for Pain in Moderate and Severe Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritic (OA) pain is largely considered to be inflammatory pain. However, during the last stage of knee OA, sensory nerve fibers in the knee are shown to be significantly damaged when the subchondral bone junction is destroyed, and this can induce neuropathic pain. Several authors have reported that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in a knee joint plays a crucial role in pain modulation. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of etanercept, a TNFα inhibitor, for pain in knee OA. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine patients with knee OA and a 2-4 Kellgren-Lawrence grading were evaluated in this prospective study. Patients were divided into two groups; hyaluronic acid (HA) and etanercept injection. All patients received a single injection into the knee. Pain scores were evaluated before and 4 weeks after injection using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and they were compared between the groups. Results Before injection, VAS and WOMAC scores were not significantly different between the groups (p>0.05). Significant pain relief was found in the etanercept group at 1 and 2 weeks by VAS, and at 4 weeks by WOMAC score, compared with the HA group (p<0.05). No adverse events were observed in either group. Conclusion Direct injection of etanercept into OA knee joints was an effective treatment for pain in moderate and severe OA patients. Furthermore, this finding suggests that TNFα is one factor that induces OA pain. PMID:26256983

  20. Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2013-08-09

    Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can simply be summed up. A total of 401 patients with hip or knee OA completed questionnaires on demographic variables and joint-pain comorbidities. Rasch analysis was performed to evaluate whether a sum score of joint-pain comorbidities can be calculated. Self-reported joint-pain comorbidities showed a good fit to the Rasch model and were not biased by gender, age, disease duration, BMI, or patient group. As a group, joint-pain comorbidities covered a reasonable range of severity levels, although the sum score had rather low reliability levels suggesting it cannot discriminate well among patients. Joint-pain comorbidities, in other than the primary affected joints, can be summed into a joint pain comorbidity score. Nevertheless, its use is discouraged for individual decision making purposes since its lacks discriminative power in patients with minimal or extreme joint pain.

  1. Assessment of safety and efficacy of methylsulfonylmethane on bone and knee joints in osteoarthritis animal model.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Junko; Hashimoto, Miyuki; Hosokawa, Yu; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), which is one of the popular ingredients of so-called health foods in Japan, is expected to relieve inflammation in arthritis and allergies. However, there is no scientific evidence to confirm the efficacy and safety of MSM in detail. In this study, we examined the effects of MSM on cartilage formation in growing rats (G) and cartilage degradation in STR/Ort mice (A), an accepted human osteoarthritis (OA) model. For cartilage formation study, 6-week-old growing male Wister rats were assigned to four groups to receive a control or MSM-containing diet. To examine the efficacy of MSM on the cartilage of OA model mouse, 10-week-old male STR/OrtCrlj mice were assigned to three groups to receive a control or MSM-containing diet. The dosages used were amounts equal to the recommended supplements for humans [0.06 g/kg body weight (BW)/day: MSM1G and MSM1A], 10 fold higher (0.6 g/kg BW/day: MSM10G and MSM10A), and 100 fold higher (6 g/kg BW/day: MSM100G). Intake of MSM for 4 weeks did not affect cartilage formation in the knee joint in growing rats. Body, liver, and spleen weight in the MSM100G group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Intake of MSM for 13 weeks decreased degeneration of the cartilage at the joint surface in the knee joints in STR/Ort mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that appropriate intake of MSM is possibly effective in OA model mice; however, intake of large amounts of MSM induced atrophy of several organs.

  2. Distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jixiang; Liang, Qianqian; Zuscik, Michael; Shen, Jie; Chen, Di; Xu, Hao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Chen, Yan; Wood, Ronald W; Li, Jia; Boyce, Brendan F; Xing, Lianping

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels and draining function in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice. For the mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA), we used mice with meniscal-ligamentous injury or mice with conditional knockout of the gene for cartilage transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor. The severity of cartilage loss and joint destruction was assessed histologically. Capillary and mature lymphatic vessels were identified and analyzed using double immunofluorescence staining and a whole-slide digital imaging system. Lymphatic drainage of knee joints was examined using near-infrared lymphatic imaging. Patient joint specimens obtained during total knee or hip arthroplasty were evaluated to verify the content validity of the mouse findings. Lymphatic vessels were distributed in soft tissues (mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads, and muscles of normal knees). The number of lymphatic vessels, particularly the number of capillaries, was significantly increased in joints of mice with mild OA, while the number of mature lymphatic vessels was markedly decreased in joints of mice with severe OA. OA knees exhibited significantly decreased lymph clearance. The number of both capillary and mature lymphatic vessels was significantly decreased in the joints of patients with OA. The whole-slide digital imaging system is a powerful tool, enabling the identification and assessment of lymphatic microvasculature in the entire mouse knee. Lymphatic capillaries and mature vessels are present in various soft tissues around articular spaces. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels and draining function, including significantly reduced numbers of mature vessels and impaired clearance, are present in OA joints. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Distribution and Alteration of Lymphatic Vessels in Knee Joints of Normal and Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jixiang; Liang, Qianqian; Zuscik, Michael; Shen, Jie; Chen, Di; Xu, Hao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Chen, Yan; Wood, Ronald W.; Li, Jia; Boyce, Brendan F.; Xing, Lianping

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels and draining function in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice. Methods For the mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA), we used mice with meniscal-ligamentous injury or mice with conditional knockout of the gene for cartilage transforming growth factor β (TGF β) type II receptor. The severity of cartilage loss and joint destruction was assessed histologically. Capillary and mature lymphatic vessels were identified and analyzed using double immunofluorescence staining and a whole-slide digital imaging system. Lymphatic drainage of knee joints was examined using near-infrared lymphatic imaging. Patient joint specimens obtained during total knee or hip arthroplasty were evaluated to verify the content validity of the mouse findings. Results Lymphatic vessels were distributed in soft tissues (mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads, and muscles of normal knees). The number of lymphatic vessels, particularly the number of capillaries, was significantly increased in joints of mice with mild OA, while the number of mature lymphatic vessels was markedly decreased in joints of mice with severe OA. OA knees exhibited significantly decreased lymph clearance. The number of both capillary and mature lymphatic vessels was significantly decreased in the joints of patients with OA. Conclusion The whole-slide digital imaging system is a powerful tool, enabling the identification and assessment of lymphatic microvasculature in the entire mouse knee. Lymphatic capillaries and mature vessels are present in various soft tissues around articular spaces. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels and draining function, including significantly reduced numbers of mature vessels and impaired clearance, are present in OA joints. PMID:24574226

  4. [Iohexol tracing of hyaluronic acid distribution in the knee joint cavity of rabbits].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqiang; Lin, Bingquan; Xiao, Jun; Shi, Zhanjun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the distribution of hyaluronic acid (HA) with iohexol tracing in the knee joint cavity of rabbits using CT plain scan, three-dimensional reconstruction and Χ-ray and observe how different injection sites affect HA distribution. Mixtures of HA and iohexol (tracer) were prepared that contained final iohexol concentrations of 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 20%, or 40%. The HA-iohexol mixtures (0.5 ml) were injected into rabbit knee joints, and the optimal iohexol concentration that allowed clear differentiation of the injected agents from the surrounding tissues was determined using dual-source CT plain scan and three-dimensional reconstruction technique. The HA-iohexol mixture (0.5 ml) containing the optimal concentration of iohexol was then injected into the knees of the rabbits either through the patella medial approach or the medial joint line approach, and HA distribution in the knee joint cavity was observed using CT scan and Χ-ray. The CT value of HA-iohexol mixture increased progressively with the tracer concentration. After injection of the mixture containing 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 40% iohexol, the CT value ratios of the soft tissue, HA-iohexol mixture and bone cortex were 2:7:46, 2:14:44, 2:28:44, 2:60:46, and 2:98:45, respectively, and a iohexol concentration of 5% was determined as optimal for differntiating the injected agents from the surrounding tissues. The HA-iohexol mixutre containing 5% iohexol injected through the medial-patellar approach was distributed mainly over the patello-femoral joint, and that injected through the joint line approach was found mainly over the tibio-femoral joint. HA-iohexol mixture containing 5% iohexol allows clear differentiation of bone cortex and soft tissues in rabit knee joint from the injected agents on CT scan and Χ-ray, and the injection approach can influence HA distribution in the knee joint cavity.

  5. Hip and knee joint kinematics during a diagonal jump landing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed females.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Prendiville, Anna; Sweeney, Lauren; Chawke, Mark; Kelleher, Judy; Patterson, Matt; Murphy, Katie

    2012-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a common injury encountered by sport medicine clinicians. Surgical reconstruction is the recommended treatment of choice for those athletes wishing to return to full-contact sports participation and for sports requiring multi-directional movement patterns. The aim of ACL reconstruction is to restore knee joint mechanical stability such that the athlete can return to sporting participation. However, knowledge regarding the extent to which lower limb kinematic profiles are restored following ACL reconstruction is limited. In the present study the hip and knee joint kinematic profiles of 13 ACL reconstructed (ACL-R) and 16 non-injured control subjects were investigated during the performance of a diagonal jump landing task. The ACL-R group exhibited significantly less peak knee joint flexion (P=0.01). Significant between group differences were noted for time averaged hip joint sagittal plane (P<0.05) and transverse plane (P<0.05) kinematic profiles, as well as knee joint frontal plane (P<0.05) and sagittal plane (P<0.05) kinematic profiles. These results suggest that aberrant hip and knee joint kinematic profiles are present following ACL reconstruction, which could influence future injury risk.

  6. Large subarticular cysts (geodes) adjacent to the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carter, A R; Liyanage, S P

    1975-10-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis are described, who developed very large bone cysts or geodes adjacent to the knee-joint. The existence of cysts adjacent to joints involved by rheumatoid arthritis is well recognised, but the occurrence of very large cysts is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulties. Possible aetiological factors are discussed.

  7. Primary and secondary restraints of human and ovine knees for simulated in vivo gait kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Rebecca J; Herfat, Safa T; Boguszewski, Daniel V; Engel, Andrew J; Galloway, Marc T; Shearn, Jason T

    2014-06-27

    Knee soft tissue structures are frequently injured, leading to the development of osteoarthritis even with treatment. Understanding how these structures contribute to knee function during activities of daily living (ADLs) is crucial in creating more effective treatments. This study was designed to determine the role of different knee structures during a simulated ADL in both human knees and ovine stifle joints. A six degree-of-freedom robot was used to reproduce each species' in vivo gait while measuring three-dimensional joint forces and torques. Using a semi-randomized selective cutting method, we determined the primary and secondary structures contributing to the forces and torques along and about each anatomical axis. In both species, the bony interaction, ACL, and medial meniscus provided most of the force contributions during stance, whereas the ovine MCL, human bone, and ACLs of both species were the key contributors during swing. This study contributes to our overarching goal of establishing functional tissue engineering parameters for knee structures by further validating biomechanical similarities between the ovine model and the human to provide a platform for measuring biomechanics during an in vivo ADL. These parameters will be used to develop more effective treatments for knee injuries to reduce or eliminate the incidence of osteoarthritis.

  8. Failed Radiation Synovectomy in Diseased Knee Joint with Missed Tuberculous Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Ashwani; Sharma, Aman; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Gupta, Kirti; Parghane, Rahul; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    The authors in this case report highlight the poor outcome of radiation synovectomy (RSV) for repeated knee joint effusion in a patient with histopathologically proven nonspecific arthritis. There was partial response initially following RSV but later follow-up showed recurrence in joint effusion with limited and painful mobility of the knee joint. Subsequent surgical synovectomy and histopathological examination showed it to be tubercular in origin. Thus in a country endemic for tuberculosis, an alternative infective etiology should also be kept in mind before subjecting the patient to RSV. PMID:27651744

  9. Evaluation of knee joint forces during kneeling work with different kneepads.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Jampala, Sree; Bloswick, Donald; Zhao, Jie; Merryweather, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine knee joint forces resulting from kneeling work with and without kneepads to quantify how different kneepads redistribute force. Eleven healthy males simulated a tile setting task to different locations during six kneepad states (five different kneepad types and without kneepad). Peak and average forces on the anatomical landmarks of both knees were obtained by custom force sensors. The results revealed that kneepad design can significantly modify the forces on the knee joint through redistribution. The Professional Gel design was preferred among the five tested kneepads which was confirmed with both force measurements and participants' responses. The extreme reaching locations induced significantly higher joint forces on left knee or right knee depending on task. The conclusion of this study is that a properly selected kneepad for specific tasks and a more neutral working posture can modify the force distribution on the knees and likely decrease the risk of knee disorders from kneeling work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of the Japanese herbal medicine, Boiogito, on the osteoarthritis of the knee with joint effusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Boiogito (Japanese herbal medicine, Tsumura Co. Tokyo, Japan) contains sinomenin which inhibits inflammatory reactions. Since sinomenine is a principle component of the Boiogito, there is a possibility of it being effective on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee with joint effusion. However, there is no report concerning the effectiveness of Boiogito on knee OA. The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic effect of Boiogito on OA of the knee associated with joint effusion in a comparative study among randomly assigned groups. Methods Study was performed using 50 patients who were diagnosed with primary osteoarthritis of the knee with joint effusion. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: one group (25 patients) using both loxoprofen (2-{4-[(2-oxocyclopentyl) methyl]} propanoic acid) and Boiogito and the other group (25 patients) using loxoprofen, and were evaluated during a 12 week observation period. The assessment parameters including knee scores in the Knee Society Rating System including Knee score and Functional scores, amount of joint effusion by joint puncture in clinically detected cases, the 36-items short form of the Medical Outcome Study Questionnaire (SF-36) as a measurement of health related quality of life were used. Results The knee scores based on the Knee Society Rating System were improved in both groups. The staircase climbing up and down ability in the Knee society rating system functional score was significantly improved in the group using Boiogito and loxoprofen compared to the loxoprofen group. In the evaluation using SF-36, significant improvements were found in the scores in both groups in physical functioning after 12 weeks. The amount of joint fluid was significantly decreased at 4, 8 and 12 weeks compared to pre-administration baseline in the group using Boiogito and loxoprofen. A side effect of Boiogito, dry mouth, was found in one case. The symptom was mild and improved immediately after

  11. Joint space narrowing after partial medial meniscectomy in the anterior cruciate ligament-intact knee.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, K Donald; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2007-09-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is common after total medial meniscectomy. In anterior cruciate ligament-intact knees, the reported outcomes of partial medial meniscectomy are variable. Radiographic assessment using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view is a reliable tool for detecting minor medial joint space narrowing, which may be an early sign of osteoarthritis. Studies that assessed the effect of partial medial meniscectomy found a low percentage of patients with >50% joint narrowing at 10 to 15 years after surgery. Digital radiography, using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view, is a highly sensitive method for observing minor joint space narrowing in the involved knee. A recent study showed that 88% of patients who underwent partial medial meniscectomy had joint space narrowing of <2 mm, and none had narrowing >or=2 mm, at a mean follow-up of 12 years. Subjective results after partial medial meniscectomy are favorable, with 88% to 95% of patients reporting good to excellent results.

  12. Biomechanical comparison of frontal plane knee joint moment arms during normal and Tai Chi walking.

    PubMed

    Jagodinsky, Adam; Fox, John; Decoux, Brandi; Weimar, Wendi; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Medial knee osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, affects adults. The external knee adduction moment, a surrogate knee-loading measure, has clinical implications for knee osteoarthritis patients. Tai Chi is a promising intervention for pain alleviation in knee osteoarthritis; however, the characteristics of external knee adduction moment during Tai Chi have not been established. [Subjects and Methods] During normal and Tai Chi walking, a gait analysis was performed to compare the external knee adduction moment moment-arm characteristics and paired t-tests to compare moment-arm magnitudes. [Results] A significant difference was observed in the average lateral direction of moment-arm magnitude during Tai Chi walking (-0.0239 ± 0.011 m) compared to that during normal walking (-0.0057 ± 0.004 m). No significant difference was found between conditions in average medial direction of moment-arm magnitude (normal walking: 0.0143 ± 0.010 m; Tai Chi walking: 0.0098 ± 0.014 m). [Conclusion] Tai Chi walking produced a larger peak lateral moment-arm value than normal walking during the stance phase, whereas Tai Chi walking and normal walking peak medial moment-arm values were similar, suggesting that medial knee joint loading may be avoided during Tai Chi walking.

  13. Degenerative joint disease on MRI and physical activity: a clinical study of the knee joint in 320 patients.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, G F; Basad, E; Rauber, K; Damian, M S; Rau, W S

    1999-01-01

    We examined 320 patients with MRI and arthroscopy after an acute trauma to evaluate MRI in diagnosis of degenerative joint disease of the knee in relation to sports activity and clinical data. Lesions of cartilage and menisci on MRI were registered by two radiologists in consensus without knowledge of arthroscopy. Arthroscopy demonstrated grade-1 to grade-4 lesions of cartilage on 729 of 1920 joint surfaces of 320 knees, and MRI diagnosed 14% of grade-1, 32% of grade-2, 94% of grade-3, and 100% of grade-4 lesions. Arthroscopy explored 1280 meniscal areas and showed degenerations in 10%, tears in 11.4%, and complex lesions in 9.2%. Magnetic resonance imaging was in agreement with arthroscopy in 81% showing more degenerations but less tears of menisci than arthroscopy. Using a global system for grading the total damage of the knee joint into none, mild, moderate, or severe changes, agreement between arthroscopy and MRI was found in 82%. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy showed coherently that degree of degenerative joint changes was significantly correlated to patient age or previous knee trauma. Patients over 40 years had moderate to severe changes on MRI in 45% and patients under 30 years in only 22%. Knee joints with a history of trauma without complete structural or functional reconstitution showed marked changes on MRI in 57%, whereas stable joints without such alterations had degenerative changes in only 26%. There was no correlation of degenerative disease to gender, weight, type, frequency, and intensity of sports activity. Therefore, MRI is an effective non-invasive imaging method for exact localization and quantification of chronic joint changes of cartilage and menisci that recommends MRI for monitoring in sports medicine.

  14. An investigation to examine the inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of the Rolimeter knee tester, and its sensitivity in identifying knee joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Julian; Hatcher, Alison; Arbuthnot, Jamie; McNicholas, Mike

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the Rolimeter knee tester (Aircast, Europe) as reliable and clinically sensitive tool for identifying and quantifying knee joint laxity utilising a sample of both known ACLD and normal knees. Thirty matched subjects (15 known ACLD and 15 normal subjects) were tested for knee joint laxity using the Rolimeter. Each subject was measured at both 90 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion, by each of the six investigators. This was then repeated again by all six investigators so that inter-tester and intra-tester reliability could be examined. Results showed that there was good reliability between testers, and intra-tester reliability was good for both left and right knees in both 90 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion. Results also demonstrated a high level of sensitivity for determining knee joint laxity in ACLD compared to normal knees. The Rolimeter knee tester is a reliable device for quantifying knee joint laxity, and is sensitive enough to identify anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

  15. Finite element analysis of the valgus knee joint of an obese child.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Yan, Songhua; Jiang, Yan; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Ming; Zeng, Jizhou; Zhang, Kuan

    2016-12-28

    Knee valgus and varus morbidity is at the second top place in children lower limb deformity diseases. It may cause abnormal stress distribution. The magnitude and location of contact forces on tibia plateau during gait cycle have been indicated as markers for risk of osteoarthritis. So far, few studies reported the contact stress and force distribution on tibial plateau of valgus knee of children. To estimate the contact stresses and forces on tibial plateau of an 8-year old obese boy with valgus knee and a 7-year old healthy boy, three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of their left knee joints were developed. The valgus knee model has 36,897 nodes and 1,65,106 elements, and the normal knee model has 78,278 nodes and 1,18,756 elements. Paired t test was used for the comparison between the results from the 3D FE analysis method and the results from traditional kinematic measurement methods. The p value of paired t test is 0.12. Maximum stresses shifted to lateral plateau in knee valgus children while maximum stresses were on medial plateau in normal knee child at the first peak of vertical GRF of stance phase. The locations of contact centers on medial plateau changed 3.38 mm more than that on lateral plateau, while the locations of contact centers on medial plateau changed 1.22 mm less than that on lateral plateau for healthy child from the first peak to second peak of vertical GRF of stance phase. The paired t test result shows that there is no significant difference between the two methods. The results of FE analysis method suggest that knee valgus malalignment could be the reason for abnormal knee load that may cause knee problems in obese children with valgus knee in the long-term. This study may help to understand biomechanical mechanism of valgus knees of obese children.

  16. Effects of moving forward or backward on the saddle on knee joint forces during cycling.

    PubMed

    Bini, Rodrigo Rico; Hume, Patria Anne; Lanferdini, Fabio Junner; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of cycling at preferred, forward and backward saddle positions on patellofemoral compressive and tibiofemoral compressive and shear forces. Cross-sectional. An incremental cycling test to exhaustion determined cyclists' maximal aerobic workload and second ventilatory threshold. In a second session, 1-min cycling trial at maximal aerobic workload then three 2-min trials at second ventilatory threshold workload at preferred, forward and backward saddle positions. Right pedal force via instrumented pedals, lower limb joint kinematics via video and inverse dynamics were used to calculate knee joint forces. Twenty-one competitive cyclists (28 ± 7 years). Patellofemoral compressive, tibiofemoral compressive and shear forces, and knee flexion angle. Changes to forward/backward saddle positions did not substantially affect compressive forces for patellofemoral (1-4%) or tibiofemoral (1-3%) joints. Tibiofemoral shear force increased in backward compared with preferred (19%) or forward (26%) saddle positions. Knee flexion angle at 3 o'clock (22%) and 6 o'clock crank positions (36%) increased at the forward compared to the backward saddle position. Small increases in knee flexion angle (5-6°) explained trivial differences in patellofemoral and tibiofemoral compressive forces. Tibiofemoral shear force may be more sensitive to changes in knee joint angle compared to other knee force components. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect studies of Uyghur sand therapy on the hemodynamics of the knee-joint arteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rongchang; Mahemut, Dilinaer; Tiyipujiang, Rexiati; Aihemaiti, Kuwahan; Ainiwaierjiang, Nuerya

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of Uyghur sand therapy on dynamics of arterial flow of knee joints via experiments and numerical simulations. Experiments have been carried out on 30 volunteers, with their diameter and flow rate of arteries of knee joints measured before and after Uyghur sand therapy. It has been found that Uyghur sand therapy will increase the inner diameter of knee arteries and speed up the blood flow. Experimental results show that Uyghur sand therapy can help relieve obstacles in local blood flow. By choosing one volunteer for CT scanning, three-dimensional reconstruction of knee-joint arteries via MIMICS software is achieved. Calculation model is the established with numerical calculations performed by ANSYS software. According to the calculations, the blood flow of the knee arteries speeds up and the uniform distribution of velocity enlarges after Uyghur sand therapy, which further confirms the experimental results. Besides, the research also suggests that Uyghur sand therapy has stronger effect on blood flow of knee-joint arteries than the inner diameter.

  18. Application of a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method for biomechanical modeling of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Liukkonen, Mimmi K; Mononen, Mika E; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-09-12

    Manual segmentation of articular cartilage from knee joint 3D magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a time consuming and laborious task. Thus, automatic methods are needed for faster and reproducible segmentations. In the present study, we developed a semi-automatic segmentation method based on radial intensity profiles to generate 3D geometries of knee joint cartilage which were then used in computational biomechanical models of the knee joint. Six healthy volunteers were imaged with a 3T MRI device and their knee cartilages were segmented both manually and semi-automatically. The values of cartilage thicknesses and volumes produced by these two methods were compared. Furthermore, the influences of possible geometrical differences on cartilage stresses and strains in the knee were evaluated with finite element modeling. The semi-automatic segmentation and 3D geometry construction of one knee joint (menisci, femoral and tibial cartilages) was approximately two times faster than with manual segmentation. Differences in cartilage thicknesses, volumes, contact pressures, stresses, and strains between segmentation methods in femoral and tibial cartilage were mostly insignificant (p > 0.05) and random, i.e. there were no systematic differences between the methods. In conclusion, the devised semi-automatic segmentation method is a quick and accurate way to determine cartilage geometries; it may become a valuable tool for biomechanical modeling applications with large patient groups.

  19. A joint-constraint model-based system for reconstructing total knee motion.

    PubMed

    Hsin-Chen Chen; Chia-Hsing Wu; Chien-Kuo Wang; Chii-Jeng Lin; Yung-Nien Sun

    2014-01-01

    Comprehending knee motion is an essential requirement for studying the causes of knee disorders. In this paper, we propose a new 2-D-3-D registration system based on joint-constraint model for reconstructing total knee motion. The proposed model that contains bone geometries and an articulated joint mechanism is first constructed from multipostural magnetic resonance volumetric images. Then, the bone segments of the model are hierarchically registered to each frame of the given single-plane fluoroscopic video that records the knee activity. The bone posture is iteratively optimized using a modified chamfer matching algorithm to yield the simulated radiograph which is the best fit to the underlying fluoroscopic image. Unlike conventional registration methods computing posture parameters for each bone independently, the proposed femorotibial and patellofemoral joint models properly maintain the articulations between femur, tibia, and patella during the registration processes. As a result, we can obtain a sequence of registered knee postures showing smooth and reasonable physiologic patterns of motion. The proposed system also provides joint-space interpolation to densely generate intermediate postures for motion animation. The effectiveness of the proposed method was validated by computer simulation, animal cadaver, and in vivo knee testing. The mean target registration errors for femur, tibia, and patella were less than 1.5 mm. In particular, small out-of-plane registration errors [less than 1 mm (translation) and 2° (rotation)] were achieved in animal cadaver assessments.

  20. Design and Evaluation of a New Type of Knee Orthosis to Align the Mediolateral Angle of the Knee Joint with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Esrafilian, Amir; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Eshraghi, Arezoo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease which influences the performance of the knee joint. Moreover, the force and moments applied on the joint increase in contrast to normal subjects. Various types of knee orthoses have been designed to solve the mentioned problems. However, there are other problems in terms of distal migration during walking and the alignment of the orthosis which cannot be changed following the use of brace. Therefore, the main aim of the research was to design an orthosis to solve the aforementioned problems. Method. A new type of knee orthosis was designed with a modular structure. Two patients with knee OA participated in this research project. The force applied on the foot, moment transmitted through the knee joint, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured by use of a motion analysis system. Results. The results of the research showed that the adduction moment applied on the knee joint decreased while subjects walked with the new knee orthosis (P-value < 0.05). Conclusion. The new design of the knee brace can be used as an effective treatment to decrease the loads applied on the knee joint and to improve the alignment whilst walking. PMID:22577565

  1. Quadriceps arthrogenic muscle inhibition: the effects of experimental knee joint effusion on motor cortex excitability.

    PubMed

    Rice, David Andrew; McNair, Peter John; Lewis, Gwyn Nancy; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2014-12-10

    Marked weakness of the quadriceps muscles is typically observed following injury, surgery or pathology affecting the knee joint. This is partly due to ongoing neural inhibition that prevents the central nervous system from fully activating the quadriceps, a process known as arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). This study aimed to further investigate the mechanisms underlying AMI by exploring the effects of experimental knee joint effusion on quadriceps corticomotor and intracortical excitability. Seventeen healthy volunteers participated in this study. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure quadriceps motor evoked potential area, short-interval intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation and cortical silent period duration before and after experimental knee joint effusion. Joint effusion was induced by the intraarticular infusion of dextrose saline into the knee. There was a significant increase in quadriceps motor evoked potential area following joint infusion, both at rest (P = 0.01) and during voluntary muscle contraction (P = 0.02). Cortical silent period duration was significantly reduced following joint infusion (P = 0.02). There were no changes in short interval intracortical inhibition or intracortical facilitation over time (all P > 0.05). The results of this study provide no evidence for a supraspinal contribution to quadriceps AMI. Paradoxically, but consistent with previous observations in patients with chronic knee joint pathology, quadriceps corticomotor excitability increased after experimental knee joint effusion. The increase in quadriceps corticomotor excitability may be at least partly mediated by a decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition within the motor cortex.

  2. Development of arthrogenic joint contracture as a result of pathological changes in remobilized rat knees.

    PubMed

    Kaneguchi, Akinori; Ozawa, Junya; Kawamata, Seiichi; Yamaoka, Kaoru

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to elucidate how rats recover from immobilization-induced knee joint contracture. Rats' right knees were immobilized by an external fixator at a flexion of 140° for 3 weeks. After removal of the fixator, the joints were allowed to move freely (remobilization) for 0, 1, 3, 7, or 14 days (n = 5 each). To distinguish myogenic and arthrogenic contractures, the passive extension range of motion was measured before and after myotomy of the knee flexors. Knee joints were histologically analyzed and the expression of genes encoding inflammatory or fibrosis-related mediators, interleukin-1β (1L-1β), fibrosis-related transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and collagen type I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1), were examined in the knee joint posterior capsules using real-time PCR. Both myogenic and arthrogenic contractures were established within 3 weeks of immobilization. During remobilization, the myogenic contracture decreased over time. In contrast, the arthrogenic contracture developed further during the remobilization period. On day 1 of remobilization, inflammatory changes characterized by edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and upregulation of IL-1β gene started in the knee joint posterior capsule. In addition, collagen deposition accompanied by fibroblast proliferation, with upregulation of TGF-β1, COL1A1, and COL3A1 genes, appeared in the joint capsule between days 7 and 14. These results suggest the progression of arthrogenic contracture following remobilization, which is characterized by fibrosis development, is possibly triggered by inflammation in the joint capsule. It is therefore necessary to focus on developing new treatment strategies for immobilization-induced joint contracture. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1414-1423, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  4. Soft tissue balance changes depending on joint distraction force in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kanto; Muratsu, Hirotsugu; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Miya, Hidetoshi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    The influence of joint distraction force on intraoperative soft tissue balance was evaluated using Offset Repo-Tensor® for 78 knees that underwent primary posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The joint center gap and varus ligament balance were measured between osteotomized surfaces using 20, 40 and 60 lbs of joint distraction force. These values were significantly increased at extension and flexion as the distraction force increased. Furthermore, lateral compartment stiffness was significantly lower than medial compartment stiffness. Thus, larger joint distraction forces led to larger varus ligament balance and joint center gap, because of the difference in soft tissue stiffness between lateral and medial compartments. These findings indicate the importance of the strength of joint distraction force in the assessment of soft tissue balance, especially when using gap-balancing technique.

  5. Proximal tibiofibular subluxation relationship to lateral knee pain: a review of proximal tibiofibular joint pathologies.

    PubMed

    Semonian, R H; Denlinger, P M; Duggan, R J

    1995-05-01

    Proximal tibiofibular subluxation is the symptomatic hypermobility of the proximal tibiofibular joint. Pain along the lateral aspect of the knee must be carefully evaluated as the anatomy and biomechanics of this region are very complex. Anatomical variants of the proximal tibiofibular joint may be key to understanding the pathomechanics and, thus, treatment of this joint. The "horizontal" proximal tibiofibular joint has a higher degree of mobility, while the "oblique" joint is relatively immobile to rotational forces on the fibula. Increased fibular external rotation will result in injury to the anterior capsule and ligaments of the proximal tibiofibular joint causing common complaints of "popping" and lateral knee pain. Treatment of proximal tibiofibular subluxation will involve modifications of a patient's activity level and training programs, utilization of a supportive strap, lower leg strengthening, and modifications in the lower kinetic chain biomechanics.

  6. Remobilization does not restore immobilization-induced adhesion of capsule and restricted joint motion in rat knee joints.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Suda, Hideaki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Onoda, Yoshito; Chimoto, Eiichi; Itoi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Joint immobilization, which is used in orthopaedic treatments and observed in bedridden people, usually causes restricted joint motion. Decreased joint motion diminishes activities of daily living and increases burden of nursing-care. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reversibility of immobilization-induced capsular changes and restricted joint motion in rat knee joints. The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were immobilized with an internal fixator for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks as a model of immobilization after surgery or disuse of the joint. After the fixation devices were removed, the rats were allowed to move freely for 16 weeks. Sham-operated rats were used as controls. Sagittal sections at medial midcondylar regions were made and assessed with histological, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical methods. Joint motion was measured using a custom-made device under x-ray control after removal of the periarticular muscles. In the 1/16-week and 2/16-week immobilization-remobilization (Im-Rm) groups, cord-like structures connecting the superior and inferior portions of the posterior capsule (partial adhesion) were observed without restricted joint motion. In the 4/16-, 8/16-, and 16/16-week Im-Rm groups, global adhesion of the posterior capsule and restricted joint motion were observed. The restricted joint motion was not completely restored after incision of the posterior capsule. These data indicate that immobilization alone causes irreversible capsular changes and arthrogenic restricted joint motion. Besides the joint capsule, other arthrogenic factors such as ligaments might influence the restricted joint motion. Prolonged immobilization over 4 weeks should be avoided to prevent irreversible joint contracture.

  7. Lymphatic vessels in osteoarthritic human knees.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D A; Verghese, P; Cook, G J; McWilliams, D F; Mapp, P I; Ashraf, S; Wilson, D

    2012-05-01

    The distribution and function of lymphatic vessels in normal and diseased human knees are understood incompletely. This study aimed to investigate whether lymphatic density is associated with clinical, histological or radiographic parameters in osteoarthritis (OA). Sections of synovium from 60 knees from patients with OA were compared with 60 post mortem control knees (from 37 individuals). Lymphatic vessels were identified using immunohistochemistry for podoplanin, and quantified as lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) fractional area. Effusion status was determined by clinical examination, radiographs were scored for OA changes, and inflammation grading used haematoxylin and eosin stained sections of synovium. Lymphatic vessels were present in synovia from both disease groups, but were not identified in subchondral bone. Synovial lymphatic densities were independent of radiological severity and age. Synovia from patients with OA displayed lower LVD (z=-3.4, P=0.001) and lower LEC fractional areas (z=-4.5, P<0.0005) than non-arthritic controls. In patients with OA, low LVD was associated with clinically detectable effusion (z=-2.2, P=0.027), but not with histological evidence of synovitis. The negative associations between lymphatics and OA/effusion appeared to be independent of other measured confounders. Lymphatic vessels are present in lower densities in OA synovia. Abnormalities of synovial fluid drainage may confound the value of effusion as a clinical sign of synovitis in OA. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Influence of Task Complexity on Knee Joint Kinetics Following ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Megan J.; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction exhibit abnormal knee joint movement patterns during functional activities like walking. While the sagittal plane mechanics have been studied extensively, less is known about the secondary planes, specifically with regard to more demanding tasks. This study explored the influence of task complexity on functional joint mechanics in the context of graft-specific surgeries. Methods In 25 participants (10 hamstring tendon graft, 6 patellar tendon graft, 9 matched controls), three-dimensional joint torques were calculated using a standard inverse dynamics approach during level walking and stair descent. The stair descent task was separated into two functionally different sub-tasks—step-to-floor and step-to-step. The differences in external knee moment profiles were compared between groups; paired differences between the reconstructed and non-reconstructed knees were also assessed. Findings The reconstructed knees, irrespective of graft type, typically exhibited significantly lower peak knee flexion moments compared to control knees during stair descent, with the differences more pronounced in the step-to-step task. Frontal plane adduction torque deficits were graft-specific and limited to the hamstring tendon knees during the step-to-step task. Internal rotation torque deficits were also primarily limited to the hamstring tendon graft group during stair descent. Collectively, these results suggest that task complexity was a primary driver of differences in joint mechanics between anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed individuals and controls, and such differences were more pronounced in individuals with hamstring tendon grafts. Interpretation The mechanical environment experienced in the cartilage during repetitive, cyclical tasks such as walking and other activities of daily living has been argued to contribute to the development of degenerative changes to the joint

  9. Eccentric loading and range of knee joint motion effects on performance enhancement in vertical jumping.

    PubMed

    Moran, Kieran A; Wallace, Eric S

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of variations in eccentric loading and knee joint range of motion on performance enhancement associated with the stretch-shortening cycle in vertical jumping. Seventeen male elite volleyball players performed three variations of the vertical jump which served as the research model: the squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and drop jump from a height of 30 cm (DJ30). Knee joint angle (70 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion) at the commencement of the propulsive phase for each jump type was experimentally controlled, with the trunk kept as erect as possible. Force and motion data were recorded for each performance and used to compute a range of kinematic and kinetic variables, including hip, knee and ankle angles, angular velocities, work done, net joint moments and a number of temporal variables. The average of 12 trials for each participant was used in a series of repeated measures ANOVA's (jump xk nee, alpha=.05). From both knee joint angles, an increase in eccentric loading resulted in a significant increase in jump height (DJ30>CMJ>SJ; p<.05). These enhancements were significantly greater (p<.05) for 70 degrees in comparison to 90 degrees of knee flexion. From 70 degrees of knee flexion, these enhancements were due to significant increases in work done at all three joints; while from 90 degrees of knee flexion, only the hip and ankle joints appeared to contribute (p<.05). The amount of enhancement associated with employing the SSC in jumping is dependent upon the interaction of the magnitude of eccentric loading and the range of motion used.

  10. Three-dimensional knee joint contact forces during walking in unilateral transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Neptune, Richard R

    2014-08-22

    Individuals with unilateral transtibial amputations have greater prevalence of osteoarthritis in the intact knee joint relative to the residual leg and non-amputees, but the cause of this greater prevalence is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare knee joint contact forces and the muscles contributing to these forces between amputees and non-amputees during walking using forward dynamics simulations. We predicted that the intact knee contact forces would be higher than those of the residual leg and non-amputees. In the axial and mediolateral directions, the intact and non-amputee legs had greater peak tibio-femoral contact forces and impulses relative to the residual leg. The peak axial contact force was greater in the intact leg relative to the non-amputee leg, but the stance phase impulse was greater in the non-amputee leg. The vasti and hamstrings muscles in early stance and gastrocnemius in late stance were the largest contributors to the joint contact forces in the non-amputee and intact legs. Through dynamic coupling, the soleus and gluteus medius also had large contributions, even though they do not span the knee joint. In the residual leg, the prosthesis had large contributions to the joint forces, similar to the soleus in the intact and non-amputee legs. These results identify the muscles that contribute to knee joint contact forces during transtibial amputee walking and suggest that the peak knee contact forces may be more important than the knee contact impulses in explaining the high prevalence of intact leg osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sagittal knee joint kinematics and energetics in response to different landing heights and techniques.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2010-03-01

    Single-leg and double-leg landing techniques are common athletic maneuvers typically performed from various landing heights during intensive sports activities. However, it is still unclear how the knee joint responds in terms of kinematics and energetics to the combined effects of different landing heights and techniques. We hypothesized that the knee displays greater flexion angles and angular velocities, joint power and work in response to the larger peak ground reaction force from 0.6-m height, compared to 0.3-m height. We further hypothesized that the knee exhibits elevated flexion angles and angular velocities, joint power and work during double-leg landing, relative to single-leg landing. Ground reaction force, knee joint kinematics and energetics data were obtained from 10 subjects performing single-leg and double-leg landing from 0.3-m to 0.6-m heights, using motion-capture system and force-plates. Higher peak ground reaction force (p<0.05) was observed during single-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. We found greater knee flexion angles and angular velocities (p<0.05) during double-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. Elevated knee joint power and work were noted (p<0.05) during double-leg landing and/or at greater landing height. The knee joint is able to respond more effectively in terms of kinematics and energetics to a larger landing impact from an elevated height during double-leg landing, compared to single-leg landing. This allows better shock absorption and thus minimizes the risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acceleration-based joint stability parameters for total knee arthroplasty that correspond with patient-reported instability.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Dustyn; Khan, Humera; Kim, Joo H; Slover, James; Walker, Peter S

    2013-10-01

    There is no universally accepted definition of human joint stability, particularly in nonperiodic general activities of daily living. Instability has proven to be a difficult parameter to define and quantify, since both spatial and temporal measures need to be considered to fully characterize joint stability. In this preliminary study, acceleration-based parameters were proposed to characterize the joint stability. Several time-statistical parameters of acceleration and jerk were defined as potential stability measures, since anomalous acceleration or jerk could be a symptom of poor control or stability. An inertial measurement unit attached at the level of the tibial tubercle of controls and patients following total knee arthroplasty was used to determine linear acceleration of the knee joint during several activities of daily living. The resulting accelerations and jerks were compared with patient-reported instability as determined through a standard questionnaire. Several parameters based on accelerations and jerks in the anterior/posterior direction during the step-up/step-down activity were significantly different between patients and controls and correlated with patient reports of instability in that activity. The range of the positive to negative peak acceleration and infinity norm of acceleration, in the anterior/posterior direction during the step-up/step-down activity, proved to be the best indicators of instability. As time derivatives of displacement, these acceleration-based parameters represent spatial and temporal information and are an important step forward in developing a definition and objective quantification of human joint stability that can complement the subjective patient report.

  13. Three-dimensional reconstruction of rat knee joint using episcopic fluorescence image capture.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, R; Aoyama, T; Zhang, X; Higuchi, S; Yamada, S; Takakuwa, T

    2014-10-01

    Development of the knee joint was morphologically investigated, and the process of cavitation was analyzed by using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) to create spatial and temporal three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. Knee joints of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E)14 and E20 were investigated. Samples were sectioned and visualized using an EFIC. Then, two-dimensional image stacks were reconstructed using OsiriX software, and 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. Cavitations of the knee joint were constructed from five divided portions. Cavity formation initiated at multiple sites at E17; among them, the femoropatellar cavity (FPC) was the first. Cavitations of the medial side preceded those of the lateral side. Each cavity connected at E20 when cavitations around the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were completed. Cavity formation initiated from six portions. In each portion, development proceeded asymmetrically. These results concerning anatomical development of the knee joint using EFIC contribute to a better understanding of the structural feature of the knee joint. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria infection of prosthetic knee joints: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Manyoung; Ha, Chul-Won; Jang, Jae Won; Park, Yong-Beom

    2017-08-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause prosthetic knee joint infections in rare cases. Infections with rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (RGNTM) are difficult to treat due to their aggressive clinical behavior and resistance to antibiotics. Infections of a prosthetic knee joint by RGNTM have rarely been reported. A standard of treatment has not yet been established because of the rarity of the condition. In previous reports, diagnoses of RGNTM infections in prosthetic knee joints took a long time to reach because the condition was not suspected, due to its rarity. In addition, it is difficult to identify RGNTM in the lab because special identification tests are needed. In previous reports, after treatment for RGNTM prosthetic infections, knee prostheses could not be re-implanted in all cases but one, resulting in arthrodesis or resection arthroplasty; this was most likely due to the aggressiveness of these organisms. In the present report, two cases of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by RGNTM (Mycobacterium abscessus) are described that were successfully treated, and in which prosthetic joints were finally reimplanted in two-stage revision surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Perioperative management of patients during general endoprosthethic operations on the knee joint (a review of literature)].

    PubMed

    Iudin, A M

    2006-01-01

    Arthrosis deformans of the knee joint (gonarthrosis) is a common disease accompanied by pain syndrome and disability. Medical treatment of the disease ensures only a temporary analgesic effect and fails to restore the range of motion in the legs. General endoprosthetic operations on the knee joint can significantly improve the results of treatment, alleviate pain, and restore the patients' working capacity. Most patients undergoing endoprosthetic repair of the knee joint are elderly and senile, who have concomitant multiple organ somatic pathology. Comorbidity, old age, the specific features and traumaticity of a surgical intervention make high requirements for anesthesic maintenance at surgery and for stability of hemodynamic parameters in the perioperative period, and adequate analgesia in the postoperative period. Different approaches to adequate anesthesia are considered in both intra- and postoperative period. Numerous references lead to the conclusion that many widely used anesthetic procedures (general inhalational and intravenous anesthesia, high-conduction anesthesia, etc.) are incompletely adequate during a general endoprosthetic repair of the knee joint. A number of authors state that spinal or combined spinal epidural anesthesia is the most adequate methods of intra- and postoperative anesthesia at general endoprosthetic repair of the knee joint.

  16. Dynamic knee joint mechanics after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sarah B; Kenny, Ian C; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of information on the long-term adaptations in lower limb biomechanics during game-specific movements after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Particularly, variables such as knee abduction moments and transverse plane knee motion have not been studied during a game-specific landing and cutting task after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare the hip and knee mechanics between the ACL-reconstructed (ACLr) group and a healthy control group. Thirty-eight reconstructed athletes (18 ACLr, 18 control) participated in the study. Three-dimensional hip, knee, and ankle angles were calculated during a maximal drop jump land from a 0.30-m box and unanticipated cutting task at 45°. During the landing phase, ACLr participants had increased hip flexion (P < 0.003) and transverse plane knee range of motion (P = 0.027). During the cutting phase, the ACLr participant's previously injured limb had increased internal knee abduction moment compared with that of the control group (P = 0.032). No significant differences were reported between the previously injured and contralateral uninjured limb. Previously injured participants demonstrated higher knee abduction moment and transverse plane range of motion when compared with those of control participants during a game-specific landing and cutting task.

  17. The use of focal knee joint cryotherapy to improve functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty: review article.

    PubMed

    Ewell, Melvin; Griffin, Christopher; Hull, Jason

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to review and synthesize available evidence on the effect of focal knee joint cryotherapy on quadriceps arthrogenic muscle inhibition and to discuss the implications of the findings regarding the use of this modality for patients after a total knee arthroplasty. An electronic literature search that targeted peer reviewed journals was completed by using the PubMed, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, and OvidSP databases. An article was included when it was determined that the article was relevant to the topic of focal knee joint cryotherapy and its effect on quadriceps muscle function. There were 6 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Of the reviewed studies, effect sizes for quadriceps activation ranged from very small to large. Five of the 6 studies observed medium to large effects. Effect sizes for quadriceps torque and force production ranged from no effect to a large effect. Two of the 5 studies with outcome measurements related to quadriceps torque or force production observed medium and large effects. Analysis of this evidence suggests that focal joint cooling of the knee shows the potential to improve quadriceps activation as well as quadriceps torque and force production in patients with arthrogenic muscle inhibition. Arthrogenic muscle inhibition of the quadriceps is an impairment commonly observed in patients after a total knee arthroplasty. Analysis of the evidence uncovered in this review suggests that this patient population may be positively impacted by the use of this modality to improve quadriceps activation as well as quadriceps torque and force production.

  18. The effect of age and knee osteoarthritis on muscle activation patterns and knee joint biomechanics during dual belt treadmill gait.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Derek; Baker, Matthew; Wong, Ivan; Stanish, William

    2017-06-01

    To compare a group of individuals with moderate medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) to both an age-matched asymptomatic group of older adults and younger adults to determine whether differences in knee joint muscle activation patterns and joint biomechanics exist during gait between these three groups. 20 young adults, 20 older adults, and 40 individuals with moderate knee OA were recruited. Using standardized procedures, surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis and medialis, rectus femoris and the medial and lateral hamstrings. All individuals walked on a dual belt instrumented treadmill while segment motions and ground reaction forces were recorded. Sagittal plane motion and net external sagittal and frontal plane moments were calculated. Discrete measures and principal component analyses extracted amplitude and temporal waveform features. Analysis of Variance models using Bonferroni corrections determined between and within group differences in these gait features (α=0.05). Individuals with knee OA have distinct biomechanics and muscle activation patterns when compared to age-matched asymptomatic adults and younger adults whereas differences between the young and older adults were few and included only measures of muscle activation amplitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Joint contact forces when minimizing the external knee adduction moment by gait modification: A computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ross H; Esterson, Aryeh Y; Shim, Jae Kun

    2015-12-01

    Gait modification is often used to reduce the external knee adduction moment (KAM) in human walking, but the relationship between KAM reduction and changes in medial knee joint contact force (JCF) is not well established. Our purpose was to examine the limiting case of KAM-based gait modification: reducing the KAM as much as possible, and the resulting effects on JCF. We used musculoskeletal modeling to perform three optimal control simulations: normal walking, a modified gait that reduced the KAM as much as theoretically possible (Min(KAM) simulation), and a second modified gait that minimized the KAM plus the metabolic cost of transport (Min(KAM+CoT) simulation). The two modified gaits both reduced the peak KAM from normal walking (-82% for Min(KAM) simulation, -74% for Min(KAM+CoT) simulation) by increasing trunk lean, toe-out, and step width, and reducing knee flexion. Even though the Min(KAM+CoT) simulation had the larger KAM, it had a greater reduction in peak medial JCF (-27%) than the Min(KAM) simulation (-15%) because it reduced the KAM using less knee muscle activity. These results were qualitatively robust to a sensitivity analysis of the knee joint model, but the magnitude of changes varied by an order of magnitude. The results suggest that (i) gait modification can benefit from considering whole-body motion rather than single adjustments, (ii) accurate interpretation of KAM effects on medial JCF requires consideration of muscle forces, and (iii) subject-specific knee models are needed to accurately determine the magnitude of KAM reduction effects on JCF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immediate effect of valgus bracing on knee joint moments in meniscectomised patients: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Thorning, Maria; Thorlund, Jonas B; Roos, Ewa M; Wrigley, Tim V; Hall, Michelle

    2016-12-01

    Patients undergoing medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy are at increased risk of developing and/or progressing knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial compartment load being a potential contributor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of a valgus unloader knee brace on knee joint moments in patients following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Within-participant design. Twenty-two patients (age 35-55 years) who had undergone medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the previous 8-15 months completed three-dimensional analysis of gait, forward lunge and one-leg rise during two conditions: with and without a valgus unloader knee brace. Outcome measures included the peak and impulse of the knee adduction moment and the peak knee flexion moment. The peak knee flexion moment increased during brace condition for forward lunge (mean difference [95% CI]) 0.54 [0.27-0.82] (Nm/(BW×HT)%), p<0.001 and one-leg rise (mean difference 0.45 [95% CI 0.08-0.82] (Nm/(BW×HT)%), p=0.022). No other significant differences were found between conditions in any of the included tasks. A significant effect of the knee brace was detected in terms of an increase in peak knee flexion moment during the more demanding tasks such as forward lunge and one-leg rise. This increase implies enhanced stability of the knee provided by the brace, which may induce increased knee function and knee-related confidence during strenuous tasks. Future research is required to explore the structural implications. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influences of Alignment and Obesity on Knee Joint Loading in Osteoarthritic Gait

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Pater, Mackenzie; Beavers, Daniel P.; Legault, Claudine; Loeser, Richard F.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the influences of frontal plane knee alignment and obesity on knee joint loads in older, overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis. Methods Cross-sectional investigation of alignment and obesity on knee joint loads using community dwelling older adults (age ≥ 55 yrs.; 27 kg·m−2 ≥ BMI ≤ 41 kg·m−2; 69% female) with radiographic knee osteoarthritis that were a subset of participants (157 out of 454) enrolled in the Intensive Diet and Exercise for Arthritis (IDEA) clinical trial. Results A higher BMI was associated with greater (p = 0.0006) peak knee compressive forces [overweight, 2411 N (2182, 2639), class 1 obesity, 2772 N (2602, 2943), class 2+ obesity, 2993 N (2796, 3190)] and greater (p = 0.004) shear forces [overweight, 369 N (322, 415), class 1 obesity, 418 N (384, 453), class 2+ obesity, 472 N (432, 513)], independent of alignment, and varus alignment was associated (p < 0.0001) with greater peak external knee adduction moments, independent of BMI [valgus, 18.7 Nm (15.1, 22.4), neutral, 27.7 Nm (24.0, 31.4), varus, 37.0 Nm (34.4, 39.7)]. Conclusion BMI and alignment were associated with different joint loading measures; alignment was more closely associated with the asymmetry or imbalance of loads across the medial and lateral knee compartments as reflected by the frontal plane external adduction moment, while BMI was associated with the magnitude of total tibio-femoral force. These data may be useful in selecting treatment options for knee osteoarthritis patients (e.g., diet to reduce compressive loads or bracing to change alignment). PMID:24857973

  2. Influences of alignment and obesity on knee joint loading in osteoarthritic gait.

    PubMed

    Messier, S P; Pater, M; Beavers, D P; Legault, C; Loeser, R F; Hunter, D J; DeVita, P

    2014-07-01

    To determine the influences of frontal plane knee alignment and obesity on knee joint loads in older, overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional investigation of alignment and obesity on knee joint loads using community dwelling older adults (age ≥ 55 years; 27 kg m(-2) ≥ body mass or body mass index (BMI) ≤ 41 kg m(-2); 69% female) with radiographic knee OA that were a subset of participants (157 out of 454) enrolled in the Intensive Diet and Exercise for Arthritis (IDEA) clinical trial. A higher BMI was associated with greater (P = 0.0006) peak knee compressive forces [overweight, 2411 N (2182, 2639), class 1 obesity, 2772 N (2602, 2943), class 2+ obesity, 2993 N (2796, 3190)] and greater (P = 0.004) shear forces [overweight, 369 N (322, 415), class 1 obesity, 418 N (384, 453), class 2+ obesity, 472 N (432, 513)], independent of alignment, and varus alignment was associated (P < 0.0001) with greater peak external knee adduction moments, independent of BMI [valgus, 18.7 Nm (15.1, 22.4), neutral, 27.7 Nm (24.0, 31.4), varus, 37.0 Nm (34.4, 39.7)]. BMI and alignment were associated with different joint loading measures; alignment was more closely associated with the asymmetry or imbalance of loads across the medial and lateral knee compartments as reflected by the frontal plane external adduction moment, while BMI was associated with the magnitude of total tibiofemoral force. These data may be useful in selecting treatment options for knee OA patients (e.g., diet to reduce compressive loads or bracing to change alignment). Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cartilage Repair Approach and Treatment Characteristics in the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Elmali, Nurzat; Tandogan, Reha; Bozkurt, Murat; Demirel, Murat; Beyzadeoğlu, Tahsin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the approaches of Turkish Orthopaedic and Traumatology specialists towards the treatment of isolated focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint. Methods: An online questionnaire consisting of 21 questions was prepared and sent to a sample group comprising members of the Turkish Orthopaedics and Traumatology Association (TOTBID) and the Turkish Sports Injuries Arthroscopy and Knee Surgery Association (TUSYAD). The responses of 129 members were evaluated. Results: Of the total respondents to the questionnaire, approximately 1/3 worked in a private hospital, 1/3 in a university, 15% in a state hospital and 13% in a training and research hospital. An arthroscopic approach was applied fewer than 50 times per year by 20% of respondents, 50-100 times by 40%, 100-200 times by 24% and more than 200 times by 17%. The upper age limit for surgical repair of cartilage was reported as 50 years by 52% and 40 years by 25%. Similarly, the body mass index (BMI) upper limit was stated as below 30kg/m2 by 58% and below 25kg/m2 by 22%. The best results were thought to come from femoral condyle lesions by 85% of the surgeons. In patients with high activity expectations, the most frequently applied methods were 60% microfracture and 40% mosaicplasty. For lesions between 2.5 and 4cm2 in size, mosaicplasty was applied most often, followed by matrix-supported chondrocyte implantation. In lesions larger than 4cm2, MACI was the most common procedure. Although 70% of surgeons had never applied the matrix-supported microfracture method, 30% considered that it could be a choice for individuals with a high activity level. A return to sports following cartilage repair was accepted as 6 months for microfracture (86%), 9 months for mosaicplasty (63%), and 12 months for matrix-supported autologous chondrocyte implantation (73%). Conclusion: As there was a similar distribution of experienced and less experienced surgeons among the respondents, the results obtained from the

  4. Knee Joint Contact Mechanics during Downhill Gait and its Relationship with Varus/Valgus Motion and Muscle Strength in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Group differences in contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion excursions were compared using analysis of covariance with adjustments for body mass index. Differences in strength were compared using independent sample t-tests. Additionally, linear associations between contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee motion and muscle strength were evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p<0.02) and greater heel-strike joint contact point velocities (p<0.05) for the medial and lateral compartments compared to the control group. The peak medial/lateral joint contact point velocity of the medial compartment was also greater for patients with knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p=0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p<0.01) and greater quadriceps and hip abductor muscle weakness (p=0.03). In general, increased joint contact point excursions and velocities in patients with knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p<0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Conclusion Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with

  5. Prediction of knee joint moment changes during walking in response to wedged insole interventions.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2016-04-01

    Wedged insoles are prescribed for medial knee osteoarthritis to reduce the knee adduction moment; however, it is currently not possible to predict which patients will in fact experience reduced moments. The purpose of this study was to identify a simple method using two-dimensional data for predicting the expected change in knee adduction moments with wedged insoles. Knee adduction moments during walking were determined for healthy individuals (n = 15) and individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (n = 19) while wearing their own shoe without an insole (control), with a 6-mm medial wedge and with a 6-mm lateral wedge. The percent changes relative to control were determined. Then, participants completed single-step trials with each footwear condition where only the changes in mediolateral positions of the knee joint center, shank center of mass, ankle joint center, and foot center of mass relative to control were determined. These variables were used as predictors in regression equations where the change in knee adduction moment during walking was the dependent variable. The change in mediolateral positions of the lower extremity during a single step significantly predicted the change in knee adduction moment during walking for the lateral wedge in both the healthy (R(2) = 0.72, p = 0.008) and knee osteoarthritis (R(2) = 0.52, p = 0.026) groups, and also for the medial wedge in both the healthy (R(2) = 0.67, p = 0.016) and knee osteoarthritis (R(2) = 0.54, p = 0.020) groups. The method of using mediolateral position data from a single-step movement to predict walking biomechanics was successful. These data are relatively simple to collect and analyze, offering the possibility for future incorporation into a wedge prediction system.

  6. Design and energetic evaluation of a prosthetic knee joint actuator with a lockable parallel spring.

    PubMed

    Geeroms, J; Flynn, L; Jimenez-Fabian, R; Vanderborght, B; Lefeber, D

    2017-02-03

    There are disadvantages to existing damping knee prostheses which cause an asymmetric gait and higher metabolic cost during level walking compared to non-amputees. Most existing active knee prostheses which could benefit the amputees use a significant amount of energy and require a considerable motor. In this work, a novel semi-active actuator with a lockable parallel spring for a prosthetic knee joint has been developed and tested. This actuator is able to provide an approximation of the behavior of a healthy knee during most of the gait cycle of level walking. This actuator is expanded with a series-elastic actuator to mimic the full gait cycle and enable its use in other functional tasks like stair climbing and sit-to-stance. The proposed novel actuator reduces the energy consumption for the same trajectory with respect to a compliant or directly-driven prosthetic active knee joint and improves the approximation of healthy knee behavior during level walking compared to passive or variable damping knee prostheses.

  7. Gait adaptations with aging in healthy participants and people with knee-joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Duffell, Lynsey D; Jordan, Stevan J; Cobb, Justin P; McGregor, Alison H

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between age and gait characteristics in people with and without medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. We aimed to characterize this relationship and to relate biomechanical and structural parameters in a subset of OA patients. Twenty five participants with diagnosed unilateral medial knee OA and 84 healthy participants, with no known knee pathology were recruited. 3D motion capture was used to analyse sagittal and coronal plane gait parameters while participants walked at a comfortable speed. Participants were categorized according to age (18-30, 31-59 and 60+ years), and those with and without OA were compared between and within age groups. In a subset of OA patients, clinically available Computed Tomography images were used to assess joint structure. Differences in coronal plane kinematics at the hip and knee were noted in participants with OA particularly those who were older compared with our healthy controls, as well as increased knee moments. Knee adduction moment correlated with structural parameters in the subset of OA patients. Increased knee moments and altered kinematics were observed in older participants presenting with OA only, which seem to be related to morphological changes in the joint due to OA, as opposed to being related to the initial cause of medial knee OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effects of childhood obesity on three-dimensional knee joint biomechanics during walking.

    PubMed

    Gushue, David L; Houck, Jeff; Lerner, Amy L

    2005-01-01

    Despite the increasing percentages of children who are overweight, few studies have investigated their gait patterns. The purpose of this study was to quantify the three-dimensional knee joint kinematics and kinetics during walking in children of varying body mass and to identify effects associated with obesity. Three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were collected from children of normal weight and overweight during normal gait using surface-mounted infrared emitting diodes and a force plate. The overweight group walked with a significantly lower peak knee flexion angle during early stance, and no significant differences in peak internal knee extension moments were found between groups. However, the overweight group showed a significantly higher peak internal knee abduction moment during early stance. These data suggest that although overweight children may develop a gait adaptation to maintain a similar knee extensor load, they may not be able to compensate for alterations in the frontal plane, which may lead to increased medial compartment joint loads. Therefore, assuming that the development of varus angular deformities of the knee joint and, in the longer term, medial compartment osteoarthritis are influenced by cumulative stress, this study supports the understanding that childhood obesity may impart a greater risk for the development of these diseases.

  9. Ankle, knee, and hip joint contribution to body support during gait

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Tsutomu; Ueda, Yasuhisa; Kamijo, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Support moment was defined as the sum of ankle plantar flexion, knee and hip extension moments. There are some mechanical relationships among the 3 joints. If these relationships were understood, it might be possible to determine which joint should be strengthened to improve gait. The aims of this study were to examine the mutual relationship among kinetic variables of the 3 joints during different phases. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy subjects volunteered for this study. They were asked to walk on a platform at a self-selected speed. Correlation coefficients between support moment and vertical ground reaction force were calculated for each subject. Pearson correlation analysis was performed among the 3 joint moments and between each joint moment and vertical ground reaction force. [Results] Knee and hip extension moments showed negative correlation throughout the stance. Ankle moment had a positive with hip but a negative correlation with knee moment except in the initial contact and pre-swing. Hip moment in the initial contact, knee moment in the loading response, and ankle moment from the terminal stance to pre-swing had a high correlation with vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results may indicate which joint should be strengthened to improve gait pattern. PMID:27821945

  10. Controlled trial of synovectomy of knee and metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    1975-10-01

    In a multicentre study patients with rheumatoid arthritis judged by prevailing criteria to be suitable for synovectomy of the knee or metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were randomly allocated to one of two groups. One group had the operation, the other was observed without operation from a notional corresponding date. 3 years later the outcome of synovectomy was compared with that of observation without synovectomy. Synovectomy of the knee was followed by significantly less pain and tenderness, smaller effusions, and smaller and less frequent erosions and geodes. By contrast, MCP joints were no better clinically or radiographically than those treated conservatively. The results have been compared with those of two other controlled trials, one concerned with the knee and MCP joints, the other only with MCP joints. In the present trial results were more favourable in the knee but comparable in the MCP joints with those reported in the first of these two trials but less favourable in the MCP joints than those observed in the second.

  11. Effect of patient positions on measurement errors of the knee-joint space on radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilewska, Grazyna

    2001-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most important health problems these days. It is one of the most frequent causes of pain and disability of middle-aged and old people. Nowadays the radiograph is the most economic and available tool to evaluate changes in OA. Error of performance of radiographs of knee joint is the basic problem of their evaluation for clinical research. The purpose of evaluation of such radiographs in my study was measuring the knee-joint space on several radiographs performed at defined intervals. Attempt at evaluating errors caused by a radiologist of a patient was presented in this study. These errors resulted mainly from either incorrect conditions of performance or from a patient's fault. Once we have information about size of the errors, we will be able to assess which of these elements have the greatest influence on accuracy and repeatability of measurements of knee-joint space. And consequently we will be able to minimize their sources.

  12. Sock systems to prevent foot blisters and the impact on overuse injuries of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Van Tiggelen, Damien; Wickes, Simon; Coorevits, Pascal; Dumalin, Mich; Witvrouw, Erik

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of foot blisters and other overuse injuries of the lower limb is very high during basic military training (BMT). One hundred and eighty-nine subjects were divided into two intervention groups wearing alternative sock systems and one control group. Overall, 57% of the 173 recruits who completed the training, developed foot blisters. Binary logistic regression revealed the type of sock, race, previous hiking or military experience, and known orthopedic foot conditions to be pred